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02 December 2021 - NW2313

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether any successful arrests have been made in (a) CAS 53/07/2020 at Hammanskraal Police Station, (b) CAS 16/08/?020 at Olifantsfontein Police Station, (c) CAS 53/08/2020 at Fretor.a North Police Station, (d) CAS 97/08/2020 at Boschkop Police Station, (e) CAS 183/09/2020 at Muldersdrift Police Station and (I) CAS 113/06/20?0 a‹ Kameeldrifi Police Station; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case, (2). whether any successful criminal prosecutions have been effected in each specified case: if not, why not if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case: (3). what is the current status of the investigations and/or criminal prosecution in each specified case? NW2632E

Reply:

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02 December 2021 - NW2324

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the (a) breakdown of the total number of Public Service employees currently reported to be working from home for each (i) national and (ii) provincial government department and (b) total number of (i) national and (ii) provincial departments which have implemented a hybrid system or model for work; (2) What are the relevant details of how government departments are implementing the hybrid system or model of work?

Reply:

1. The required information is not centralised and readily available as each department keeps its own register and records. Individual Departments must be approached for detailed information.

2. The DPSA issues circulars following Cabinet and National Corona Virus Command Council (NCCC) resolutions as announced by the President on the state of COVID-19 Risk Adjusted Disaster Alert Levels. These circulars are meant to guide Heads of Departments on the decongestion of workplaces by keeping the minimum numbers of employees physically on-site in order to be within safety protocols in line with Department of Health Guidelines and the Occupational Health and Safety Directions from the Department of Employment and Labour. This is achieved through rotational and remote working arrangements. Although employees work off site on certain days, they are still expected to discharge their responsibilities as if they are in the offices.

The percentage of the occupancy rate at the workplace on any particular workday is determined by the alert level at that particular time and the specific operational needs and realities of the relevant organisation.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2312

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Police

(1). Whether any successful arrests have been made in (a) CAS 88/08/2020 at Bronkhorstspruit Police Station, (b) CAS 89/07/2020 at Cullinan Police Station, (c) CAS 112/08/2020 at Cullinan Police Station, (d) CAS 1/07/2020 at Cullinan Police Station, (e) CAS 5/09/2020 at Welbekend Police Station, (I) CAS 96/06/2020 at Kameeldrift Police Station and (g) CAS 19/07/2020 at Lanseria Police Station; if not, in each specified case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case, (2). whether any successful criminal prosecutions have been effected; in each specified case, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3). what is the current status of the investigations and/or criminal prosecution in each specified case? NW2631E

Reply:

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02 December 2021 - NW2322

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) is the current breakdown of the availability of rape kits at each office of the SA Police Service in (i) the Western Cape, (ii) Gauteng, (iii) KwaZulu-Nata1 and (iv) Eastern Cape and (b) measures are taken to address shortages of rape kits at police stations?

Reply:

Introduction

The term “rape kits" is used in the public domain, to refer to the collection kits, which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape. However, the South African Police Service (SAPS), makes use of 16 different types of crime kits to collect various samples at crime scenes, These include the two types of evidence collection kits, namely; the Adult Sexual Assault Collection Kit (D1) and the Paediatric Sexual Assault Collection Kit {D7), which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape. The Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Reference Buccal Sample Kits (DB), are used to take buccal simples from persons, who are arrested and charged, for schedule eight offences (this includes serial murderers and serial rapists) as required by the DNA Act.

(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) The breakdown of the availability of rape kits, as at 4 November 2021, at each office of the South African Police Service (SAPS), in the Western Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape, is reflected in the tables below:

  1. Western Cape

Police Station

D1: Kit Collection, Adult, Sexual Assault

D7: Kit Collection, Paediatric, Sexual Assault

Albertinia

25

10

Ashton

27

38

Athlone

20

20

Atlantis

64

55

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01 December 2021 - NW2422

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

In light of the fact that the Minister of Home Affairs recently reported to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs that one of the officials that were facing disciplinary charges at the Department of Home Affairs is now in the employ of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, how will his department assist government departments to ensure that Public Service employees who are facing disciplinary charges do not avoid facing charges against them by seeking and finding employment in another government department?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is assisting departments in the following ways to deal with the disciplining of employees who left one department to join another:

Departments have, in terms of Section 16B (4) of the Public Service Act, 1994, a responsibility to ensure employees guilty of misconduct are disciplined.

Section 16B (4): If an employee of a department (in this subsection referred to as ‘the new department’), is alleged to have committed misconduct in a department by whom he or she was employed previously (in paragraph (b) referred to as ‘the former department’), the head of the new department-

a) may institute or continue disciplinary steps against that employee; and

b) shall institute or continue such steps if so requested-

(i) by the former executive authority if the relevant employee is a head of department; or

(ii) by the head of the former department, in the case of another employee.

The head of the Department of Home Affairs can follow the above prescripts to ensure that the disciplinary process is instituted by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture.

To further discourage employees with pending disciplinary cases against them from moving around within the Public Service, the DPSA amended the Application for Employment form (Z83) to make it compulsory for prospective employees to disclose all pending disciplinary cases on the form. The use of the amended Z83 form is compulsory from January 2021, and misrepresentation is considered a misconduct which may result in the termination of an employee’s service.

End

01 December 2021 - NW2525

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to the statement published in the Government Gazette No. 1160 of 30 October 2020, pertaining to the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions Determined in Terms of Section 27(2) of the Higher Education Act, Act 101 of 1997 as amended, the final policy framework signed into law by him on 9 August 2020 is being reviewed as indicated in his statement of 1 November 2021; if not, (a) what is the position in this regard and (b)(i) what are the reasons he is still considering universities and other stakeholders’ proposals and inputs and (ii) on what statutory grounds does he rely in this regard; if so, (i) what are the reasons he said that (aa) the final policy framework’s proposals are still being discussed by universities and other stakeholders and (bb) he will look at the proposals when he has already signed the final policy into law on 9 August 2020, (ii) on what statutory grounds did he rely to (aa) annul the final policy framework signed into law on 9 August 2020 and (bb) reopen the period for public participation on the reviewed policy framework and (iii) by what date is it envisaged that the reviewed policy framework will be finalised; (2) whether the final policy framework will be amended to include Afrikaans, Khoi and San languages in its definition of indigenous languages before it is set to take effect on 1 January 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The only aspect of the Language Policy Framework for Public Higher Education Institutions, published on 30 October 2020, that is being legally consulted upon is the definition of "indigenous languages". My Department has sought legal opinion on this matter. I have indicated before that a technical matter such as a definition should not detract from the progressive character of the policy framework, which essentially seeks to create a just and inclusive higher education sector where all our languages are duly recognised and given space to develop in line with the prescripts of the Constitution of the Republic.

2. The above answers the next question, which is, whether the amendment will include languages that are perceived to be excluded in the policy framework. In my other response to this same question I have indicated that the Policy Framework affirms all South African languages, official and non-official. Specific reference is made in the framework to the importance of developing Khoi, Nama and San languages which remain largely neglected across the education system. The Framework has been positively received by universities and they are looking forward to its implementation starting from next year.

01 December 2021 - NW2331

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1. With reference to her reply to question 798 on 24 March 2021, specifically with reference to the draft Animal Welfare Bill, (a) what are the reasons that her department did not (i) follow the parliamentary process of issuing a Green Paper, followed by a White Paper, enabling interested parties to give comments, suggestions and ideas regarding the draft Animal Welfare Bill and (ii) initiate a public participation process and (b) at what stage in the process does her department intend to do so; (2) how has her department taken into account the welfare recommendations of the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment High Level Panel regarding the management of lion, elephant, rhino and leopard, which was accepted by Cabinet; (3) whether her department involved the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment in the drafting of the draft Animal Welfare Bill; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details of such involvement; (4) whether the National Council of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA) has been involved in the drafting of the Animal Welfare Bill; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the full relevant details of such involvement and (b) which other animal welfare organisations have been involved in the drafting of the Animal Welfare Act?

Reply:

(1) As responded to in March 2021, the proposed Animal Welfare Bill has not been introduced to Parliament due to reasons advanced in the response. The Bill is still in its infancy and currently only an internal departmental (DALRRD and Provincial Departments of Agriculture) document. The department will not extend the process of drafting the proposed Animal Welfare Bill as far back as Green and White Papers. The reason for this is that the draft Bill is not a new policy direction since it aims to consolidate and update animal welfare issues which are currently dealt with in different pieces of legislation. Full consultation is however envisaged with all stakeholders after the necessary approvals have been obtained within the department.

(2) The Department is in communication with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment with regard to the implementation of the recommendations of the High Level Panel on the management of lions, elephants, rhinos and leopards. Some of the recommendations will be addressed in the draft Animal Welfare Bill, however, the Departments are considering drafting regulations under the current Animals Protection Act, 1962 (Act No. 71 of 1962) to address the issues that have been identified in the report and require additional regulations.

(3) The response under part (1) above addresses the question.

(4) The response under part (1) above addresses the question.

01 December 2021 - NW2368

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(What programmes has his department put in place to ensure that children of foreign nationals, who are born in the Republic, have access to all necessary documentation?

Reply:

The Births and Deaths Act 1992, (Act No 51 of 1992), makes provision for birth registration of all children born in the Republic of South Africa. Section 9 dealing with Notice of birth in subsection (1) states that in the case of any child born alive, any one of his or her parents, or if the parents are deceased, any of the prescribed persons, shall, within 30 days after the birth of such child, give notice thereof in the prescribed manner, and in compliance with the prescribed requirements, to any person contemplated in section 4. This legislative requirement make reference to any child born in the Republic without discriminating on the basis of the nationality of parents. Legislation provides for issuance of a notification certificate of birth to children born of foreign nationals.

END

01 December 2021 - NW2403

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether he has been informed that the University of Zululand in KwaZulu-Natal is deducting monthly payments from the food allowance of students who receive funds from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) as payment for laptops that they received from his department; if not, will he investigate the matter; if so, (a) on what date and (b) for what reason was a decision taken to deduct payment from NSFAS food allowances for the laptops that students received; (2) in view of many NSFAS students saying that they have not received an allocation for data despite his department’s assurance that NSFAS students would receive laptops and data, (a) what data for online courses will be made available to students and (b) on what date will they receive the data?

