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09 December 2021 - NW2333

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Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)What (a) is the current status of the Akasia Police Station’s R4 626 222,47 owed in arrears of rental payments to the City of Tshwane, (b) payments have been made to date on the outstanding amount and (c) are the details of the available budget for the settlement of the outstanding amount in the current financial year; (2) whether any payment agreements have been concluded with the City of Tshwane to settle the debt; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the details of the payment agreement(s) and (b) have the payment agreements been honoured to date?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

1 I have been informed that the Department received the letter of demand without a breakdown of the amount claimed as well as a copy of a non-compliant lease which was signed by one party to a contract. The matter was referred to the attorneys of City of Tshwane to provide the breakdown of the claim and justify its legitimacy. To date, the region has not received response. No payment will be effected until the claim is verified.

(2) No payment arrangement has been concluded with City of Tshwane.

a) There is no payment agreement in place.

b) The Department through its Legal Services has requested the breakdown of the amount claimed from the Attorneys as this information was not included, so that the Department knows from what period is the claim based. Once the department is in receipt of such information, verification will be conducted on the system. Finance and REMS through Legal Service will confirm whether the claim is payable or not.

08 December 2021 - NW2503

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether any disciplinary and/or legal steps have been taken against the 241 Public Service employees who, according to the Department of Social Development, received the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant in May 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What steps has her department put in place to deter Public Service employees from applying for the SRD grant following its recent reintroduction by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa

Reply:

1. No disciplinary and/or legal steps have been taken against the 241 Public Service employees who received Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grants in May 2020.

The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) is working with the departments of identified Public Service employees to ensure legal steps are taken where required. The Department of Public Service Administration (DPSA) is working closely with SASSA to ensure that disciplinary steps are taken against Public Service employees who received SRD grants in an unlawful way.

In terms of this arrangement, investigations are conducted by SASSA (supported by the Fusion Centre), as the DPSA has no investigative mandate. Furthermore, However, the DPSA plays a coordinating role and provides technical assistance to departments as far as that is concerned.

Up to date, the DPSA verified a list of 241 employees identified to have received SRD grants unlawfully. During the screening process, the DPSA found that only 198 employees on the list of 241 employees were in fact Public Service employees.

The investigating team therefore is currently focussing on the remaining 198 cases, and works with the South African Police Service to obtain statements and to collect evidence. This collated information is packaged in files which were opened for each accused. These files will be used during the criminal and disciplinary process so as to synchronize the two processes. The charges levelled against the employees will be fraud and misrepresentation. The investigation process is not yet finalised, but is continuing.

On 16 November 2021, the DPSA and investigation team from SASSA met to assess progress. The meeting resolved that the allegations against the public service employees are of a serious nature and therefore:

a) Disciplinary hearings should be held;

b) SASSA and DPSA agreed on the information/evidence to be included in the files to be opened for each employee;

c) For employees employed in provinces, the offices of the Premier will coordinate and monitor cases;

d) SASSA will provide witnesses;

e) Departments will have 90 days to finalise their cases from the dates of receiving files;

f) DPSA and SASSA will monitor the adherence to the timelines; and

g) SASSA will finalise the packaging of files.

 

Once investigations are finalised, the DPSA and investigators will reconvene with the identified departments, where guidance will be provided to labour relations officers to take the disciplinary cases forward in a coordinated way. The DPSA will source additional resources to assist those provinces with the most cases.

(2) SASSA is responsible for managing the payment of SRD grants and utilises its own electronic system to do that. The DPSA and SASSA linked the SASSA system to access information on the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) so that current payments to applicants are only made after it was confirmed that the applicants are not appointed as Public Service employees.

End

08 December 2021 - NW2588

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has conducted an investigation into the reasons that some government departments are battling to finalise and/or conclude disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons that some government departments are battling to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame and (b) steps has her department taken in order to capacitate government departments that are failing to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frames?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has conducted an investigation into the reasons why some government departments are battling to finalise and/or conclude disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame.

During Quarter (Q) 3 of the previous financial year (October to December 2020), the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU), assisted by the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project that are funded by the Canadian Government, contracted an independent expert to conduct research into the reasons for case backlogs and long overdue precautionary suspensions.

a) The following reasons were identified why some government departments are battling to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame:

  • Interference were reported, where it was alleged that suspensions were sometimes used as a tool to neutralize opposition, or employees from different camps or interest groups.
  • Heads of Departments and labour relations officials are scared to address interferences due to a fear for retaliation.
  • Unavailability of chairpersons in provinces.
  • Use of legal services to assist with discipline management cases without involving the labour relations official.
  • Appeals instituted on the side of the employer with the aim to keep an official out of the work place, usually when this person reported wrongdoing or corruption.
  • Shortage of labour relations employees.
  • Unavailability of tools of the trade, especially where educators are involved.
  • Complexity of cases due to sector specific challenges, such as in Education and Health.

b) To capacitate government departments that are failing to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frames, the DPSA launched a project where the Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) held one-on-one meetings with Executive Authorities of departments identified to have long overdue disciplinary cases and precautionary suspensions to ascertain the reasons for backlogs and to pledge support. This was immediately followed by a workshop conducted by the PAEIDTAU to the identified departments to address their backlogs. The PAEIDTAU developed, with the assistance of the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project, an electronic tool that was utilised by the affected departments to register their backlog cases on, and to provide monthly feedback. In January 2021, the Director-General (DG) DPSA embarked on provincial meetings, where the issue of discipline management is addressed and compliance statistics are shared with departments. The MPSA also addressed a special FOSAD meeting in May 2021 to raise this issue with director-generals.

To assist departments with managing discipline and to address the findings of the PAEIDTAU research, a new Guide on managing discipline in the public service was adopted and approved by the MPSA. From 1 April 2021, the implementation of this Guide is compulsory. This guide specifically addresses the issues of appeals and precautionary suspensions. During 2020, the DPSA also facilitated the training of 204 (out of 246) public service employees on a PSETA accredited course for presiding officers (chairpersons and initiators) to address the issue of capacity. With the assistance of the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project, the PAEIDTAU is currently developing training material for labour relations officials and managers, to improve implementation of the newly adopted guide.

The above outlined interventions undertaken by the MPSA, PAEIDTAU and DG yielded significant success. A decrease in suspensions and in the costs of precautionary suspensions, as well as an improvement in the capturing of cases on the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) were noted at the end of March 2021. By the end of March 2021, provinces finalised 78% of their backlogs (up from only 1% in Q1, 8% in Q 2, and 18% in Q 3). The cost of precautionary suspensions for National Departments stabilised around R 20 million per quarter and the cost for precautionary suspensions in provinces decreased to a new low level - almost R 25 million less than what the year started with (Q1: R 87 million compared to Q4: R62 million). The two provinces that had the most precautionary suspensions also managed to reduced their backlogs. The Free State reduced their cost from R 12 million in Q 3 to R 6 million in Q 4. Kwa-Zulu Natal managed to reduce their cost from a high of R 92 million in Q 3 to R 21 Million in Q 4. The amounts reflected here are based on all disciplinary cases captured on PERSAL.

End

07 December 2021 - NW2641

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What total number of (i) Chief Director and, (ii) Deputy Director-General positions are occupied by persons on an acting basis in her department and (b) by what date is it envisaged that the positions will be filled by permanent employees?

Reply:

Honourable Member, here is the reply:

a) There are currently two employees acting in higher positions:

(i) Chief Director: Communications

(ii) Deputy Director-General: Informal Settlement Upgrading and Emergency Housing

b) The Chief Director: Communication was advertised and shortlisting is scheduled to take place before 20 December 2021, with the interview taking place before the end of January 2022. The Deputy Director-General post will be advertised by 28 January 2022 and be filled by the end of the financial year (31 March 2022).

07 December 2021 - NW2444

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In view of the important and serious extradition case of the Bushiris having been delayed once again, what is the (a) latest development regarding the extradition of the Bushiris and (b) cause of the delay?

Reply:

The extradition proceedings against Shepherd Huxley Bushiri and Mary Bushiri (the Bushiris) commenced on the 8th March 2021 before the Chief Resident Magistrate’s Court in Lilongwe, Malawi. During these proceedings, Counsel for the Bushiris brought a number of preliminary applications relating to the following issues:

a) The Magistrate should recuse himself from the proceedings. This application was dismissed.

b) The State is using SADC Protocol when it is not law in Malawi. This application was dismissed.

c) The State should furnish counsel for the Bushiris with the transcript of the bail hearing of the Bushiris in South Africa. This application was successful. The State has since complied with the order.

d) The various witnesses of the State of South Africa should appear in person in the extradition proceedings in order to:

(i) Authenticate documents; and

(ii) Sign depositions.

This application was successful.

Counsel for the Bushiris applied for the review of all applications that were dismissed. The High Court dismissed the application without a hearing.

The State made an application to the Chief Resident’s Magistrate Court for the review of the decision regarding witnesses, and asked the Court to order that witnesses must appear through video conferencing or link. The Court dismissed the application.

The State then applied for a review in the High Court of the order of the Chief Resident’s Magistrate Court regarding witnesses. The review was argued in Court on 21 July 2021.

The High Court directed both parties to file submissions on whether the State witnesses from South Africa could testify via video link. The matter has since been adjourned pending the delivery of the order on a date to be communicated by the Court through the office of the Registrar.

07 December 2021 - NW2247

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Whether he has found that the National Commissioner of Correctional Services, Mr Arthur Fraser, complied with all the requirements and provisions set out in section 79 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, as amended, before placing the former President, Mr J.G Zuma, on medical parole; if not, which requirements and provisions did he find the National Commissioner did not comply with in processing the medical parole; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he established a medical advisory board to provide an independent medical report to the National Commissioner before the specified inmate was placed on medical parole; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did he establish the medical advisory board, (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) professional designations of each person who served on the medical advisory board, (c) on which date(s) did the medical advisory board meet and (d) what are the details of the recommendation of the independent medical report that the medical advisory board gave to the National Commissioner; (3) whether the inmate, his legal representatives and/or the inmate’s medical practitioner(s) lodged the request for medical parole; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the request for medical parole lodged and (b) what are the full details of the inmate’s medical parole conditions, including the appropriate arrangements made for the inmate’s supervision, care and treatment; (4) whether he was consulted before the National Commissioner decided to place the inmate on medical parole; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The matter is sub judice and therefore the Department is not in a position to respond until court proceedings are finalised.

