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28 October 2022 - NW3676

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

In light of the fact that the Development Bank of South Africa (DBSA) has been at the helm as the implementing agency for the Telkom Towers project since 2015, and to date the project has not been completed despite numerous promises to do so, what are the reasons that the DBSA is still retained as an implementing agency despite the fact that the Portfolio Committee on Public Works and Infrastructure does not have jurisdiction over DBSA but the Independent Development Trust which is an entity within her department and has a responsibility to provide infrastructure according to its mandate?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Background

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (“DPWI”) was informed by the Telkom Retirement Fund (“TRF”) itself on 07th March 2015 that the subject property was still on the market, which led to the Department investigating the viability of the property and an eventual acquisition in 2015 for use as government accommodation.

The Telkom Towers Complex comprised of 10 buildings that measure 221,954m² with a gross lettable office accommodation area of 115,480m². There are 2234 parking bays totalling 60,624m². However, the PPS building which, until today, remains a National Key Point Building would not be available to a new owner as Telkom required to lease this building indefinitely.

The migration plan from SAPS into Telkom towers was delayed since December 2015.

Response

In order to respond to the immediate upgrade requirements for the Telkom Towers North Building and Annex buildings, a project was commenced through the Development Bank of Southern Africa (“DBSA”) as Implementing Agent to DPWI, in accordance with the SAPS migration plan. The site was handed over to the contractor on the 24th June 2019 and practical completion was obtained on 31st August 2021. The DBSA has not been an implementing agent for Telkom Towers since 2015, as they were only engaged to complete two buildings out of the entire complex.

The DBSA is a government owned entity and development finance institution under the National Treasury. The Independent Development Trust (“IDT”) is also a government owned entity under the DPWI. On or about 22 June 2022 the National Treasury approved the inclusion of IDT as an Implementing Agent for the DPWI. The DPWI and IDT are currently finalising the Memorandum of Agreement for collaboration and cooperation as an Implementing Agent on DPWI’s infrastructure portfolio.

28 October 2022 - NW3616

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a copy of the 2021-22 annual report for the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) what is the (a) total budget for the specified programme, (b) breakdown of all costs and (c) total amount that has been spent in the past five years?

Reply:

The National Department is consulting with the Provincial Departments of Health to get the full details and figures on this question. The response will be ready in a week or two and will be furnished to the Honourable Member as soon as it is ready.

END.

28 October 2022 - NW3710

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of (a) hospitals and (b) clinics have contacted (i) Eskom and (ii) the National Energy Regulator of South Africa in order to ask for loadshedding exemption in (aa) emergency situations and (bb) during general loadshedding nationally and provincially; (2) what number of (a) hospitals and (b) clinics have been granted loadshedding exemption in (i) emergency situations and (ii) during general loadshedding nationally and provincially?

Reply:

(1)-(2) The National Department of Health has identified a priority list of health facilities that requires an urgent exemption either from Eskom or local municipalities. The Department has provided Eskom with a total of 212 priority hospitals across the country to be considered for possible exclusion from loadshedding on a phased approach, and 67% of them are supplied directly by municipalities, while Eskom supplies the remaining 33%. The current number of hospitals excluded from loadshedding across the country, has increased from 37 to 72 since the last public announcement by Minister of Health Dr Joe Phaahla in September, while more efforts are being made to implement exemption of health facilities in all the provinces as a matter of urgency in line with the commitment made to ensure that no province is left behind. The updated list of exempted facilities per provinces is as follows: Eastern Cape (7), Free State (14), Gauteng (17), KZN (15), Limpopo (10), Mpumalanga (4), Western Cape (4) Northern Cape (1), and North West (0).

The preliminary network analysis conducted revealed that, 28 hospitals in various provinces can be excluded from loadshedding by building new infrastructure at the estimated cost of R100 million. However, the team is investigating possible load curtailment for bigger hospitals as well as other alternative solutions.

 

END.

28 October 2022 - NW3389

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has received any correspondence from attorneys in Potchefstroom regarding the inadequate maintenance of infrastructure at the Magistrate’s Court building in Potchefstroom; if so, what steps were taken by his department to address the specified challenges; (2) Whether he was informed of the collapse of the roof of the Magistrate’s Court building; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the cost of the damage to the building and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that court proceedings continue to prevent a backlog of cases as a result; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department has received correspondence regarding maintenance of infrastructure at Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court. On 27 February 2020, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) handed over the site to the contractor in order to carry out planned maintenance to the entire building of the Magistrate’s Court but the project was disrupted due to COVID-19 lockdown regulations. However, as soon as the restrictions were lifted and the contractor came back on site, the local business forum intimidated the workers, and added to the delay. The contractor returned on site from 1 August 2022.

2. I have been informed about the collapse of the roof at the Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court.

a) The DPWI provided a report, titled “Preliminary Investigation Report: Current Condition of the Roof Covering and Safety of the Building”, dated 21 September 2022. Thereafter, a full investigation report on the current condition of all wooden roof trusses will be provided. Once the survey is completed, the Department is expecting to receive the cost estimates of the damages from the DPWI.

b) A contingency plan was compiled together with all the stakeholders at the magistrates’ court as follows:

  1. Potchefstroom Magistrate engaged JB Marks Municipality to assist in identifying alternative accommodation. The Municipality made the Town Hall and the Traffic Court available for use by the Department.
  2. The District Courts B and E were accommodated at the Town Hall for all cases where the accused persons are out on bail or warning.
  3. The Regional Court is accommodated at the Traffic Court for all cases where the accused persons are on bail or warning.
  4. All Regional Court matters, where the accused persons are in custody including sexual offences related matters, are heard at the Regional Court.
  5. All the cases, whereby the accused persons are in custody including first appearance matters and bail applications, are dealt with at the only available court room, Regional Court 3.
  6. The Children’s Court matters are dealt with at the boardroom of the Head of Court.
  7. The rest of the Family Court matters (Domestic Violence and Protection from Harassment) including District Civil Court matters are dealt with at the dedicated Children’s Court.
  8. The quasi-judicial functions (Small claims, Maintenance applications, Clerk of the Civil Court, Cash Hall, Offices for the Magistrates Regional and District and Public Prosecutors) are accommodated at the additional office space made available on the 1st floor.
  9. Transport is made available to transport members of public, accused persons on bail/warning and witness to the respective alternative accommodation.
  10. To ensure effective implementation of the contingency plan, 08:00 morning meetings are held with all the JCPS stakeholders to discuss the circumstances prevailing on a daily basis.

3. On 20 September 2022, the Department issued a media statement, titled: “Potchefstroom Magistrates’ Office temporarily evacuated after roof collapse”.

28 October 2022 - NW3600

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department is responsible for the construction of the site establishment project taking place at the SA National Defence Force College of Intelligence in Waterkloof; if not, who is responsible for the construction of the project; if so, what are the relevant details in respect of the (a) main contractor, (b) number of persons employed who are (i) South African citizens and (ii) foreign nationals, (c) (i) professional quantity surveyor and (ii) project manager and (d) small, medium and micro enterprises appointed in respect of the 30% allocation for sub-contractors?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

I have been informed that the project is being implemented by the Department of Defence and not the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure.

Therefore, (a), (b) (i) & (ii), (c) (i) & (ii) and (d), Fall away.

28 October 2022 - NW3596

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Police

What is the progress in relation to case number CAS 753/08/20 opened at Sunnyside Police Station against 242 public servants who benefited from the R350 Social Relief of Distress grant?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

28 October 2022 - NW3688

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Which steps of intervention has he taken regarding the crisis at the Steve Biko Academic Hospital in Pretoria, where surgeries have been halted due to two broken air conditioners?

Reply:

Based on the recent feedback from Steve Biko Academic Hospital, a service provider was appointed at the beginning of October 2022 for the servicing of the chillers including air conditioners. The hospital has 5 out 6 chillers currently running at optimal levels. The two broken air conditioners has been fixed and the temperatures are now perfect in their theatres. And they are being monitored on a daily basis by the recently appointed service provider.

END.

28 October 2022 - NW3445

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will the training of senior managers in the (a) Kagisano Molopo, (b) Ditsobotla, (c) Lekwa-teemane, (d) Mamusa and (e) Greater Taung Local Municipalities that are in the (i) Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality and (ii) Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality be completed by her department in order to capacitate municipal managers, senior managers and asset managers?

Reply:

The question by Honourable Member does not indicate what kind or type of training referred to in the above question. It is recommeded that the member be specific on what type of training is referring to in order for the department to respond accordingly.

28 October 2022 - NW2598

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

On what basis, understanding, research, historical first nation and/or indigenous history did her department rely when it decided that only five Khoisan groups be identified and recognised in the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, Act 3 of 2019?

Reply:

 

Government engaged in a consultation process to recognise the 5 groupings of Khoi-San namely the Griqua, Koranna, Nama, San and Cape-Khoi as per the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, 2019 (Act No. 3 of 2019).