Reply:

1. The 2021 Guidelines for the Department of Higher Education and Training Bursary Scheme for Students at Public universities make provision for NSFAS students to utilise the learning material allowances for the purchase of a digital learning device (laptop or tablet). All university students qualify for a learning materials allowance, which is set at a maximum amount of R5 200. The University of Zululand indicated that 438 students were notified that they erroneously received laptops as well as the R5 200 learning material allowances in April 2021.  The University recovered the R5 200 that students received as a once off amount up front, by deducting it over the remaining period from the meal allowances. These students received a laptop and the full meal allowances and did not forfeit any meal allowances to pay for laptops. The balance of the R15 000 living allowances for the 2021 academic year is spread out over the academic year.

2. Data provision to students required for online access for teaching and learning and for assessments remained high across the system. The average across the system for all undergraduate students was 90% and 91% for NSFAS students, as reported by institutions in the September 2021 monitoring reports.

Below is the breakdown per university:

Percentage of all undergraduate students and NSFAS students that have access to data off-campus for teaching and learning purposes.

 

% all

% NSFAS

Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT)

73.0%

73.0%

Central University of Technology (CUT)

99.5%

100.0%

Durban University of Technology (DUT)

87.7%

84.8%

Mangosuthu University of Technology (MUT)

100.0%

100.0%

Nelson Mandela University (NMU)

99.0%

99.0%

North West University (NWU)

57.5%

70.0%

Rhodes University (RU)

16.8%

12.9%

Sefako Makgato University (SMU)

94.2%

96.2%

Sol Plaatje University (SPU)

100.0%

100.0%

Stellenbosch University

90.0%

90.0%

Tshwane University of Technology (TUT)

99.0%

99.0%

University of Cape Town (UCT)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Fort Hare (UFH)

96.9%

99.4%

University of Free State (UFS)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Johannesburg (UJ)

100.0%

100.0%

University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN)

99.9%

100.0%

University of Limpopo (UL)

98.0%

98.0%

University of Mpumalanga (UMP)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Pretoria (UP)

100.0%

100.0%

University of South Africa (UNISA)

100.0%

100.0%

University of Venda (UNIVEN)

45.0%

45.0%

University of Zululand (UNIZULU)

100.0%

100.0%

University of the Western Cape (UWC)

100.0%

100.0%

University of the Witwatersrand (UWC)

100.0%

100.0%

Vaal University of Technology (VUT)

99.0%

99.0%

Walter Sisulu University (WSU)

100.0%

100.0%

Average

90.60%

91.01%

14 Universities (CPUT, MUT, SPU, UCT, UFS, UJ, UKZN, UMP, UP, UNISA, UNIZULU, UWC, WITS, and WSU) reported that 100% of their students have been provided with data.  7 universities (NMU, SMU, SUN, TUT, UFH, UL, and VUT) reported that 90-99% of their students were provided with data. DUT reported 85% of their students to have been provided with data. CPUT reported 73%, NWU reported that 70%, of their students to have been provided with data in the period. UNIVEN reported 45% of their students to have been provided with data in the period under review. RU reported 13% of their students to have been provided with data.

It should also be noted that student who are on campus and living in university residences have access to campus wi-fi, so many students do not require access to mobile data at all times.

01 December 2021 - NW2281

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Tlhape, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In view of her announcement on 1 October 2020 that 700 000 hectares of underutilised land which translated to 896 farms were to be redistributed, what (a) progress has been made in this regard and (b) steps has her department taken to ensure that the specified farms will not lay fallow and beneficiaries are assisted to start farming right away?

Reply:

a) There are 1 535 farms amounting to 691 523 hectares of agricultural state land that were identified for redistribution of which currently a total of 1 421 farms amounting to 650 550 hectares translating to 91% have been approved for allocation to various categories of beneficiaries.

b) The support to these farmers with production inputs and other agricultural inputs will commence in the new financial year starting 2022/23 through the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP). This will happen over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period due to the number of farmers and the budget required. The roll – out of training programmes in the allocated farms has started. A total of 106 beneficiaries have received training on business entrepreneurship in 66 farms in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North West

30 November 2021 - NW2309

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) progress has been made regarding the disciplinary action taken against the officials of her department with respect to the Beit Bridge border fence, (b) total number of disciplinary cases have (i) been completed and (ii) not been completed, (c) are the reasons that the cases have not been finalised and (d) are the outcomes of the cases that were completed; (2) whether any progress has been made in finalising the case against a certain person (name furnished); if not, what are the reasons that it has not been finalised; if so, what are the outcomes of the case; (3) whether any progress has been made in finalising the case against the Director-General; if not, what are the reasons that it has not been finalised; if so, what were the outcomes of the case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1. (a) The hearings on the Beitbridge border fence consists of two phases. The first phase of the hearing is in respect of three senior managers and the second phase is in respect of the eleven NBAC members. The disciplinary hearing for the three senior managers was postponed until further notice by the Chairperson; pending the finalisation of the High Court review application served and filed by one of the senior managers in May 2021. The record of the review in terms of Rule 35, has been served and filed. However, the Applicant has since, requested additional information and documents. The record has been prepared and forwarded to State Attorney and Counsel for advice and releasing of same, in order to ensure that the Applicant supplements his papers and affords the Minister and ADG an opportunity to serve their answering papers.

Secondly, the hearings of the 11 NBAC members was scheduled for the 08 -12 November 2021 for continuation of hearings, but the hearing dealt with an application for postponement by NBAC members, through their legal representatives. After agreement and undertaking by the employee parties’ representatives that there will be no further postponements, the hearing was postponed to 14 – 25 February 2022.

2. Following a review application of the final Beitbridge report by one of Department officials charged, the Minister was advised to postpone the process until the outcome of the court application. Due to the proposed length of time of the legal proceedings, the Minister sought legal advice and was advised to continue with the DC. The Minister is scheduled to meet the Initiator on 10 December 2021 to finalize the charge sheet.

3. This matter is being dealt with by the Minister in the Presidency.

30 November 2021 - NW2289

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)In terms of her department’s initiative to support tourism development in local government, (a) which municipality district profiles have not been finalised with her department and (b) what are the reasons for this; (2) whether she will furnish Ms H S Winkler with copies of each of the profiles finalised with her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what is the next step that her department will take after the finalisation of the aforementioned profiles?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department’s target for the 2021-2022 financial year is to finalise 13 district profile. The following 13 districts/ metros profiles are being developed but are not yet finalised:

  • City of Johannesburg, Gauteng;
  • Central Karoo, Western Cape;
  • Chris Hani, Eastern Cape;
  • Buffalo City, Eastern Cape;
  • Joe Gqabi, Eastern Cape;
  • Mangaung, Free State;
  • Lejweleputswa, Free State;
  • Amajuba, KZN;
  • Zululand, KZN;
  • Bojanala, North West;
  • Ngaka Modiri Molema, North West;
  • John Taolo Gaetsewe, North West; and
  • Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati, North West

(b) The profiles will be finalized at the end of this financial year as planned.

2. Yes, finalised profiles are available.

3. The profiles will be deposited into the departmental knowledge portal for access by various potential users, in addition they will be used to guide tourism planning and development within municipal spaces.

--

30 November 2021 - NW2290

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

How does her department monitor recipients of the Green Tourism Incentive Programme to ensure that the funds allocated by her department are being utilised in terms of the specified programme?

Reply:

Implementation progress of the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) is monitored on a quarterly basis through quarterly implementation reports submitted by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) as the Department’s implementation partner for the GTIP, as well as quarterly Project Steering Committee meetings led by the Department.

Recipients of the GTIP that have concluded grant agreements and commenced installation are monitored through site visits conducted by officials from both the Department and the IDC. In addition, auditors that form part of the GTIP panel of resource efficiency assessors appointed by the IDC are contracted to audit energy and water consumption in the first 12 months after installation to verify actual efficiency improvements and saving against projected targets.

30 November 2021 - NW2288

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What total number of tourist guides did not receive the R1 500 monthly payment for three months from her department under the Tourist Guide Relief Fund?

Reply:

The Covid-19 Relief Fund for Tourism Guides who are under distress were granted R1500 per month for three months. The relief was available to those distressed individuals who are:

  • Registered as tourism guides at the provincial departments or agencies as per the Tourism Act; and
  • Who are not registered on Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) up to and including December 2019.

The Tourism Act, no. 3 of 2014 provides for Provincial Registrars to register tourist guides and keep record of such. Provincial Registrars provided the Department with lists totalling 9561 tourist guides registered in the respective provincial databases. The information was verified by the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) to ascertain the tourist guides’ employment status.

A total of 4 650 registered tourist guides were reflected as unemployed and therefore falling under freelancing category. Payments amounting R4 500 were processed in three single payments of R1 500 per tourist guide. However, the total number of the R1 500 payments that were redeemed was 11 252 while a total of 4 435 payments of R1 500 each were not redeemed.

30 November 2021 - NW2489

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)How does a budget increase from R44,7 billion to R56,8 billion that was allocated by the Minister of Finance in his recent Medium-Term Budget Policy Statement on 11 November 2021 sufficiently provide for the needs of his department in the current financial year; (2) in light of the lack of a comprehensive student financial aid system in the Republic, how does a budget allocation of R158,8 billion allocated over the 2022 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework address the issues affecting higher education student funding with regard to (a) student debts and (b) the National Student Financial Aid Scheme funding?

Reply:

1. The allocation over the Medium-Term will continue to assist the Department to execute its mandate in the current economic constraints. However, the allocation is not sufficient to provide for all the needs of the Department.

2. A shortfall on the NSFAS budget is still anticipated for the 2022/23 financial year and engagement is ongoing within the government budget processes in relation to this matter. Student debt for qualifying NSFAS students is being addressed in part through a process between NSFAS and institutions following a 2019 allocation from the Department to NSFAS for this purpose. I have also appointed a Ministerial Task Team to look at the long-term issues relating to a new financial aid policy for the future.

