Questions and Replies

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27 October 2022 - NW2889

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has concluded its assessment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) cases; if not, by what date is it envisaged that the NPA will take a decision on the remaining cases; if so, what are the reasons that the remaining cases were not referred for investigation and/or prosecution; (2) Which TRC cases have already been referred to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation?

Reply:

1. I have been informed that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has not yet concluded its re-assessment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) cases. It is not possible to stipulate a specific date as it is an ongoing process. However, efforts are made to ensure that the matters are referred as speedily as possible.

2. The hundred and twenty-nine (129) investigations referred to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI) are as follows:

a) Prior to September 2021, a total of 59 TRC cases were under investigation by DPCI. These were overseen by Priority Crimes Litigation Unit (PCLU) until the matters were migrated to the respective provinces in April 2019.

b) A further 55 cases were identified for re-opening by the PCLU. These pertain to the deaths in detention, where detainees who were detained for contravention of security legislation or died under circumstances which necessitated further investigation. Some investigations also pertain to deaths where the deceased died in alleged confrontations with the police.

Division

Number of Matters under Investigation

1. Western Cape

9

2. Free State

2

3. Mthatha

10

4. Eastern Cape

13

5. North West

5

6. Kwazulu-Natal

29

7. Mpumalanga

4

8. Northern Cape

3

9. Johannesburg

25

10. Pretoria

11

11. Limpopo

10

We are in possession of a list of matters under investigation. However, it must be emphasized that this information is confidential, and the risk in the release of this information is that it might compromise further investigations. This creates challenges for investigators and prosecutors alike, once suspects/witnesses/persons of interest are made aware of matters under investigation.

On 20 June 2022, the National Director of Public Prosecutions directed, through an internal memorandum which was circulated to all the divisions, that in all TRC matters that are under investigation, dedicated prosecutors must ensure that contact with the families is made. It was also emphasised that families must be updated regularly on the progress made in their matters. It was also directed that a name list of all families together with their contact numbers be obtained. This name list was also forwarded to the office of the Deputy National Director of Public Prosecutions. Prosecutors were encouraged to engage actively with families to ensure that a more victim-centred approach is followed.

END

27 October 2022 - NW3252

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Which land redistribution programmes have been initiated recently that target women and youth on farms and (b) what total number of (i) women and (ii) youth were allocated farms in their own right in each (aa) province and (bb) district from 1 January 2021 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a) The land redistribution programmes have initiated the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP) wherein the state has acquired the land and later allocated and leased it out to farmers for a period of 30 years through the Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation Policy (BSLAP). BSLAP was formulated to ensure transparent allocation of land with priority being given to vulnerable groups such that 50% is allocated to women and 40% is allocated to youth.

(b)(i),(ii),(aa),(bb) Please refer to the table below.

(aa) Province

(bb) District

(i) Women

(ii) Youth

Eastern Cape

Amathole

1

1

 

Chris Hani

0

2

Free State

Fezile Dabi

1

1

 

Mangaung Metro

1

0

 

Xhariep

2

1

Gauteng

Sedibeng

2

3

 

West Rand

1

0

Kwazulu-Natal

Umgungundlovu

3

1

 

Zululand

1

1

Limpopo

Waterberg

1

1

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni

1

0

 

Gert Sibande

3

5

 

Nkangala

4

2

North West

Bojanala

2

2

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

4

1

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

1

0

Northern Cape

Namakwa

1

0

 

Pixley Ka Seme

0

1

 

ZF Mgcawu

3

0

Western Cape

West Coast

5

3

Total

 

37

25

27 October 2022 - NW3302

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in view of media reports of the terrible condition of the buildings and animals at the Potchefstroom College of Agriculture, she will provide the (a) reasons for the deterioration of the upkeep of the specified college and animals and (b) relevant details of (i) how her department intends to improve the specified conditions at the college, (ii) the detailed budget allocation towards the upkeep of the college in each year of the past 10 financial years and (iii) the work done at the college to maintain the college in the past 10 financial years; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

(a) The upkeep and day-to-day maintenance of this College is administered by the North the West Provincial Department of Agriculture as College is currently residing and reporting under that Department.

(b)(i) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) and the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) are in a process of transferring Colleges of Agriculture to a national competence and having them declared as Higher Education Colleges governed by the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997) but will be funded and managed administratively under the Minister responsible for Agriculture. This will benefit the Colleges in that DHET has established programmes for support to Higher Education Institutions, developing needy colleges towards attaining semi-autonomy and eventually full autonomy to Colleges leading to quicker decision-making and more effective implementation of decisions. College of Agriculture students as well will be able to access bursaries from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) as it is only available to students at higher education institutions. Collaborations and coordination within the Higher Education sector will assist in improving the conditions of the Colleges of Agriculture especially in respect of infrastructure that supports curriculum offerings.

(b)(ii) The Potchefstroom College of Agriculture is administered by the North West Provincial Department of Agriculture, however, DALRRD provides support to the College through the College Revitalisation Plan since 2012. The allocations over the years are as follows:

Financial year

Name of College

Allocation

2011/2012

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R4 500 000,00

2012/2013

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R6 000 000,00

2013/2014

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 524 000,00

2014/2015

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R10 000 000,00

2015/2016

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R11 800 000,00

2016/2017

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R9 500 000,00

2017/2018

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 000 000,00

2018/2019

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 000 000,00

2019/2020

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R2 986 000,00

2020/2021

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R2 466 000,00

2021/2022

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R8 500 000,00

Total

 

R77 276 000,00

(b)(iii) The following Infrastructure, equipment and machinery were developed or procured at Potchefstroom College of Agriculture through Colleges Revitalisation Plan since 2012.

New building constructed

Buildings renovated

Procurement of equipment and machinery

Others

  • Construction of Poultry house
  • Construction of 20 sow-unit Piggery house
  • Construction of Poultry Abattoir
  • Construction of Greenhouse, Office and Palisade Fencing
  • Renovation of Lecture halls, Examination Hall and the assessment rooms security system– Phase 2
  • Construction of new Laboratories (Practical Training Facilities)
  • Building of One multi-purpose lecture hall with a capacity of 150 student
  • Construction of mini pack house for the horticultural unit
  • Renovation and installation of new machines in the Dairy
  • Refurbishment of student kitchen and dining hall
  • Renovation of students infrastructure and Alex/ Pampoen boere pit (6 hostels and 2 Halls)
  • Procurement of stand-by Generators
  • Procurement of 89 KW tractor
  • Procurement of nine double cab bakkies
  • Procurement of 24 row wheat drill
  • Procurement of farm agricultural equipment
  • Procurement of ICT equipment; computers, laptops, printers, projectors, etc
  • Procurement of Tractor GPS, Air Conditioners and Installation of 2 X Canopies
  • Supply and delivery of Tractor, Ridger, Plough and Slasher,
  • Installation of Bio-metric Access Control System in the Admin Block and student hostels
  • Installation of galvanized steel palisade for the centre pivot, Piggery House, layer house and whole campus
  • Installation of High Mast Lights
  • Provision of Wi-Fi on the campus

27 October 2022 - NW3097

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her department’s mission statement, what mechanisms has her department implemented since 1 April 2019 to (a) accelerate land reform and (b) catalyse integrated rural development in the Republic?

Reply:

a) To accelerate Land Reform, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implemented the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP) in terms of which the state has acquired over 170 000 hectares of land to date. The land is allocated and leased out to farmers for a period of 30 years and the lease can be extended for another 20 years.

In order to ensure equitable access to land, the Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation Policy (BSLAP) was formulated to ensure transparent allocation of land with priority being given to vulnerable groups, i.e. women, youth and people with disabilities. Over 76 000 hectares of land was allocated to women, over 52 000 hectares to youth and about 489 hectares to people with disabilities. The policy also prioritises the allocation of land to communal farmers to decongest communal areas.

The Department further identified and released 700,000 hectares of state land for agricultural purposes.

DALRRD has also developed the Land Donations Policy to encourage landowners to contribute to land reform, as recommended by the Advisory Panel on Land Reform and Agriculture. The policy provides a framework on how a donation can be done including associated incentives to those who donate land i.e. tax incentives.

DALRRD is currently processing applications for awards of land by labour tenants, which were lodged not later than 31 March 2001. The Department is, therefore, working with the Special Master on Labour Tenants to settle all outstanding labour tenant claims as ordered by the Land Claims Court.

Communal tenure remains another priority for Land Reform: following the Communal Land Tenure Summit held from 27-28 May 2022, and taking into account the outcomes of the Summit, the draft Communal Land Tenure Policy and Communal Land Tenure Bill have been formulated and once finalised will follow the normal processes of government before it is tabled in Parliament.

Regarding Tenure Policies and Legislative Development: The Upgrading of Land Tenure Rights Act 112 of 1991 (ULTRA) Bill was passed into law to comply with the Court Judgement and the Regulations have been finalized and will be published during the 2022/2023 financial year.

The Communal Property Associations Amendment Bill was approved by Cabinet and the Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 1997 (Act No. 62 of 1997) (ESTA) Amendment Bill was also passed into law. Regulations will be published in the 2022/23 financial year.

The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights has developed a backlog reduction strategy to accelerate the finalization of land claims. These mechanisms are at an implementation stage.

b) The Department’s Rural Development Mandate Outcome 6: Integrated and inclusive rural economy:

The Department is engaged in the finalisation of the Draft Integrated Rural Development Strategy, building on the lessons learnt from the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (ISRDS). The Department continues to play its role to “initiate, facilitate, coordinate and act as a catalyst for the implementation of a comprehensive rural development programme leading to sustainable and vibrant rural communities”, working closely with provincial and other national departments through the District Development Model (DDM) and Rural District Plans as well as with Traditional Councils.

The Strategy further recognises that rural development and rural economy objectives are transversal in nature and cannot be successfully implemented without the collaboration of Traditional leaders and traditional communities because rural areas are largely under the custodianship of Traditional Councils. Sustainable communities and inclusive rural economies require a bottom-up community-driven participatory approach that places traditional communities and rural people at the centre of development.

The National Development Plan (NDP) (2012) identifies the following four key points relating to rural development: (i) Rural communities require greater social, economic, and political opportunities to overcome poverty; (ii) To achieve this, agricultural development should introduce a land reform and job-creation/livelihood strategy that ensures rural communities have jobs; (iii) Ensure quality access to basic services, health care, education, and food security; and (iii) plans for rural towns should be tailor-made according to the varying opportunities in each area.