Should there be any evidence submitted to government of the existence of an additional Khoi-San main grouping other than the Cape-Khoi, Griqua, Koranna, Nama or San, government will consider amending the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act to include that main grouping.

28 October 2022 - NW3013

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Dr N V Khumalo with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) regularly provides documents for public and stakeholder comment as feedback can assist to strengthen policy documents.

Section 195(1)(e) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), prescribes that Public administration must be governed by the democratic values and principles enshrined in the Constitution, including the principle that the people’s needs must be responded to, and the public must be encouraged to participate in policy-making.

Copies of the dtic Policy documents are available on the Department website: www.thedtic.gov.za.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3444

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the failure of the Municipal Managers from (a) Mamusa Local Municipality and (b) Maquassi Hills Local Municipality, what outcomes does her department intend for the section 139(7) constitutional intervention to yield in the North West?

Reply:

The Maquassi Hills and Mamusa Local Municipalities are currently not under intervention in terms of Section 139 (7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa.

  

28 October 2022 - NW3331

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Given that he has been in office for more than a year, what number of formal businesses and start-up companies, whose primary business operandi involve technologies related to mobile connectivity, artificial intelligence, big data analytics, machine-to-machine communication and the internet of things which make use of machines to optimise efficient manufacturing and the production of goods in the small, medium and micro enterprises sector have been registered in the past two financial years?

Reply:

The Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) informs me that it uses standard industrial classification codes (SIC) that does not include the level of detail set out in the question. For example, if a company’s business is in the computer industry, it will be classified as Information and Communication Technology and will not be specific as to whether that entails Artificial Intelligence or Robotics etc. The Companies Act, 2008 (Act No. 71 of 2008), did away with the concept of primary business being contained in a Companies Memorandum of Incorporation and made same general.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW2772

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will use the (a) findings and (b) recommendations of the report of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State to investigate if her department and/or the entities reporting to her contributed towards state capture; if not, why not; if so, (a) which part of the report is relevant to her department and (b) on what date will the investigation start?

Reply:

(a) and (b) No, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) will not use the Report on the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegation of State Capture to investigate whether the Departments and/or Entities reporting to her contributed towards state capture.

(a) On reading the various reports, there is an indication that there are no parts of the report that are relevant to the Departments and Entities reporting to the Minister of COGTA. Although, there are certain issues affecting a municipality that were highlighted in the report, there are no specific findings and/or recommendations in relation to the affected municipality. Officials from the Department have collaborated with officials from the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) to assess all the recommendations emanating from the various reports of the Commission. Should this broader assessment in collaboration with the DPME identify matters that require my attention, I will ensure that the necessary steps are taken, especially where legislative or institutional changes would be required and prepare motivated implementation plans, indicating how each recommendation ought to be addressed.

(b) Not applicable.

 

28 October 2022 - NW2949

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total amount was allocated to the Commission for Khoi-San Matters in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years and (b) is the breakdown of expenditure on (i) traveling, (ii) accommodation and (iii) administration for the public meetings for each visit to each province?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii)

The total amount that was allocated to the Commission for Khoi-San Matters (i) during the 2021-22 financial year was R6,320,135,18 and in the 2022-23 financial year R9,781,111.00

The following table indicates the (b) Breakdown of expenditure on (i) traveling, (ii) accommodation and (iii) administration for the public meetings per province as at the beginning of October 2022:

Spending Item

2022/23 FY

2021/22 FY

Traveling (Summary)

R307,790.17

R94,878.90

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R55,590.94

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R15,762.19

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R25,270.66

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R23,595.00

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R22,401.49

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R34,163.76

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R43,928.72

R94,878.90

Accommodation (Summary)

R185,760.00

R18,500.00

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R10,080.00

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R25,920.00

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R28,800.00

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R31,680.00

R18,500.00

Administrative costs (Summary)

R 66,529.19

R12,402.35

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R12,323.12

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R10,001.66

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R12,158.85

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R3,258.97

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R2,382.82

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R10,771.86

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R3,565.89

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R12,066.02

R12,402.35

28 October 2022 - NW3565

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, considering that construction waste has been identified as one of the core problems in the construction industry across the world and in the Republic between five and eight million tons of construction waste are generated annually, as up to 30% of the material delivered to a construction site ends up as waste, and noting that neither national nor municipal legislation and/or regulations require contractors to have a waste management plan, as only a small fraction of the waste is reused or recycled, with the result that a large amount of waste is disposed of in landfills, which are rapidly reaching capacity in many places, her department intends to develop and enforce legislation and/or regulations around the issue of waste management; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

REPLY:

  • I have been informed by the Department that the Public Works Green Building Policy as approved and signed on the 31st of May 2018, in section 10.4, paragraph 3 states that DPWI will develop guidelines and minimum standards for the management and recycling of construction waste. These guidelines and minimum standards are incorporated into the relevant specifications for the construction works of DPWI throughout the procurement process.
  • Recoverable waste shall be dealt with before disposal to sites. The Department, through the Indigenous Knowledge Systems is planning to roll-out rammed earth techniques in utilising crushed and compacted construction waste including earthworks waste. The excess material shall be disposed of, spread, and roughly levelled where permitted on-site.
  • Within the DPWI’s procurement processes, credits shall be awarded to contractors who adhere to alternative and innovative greening ideas during construction including disposal of construction waste.
  • The Public Works Green Building policy, in terms of green procurement, stipulates that the DPWI will adopt the Green Building Public Procurement Policy where all contractors and/or sub-contractors are mandated to provide detailed Waste Management Plans in accordance to the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) as regulated by the National Environment Management Act 107 of 1998 and the Public Works Green Building Policy.
  • Furthermore, the Green Building National Framework, states that the Certification of green contractors and products will be adapted in the construction sector to ensure recognition as credited green building practitioners, contractors, or suppliers, hence this initiative will benefit the sector through materials that will not be disposed of, to the landfill sites and repurposed for other uses. It will also ensure confidence in the contractor’s ability and knowledge of disposing of construction waste.
  • In addition, the Construction Industry Development Board (cidb) is planning to develop a best practice or standard related to optimising the reuse of waste from construction. This will include the requirement for waste management plans.
  • In line with interdepartmental cooperation, DPWI provided an input to the Operation Phakisa work stream championed by the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) regarding plans around the management of construction waste. The management of construction waste is expected to provide job creation and entrepreneurial opportunities.

28 October 2022 - NW3183

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs  QUESTION

On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) Whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable WF Faber is vague. It would assist the response if the Honourable Faber were to indicate the specific structures and/or fora external to Government to which he refers.

28 October 2022 - NW2451

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Finance

Given that the fuel price per litre is R24,17, and that the State is absorbing some of the levies for an extended two months, what effective long-term plans are in place to ensure that citizens are not exposed to such high tariffs; (2) what assurance do we have that the levy system, especially for the embattled Road Accident Fund, is still effective; (3) what projects, in detail, have been funded by the levy system in place?

Reply:

1. In March 2022, government responded to the escalating fuel prices by implementing a package of short-term measures comprising temporary fuel levy relief, release of strategic stocks and structural adjustments to fuel prices to assist consumers and vulnerable households. A temporary reduction in the general fuel levy of R1.50 per litre was implemented from 6 April 2022 until 31 May 2022 to provide limited short-term relief to households from rising fuel prices following the Russia/Ukraine conflict. The revenue foregone of R6 billion will be recouped through the sale of a portion of the strategic crude oil reserves held by the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) and will not have an impact on the fiscal framework.

Government extended the temporary fuel levy relief for a two-month period consisting of a continuation of the relief of R1.50 per litre for the first month, from 1 June 2022 to 6 July 2022, and a reduction in the relief for the second month to 75c per litre of fuel from 7 July 2022 to 2 August 2022. This temporary relief was withdrawn from 3 August 2022 and the revenue foregone from the extension of the relief is estimated at R4 billion. Unlike the previous announcement, this is expected to have an impact on the fiscal framework as it will not be funded through a sale of strategic oil stocks. The extension of the fuel levy relief will be accommodated in the current fiscal framework in a manner that is consistent with the fiscal strategy outlined in the Budget and to be dealt with in the October 2022 MTBPS.

Government remains committed to the fiscal framework outlined in the 2022 Budget and any further relief should be done in a fiscally neutral manner or it would undermine government’s efforts at consolidation. Due to the tight fiscal position, there is limited space to fund additional tax relief.

As announced in May 2022, the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) has also taken further measures to help reduce fuel prices in a more sustainable manner. The DMRE removed the demand side management levy of 10c per litre applied to 95 unleaded petrol sold inland effective from 1 June 2022. After a review and consultation by the DMRE, it is proposed that the basic fuel price is also decreased by 3c per litre in the coming months.