29 November 2021 - NW2370

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the recent court case in East London where SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) officials appeared in court for work which was contracted, but not done in the past five years, what total amount has SASSA lost to contractors who were appointed and paid for work not done?

Reply:

I do not have knowledge of any other contractor that SASSA has paid without work being done except this one.

The case of fraud and corruption was opened in March 2019 (Case no. 133/03/2019) in Qeberha (not East London). This matter was finalised through SASSA’s internal disciplinary processes and the official was dismissed in 2019. The case is currently in court scheduled for the 6th of December 2021.

The total amount involved in this particular case is R1 174 777, 59 (One million, one hundred and seventy-four thousand, seven hundred and seventy-seven rand – fifty-nine cents.

The SIU (in terms of Proclamation No. R. 37 of 2019) launched an investigation into this matter. It should be noted the SIU has a legal duty to submit the investigation report only to the President, and not to SASSA. It is envisaged in the event there are recommendations necessitating SASSA implements certain recommendations, SIU will communicate the investigation report.

29 November 2021 - NW2431

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that the cash send mode of the Social Relief of Distress Grant payment is the most accessible method, especially for millions of beneficiaries who are unable to access banks, yet it is the one that is not being used because the SA Social Security Agency has not concluded contracts with banks, which is an additional exclusion of the already excluded applicants, what (a) total number of cash send applicants are waiting to be paid since the roll-out of the grant and (b) are the reasons for difficulties and delays in finalising contracts with the banks?

Reply:

a) No cash send payments for the first iteration of the grant are still outstanding. Of all the applications received to date, approximately 51% have provided information their personal bank accounts, into which the grants are paid. The cash send option, while being very convenient, is not the most popular method of payment for approved applicants. This is because many do not own their mobile phones, and one of the requirements for this payment option is that there has to be a positive, direct link between the applicant’s ID number and the mobile number.

For the month of August, only 8,8% of approved applicants chose the cash send option; while this percentage for September and October is 9,1% and 9,4% respectively. Given the delay in activating the cash send payment method, clients who had chosen this method were requested to provide banking details or to opt to be paid through the post office. The majority responded positively, and in August 2021, of the 734 358 approved clients who chose cash send as a payment method, 712 784 were paid through their own bank accounts or the post office. The numbers paid through their own bank accounts or post office in September and October were 804 559 of the total of 866 517 and 809 647 out of 900 753 respectively. This indicates that approximately 89% of the clients who originally chose the cash send payment option were able to access their funds.

The balance of the clients who have not yet been paid for these three months, are as a result of the failure of the bank details which were submitted, or a delay in the opening of accounts with SAPO for them. SASSA will continue to ensure that all approved clients are paid.

(b) SASSA was not given the authority to extend the contracts which had been in place with the banks for the first iteration of the grant. As this is a procurement process, SASSA had to first get approval from National Treasury to go on a closed tender with all registered banks, as advised by the Bid Adjudication Committee in order to ensure compliance with supply chain prescripts. This process is currently underway. Once completed, the cash send option will be available once again, and those clients who initially indicated this as their preference will be considered to be paid through this channel, provided they meet the conditions for this channel as set by National Treasury.

29 November 2021 - NW2369

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What plans has her department put in place to assist Expanded Public Works Programme workers, who have Persal numbers and have as a result been rejected by the SA Social Security Agency system in their attempts to access social grants?

Reply:

I would like to bring it to the attention of the Honourable Member that no application for any of the social grant is rejected by virtue of the applicant being part of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). On application for a social grant, every applicant has to declare his/her source of income. Applications are subjected to a means test thresholds for a specific grant, and applicants are approved when the meet the eligibility criteria.

Recently, SASSA completed a verification process against the PERSAL (government payroll system) to identify social grants beneficiaries on this system, but have not declared income on their applications. Beneficiaries whose names appear on the PERSAL were all suspended pending verification. Upon completion of this process, it was found that many were EPWP workers or interns, whose stipends do not exceed the means test threshold. The affected beneficiaries’ social grants have since been investigated from this month.

However, I must clarify that the reinstatement does not absolve beneficiaries from declaring their source of income to SASSA. Each affected beneficiary will thus have to review their grant, and provide information on the stipend received, to ensure that SASSA records are up to date. The onus is on beneficiaries to inform SASSA as soon as their financial circumstances change.

29 November 2021 - NW2436

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to a meeting of 1 September 2021 with the Portfolio Committee (PC) on Social Development, wherein it was revealed that the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) was investigating applicants who have been identified by the Auditor-General regarding fraudulent payments of the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD grant) of R350, what (a) is the status of the investigation taken against government employees who attempted to defraud the SASSA system by applying for the SRD grant of R350 since the meeting of 1 September 2021 with the PC on Social Development and (b) total number of government officials have been suspended pending investigation; (2) Whether any matters have been referred to the National Prosecuting Authority for prosecution; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Auditor General identified 5812 government employees who had applied for and received the social of relief grant to the value of R5 498 500. Due to the volume of government employees exposed and also work which needs to be done, a total of 242 was prioritised in line with a resolution taken with other stakeholders at the Fusion Centre.

SASSA opened one a criminal case for all the prioritised 242 government employees at Sunnyside Police Station (CAS 753/08/2021). SAPS recommended that SASSA open a criminal case for each of the individual on the prioritised list.

A series of meetings were held at the Fusion Centre to further discuss prosecution-led investigation, with another meeting scheduled for 26th November 2021. Working with the Fusion Centre, SASSA is currently in the process of opening such individual cases and this process is envisaged to be concluded on or before the end of December 2021.

b) No government employee suspended currently. SASSA has concluded its internal investigation of the 242 government employees. An internal investigation report was shared with the DPSA for the purpose of coordinating and monitoring disciplinary hearings as well as facilitating Acknowledgment of Debts (recovery) with relevant government employees through their respective departments. DPSA has since advised that of 242 government employees on the priority list, 198 were confirmed to have been actual government employees in the period of the Social Relief of Distress grant pay-outs, meaning 44 individuals are to be removed from the initial list.

In the meeting held by DPSA and SASSA on the 15th November 2021, as directed by the Fusion Centre, it was resolved that SASSA should submit evidence files per individual government employee. The process of submitting such 198 files is projected to be concluded on or before the 3rd December 2021. SASSA and DPSA is also validating the variance between 242 and 5812 (5570) and such process is to be concluded by the 30th December 2021.

In terms of roles and responsibilities, SASSA is expected to compile evidence files, while DPSA is expected to coordinate and monitor the processes of disciplinary hearings and acknowledgment of debts with relevant departments.

On the question of loss recovery, it is expected that cases of government employees who refuses to sign acknowledgment of debt forms be dealt with in terms of Section 300 of the Criminal Procedure Act. Disciplinary hearing and criminal prosecution processes will run concurrently.

2. As and when SASSA submits individual criminal cases to SAPS, SAPS will hand over the cases to the NPA for criminal prosecution.

29 November 2021 - NW2430

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of beneficiaries of the Social Relief of Distress Grant has actually been paid by the SA Social Security Agency in each month from 1 January 2021 up to the latest specified date in November 2021?

Reply:

The numbers of beneficiaries who have been paid per month from January 2021 to October, as at 10 November 2021 is as follows:

Month

Number paid

January 2021

6 045 534

February 2021

6 057 481

March 2021

5 897 986

April 2021

5 939 137

August 2021

6 998 278

September 2021

7 483 712

October 2021

8 850 442

29 November 2021 - NW2597

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What (a) steps has she put in place to deal with the escalating debt owed by Soweto to the City of Johannesburg as little progress has been made in this regard and (b) are the details of a complete plan detailing how the amount will be dealt with; (2) what is the total debt bill currently reported to her department for defaulting municipalities as the debt bill for the past financial year was R35,5 billion; (3) in light of the fact that 47 municipalities owed more than 100 million each, what is the (a) name and (b) outstanding amount for each municipality reported to her currently; (4) what (a) is the total outstanding debt of Soweto reported to her and (b) steps have been taken by her department to assist in recovering the debt? NW3073E

Reply:

The Honorable member is advised and requested to direct the above Parliamentary Question (PQ2597) to the Minister of Finance as National Treasury is the department in terms of the Municipal Finance Management Act, (MFMA) Section 71 responsible for receiving reports on municipal finance and budget management related aspects. Also the City of Joburg is a non-delegated municipality and reports directly to National Treasury.

29 November 2021 - NW2305

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What buildings does his department own in Gauteng? (2) whether his department has disposed of any of its buildings since 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, to whom were the buildings disposed?

Reply:

1.  The Water Trading Entity of the Department of Water and Sanitation owns 108 buildings in Gauteng as reflected in the table below:

Area Office

Spatial Locations

Number of buildings

1. Bronkhorstspruit Dam

Bronkhorstspruit/ Gauteng

11

2. Roodeplaat Dam on the Pienaars River

Moloto Road/ Gauteng

60

3. Vaal Dam

Springs, Krugersdorp & Germiston

37

Total

108

2. Since 1 April 2020 to date, the department did not dispose-off any buildings.

26 November 2021 - NW2384

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether his department has sent any labour inspectors to asses labour conditions at the (a) Gravellote charcoal mine between Tzaneen and Phalaborwa and (b) Foskor mine in Phalaborwa; if not, why not; if so, what was the report of the inspectors on the (i) general working conditions and (ii) remuneration of employees at the specified mines?

Reply:

FOSKOR MINING PHALABORWA INSPECTIONS:

COMPENSATION FOR OCCUPATIONAL INJURIES AND DISEASES ACT, NO 130 of 1993

Inspections were conducted at Foskor Mining Phalaborwa from 12/08/2019 to 16/08/2019.Thirty eight (38) employers were inspected to determine compliance with COID Act. Twenty-four (24) employers complied and Fourteen (14) employers were found not complying with the COID Act. Compliance orders were issued and the employers complied before the expiry of the compliance order.

UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE ACT, NO. 63 OF 2001 AND UNEMPLOYMENT INSURANCE CONTRIBUTIONS ACT, NO. 4 OF 2002

Thirty-Three (33) inspections were conducted for the financial year 2019/2020 at Foskor Mining Phalaborwa from the period of 12/08/2019 to 16/08/2019 to determine the level of compliance with UI legislation. Eleven (11) employers complied and Twenty-two (22) employers were found not complying. Compliance orders were issued and the employers complied before the expiry of the orders.