Intergovernmental relations should be addressed to improve rural governance.

The Department in conjunction with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation have also finalized the first National Spatial Development Framework (NSDF) for the country, which was approved by Cabinet in March 2022. The NSDF is a strategic long-term spatial planning instrument with a 2050 – time horizon. One of the key objectives of NSDF is to assist in the redress of multiple social and economic problems and ensure decisive, collaborative, integrated state and non–state action. The NSDF proposes the identification, development and strengthening of a series of Regional Rural Development Anchors to create a functional polycentric rural service delivery network, that will enhance rural development and more efficient land reform delivery.

The District development model (DDM) provides a platform to align and integrate multi-sectoral contributions from all spheres of government toward sustainable rural development. The DALRRD has also developed Rural Development Sector Plans (RDSPs) to reflect the Department’s programmes and priorities in line with the mandate of the Department. The RDSPs are plans that package the Department’s interventions and contributions at a district level and elements of these plans are incorporated into the District One Plans to ensure better integration in Rural Development interventions in line with spatial development opportunities and priorities.

The Department remains the driver of the Agri-Parks Programme that aims to uplift impoverished rural communities into the agricultural value chain. The Department provides critical infrastructure such as fencing and irrigation to rural communities to assist them, with improving their production. These communities are linked to Farmer Production Support Units, which are constructed in rural areas to provide communities with agricultural support services. The Department continues to construct Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) that provide rural communities with a range of facilities such as mechanisation, pelleting machines for feed, silos to store grain, pack houses with refrigeration, access to state vets and training. Many of these services were in the past only reserved for commercial farmers in rural areas. This allows rural communities to improve their production and enter the agricultural value chain with their small-scale production and creates a sustainable path out of poverty.

The current programmes through which the Department executes its work include the following:

  • Socio-economic infrastructure projects to support Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs), Animal and Veld Management Programme (AVMP) and River Valley Catalytic Programme (RVCP). This includes mechanization such as: fencing, animal handling facilities, stock water dams, boreholes, canals, dip tanks, pump houses, pack houses, irrigation pipes and schemes, silos and storage facilities and rural roads.
  • The AVMP, focuses on bringing arable and grazing land into production by providing all the required infrastructure like fencing, boreholes, irrigation systems, cattle handling and dipping facilities, dams etc. In addition, the AVMP supported re-greening and soil rehabilitation.
  • The RVCP, focuses on the catalytic utilization of river systems to bring the land into production and would typically develop irrigation schemes with all the associated infrastructure. Both the AVMP and RVCP provide infrastructural support to commonages, communal areas, traditional areas and farmers occupying state-owned facilities (where requested by Land Reform).
  • Road infrastructure remains a high priority in national, provincial, municipal and farm roads to promote economic viability through safer, swift transport logistics of agricultural produce. As part of the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP), repair and rehabilitation of rural roads are critical to facilitate road logistics from farm to harbor and to market. The Department is coordinating a Public-Private Partnership initiative which will include national, provincial and local governments as well as agricultural organisations. Rural Roads are economic catalysts for impoverished rural communities. It provides entry for communities to access basic services and to take produce to the markets. The Department will work with farmer organisations and their counterparts in all spheres of government to implement the repairing and rehabilitation of rural and farm access roads to facilitate improved access for rural communities into the agricultural value chain and broader rural economy.
  • Development and Implementation of skills development opportunities for rural youth through the National Rural Youth Services Corps (NARYSEC) which aims to build the capacity of rural youth through various skills development interventions and working with public and private sector partners to facilitate the transitioning of recruited youth into economic activities.
  • Research of new innovative technologies, including Information and Communications Technology (ICT), and promote indigenous knowledge systems in rural communities to contribute towards improving the quality of lives of rural communities working in partnership and collaboration with institutions of higher learning, research agencies and technology agencies.

27 October 2022 - NW2655

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with regard to the Government’s commitment to gender sensitivity, his department included gender sensitivity into their policies and budget; if not, why not; if so, (a) how does his department (i) implement and (ii) monitor its gender sensitivity policy and/or programmes and (b) what total number of (i) legal practitioners, (ii) magistrates and (iii) maintenance officers are fully trained and knowledgeable on the Maintenance Act, Act 99 of 1998?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii) Yes, the Department has included gender sensitivity into its policies and budget. Further, the Department has developed Gender Indicators/Analysis Tools for Finance, HR, Supply Chain Management and the generic one for other Branches that assist them in the implementation and monitoring of the gender sensitivity policies and /or programmes. These Gender Indicators are used as guiding tools by different Branches within the Department on how to include gender sensitivity into their policies and/or programmes. Furthermore, the Gender Directorate monitors the implementation of the policies and programmes of the Department.

b) (i) The application of the Maintenance Act is covered in terms of training on Marriage

and Divorce for all PVT candidates, both the PVT Schools and those in PVT contracts.

For the past four (4) years, the numbers are tabulated below:

2022 (to date)

4 010

2021

4 303

2020

4 014

2019

4 335

 

Additionally, for practitioners, this is also covered in the training of Marriage, Divorce and Child Law seminars, which is discretionary.

2022 [As at July 2022]

130

2021

272

2020

135

2019

168

(iii) Maintenance officers are fully trained and knowledgeable on the Maintenance

Act, Act 99 of 1998?

The Department do make provisioning to fund training programmes that address various sets of skills. These sets of skills encompass core competencies, scarce & critical skills and/or transversal skills.

Maintenance Officers falls within core competencies, scarce & critical skills of the Department. The table below illustrate the total number of Maintenance Officer trained per programme:

Name of the Programme

Number of Maintenance Officers

Period

a) Training on the Maintenance Act 99 of 1998

3 African Females, 3 African Males, 1 Coloured Female, and 2 Coloured Males.

Total: Nine (9)

1 April to August 2022

b) Records Management

1 African Male.

Total: One (1)

 

c) TransUnion

1 African Female, 3 African Males, and 2 Coloured Females.

Total: Six (6)

 

d) Departmental Induction

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

 

e) Anti-Corruption and fraud

1 African Female.

Total: One (1)

 

f) Sexual harassment policy and procedure

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

1 April to August 2022

g) Ethics in the workplace

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

 

h) Labour Relations

1 African Male

Total: One (1)

 

i) Grievance and disciplinary procedure

2 African Male

Total: Two (2)

 

j) Employee Assistance Programme

3 African Females, and 4 African Males.

Total: Seven (7)

 

k) Service Excellence

1 African Female and 1 African Male

Total: Two (2)

 

l) Maintenance Clerks and Officers Training

6 African Females, 4 African Males, 9 Coloured Females, and 4 Coloured Males.

Total: Twenty-three (23)

 

m) Domestic Violence Act Workshop

1 Coloured Female

Total: 1 (One)

 

n) ICMS Domestic Violence

1 African Female

Total: One (1)

 

o) ICMS Maintenance

1 African Female

Total: One (1)

 

p) Crafting of Performance Agreement

1 African Male

Total: One (1)

 

GRAND TOTAL

Sixty One (61)

 

On annual basis, the Department develops the Workplace Skills Plan (WSP), and the training for Departmental officials are implemented and/or coordinated throughout the specified financial year in line with the WSP. Furthermore, the annual training report is compiled to verify the implemented training against the WSP.

27 October 2022 - NW3099

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department, as the custodian of Tourism in the Republic, has established any functional mechanisms to ensure that all government departments (a) support and protect the promotion of internal and international tourism and (b) protect the tourism infrastructure and heritage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

The Department and SA Tourism work with Provinces and Local Government through the MINMEC structures. The Department also works with sister departments as well as entities at a National level through the government clusters and bilateral mechanisms. Furthermore, the Department convenes the National Tourism Stakeholder Forum (NTSF) which is a platform that amongst others enables engagements between industry and the various departments that contribute to tourism growth and development. These platforms cover the entire spectrum of matters pertaining to tourism growth and development including marketing and promotion of destination South Africa, product development and enhancement amongst others in as far as government’s role is concerned.

(2) No

27 October 2022 - NW3068

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of women have benefited from the land reform programme to date?

Reply:

Since the inception of the Land Reform programme, a total of 2.8 million hectares had been redistributed to municipalities under Commonage grant (COMG), Settlement Land Acquisition Grant (SLAG) for settlement and Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) for agricultural purposes and this land is held in title by communities and individuals. This involves a total of over 67 000 women benefiting in the form of accessing land for various needs including agriculture and tenure security.

For the implementation of the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP), the state has acquired over 2.4 million hectares of land which benefited about 5 000 women mostly in the form of allocation and leased agreements for a period of 30 years extendable for another 20 years.

The Restitution programme has settled 172 933 land claims to female headed households.

27 October 2022 - NW2796

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of business incubators are equipped to provide entrepreneurs with skills that are relevant to the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution such as artificial intelligence and blockchain technologies in each province?

Reply:

The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) supported Incubation ecosystem provides a bouquet of interventions in multi-disciplined sectors including relevant technologies and all nine verticals of the Fourth Industrial Revolution through Township based Digital Hubs and ICT focused Incubators. To emphasise, these incubation ecosystem are well equipped to provide entrepreneurs with skills relevant to the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

No.

Incubator

Province

Digital Hubs

1

Botshabelo Digital Hub

Free State

2

Galaxcoc Digital Hub

Gauteng

3

Kwamashu Digital Hub

KwaZulu Natal

4

Limpopo Digital Hub

Limpopo

5

Mafikeng Digital Hub

North West

6

Mpumalanga Digital Hub

Mpumalanaga

Technology Business Incubators

7

SmartXchange

KwaZulu Natal

8

Softstart Business Technology Incubator (SBTI)

Gauteng

9

IHub Nelson Mandela Bay

Eastern Cape

10

Africa Beyond 4IR (AB4IR)

Gauteng

11

Propella

Eastern Cape

12

Tucsnovation

Gauteng

13

Firi JHB

Gauteng

14

Firi CPT

Western Cape

15

Daily Grind

Western Cape

No.