END

07 December 2021 - NW2129

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the decision his department took in terms of paragraph 4.7 of Resolution 1/2016 of the Departmental Bargaining Chamber, Dr LA Schreiber has been informed that in some cases, former officials have not yet received their payments, while in other cases the calculations used for the pay-outs of former officials were incorrect; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the reason that (i) some former officials were not paid and (ii) other officials were paid incorrect amounts and (b) on what date will the outstanding payments to former officials be made; (2) whether his department will pay interest to former officials who did not receive their payments by the deadline of March 2020, which was before the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department has different regulations and/or policy positions for serving officials who have already received their payments and for former officials who have not received their payments yet; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.It should be noted that not all former officials have received their payment. This is due to the system utilised to process calculations providing incorrect outcomes.

(1)(a)(i) Some former officials have not been paid due to the department having to suspend the process and subject all payments to an audit due to discrepancies in percentages used to calculate payments.

(1)(a)(ii) Rectification is underway with regard to all officials that were paid incorrect amounts.

(1)(b) The Department anticipates finalising this process during the 2022/23 financial year due to the magnitude of transactions to be audited. It must be noted that out of 6 306 transactions, 3 567 (57%) have been concluded.

2. The Department will not be paying interest. DCS was compelled to undertake the verification process to avoid overpayments to ex – officials as it would be difficult if not impossible to recover such amounts.

3. No, the Department does not have different regulations and/or policy positions for serving and former officials. The Department opted to initially pay serving officials as they are on the payroll system of Government (PERSAL) and as such processing such emoluments was less onerous administratively, however after commencement of the process the errors in calculations were discovered and a comprehensive audit was commissioned to rectify / prevent any errors. As such former officials’ payments are pending finalisation of the audits.

END

06 December 2021 - NW2516

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the vacant position of director in the Care and Services to Older Persons sub-directorate of her department, (a) how long has the position been vacant, (b) what are the reasons that her department has been unable to fill the specified position, (c)(i) who has been acting in the position and (ii) for how long, (d) what is the status of her department’s progress in the advertising and recruitment process for the position and (e) on what date is it envisaged this critical position will be filled?

Reply:

a) The post became vacant on 14 December 2014.

b) In 2018, a moratorium was placed on the filling of posts due to financial constraints occasioned by a drastic cut to the Compensation of Employees (COE) budget The Department has commenced with the process of identifying and prioritising critical posts to be filled.

c) (i) Initially two Deputy Directors, namely Ms MG Keetse and Ms MN Maloba acted in the vacant post before it became unfunded.

(ii) 2 years and 5 months

d) Refer to (b)

e) The Department is currently prioritising posts that will give effect to the Departmental Strategy as required in the MTSF. While this process is under way, this function is currently performed by the four (4) Social Work Managers in the unit.

06 December 2021 - NW1919

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether, given that the Hammanskraal community has lived in a state of indignity and health risks caused by contaminated water for over 16 years, his department made any intervention; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of such an intervention?

Reply:

Yes, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has made efforts to intervene and improve the quality of drinking water in Hammanskraal including the following:

  • Undertaking sampling of drinking water at the Temba Water Treatment Works (WTW) which confirmed that the drinking water is non-compliant with the drinking water standards, South African National Standards 214:2015
  • Conducting investigations into the situation regarding water challenges in Hammanskraal and issued Directives to the City of Tshwane to improve the quality of drinking water supplied to the community of Hammanskraal
  • Issued mutliple directives instructing City of Tshwane (CoT) to comply with the drinking water standards

It is important for the Honourable Member to note that the source of the contaminated water in Hammanskraal is the poor effluent discharged by the Rooiwal Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) into the Apies River. The Rooiwal WWTW is overloaded, such that the effluent discharged into the Apies River is partially treated, and therefore pollutes the Apies River and the Leeukraal Dam.

The DWS also found that the CoT did not have capacity to optimally operate the Rooiwal WWTW. Subsequently, the CoT appointed East Rand Water Care Company (Erwat) to operate and upgrade the Rooiwal WWTW. Once completed, it is envisaged that the effluent discharged from the WWTW will improve. This will in turn improve the quality of water abstracted from the Temba WTW, which supplies water to Hammanskraal. The DWS will continue with compliance and enforcement processes until the CoT fully complies with effluent standards. The CoT is currently providing potable water to Hammanskraal community, using tankers.

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06 December 2021 - NW2659

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What has she found to have been the impact of load shedding on the 2021 matric examinations; (2) whether there are any measures to assist learners who have reported that they have been disadvantaged by the blackouts; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.  The writing of Grade 12 examinations is reaching its conclusion and as at 31 November 2021, there are four more days to the end of the writing of the examination. In terms of the writing of the examination, the impact of load shedding has been minimal, as observed during the monitoring process. In subjects like Computer Applications Technology (CAT) and Information Technology (IT), where computers are used, and where learners may have been affected, the DBE, will offer to these candidates an opportunity to rewrite the examination on 7 December 2021. The other subject that required electricity, is South African Sign Language (SASL). But given the very small numbers, these candidates were not adversely affected, as the schools could put in place alternative mechanisms. However, there is still the impact of load shedding on the final preparations for the examination, undertaken by learners during the examination period. This impact, if any, will only be established after the marking has been completed and the results are analysed.

 

2. In terms of addressing the possible disadvantage that may have been suffered by learners in terms of their final preparations for the examinations, this together with other factors that may have negatively impacted on learner performance, these will be addressed during the standardisation of results. The standardisation of results is a process, undertaken by the Quality Assurance Council, Umalusi, to mitigate, factors other than learners knowledge, ability and aptitude, that may impact on learner performance.     

06 December 2021 - NW2630

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How does her department intend to ensure that the nature of professional misconduct by educators is reduced, given the increase in the number of such cases?

Reply:

The Department has the Disciplinary Code and Procedures for Educators which are provided in Schedule 2 of the Employment of Educators Act (EEA), 1997 (Act No. 76 of 1998). The Code is aimed at, amongst others, promoting acceptable conduct. It is therefore, the responsibility of the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the EEA, is the Head of the Provincial Education Department, to implement and enforce the Code.

06 December 2021 - NW2522

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) What are the details of the position of her department regarding Note 17 of the Department of Social Development in respect of the Fund-Raising Act, Act 107 of 1978; (2) In light of the fact that both the SA Social Security Agency and the National Development Agency received findings adverse on compliance with legislation and are not taking effective steps to prevent irregular expenditure, what corrective measures will she and/or her department take to put in place in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Fund-Raising Amendment Bill, once signed into law, will culminate in the dissolution of the Refugee Relief, Social Relief, State President and Disaster Relief Funds with the exception of South African National Defence Force Fund (in terms of clause 7 of the amendment Bill), The amendment Bill establishes a new Disaster Relief and National Social Development Fund, and in terms of clause 7, transfers all the assets and liabilities of the existing funds to the new Fund. There should thus be no impact on the Funds, as the four funds are being consolidated into one, and all their assets and liabilities will be transferred to the new Fund once the President has signed the Bill into law.

2. (a) SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

The Department has an established an Entity Oversight Forum. This engagement was prompted by the Auditor General’s report that the Department strengthen its oversight on its public entities. The main focus of the Forum is to:

  • Built a harmonious relationship with DSD Entities and Associated institutions;
  • To address Auditor general’s concerns of oversight;
  • To take note of governance issues in all Entities;

The Audit Steering Committee has also been re-established to address all Auditor-General’s findings within the Department and its Entities. The Committee meets on monthly basis to discuss the Audit Implementation Action Plan. Responses to challenges related to audit findings and related implementation plans are managed and overseen as preparations for the scheduled Audit Committee meetings.

2(b) NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY:

The NDA has put in place the following measures in place to prevent the occurrence of irregular expenditure:

a) The development a policy and detailed Standard Operating Procedure manual on Irregular Expenditure - In the 2021 Financial year, the entity developed a policy on Irregular expenditure, guided by the requirements of the Framework for Irregular expenditure that was issued by the National Treasury. The Framework and the policy are intended to institutionalise the processes for the treatment of Irregular expenditure identification, determination of losses and investigation of cases of irregular expenditure. After approval of the policy, awareness workshops were held across all NDA offices where NDA staff were workshopped on the policy.

b) Establishment of an independent Loss Control Committee to investigate all reported cases of Irregular Expenditure - The establishment of this committee is informed by the requirement of the Framework on Irregular expenditure that was issued by National Treasury. The Loss Control Committee is expected to investigate all reported cases within 30 days of these instances being reported. This committee will ensure that all cases are dealt with timeously. The process to appoint the Loss Control Committee is s expected to be finalised by end of January 2022.

2. SASSA

SASSA takes issues of irregular expenditure very seriously and has focused on the areas listed below;

a) Focus on office accommodation procurement for SASSA:

SASSA recorded additional Irregular expenditure amounting R73 million during the 2020/21 reporting period of which over R43 million relate to occupation of office accommodation with expired lease agreements. The procurement of alternative accommodation by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure was not concluded by the time a lease expired and SASSA did not request approval to extend the existing lease agreement on time.

Mechanism being put in place are:

  • SASSA is currently developing an appropriate procurement strategy to fast track procurement of office accommodation currently occupied by SASSA for which lease agreements already expired. This is being done in consultation with Department of Social Development and Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to be finalised 31 December 2021.
  • SASSA with the assistance of Department of Social Development is currently reviewing Immovable Property management policy to be concluded by 31 March 2022.
  • Review the Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) entered with DPWI by 28 February 2022.

b) Strengthen internal controls

  • Requests for procurement of alternative office accommodation by Department of Public Works and Infrastructure will be sent eighteen (18) months before expiry of any lease agreement.
  • Where DPWI has not finalised procurement of requested office accommodation, SASSA will timeously request for the extension of the existing lease agreement before expiry of lease agreement.
  • Supply Chain Management Compliance unit performs pre-audit or reviews of all new contracts before an award is made.
  • Prioritised Supply Chain Management (SCM) unit capacity (Currently busy with recruitment process to augment current manpower across the agency).
  • Re-trained SCM and users at head office on SCM Legislative framework and processes and procedures.
  • Reviewed Supply Chain Management Policy and Standard Operating Procedures and work shopped all SCM officials in the Agency on 26 November 2021
  • Trained EXCO and officials serving as Bid Adjudication Committee members. The first training took place on 22 October 2021 and the second training should take place during the fourth (4th) quarter of 2021/22.
  • Treasury training of all SCM officials in SASSA on 02 June 2021
  • Develop and implement a Corporate Audit Action plan to respond to 2020/21 audit findings.

c) Strengthen implementation of disciplinary corrective measures for already incurred irregular expenditure cases:

  • Accurate and complete recording of all incurred irregular expenditure including where currently SASSA is in occupation of office accommodation where leases have expired thus continue to incur irregular expenditure.
  • A target on financial misconduct cases has been included in 2021/22 Annual Performance Plan (APP) allowing adequate monitoring.
    • 95% of long outstanding cases to be finalised by 31 March 2022, timeous implementation of disciplinary corrective measure will serve as a deterrent.
  • SASSA Head Office to strengthen regional Support
  • Outcome of the disciplinary corrective measures will become the basis for consideration of recovery or support for National Treasury to condone Irregular Expenditure where appropriate.