 

BASIC CONDITIONS OF EMPLOYMENT ACT, NO 75 OF 1997 (BCEA) AND NATIONAL MINIMUM WAGE ACT (NMWA), NO 9 OF 2018

Employers contracted to the mine were inspected in 2020/21 and 2021/22 to determine compliance of contractors with the Basic Conditions of Employment Act and the National Minimum Wage Act.

Seven (7) employers were inspected in 2020/21. Five (5) complied and two (2) were found not complying. Compliance orders were issued and the employers complied after 14 days.

Three (3) employers were inspected in 2021/22 and all complied.

The mine has a collective agreement providing for more favourable terms of employment than basic conditions of employment which are not enforceable in terms of the BCEA and NMWA and therefore it was not prioritised for inspection to establish compliance with these legislations.

More inspections to establish compliance with the BCEA and NMWA by employers contracted to the mine are planned for Q4 of 2021/22.

GRAVELLOTE CHARCOAL MINE

No recent inspections not conducted; planned for 3rd week of January 2022

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY ACT, NO 85 OF 1993 INSPECTIONS

The two workplaces (Foskor Mining and Gravellote Charcoal mine) constitute a ‘mine premise/s’ as defined in section 102 of the mine health and Safety Act, Act no.29 of 1996.

It is declared that the provisions of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act no.85 of 1993, as amended are not applicable to the workplaces as defined for in the provisions of Section 1(3)(a) of the Occupational health and safety Act, no.85 of 1993.

In terms of the above judicial confirmation, it is declared that the OHS Act, does not have jurisdiction to enforce compliance on the working conditions within the mine premises, and any further engagements on the health and safety conditions in the mine premises should be directed to the Ministry of Mineral Resources and Energy.

26 November 2021 - NW2437

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether he has been informed that churches and other faith-based institutions and/or religious organisations are currently experiencing problems in claiming and/or are being refused COVID-19 Temporary employer/Employee Relief Scheme (TERS) benefits; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether religious organisations currently qualify for such TERS benefits; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether his department will as a matter of urgency and high priority clarify this by (a) expressly stipulating that religious organisations fall within the approved sectors that can claim and (b) making any alterations necessary to the online claims site to allow religious organisations to successfully select their sector and submit their claims; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. Within this Covid-19 Ters Benefit, a special category of Charitable Industries was opened at UIF, which included Religious Bodies who have been able to apply for the Covid-19 Ters Benefit on the basis of all insured workers, meaning institutions that had registered could then apply.

However, to date no formal queries nor complaints were received that faith based organisations are experiencing problems with TERS.

From 27.03.2020 TO 15.10.2020, all employers / employees that meet the requirements as stated in the directive, including those from faith based, qualified and were paid TERS.

From 16.10.2021, it is sector based as per the directives. However, there is a bullet that states any industries and business establishments that form part of the value chain of the above qualify too.

2. According to UIF records under the Charitable Industry:

A Number of 2 666 Religious Bodies applied for this benefit.

An amount of R 516 272 762.64 was paid out to these Charitable bodies.

It is not clearly outlined in any communication that faith based do qualify outright. However, that the directive clearly states that those that lost income and are contributors to UIF is sufficient and was basis for all to apply.

3. As stated the directive allows for discretion of the UIF to include or not, however no communication clearly states that. As stated above, the category that accommodates churches already exist.

25 November 2021 - NW2395

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details of the measures that his department intends to put in place to review and resolve concerns that members of sports council are recycled, especially those who have been performing poorly in other sports councils as well as those who have been historically implicated in wrong doing where they served previously? 2. What a) consequence management is there from the side of his Department towards council members who are implicated in investigated reports and b) are there reasons the department allowed people to serve on other Boards when they leave while being implicated and or before the outcomes of the investigation in previous boards are concluded?

Reply:

1. The Sports Councils where they still exist are primarily at the Local Government Level. At the Provincial Level there are Provincial Sports Confederations. The Provincial Sports Confederations are members of the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC). SASCOC is a National Confederation recognized by the Minister in terms of Section 2(1) of the National Sport and Recreation Act. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Schedule 5, lists “Provincial Sport” as a Functional Area of Exclusive Provincial Legislative Competence. Therefore, the administrative and governance matters relating to the Sports Councils fall within the jurisdiction of the Local Government as well as Provincial Government.

2(a) and (b) Considering the response in (1) above should there be any matter, allegations or complaint against Sports Council Members such may only be referred to the Provincial Department concerned.

25 November 2021 - NW2279

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What interventions has she put in place to salvage the 10 bankrupt municipalities in the Eastern Cape, which are at the brink of collapsing and told the Auditor-General they cannot carry on and (b) who will be held liable for the collapse of the specified municipalities?

Reply:

a) The Auditor-General Report for 2019/20 identified the following ten (10) municipalities in the Eastern Cape Province as they indicated in their Annual Financial Statements that they are a going concern uncertainty, and their total current liabilities exceeded the total current assets.

Out of the ten (10) municipalities, the following six (6) municipalities (Makana, Amahlathi, Raymond Mhlaba, Amathole, Enoch Mgijima and Walter Sisulu) were included by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA) in the list of dysfunctional municipalities in the Eastern Cape and draft Municipal Support and Interventions Plans have been developed for these municipalities taking into consideration an analysis conducted by National Treasury.

Three (3) out of the ten (10) the municipalities identified in the Auditor-General report have been placed under Section 139 intervention and they are Makana and Enoch Mgijima and have FRPs in place and they are jointly monitored on a monthly basis whilst the Amathole FRP has just been approved and will be implemented and monitored.

Dr Beyers Naudé, Koukamma and Inxuba Yethemba local municipalities, have been engaged by the province to participate in a financial management support programme in partnership with the National Business Initiative to address their financial challenges, part of the initiatives in the NBI include:

  • Group coaching of financial management personnel within municipalities.
  • Deployment of support staff from the pool of consultants from NBI
  • Training of municipal officials on financial reporting.

Dr Beyers Naudé, Koukamma and Inxuba Yethemba local municipalities also are set to benefit from the partnership with the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) and the projects include development of revenue enhancement strategies for municipalities and assisting them with the embedded energy generation to overcome the high cost of electricity.

King Sabata Dalindyebo, Walter Sisulu and Amahlathi have also been approved by DBSA for funding on embedded energy generation and for the development of revenue enhancement strategies.

b) Out of the ten (10) municipalities, the provincial department instituted investigations in line with Section 106 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act in seven (7) of the municipalities (Makana, Amahlathi, Raymond Mhlaba, Amathole, King Sabata Dalindyebo, Emoch Mgijima and Inxuba Yethemba). Investigations are at various stages. Further, the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (Hawks) is conducting investigations in two (2) of the municipalities (King Sabata Dalindyebo and Makana).

25 November 2021 - NW1201

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of (a) prison escape attempts that implicated prison staff has his department noted in the past two years and (b) arrests have been made in this regard?

Reply:

a) it should be noted that in 2019/20 a total o f28 attempted escapes were reported, whilst a total of 22 were reported om 2020/21. Based on investigations conducted no officials were implicated in these incidents.

b) No arrests were made as no staff was implicated in these attempted escapes.

END

25 November 2021 - NW2409

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)Whether board members of the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) get paid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount do members of the Board of Directors receive as an allowance; (2) In view of the fact that, since 2019, the CCIFSA board has had a board, which has not been representing the South African creative industry, what are the reasons that CCIFSA has no diversity on its board of directors? (3) On what date will the next CCIFSA Annual General Meeting be held?

Reply:

1. This question was forwarded to CCIFSA to answer and we are still waiting for their response. As soon as CCIFSA provide me with the information, I will furnish the Hon. Member.

25 November 2021 - NW2375

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1.What number of artists have benefited from the presidential employment stimulus package; 2. Whether he will furnish Mr. B S Madlingozi with a list of all the names of the artists who benefitted; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a). National Film and Video Foundation (NFVF) supported beneficiaries as follows;

Beneficiaries

Number

Stream 1: Production

133

Stream 2: Skills Development

43

Stream 3: Industry

26

Stream 4: Business Recovery

11

Total

213

(b). With regard to the National Arts Council, 1 309 projects (or lead beneficiaries) were supported. Within these 1 309 supported projects 20 221 Beneficiaries were verified by the end September and these numbers includes artists and other industry practitioners.

(c). The South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) supported 893 beneficiaries.

(d). Public Art programme supported 200 beneficiaries from Iziko Museum, National Museum and KZN Museum combined.

(e). Banking with the arts supported 151 beneficiaries through the Arts Bank and CCIFSA (Cultural and Creative Industry Federation of South Africa).

2. List with names of artists is attached as annexure A.

 

IZIKO MUSEUM


 

 

 

Ms

D

Danica

Barends

Mr

M

Malibongwe

Bonakele

Mr

L

Liso

Bonile

Ms

L

Lecardia

Eleni

Ms

T

Tamryn

Joseph

Mr

S

Sizwe

Kwezi

Ms

L

Lumka

Mangena

Mr

S

Siyabulela

Mana

Mr

C

Chadwyn

Matthews

Ms

N

Nonkuleleko

Mbili

Mr

T

Thobani

Mnconywa

Mr

S

Sandile

Mzimela

Ms

Z

Zintathu

Nogengela

Ms

L

Lusanda

Paul

Mr

A

Ayabulela

Stevens

Ms

N

Ncuthukazi

Tshotyana

Mr

Y

Yanga

Zaba

 

 

 

 

25 November 2021 - NW2287

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, given that her department leases a property from the City of Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality which houses the Brackendowns Police Station, and given that in 2019 a bus terminus on the specified property burnt down and has not been repaired and, seeing that this structure housed the police reservists that are linked to the Brackendowns Police Station, the cause of the fire at the bus terminus in May 2019 has been established; if not, why not; if so, on what date will the structure be refurbished to allow the police reservists to once again utilise the property;

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

  1. I have been informed by the Department that the structure that burnt down was not part of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) leased properties. SAPS had made its own arrangements to occupy and utilize the space. The DPWI did not investigate the cause of the fire because it is not leasing nor does it own the structure that burnt down. As this property is not part of the DPWI portfolio, the DPWI will not be refurbishing the property.
  1. There is an extension of lease in place.
  1. Payments for the lease are up to date.