Province

Number of Incubators

1

Eastern Cape

2

2

Free State

1

3

Gauteng

5

4

KwaZulu Natal

2

5

Limpopo

1

6

Mpumalanga

1

7

North West

1

8

Western Cape

2

15

Seda is planning to establish a Township and Digital Hub (proposals are currently at adjudication stage) in the Northern Cape (Namakwa region) which will operate within the 4IR space moving forward.

The DSBD is further entering into strategic partnership with NEMISA which would be anchored around the following: (a) physical technology production, (b) transformative tech applications, (c) digital platforms, and (d) digitally traded services. This partnership, together with some that we will explore in the digital space as we expand our incubation footprint, will go a long way in providing needed skills in new technologies driven by the fourth industrial revolution.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

27 October 2022 - NW3035

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total number of parolees in the period 1 January 2019 to date, (i) have not been found by departmental officials during routine visits and/or (ii) did not turn up at departmental offices as part of their parole conditions and (b) number of the total specified number of parolees (i) have been returned to finish their sentence and (ii) are still on the run, being sought to be returned?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of parolees that have not been found by departmental officials during routine visits are as follows:

Region

01 January 2019-31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

1 338

1 221

1 278

1 087

WC

4 1834

21 854

21 889

9 392

KZN

3 411

2 743

3 265

3 670

EC

1 301

1 029

1 320

829

LMN

1 02

405

525

72

GP

1 391

831

1 255

982

National

49 377

28 083

29 532

16 032

(a)(ii) The total number of parolees that did not turn up at departmental offices as part of their parole conditions are as follows:

Region

01 January 2019-31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

708

371

574

372

WC

4 368

1 949

2 352

864

KZN

1 077

976

1 922

1 747

EC

811

695

966

747

LMN

83

81

81

50

GP

241

158

344

299

National

7 288

4 230

6 239

3 279

(b)(i) The following are the number of parolees that have been returned to complete their sentence in correctional centres:

Region

01 January 2019 to 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

606

453

443

259

WC

1471

636

771

389

KZN

410

151

320

236

EC

440

380

402

331

LMN

83

81

81

50

GP

666

197

296

236

National

3 676

1 898

2 313

1 501

(b)(ii) The following are the number of parolees still on the run and being sought to be returned to correctional Centres:

Region

01 January 2019 to 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

377

259

296

161

WC

6163

6370

6449

6384

KZN

735

352

363

152

EC

1741

1710

1674

1615

LMN

1003

1001

894

797

GP

426

575

483

323

National

10 445

10 267

10 159

9 432

END

27 October 2022 - NW2969

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What are the details of Ikhala Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (TVETs) in Sterkspruit, Eastern Cape, that are in (a) the planning, (b) construction and (c) completed phase; (2) whether any of the TVETs that are in the construction phase are currently unfinished; if so, (a) in which area and (b) what are the details of progress and/or plans to deal with unfinished buildings?

Reply:

1. The details of the new Ikhala TVET College Campus situated in Sterkspruit are:

a) In planning: None

b) Construction: The new Campus is currently at 96% physical completion and a dispute is in progress between the Principal Agent, MSW Project Managers and Consultant Engineers and the Contractor, Uphala Construction. The resultant determination founded in favour of the Contractor. As a result, an application for additional budget is in progress. Once the funds have been approved, the buildings will be brought to completion. This process is expected to take three to four months. In the meantime, the site is secured by onsite security.

c) in Completion: None.

2. There are currently 4 sites in construction in addition to Sterkspruit that are not yet fully completed:

a) Gert Sibande TVET College, Balfour Campus, 98% Physical Completion with Estimated Completion date of end November 2022; Mthashana TVET College, Vryheid Engineering Campus, 34% Physical Completion, Estimated Completion October 2023; Umfolozi TVET College, Bhambanani Campus, 64% Physical Completion, awaiting new tender processes for Phase 2 and new contractor. Tender will be published once Departmental procedures are in place; UMgungundlovu TVET College, Greytown Campus, 75% Physical Completion Phase 2, Tender Documentation in development.

b) As indicated above, the phase 2 process for the Bhambanani and Greytown sites will commence once the Department has finalized its tender processes and appointed the new contractors. The following sites have been completed:

      • Umfolozi TVET College, Nkandla A Campus in Nkandla Town;
      • UMgungundlovu TVET College, Msinga Campus near Tugela Ferry;
      • Esayidi TVET College, Umzimkhulu Campus at Umzimkhulu;
      • Ikhala TVET College, Aliwal North Campus in Aliwal North;
      • Ingwe TVET College, Ngqungqushe Campus in Lusikisiki;
      • Waterberg TVET College, Thabazimbi Campus in Thabazimbi,
      • Mthashana TVET College, Nongoma;
      • Kwagqikasi Campus in Nongoma; and
      • East Cape Midlands TVET College, Graaff Reinet Campus in Graaff Reinet

27 October 2022 - NW3355

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What action has been taken to resolve the accommodation allowance crisis after the protests at the University of Limpopo and (b) how will this unfortunate event of accommodation allowances not being paid because of administrative processes and delays be avoided in future?

Reply:

a) In relation to the University of Limpopo, NSFAS took a decision to deploy Senior Officials to attend to the conflict between the University of Limpopo, landlords and the students. At a meeting attended by these stakeholders and NSFAS in Polokwane on 22 September 2022, an agreement was reached on how to proceed. This agreement will be submitted for consideration and approval by the Board and the Minister. It should be noted that NSFAS only pays allowances upon receipt of claims on behalf of qualifying students by the University. However, the University has been busy with a verification exercise in order to comply with the Norms and Standards of DHET and the funding guidelines by NSFAS. The verification exercise took longer than expected and was met with some resistance from some of the landlords and students, especially the decision by NSFAS that off-campus allowances be paid directly into the landlords’ bank accounts. The agreement reached at the meeting was that for the rest of the 2022 academic year, off-campus allowances should be paid to the students who will settle their rental obligations with the landlords, as has been the case to date. The verification exercise should be continued until 2023 to allow landlords to make the necessary improvements to their properties so as to eventually comply with the minimum standards set by DHET. The meeting recommended that a fixed allowance of R1 820 be paid to all qualifying students until the verification exercise is concluded. 

b) As part of the student-centred model NSFAS took the decision to improve the administration of student accommodation. This will include accreditation of accommodation, grading and assigning costs to the different grades, linking students to accommodation, and ultimately paying accommodation providers directly. Part of the model will include increased capacity for accommodation. NSFAS plans, as of 2023, take over the accreditation of student accommodation. A system will be available for all potential housing suppliers to enlist their properties so that students can have a wider choice of accommodation. NSFAS will use this platform to expedite the allocation of suitable student accommodation and ensure that landlords are paid a fair value according to the accommodation provided directly.

27 October 2022 - NW3215

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reformand Rural Development

(1) What (a) steps is her department taking to challenge the reported ban by Botswana and Namibia of the import of produce from the Republic, mainly vegetables and certain fruits and (b) has she found would be the impact of the ban on the Republic’s farmers and consumers. (2) whether she is in communication with her Namibian and Botswana counterparts in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3938E

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) undertook consultations with the relevant industries and the Department of Trade Industry and Competition (DTIC) as the lead Department on trade policy matters. The engagements resolved that the trade challenge should be addressed through a bilateral Ministerial meeting with the affected countries. DALRRD is implementing this resolution. The Director General wrote to his counterparts requesting urgent bilateral engagements on the matter. The outcome of the engagements will be shared with organised industry.

(b) The impact of such closures is lost market opportunities for the industry and loss of revenue to the State. This also undermines the efforts of free trade as contemplated in the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA). Furthermore, consumers of the affected products in these countries are more likely to experience an increase in prices of these commodities due to shortages/supply constraints.

According to the 2nd Quarter Agricultural Economic Review, vegetable prices registered a marked decrease, and this could be directly attributed to the short effects of the import bans. Price depression likely occurred as producers redirected, (as a short-term measure) these export consignments into the domestic market.

The current import ban includes tomatoes, carrots, beetroots, potatoes, cabbage, lettuce, garlic, onions, ginger, turmeric, chili peppers, butternut, watermelons, sweet peppers, green corn, and fresh herbs. Over the past 5 years, 98% of vegetables in Botswana originated from South Africa.

(2) No. The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has not yet communicated with her counterparts in Botswana and Namibia. She is awaiting the outcome of the meetings of the Director General with his counterparts in Botswana and Namibia.

27 October 2022 - NW3365

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the total budget set aside by his department for physical therapy for prisoners living with disabilities?

Reply:

There is no budget set aside for physical therapy for inmates living with disabilities specifically, costs for physical therapy for inmates are accommodated under the budget for Health Care Services for inmates. The budget for health care services for inmates is one hundred and eleven million, six hundred and twenty-nine thousand and two hundred (R111 629 200.00).

END

27 October 2022 - NW3202

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of Africa being regarded as contributing about 1% of global knowledge, which further marginalises the continent as a producer of knowledge, what are the (a) relevant details of any improved measures that his department has actioned and/or implemented to ensure that the Republic’s universities and students contribute to the production of global knowledge to close the gap and (b) strides that his department has made thus far to ensure that higher education institutions around the Republic are keeping up to world standards in light of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) implements two policies that are directly geared towards bolstering knowledge productivity in higher education institutions. The first policy is the Research Outputs Policy (2015) which provides a framework for the evaluation and subsidy allocation for research outputs produced by South African universities. The second policy is the Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations produced by South African Higher Education Institutions (2017).

Over and above the two policies, there are various initiatives under the umbrella programme we call the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP) which also incentivises capacity development initiatives of academics at all our universities. The policy recognizes quality creative outputs in the subfields of Fine Arts; Visual Arts; Music; Theatre; Performance and Dance; Design; Film and Television and Literary Arts. Under innovation the policy recognizes Patents and Plant Breeders’ Rights.

Since the implementation of the policy from 2005, South African universities recorded notable growth in the number of research publications produced by academics in the sector. Table 1 below attests to the steady growth of research outputs, from 7 230 units in 2005 to 21 734.4 units in 2020.

The growth of research outputs from the universities has also impacted positively on the growth of academics with doctoral degrees as shown in Table 2 below.

Several independent studies have shown that the policies of the Department and the UCDP have increased research productivity and the number of doctoral graduates from South African universities. The graphs in Table 1 and 2, confirm that research productivity is on the rise in South African universities.