Government intends to continue with consultations and proposals to remove the price cap on 93 ULP, which will partially deregulate the market and introduce more competition to lower pump prices. A review on the Regulatory Accounting System (which includes the retail margin, wholesale margin and secondary storage and distribution margins) will be completed by the DMRE to assess the potential to lower margins over the medium term.

Government continues to monitor the impact off the Russia/Ukraine conflict and zero-COVID policies in some countries, which continue to have an impact on energy and food prices and result in supply chain shocks, with the aim of investigating further measures to make households and businesses less vulnerable to such shocks.

2. Section 5(1)(a) of the Road Accident Fund Act (1996) stipulates that Road Accident Fund (RAF) is funded by means of Road Accident Fund levy, as contemplated Customs and Excise Act (1964). The funds collected, subject to any deductions in the Customs and Exercise Act, is a direct charge against the National Revenue Fund, for the credit of the RAF. With the levies earmarked in law, the revenue for the RAF is protected.

3. A general principle in public finances is earmarked funds for expenditure should be avoided, as it is inefficient and could be wasteful. Earmarked funds also limit budget flexibility in the delivery of priorities. It is only under exceptional circumstances that funds are earmarked and the general practice in South Africa is that all taxes revenues are deposited into the National Revenue Fund for general use.

Section 213(1) of the Constitution provides for a National Revenue Fund into which all revenue received by the national government must be paid, except money reasonably excluded by an Act of Parliament. Money is only withdrawn from the National Revenue Fund, in terms of Section 213(2) through an Act of Parliament.

With taxes and levies funding general budget programmes, in terms of Section 213 of the Constitution, it is impossible to list detailed projects funded through the general fuel levy for specific projects.

28 October 2022 - NW3398

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has received any correspondence from attorneys in Potchefstroom regarding the inadequate maintenance of infrastructure at the Magistrate’s Court building in Potchefstroom; if so, what steps were taken by his department to address the specified challenges; (2) Whether he was informed of the collapse of the roof of the Magistrate’s Court building; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the cost of the damage to the building and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that court proceedings continue to prevent a backlog of cases as a result; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department has received correspondence regarding maintenance of infrastructure at Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court. On 27 February 2020, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) handed over the site to the contractor in order to carry out planned maintenance to the entire building of the Magistrate’s Court but the project was disrupted due to COVID-19 lockdown regulations. However, as soon as the restrictions were lifted and the contractor came back on site, the local business forum intimidated the workers, and added to the delay. The contractor returned on site from 1 August 2022.

2. I have been informed about the collapse of the roof at the Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court.

a) The DPWI provided a report, titled “Preliminary Investigation Report: Current Condition of the Roof Covering and Safety of the Building”, dated 21 September 2022. Thereafter, a full investigation report on the current condition of all wooden roof trusses will be provided. Once the survey is completed, the Department is expecting to receive the cost estimates of the damages from the DPWI.

b)  A contingency plan was compiled together with all the stakeholders at the magistrates’ court as follows:

  1. Potchefstroom Magistrate engaged JB Marks Municipality to assist in identifying alternative accommodation. The Municipality made the Town Hall and the Traffic Court available for use by the Department.
  2. The District Courts B and E were accommodated at the Town Hall for all cases where the accused persons are out on bail or warning.
  3. The Regional Court is accommodated at the Traffic Court for all cases where the accused persons are on bail or warning.
  4. All Regional Court matters, where the accused persons are in custody including sexual offences related matters, are heard at the Regional Court.
  5. All the cases, whereby the accused persons are in custody including first appearance matters and bail applications, are dealt with at the only available court room, Regional Court 3.
  6. The Children’s Court matters are dealt with at the boardroom of the Head of Court.
  7. The rest of the Family Court matters (Domestic Violence and Protection from Harassment) including District Civil Court matters are dealt with at the dedicated Children’s Court.
  8. The quasi-judicial functions (Small claims, Maintenance applications, Clerk of the Civil Court, Cash Hall, Offices for the Magistrates Regional and District and Public Prosecutors) are accommodated at the additional office space made available on the 1st floor.
  9. Transport is made available to transport members of public, accused persons on bail/warning and witness to the respective alternative accommodation.
  10. To ensure effective implementation of the contingency plan, 08:00 morning meetings are held with all the JCPS stakeholders to discuss the circumstances prevailing on a daily basis.

3. On 20 September 2022, the Department issued a media statement, titled: “Potchefstroom Magistrates’ Office temporarily evacuated after roof collapse”.

28 October 2022 - NW2737

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to section 57A(1) and (2) (details furnished) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000, as amended, she has yet to determine the different periods for the different categories of misconduct; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does she intend to prescribe the different categories as required by the specified Act; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No. The President of the Republic of South Africa assented to the Local Government: Municipal Systems Amendment Act No. 3 of 2022 on 17 August 2022 which Act will be operational on 1 November 2022. New regulations relating to this matter will be finalised and gazzeted in due course.

2. The Minister of COGTA will not make a statement on the matter.

28 October 2022 - NW3711

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What programmes and processes have been put in place to ensure (a) the safety of the students in Cuba, (b) that they are not living in poor conditions, (c) that their mental health is prioritised and (d) that they are supported to study a very demanding course in a foreign language since the inception of the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration programme; (2) (a) what does a bursary contract for the programme entail, (b) under what conditions can it be declared null and void and (c) what are the repercussions of declaring the bursary null and void for (i) the students and (ii) his department?

Reply:

1. (a) Before students leave for Cuba, they get orientation about their stay and study in Cuba and the socioeconomic status in Cuba and some of the strengths of the medical training, this includes safety measures, living conditions. Upon arrival in Cuba, the Cuban authorities also orientate them about safety issues.

(b) Students from South Africa receive 200 USD per month to supplement their needs over and above what they are provided for by the Universities in Cuba. South African students are also provided with additional essential items when a need arise, an example is during the COVID-19 pandemic. The latest consignment was sent in June 2022 to alleviate challenges their challenges in Cuba.

(c) There are three support levels for students, from time to time, delegations from Provincial Health Departments including the MECs and Deputy Minister of Health, visit Cuba, and travel to various Provinces in Cuba to meet with the students. Where there is tragedy such as death of a student, or next of kin, Psychologist and/Psychiatrist are sent to Cuba where there are emergencies. All Provinces also provide online counselling of students from time to time. The Cuban authorities also provide psychological and psychiatric treatment for students, however where there is real need for students to come back home for further treatment, students are accompanied back home to receive that treatment.

(d) The following structures were also established to provide a support mechanism for integration of students from Cuba, these are:

i. The Ministerial task Team (MTT)

The MTT is comprised of Deans of Medical Schools/Health Sciences Faculties or their representatives, representatives from National Treasury and National Department of Higher Education and Technology. In developing an effective strategy for integration of large groups, the Minister of Health appointed the MTT whose terms of reference are:

  • To co-ordinate and facilitate the process of engagement with all stakeholders in order
  • To ddevelop comprehensive and detailed implementation plans for each province and associated university in order to ensure the successful re-integration of the students in the expanded Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme into the final year undergraduate medical programme.
  • To pprovide oversight, monitoring, evaluation and support to Provinces and Universities to ensure that deadlines as determined within these implementation plans are adhered to and met.
  • To develop and implement a Primary Health approach to under-graduate medical training and to ensure the transformation of undergraduate medical training to incorporate some of the strengths of the Cuban model of training.
  • To provide oversight to the process to ensure that quality standards as required by the HPCSA as well as the Ministry of Public Health of Cuba are met.
  • Facilitate communication and coordination between all stakeholders to overcome challenges and hurdles.

The MTT has a subcommittee Academic Review Committee (ARC) that:

  • focuses on Academic performance of students in all the Medical Schools/Health Sciences Faculties where they are allocated on their return.
  • All Universities participating in the Programme have appointed Academic Coordinators who are responsible for the day-to-day management of the programme.
  • These coordinators also monitor academic performance of the students including clinical practice and provide interventions at an operational level in terms of academic progress of students.

The Academic Coordinators have a direct link with the Academic Review Committee (ARC) which focuses on the Academic performance of the students in South Africa relation to:

  • students who are not progressing well and recommend remedial programmes
  • monitor progress of all students in the different levels in Cuba
  • Request for regular reports on students from all Universities
  • Advocate for issues of standardization amongst participating universities
  • Advocate for curriculum review, changes with focus on PHC & District Health Care through the Curriculum Subcommittee amongst others.

ii. Joint Academic meeting (JAM)

The JAM is an Academic structure is comprised of the Deans of Medical Schools/Health Science Faculties responsible for Medical Education in South Africa and the Medical Education University Deans in Cuba. It was established in 2010. Its function among others is to:

  • conduct of oversight in relation academic teaching, training, and learning including discussion around curriculum development and alignment to prepare the students when they return in South Africa.
  • share of experiences between the two countries in terms of academic performances of students but also looking at areas that need improvement.
  • monitor performance of students when they are in Cuba and their performance in South Africa after their return.
  • share and align policies, procedures applied in Cuba and where there is a need for alignment of review in the pursuit for academic excellence including good clinical practice amongst others.
  • The JAM is held annually alternating between the two countries. The first JAM was held in Cuba in 2010 followed by the second in Durban 2011 and the in 2019 at Walter Sisulu University from the 3 to 4 July University. The JAM was supposed to be held in CUBA in 2020 but could not materialize due to COVID-19, however it was held in Cuba from the 23 to the 24 October in 2022.

iii. South African Committee of Medical Deans (SACOMD)

This structure has been existing however in terms of the integration Programme the NMFC Programme is also discussed at meetings of SACOMD some of which relates to:

  • Expansion of the training platform for the re-integration process and future expansion.
  • Move towards Primary Health Care approach in teaching and training.
  • identify the requirements to expand the training platform.
  • Collaborates with Department of Health to monitor Memorandum of Agreements (MOU) signed between Universities and the Department of Health.