(4) DPWI has not received an instruction to purchase the property from SAPS. The decision to purchase the property should originate from SAPS. The current lease is extended to 31 March 2028.

25 November 2021 - NW2241

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference her reply to question 1486 on 18 August 2020, what is the (a) total cost to her department of the refurbishment of all 13 buildings, (b) the total amount paid to each service provider to date and (c) outstanding amount to each service provider?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I have been informed by the Department that the question refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

The following 12 buildings renovations were completed. The table, below, indicates (a) total cost of the refurbishment of all 12 buildings, (b) the total amount paid to each service provider to date and (c) outstanding amount to each service provider.

The PQ refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

Region:

Building:

(a) Total cost:

(b) Progress payment to date:

(c) Outstanding amount to date :

Cape Town

Heldelberg:92 Van Riebeek Street

R 155 287.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Albertina: 8 Aalwyn Street

R 102 839.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Laingsburg: 39 Voortrekker Road

R 147 344.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Aurora: 179 Main Street

R 218 381.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Aurora: 180 Main Street

R 179 779.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

331 Moorreesburg

R 223 270.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

Johannesburg

Observatory: 37 Frederick Street

R 822 760.29 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Cyridene: 48 Aida Street

R 424 466.59 (All inclusive)

100%

None

Pretoria

Salvokop

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 5500 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Electrical fence installation: R 22 087.46 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Structural Palisade fencing installation and razor barbwire: R301 000.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

Kordaat Avenue, Pretoria

Garden services: R29 382.50

100%

None

   

Building work: R 109 800.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 26 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

103 Mountain View Road, Pretoria

Garden Services: R20 585.00

100%

None

   

Building work: R 99 00.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 37 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

 

5 Adina Street, Waterkloof

Garden Services: R20 930.00

100%

None

   

Building work: R 110 000.00 (All inclusive)

100%

None

   

Minor Repair work by DPWI Workshop: They used materials from the workshop stores. The cost is approximately R 21 000 (All inclusive)

100%

None

25 November 2021 - NW2374

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps has he taken to alleviate the plight of the creative sector, who have engaged with the offices of his department repeatedly, trying to meet with officials in order to resolve the longstanding challenges faced by this sector in the republic?

Reply:

The officials from the department are engaging the creatives through various meetings, with the latest having been held on the Monday 22nd November 2021.

25 November 2021 - NW2365

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What interventions has she and/or her department made to stop the water cuts in the (i) Matjhabeng Local Municipality and (ii) Nala Local Municipality, following the millions of rands owed by both municipalities to Sedibeng Water and (b) which officials have been held to account by her department for non-payment of the specified services?

Reply:

a) A joint national and provincial intervention was undertaken by the Deputy Minister of CoGTA, the Minister and Deputy Minister of Water and Sanitation and the MEC responsible for CoGTA in the Free State province which resulted in a series of engagements with the Sedibeng Water Board and its management team aimed at resolving the challenges impacting on water interruptions due to the debt owed by Nala and Matjhabeng Local Municipalities to Sedibeng Water Board. The national and provincial interventions undertaken resulted in payments made by both Nala and Matjhabeng local municipalities to the Sedibeng Water Board. Discussions are ongoing between Sedibeng Water and the Nala and Matjhabeng municipalities to finalise realistic and affordable payment plans to address the debt owed to Sedibeng Water.

b) The Municipal Managers are appointed by the Municipal Councils, and it is therefore the responsibility of the Mayor and municipal council to hold officials to account for any practices relating to maladministration or misconduct.

25 November 2021 - NW2351

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture;

(1) What is the current status of Downtown Music Hub and (b) how successful is the specified project; (2) (a) what total amount has been spent by his department on maintaining the Downtown Music Hub project and (b) since what date has Downtown Music Hub been receiving financial support from his department annually; (3) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the (a) financial reports and (b) business plan(s) upon which the project was funded; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1. The Downtown project is very important in the history of our music industry. It is the most sacred place where most of our well-known musicians and producers from across the racial divide busied themselves, creating top local and international hits. For many years, the studios remained a haven of these legendary musicians who also were instrumental in the progressive politics of this country, when they used their music to further the objectives for the emancipation of our people, thereby bringing the atrocities of apartheid to the eyes and ears of the world. It was for this reason that the Department saw it fit to preserve its legacy, when that opportunity was presented to us by Gallo Records when they took a decision to sell the asset.

The studios boast, inter alia, a collection of historical artifacts including gold and platinum discs covering what SA had produced over the past years, an accomplishment for which we should be immensely proud of. The Department aligns itself with the notion that, a generation which ignores its history has no past and no future.

Since it was purchased, the asset had been transformed from just being a mere studio into a Music Industry Hub for people to be empowered as we also ensure accessibility to recording opportunities. Certain parts of the building were renovated, and the recording facilities were also upgraded to be one of the best spacious control room and large versatile studio area, making it the flagship studio ideal for large ensembles and is now regarded as one of the best in the entire continent. A permanent exhibition has been set up on the first floor of the Hub titled A Glimpse of South African Music Industry.

The exhibition includes a presentation of old multi-media recordings, historical landmark recording equipment’s and information about many musicians who went through the Downtown Studios such as the late Mama Miriam Makeba and many others. The exhibition is accessible to many students, among others, who want to get further information about the development of the SA music sector. The Hub has also been used to provide educational information for many practitioners and has hosted workshops and master classes in areas such as sound engineering and general music business insight.

The studio section of the Hub has recorded over 1500 recordings per annum and such services are provided at a more affordable rate to benefit the historically disadvantaged, especially those with talent who cannot afford the exorbitant fees charged by some of the prime studios. This speaks to the access to quality recordings that the industry now has. Recent recordings from Downtown have won well known accolades such as the South African Music Award, and a Grammy.

Although not yet at the level that we have envisaged, the Downtown project plays a significant role in nurturing the development of all forms of South African music from traditional sounds such as Maskandi, Isicathamiya, choral and other genres. Therefore, investing in this project is one way of contributing to the upliftment of the lives of our people, in particular, assisting many local investors to move from the periphery economy into the more mainstream, while also preserving the history of our music industry.

2. The Department has either directly or indirectly through the National Arts Council (NAC) provided just over R60 million to support the Downtown project since its inception in 2008. The total amount includes funds allocated for the purchasing of the assets (both immovable and movable), refurbishment of some spaces in the building, installation of recording studio equipment’s and for the day-to-day operations and management.

Abiding by the parameters laid down in the Promotion of Access to Information Act, the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPIA) and other relevant legislation/s and all protocol observed, the Department would be in a position to furnish or provide access to honourable Mrs Van Dyk of the relevant information that is in its custody.

25 November 2021 - NW2240

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference her reply to question 1486 on 18 August 2020, what are the (a) names of the service provider(s) who were contracted to carry out the refurbishment of the 13 buildings handed over to the Department of Social Development for the purpose of being used as shelters in terms of the Victim Empowerment Programme, (b) full names of the owner(s) of the specified service provider(s) and (c) full names of the foreman on site during each specified refurbishment?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I have been informed by the Department that the question refers to 13 buildings, however the actual number of buildings refurbished is 12.

The table below indicates the 12 buildings handed over to the Department of Social Development for the purpose of being used as shelters in terms of the Victim Empowerment Programme. The table provides (a) names of the service provider(s) who were contracted to carry out the refurbishment, (b) full names of the owner(s) of the specified service provider(s), and (c) full names of the foreman on site during each specified refurbishment.

Region:

Building:

(a) Service provider(s):

(b) Full names of the owner(s):

(c) Full names of the foreman:

Cape Town

Heldelberg:92 Van Riebeek Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Albertina: 8 Aalwyn Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Laingsburg: 39 Voortrekker Road

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Aurora: 179 Main Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

Aurora: 180 Main Street

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office
 

331 Moorreesburg

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops)
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Takalani Mudau, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Cape Town Regional Office

Johannesburg

Observatory: 37 Frederick Street

  • Unified Plumbing Services
  • Siyaphambili
  • Hassim Reyaaz Hajee
  • Mr S. Moodley
  • Gerald Percival Anthony Breda
  • Mrs S Balgobind
 

Cyridene: 48 Aida Street

  • Unified Plumbing Services
  • Siyaphambili
  • Hassim Reyaaz Hajee
  • Mr S. Moodley
  • Gerald Percival Anthony Breda
  • Mrs S Balgobind

Pretoria

Salvokop

  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
   
  • SEAMIED Electrical and Building Construction CC – For electric fence
  • Michael Machete
  • Michael Machete
   
  • Jorud Solutions - For Structural Palisade fencing installation and razor barbedwire
  • Mr Matole Malatjie
  • Mr Matole Malatjie
 

Kordaat Avenue, Pretoria

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • Provide the Best – Building Services
  • Marcie Mogale
  • Marcie Mogale
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
 

103 Mountain View Road, Pretoria

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • RM 7 – Building Services
  • Mr Ramoboa
  • Mr Ramoboa
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office
 

5 Adina Street, Waterkloof

  • Babereki projects - Garden Services
  • Mr Vincent Mphahlele
  • Mr Walter Mkhabela
   
  • Clamsy Construction – Building Services
  • Jonas Manyemula
  • Jonas Manyemula
   
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure in house resources (Workshops) – For minor repair work
  • Department of Public Works and Infrastructure
  • Mr Johann De Wit, Head of Workshops, DPWI’s Pretoria Regional Office

25 November 2021 - NW2314

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether, with regard to the Kwa-Thema Police Station leased by her department from the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality, she has been informed that (a) in terms of the lease agreement the responsibility for the maintenance of the facility rests with her department, (b) the Department of Employment and Labour has closed off large sections of the station as they are deemed to be an unsafe working environment and (c) if the station closes, the Kwa-Thema community will not have a police station; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) what are the reasons that her department does not track the state of infrastructure for which it is responsible; (3) on what date will critical maintenance and repairs be undertaken and expedited so that her department is not the cause of the community losing access to police services?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1, 2 and 3

I’ve been informed by the Department that in terms of the lease agreement the Lessor is responsible for the repairs and maintenance. The Department of Labour and Employment has closed the detectives’ offices which has been substituted by park homes.