06 December 2021 - NW2506

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of deceased persons were recipients of the (a) Old-Age Grant, (b) Disability Grant, (c) R350 Social Relief of Distress Grant and (d) Dependency Grant in the period 1 January 2020 to 31 October 2021?

Reply:

SASSA runs the data – both for social grants and the social relief of distress grant – against the Department of Home Affairs’ Population Register before the payments are extracted for the following month. All deaths that have been registered with Department of Home Affairs result in the payment not being extracted. However, deaths that are reported late, or after the extraction date will result in payments for the specific beneficiary being extracted.

The information provided below is for the payment vouchers extracted after the date of death of the beneficiary. This information is not grant specific, but linked to a beneficiary, who may receive more than one grant. Further analysis is required to be able to specify this by grant type. For the period January 2020 to 31 October 2021, a total of 214 344 vouchers were extracted after the death of the beneficiary. However, this does not reflect the numbers actually paid out as in some cases, the money paid has already been recovered, or returned to SASSA by SAPO.

The total number of vouchers for the R350 social relief of distress grant extracted after the death of the beneficiary for the period under discussion is 59 089. Again, this is the total number of vouchers extracted, but the actual number paid out will only be known on receipt of the full reconciliation from SAPO.

06 December 2021 - NW2517

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the approved organisations in receipt of the 2016 Comprehensive Addiction and Recovery Act grant funding for Victim Empowerment Programmes administered by the National Development Agency (details furnished), (a) on what date (s) did the organisations receive their (i) first and (ii) second tranche payments, (b) what are the reasons that the specified organisations did not receive their full tranche payment, (c) on what date is it envisaged that all organisations will receive their full tranche payment and (d) what gender-based violence programmes do these organisations provide?

Reply:

I would like to point out to the Honourable Member that South Africa does not have any legislation referred to in the question. Rather, the Comprehensive Addiction Recovery Act 2016 is a piece of legislation that has its origins from the United States of America.

CARA is an abbreviation for the Criminal Assets Recovery Accounts, a fund that is currently administered by the National Development Agency (NDA). The contract for the NDA to manage the CARA Fund to support NGOs/civil society organisations that provide services to survivors and victims of gender-based violence as guided by the National Strategic Plan on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (2019-2024).

a) (i) (ii) Refer to Annexure A

b) The Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), which is the principal Act in terms of funding of non-profit organisations/civil society organisations prescribes that due diligence be conducted before the transfer of funds to any organisation, and the CARA Fund is no exception. All funded CSOs are subjected to verifications and performance reviews before funds can be transferred to the CSOs’ bank accounts. The organisations are expected to submit progress reports and thereafter the performance reviews are conducted before second tranches can transferred. Therefore, all the CSOs that have not been paid second tranches are yet to submit progress reports and be subjected to performance review before the transfer of second tranches as per the Service Level Agreement.

c) Refer to (b)

d) Refer to second paragraph above.

06 December 2021 - NW2523

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)In light of the fact that the National Development Agency paid R29 million in stipends to volunteers which were not approved by a delegated official, (a) who paid and (b)(i) who did not sign and (ii) what were the reasons; (2) with regard to the fruitless and wasteful expenditure of (a) R1,9 million in car damages and (b) R1 million in hotel no-shows, (i) who are the responsible persons and (ii) what consequences have been instituted?

Reply:

1. Following President Cyril Ramaphosa’s declaration of the state of emergency in 2020, the volunteers were recruited as part of the NDA’s response to control the further spread and mitigation of the COVID-19 pandemic through community education, identification and registration of individuals/households for SRD application, including the Special COVID-19 SRD Grant, distribution of food parcels to eligible individuals/households provided by the Social Development Portfolio and providing queue management at SAPO and SASSA pay points, amongst others.

The programme plan and costing of the volunteer programme was presented to the NDA for approval and it was granted by the NDA Board as per their delegated authority. The NDA administratively, executed the programme through the NDA Grant Funding Policy. However, the processing and appointment of the CSOs that were appointed did not go through the structures required in the grant funding policy. This was declared during the audit as irregular expenditure.

When President Ramaphosa extended Special COVID-19 SRD Grant earlier this year, the NDA was requested to render services alluded to earlier. As a result, the volunteer programme was extended with an additional 3 (three) months (January-March 2021). However, the Accounting Officer implemented the extension of the volunteer programme without the approval of the NDA Board.

1 (a) The R29 million that the Honourable Member is referring to is not entirely related to the NDA volunteer programme, the total sum of irregular expenditure for the Agency for the financial year 2020/2021. The total is inclusive of the following irregular expenditure reported in the NDA annual financial report:

Nature of Irregular Expenditure

Amount

Tender not approved in accordance with NDA Delegations

R 1 182 735

Competitive process not followed for price quotations

R 1 214 943

Price charged by supplier for PPE no in line with Treasury guidelines

R 21 710

Award made prior to approval

R 59 112

Extension of extension of Volunteer Programme not in accordance with Delegations of Authority

R 4 522 025

Volunteer programme approved without following Grant funding policy

R 22 471 235

TOTAL IRREGULAR EXPENDITURE - NOTE 29 OF ANNUAL REPORT

R 29 471 760

1 (b)(i) The NDA Board duly approved the programme budget, but not the expenditure of R22 471 235 which was incurred under this programme as it did not comply with the NDA Grant Funding Policy.

1 (ii) Refer to 1 and 1 (a) above

SASSA

2(a) The reported R1 million fruitless and wasteful expenditure disclosed in SASSA’s 2020/21 Annual Report is not only for the hotel no shows. Of the total amount, only R8, 908 is relates to hotel no shows. SASSA recorded the R1 million fruitless and wasteful expenditure. The fruitless and wasteful expenditure breakdown of the R1, 083, 218 as reported by AGSA is made up of the following (Refer to note no. 30 of SASSA Annual Report):

  • Interest and penalties R61, 147 which include a material amount of R58, 136.99 (R50, 000 with interest) paid to an official for the unfair disciplinary process and defamation of character as per the court judgement made on a matter employee vs SASSA. There were penalties and interest levied by municipalities relating to car renewals and accounts payments cycle negatively impacted by the pandemic making the balance of the amount.
  • Hotel no shows amounted to R8, 908 sometimes officials are booked and due to circumstances related to Covid-19 the accommodation could not be utilised. An amount of R 3,303.06 associated to a SASSA appointed medical doctor for purposes of disability assessment. The amount was then deemed recoverable from the relevant doctor. Hotel no shows does not make a major portion of the fruitless and wasteful expenditure. All the cases have been finalised, four were finalised in the previous financial year (2020/21) and last one was finalised during the current financial year (2021/22). Three cases were written off and two are being recovered.
  • Payment made to a service provider R266, 760 (the service provider did not render the service but claimed the money, a case of fraud has been opened). The corrective disciplinary process was undertaken and the affected official who has since left the agency was cleared due to insufficient evidence of wrong doing. The agency awaits the outcome of the criminal case.
  • Other matters R746, 403 made out of the following amounts:
    • R 549,942.75 salary paid to an official from KZN who was not at work, when SASSA requested the alleged sick notes could not get any. The employee has since been dismissed. We are currently trying to recover funds, she does not have adequate pensions benefits as she started work the past two years. SASSA is following a due legal process to recover the amount paid.
    • R187,920.53 relate to salary paid to an official in Gauteng region together with legal costs (There is currently a disciplinary process underway to deal with this matter). Only once the corrective disciplinary process is finalised will the matter be finalised in line with the outcome.
    • R8, 381.20 a KZN official did not attend arranged training. The circumstances are still being investigated.
    • R158.52, a beneficiary was booked for medical assessment in the month the grant was still valid.

(b) (i) who are the responsible persons and (ii) what consequences have been instituted?

From the stated information hotel no shows does not make a major portion of the fruitless and wasteful expenditure recorded in 2020/21. The hotel no shows cases have been finalised, four were finalised in the previous financial year (2020/21) and last one was finalised during the current financial year (2021/22). Three cases were written off and two are being recovered.

DSD

(2)(a)

With regards to fruitless and wasteful expenditure, the National Department of Social Development had R1,132 million related to car damages. 51 cases were recorded as car damages.

(2)(a)(i)

The Loss Control Committee recommended that 35 cases (R674 437, 04) be recovered from officials and the Travel Agent. The cases have been referred to the Finance to commence with the recovery process. 12 cases (R170 624, 55) were written off on the basis that the officials were not negligent; and

(2)(a)(ii)

4 cases (R286 298, 47) were referred to Labour Relation for further investigation and if the officials are found to be liable for the expenditure, it will be recovered and disciplinary processes will commence.

(2)(b)

In terms of R 1 million in hotel no-shows, only R21 638.96 has been recorded in the Annual Report for Social Development as “Hotel no-shows” and not R1 million as indicated.

14 Cases were recorded during the 2020/21 financial year 2020/2021 for “Hotel No-Show”. Eight (8) cases has already been recommended to be recovered from the officials and the Travel Agent to the amount of R11 714,52 and these cases have already been referred to commence with the recovery process.

1 case (R1 200, 00) was written off and the official was not liable due to travel restrictions imposed and the late cancellation of an event as a result of Covid-19 restrictions

The remaining 5 cases (R8 724.44) has been investigated and will be finalised by the Loss Control Committee in due course.