Table 1: Total Publications Units awarded, 2005 - 2020

See the link for Table:  https://pmg.org.za/files/Table_1.pdf

(b) What are the strides the Department has made thus far to ensure that higher education institutions around the Republic are keeping up to world standards in light of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

 

The Ministerial Task Team on the 4th industrial Revolution established in 2019 sought to investigate and advise the Minister on how the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system should take up opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). The Report of the Ministerial Task Team on the Implications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for Post-School Education and Training was presented to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 18 September 2020. Since the Report’s release in 2021, the Department and the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) are developing an Implementation Plan of its recommendations. Progress on implementation was reported to the Social Protection, Community and Human Development (SPCHD) Cluster on 17 August 2022. We have recorded several partnerships and progress by universities, colleges and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) in advancing 4IR interventions within the PSET Sector.

Various initiatives are taking place in all the four sub-sectors of the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system, and they are captured in a database that has been developed by the Department. These include initiatives that (a) contribute to the 4IR (research, development and innovation); (b) provide/produce skills that are in line with the needs of the 4IR (building capacity for functioning in the 4IR); and (c) embrace the affordances of the 4IR in the PSET system, how it is managed, administered, equipped, teaching and learning taking place and how assessment is being done (impact of the 4IR on PSET).

Universities, TVET and CET colleges, through already established structures and partnerships are resourced and capacitated in the implementation of 4IR initiatives. The Department is actively supporting institutions, for example, it has, through an EDTP SETA partnership, established 4IR Centres of Excellence in 10 TVET colleges and, through a partnership with Intel, initiated the establishment of a series Artificial Intelligence (AI) Labs. The first was established at Orbit College where 20 mentors were trained to implement AI

Curriculum in the college. In collaboration with the MICT SETA, TVET College Curriculum

was developed in 4IR Technologies and an 4IR Learning Factory was established in collaboration with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), to name a few.

An Inter-Departmental Committee for the 4IR in PSET (4IRIDC) was established in 2021 to coordinate the Department’s efforts in the 4IR; to drive the implementation of the recommendations of the Report; and to monitor its implementation. The 4IRIDC is finalising a Framework for 4IR Implementation in the PSET that will further guide and support PSET institutions in implementation and provide a tool to monitor implementation.

26 October 2022 - NW2511

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Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) are the details of the current status of the SA National Defence Force deployment to other parts of the continent and (b) total amount do the deployment cost the Republic annually?

Reply:

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26 October 2022 - NW3371

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Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Noting how 20% of small businesses fail in their first year and 30% in the second, which intervention measures has her department put in place to prevent this from happening?

Reply:

The mitigating measures that the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is implementing to prevent and minimise business failures are as follows:

1. Rolling out Business Development Support Services as part of the non-financial support component through the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda), Incubators and Digital hubs with a view to provide a broad range of enterprise development support to small businesses including Co-operatives.

2. Implementing various financial support incentives such as Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), Informal and Micro Enterprises Development Programme (IMEDP), Business Viability Programme, Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme (SEMSP) and Shared Economic Infrastructure Facility (SEIF) to support the growth and sustainability of small businesses.

3. On the reform side, the Department is implementing the localisation policy framework and finalising the SMMEs and Co-operatives Funding Policy, NISED Master Plan as well as Incubation and Business Development Services Policy. In addition to the above, the Department is a key participant in the Financial Sector Development Reform Programme and is leading the SMME Access to Finance Action Plan that is aimed at alleviating challenges confronting small businesses in the country. The primary objective is to ensure that small businesses flourish, and potential entrepreneurs are incentivised to consider entrepreneurship as a career option.

4. The DSBD has developed a new programme called the Co-operatives Development Support Programme (CDSP) with an objective to support co-operative enterprises financially and non-financially. DSBD, together with its agencies, the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) and Seda seek to assist co-operative enterprises to address the following identified and encountered market failures:

The Department of Small Business Development has developed a new programme called the Co-operatives Development Support Programme (CDSP) with an objective to support co-operative enterprises financially and non-financially.

DSBD, together with its agencies, sefa and Seda seek to assist co-operative enterprises to address the following identified and encountered market failures:

      1. Lack of participation in the formal economy by co-operatives,
      2. Lack of effective and professional managerial capacity within the co-operative entities capable of efficiently running and managing both the association and business component of the co-operative to minimize tension between the two and thus grow and develop the co-operative
      3. Low or non-participation by co-operative enterprises on all other incentive programmes
      4. Lack of access to finance
      5. Lack of working capital to allow effective market entry
      6. Lack of improved assets value
      7. Lack of targeted business development support.

As part of ensuring the growth, development, and sustainability of these co-operative enterprises, Seda was tasked with assisting the co-operatives with non-financial support inclusive of, but not limited to pre-formation, business development services, trainings and workshops etc., while DSBD through sefa, will be supporting the co-operatives financially and providing programme oversight.

DSBD has also concluded a Memorandum of Understating (MoU) with the German Co-operative and Raiffeisen Confederation (DGRV) with an objective to facilitate job creation through supporting and capacitating communities, officials, and groups for development of viable and sustainable co-operatives within their space.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

26 October 2022 - NW2617

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether the Armaments Corporation of South Africa sells arms and ammunition, propellant powder and/or explosives to the Russian Federation (1); if not, what is the position in this regard (2), if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

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26 October 2022 - NW3026

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

With the reported merger of BrandSA and SA Tourism, what steps are being taken to (a) introduce a smooth transition for employees of the specified entities and (b) prevent having an overbloated staff structure?

Reply:

(a) and (b) In light of the fact that such a process will have implications for affected parties, e.g.employees it is prudent that the relevant information will be made available upon conclusion of the whole process.

These are some of the issues that will be considered in the merger. It is not at this stage the intention nor the indication that jobs will be lost. The purpose of the merger is a decision taken in the Cabinet meeting of 9 June 2021 that there should be a cut down on the number of entities so that there is a consolidation of purpose. The intention was never about cutting off of jobs.

26 October 2022 - NW2884

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether, noting the 2019 study by the North West Chamber of Commerce that indicated that 82% of North West small businesses and most within the Republic are owned by foreigners, she has found that the R5 million restriction bill is successful to combat such; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether small and medium-sized enterprises (SMMEs) owned by South Africans will receive exemption from taxes and/or subsidies to recover from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) how does her department intend to ensure that state (a) contracts and (b) tenders to uplift SMMEs are depoliticised?

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is aware of the interview of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the North West Chamber of Commerce, and has researched for this study, but to no avail. The DSBD nonetheless note that there is a high number of foreign owned informal and small businesses but unfortunately there is no definite statistics in this regard.

Section 15 of the Immigration Act of 2011 provides for the Minister of Trade and Industry to stipulate the minimal financial and capital contribution or investment required for a Business Visa which as off 2014 has been set at R5million. The Department is of the firm view that this requirement does regulate and manage the entry and participation of foreign nationals in the small business sector. It seems that many foreign owned small businesses are operated by foreign nationals who have applied or secured Refugee or Asylum seeker status, rather that foreign nationals who have secured a business visa. The DSBD perspective is that the Refugee and Asylum seeker system has been heavily abused and corrupted with many economic migrants claiming refugee status. In this regard, the DSBD has engaged and supported the Minister of Home Affairs in his efforts to clamp down on corruption and abuse of our immigration laws.

The Immigration Act of 2011 also provides for designation of sectors that are undesirable for a business visa – meaning that while a foreign national may get a business visa – they may not engage in the sectors that have been designated as undesirable for a business visa. The following business undertakings are currently listed under the regulation or directive of the noted Act as undesirable:

  • List of undesirable business undertakings in relation to an application for Business Visa [Section 15(1A)]
    1. Business that imports second hand motor vehicles into the Republic of South Africa for the purpose of exporting to other markets outside the Republic of South Africa.
    2. The exotic entertainment industry.
    3. Security industry.
  • List of undesirable business undertakings in relation to an application for a Corporate Visa [Section 21(1A)]
  1. Exotic entertainment.
  2. Hospitality industry.
  3. Fast food outlets and franchises.
  4. Cosmetic and beauty industry.

The DSBD has also been made aware that some South Africans are fronting on behalf of foreign nationals when applying for these work permits, which are then handed over to the foreign nationals upon approval.

The DSBD is currently reviewing the Businesses Act no.71 of 1991 with the intention of introducing provisions that will be aligned to the Immigration and provide for further powers to the Minister of Small Business Development in regulating the entry of foreign nationals to the small business sector; as well as better protections for South African informal traders including spaza shops.

Furthermore, the DSBD is mindful of the extent to which South Africa SMMEs are disadvantaged by the encroachment of foreign owned business. It is for this reason, that the DSBD is supporting the SMMEs especially the micro and informal enterprise through financial and non-financial programmes such as Informal Micro Enterprises Development Programme (IMEDP). To make these South African businesses more competitive, IMEDP provides appropriate tools and equipment to business (spaza shops, hair salons, garden services etc.) and the support is in a form of a grant.

2. DSBD has implemented the support to the SMMEs and Co-operatives that were affected by the Covid 19 through the Debt Relief Fund and Township and Rural Enterprise Programme (TREP). In this regard, DSBD spent an amount of R500m to support Covid affected SMMEs. Regarding tax relief National Treasury as the custodian of tax policy has also implemented tax relief to all business affected by Covid 19.

3. State contract and tenders are regulated by Preferential Procurement Framework and PFMA to ensure their implementation and remove corruption in the process.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

26 October 2022 - NW2505

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Xaba, Mr VC to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with regard to the SA Military Health Service (SAMHS) that had to outsource certain SERVICES to private service providers in recent years due to its declining capability, there are any efforts being undertaken to restore the required capability of the SAMHS to improve service provision in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

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25 October 2022 - NW3161

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to his letter to Mr R A Lees dated 2 June 2022, he has found that the concerns regarding certain terms and conditions contained in the agreement entered into between the Department of Public Enterprises and the Takatso Consortium, dealing with the transfer of SA Airways shares to the Takatso Consortium had been attended to, to the satisfaction of the National Treasury; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, as I communicated to the Honourable Member in my letter dated 2 June 2022, there is no requirement in terms of the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 (PFMA) for the Minister of Finance to grant approval or provide concurrence in respect of the Takatso transaction. In terms of Section 54(2) of the PMFA, the Minister of Finance is only required to note the intention of the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) to dispose the majority of Government’s shareholding of SAA by selling the Government’s stake in South African Airways SOC Ltd (SAA). Section 54(2) of the PFMA only finds application where a public entity concludes any of the transactions mentioned under the section. Section 54(2)(c) would apply in an event whereby SAA was seeking to dispose a significant shareholding in any of its subsidiaries or was seeking to acquire a significant shareholding in another company. The disposal of a majority shareholding in SAA was already approved by Cabinet and no further approval, concurrence or noting is required from the Minister of Finance in terms of the PFMA.