The Department approached the Municipality on the 09th of October 2018, requesting approval to place additional park homes as a temporary solution. This request of placing additional park homes has not yet approved by the Municipality. Furthermore, the Department approached the municipality on the 04th of December 2017 to consider disposing the building to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure so that full maintenance and upgrades can be performed by this Department.

The Department will send out a team of building inspectors on 24 November 2021 to do an assessment report, and will be guided by the report regarding the urgent maintenance requirements.

25 November 2021 - NW2394

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture´

1. What is the (a) total number of (i) vacant managerial positions in each entity reporting to him and (ii) the specified positions where a staff member is acting and (b) a breakdown of the vacancies according to (i) positions and (ii) each entity. 2. Whether he will furnish Mrs V Van Dyk with (a) number and (b) details of council members who are serving in different boards, also indicating (i) acting capacity and (ii) the names of entities.

25 November 2021 - NW2433

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1(a). On what date did his department start funding the Liliesleaf Farm Museum in Rivonia, Johannesburg, (b) how was the funding given to the museum by his Department from 2017 to 2021 and (c) what was the funding for; 2 Whether the Liliesleaf Farm Museum accounted for the money it was given by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, 3. Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with an audited financial statement for the (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21 financial years; if not, why not; if so; what are the further relevant details, 4. Whether he and/or his department will save Liliesleaf farm from closing down; if not, why not; if so, how?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department started funding the Liliesleaf Farm Museum in Rivonia, Johannesburg from the 2002/2003 financial year. (b) No funding was provided for the Liliesleaf Farm Museum during the 2017 to 2021 period. (c) No funding was provided by the Department during the above-mentioned period.

2.The Liliesleaf Farm Museum has accounted for the previous funding received from the Department in the years. It was only in 2015 after receiving funding for exhibition infrastructure development that the Museum failed to account to the Department as per the agreement signed which stated that the funds were for exhibition infrastructure development and not for the Museum’s operations. The Department communicated to the Board of Trustees of the Lilies Leaf Trust of the Museum management’s inability to account for the money received from the Department. The Board of Trustees informed the Department that an investigation will be instituted and the Department will be updated of the outcome of the investigation. A meeting was held with the Board where the Board informed the Department that it is handling the matter in accordance with the outcomes of the investigation.

(3) The Liliesleaf Farm Museum is not a Declared Cultural institution that is obliged to submit their annual financial statements to the Department.

(4) The Department Sport Arts and Culture (DSAC) has for the past years supported the Liliesleaf Trust on several projects ranging from capital funding to construct the facility, infrastructure refurbishments and exhibitions. DSAC is unable to provide annual operational funding to the Liliesleaf Trust as the museum has not been declared by the Minister in terms of the Cultural Institutions Act, No 119 of 1998 as a Declared Cultural Institution and a Schedule 3 A Public Entity in terms of the PFMA.

Should the site be so declared, and depending on the availability of funds, I will in consultation with and with the assistance of the Minister of Finance set aside an annual subsidy that would be transferred to the institution for operational purposes. The Department has also not received a request for assistance from Liliesleaf for any of the Presidential COVID-19 relief funding opportunities the Department has made available for struggling institutions in the sector.

25 November 2021 - NW2408

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)What is the total number of member organisations that are currently affiliated with the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA); (2) whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a database of the organisations affiliated to CCIFSA; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) whether CCIFSA has a membership form that a member organisation is required to sign; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

This question was forwarded to CCIFSA to answer and we are still waiting for their response. As soon as CCIFSA provide me with the information, I will furnish the Hon. Member.

24 November 2021 - NW2254

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is his department’s current (a) national backlog for the installation of boreholes in rural municipalities and (b) time frame for completing the (i) installation of boreholes and (ii) building of dams in this regard?

Reply:

a)  The installation of boreholes falls under the mandate of municipalities in line with Section 84(1)(d) of the Municipal Structures Act which mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water within their areas of jurisdiction.

(b) (ii) As per the Department of Water and Sanitation Annual Performance Plan and funding for the 2021/22 financial year, progress for the following construction of the following dams is as follows:

No

Project

Progress

Estimated date of completion

1

Raising of Hazelmere Dam

96% construction

August 2022

2

Raising of Clanwilliam Dam

12% construction

April 2026

3

Raising of Tzaneen Dam

10% construction

June 2023

4

Mzimvubu Water Project

20% construction (Advanced Works-Access Roads)

Completion to be confirmed on finalisation of construction drawings

5

New Nwamitwa Dam

  • Procurement completed
  • Designs completed

Completion to confirmed on sequencing of the work packages and availability of long term funding

6

Lusikisiki Regional Water Supply Scheme: Zalu Dam

  • 43% design completion with estimated
  • 100% design completion

Date of completion to be confirmed on finalisation of specialist services appointment

6

Algoa Water Supply System: Corney Dam

0% Design stage

October 2022 for completion of designs

7

Umkhomazi Water Project

Project preparation stage

2027

---00O00---

 

 

24 November 2021 - NW2057

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant facts that has been recorded by her department regarding the effects of the dry winter season on water reserves in all affected provinces?

Reply:

South Africa receives both summer and winter rainfall, with most Provinces falling within the summer rainfall area; whereas the Western Cape Province receives its rainfall mainly in winter. As a result, annual water allocation decisions for the summer rainfall areas are made in May or June when most of the summer rainfall is believed to have been harvested. On the other hand, the decision date for the winter rainfall areas is November.

The water reserves in most Provinces have been generally sufficient due to good rains received during the past summer rainfall season. The state of water storage in dams as at 30 August 2021 per Province is indicated in the table below:

Water availability and supply situation is determined by undertaking an Annual Operating Analysis (AOA) of the relevant water supply systems in the Provinces. The AOA determines the amount of water that can be supplied sustainably and equitably over the coming year considering the amount of water in storage at the decision date of the system. Water restrictions are implemented in cases of inadequate water availability.

The provinces with relatively less water availability, as indicated by low Dam levels, are located in the Eastern Cape and parts of the Western Cape Provinces. Dam levels in the Western Cape winter rainfall area are generally good and still increasing given that the Province is still in its rainfall season.

The main two water supply systems in the Eastern Cape experiencing water shortages are the Algoa and Amathole Water Supply Systems (WSS). The Algoa WSS supplies water to the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipal Metro (NMBMM), Kouga Local Municipality and the irrigation sector. On the other hand, Amathole WSS supplies the Buffalo City Local Municipality and Amatola Water Board in East London and surrounding areas; as well as the irrigation sector.

On river systems that have been found to have inadequate water availability for the season, water restrictions are proclaimed in the government gazette to curb water abstractions in order to prolong supplies, especially for essential use. The Provinces with water restrictions on a number of systems/dams are listed below as:

Eastern Cape Province

The Algoa Water Supply System, which supplies the Nelson Mandela Bay Metro area, comprises of 5 Dams and is also augmented by the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme from the Orange River System in the Free State. There are currently restrictions imposed at 80% on irrigation supply and an overall 30% on the domestic sector. Specific restrictions for the different dams are indicated in Table 2.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Churchill

35.24

23.07

19.55

50% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Impofu

105.76

15.04

16.99

 

Kouga

125.91

4.22

5.44

70% Domestic & 80% Irrigation

Loerie

3.03

37.16

32.8

 

Groendal

11.64

26.64

21.81

80% Irrigation

Total System

281.6

11.92

12.51

30% Domestic and 80% Irrigation

Note: A supply of 58 million m³/a from the Orange-Fish-Sundays transfer scheme to the NMBMM

is not restricted

The Amathole Water Supply System, which supplies the Buffalo City area comprises of 6 Dams as detailed in table 3 below – 10% Restrictions are required on the domestic water supply and 30% on irrigation.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Rooikrantz

4.79

97.14

77.59

10% on Domestic & 30% on irrigation

Laing

18.90

99.57

100.65

 

Bridle Drift

97.92

26.59

21.15

 

Wriggleswade

91.47

19.06

14.88

 

Nahoon

19.26

42.00

28.86

 

Gubu

8.52

85.76

79.36

 

Total System

240.88

34.19

28.81

 

 

Stand-alone Dams in Eastern Cape Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 4 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage Level (%) – 01 Jun 2021 (Decision Date)

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

% Restrictions

Nqweba

44.7

8.0

6.7

20% domestic

Howiesonspoort and Settlers Dam

6.4

Not known - no information received from the municipality

20% domestic & 70% irrigation

Sandile

29.7

56.0

50.7

30% irrigation

Xilinxa and Gcuwa

14.2

20.4

7

20% domestic

Kliplaat

57.1

26.9

24.3

30% irrigation

Mhlanga

1.6

13.2

35.1

10% domestic

 

Western Cape Province

Stand-alone Dams in Western Cape Province that are experiencing water shortages and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 5 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

Storage level at decision date 1 June 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Gamka

1.82

45.1

32.62

10% domestic

Oukloof

4.19

0.0

0.00

90% irrigation

Karee

0.95

14.9

21.00

50% domestic

 

Mpumalanga Province

Stand-alone Dams in Mpumalanga Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 6 below.

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date - 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Mkhombo

204.6

10

7.6

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Rust de Winter

28.2

100

99.65

10% domestic, 40% irrigation

Ohrigstad

13.5

100

57.6

10% domestic and irrigation

Limpopo Province

Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province that are experiencing water shortage and requiring restriction rules for the season are listed in Table 7 below.