 

06 December 2021 - NW2390

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With regard to the role played by the National Treasury in drafting sound economic policies for the Republic, how does the National Treasury justify the move towards a family poverty grant when it is anti-poor given that its targeting of households and not individuals will most likely exclude millions from having a basic income support; (2) what is the budget for piloting the proposed family poverty grant; (3) whether the proposed piloting of the specified grant will run concurrently with the Social Relief of Distress Grant; if not, what relief will be provided for the unemployed who might be excluded from the family poverty grant; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. National Treasury is not drafting a policy on a family poverty grant.

2. There will be no pilot as National Treasury is not drafting the policy.

3. Refer to (2).

03 December 2021 - NW2407

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the Maluti-a-Phofung Special Economic Zone, what are the details of (a) measures that have been put in place to ensure that the (i) boundary fence is not breached and/or cut and (ii) boundary lights and associated equipment are not vandalised and/or stolen and (b) the reasons for not having such measures in place in order to protect the boundary fence and lighting? [

Reply:

The Maluti-A-Phofung SEZ (MAPSEZ) was designated in 2015; and subsequent to that, the SEZ License was issued in 2017 which formally designated MAPSEZ as a brownfield. The SEZ is managed by the Free-State Provincial Government. The department of trade, industry and competition’s role in this regard is to designate at the request of the province and to provide the financial support at the SEZ.

With all the new SEZ’s designated since 2020, the dtic is directly involved in the co-ownership and management of the zones. The new ownership model involves the national, province, and municipalities in the running of the SEZs.

Accordingly, the honourable member is encouraged to engage directly with the province and the SEZ Management to get more details about the project.

-END-

03 December 2021 - NW2391

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With regard to the R131 billion recently secured for renewable energy, how will Eskom show accountability and transparency in the just transition when corruption, fraud and theft are at the centre of the entity. (2) (a) what amount has been lost to corruption at Eskom in the past financial year and (b) how far has the loss jeopardised the mandate of the organisation to keep the lights on in the Republic?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

Eskom’s current leadership is committed to rooting out fraud and corruption and addressing issues related to past corporate governance breaches, in order to restore Eskom's reputation as a trusted corporate citizen and further, to improve the organization’s financial and operational sustainability.

(1)

There are a number of safeguards built into the operationalization of the JET financing facility. Firstly, we see the facility, and disbursement of funds being managed by a strict governance committee comprised of the lender group. Financing will be released in tranches, based on project milestones being met. This means if we do not meet project deliverables and timeframes for deliverables, the financing will not be released.

(2)(b)

The total amount identified through investigations conducted by the Eskom Forensics team is R3 448 024.

(2)(b)

While loadshedding cannot ALWAYS BE attributed to corruption, the financial losses due to corruption have had a negative impact on Eskom’s overall financial position. This in turn negatively affect Eskom’s ability to reliably provide electricity.

For instance, the underlying cause of Eskom’s poor operational performance is insufficient maintenance on Generation plant over the years which is now resulting in poor plant performance. There is an increase in mechanical power station breakdowns.

Therefore, the sum of R3 448 024 which was lost due to maladministration could have been used to perform much-needed maintenance on Eskom’s power generating units.

 

We also provide details of Eskom’s response to the fraud and corruption challenge:

  • Eskom is making good progress in the implementation of the Fraud Risk Management Plan, to maximise fraud prevention and enhance good corporate governance practices. The Anti-Fraud and Corruption Integration Committee monitors the implementation of this plan and ensures integration between forensic, legal, ethics, industrial relations and supplier review functions, with progress reported to Exco and the Audit and Risk Committee (ARC) on a regular basis.
  • In financial year 2020/21, our fraud prevention and whistleblowing policies were revised to enforce our zero-tolerance approach to fraud, strengthen our whistleblowing processes and ensure compliance with changes to relevant legislation. Furthermore, a whistle-blowing procedure has been developed to provide step-by-step guidance to report incidents of unethical behaviour through an independent, confidential hotline. As an additional measure, we also encourage reporting through DPE's whistle-blowing channels.
  • Ethics and fraud awareness programmes have been enhanced and remain mandatory for all employees. To complement these, anti-fraud training has been developed for managers and supervisors to ensure that they understand their roles and responsibilities in the management of risks associated with fraud, corruption and irregularities. Fraud awareness for suppliers was also implemented during the year.
  • Our Assurance and Forensic Department and Human Resources Division are collaborating to improve consequence management and disciplinary processes. Feedback on disciplinary cases is reported regularly to executive management. Disciplinary action is monitored, particularly where line managers and supervisors have decided not to take action against an employee despite findings from an investigation.

03 December 2021 - NW2342

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What measures has he put in place to assist Eskom to ensure that loadshedding is stopped?

Reply:

There are a number of factors (and therefore, government departments) that are possible contributors to ultimately, to ultimately resolving the challenge of loadshedding.

The government is working closely with Eskom to reduce the duration of loadshedding. Cabinet has acknowledged the inconvenience loadshedding has caused and National Treasury is working with Eskom to grant it the appropriate exemptions to acquire the spare parts needed for repairs and maintenance.

Government notes that Eskom is making progress in re-employing skilled personnel – including plant managers – to help the organisation make headway at individual power stations and across other operations.

In addition, government is making every effort to bring new power generation capacity online in the shortest possible time. While Cabinet is aware that the current energy challenges are frustrating and counterproductive to economic growth, it is confident that the practical actions to restructure and strengthen our electricity system will eventually improve South Africa’s energy capacity.

We are very mindful of the economic constraints and social (and political) negativity unleashed by loadshedding.

We should always be mindful of the operational and technical damage done by those involved in state capture – their priority together with insiders and businesses, was to steal, to overprice services and parts and engage in other forms of malfeaseance. The parliamentary enquiry conducted in 2017, exposed many of these shenanigans.

03 December 2021 - NW2493

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the guidelines stipulated in the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993, (a) what safety precautions and/or plans have been implemented nationally in hospitals to manage fires, (b) how often is fire equipment serviced and (c) what is the breakdown in each province in terms of fire equipment checks in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

The following responses are as received from the nine provinces

a) Safety precautions and/or plans have been implemented nationally in hospitals to manage fires

  • In Eastern Cape, fire safety is managed at hospital level. Fire safety has several role-players including Infrastructure/ Facilities/ Engineering and Occupational Health and Safety units in most hospitals. Some hospitals have fire safety in their disaster plans and some have unit / ward – based action cards for response to fire and/or evacuation plans.
  • All Free State facilities are fitted with fire extinguishers and fire hydrants. The smaller facilities have fire extinguishers and the larger facilities e.g. Hospitals have fire extinguishers and fire hydrants.
  • Safety plans and emergency preparedness plans are in place but in many facilities in Gauteng there are no approved disaster management plans by the local authority for hospitals and also no occupancy certificates. Fire and evacuation drills are done sporadically or not done at all.
  • All institutions in KwaZulu-Natal have fire fighting equipment i.e. fire extinguishers (10538), fire hose reels (2756) and depending on the size of the institution fire hydrants (1152). Internal disaster management plans, which include fire evacuation plans are available and reviewed as necessary. Fire evacuation drills are conducted internally and documented. Fire departments from local municipalities are involved in major evacuation drills and also institutions acquire their inputs when reviewing fire evacuation plans. Fire safety training has been conducted for staff and some institutions have fire and alarm detection systems.
  • Limpopo has trained fire wardens in every facility with the Fire departments providing support and training. Fire drills are conducted at each facility.
  • Mpumalanga facilities have approved disaster and emergency evacuation plans. Risk assessments are being conducted inclusive of fire hazards and risks and control measures put in place. Local fire inspectors conduct fire inspections at facilities on invitation.
  • Northern Cape has no approved disaster plan but emergency plans are in place and bi-annual fire drills are conducted at facilities.
  • All hospitals in North West have floor plans and evacuation plans with trained fire wardens and fire drills performed. Inspections of hospitals were done by the Fire Departments of local authorities in 2021 and the recommendations are used to enhance the plans.
  • The Western Cape has adopted the MIMMS systems for hospital preparedness for managing Major Incidents. MIMMS (Major Incident Medical Management and Support) is an internationally accepted system to manage such incidents. Hospitals have Major Incident Plans that also include managing a fire incident. The Office for Disaster Medicine at provincial level and the facility manager signs off on the plan. The plan is reviewed annually or after a major incident at the facility.

(b) Servicing of fire equipment

  • Eastern Cape has a provincial contract for the fire safety equipment which includes the servicing of fire extinguishers and fire hydrants annually.
  • In Gauteng fire equipment are serviced once a year in line with expiry dates – however there is a dependency on the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure.
  • The fire equipment are serviced annually in Free State, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and North West.
  • Fire equipment at all facilities in all districts of the Western Cape are serviced through service level agreement (SLA) contracts. Each district has its own SLA contract and all fire equipment are serviced every 12 months according to applicable regulations and requirements.

(c) Breakdown in each province in terms of fire equipment checks in each of the past five financial years

  • Eastern Cape could not collate the information as it is kept at facility level.
  • It varied in different hospitals in Gauteng with 27 facilities reporting annual checks; 5 facilities were last assessed in 2020 and 4 facilities did not report.
  • Free State and Limpopo have annual checks on the fire equipment.
  • In KwaZulu-Natal, fire equipment checks form part of the monthly inspections by health and safety representatives.
  • Mpumalanga has spent on average R2m per annum on fire equipment checks and maintenance.
  • Northern Cape conducts monthly checks on fire equipment.
  • North West has monthly checks by Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) representatives with quarterly inspections by the provincial OHS forum.
  • Western Cape has spent on average R8m per annum on fire equipment checks and maintenance.

 

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2405

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What percentage as a stakeholder and state-owned entity (a) does Alexkor and (b) the Pooling and Sharing Joint Venture (PSJV) hold; (2) whether, in view of the fact that Alexkor and the PSJV are reliant on Government funding and should be open and transparent to the public, the two specified entities are bound to comply with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Act 1 of 1999, when making their financial decisions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the PSJV forms part of a schedule 2 Major Public Entity in terms of the PFMA; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) whether he has found that the PSJV must then comply with the provisions of the PMFA; if not; why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from ALEXKOR

1. Alexkor and Richtersveld Mining Company (RMC) Pooling and Sharing Joint Venture, known as Alexkor RMC PSJV, is an unincorporated joint venture where Alexkor holds 51% interest and RMC holds 49%.