2. (a) The bursary contract elements are standard for all bursaries for the Department of Health. In terms of the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Collaboration additional elements are added in the bursary contract:

  • running costs such as, return air tickets twice (during second and fourth year) during their training in Cuba for vacations in South Africa,
  • transportation costs for bereavement in SA (for close family members only), this is restricted to “immediate family member” referred to the parents/ legal guardian(s), brother(s); sister(s) and spouse of the bursar,
  • stipend whilst in Cuba, expended by the Department on behalf of the bursar
  • the bursar will be allocated to an authorised medical university on return to South Africa to complete his or her medical degree;
  • the bursar will complete his/her study at the University of the Republic of Cuba for the first six years of the course, and a designated university in South Africa for the final year of the course.

(b) The only condition where the bursary can be declared null, and void is when it is a fraudulent document.

(c) (i) If it is a fraudulent document, it should be terminated when this is known and confirmed and

(ii) the student might be liable for paying back the money or legal action will be taken against the student

 

END.

28 October 2022 - NW2992

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Mr W F Faber with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

All official government policy and review documents must be widely consulted with and made known to the public in all its manifestations.

28 October 2022 - NW3654

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has any documented COVID-19 vaccine procurement guidelines in place; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The procurement of COVID-19 vaccines followed a two-step process:

1. Availability of clinical evidence from randomised controlled clinical trials which formed the basis of the Advisory from the Ministerial Advisory Committee on Covid-19 vaccines. This advisory is available on the SA Coronavirus website.

2. Procurement following prescripts of the Public Finance Management Act made available from National Treasury.

The procurement prescripts, available on the National Treasury website, are applicable to all government departments and are not unique to the NDoH.

END.

28 October 2022 - NW3203

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With regard to the findings of alleged corruption that has been flagged in her department relating to tenders to repair state-owned properties that were damaged during the April 2022 floods, what (a) forms of consequence management will her department be instituting against the workers who have been fingered in the malpractice and (b) corrective measures does her department intend to take to ensure that employees of her department do not delay the process to repair the properties any further; (2) Whether her department has taken any steps that seek to include women, youth and individuals with disabilities in departmental programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

a) I have been informed that disciplinary processes will be instituted against employees who may be fingered in the malpractices as soon as internal investigation is concluded.

b) The department has developed a task team that monitors and ensures the smooth running of the process.

2. Empowerment initiatives for Women, Youth & People with disabilities are tabled below:

As per Quarter 1 REPORT

April -June 2022/2023 Financial Year from SCM

INITIATIVES

ACHIEVEMENTS

DISAGGREGATED DATA ON BENEFICIARIES

   

WOMEN

MEN

YOUTH

DISABILITY

       

MALE

FEMALE

MALE

FEMALE

               

Participation of designated Groups in the DPWI Programmes through Procurement For all transactions within quotation threshold, a mandatory Preferential Procurement Requirements for B-BBEE Level 1, 2 & QSE/EME applies.

Majority of quotations awarded to Designated Groups in line with Preferential Procurement Regulations 2017

475

Transactions to the value of

R24 442 932,97

858

Transactions to the value of R77 674 599,64

224

Transactions to the value of R23 816 608,54

97

Transactions to the value of R10 839 286,51

1

Transactions to the value of R384 999,54

1

Transactions to the value of R2 9000,00

 

3. The department leverages its procurement spend to promote transformation and empowerment of historically disadvantaged individuals and designated groups as listed in the Preferential Procurement Regulations of 2017. The department has implemented a transformation agenda that utilizes pre-qualification criteria and mandatory subcontracting when inviting bids and quotations.

For the period 01 April 2022 – 31 August 2022, 62 tenders worth R 329 224 983 were awarded to designated/ targeted groups. 57 of these tenders to the value of R316,797,325 were awarded to Level 1 BEE service providers and 5 tenders to the value of R12,427,658 were awarded to Level 2 BEE service providers.

The targeted (designated) groups benefited as follows;

  • Black majority owned, 60 awards (97%) to the value R283,838,371
  • Women black owned, 15 awards (24%) to the value of R26,256,604
  • Youth black owned, 8 awards (13%) to the value of R30,734,232
  • Contractor Co-operative, 4 awards (6.5%) to the value of R2,125,567
  • Companies in Rural/ Underdeveloped/ township areas, 26 awards (44%) to the value of R50,940,120

The above statistics are indicative of the department’s commitment to empowerment and transformation.

28 October 2022 - NW3255

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the programme that supports the InvestSA unit, which has been allocated a budget and has set targets for each year, (a) what are the reasons that reports are based on key performance targets instead of tangible service delivery targets such as job creation, (b)(i) who generates the reports and (ii) at what cost for each report and (c) what total number of compiled reports have actually translated into (i) a tangible service delivered and (ii) real projects that created jobs of the investment pledged? [

Reply:

InvestSA reports on metrics outlined in the dtic’s Annual Performance Plan, which sets out the key actions to be undertaken. By acting as a facilitator in the business eco-system, Invest SA plays a role in companies investing and expanding. The outcomes are in turn reported on as set out below.

The following six examples as outlined in the dtic Annual Report presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition, provides tangible evidence of targets being attained:

  • R176 billion-investment pipeline.
  • 642 investor consultations for rapid implementation
  • Assisted with the evaluation of 305 visa recommendations for technical experts of various companies
  • 54 ease of doing business engagements i.e., Technical Working Groups, Business meetings , Stakeholder engagements
  • 179 intra-company transfers, critical skills and permanent residency visas facilitated.

There are several more examples of outcomes achieved by Invest South Africa and I will report on some of these to the Portfolio Committee when reporting on the department’s quarter 1 and quarter 2 performance for this financial year.

Reports are generated internally through the branch in cooperation with other branches such as the Economic Research and Policy Branch in the Department.

Reports are generated internally and there are no costs involved.

Quarterly reports are compiled by Invest SA based on reports submitted by companies.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3114

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) what are the relevant details of the (a)(i) types and (ii) total tonnage of fertilisers being produced at the Foskor mine in the past 10 years and (b) full capacity of the production of each of the fertilisers; (2) whether the specified mine is producing at its full capacity; if not, (a) why not and (b) how are the challenges being addressed; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) how does his department intend to ensure that Foskor is able to produce to its full capacity and (b) by what date will the specified company be able to produce to its fullest capacity; (4) whether the Government has a stake within Foskor; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the specified company is for sale; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for selling the company?

Reply:

The CEO of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) has advised me that the following total production volumes were achieved for the 10 year period from 2013-2022:

  • Phosphate rock: 18 860 000 tons (on average 73% of capacity)
  • Mono-ammonium phosphate 2 678 000 tons (on average 59% of capacity).

The Mine and acid plant had not been operating at full capacity for a number of years. Improvements to the infrastructure, power supply and additional technical capacity is required to improve production and capacity utilisation. The IDC has regularly engaged the Foskor leadership to improve operational performance and works with Transnet on logistics and Eskom on the energy related issues.

Following operational improvements made and favourable market conditions, a projected improvement in output for the current financial year is expected to increase capacity utilisation at the mine to 95% and a substantial improvement at the plant.

The IDC is the majority shareholder in Foskor, holding 59% of the Foskor shares. The IDC does consider potential Strategic Equity Partners for businesses that it is involved in.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3456

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What is the policy decision of her department to maintain the status quo of the Central Karoo Region with 15 wards and an insignificant number of residents as a district municipality, measured against many other municipalities with a total in excess of 70 wards with a high population density, congested into one district municipality?

Reply:

The responsibility to determine the category of municipalities resides with the Municipal Demarcation Board.

28 October 2022 - NW3093

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)       Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with copies of all of the public submissions received by his department through the public participation process for the Draft Policy Proposals On Measures to Restrict and Regulate Trade in Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals Waste, Scrap and Semi-Finished Products to Limit Damage to Infrastructure and the Economy; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) Whether all the requested documents were submitted by 26 August 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3604E

Reply:

A large number of public comments were received by the due date and a few stakeholders requested additional time and were granted a short extension. Comments ranged from pro-forma views in favour or against the proposals; to substantive submissions that engaged specifically with the policy, legal or economic aspects of the proposals. These comments are currently being evaluated and considered by the Ministry.