Table 7: Stand-alone Dams in Limpopo Province

Dam

Net Full Supply Capacity (Million m3)

% Storage decision date 1 May 2021

Storage Level (%) – 30 Aug 2021

Restrictions Required at Decision Date

Middle Letaba

171.9

11

7.79

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

Nsami

21.9

90.5

71.46

35% domestic, 70% irrigation

---00O00--

24 November 2021 - NW2157

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What is the status and/or condition of all the bulk water and sanitation infrastructure that his department handed over to municipalities in the Republic as at the latest date for which information is available?

Reply:

 

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is responsible for assisting the municipalities with provision of water and sanitation services to communities. In this regard, the DWS provides assistance to municipalities through conditional grants such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the following:

  • Building new infrastructure
  • Refurbishment and upgrade of the existing water and sanitation infrastructure.

In accordance with the implementation protocols, the DWS is responsible for implementation of the infrastructure projects and the municipalities are responsible for Operation and Maintenance of the infrastructure. Upon completion of projects, the assets are handed over to the municipalities. Municipalities are therefore obliged to ensure that the infrastructure is operational and delivers water or sanitation services as intended.

Requesting the Honourable Member to refer to the table below for details on bulk projects implemented and completed from 2012/13 financial year to date as well as the status thereof.

Status of completed projects from 2012/13 to 2021/22 financial year

Name of the project

Name of the WSA/district municipality

Status of the project

Reasons/comments on non-functional projects

EASTERN CAPE

Mount Ayliff Bulk Water Supply

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Greater Mbizana Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Alfred Nzo DM

Functional

None

Mncwasa Bulk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Functional

None

Ibika Bilk Water Supply

Amathole DM

Not Functional

Water rationing due to drought around Butterworth and shortfall of funds to complete the project

Xonxa Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Chris Hani DM

Functional

The contractor is busy with snags on the pumpstation

Coffee Bay Bulk Water Supply Scheme

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

KSDPI Bulk Sanitation

OR Tambo DM

Functional

None

Steytlerville Bulk Water Supply

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

Due to extreme drought. the plant is struggling to obtain water from the Poort where water abstraction is taking place.

Graaff Reinet Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dr Beyers Naude Local Municipality

Functional

None

Paterson BWS Phase 1 to 5A

Sundays River Valley Local Municipality

Functional

None

MPUMALANGA

Acornhoek Bulk Water Supply

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Botleng Wastewater Treatment Works

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour Wastewater Treatment Works phase 2

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Amsterdam/Sheepmoor phase 1 & 2

Mkhodo LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Delmas Wastewater Treatment Works phase 1

Victor Khanye LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Lushushwane Regional Bulk Water Supply phase 1 to 4

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Hoxani Bulk Water Supply

City of Mbombela LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Not functional

Waiting for the City of Mbombela to finalise the Mechanical & Electrical components that were funded through co-funding by the Municipality

Northern Nsikazi Bulk Water Supply

     

Bushbuckridge Water Services (Cunningnore) phase 1

Bushbuckridge LM (Ehlanzeni DM)

Functional

None

Empuluzi phase 3A, 4A & 8

Chief Albert Luthuli LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurb & Upgrade of Ermelo Water Treatment Works

Msukaligwa LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Emalahleni Water Treatment Works

Emalahleni LM (Nkangala DM)

Functional

None

Balfour/Siyathemba Regional Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Dipaleseng LM (Gert Sibande DM)

Not functional

Awaiting the completion of the Upgrading of the Balfour Water Treatment Works in Fortuna (known as the Balfour/Siyathemba phase 2)

GAUTENG

Upgrade of Hannes van Niekerk WWTW

Rand West City Local Municipality (formerly Westonaria Local Municipality)

Partially Functional

Some process units of the new module are dysfunctional due to poor maintenance, theft and vandalism.

Upgrade of Rothdene Pump Station

Midvaal Local Municipality

Functional

None

Upgrade of Sebokeng Wastewater Treatment Works Module 6

Emfuleni Local Municipality

Functional

None

KWAZULU-NATAL

Jozini

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional. The plant is producing 20Ml/day. Bulk pipeline to Ngwavuma with 12 zonal areas completed. Zone 1 to zone 5 completed and operational with reticulation

The municipality is currently implementing zone 6 under MIG programme

Dukuduku Resettlement

uMkhanyakude DM

Functional with minor operational challenges in some areas.

Portion of the settlement with proper reticulation. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Hlabisa

uMkhanyakude DM

The scheme is functional

There is currently not enough water coming from Mandlakazi scheme which is currently under construction. UKDM has improved most of the unreliable areas through WSIG

Emadlangeni

Amajuba DM

The scheme is functional

None

Greater Eston

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

uMshwathi Phase 1-3

uMgungundlovu DM

The scheme is functional

None

Mhlabatshane

Ugu

The scheme is functional

None

Lower Tugela

iLembe

The scheme is functional

None

FREE STATE

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Construction of Sterkfontein WTW

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: The construction of Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Rising main to Escol Reservoir.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Escol pipelines.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 2: Raw water supply system at Sterkfontein Dam.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Makwane Scheme.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 1.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Northern Bulk Storage Stage 2.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Sealing and waterproofing of the Uniqwa Reservoirs.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 3: Bulk interconnection pipeline: Uniqwa Reversal.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 1: Drilling and testing of 60 operational boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Functional

None

Maluti-a-Phofung Bulk Water Supply BWS, Phase 4: QwaQwa Borehole project Stage 2: The equipping of 5 priority boreholes.

Maluti-a-Phofung LM

Partially functional

From the five (5) priority boreholes, one (1) has been severely vandalised, and two (2) are not being operated.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 1A: Upgrading of the Reitz WTW

Nketoana LM

Partially Functional

The some components are not working fully.

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3A: Ground Water Study in Nketoana, and Development of Boreholes in Arlington, Petrus Steyn and Lindley

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3B: Upgrading of the Lindley WTW

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Nketoana Bulk Water Supply, Phase 1: Stage 3C: Upgrading and refurbishment of Lindley and Arlington Water pump Stations

Nketoana LM

Functional

None

Refurbishment of Clarens Sewer Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of La Provence Sewer pump station Rising Main

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Bethlehem Water Treatment Works: Replacing of Asbestos Cement Pipeline from Abstraction point at Sol Plaatjies Dam to Water Treatment Works

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Upgrading of Fouriesburg (Carolina) Pump Station

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of 4 sewer pump station in Bethlehem/Bohlokong

Dihlabeng LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Memel

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC pipes to PVC pipes in Warden

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of sewer rising main(asbestos) for Ezenzeleni Area and construction of new sewer station with outfall sewer

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Refurbishment of the WTW in Vrede & Memel Water Treatment Works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Replacement of AC water pipes to PVC in Vrede – Phase 1

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni 3ML reservoir and appurtenant works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni raw water pump station and pipelines

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The pump station was vandalized and some equipment at the pump station were stolen. Currently under Construction funded under RBIG 5B COVID19 project to render it operational.

Phumelela BWS: Construction of the Ezenzeleni Water Treatment Works and construction of the civil structure and associated works

Phumelela LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Non-functional

The water treatment works depended on raw water pumped from the vandalized pump station within the same scheme, making it non-functional. However, currently under construction to render it operational funded under RBIG 5B. COVID19 project.

The Upgrading of the 1,5km clear water raising main line from the WTP to Marquard Reservoir

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 1: Sand River Abstraction, Borehole refurbishment, Construction of the pipeline from Caledon to Meulspruit – Clocolan and Marquard

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Setsoto BWS Phase 2: Construction 630mm raw water pipeline from Meulspruit to Ficksburg Water Treatment Water

Abstraction of raw water from the Caledon Riverbed

Setsoto LM / Thabo – Mofutsanyana

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Sewer (Vredefort)

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Moqhaka Bulk Sewer

Moqhaka LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Not functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance. Currently the DWS, Provincial office and Municipality are implementing a project to refurbish the plant.

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of concrete reservoir at Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Ngwathe Bulk Water Supply – Construction of pump house and equipping of boreholes in Edenville

Ngwathe LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Partly functional

Not all boreholes are operational due to vandalism

Mafube Bulk Sewer Phase 1 of 2 - Construction of Namahadi Pump Station

Construction of Geelhout (Britz) Pump Station

Refurbishment of Seagull Street Pump Station and Associated Works

Mafube LM – Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Moqhaka Bulk Water Supply - To construct a 9.5 km pipeline with a booster pump station

Moqhaka LM in the Fezile Dabi DM

Functional

None

Bulk water pipeline to hospital

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of 6 Boreholes

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius10km Radius Phase 2A (Exploration)

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Tweespruit Bulk water Supply - Supply and Equipping of Two Boreholes within 10km Radius – Phase 2B

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Equipping Of Boreholes and Upgrading

Of Pump Station in Excelsior

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Excelsior: Design and Construction Monitoring Water Tower, Raw Bulk Pipeline and Pumpstation- Phase 2

Mantsopa LM

Functional

None

Masilonyana Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/ Masilonyana LM

Functional

The project is functional but being a raw water pipeline, some repairs has been highly necessary to undertake through a WC/WDM project, considering water leakages in the line and mechanical / electrical issues in the high lift pump stations associated to this pipeline

Tokologo Bulk Water Supply Phase 1 of 3

Lejweleputswa DM/Tokologo LM

Functional

The project is functional, but Municipality is facing operational issues with lack of spares in the installed raw water pumps in the abstraction point.

Tswelopele Bulk water Supply Phase 1 of 2

Lejweleputswa DM/Tswelopele LM

Functional

None

Wesselsbron / Monyakeng Bulk Sewer

Lejweleputswa DM/Nala LM

Non-functional

The plant is not functional due to lack of operation and maintenance.

Jagersfontein /Fauresmith BWS Phase 1

Xhariep DM/Kopanong LM

Functional

The project is complete and functional connected to phase 2 which is at practical completion stage

WESTERN CAPE

Worcester Bulk Water

Breede Valley

Functional

None

Grabouw Wastewater Treatment Works

Theewaterskloof

Functional

None

Paarl Bulk Sewer

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Drakenstein Wastewater Treatment Works

Drakenstein

Functional

None

Swellendam Wastewater Treatment Works

Swellendam

Functional

None

Citrusdal Wastewater Treatment Works

Cederberg

Functional

None

George Bulk Water

George

Functional

None

Stellenbosch Wastewater Treatment Works

Stellenbosch

Functional

There is a challenge on the inlet works but municipality is sorting matter.