The settlement agreement reached between Government and the community of Richtersveld directed that land-based diamond assets previously owned by Alexkor be transferred to the community and Alexkor to retain the marine based diamonds assets

The Alexkor RMC PSJV is led by a board composed of three (3) members from Alexkor and three (3) from the communities.

2. In terms of the settlement agreement, the court ordered that R200 million be expended to the recapitalisation of the diamond operations post the prolonged court proceedings.

The terms of repayment are outlined in the settlement agreement. No further funding has been provided to the PSJV nor Alexkor

Alexkor is a Schedule 2 company bound by the PFMA. Alexkor RMC PSJV is not Schedule 2 company therefore it is not bound by PFMA provisions.

3. Alexkor is a Schedule 2 company bound by the PFMA. Alexkor RMC PSJV is not Schedule 2 company therefore it is not bound by PFMA provisions.

4. The Alexkor RMC PSJV is an unincorporated entity and does not qualify as a national public entity or a national government business enterprise based on the definition of the two by the PFMA namely the Alexkor RMC PSJV is not juristic entity nor under the ownership control of the national executive. Given that the Alexkor RMC PSJV is not a public entity that it could not be listed in either Schedule 2 or 3 of the PFMA. Section 3 of the PFMA provides that the PFMA applies to departments, public entities listed in Schedule 2 or 3, and constitutional institutions. The Alexkor RMC PSJV is none of these. It is therefore advised that the PFMA does not apply to the Alexkor RMC PSJV itself, in its own name.

03 December 2021 - NW2465

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that the elderly had not received assistance regarding vaccinations at their homes in the same manner that volunteers went house to house over the voting period?

Reply:

The health system has limited capacity to provide vaccinations in people’s homes. Factors that contribute to this include the fact that the vaccine must be administered by a health professional, that open vials of vaccine (5 doses) cannot be transported between different locations, that the vaccinee must be observed for 15 minutes (or in some cases 30 minutes) following vaccination and that emergency equipment must always be available during administration of vaccines.

Local health services are however encouraged to assist elderly and disabled persons who are unable to attend vaccination sites, including through provision of vaccination in people’s homes. Community health workers who visit households play an important role in establishing linkage between such persons and local vaccination sites.

Additional strategies used by the Vaccine Programme to reach elderly people include:

  • Vaccination of people in congregate settings especially in old-age homes.
  • Setting up outreach and pop-up sites at locations where older persons congregate such as at SASSA pay-points.
  • Encouraging younger people to assist elderly people to access sites.
  • Ensuring that all sites prioritise the elderly to avoid long waiting times.
  • Piloting the provision of R100 grocery vouchers for older persons to offset costs associated with vaccination such as costs associated with transport.

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2343

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With regard to Transnet’s recent financial statements which show that the company has suffered revenue losses of over R8 billion, and that irregular expenditure was more than R100 billion, with over 3 000 employees forced to take severance packages, what (a) were the causes of the mismanagement lapses at Transnet and (b) plans has he put in place to turn the entity around?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

Financial performance

For the 31 March 2021 financial year, Transnet experienced challenges due to the nationwide lockdown resulting in subdued volume demand as well as operational challenges.

  • Transnet’s revenue decreased by 10,5% to R67,3 billion (2020: R75,2 billion), due to a:
  • 13,7% decline in rail freight volumes,
  • 26,4% decline in pipeline volumes, and
  • 11,5% decline in port container throughput mainly as a result of the nationwide lockdown.

Transnet performance was at a backdrop of South Africa’s real GDP that had contracted by 7% in 2020 after GDP growth of only 0,2% was recorded in 2019. In a historic context, it was the worst SA GDP performance since the great depression years of the 1930’s.

In addition, net operating expenses increased by 16,2% to R47,8 billion (2020: R41,2) mainly due to:

  • fixed costs that have not decreased in line with the reduced activity - personnel costs, maintenance, and security costs,
  • unbudgeted third party claim provision and increased environmental provisions relating to pipeline spills arising from product theft incidents, which also resulted in increased security costs (R5,6 billion),
  • unbudgeted Covid-19 related expenses of R232 million, and
  • lower operating income due to the lower sale of scrap, lease recoveries and PRASA recoveries.

The 2022 YTD results indicate that recovery is further evident in the steady improvement of revenue achieved (96,2% of the plan).

Management has also implemented cash preservation measures to safeguard financial performance and cash flows over and above the plan. Key focus areas include amongst others:

  • Collections from overdue customers;
  • Revenue initiatives;
  • Sale of non-core properties;
  • Sale of scrap;
  • Procurement optimisation;
  • Moratorium on discretionary and other costs;
  • Review of contract spend; and
  • Capital investment optimisation.

It is important to note that no employee has been forced to take severance packages, however, employees voluntarily selected to leave the company.

Irregular expenditure

The Company has embarked on a PFMA improvement programme which has both a long-term ( STATE CAPTURE LINKED IRREGULAR EXPENDITURE) and short-term emphasis, which collectively focusses on addressing the audit qualifications and improving internal controls, to ensure a sustainable process is in place where all information required by the PFMA are identified, actioned and reported timeously.

The PFMA improvement programme was implemented through an enhanced 2021 financial year remedial plan to deal with the root cause and the recommended remedial action that is required to create sustainable solutions around people, processes and systems in the procurement environment and to reduce the occurrence of irregular expenditure.

Planned outcomes of the PFMA remedial plan include:

• improved procurement processes;

• reduction in PFMA transgressions; and

• improved completeness and accuracy of PFMA reporting through implementing sustainable solutions embedded within the business.

Transnet remains committed to continuing to enhance consequence management efforts and investigating PFMA related transgressions. As a result, the forensic investigations process has been centralised. The centralisation was to enhance the coordination and efficiencies of the investigation process, to ensure consistent application of corrective action throughout the organisation that resulted in areas of improvement.

Challenges exist due to the history in managing and reporting PFMA transgressions which make it impractical for Transnet to disclose all irregular expenditure reliably. The National Treasury accepted the impracticability judgement for the historic periods up to and including 31 March 2021, given the legacy of state capture that this process will take time to complete. However, Transnet will still need provide evidence to demonstrate the impracticability assertion and for the Auditor General of South Africa to assess its applicability.

Transnet will continue engaging the National Treasury to find a way to ring-fence the legacy issues of irregular expenditure as these do not impact on the fair presentation of the annual financial statements.

03 December 2021 - NW2406

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What are the details of the boundary of the Maluti-a-Phofung Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in respect of, but not exclusively, (a) the length of the boundary and (b) the details of the boundary fence; (2) What are the details of the (a) design of the boundary fence, (b) costs of constructing the boundary fence, (c) number of places that the boundary fence has been breached and/or cut, (d) number of breaches and/or holes in the boundary fence as at 31 July 2021 and (e) date by which it is anticipated that all breaches and/or holes in the boundary fence will be repaired?

Reply:

The Maluti-A-Phofung SEZ (MAPSEZ) was designated in 2015; and subsequent to that, the SEZ License was issued in 2017 which formally designated MAPSEZ as a brownfield. The SEZ is managed by the Free-State Provincial Government. The department of trade, industry and competition’s role in this regard is to designate at the request of the province and to provide the financial support at the SEZ.

With all the new SEZ’s designated since 2020, the dtic is directly involved in the co-ownership and management of the zones. The new ownership model involves the national, province, and municipalities in the running of the SEZs.

Accordingly, the honourable member is encouraged to engage directly with the province and the SEZ Management to get more details about the project.

-END-

03 December 2021 - NW2438

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What are the details of the boundary lighting of the Maluti-a-Phofung Special Economic Zone with regard to the (a) total number of boundary lights, (b) details of the design of the boundary lights, (c) total cost of installing the boundary lights, (d) total number of boundary lights that were operational as at 31 July 2021, (e) detailed reasons why boundary lights are not operational and (f) date by which it is anticipated that all boundary lights will be fully operational? [

Reply:

The Maluti-A-Phofung SEZ (MAPSEZ) was designated in 2015; and subsequent to that, the SEZ License was issued in 2017 which formally designated MAPSEZ as a brownfield. The SEZ is managed by the Free-State Provincial Government. The department of trade, industry and competition’s role in this regard is to designate at the request of the province and to provide the financial support at the SEZ.

With all the new SEZ’s designated since 2020, the dtic is directly involved in the co-ownership and management of the zones. The new ownership model involves the national, province, and municipalities in the running of the SEZs.

Accordingly, the honourable member is encouraged to engage directly with the province and the SEZ Management to get more details about the project.

-END-

03 December 2021 - NW2481

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his recent media briefing held on Friday, 12 November 2021, where he informed the public that his department will ensure that there is an adequate supply of oxygen, ventilators, beds and personal protective equipment (PPE) in light of the shortage of beds and oxygen during the third wave of COVID-19 infections, what number of additional (a) beds, (b) ventilators and (c) PPEs does his department estimate will be needed nationally in order to overcome the impact of the fourth wave?

Reply:

a) Beds

The Department has no plan to increase the number of beds from the current baseline that we have. This is based on the fact that even during the third wave, which was the highest, the country never had shortage of beds and oxygen that was required for the management of Covid-19 pandemic. As an example, between the 12 and 15 July 2021, which was at the highest point of the third wave, the country had the following hospitalisation breakdown:

  • The total admissions in Non-ICU Beds was 14 319 out of total General 108 805 beds (13% bed occupancy)
  • There 2423 admissions in the ICU beds out of 5615 total ICU beds (43% bed occupancy)

This means that we have enough capacity based on the lessons learned from the third wave, and as such there is no need to increase the number of beds.

b) Additional Ventilators

Both private and public sector hospitals have received 14 292 ventilators from Solidarity Fund. These devices are in the hospitals and approximately 7000 have been used. This has left us with a strategic reserve in the event of the increase in the number of patients. The department has further received 5708 of the additional ventilators which is the reserve that is kept in the National Department of Health for further deployment in the event of further pressure that may arise.

c) Additional PPEs

PPEs are in the main consumable and as such they are dependent on the rate of use. The Department has a system for monitoring the Stock On Hand, which alerts the department to the areas of acute shortages. The department has budget which will be used whenever the PPE reach less than 70% at aby given time.