Copies of submissions are not normally made available to the public or to Members of Parliament, as respondents to a request for comment did not make representations in anticipation that their comments would be made available to the public.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3603

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the reply of the Minister of Finance to question 2330 on 20 July 2022, what percentage of the Health Promotion Levy (HPL) has his department received from the National Treasury in each financial year since the introduction of the HPL in 2018; (2) (a) how has his department spent the money in each financial year and (b) what portion of the budget received from HPL is levied towards (i) health awareness and (ii) health services; (3) what (a) diseases are prioritised with the specified allocation from the sugar tax and (b) strides have the programmes made in improving health in the Republic; (4) whether his department audits the success of the programmes on which the HPL is spent; if not, why not; if so, will he furnish Mrs M O Clarke with the past five annual reports of the programmes?

Reply:

1. Based on the figures below (revenue that National Treasury received from the Levy), it can be estimated to be about 2.2 %.

“In the revenue year 2021/22, the Health Promotion Levy (colloquially referred to as the sugar tax) contributed a total of R 2,259,832,000.00* in the revenue collections that were reported by the South African Revenue Service. The R 2,259,832,000.00* collected reflects R2, 182,323,000.00* in domestic levy and R77, 510,000.00* in an import levy. Overall the FY2021/22 collections represent a growth of 6.92% on the FY2020/21 collections of R2, 113,606,000.00 (R2, 046,177,000.00 domestic levy and R67, 429,000.00 in import levy). “

* All figures for FY2021/22 are preliminary pending auditing processes.

The following are the actual amounts that the Department received:

  • R50m in 2018/19
  • R40m in 2109/20
  • R49 699m in 2020/21
  • R53.5 in 2021/22
  • R48 366 00 in 2022/23

2. (a) The Department spent the HPL as follows

  • 2018/2019 :
    • Wellness Campaign to create awareness and screen for HIV, TB, Hypertension and Diabetes in all provinces (Cheka Impilo).
    • Events in provinces to raise awareness on Cancer and to introduce the provinces to the Breast and Cervical Cancer Strategy which was approved in 2017.
  • 2019/2020:
    • Funds were spent on expanding the scope and coverage of Cancer Awareness Campaigns to all provinces.
  • 2020/2021:
    • Spending on Campaigns was not possible due to Covid-19 restrictions. However, funds were directed toward public education and awareness programs on Covid-19.
  • 2021/2022:
    • There was a continuation in the allocation of funds for public education programs on Covid-19.
    • Funds were spent on phase one of the National Dietary Intake Survey
    • SABC Side-by-Side Campaign on Child Health.
    • Planning for the National Non-Communicable Diseases Campaign
  • 2022/2023:
    • The HPL is being used to fund Phase two of the National Dietary Intake Study (NDIS).
    • National Non-Communicable Diseases Campaign. Funds will be used for the purchases of screening devices, consumables and community health worker training material for the Campaign. The key objective is for CHWs to screen for hypertension and diabetes and link patients to care.
    • Launch of the National Strategic Plan for NCDs and the commemoration of the World No Tobacco Day

(b) Hundred percent (100%) of the HPL levy is spent for health promotion, awareness, disease/injury prevention and disease related research.

3. (a) Non-communicable diseases (hypertension, diabetes, cancer, mental health), communicable diseases (HIV, TB, Covid-19, water and vector borne diseases), Violence and Injury

(b)

  • In 2021 PRICELESS reported evidence-based gains from the HPL, including
    • The national urban household purchases of taxable beverages by

volume fell by 51% (Kantar) with a 29 % decrease in sugar intake.

    • In a self-reported Langa survey of young adults ( 18- 39 y), on taxable

beverages showed a 37% reduction by volume and 31% decrease in sugar intake

    • In a Soweto Study of teenagers , young adults, and older adults, the frequency of Sugar Sweetened Beverages intake amongst heavy consumers fell from 10 beverages per week pre HPL to 4 beverages per week one year post HPL
  • As at August 2022, the country achieved 94% of the target population knowing their HIV status as part of the 90-90-90 targets. The achievement can be attributed to the Wellness Campaign (Cheka Impilo) that influences health seeking behaviour, including condom distribution and treatment adherence.
  • In 2022, the Department approved the National Strategic Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2022 – 2027 (NSP NCDs) which adopts an integrated person centered approach and is inclusive of population level interventions. The NSP NCDs aims to promote wellness, reduce modifiable risk behaviour, enhance management and control of non-communicable diseases in particular hypertension and diabetes and empower communities, patients and their families.
  • The 2022/23 Annual Performance Quarter 1 and Quarter 2 Reports confirm increased heath seeking behaviour as the total screened for diabetes for Q1 was 2 550 479 which increased to 6 242 487 in Q2 and Total screened for hypertension for Q1 was 2 654 572 which increased to 6 366 095.

4. (a) (i) The Department commenced the Dietary Intake survey in 2019 but it could not be completed due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

     (ii) The Department completed the Global Adult Tobacco Survey (GATS) in 2021.

(b) (i) The results of the Dietary Intake Survey will become available in June 2023.

(ii) The GATS results provide statistics on tobacco use, cessation, second hand smoke, economics and the role of other players in the environment including the media. This survey is available on the internet.

(c) Results from surveys (international and national) are used to inform strategies for combating burden of disease conditions.

.

END.

28 October 2022 - NW2909

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) What (i) total number of employees of his department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (ii) are the reason for granting such special permission and (b) on why date will such employees return to their respective offices; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

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28 October 2022 - NW2117

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the disaster relief funding, donations and resources from the State, businesses and non-governmental organisations that were provided as an immediate response to the flood in KwaZulu-Natal, and in view of the announcement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, on 26 April 2022 that the AuditorGeneral is working with the National Treasury to conduct real-time audits on the emergency flood relief funds (details furnished), what is the (a) total amount of money that has been allocated to date from the (i) Government and (ii) Solidarity Fund and (b) breakdown for each?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Honurable Member may request the National Treasury for the full allocations for government as a whole. For its part the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) has allocated a total of R516 748 000 from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant. This does not include allocations in terms of Reprioritisation and Reallocations made by other sector departments.

(ii) The Honourable Member may contact the Solidarity Fund for the information requested.  

(b)

Disaster Response Grant Allocation (2022/2023)

Approved amount

(KZN Phase 1)

Approved amount

(KZN Phase 2)

Approved amount

(EC Phase 3)

Approved amount

(EC Phase 4)

Recommended amount

(KZN- Phase 5)

(Awaiting NT approval)

Municipal Disaster Response Grant:

R371 420 000

Inkosi Langalibalele LM:

R 48 950 000

Alfred Duma LM:

R14 414 000

Port St Johns LM:

R 13 300 000

Winnie Madikizela LM: R 12 790 132

eThekwini MM:

R 185 087 026

 

ILembe DM:

R 19 523 000

Kwa –Dukuza LM:

R109 043 000

Ingquza Hill LM:

R 4 130 000

Mbashe LM:

R 14 415 000

 
 

UMsunduzi LM:

R 620 000

Ray Nkonyeni LM:

R11 000 000

Nyandeni LM:

R 2 692 902

OR Tambo DM:

R 46 872 163.23

 
 

Mkhambathini LM:

R 8 200 000

 

Umzimvubu LM:

R 10 500 000

   
 

Ray Nkonyeni LM:

R 8 100 000

 

Ntabankulu LM:

R 5 110 777

   
 

uGu DM: R 2 000 000

       

Provincial Disaster Response Grant:

R145 328 000

R 145 328 000 of the Provincial Disaster Response Grant was moved to the Municipal Disaster Response Grant where it was allocated to municipalities

R516 748 000

R87 393 000

R134 457 000

R35 733 678

R 74 077 296

R 185 087 026

28 October 2022 - NW3646

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What was the total cost to the SA Police Service (SAPS) with regard to firearm-related court cases in the period 1 January 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; (2) ( a) in what year was each of the specified cases before the court, (b) what were the legal costs to the State for the legal representatives for (i) the SAPS and (ii) other parties in each case and (c) whether the SAPS won or lost the specified cases; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

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27 October 2022 - NW3415

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, considering that the procurement practices in recent times have been a hindrance to infrastructure development in the higher education sector, with corruption and lack of services being rendered for payments made characterising procurement processes, his department has any policy in place to streamline and/or centralise procurement at public institutions of higher learning; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department) centralised procurement of infrastructure for 16 TVET colleges. Nine colleges have since been finalised, three are an 85% to 99% completion rate and four below an 85% completion threshold. The Department continues to engage TVET colleges on the monitoring of their infrastructure delivery. 