However, following perusal of the document that the DPE shared with the department in relation to some of the terms and conditions entered into between the DPE and the preferred Strategic Equity Partner, NT took the opportunity to make suggestions to the DPE with some of the terms and conditions of the agreement. We continue to engage with the DPE in relation to the disposal of 51% of Government’s shareholding in SAA.

25 October 2022 - NW3433

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has she taken to protect the integrity of this year’s matric examination in light of persistent load shedding by Eskom this year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in establishing the state of readiness for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations has considered the impact of load shedding on the different phases of the examination cycle. Contingency plans have been put in place to address the negative impact of load shedding on critical processes. There has been communication between Eskom and  DBE to prevent load shedding on certain critical days during the conduct of the examinations, that are dependent on electricity. These subjects include Computer Applications Technology (CAT), Information Technology and South African Sign Language (SASL). In addition, the heads of provincial examination units will be liaising with the provincial coordinators of Eskom to manage the load shedding. In addition, during the important processes of marking, mark capture and resulting, the sites at which these will take place, will have generators installed as a back-up option. 

In the unlikely event that load shedding affects the writing of CAT and IT, the Department of Basic Education has a rewrite paper which is scheduled for 07 December 2022. Rewrite for CAT and IT is planned for every examination, given the computer glitches that could cause candidates not to complete their examinations

The security of question papers is not threatened by load shedding in any way. Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) factored this into their plans and all question papers are secure, and printing, packing and distribution will be completed on time.       

25 October 2022 - NW3609

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of (i) Funza Lushaka bursaries have been awarded since it was established, (ii) students have been placed after graduation and (iii) beneficiaries who were not placed have paid back their bursaries and (b) are the reasons that the remaining graduates were not placed in each (i) year and (ii) province in each case?

Reply:

(a) i. The number of Funza Lushaka bursaries (FLB) that have been awarded since it was established.

Year

No. Bursaries

2007

3662

2008

5185

2009

9141

2010

10073

2011

8619

2012

11620

2013

14301

2014

14245

2015

13865

2016

14036

2017

15135

2018

13700

2019

12953

2020

13082

2021

11905

2022

12087

Grand Total

183609

 (ii) Information that is immediately available allows for reporting of placements from the 2013 to 2021 period. During this period 33 113 bursary recipients graduates that were eligible for placement were placed after graduation.

(iii) No there was no monies paid back by the Students that graduated.  After graduations, the students are given six month to be placed in public schools.

(b) What are the reasons that the remaining graduates were not placed in each (i) year and (ii) province in each case? 

REPLY: Each year the reasons for the non-placement of FLB is primarily the same.  The placement of Funza Lushaka bursary recipients depends on the availability of vacant posts that match their qualifications. This approach has not changed since the inception of the programme. Therefore, some graduates remain unplaced each year mainly due to the unavailability of suitable vacancies. According to policy, the filling of educator vacancies follows an order which prioritises matching and placement of educators declared in addition; conversion of educators appointed in temporary capacity;  then the matching and placement of the Funza Lushaka and provincial bursary recipients in the remaining vacant posts. In some Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) bursary recipients compete for the remaining vacant posts with all other first-time appointments and this reduces the potential number of graduates placed. However, many of those that are not placed in the year that they are available for placement do join the system in the subsequent years.

25 October 2022 - NW3559

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number (a) of (i) school infrastructure projects has her department planned in the past three years and (ii) the specified projects (aa) have been completed and (bb) are in progress in each province and (b) number out of the initial total number of planned school infrastructure projects have been completed to date?

Reply:

1. Under the ASIDI programme (Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative) and the SAFE programme (Sanitation Appropriate For Education) the progress regarding inappropriate structures was as follows:

  • A total of 40 new schools were planned for 2019/20, actual delivery was 24 new schools
  • A total of 32 new schools were planned for 2020/21, actual delivery was 32 new schools
  • A total of 21 new schools were planned for 2022/22, actual delivery was 21 new schools

 

2. Under the ASIDI & SAFE programmes, the progress regarding water supply was as follows:

  • A total of 225 water projects were planned for 2019/20, actual delivery was 85 water projects
  • A total of 100 water projects were planned for 2020/21, actual delivery was 100 water projects
  • A total of 100 water projects were planned for 2021/22, actual delivery was 112 water projects

3. Under the ASIDI & SAFE programmes, the progress regarding sanitation was as follows:

  • A total of 717 sanitation projects were planned for 2019/20, actual delivery was 99 sanitation projects
  • A total of 600 sanitation projects were planned for 2020/21, actual delivery was 263 sanitation projects
  • A total of 1000 sanitation projects were planned for 2021/22, actual delivery was 1019 sanitation projects

   4. Under the ASIDI programme, there are a total of 3033 projects, of which 2984 have already progressed to practical completion:

  • A total of 1300 projects in EC of which 1258 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 154 projects in FS of which 154 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 16 projects in GP of which 16 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 448 projects in KZN of which 448 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 888 projects in LP of which 881 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 135 projects in MP of which 135 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 18 projects in NW of which 18 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 19 projects n NC of which 19 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 55 projects in WC of which 55 achieved practical completion
  • The balance of ASIDI projects are scheduled for completion in 2022/23 

5. Under the SAFE programme, there are a total of 3408 projects, of which 2352 have already progressed to practical completion:

  • A total of 1447 projects in EC of which 753 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 106 projects in FS of which 106 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 1 projects in GP of which 0 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 1212 projects in KZN of which 990 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 469 projects in LP of which 334 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 98 projects in MP of which 96 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 73 projects in NW of which 73 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 1 projects n NC of which 0 achieved practical completion
  • A total of 1 projects in WC of which 0 achieved practical completion
  • The balance of SAFE projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24  

25 October 2022 - NW3503

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) total amount does her department owe to the (i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) Senqu Local Municipality and (b) is the age analysis of the monies owed in each case; (2) what (a) are the specific details of the buildings in respect of which her department owes the specified municipalities and (b) is the use of each specified building; (3) whether her department has any plans to address the debts; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of her department’s plan and (b) is the time frame in which the debts will be settled?

Reply:

The question was referred to the Eastern Cape Education Department with a response date of Wednesday, 05 October 2022. To date, there has been no response from the province. 

The response will be shared as and when it is received.

25 October 2022 - NW3691

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of non-South African learners without bar-coded identity documents are (a) currently registered in the system of her department and (b) due to write the 2022 matric exams?

Reply:

(a) 

There were 138 982 non - South African learners who did not provide their documentation to be captured in our School Administrative System. Of the 138 982, 6 489 were attending Grade 12.

25 October 2022 - NW2886

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)What is the total cost to the fiscus of (a) the nine provincial legislatures in the 2022-23 financial year and (b) each legislature with regard to (i) salaries of Members of the Provincial Legislature (MPLs), (iii) support offered to MPLs, (iii) the operating costs of each legislature and (iv) staff salaries of each provincial legislature; (2) what is the total cost to the fiscus of the (a) official vehicles allocated to Members of the Executive Council (MECs) of each provincial legislature, (b)(i) Speakers and (ii) Deputy Speakers in each of the nine provincial legislatures and (c) protectors and drivers provided to MECs of each of the nine provinces?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b) Detailed in the table 1 below is the cost for the Legislatures broken into compensation of employees for MPLs as well as other officials, political support and operational costs for the 2022/23 financial year. A cost to the Legislatures in terms of political support amounts to R675 million. In terms of operational costs (goods and services as well as payments for capital assets) an amount of R1.1 billion has been set aside. The total main appropriation for the Legislatures amounts to R4 billion.

(2) The National Treasury does not have this information readily available in its possession, therefore, we recommend that this type of information be requested from Provincial Legislatures and Provincial Treasuries.

 

25 October 2022 - NW3248

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How does the National Framework on Rural Education guarantee sustainable living in rural communities and curb migration into cities in search for quality education for the children?

Reply:

The Rural Education Framework aims to:

  • Improve access to, and the quality of education in rural schools.
  • Address the isolation, disconnectedness, as well as the lack of development often associated with rural communities and schools.
  • Provide a basis for the development of context-specific, relevant and sustainable strategies to improve the quality of teaching and learning in rural schools

The Framework moves from the premise that there is no single definition of “rurality”; and therefore, the strategies to address the challenges facing rural education, need to be sensitive and relevant to the different contexts.  In South Africa, rural refers to - 

  • Areas that consist of the tribal lands controlled by traditional leaders;
  • Settings that are sparsely populated and where agriculture is the major means of economic activity;
  • Areas of dense settlement created by colonial and apartheid-driven land settlements; and
  • Mining areas in rural contexts, where mining is no longer active.’

With such an all-encompassing definition, the Framework provides a guide for to provinces, districts and schools in their design of programmes and projects aimed at improving the quality of education and livelihoods.  This is in line with the NDP’s call for an inclusive rural economy which requires multi-sectoral cooperation and collaboration among key stakeholders.

The Framework recognises the centrality of teachers in any attempt to improve the quality of education, especially in rural areas.  One of the challenges that the Framework seeks to address, is the difficulty of attracting quality teachers to rural schools.  It recommends the establishment of Edu-Villages, which will serve as hubs for teacher development, but also provide much-needed accommodation for teachers in rural schools.  These villages will also have infrastructure required for modern day living, so that teachers do not have to go to town to access such services (IT facilities, Early Childhood facilities, etc.)

The Framework also recommends broader community mobilisation and participation in educational affairs.  Such participation should extend to parents playing a role in supporting schools in areas, such as the teaching of Arts and Culture, Sports and Reading and Numeracy.  The bringing in of communities into schools for the teaching of these subject areas, will bring to bear the relevance of what is delivered in rural schools, as these will draw on indigenous knowledge systems, and heighten awareness of the rich cultural resources that are available in rural communities for the benefit of children and education.  This will also highlight the possibilities that exist in rural areas to contribute meaningfully to the rural economy, particularly the potential benefits and marketability of skills related to the Arts, Culture and Sports.