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2298

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What are the details of (a) the names of businesses that invested, (b) the value of each businesses investment, (c) the products produced by each business and (d) each business within the special economic zone (SEZ) that has closed/ceased operations within the Maluti-A-Phofung SEZ situated in Harrismith in the Free State since the date the SEZ was established to 31 July 2021? [

Reply:

The Maluti-A-Phofung SEZ (MAPSEZ) was designated in 2015; and subsequent to that, the SEZ License was issued in 2017 which formally designated MAPSEZ as a brownfield. The SEZ is managed by the Free-State Provincial Government. The department of trade, industry and competition’s role in this regard is to designate at the request of the province and to provide the financial support at the SEZ.

With all the new SEZ’s designated since 2020, the dtic is directly involved in the co-ownership and management of the zones. The new ownership model involves the national, province, and municipalities in the running of the SEZs.

Accordingly, the honourable member is encouraged to engage directly with the province and the SEZ Management to get more details about the project.

-END-

03 December 2021 - NW2392

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he will furnish Mr E M Buthelezi with the relevant details on how a crime syndicate was able to steal R100 million worth of oil and/or fuel on a monthly basis without detection; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a) and (b)

Investigations on the fuel oil crime syndicate are ongoing and at a critical stage therefore we are unable to offer any more information on the matter at this stage.

Eskom issues media statements to the public, and reports progress on investigations into cases of suspected fraud and corruption to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts, on a regular basis.

The media statement issued on 5 November 2021 on the fuel oil crime syndicate is attached.

03 December 2021 - NW2461

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What security contingency plans have been put in place by his department to help fight the recent spate of crimes which are occurring at various hospitals where patients and doctors are robbed at gunpoint of their valuables, including cellphones and jewellery?

Reply:

10 In 2018, Ministers of Health and of Police met to discuss safety and security challenges emanating from the incident where a Dr was shot at in Limpopo at Letaba Hospital. It was resolved that an inter departmental task team should be established comprising SAPS, PSIRA, DLE, SSA and all Provincial Security Managers to develop a safety and security strategy to address security challenges.

2. In this regard, a Task Team through National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NATJOINS) developed a plan with the following deliverables:

  • Development of security infrastructure norms and standards
  • Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) between SAPS and Department of Health
  • Deployment of Reservist at identified hot spot hospitals
  • Development of a Health Security Dispensation
  • Physical assessment of hot spot hospitals
  • Normalisation of hot spot hospitals and safety of EMS practitioners

Progress to date

The following table reflects progress to date

Deliverables

Progress

Development of security infrastructure norms and standards

Done: Infrastructure Unit Support Systems (IUSS) was developed and Gazetted. This is a document developed for health facilities and provides norms and standards, which include security services.

Memorandum of Agreement between SAPS and Department of Health

Done: MOA for collaboration was developed and signed by both the Director-General of Health and the National Commissioner of South African Police Services

Deployment of Reservist at identified hot spot hospitals

Work in progress: Costing for the development of police Reservists was done, waiting for provinces to request for deployment when required

Development of a Health Security Dispensation (in-sourcing of security)

Work in progress: Dependent on inputs from provincial in-sourcing strategy and/or hybrid model, which would then be consolidated into a nation strategy. These are still outstanding.

Physical assessment of hot spot hospitals

Done: Assessments were conducted at all hot spot hospitals and recommendations were submitted to relevant HoDs for implementation.

 

3. In addition to the establishment of the task team by both Ministers (Health and SAPS), NDoH has established a team to facilitate the implementation of safety and security strategy emanating from NATJOINTS comprising South African Medical Association (SAMA), Medical Women Association of South Africa (MWASA), Provincial Security Managers and Organised Labour.

4. The National Department of Health internal team came up with the following action plan:

  • Expand membership of the Forum to incorporate other key stakeholders.
  • The Forum will be the sub-committee to the Technical NHC
  • Provinces must submit their needs for intervention and indicate hotspots hospitals for deployment of Reservists, number and period for deploying the Reservists and lastly indicate if funding is available.
  • Health Care Workers and In-house Security Officers must be trained while Private Security should be retrained every six months.
  • Provinces to provide copies of their current Service Level Agreement (SLA) to NDoH which will help the Forum to develop a universal SLA.
  • The Forum will develop standardized security services specifications.
  • Provinces to conduct and provide capacity and competency database audits and submit to NDoH.
  • Provinces must report security breaches to NDoH promptly on a continuous basis.

5. CONCLUSION

Both NATJOINTS task team led by SAPS and internal stakeholder’s security committee are meeting on continuous basis with the view to ensure that all provinces implement the strategy.

 

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2297

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) What are the details of the appointment of Themba Mc Clain, (b) his pilot training and (c) his previous employers including dates of employment, positions held and reasons for leaving each employer; (2) what are the details of (a) any investigations into how the specified person obtained his pilot licence and (b) the findings and recommendations of any such investigations; (3) what are the details of the person’s employment at SA Airways (SAA) including (a) the date he was (i) employed as a pilot and (ii) appointed a captain and (b) his flight training at SAA; (4) What are the detailed reasons for appointing the person as the SAA Chief Pilot?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA

 

1. (a) Captain Themba McClain was appointed at SAA as a Captain on 1 June 1992. He held the position of Chief Standards Pilot during his career at SAA.

(b) During his employment with the airline he received and completed training required for the execution of his duties as a pilot, as required by all pilots. Captain McClain’s training as a Commander with SAA, commenced on 29 January 2007.

c) This information is of a confidential nature

2. (a) & (b) No investigations or findings thereof are known to SAA. The SACAA in their role as regulator approves all pilots license. It is Important to note that the Chief Pilot position is a regulated post holder in terms of CARS 121.06.2, and all incumbents acting for a period in excess of 30 days are approved by the CAA. Captain Themba acted as the Chief Pilot from 8 November 2016 until 31 December 2017. He was approved by the CAA on the 3 November 2016.

3. Please refer to responses in (1) and (2) above.

4. Capt. Themba McClain was offered the position of Chief Pilot at SAA, which he declined.

03 December 2021 - NW2355

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether he will furnish Ms R N Komane with a list of the consultants who were paid R24 million by his department in the 2020-21 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details. (2) what was each consultant appointed to do?

Reply:

The Department spent a total amount of R24 million on consultants as shown below:

Service Provider (1)

Service Rendered (2)

Amount

Matsei Technology

Development and implementation of the enterprise architecture

912 640,00

Tipp Focus holdings

On Demand IT Technical Services

169 883,77

R. Kalidass

Provision of co-sourced internal audit and forensic investigation services

291 121,35

Full Stream Business

Development of the ICT Security Strategy

819 057,41

21st Century

Conduct SOC Remuneration Survey

1 202 400,00

Vortex

Development of the Board Evaluation Framework

543 950,00

Government Technical Advisory Committee

Development of the Risk Management Framework

1 691 754,70

Seabury International

SAA Business Rescue

17 486 565,00

Basadzi Personnel

Recruitment and Selection

192 648,00

Quest Staffing Solutions

Recruitment and Selection

17 725,00

Gijima Holdings

Recruitment and Selection

16 882,00

Mogoma Research and Development

Recruitment and Selection

21 200,04

Audit and Risk Committee Members

Audit and Risk Committee meetings

676 356,58

Azile Resources

Impact Assessments of Corporate Social Investment Projects

145 600,00

Total

24 187 783,85

03 December 2021 - NW2491

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) How will the no-fault compensation fund be (i) distributed and (ii) administered by his department, (b) which is the principal entity reporting to him that will be responsible for the management of the fund, (c) what measures will he put in place to (i) ensure that the management of the fund is transparent and (ii) prevent the fund from falling prey to theft, fraud and corruption and (d) which official in his office will be legally responsible for the management of the fund?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii) Following extensive investigation and consultation between the National Department of Health (NDOH) and National Treasury to find a suitable model to distribute the funds, these two departments have resolved that the Fund will be administered within the NDOH. Treasury will transfer the appropriate allocation to the NDOH. The NDOH is in the process of establishing a unit that will administer the Fund, in consultation with Treasury and the Department for the Public Service and Administration (DPSA). The Director-General of Health as the Accounting Officer will oversee the governance and administration of the Fund.

b) See (1) above.

c) (i) and (ii) The prescripts of the PFMA will apply. Treasury and the Auditor General will also continue to exercise oversight over the Fund.

d) The Director-General of the National Department of Health.

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2292

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether, with reference to the decision by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa to increase the electricity tariff by 15,3%, he has found that this decision will enable Eskom to avoid loadshedding, destabilisation of the national grid and defaulting on its borrowing costs; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether Eskom’s position can change on renewal producers, in light of Eskom’s position that providing generation facilities to renewable projects, comes at a cost of coal miners, their communities and potentially the economy as a whole; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) with reference to Eskom announcing its unbundling process, will this affect the new build program?

Reply:

According to the information received from ESKOM

1. With respect, the two issues are not linked.

The increased tariff contributes to the revenue of Eskom and its financial performance. Eskom has managed to meet its debt commitments and not defaulted on its debt commitments. There are various factors that contribute to this including the equity support that Eskom has received from Government. The increase in the tariff will improve cash from operations and will assist in strengthening Eskom’s financial position.

The load shedding minimization and impact on the national grid is not related to the price increase. Various other issues, from a technical operational point, need to be considered in this regard.

2. Eskom will work together with the private sector and IPPs to rollout renewables. Our plans and strategies are not mutually exclusive. An important part of our strategy is to ensure we deal with the socio-economic impacts of transition from coal. We are working on repowering and repurposing options, as well as plans to drive localisation, in collaboration with other industry players. This is meant to spur economic growth and grow local manufacture and industrialisation.

3. The unbundling process will not affect the completion of the new build programme.

  • At Medupi, following the Commercial Operation (CO) of the last unit (Unit 1) on 31 July 2021, focus is now on completion of the remaining issues on the balance of plant (outside plant), including but not limited to the ash dump facility, ash silos, coal stockyards and building structures with their associated systems.
  • At Kusile, the three remaining units (Units 4, 5 and 6) are under construction, with the last unit (Unit 6) targeted for completion in May 2024.

03 December 2021 - NW2492

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the North West hospital near Lichtenberg, what (a) plans have been put in place by his department since 2017 to address the hospital’s (i) infrastructural problems and (ii) staff shortages, (b) are the costs of the plans to his department, (c) is the update on the progress regarding the implementation of the plans and (d) steps will he take to address the implementation of the plans?