The centralisation of infrastructure at universities is limited by the autonomous nature of university councils. However, the Department has set in place monitoring mechanisms to trace the procurement, delivery and expenditure on projects in order to improve the coordination and delivery of infrastructure across all institutions the Department has: 

  • Appointed a Chief Director: Infrastructure to facilitate streamlining of infrastructure delivery; and 
  • Appointed Implementing Agents to accelerate the infrastructure procurement processes, as well as project management of infrastructure. 

The Implementing Agents will also assist with capacity building at institutions where challenges of delivery have been experienced. The Department is currently in the process of following the guidelines as outlined in the Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS) and the Framework for Infrastructure Delivery and Procurement Management (FIDPM). It is also in the process of developing a portfolio and programme plans. Priority projects have been identified and included in the draft plans. 

27 October 2022 - NW3520

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1159 on 4 May 2022, in which he indicated that proposed amendments to the definition of indigenous languages contained in the Policy Framework are underway, the specified amendment to recognise Afrikaans as an indigenous language have been implemented; if not, what are the reasons that the amendments to recognise Afrikaans as an indigenous language have not been implemented despite his undertaking on 4 May 2022 to implement them; if so, what are the details of the amendments; (2) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with proof that the amendments have been gazetted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As I had indicated previously, the Department has received, considered and accepted the legal advice on the status of Afrikaans as an indigenous language, and the need for policy adjustment to clearly reflect this fact so that we are not unduly distracted from the important task of developing our historically marginalised languages. The adjusted definition will be published in a Government Gazette. Officials from my Department have been having discussions with officials from the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture and there is consensus on the need for an explicitly inclusive definition of indigenous languages in the policy framework.

2. The Honourable member must rest assured that the amendment will be published as per the advice, and I hope this will close this matter once and for all and re-focus our attention on the main task at hand which is bringing dignity and respect to all our historically marginalised indigenous languages as the Constitution of the Republic demand of us.

27 October 2022 - NW3693

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What long-term plans have been put in place to combat the challenge of large-scale illegal mining operations in the Republic?

Reply:

The South African Police Service is to launch the Economic Infrastructure Task Team (EITT) whose role will be to address the scourge of crimes within the non-ferrous metals, essential infrastructure, critical infrastructure, extortion, and illegal mining. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy will work together with the envisaged unit.

27 October 2022 - NW3400

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority has received any documents regarding the prosecution of a certain person (name furnished) in connection with an investigation into a diamond scheme in which investors invested approximately R100 million; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it envisaged that the case will be before the court; (2) Whether there is a delay in the court hearing on the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what has he found is the reason for the delay; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has confirmed that the matter is a project driven investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) Northern Cape. The Organised Crime component within the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Gauteng Division, Pretoria has been guiding the investigations.
  2. The investigation is at an advanced stage. An expert report is awaited. On conclusion of the investigation, the prosecutor will decide whether to institute a prosecution, and if so, on what charges.
  3. There is no need to release a statement on the matter.

27 October 2022 - NW3394

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In the light of several protests at the universities and technical vocational education and training (TVET) colleges on account of inefficiencies of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), what (a) turnaround strategy is in place to ensure that the inadequacies of NSFAS is completely a thing of the past and (b) total number of such protests have been recorded in the 2022 academic year at (i) universities and (ii) TVET colleges?

Reply:

No.

Institution/University

Turnaround strategy

Total number of protests recorded in 2022

1.

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

The allowances were paid on time to students. The university made some concessions to allow NSFAS qualifying students to register whilst await for the advancement from NSFAS.

There were no protests reported.

2.

University of Cape Town

The University advances all NSFAS funded students with meals, books and accommodation allowance until funds are received from NSFAS.

The university had minor protests this year that were contained. Not all the protests were NSFAS-related.

3.

Central University of Technology

The NSFAS to issue the Funded List and Guidelines to all the universities & TVET colleges at the beginning of the academic year

Bloemfontein Campus:

  • 23-24 February 2022
  • 28 February 2022
  • 07 March 2022
  • 13-14 March 2022
  • 17 March 2022
  • 22 March 2022
  • 24-25 March 2022
  • 06-07 June 2022

8 in total

Welkom Campus

  • 04 February 2022
  • 27-30 March 2022
  • 03-04 April 2022

3 in total

4.

Durban University of Technology

There was a delay in payment of the upfront payment by NSFAS as a result payment of allowances to students delayed.

On 8 -11 March 2022

The protests were not only about NSFAS matters. However, the concerns raised by students included the delays in payment of allowances

5.

University of Fort Hare

The university extended the registration period to allow NSFAS funded students to register upon confirmation of funding by NSFAS.

In the beginning of the academic year, there were pockets of demonstrations due to delayed NSFAS lists of funded students

6.

University of the Free State.

All other concerns were addressed during registration period. Only the issue of accommodation took longer and was addressed in May 2022 through engagements between DHET, NSFAS, Students represented by SRC, and UFS management.

From 21 to 23 February 2022 in both Bloemfontein and Qwaqwa campus

The concerns raised include withdrawal of offers due to late confirmation of funding from NSFAS for first-time entering students, late confirmation of funding for continuing students, immediate payment of allowances to NSFAS students, N+1/2 Rule,

Accommodation for NSFAS funded students

7.

University of Johannesburg.

The University administers funds on behalf of NSFAS for over 25 600 students registered in 2022. All efforts are made to ensure that potential NSFAS students are assisted with registration and allowances at the beginning of the year while waiting for NSFAS to confirm funding whilst waiting for the upfront payment from NSFAS.

The University lifted a financial block to 8998 students who were identified as potential NSFAS beneficiaries. This includes 872 SASSA beneficiaries.

 

The university also set aside a budget for the SRC Trust Funds. A total number of 4462 students were approved for SRC trust fund during the academic registration period.

The University of Johannesburg advances all NSFAS funded students with meals, books and accommodation allowance until funds are received from NSFAS in April 2022.

The experienced protests were sectional (groups of common interest protesting – not led by the SRC).

On the10th of February 2022, about 50 students attempted to disrupt registration process but the University responded in time to prevent the disruption.

All the protests were managed successfully by of course pressurizing the relevant sectors to be responsive by addressing the problems.

8.

University of KwaZulu-Natal

The vast majority of list of demands received from the SRC, includes issues, as students experience them, with respect to NSFAS. Concerns raised include poor communication, non-responsiveness, perceived inequity/bias in applying NSFAS rules, systems, e.g., for appeals, not working well

NSFAS funded students were assisted whilst waiting for communication and funds from NSFAS.

27 May 2022, 6 & 14 June 2022.

9.

University of Limpopo

The challenging area with regard to the NSFAS funding has been around the student’s allowances, and in particular, Off-Campus accommodation allowances.

The matter was resolved immediately with NSFAS taking full responsibility of the administration of the process as such, further challenges would be resolved within the shortest turnaround time.

14 September 2022.

10.

Mangosuthu University of Technology

NSFAS qualifying students are assisted to register

On 23 June 2022, not NSFAS related

11.

University of Mpumalanga

No protests experienced

 

12.

Nelson Mandela University

Nelson Mandela University has been working closely with NSFAS. Ongoing communication with the NSFAS agent has proved valuable in addressing certain operational issues.

A visit to the NSFAS Office in Cape Town with a multi-stakeholder University team, assisted in attending to some strategic interventions that were required. A productive and meaningful relationship with NSFAS is required with institutions to ensure open and constructive flow of information and planning. An academic year requires prior planning to ensure that universities can enrol new and returning students without any significant disruptions. The sector needs to be engaged through a multi-stakeholder task team and informed well in advance if there will be significant policy changes to ensure adequate risk mitigation and preparation for unintended consequences.

The University experienced protests that closed the campus on 14 February, as well as 3 and 4 March.

A management team lead by the Dean of Students engaged on the issues.

The main issues of the closure on 14 February being:

  • Students awaiting funding statuses including NSFAS appeals which then result in allowances not being able to be released. This included the Higher Certificate
  • unfunded students
  • Postgraduate student funding
  • Unfunded students that do not qualify for University concessions for registration
  • Historic debt.

Following positive engagements, the parties found each other on a number of issues raised.

The main issues of the protests on 3 and 4 March being:

  • Extension of the closing date for registration

Management agreed on an extension to the registration period from 4 March to 11 March 2022.

13.

North-West University

The NWU has set aside funds to pay allowances from the end of February albeit that an NSFAS payment had not been received.

An agreed-upon process and measures involving members of the university management and the student leadership has been in place to address concerns that had been raised by students – some of which were related to NSFAS

The University experienced some unrest in February 2022. The issues raised were NSFAS and registrations related. A meeting was arranged between the SRC and management and matters raised, were resolved.

14.

University of Pretoria

There were no protests at UP on NSFAS.

 

15.

Rhodes University

The university committed support initiatives that would make NSFAS more efficient and effective.

No protests experienced.

16.

Sefako Makgatho University

University takes upon itself to process and allocate allowances to funded students and later claim from NSFAS.