Lamberts Bay

Cederberg

Non-functional

There is a need to complete the installation of the sea outfall. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of February 2022

Tulbugh BWS

Witzenberg

Functional

There is a need to complete the construction of the dam and tributaries. The contractor has been appointed and the anticipated completion date is end of June 2024

LIMPOPO

Mogalakwena Phase 1

Waterberg

Non-functional

The challenge is with the water abstraction point that has not been developed as yet

Polokwane BWS

Capricorn

Functional

None

NORTH WEST

Koster Wastewater Treatment Works

Kgetleng river

Functional

None

Tlokwe phase 1

Tlokwe

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 1

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Pilanesburg phase 2

Moses Kotane /Rusternburg

Functional

None

Madibeng /Britsphase 1

Madibeng

Functional

None

Maqussi hills WWTW/BWS

Maquassi

Functional

None

Moretele south phase 1

Moretele

Functional

None

Greater Mamusa phase 1

Mamusa

Functional

None

Taung Naledi phase 1 Podumong

Dr Ruth Mompati

Functional

None

NORTHERN CAPE

Colesburg Wastewater Treatment Worksulk

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Hopetown Water Treatment Works

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Niekershoop Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kathu Wastewater Treatment Works

Gamagara / John Toalo Geatsewe

Functional

Functional, but need to be upgraded again

Colesburg Water Treatment Works

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Vanderkloof Wastewater Treatment Works

Renosterberg / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Norvalspont Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Noupoort Bulk Water Supply

Umsobomvu / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Britstown Oxidation Ponds

Emthanjeni / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Van Wyksvlei Bulk Water Supply Phase 1

Kareeberg / Pixley Ka Seme

Functional

None

Marydale Bulk Water Supply

Siyathemba / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Strydenburg Bulk Water Supply

Thembelihle / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Kalahari East Pipeline phase 1

Dawid Kruiper / Pixley ka Seme

Functional

None

Homevale Wastewater Treatment Works

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Non-Functional

The plant is currently not fully functional due to poor Operation & Maintenance, theft, and vandalism

Ricthie Bulk Water Supply

Sol Plaatje / Frances Baard

Functional

None

Loeriesfontein Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Brandvlei Bulk Water Supply

Hantam / Namakwa

Functional

None

Williston Bulk Water Supply

Karoo Hoogland / Namakwa

Functional

None

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24 November 2021 - NW2156

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether he has disbanded the advisory committee that was set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the progress reports which had been compiled by the advisory committee were collected, given that these were compiled from taxpayers’ money; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The contracts of the advisory committees that were set up by the former Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation, were linked to her term of office in the Department of Water and Sanitation. Due to the fact that the tenure of the former Minister ended on 5 August 2021, the advisory committees was given 30 days’ notice from this date and terminated on 4 September 2021.

2. The Chairpersons of the respective committees were requested to prepare and submit close-out reports. The Water Services Advisory Committee has submitted its close-out report. The other Committees will table their reports when they meet with the Minister.

 

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23 November 2021 - NW2362

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps will she and/or her department take against the principal of a certain school (name furnished), who instructed the recently appointed Education Assistants to clean toilets, classes, offices and pick up trash, which is outside the scope of their stipulated job description?

Reply:

The Department has requested the Province to investigate and provide a report on the matter.  A response will be furnished upon receipt of the requested report. 

23 November 2021 - NW2357

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether institutions of higher learning such as the (a) University Cape Town, (b) University of the Witwatersrand and (c) Stellenbosch University have sought engagement with his department prior to enforcing mandatory vaccines as a prerequisite for student registration; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what is his department’s position regarding mandatory vaccines and their impact on the right to education?

Reply:

The matter of whether vaccination for COVID-19 should be made compulsory for physical access to university campuses is something that is currently under consideration within the university system. Universities South Africa (USAf) has prepared guidelines for universities to consider and guide them in their discussions. At the end this is a matter that is decided upon by university Councils, who have the responsibility, within the framework of the Constitution and the Higher Education Act, to determine institutional policy.

As far as I am aware there have been no formal requests for consultation with the Department. However, I am aware that universities have sought legal advice on the matter and that in some universities discussions were held with their stakeholders prior to making decisions on this matter, which is a critical part of considering any vaccination strategy and any requirement for access based on proof of vaccination.

Higher Health, working with the Department of Health, Department of Higher Education and Training, universities, TVET and CET colleges has been actively working to establish vaccination sites for the post-school education and training system and the number of sites has grown significantly. It is also working closely with institutions to promote scientific information about the vaccination which can also address vaccine hesitancy within the post-school population.

Higher Health has indicated to the Department that they believe that it is extremely vital currently to promote vaccination through every communication channel. The priority for now is to mobilise and persuade people to volunteer to be vaccinated. Higher Health’s 15 000 campus-based peer educators are tasked to explain all about the vaccine and respond to people’s anxiety and are encouraging a peer-to-peer dialogue.

This will continue to be the focus for the current period, until the vaccination programme has had time to reach a majority of staff and students. I note the public attention on this matter, given the tension between individual rights to choose and the responsibilities of educational institutions to ensure the safety of students and staff. Ultimately, it is important that stakeholder discussions on this matter continue at the current time.

23 November 2021 - NW2347

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What measures does the Government intend to take in order to ensure that King Mswati III implements comprehensive democratic reforms in Eswatini?

Reply:

His Excellency, President Matamela Cyril Ramaphosa, in his capacity as chairperson of the Southern African Development Community (SADC) Organ on Politics, Defence, and Security Cooperation, is seized with the engagements to bring about lasting solution to the political challenges in Eswatini.

To this effect, President Ramaphosa dispatched SADC Organ Troika Special Envoys to Eswatini from 21-22 October 2021, to engage with His Majesty King Mswati III, the Eswatini Government, civil society stakeholders, and diplomatic community on the ground, on ways to de-escalate the situation and chart the way forward. The Special Envoys were duly supported by the SADC Secretariat.

As a follow up to the visit of the SADC Organ Troika Special Envoys, the President visited Eswatini on 02 November 2021 to further engage with King Mswati III. Consequently, Emaswati agreed to undertake, with the assistance of SADC, a national dialogue process which will be initiated and owned by all stakeholders.

 

22 November 2021 - NW2401

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What are the details of the progress made by his department with regard to e-visas?

Reply:

The development of the eVisa phase 1 was completed in 2020/2021 financial year but the deployment of the system was delayed due to COVID19 lockdown and suspension of international travel. The eVisa system has been piloted in Kenya and India already. As at 29th September 2021, the eVisa system has been deployed in a phased approach and operational for the following countries, namely: Kenya, Cameroon, Philippines, DRC and Saudi Arabia.

It must be considered however, that the current eVisa module is designed for tourists only, and further modules of the solution for other categories of visas will be developed and deployed in line with the stabilization of the launched version of the eVisa module. As the system matures, the department will implement a more extensive deployment plan structured and sub-divided across African countries and the Rest of the World to be undertaken during the outer years of 2022-2025.

END

22 November 2021 - NW2338

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1) On what date was the Tender Bulletin last published; (2) whether there have been any delays in the publication of the bulletin; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what were the causes of the delay in each case and (b) on what date is it envisaged it be published next?

Reply:

(1) The last Tender Bulletin was last published on 29 January 2021.

(2)(a) The delays on the publication of the tender bulletin was as a result of the power surge that hit the GPW data centre on 4 February 2021, which damaged critical servers, resulting in the crashing of the eGazette systems and disabling the publishing of all Government gazettes, including the Tender Bulletin.

(2)(b) GPW had to work on manual mode to publish the National and Provincial gazettes. However due to its format, sensitivity and complexity of its content the Tender Bulletin could not be processed manually.

GPW has appointed the service provider to rebuild and automate the eGazette system and also work on the back-up systems. The project milestones are expected to have been achieved by the 31st March 2022, and then publishing of the Tender Bulletin will resume.

END

22 November 2021 - NW2276

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)With reference to the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) Fidelity Fund, what is the status of the forensic audit and/or forensic investigation into the EAAB Fidelity Fund; (2) In respect of the specified audit and/or investigation, (a) what total amount has been spent on forensic services to date and (b)(i) which consultancies and/or firms have (aa) been mandated to conduct the audit and/or investigation and (bb) resigned and/or terminated their services in this regard and (ii) for what reasons in each case.

Reply:

(1) The forensic audit has not yet commenced.

(2)(a) None.

(2)(b)(i)

(aa) & (bb) Sizwe Ntsaluba Gobodo & Grant Thornton Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd have been mandated to conduct the audit

and/or investigation.

(bb) Grant Thornton Advisory Services Pty Ltd.

(2)(ii) It was discovered that a potential conflict of interest exists as Grant

Thornton was contracted by the Estate Agency Affairs Board to conduct an audit of the Fidelity Fund in 2017. The Department will appoint a substitute forensic auditor by 31 December 2021.

19 November 2021 - NW2419

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What recourse exists for beneficiaries of structurally unsound housing units constructed by (a) provincial and (b) municipal housing departments?

Reply:

All new houses constructed with the use of the National Housing Subsidy must be enrolled with National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC). All Provinces and Municipalities must also in terms of required NHBRC regulations enrol the projects within which houses are constructed. The enrolment with the NHBRC ensures that the houses have a five-year warranty from the day of occupation. The warranty covers the following:

(1) Minor defects within 3-months from date of occupation.

(2) Roof leaks within 1-year from date of occupation and

(3) Major structural defects within 5-years from date of occupation.

Where a defect is detected, the housing consumer should as an initial step notify the home builder of any complaint(s) within a reasonable period. It is expected that the home builder will attend to the complaint again within a reasonable timeframe.

Where the Province or Municipality are the developer and enrolled the project and house, then the complaint maybe lodged with the Province or Municipality. If the compliant is not attended to or resolved between the parties, then the complaint maybe escalated to the NHBRC.

In terms of legislation and regulations, the NHBRC has the responsibility to protect the interests of homeowners, and this includes resolution of complaints received from homeowners against a home builder.