Agriculture is a cornerstone of rural economy.  While it contributes 4% to Gross Domestic Product (GDP), its contribution to the South African economic wellbeing, should not be discounted simply because of the sector’s percentile contribution to the GDP.  Agriculture has both backward and forward linkages to the entire economy, including in the sectors of manufacturing, beverages and food.

The Framework recommends expanding the provision of Agricultural education across the system as a way of developing the love for, and developing the skills amongst learners in this area.  Such skills will be beneficial not only to rural economies, but also the national economy.  Agricultural skills are not only limited to farming.  Agricultural Technology, for example, opens the way for the development of goods that are required for beyond Agriculture.  Learners, who study Agriculture Technology, can provide goods and services that are required for everyday living, and can become entrepreneurs in their own right.

Furthermore, the Framework recommends the development of education initiatives that target young people, such as their use as Education Assistants in schools.  This will assist, not only in employment creation, but also ensuring that learners in rural schools are supported, and enjoy the quality of education offered in rural schools

25 October 2022 - NW3622

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the annual breakdown (a) nationally and (b) provincially of the total number of Grade 1 to Grade 12 learners in the 2002-2022 calendar years?

Reply:

(a)(b) 

The attached table indicates the number of learners per province and grade between 2002 and 2020.

25 October 2022 - NW3563

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What discussions were undertaken with her during the meeting of the (a) Non- Aligned Movement (b) Peace and Security Council of the African Union and (c) bilateral engagements in New York City; (2) Whether any agreements were signed and/ or agreed to; if not, why not, in case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) What was the total cost of travel for the trip to New York City?

Reply:

1 a) Minister Pandor participated in the Ministerial Meeting of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) on 21 September 2020. The theme of the meeting was “The Role for the Non-Aligned Movement in Post-Pandemic Global Recovery: The Way Forward”, which formed the basis and the context for the discussions. The revitalisation of the Non-Aligned Movement with a view to strengthen and make the organisation fit for purpose in a post-COVID-19 era was topical and thus dominated the discussions. Additionally, the discussions focused on reaffirming the commitment of NAM members to the organisation and its principles as established in the Bandung Conference in 1955 and the need to buttress efforts to achieve its goals towards the promotion of global peace and security, nuclear non-proliferation and attainment of sustainable development. Members stressed the importance of strengthening coordination in the implementation of the NAM agenda and in support of the self-determination of Western Sahara and Palestine.

1 b) On 22 September, Minister Pandor participated in the High-Level Ministerial meeting of the African Union Peace and Security Council (PSC) focusing on preventing and combating terrorism and violent extremism on the continent. The meeting took place against the backdrop of increasing incidents of terrorism and violent extremism across all regions in the African Continent. In this regard, the meeting deliberated on ways to strengthen the AU’s efforts towards addressing the threat. The meeting recognised the existing peace and security frameworks of the AU and reaffirmed that focused implementation and enhanced coordination is vital in the AU’s efforts to address the challenge posed by terrorism. In this regard, the PSC underscored the need to strengthen the oversight role of the AUPSC to ensure effective coordination and collaboration between all stakeholders, including Member States, Regional Economic Communities/Regional Mechanisms (RECs/RMs), the AU Commission, notably the African Centre for the Study and Research on Terrorism (ACSRT), African Union Mechanism for Police Cooperation (AFRIPOL), and Committee of Intelligence and Security Services of Africa (CISSA), as well as other relevant AU Organs and institutions.

The meeting adopted a Communiqué as an outcome of the meeting. Please see attached additional information. The Communique emphasises the need for collaboration by all Regional Economic Communities (RECs), mobilise necessary resources and implementation of relevant decision such as the Malabo Summit on Terrorism and Violent Extremism.

1 c) Minister Pandor held eleven bilateral meetings on the margins of the 77th session of the UN General Assembly (UNGA77) High-Level Week to discuss multilateral issues, as well as ways to strengthen bilateral political and economic relations. The list of countries that were engaged were: Cuba, France, Ghana (President Nana-Addo), the President of the General Assembly, Latvia, Nicaragua, Tanzania (Former President Jakaya Kikwete), The Netherlands and Russia.

2. On 23 September, a Memorandum of Understanding on Political Consultations between South Africa and Paraguay was signed by Minister Pandor and the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Paraguay, Mr Julio César Arriola Ramirez. The Memorandum of Understanding serves as a framework for the development and consolidation of cooperation at bilateral, regional and multilateral levels.

3. The Minister’s working visit to New York was budgeted for as the High-level Week of the UN General Assembly takes place annually in September at the United Nations Headquarters in New York.

COMPILER DETAILS

Additional Information

AFRICAN UNION

Description: Description: logo

UNION AFRICAINE

 

UNIÃO AFRICANA

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, P.O. Box: 3243 Tel.: (251-11) 5513 822 Fax: (251-11) 5519 321

Email: situationroom@africa-union.org

PEACE AND SECURITY COUNCIL

1107TH MEETING

23 SEPTEMBER 2022

NEW YORK, UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

PSC/MIN/COMM. 1107 (2022)

DRAFT COMMUNIQUÉ

Adopted by the Peace and Security Council (PSC) of the African Union (AU) at its 1107th meeting, held on 23 September 2022, on the theme – Strengthening Regional Organizations for the Maintenance of Peace and Security in Africa: Preventing and Combating Terrorism and Violent Extremism in the Continent:

The Peace and Security Council,

Recalling the Declaration and Decision [Ext/Assembly/AU/Dec.(XVI)] adopted during the 16th Extraordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union on Terrorism and Unconstitutional Changes of Government in Africa held on 28 May 2022, in Malabo, Equatorial Guinea, which decided, amongst others, the establishment of a Ministerial Committee on Counter-Terrorism to give impetus to the Continental fight against terrorism;

 

Committed to the implementation of its previous decisions and pronouncements on preventing and combating terrorism and violent extremism in Africa and related themes, particularly, Communiqué [PSC/PR/COMM.1048(2021)] adopted at its 1048th meeting held on 15 November 2021; and Communiqué [PSC/MIN/COMM.1040(2021)] adopted at its 1040th meeting held at the Ministerial level on 22 October 2021;

Emphasizing the cardinal principles of subsidiarity, complementarity and comparative advantage, which guide the significant role played by the Regional Economic Communities and Regional Mechanisms (RECs/RMs), who, on many occasions, are primary responders to crises and conflict situations in their respective geographic areas of jurisdiction;

Noting the opening remarks by H.E. Shirley Ayorkor Botchwey, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Regional Integration of the Republic of Ghana and PSC Chairperson for September 2022, the remarks by H.E. Moussa Faki Mahamat, Chairperson of the AU Commission, the statement by H.E. Ambassador Bankole Adeoye, AU Commissioner for Political Affairs, Peace and Security, and Mr. Vladimir Voronkov, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations Office of Counter-Terrorism; also noting the statements made by the representatives of the RECs/RMs;

Reaffirming the solidarity of the AU with the people of the Continent, particularly those adversely impacted by the scourge of terrorism and violent extremism; and

Acting under Article 7 of its Protocol, the Peace and Security Council: 