So far, no protest actions were experienced at SMU during the 2022 academic year.

17.

Sol Plaatje University

There were no protests experienced.

 

18.

University of South Africa

Protests experienced were not NSFAS related. The protests were led by the labour unions on labour and management related matters.

 

19.

Stellenbosch University

Stellenbosch University had no NSFAS related student protests in 2022.

 

20.

Tshwane University of Technology

TUT has implemented mitigating strategies to try and resolve challenges experienced with NSFAS.

This involved TUT and NSFAS embarking on a series of engagements to address concerns and queries through the NSFAS Service Agent, robust meetings with Financial Aid Practitioners of South Africa (FAPSA) and Usaf (FEF)

(b) The students protest on NSFAS matters were recorded at Tshwane University of Technology in the beginning of 2022, i.e., during February and March. The most challenging issues that affected all six campuses were recorded as follows:

  • Delay in the release the list of NSFAS Funded students;
  • N+2 Rule of NSFAS; and
  • NSFAS appeals process being slow.

. However, there protests were not just limited to NSFAS related concerns. Other student demands also played a role

21.

Vaal University of Technology

NSFAS officials visited the campus to address outstanding challenges regarding NSFAS.

On 10 June 2022, the guard house at the entrance of the campus was set alight.

22.

University of Venda

The University of Venda Strategy is to open registration for all NSFAS potential funded students pending NSFAS confirmation and reimbursement of funds to the university. University decided to pay students allowances towards food and to pay landlords before NSFAS pay to ensure well-being of students and stability on campus. As for book allowances universities decided to wait for NSFAS to pay the university considering the magnitude of the invoice as majority of UNIVEN enrolment is funded by NSFAS.

one protest action was recorded during May 2022.

23.

Walter Sisulu University

The interventions by the University included: Ongoing engagements with institutional and campus SRCs, NSFAS visiting campuses to deal with NSFAS related matters,

Walter Sisulu University encountered protests from February to June 2022 on its four campuses (Zamukulingisa, Mthatha, Ibika and Buffalo City). The concerns raised by students included: unfunded students, and student accommodation not compliant to DHET minimum norms.

24.

University of the Western Cape

No protest actions related to NSFAS issues

.

25.

University of the Witwatersrand

No protest actions related to NSFAS issues

 

26.

University of Zululand

NSFAS qualifying students are assisted whilst NSFAS has not yet paid the upfront payment to the university.

On 9 March 2022 at the KwaDlangezwa. The concerns raised by students were not only NSFAS related. Students complained against students living off campus and inadequate residences. The University managed to source more off-campus accommodation.

27 October 2022 - NW3598

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the challenges faced by the Bjatladi Community Property Association with specific reference to their Zebediela Citrus Estate; (2) whether any investigations were conducted to establish the causes of the problems and the solution put on the table for the community; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The challenges are disputes between the concerned group and the Bjatladi Communal Property Association (CPA) committee, more specifically on governance issues.

2. Yes. The cause of the challenges is the governance issue, coupled with allegations of corruption and maladministration against the current CPA committee. On 16 September 2022, the Limpopo Department of Agriculture and Rural Development together with Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) held a meeting with both the concerned group and the current Bjatladi CPA committee with the intention to resolve their disputes, however, the two groups are not ready to work together.

Professional mediation was recommended, to which they needed to consent within five working days. To date, the two groups have not consented to participate in the proposed mediation.

27 October 2022 - NW3430

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Following the video of the seventy-year-old veteran actor, Mr. Vusi Thanda, begging for financial assistance on social media, what steps has he taken to mitigate the embarrassing financial situation which thespians often find themselves in?

Reply:

This matter has over the years affected various creatives across all domains and genres. It could be attributed to the unfavourable contractual agreements between creatives and their employers and/or management, lack of financial management including tax and budgeting.

The Department has over the years supported and will continue supporting various initiatives to empower and educate creatives in these matters quite early in their careers to have a ‘soft landing’ during troubling times since their sector operates mainly on free lancing.

Over and above that, the Department has a Program that supports Living Legends Legacy Project; creatives over 70 years old and above.

In the last three years the department has also established a Silapha Wellness Program, which is an initiative geared towards sensitising the creatives about such challenges.

27 October 2022 - NO620

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Xaba, Mr VC to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Given that the Auditor-General found during her audit of the Department of Defence (DoD) in the 2021-22 financial year, a lack of process in the implementation of the action plans to address audit findings in the DoD and a slow application of consequence management in areas identified, what short-term steps will she put in place to address the specified findings with regard to (a) lack of progress in the implementation of the action plan and (b) The slow application of consequence management?

Reply:

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27 October 2022 - NO645

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Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) is the backlog on maintenance of key SA National Defence Force equipment and (b0 are the full, relevant details of such backlogs?

Reply:

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27 October 2022 - NO622

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Mmutle, Mr TN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Considering that the SA Navy has consistently failed to achieve the target set for itself in terms of sea hours and often notes the lack of availability of naval platforms as the reason, what steps will she put in place to (a) increase the sea hours of the SA Navy and (b) ensure that the Republic’s territorial waters are regularly patrolled and efficiently controlled?

Reply:

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27 October 2022 - NW3466

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has inclusive programmes for subjects such as those in the liberal arts area which fall outside the scope of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in order to ensure a much more diverse appreciation for the subjects in the university space and labour market; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Universities in South Africa have a wide range of liberal arts in their Programme and Qualification Mixes. These are academic fields in history, literature, philosophy, sociology, drama and visual arts, to name but a few.

Traditional and comprehensive universities offer a range of classic and world-renowned liberal arts, with various schools within faculties dedicated to such studies, e.g. the University of Johannesburg has the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture that offers qualifications in creative, hospitality and the visual arts; the University of South Africa, Stellenbosch University, University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of the Witwatersrand, University of Pretoria, University of Fort Hare and University of Zululand have a long history in the offering of liberal arts.

Universities of Technology also have a long history in the liberal arts, e.g. the Tshwane University of Technology has a campus dedicated to the liberal arts and the Durban University of Technology boasts of a well-known Faculty of Art and Design.

The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation established the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) through the publication of Government Notice No. 37118 on 5 December 2013. The role of the NIHSS is broadly to enhance and support the Human and Social Sciences (HSS) in South Africa and beyond, and to advise government and civil society on HSS related matters. It does so through its various programmes, including the Doctoral school scholarships, catalytic projects and African Pathways Programme. The NIHSS works with universities, think tanks and research bodies to convene and coordinate PhD-level academic programmes, catalytic research and international research collaboration. The Doctoral scholarships programme is the Institute’s largest programme and works in collaboration with the South African Humanities Deans’ Association and Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa.

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges such as the College of Cape Town and Tshwane North TVET College offer qualifications in art and design.

27 October 2022 - NW3372

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) are the reasons that the Waterberg District Municipality in Limpopo is not a water authority (b) municipality, entity and/or department is accountable for water provision in the Waterberg District; and (c) total number of communities are affected by the water shortage in the specified district?

Reply:

The oversight role over water services institutions as per the Water Services Act is the responsibility of the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), and this question should be referred to that relevant Department for reply.

27 October 2022 - NW3566

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)In line with arguments by experts from the Scientific Officer at the African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English, that Africa’s outer space programme is integral to meeting many needs that African countries have, resulting in the Department of Science and Innovation’s funding of the Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) programme at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology since 2008, with the launch of the first South African mini-constellation of three satellites for Maritime Domain Awareness (MDASat-1) in January 2022, of which the aim of the mission is to provide data gathered by the specified satellites to the South African government to contribute to the effective management of South African territorial waters, what total amount in funding has been provided for the MDA programme to date; (2) whether his department will provide a detailed update on the MDA programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department will furnish Mr S S Zondo with the relevant details of how the data gathered by the MDASat-1 has been utilised by the Government to fulfil the aims of the programme and enhance the security and protection of South African marine resources; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. To date, a total of R28 048 067 (twenty-eight million forty-eight thousand and sixty-seven Rands) has been provided to the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) towards the Maritime Domain Awareness Satellite (MDASAT) constellation. The funding covers research and development costs, including compensation of non-academic staff (engineers), student bursary support and constellation launch costs. The cost of the full constellation of nine satellites is R97 978 338 (Ninety-seven million nine hundred seventy-eight thousand three hundred thirty-eight), the balance of which has not yet been secured.

2. Since its launch on 13 January 2022, the MDASAT-1 constellation has been in the commissioning phase of its mission, which is the first phase of satellite operation and begins immediately after deployment. The satellites automatically deployed their antennas and the immediate message about battery voltages reading were excellent. Both the primary ground station at CPUT and the secondary at the Houwteq Assembly, Integration and Testing Facility (DenelSpaceteq) successfully tracked, commanded, and decoded the signals. Automatic beaconing was switched off, after some tests were performed with the Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C) communications. All the satellites’ subsystems responded well, and all communication links, power operations and TT&C of all three satellites report a healthy status.