Reply:

a) Plans to address the hospital’s

(i) Infrastructural problems

The Northwest Department of Health currently focus on statutory and day-to-day maintenance on health facilities in Lichtenburg. Statutory maintenance budget is ring-fenced to focus on Heating Ventilation Air-Conditioning and Cooling (HVAC) and maintenance of standby generators and boilers.

(ii) Staff Shortage

Due to funding constraints, the Department finds it difficult to fill vacant posts and continue to year-on-year overspend on compensation of employees. The Department continues to engage both Provincial and National Treasury in this regard.

b) Costs of the plans to the department

The estimated cost at present associated with the replacement of Lichtenburg Hospital amounts to R1.2 billion. This excludes costs associated with maintenance to maintain operability of the current facility and to where possible extend its life.

c) Update on the progress regarding the implementation of plans

The Maintenance plan, to do upkeep of the existing hospital, is an ongoing activity and funded for every financial year. The new Lichtenburg hospital will replace the old General de la Rey Hospital and the dilapidated Thusong Hospital which is too old for renovation at an estimated cost of R1,2 billion. The following tasks have been completed by the professional team since 2017:

  • Accommodation Schedule – The number of beds (wards) including the pharmacy, operating theatres, trauma unit, kitchen, laundry, mortuary, mechanical workshops etc. have been agreed to and signed off by the stakeholders. This forms part of the project brief.
  • Acquisition of land – The Ditsobotla Local Municipality has committed to making land available for the project (refer to attached letter from the municipality).
  • Environmental Impact Assessment – A record of approval from the relevant authorities have been received.
  • Traffic Impact Study – A preliminary study has been done.
  • Geotechnical Investigation – A preliminary soil investigation has been completed.
  • Land Survey – A topographical survey of the project site has been completed.
  • Hospital layout and designs – A layout of the hospital and the detailed designs are expected to be finalized by the department in 2022/23 financial year

d) What steps will he take to address implementation of the plans.

There is an emphasis on strategic alignment of the project in the Infrastructure Unit of the National Department of Health and the appraisal and prioritization of this capital project undertaken has received quite a bit of attention over the past years. A concerted effort in alignment is thus underway for this project to ensure full compliance to the National Treasury Capital Planning guidelines.

The National Department of Health via the Direct-Health Facility Revitalisation Grant will continue monitoring the progress of implementing plans associated with this new hospital.

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2127

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether a certain person is currently employed in any state-owned enterprise; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified person employed and (b) what is the person's current (i) position and (ii) annual salary package?

Reply:

According to the information received from ALEXKOR

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

According to the information received from DENEL

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

According to the information received from ESKOM

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

According to the information received from SAFCOL

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

According to the information received from SAA

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

According to the information received from TRANSNET

  1. Not Applicable
  2. (i), (ii) Not Applicable

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi Pravin Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

03 December 2021 - NW2404

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether there has been any process initiated to sell off Denel Pretoria Metal Pressings, popularly known as PMP; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details with regard to the (a) tender processes followed and (b) companies that tendered for the sale of the state-owned entity?

Reply:

According to the Information Received from Denel

Denel SOC has no intention to sell off Denel Pretoria Metal Pressings. This part of business remains strategic to both Denel and THE Department of Defence. The development and manufacturing of small and medium caliber munitions are core to Denel’s business model of Denel. However, the SOC overall structure and business model required for sustainability is under review.

03 December 2021 - NW2291

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether, with reference to a certain Scarlet Skye Investment, he will advise if an (a) application for a licence was made for (i) another company and/or (ii) new contractors to deal with diamonds and (b) independent valuator was appointed at the time; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, (aa) what was the name of the valuator and (bb) for what period of time was the person appointed; (2) whether he will (a) furnish Mrs M O Clarke with a list of diamond purchases from a certain company from 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) advise if the diamond law was enforced around the specified purchases; if not, why not in each case; if so, in terms of the law, will he furnish Mrs O Clarke with a list of purchases, broker notes and invoices for the past five years as prescribed within the law?

Reply:

According to the information received from ALEXKOR

1. (a) Scarlet Skye Investment (SSI) does not possess a diamond marketing licence instead a licence belonging to the company Daniel Nathan Trading (now called) Alexander Bay Diamonds) was used. Daniel Nathan is the director of SSI.

(b) The valuator was appointed by SSI. Alexkor does not have the records of the

valuators details.

(c) Alexkor SOC obtained a diamond marketing licence in May 2020. Alexkor SOC has since assumed the function on behalf of the Alexkor RMC PSJV.

2. (a) The brokers notes are provided to individual companies who have a contract with Alexkor and PSJV. These are subject to confidentiality, Alexkor is unable to provide these without consent from the Alexkor RMC PSJV and contractors.

(b) The fact that SSI did not have the licence, Daniel Nathan Diamonds was used which made the selling of diamonds legal. As for Brokers Notes and Invoices, these are private and confidential information Alexkor SOC is unable to provide

these without consent from the Alexkor RMC PSJV and contractors.

 

The DPE will attempt to obtain the necessary consent for disclosure.

03 December 2021 - NW2323

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to his reply to question 2014 on 10 September 2021, (a) what are the full details of the case of fraud, (b) who was involved and (c) on what date were criminal charges instituted? [

Reply:

The CEO of the NRCS, Mr Mamaditse, has provided the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) with the following information.

a) “Full Details of the Fraud Case:

There was fraud committed amounting to R4 501,488.21. The employee processed fraudulent refunds. The NRCS receive funds from clients for services rendered or levies. In some instances, the clients fail to indicate or include the correct reference number. These funds are treated as unallocated until they are traced and allocated to the correct client account. The employee allocated some of these funds to third parties with the intention to refund them to these fraudulent clients that were not the respective depositors of the funds. The wrongly allocated funds were subsequently refunded to third parties that were not the depositors of the said funds, thereby defrauding the NRCS.

Disciplinary Against the Implicated Employee:

The NRCS has initiated a disciplinary action against the implicated employee and the disciplinary process is still in progress. The disciplinary process against the employee commenced on the 15th of March 2021. Subsequently thereto the NRCS appointed Initiator of the disciplinary process passed on due to COVID 19 and another Initiator has now been appointed. The matter sat again on 14th of September 2021 and employee representative fell ill during the proceedings and matter was postponed to and proceeded on the 14th and 15th October 2021. Matter was further adjourned to the 18th and 19th of November 2021.

b) Who was involved?

Position: Accounts Receivable Manager

Employee Name:

c) A criminal case was opened on the 25th of March 2021 at Sunnyside Police Station and was transferred to the Commercial Crimes Unit on the 12th of April 2021. The respective case number is: CAS 685/3/2021.”

-END-

03 December 2021 - NW2451

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the current number of vacancies at the Pelonomi Private Hospital in Bloemfontein, Free State, with regard to (a) nurses, (b) doctors, (c) cleaners, (d) maintenance officials, (e) administrative officials and (f) management personnel; (2) for what period has each of the specified vacancies not been filled; (3) what are the reasons that the specified vacancies have not been filled by his department; (4) whether corrective measures are being implemented by his department to ensure that the specified hospital operates with full personnel components; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The number of vacancies at the Pelonomi Hospital in Bloemfontein, Free State, as drawn from the Persal System and confirmed by the province are as follows (a) Nurses – 113, (b) Doctor – 22, (c) Cleaners – 33, (d) Maintenance officials – 5, Administrative Officials – 4 and (f) Management Personnel – 21.

2. These posts were vacated between the periods September 2009 to May 2021.

3. Due to financial constraints in the Free State Province, the priority of filling vacant posts is given to clinical posts. The Department does that to avoid unauthorised expenditure on Compensation of Employees (COE) within the budgetary allocation (VOTE), in accordance with Treasury Regulation 8.3 read with the PFMA section 76(4)(b) and Treasury Regulation 9 read with PFMA sections 38(1)g and 76(2)(e).” The Department is also busy with a process of reviewing the Organizational Structures of Hospitals including Pelonomi and the process is already at an advanced stage. It is anticipated that some of these posts might become redundant.

4. In order to ensure that the Hospital services are not compromised, as a temporary control measure, the Department has appointed a committee that focus in identify posts that are critical for filling. Based on the recommendation of the said Committee, those posts are urgently filled on a contract basis as when the need arise (i.e. While the Organizational Structural review is underway). The department also makes provision for approved overtime as one of the measures in ensuring that service delivery is not compromised.

5. The department will make a statement on the matter once the process of the Organizational Structure review is completed, defined in line with the service delivery requirements.

END.

03 December 2021 - NW2487

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the 2021 report on mortality and causes of death by Statistics South Africa that records diabetes as the second deadliest disease in the Republic, the killer disease more people than HIV/Aids, hypertension and other forms of heart diseases combined, the major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation, as well as the highest risk factor for COVID-19 patients, what are the full relevant details of the plans that his department has put in place in order to promote (a) awareness of the dangers of diabetes and (b) access to proper health care in the Republic?

Reply:

a) The Department has put the following interventions in order to promote awareness on the dangers of diabetes:

  1. The department has developed Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials on the signs and symptoms of diabetes, prevention measures and identification of risk factors. These materials have been shared with all provinces and are available in all the clinics. The materials are also used by the Community Health Workers as well as Health Promoters as part of the wider reach to the public. This is done as part of the routine services at all platforms, including during the commemoration of Health Events and at community campaigns. The target groups for these messages include vulnerable persons such as the youth, older persons, and persons with disabilities.
  2. The Department has developed material which is used by nurses to educate patients and promote health and wellness when patients attend routine health visits.

b) Interventions which demonstrate how access to proper care for patients with diabetes is created, among others include:

1. Additional to the interventions listed above, he department is also conducting screening for chronic diseases including for diabetes at health facilities as part of the routine services in all our clinics, at mobile health facilities and is offered at the general Health Counselling and Testing Campaigns during all public events.

2. The department has further developed policies, strategies and guidelines including Primary Care Adult, Standard Treatment Guidelines and Essential Medicine List on the prevention, and treatment of diabetes including on preventing complications.

3. The Department promotes that diabetes risks and care are integrated in the policies, strategies, and guidelines of other health programs to address amongst others: gestational diabetes and diabetes among TB patients. The integrated approach for diabetic patients with co-, and multi- morbidities is implemented through the Ideal Clinic service delivery platform.