  1. Expresses grave concern over the expanding and worsening scourge of terrorism and violent extremism on the Continent, exacerbated by the influx of Foreign Terrorist Fighters (FTFs), mercenaries and private military enterprises, and deplores the growing linkages between terrorism and transnational organized crime, including illicit exploitation of, and trade in minerals, and illicit financial flows with debilitating impact on the economies of the Continent;
  1. Strongly condemns the barbaric acts of terrorism and their attendant adverse impact on ordinary citizens and civilians, committed on the Continent by whomever, wherever and for whatever purposes; reiterates the AU’s determination to rid Africa of the scourge of terrorism and violent extremism, which cannot be justified under any circumstances, and expresses AU’s full solidarity with the affected countries and the victims of terrorism;
  1. Underlines the imperative of enhancing comprehensive regional and continental approaches to address the growing scourge of terrorism and the underlying root causes and structural drivers associated with youth participation in violence including redressing the socio-economic imbalances that exist, with the view to economically empowering the people, especially the women and youth, in this regard, stresses the need to prioritize political solutions alongside military and security interventions; while recognizing that terrorism, radicalization and recruitment have been attributed to many causal factors such as democratic governance deficits, economic deprivation and marginalization, and lack of effective and legitimate governance structures for the provision of sustainable political and socio-economic infrastructures ;
  1. Underscores the need to further enhance cooperation, coordination and complementarity of the regional and continental efforts, strengthening synergy and harmonization of interventions, as well as information and intelligence sharing and lessons arising from countering terrorism to reinforce the overall response to the threat of terrorism;
  1. Highlights the need for context-specific interventions tailored to address the security, governance, development and humanitarian needs of the affected countries and regions with the participation of local community leaders, faith-based leaders, youth, women and the representatives of children;
  1. Emphasizes the need to leverage the immense resource espoused by Traditional, Cultural, Religious and Community Leaders in an effort to de-radicalize the youth, given the enormous respect and influence these leaders command in the communities they lead;
  1. Underscores the need to strengthen the oversight role of the PSC to ensure effective coordination and collaboration between all stakeholders, including Member States, RECs/RMs, the AU Commission, notably the African Centre for the Study and Research on Terrorism (ACSRT), African Union Mechanism for Police Cooperation (AFRIPOL), and Committee of Intelligence and Security Services of Africa (CISSA), as well as other relevant AU Organs and institutions;
  1. Encourages the RECs/RMs, who are yet to do so, to establish policy organs on peace and security, to ensure that all the regions have right architectures to respond to conflicts and crises, as well as terrorism and violent extremism; further encourages RECs/RMs with policy organs on peace and security to share expertise with those who are yet to establish theirs, and requests the AU Commission to provide the requisite support, where required and upon request;
  1. Urges the RECs/RMs to fully utilize the cooperative mechanisms established to address country- and region-specific issues, most notably the Sahel Fusion and Liaison Unit (UFL), the Nouakchott Process on the Enhancement of Security Cooperation and the Operationalization of the African Peace and Security Architecture in the Sahelo-Saharan Region, the Djibouti Process and the Accra Initiatives established to respond to growing insecurity linked to violent extremism in the region;
  1. Urges international partners to ensure zero tolerance for terrorism regardless of the targets or motives, and to take appropriate practical measures to ensure that their respective territories are not used by terrorists for inciting, instigating, organizing, facilitating, participating in, financing, or for the preparation or organization of terrorist acts intended to be committed against other States or their citizens;
  1. Reiterates the need to further enhance collaboration between the AU Commission and RECs/RMs; in this regard, requests the AU Commission to support the RECs/RMs to undertake the following:
  1. Explore best ways and means of further improving the implementation of policy interventions aimed at addressing the root causes and drivers of terrorism and violent extremism, especially the democratic governance deficit and the absence or weakness of governance structures in peripheral and remote territories, as well as political, social and economic marginalization;
  1. Accompany the Member States affected by the scourge of terrorism through mobilization of requisite resources, including funding needed for strengthening institutions for delivery of social services, such as education, justice, health care and entrenching democracy, good governance and the rule of law;
  1. Promote the development of economic opportunities, in particular trade facilitation and cross-border infrastructure and cooperation, to strengthen the regional integration necessary for the consolidation of peace and security, and reorient the people away from terrorism and violent extremism;
  1. Strengthen existing mechanisms at the level of RECs/RMs, to compile a list of persons, groups and entities involved in terrorist acts, including FTFs, as well as those sponsoring them; with a view to tracking, monitoring, reporting on, and proposing policy responses to prevent the expansion of the threats of terrorism and violent extremism with the support of the AFRIPOL, CISSA and  ACSRT;
  1. Establish regional counter-terrorism centres to support national efforts in preventing and combating terrorism;
  1. Put in place mechanisms for supporting initiatives of local communities both for deradicalization, reconciliation, inter-communal dialogue and for implementing measures for addressing the humanitarian and socio-economic needs of affected populations;
  1. Harness the comparative technical advantages of Africa’s governance and development institutions, including the African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM), African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), African Union Development Agency (AUDA-NEPAD), the African Development Bank (ADB), and relevant AU Commission Departments, in developing and implementing peace enhancing development projects, including quick impact projects in areas liberated from terrorist groups, that are aimed at promoting the provision of social services and support the livelihoods of people in marginalized regions;
  1. Convene inter-RECs/RMs policy coordination meetings horizontally among RECs/RMs, including at ministerial and heads of state and government levels taking note of the best practices of the Joint Summit of ECOWAS and ECCAS on peace, security and stability and the fight against terrorism and violent extremism held in Lomé, Togo in July 2018;
  1. Use existing platforms and mechanisms, including the inter-regional knowledge platform (I-RECKE) for early warning and experience sharing, joint planning and collective action, launched in July 2022, in Lusaka, Zambia;
  1. Support national Governments in investing in community policing and civil military relations in order to mobilize and sensitize the population against terrorism and violent extremism with the view to capturing the hearts and minds of the population, and creating a mindset change; and
  1. Harmonize counter-terrorism and related laws at the regional level to facilitate greater regional integration and effective response mechanisms to terrorism, violent extremism and other related crimes such as drug trafficking, human trafficking and maritime piracy.
  1. Underscores the need for RECs/RMs to be adequately financed, well-resourced and equipped to ensure that the Regional Standby Forces (RSFs) and security institutions engaging in conflict management and counter terrorist operations have the capacity for early and effective response;
  1. Looks forward to the convening of the first meeting of the Ministerial Committee on Terrorism as established by the Decision [Ext/Assembly/AU/Dec.(XVI)] adopted during the 16th Extraordinary Session of the Assembly of the African Union on Terrorism and Unconstitutional Changes of Government in Africa in May 2022;
  1. Decides to remain actively seized of the matter.

25 October 2022 - NW3608

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of educators are displaced, (b) for what period have the educators been displaced, (c) what work have the displaced educators been doing since they were displaced and (d) where do they perform the specified duties?

Reply:

(a),(b) and (c). The question asked by the Honourable Member falls within the Executive Authority of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) and not the Minister of Basic Education. 

25 October 2022 - NW3096

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What action has been taken against Sasol Secunda in (a) Mpumalanga and (b) the Free State, as the specified company continues to fail at meeting emission standards in the specified areas?

Reply:

The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) is better placed to respond to this question, as it is the competent authority that regulates emission standards as well as activities which result in atmospheric emissions.

25 October 2022 - NW3564

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

) Whether, she found that the Deputy Minister accomplished all the goals set for visits to (a) Sierra Leone and (b) Liberia in West Africa to deliver vaccines; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2 Whether any agreements were signed and/ or agreed to; if not, why not, in each case; If so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3 What was the total cost of travel for the trip to West Africa?

Reply:

1. Yes, Deputy Minister Ms Candith Mashego-Dlamini accomplished all the goals set for the visits to (a) Sierra Leone and (b) Liberia in West Africa to deliver vaccines.

The Deputy Minister visited Liberia on 24-28 September 2022 and Sierra Leone on 28-30 September 2022, respectively, to handover 79, 200 doses of the Johnson and Johnson (J&J) COVID-19 vaccines to each of the countries. These vaccines were handed over as part of a gift of the partnership and friendship between the Republic of South Africa and the two governments. The contribution of COVID-19 J&J vaccines has deepened the mutually beneficial cooperation with Liberia and Sierra Leone and enhanced bilateral relations. South Africa is striving to ensure that the Continent is "COVID Free" and to ensure that Africans are vaccinated to meet the World Health Organization (WHO) threshold. The doses presented to these countries were produced at the pharmaceutical manufacturing plant in Gqebera, South Africa, which is being operated by Aspen Pharma. The vaccine is proudly manufactured at a South African plant under license approved by the WHO. Liberia and Sierra Leone are among the first of 26 countries benefiting from this initiative.

2. No bilateral agreements were signed in both countries as the purpose of the visit was to deliver COVID-19 vaccines.

3. Total cost of the Deputy Minister’s travel to West Africa was R299 698.20.

25 October 2022 - NW3340

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether, with regard to the World Bank loan announced on 13 June 2022, the funds received will be utilised for any expenditure other than the procurement of vaccines; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether terms of repayment were agreed upon; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The World Bank loan was disbursed under the South Africa Covid-19 emergency response project. As such the proceeds will only be used to fund South Africa’s vaccine rollout strategy which includes retroactively funding the delivery and distribution plan as of January 2021

2. The terms of the loan were agreed upon before disbursement. The funding rates are concessional based on a 6-month Euribor reference rate plus a 0,47% spread as well as a grace period of 3 years after which the loan will be repaid for 13 years. This is cheaper than any funding the sovereign could achieve in debt capital markets for equivalent tenor loans.

25 October 2022 - NW3418

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How does her department intend to deal with the number of systematic challenges such as inequality, poverty and the low morale of overworked teachers?

Reply:

How the National Teaching Awards assist in improving teacher morale:

  • It influences educators who participate in district, provincial and national awards in both personal and professional ways;
  • Recognition at the NTA is empowering and serves as an affirmation and validation of the hard work in the classroom;
  • The NTA establishes through compliments and words of congratulations a sense of respect for teachers;
  • Teachers develop positive feelings about the profession and develop a sense of pride in being a teacher or school leaders who are making a difference in the lives of their learners;
  • The recognition provided for their hard work in the class and in the school as a whole is appreciated not only by themselves but also by the communities that they serve;
  • Participants in the awards develop a sense of honour and pride and believe in themselves as individuals who are making a positive contribution to society;
  • They feel honoured, proud and humbled to be recognised;
  • Their confidence in the profession is boosted.  They can take more risks and try new things in the classroom and the school as a whole; and
  • They are inspired to be a better teacher.  It encourages the educator to continue to strive for excellence.


* How the National Teachers' Day SHERO Awards are also contributing in improving teacher morale;

SHERO Awards serve as an affirmation that working in partnership with the private sector can be beneficial and motivating to both the school and teachers.

  • The awards bring positive recognition not only to the winning teachers but also to their schools and communities.
  • It enhances the teacher’s credibility with parents and the community.
  • It is beneficial for career-pathing when applying for posts at other schools.
  • The awards also provide an added opportunity for professional development and sharing good practices with colleagues.
  • They develop confidence and are willing to take on the challenge of new leadership roles.
  • They are more motivated to try new strategies and methods in the classroom.


* Impact of the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative through the employment of Education Assistants and General School Assistants and how it is assisting in alleviating the work-load of teachers; and

  • Provides an income for poor/unemployed households;
  • Creating job opportunities for the unemployed youth;
  • Providing on-the-job training that will assist in career-pathing; and
  • Provides an opportunity to gain experience in pursuing self-sustainable entrepreneurial activities.


*How the DBE is supporting teachers.

  • Provides support to teachers via online and face-to-face support in enhancing their skills for the 21st Century (e.g. Coding and Robotics)
  • Support in providing conducive conditions of service through engagements at the ELRC
  • Collaborating with provinces to support employee health and wellness.
  • Addressing the needs of teachers through regular engagements with provinces.
  • Closely monitor PEDs to ensure that allocated teacher posts are filled timeously to avoid additional workload for educators. This includes the provisioning of substitutes for posts temporarily vacated and the appointment of temporary educators against vacant promotional posts.
  • Ensure that all provinces have Employee Wellness Programmes in place and, in terms of the obligation, report the DBE and unions on their programmes through the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC).
  • Closely monitor PEDs to ensure that they comply with the implementation of the post-provisioning policy to ensure that posts are allocated to schools.

 

Addressing inequality in education

In terms of recruitment and selection, all departments (National and Provincial) are obliged to implement the Employment Equity Act provisions in their selection procedures. The Act promotes equity in the workplace and ensures that all employees including educators receive equal opportunities and that they are treated fairly. The Act also protects educators from unfair discrimination. All departments report on an annual basis on the implementation of the Act to the Department of Labour.

25 October 2022 - NW3199

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

On what date will she provide a reply to question 2522 that was published on Internal Question Paper No 27 on 26 August 2022?

Reply:

Attached, please see response provided for question 2522:

25 October 2022 - NW2838

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Finance

What mechanisms and/or measures has the National Treasury put in place to ensure that the R600 million allocated towards flood disaster relief in KwaZulu-Natal and the Eastern Cape will not be wasted by officials and/or lost through corruption and tender bids?