There has been a delay in the full commissioning of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) and payloads due to a few technical challenges related to the orientation (spin and tumbling) of the satellites in space. These challenges are being investigated by reproducing them on the engineering models in the lab before developing a software update that will be installed through the onboard software-defined radio.

3. The data currently being received from MDASAT-1 is being used to commission the various satellite subsystems and payload. Maritime domain awareness data has not yet been acquired due to the satellites still being in the commissioning phase of the mission. Once the satellites are fully commissioned, data will be integrated into the National Oceans and Coast Information Management System that will provides decision support tools for oceans governance and marine protection.

27 October 2022 - NW3595

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). What are the reasons that the approved Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme 3 (PESP3) list for funding was published late. (2). whether he has found to be true the allegations that the National Arts Council (NAC) had spent the two hours that the specified list was late for interfering and fiddling with the final adjudication decisions of the Advisory Panels; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that the NAC was involved in the delay of the publication of the PESP3 list. (3). what are the reasons that the NAC interfered in the process when persons who are not members of the NAC, such as an advisory panel, are in accordance with section 11(3) of the National Arts Council Act, Act 56 of 1997, supposed to advise the NAC on the merits of applications for grants and on any matter relating to the field of the arts for which it was appointed?

Reply:

(1). The List was not published late, the NAC published the approved list on the due date (30th September 2022) on all the social media platforms. The social media sites were our quickest way to disseminate the approved list following the crash of the NAC website due to extremely heavy traffic. The website was then restored after a couple of hours and the information was also made available on that platform.

Council does not and did not adjudicate any applications. Please refer to point 2 above where they clarified the role of Advisors vs the role of Council Members. Additionally, the ACT clearly states that “Panel Members advise the NAC on the merits of applications”. This means that they advise, but do not approve, as that is the role of the Council (as the Accounting Authority of the entity). All final Council-approved Applicants are from the pool of applications that have been adjudicated by the Advisors.

27 October 2022 - NW3395

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In light of the fact that there has been an outcry regarding the backlog in the printing of certificates and diplomas in the technical vocational education and training (TVET) colleges, what total number of TVET college (a) certificates and (b) diplomas are yet to be (i) printed and (ii) handed over to the students by his department?

Reply:

Emanating from the Examination IT System, the Resulting and Certification IT System directorate has no outstanding printing of certification and diplomas to qualifying candidates. The Examination IT system could not identify and extract any outstanding qualification to qualifying candidates. Any and other candidates whose achievement records across different examinations (over multiple examination cycles) must apply via their respective TVET colleges for consolidation to meet qualification requirements. 

(a) CERTIFICATION PROGRESS FOR THE PERIOD 31 JANUARY 2022 TO 30 JUNE 2022

Business Studies 

As at 30 June 2022, 571 230 certificates for candidates who sat for Business Studies N4 to N6 qualification examinations between the period November 2021 to June 2022 were issued. This figure represents a total of 192 examination center at 50 TVET Colleges.

Engineering Studies 

As at 30 June 2022, 142 606 certificates for candidates who sat for Engineering Studies N1 to N2 and N4 to N6 qualification examinations between the period November 2021 to June 2022 were issued. This figure represents a total of 28 examination centers.

3.3 NC(V) 

As at 26 September 2022, 149 874 out of 170 300 certificates for candidates who sat for NC(V) Level 2 to 4 qualification for the 202111 examination cycle were issued. Different types of documents are created. These represents the full certificates for candidates who passed all 7 subjects in one examination cycle. The outstanding certificate are a representation of subject statements for candidates who passed less than 7 subjects and candidates who failed all subjects or candidates who were absent for all subjects. No documents are printed for these candidates, but need to be issued with an Umalusi document number for further processes once the student re write the subjects and qualify for a full certificate.

For the period November 20211 to March 2022 the certificates for 2978 candidates are still being processed. The candidates enrolled for the supplementary examination are excluded from the batch certification submitted to Umalusi for approval and printing. The reason being that a candidate could have passed or bettered a mark during the supplementary examination. This is done per level, since the issuing of the higher level is dependent on the issuing of the lower level. This means the candidates must have passed the lower levels before a higher-level certificate can be issued. 

Once this consolidation process is finalized, the records for candidates who passed subjects over multiple examination cycles are consolidated and certificates issued for qualifying candidates.

(b) 3.4 DIPLOMAS 

The following is an update progress made in issuing of diplomas during the period between 01 January 2022 to 30 June 2022 reporting period:

(i) The Certification and Historical records unit issued 34 588 diplomas to qualifying candidates who meet the theoretical and practical component requirements. 

While the number of potential candidates who are eligible for diplomas seemed to be less, consideration should be taken that this is a three years’ qualification comprising of 18 months Business Studies /12 months Engineering Studies theoretical achievement accompanied by 18 months or 2000 hours of relevant evidence of practical experience in commerce or industry, while Engineering requires 24 months or two years of relevant practical experience respectively.    

National N Diploma application declined to candidates not meeting the requirements must resubmit their applications for appeal. 

The above figure represents a total of 50 TVET Colleges.

INTERVENTIONS

Department of Higher Education and Training courier all Certificates and National N Diplomas printed and awarded to TVET colleges and campuses to be issued to qualifying candidates. These qualifications are captures and recorded on the Examination IT System with tracking waybill number for easy tracking and retrieval. It is the responsibility of the TVET colleges to inform candidates to collect their qualification upon receipt by their respective colleges/campuses. 

While it is expected of college to hand over certificates and diplomas to qualifying candidate’s challenges does occur especially with private colleges relocations.

27 October 2022 - NW3777

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 3254 on 29 September 2022, in which she indicated that Phase 1 of the settlement of the Lower Zingcuka Land claim will take place during this quarter and that the settlement will depend on the co-operation of the community, what (a) total number of phases will it take to settle the long outstanding claim, (b) will each phase entail and (c) sort of co-operation is expected from the community in order to fast-track the settlement of the specified claim?

Reply:

a) The claim was to be settled in two (2) phases, however due to policy changes in the processing and the settlement of claims in the Commission, full and final settlement of the claim at once is planned.

b) The claimant beneficiaries comprises of three (3) villages, namely Lower Zingcuka, Upper Zingcuka and Lower Ngqumeya. The household verification for Lower Zingcuka and Lower Ngqumeya has been completed and the household verification for Upper Zingcuka is currently underway.

c) Submission of verification documents by Upper Zingcuka beneficiaries to finalise the household verification process.

END

27 October 2022 - NW3489

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether Bodybuilding South Africa (BBSA) paid the fine of R300 000 issued by SA Institute for Drug-Free Sports in 2018; if not, what steps were taken against BBSA; if so, on what date was it paid. (2). what action and/or recommendations were taken by the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and his department to stop BBSA from repeated doping offences. (3). what (a) is the anti-doping record for BBSA during the 2021-22 financial year and (b) were the results?

Reply:

  1. No, Body Building South Africa (BBSA) has not paid the fine. South African Institute for Drug-Free Sports has sent the federation Letters of Demand provided for the debt owed to it in our Annual Financials. BBSA responded with lawyer’s letters despite being informed that the SA Anti- Doping Regulations (2021) and the World Anti- Doping Code (2021) do not provide recourse for a national federation to dispute the fine.
  2. The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) has not indicated what actions they have taken to stop BBSA from repeated doping offenses. Section 17(A) that deals with Punitive Measures and specifically Subsection (1) of The South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport Amendment Act; the Department on written recommendations of SASCOC, may cause an investigation to be conducted as it deems fit to ascertain whether the federations comply with the provisions of the Act. The Department is still awaiting written recommendations from SASCOC.
  3. (a) As disclosed in the SAIDS 2021/22 Annual Report, eleven (11) tests were conducted at the National Bodybuilding Championships. (b) Ten (10) tests returned positive for various anabolic steroids. The names of the athletes and the substances are disclosed, as is required by the World Anti-Doping Code, in the Annual Report.

27 October 2022 - NO662

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the recent findings of the Auditor-General and the Public Protector, that the Project Thusano contracts and the Supplementary agreements were concluded irregularly and in contravention of the supply chain management processes, what steps has her department taken to (a) cancel the specified irregular agreements and (b) recover any losses suffered as a result of the specified irregular agreements?

Reply:

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27 October 2022 - NO621

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Xaba, Mr VC to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Considering that over-expenditure on compensation of employees remains the largest contributor to irregular expenditure in her Department of Defence (DOD), and noting that the DOD previously indicated to Parliament that it intends to bring the specified expenditure under control by the 2024-25 financial year through a number of interventions, has she found that DOD (a) is on track with the implementation of the Mobility Exit Mechanism for 2022-23 financial year according to the agreement with National Treasury and (b) Will have over-expenditure on compensation of employees under control by the 2024-25 financial year?

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