4. The department also introduced the Centralised Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distributing mechanism which ensures that the medicines are available and reach the eligible diabetic patients at points where they live and work.

5. There has been training of health care workers at all levels to enhance knowledge of diabetes and risk factors as well as to improve competencies when treating patients.

6. The department has also strengthened home and community-based care and support of patients with diabetes by community health workers.

END.

02 December 2021 - NW2420

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

How will his department monitor the strict adherence to Part B of the new Z83 form introduced in 2021 by (a) line managers and (b) human resources departments in the recruitment process?

Reply:

(a)&(b) The Minister of Public Service and Administration is responsible for the setting of norms and standards in terms of Section 3 of the Public Service Act, 1994. The Z83 is an instrument gazetted for such norms and recruiting. It is thus the relevant Executive Authorities responsibility to ensure that norms and standards are upheld. This was applicable to the previous version of the Z83 as well. Human Resource processes are subject to audit processes. DPSA has issued various circulars on the strict application of the Z83 to departments as part of advocacy.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2336

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What were if e reasons that certain persons (names and details furnished) are accommodated in a hotel while an official residence is reserved for this purpose, (b) on what date were the specified persons accommodated in the specified hotel, (c) what is the total cost to date and (d) for how long will the status quo remain?

Reply:

The Provincial Commissioner of the South African Police Service, in KwaZulu-Natal, was making use of interim accommodation, because the official reserved residential accommodation was not available at the time when he arrived in the Province. The reasons are as follows:

The official residence needed minor repairs, as well as the installation/upgrade of security features. These minor repairs were not regarded as an emergency and the normal procurement process had to be followed. Some of the suppliers had challenges in obtaining the material. which was required to execute the task.
The major challenge, which prevented the Provincial Commissioner from occupying the official residence, was the alleged dispute over ownership of the property and the change of ownership of the electricity account.

lt was found that the official residence was allegedly fraudulently sold to a third party and the victim of this fraud had tried to change the ownership of the property into his name. He was not successful, however, he had successfully changed the electricity account details into his name, at the municipal offices.

The alleged fraudster owed the municipality a substantial amount of money since the change-over of this account. The municipality refused to reverse this account and insisted on all outstanding payments being settled before a new account could be opened. A fraud case was opened, at the Durban North Police Station and the case number, is CAS 165/05/2021

(a). The Provincial Commissioner made use of interim accommodation, from 1 April 2021 to 31 August 2021.

(b). The total cost for the interim accommodation, amounted to R175 000,00.

(c) The Provincial Commissioner has moved and is now occupying the official residence.

Reply to question 2336 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-11-17

Reply to question 2336 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021-12-02

02 December 2021 - NW2471

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Police

Whether there are any plans in place to build a satellite police station in Greater Taung, at Magogong and Molelema, as was promised in 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2890E

Reply:

No, there are no plans to build a satellite police station at Greater Taung, at Magogong and Molelema.

There is currently at satellite station at Kokomeng which is currently under repair and renovation after being vandalised by the community. Magogong Contact point was at the tribal office but was closed down due to resource shortages at the Station.

The accessibility to Taung and Kokomeng Police Station is as follows:

Within a 4 km radius 35.24%
Within a 8 km radius 25.44%
Within a 16 km radius 27.59%
Within a 24 km radius 8.7%

The community had no requests for any additional service points including Molelema.

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
FN VUMA
Date: 2021-11-24

Reply to question 2471 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2021-11-23

Reply to question 2471 approved

GENERAL BH CELE, MP
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 2021-12-02

02 December 2021 - NW2447

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether foreign nationals from all countries will be allowed to submit new South African permanent residency permit applications through Visa Facilitation Services Global from 1 January 2022; if not, which foreign nationalities will be excluded?

Reply:

Submission of new South African permanent residency permit applications through Visa Facilitation Services Global will be opened for all foreign nationals who qualifies to apply for permanent residence on any of the categories of permanent residence. No foreign nationalities will be excluded.

END

02 December 2021 - NW2377

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he is considering to take in new police recruits IO boost the capacity of the SA Police Service in order to fight crime; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) by what date will he be enrolling new recruits and (b) what number of new recruits does he intend to enrol? NW2749E

Reply:

Yes. The SAPS Compensation budget has been significantly reduced over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), which resulted in the SAPS Fixed Establishment (headcount) being hugely reduced over this period. To ensure that the compensation budget is not exceeded, very minimal enrolment of new Police recruits will take place over the MTEF.

  1. The intake is planned for 23 January 2022; and
  2. It is envisaged to enroll 3000 new Police recruits.

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
L NTSHIEA
Date: 2021-11-18

Reply to question 2377 recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: SUPPORT SERVICE
FN VUMA
Date: 2021-11-23

REPLY RO QUESTION 2377 approved

GENERAL BH CELE, MP
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 2021-12-02

02 December 2021 - NW2472

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Police

Whether there are any plans that have been put in place in order to build a new police station in Taung as was promised more than 10 years ago; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) felevant details and (b) reasons that nothing has happened to date’? NW2891E

Reply:

Yes, there are plans to build a new Police Station in Taung. Construction of Taung Police Station is priority number 1 for the MTEF 2024-2028.

Taung Police Station is priority no 1 for the MTEF 2024-2028 the reasons why nothing has been done is due to the fact that attention was given to priorities 1- 5 for MTEF 2020-2024 which are as follows:

lkageng Police Station

Mothutling Police Station

Letlhabile Police Station

Makapanstadt Police Station

ltsoseng Police Station

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT
J RIET
Date: 2021-11-24

Reply to question 2472 recommended

LIEUTENANT DEPUTY GENERAL DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: SUPPORT SERVICE
FN VUMA
Date

Reply to question 2472 recommended

GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)

Reply to question approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 02-12-2021

02 December 2021 - NW2460

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Police

What steps has his department taken in cases where SA Police Service employees have been found to be dishonest regarding their qualifications to get posts? NW2878E

Reply:

The promotion and appointment of employees of the SA Police Service to advertised posts are, inter alia, regulated by National Instructions. These National Instructions make provision for the withdrawal of a promotion or appointment in the instance where an employee was dishonest in his or her application for a post. to instances where employees were dishonest in their applications, processes to withdraw such promotions or appointments are instituted. Further action in terms of the South African police Service Disciplinary Regulations, 2016 may also be considered, and in the stance where qualifications are forged, criminal charges may be instituted.

i

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

DIVISIONAL COMMISSIONER: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

TSHIEA
Date: 2021-11-24

Reply to question 2460 recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL ACTING NATIONAL COMI¥IISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE FN VUMA
Date: 2021-11-24

Reply to question 2460 approved

MINISTER OF POLICE
GENERAL BH CELE, MP
Date: 2021-12-02

02 December 2021 - NW2322

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) is the current breakdown of the availability of rape kits at each office of the SA Police Service in (i) the Western Cape, (ii) Gauteng, (iii) KwaZulu-Nata1 and (iv) Eastern Cape and (b) measures are taken to address shortages of rape kits at police stations?

Reply:

Introduction

The term “rape kits" is used in the public domain, to refer to the collection kits, which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape. However, the South African Police Service (SAPS), makes use of 16 different types of crime kits to collect various samples at crime scenes, These include the two types of evidence collection kits, namely; the Adult Sexual Assault Collection Kit (D1) and the Paediatric Sexual Assault Collection Kit {D7), which are used to collect evidence from victims of sexual assault and rape. The Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Reference Buccal Sample Kits (DB), are used to take buccal simples from persons, who are arrested and charged, for schedule eight offences (this includes serial murderers and serial rapists) as required by the DNA Act.

(a)(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) The breakdown of the availability of rape kits, as at 4 November 2021, at each office of the South African Police Service (SAPS), in the Western Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape, is reflected in the tables below:

  1. Western Cape

Police Station

D1: Kit Collection, Adult, Sexual Assault

D7: Kit Collection, Paediatric, Sexual Assault

Albertinia

25

10

Ashton

27

38

Athlone

20

20

Atlantis

64

55

Find here: Table

02 December 2021 - NW2325

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How are the various government departments (a) measuring and (b) monitoring employee performance with some Public Service employees working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) (a) whether her department has developed a remote working policy for government departments given that some Public Service employees are working from home; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date was the specified policy developed; (3) Whether the remote working policy has been fully implemented and/or rolled out in all government departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) All employees are required to sign performance agreements outlining the outputs, indicators and activities that they must deliver on during a particular period. This requirement still applies even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

1 (b) Remote working requires supervisors to agree on work to be completed by employees and regular monitoring to be done in order to ensure that employees are on track in meeting the agreed upon targets. The Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) requires that the performance of employees must be monitored on a continuous basis, with oral feedback on an employee’s performance if the performance is fully effective and meeting the requirements, and in writing if the employee’s performance is unsatisfactory. Conducting mid-year performance reviews and annual performance assessments are compulsory, which is a formal process and in writing.

2. The Remote Working Policy Framework for the Public Service has been developed and is being consulted on with stakeholders including Organised Labour who are parties to the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) and it will be approved once consultations are completed.

3. The Remote Working Policy Framework for the Public Service is at a consultation stage, having been placed on the agenda of the PSCBC meeting of the 6th December 2021 for consultations with organised labour.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2324

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the (a) breakdown of the total number of Public Service employees currently reported to be working from home for each (i) national and (ii) provincial government department and (b) total number of (i) national and (ii) provincial departments which have implemented a hybrid system or model for work; (2) What are the relevant details of how government departments are implementing the hybrid system or model of work?

Reply:

1. The required information is not centralised and readily available as each department keeps its own register and records. Individual Departments must be approached for detailed information.

2. The DPSA issues circulars following Cabinet and National Corona Virus Command Council (NCCC) resolutions as announced by the President on the state of COVID-19 Risk Adjusted Disaster Alert Levels. These circulars are meant to guide Heads of Departments on the decongestion of workplaces by keeping the minimum numbers of employees physically on-site in order to be within safety protocols in line with Department of Health Guidelines and the Occupational Health and Safety Directions from the Department of Employment and Labour. This is achieved through rotational and remote working arrangements. Although employees work off site on certain days, they are still expected to discharge their responsibilities as if they are in the offices.

The percentage of the occupancy rate at the workplace on any particular workday is determined by the alert level at that particular time and the specific operational needs and realities of the relevant organisation.

End