Reply:

The mechanism to ensure efficient and effective spending of allocations exist in law. Disaster relief grants are appropriated on the budgets of Vote 3: Co-operative Governance and Vote 33: Human Settlements. The allocations to provinces and municipalities are conditional grants in terms of the Division of Revenue Act. The Division of Revenue Act sets out the responsibilities of the National Transferring Officer related to planning, implementation and monitoring. In addition, the accounting officers of these departments’ responsibilities are set out in section 38 of the Public Finance Management Act. Amongst others, accounting officers are responsible for ensuring the efficient and effective spending of resources, and must take appropriate and effective steps to prevent unauthorised, irregular and fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

Accounting officers reporting responsibilities are set out in section 40 of the Public Finance Management Act and section 71 of the Municipal Finance Management Act. Section 12 of the Division of Revenue Act sets out the responsibilities of the receiving officer in relation to funds received from national government.

25 October 2022 - NW3164

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George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)whether, with regard to the value added tax (VAT) registration status of potential vendors, there is any existing difference in the procurement process with regard to how vendors who are (a) VAT registered and (b) not VAT registered are considered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in what way are they considered differently; (2) whether a VAT-registered vendor has any disadvantage to a vendor who is not VAT-registered; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether any steps will be taken to resolve the disadvantage; if not, why not; if so, what steps will be taken?

Reply:

1. In terms of Regulation 1 of the Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2017 (PPRs, 2017), price is defined as including all applicable taxes less all unconditional discounts. Furthermore, Regulations 6(1) and 7(1) of the PPRs, 2017 state that the formula must be used to calculate points out of 80 or 90 for price (as per definition in the PPR) in respect of tenders with a Rand value equal to or above the prescribed threshold, which price should be inclusive of all applicable taxes.

Therefore, the price used for evaluation of tenders is the price inclusive of all applicable taxes as per regulation 6(1) and 7(1). All applicable taxes certainly will include Value Added Tax (VAT), where applicable, and any other taxes as may be imposed through legislation.

Arising from a simple reading of the definition of price and the provisions of regulation 6(1) and 7(1) as stated above, price used for evaluation of tenders must be total price, inclusive of all applicable taxes. Such “all inclusive” price is what makes the evaluation comparative. There is no breakdown required to indicate the types of taxes that each supplier is paying. Everyone has a right to bid and to be awarded a bid if they comply with all applicable laws.

It is important to emphasize that as a procurement principle, organs of state may not interfere with a price submitted by a bidder. This includes adding / subtracting VAT from the price submitted by a bidder.

It should be stressed that mandatory registration for VAT is a legislative requirement once enterprises exceed a particular threshold in sales within a 12-month period. Other enterprises may elect voluntary registration for VAT even if they do not meet the mandatory threshold for registration. Institutions are encouraged to contact the South African Revenue Services for guidance on VAT registration requirements, should they so require.

2. Enterprises that by legislation are not required to register for VAT may not be unfairly penalized or advantaged in the evaluation and award of tenders on the basis of not being registered as VAT vendors. In other words, if an enterprise is not required by law to register as a VAT vendor, and in submitting a bid or price quotation thus does not include VAT in its price, an organ of state may not subsequently add VAT to the price submitted by the bidder. In a similar vein, the organ of state may not remove VAT from the bids of other bidders for evaluation purposes.

3. The onus, therefore, rests on the bidder to consider what the “including all applicable taxes” entails when determining the bid/ quotation price and to factor such information into the price submitted by that bidder in the quotation or tender document.

4. Please see response to questions 1 and 2 and above

25 October 2022 - NW3700

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the Republic’s foreign policy position regarding the unification of the Southern African Development Community and the African continent as a whole?

Reply:

  • In the context of Southern African Development Community (SADC) and African Union (AU) at large, reference is made to “integration” and not “unification”. The integration agenda of the African Union is driven by the respective Regional Economic Communities (RECs).
    • In the case of South Africa, the SADC remains the primary focus of the country’s foreign policy, which is aimed at the promotion of security and political stability, which are pathways towards addressing key challenges of underdevelopment, unemployment, and poverty.
    • Since its formation in 1980, SADC has adopted dozens of legal instruments aimed at deepening the regional integration agenda. Accordingly, South Africa continues to reaffirm her commitment to the regional integration agenda in line with the provisions of these instruments, which cover such sectors as trade and investment, energy security, food security, infrastructure development, health and education, mineral resources as well as peace and security.
    • The SADC integration objectives and strategies are articulated in the SADC Blueprints namely, the SADC Vision 2050 and the Regional Indicative Strategic Development Plan (RISDP) 2020-2030. South Africa was one of the key contributors in the development of the RISDP and it is involved in the development of its Implementation Plan.
    • In the context of the foundation aspect of RISDP 2020- 2030, which underpins the pursuit of Peace, Security and Good Governance in the region, South Africa plays an active role in efforts to ensure peace and security in the region. In this regard, SADC is engaged in finding a lasting solution in the Republic of Mozambique, the Kingdom of Lesotho, the Kingdom of Eswatini and the Democratic Republic of Congo. SADC also deploys electoral observer missions in countries that conduct elections as was the case in Angola on 24 August 2022 and in Lesotho on 7 October 2022. This is in line with the SADC Principles and Guidelines governing democratic elections.

25 October 2022 - NW3677

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of public schools in rural Eastern Cape cater for (a) autistic children and (b) children with serious learning disabilities?

Reply:

(a) Approximately 88 ordinary and special schools in the Eastern Cape, which is a generally rural province, cater for autistic children, (b) while 380 schools cater for children with serious learning disabilities. 

25 October 2022 - NW3623

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education.

Since 2015, what is the annual dropout rate (a) nationally and (b) provincially for (i) Grade 8 to Grade 12 and (ii) Grade 7 learners after completion of their General Education and Training?

Reply:

The most reliable estimates of dropout rates by grade are derived using STATS SA’s General Household Surveys, which are conducted annually. This is a nationally representative survey of South African households and collects information about the highest level of education attained by each member of the household. If a person’s highest level of education is grade 11, for example, and they are old enough to be unlikely to still be in the process of completing a higher level of education, it can then be assumed that they exited the education system at that point. The sample sizes are not large enough to permit precise estimates of dropout for each grade and province separately. The table below shows the estimated percentages of children reaching each grade, and conversely, the estimated percentages of children dropping out after each grade. Based on this methodology, data collected in a particular year is reflective of dropping out in the years preceding that year, but not necessarily of dropping out in that year. As the table shows, grade survival rates (or completion rates) have been increasing over time in recent years. Using GHS data from 2019-2021, the estimated percentage of youths who completed grade 12 had reached a figure of 57,0%.

Survival rates and drop-out rates for each grade

2015-2017

2017-2019

2019-2021

 

Percentage reaching at least this grade

Grade-specific dropout rate

Percentage reaching at least this grade

Grade-specific dropout rate

Percentage reaching at least this grade

Grade-specific dropout rate

Total cohort

100%

 

100%

 

100%

 

No schooling

 

0.6%

 

0.6%

 

0.7%

Grade 1

99.4%

0.2%

99.4%

0.1%

99.3%

0.0%

Grade 2

99.3%

0.2%

99.3%

0.3%

99.3%

0.2%

Grade 3

99.1%

0.5%

99.0%

0.2%

99.1%

0.2%

Grade 4

98.6%

0.4%

98.8%

0.3%

98.9%

0.4%

Grade 5

98.2%

0.6%

98.5%

0.6%

98.4%

0.4%

Grade 6

97.6%

1.5%

97.8%

1.4%

98.0%

1.3%

Grade 7

96.2%

2.9%

96.5%

2.7%

96.7%

1.9%

Grade 8

93.4%

4.7%

93.9%

4.3%

94.9%

3.8%

Grade 9

89.0%

9.3%

89.9%

8.9%

91.3%

6.8%

Grade 10

80.7%

15.6%

81.9%

15.3%

85.1%

12.4%

Grade 11

68.2%

25.0%

69.3%

23.7%

74.6%

22.4%

Grade 12

51.1%

 

52.9%

 

57.9%

 

Notes: Own calculations using General Household Survey datasets, STATS SA.
Three years of GHS data are pooled together with the purpose of increasing the sample size and therefore constructing more stable estimates over time. For the GHS datasets of 2015-2017, only persons born between 1991 and 1993 were included; for 2017-2019, only persons born between 1993 and 1995 were included, and for 2019-2021, only persons born between 1995 and 1997 were included. These age ranges were decided on in order to ensure that persons included would have been old enough to have been unlikely to still be completing school but young enough so as to reflect recent trends in school completion and dropout.

25 October 2022 - NW3558

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, taking into account that at the start of each year her department celebrates top achievers nationally and also places heavy emphasis on Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) subjects, her department has any inclusive initiative for non-STEM subjects at the same level to ensure a much more diverse appreciation for the specified subjects by learners in schools throughout the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The STEM subjects have enjoyed special attention over the last few years, given the need to provide learners with the space to develop their problem solving and critical thinking skills and the imperative to address the needs of a technologically advancing economy. However, the emphasis on the STEM subjects does not imply a neglect of the non-STEM subjects. In the support programmes of the Department of Basic Education, all subjects are given attention, with more attention being devoted to subjects where there is evidence of under-performance. For example, the Department has over the last few years devoted a significant percentage of its annual budget to reading as part of developing language competency. The Department is currently devoting much attention to the Business, Commerce and Management Sciences (BCM) subjects i.e. Accounting, Business Studies, and Economics given the decline in the enrolment for these subjects.   

25 October 2022 - NW3560

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the 38 new subjects that her department intends to introduce in schools, despite the fact that there are schools, especially those in rural areas, which currently do not have the capacity in terms of teachers to teach the existing subjects, what are the relevant details of how her department will ensure that they not only address those challenges, but also capacitate those schools with the necessary human resources and infrastructure to enable them to offer the additional subjects to their learners?

Reply:

Please see attached for detailed progress. 

25 October 2022 - NW2855

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy.Mr. Jacob MbeleDirector General

Given the Government’s commitment to COP-26 and a so-called just transition from coal to green energy resources, (a) what steps has his department taken to protect jobs in the coal industry and (b) how does his department rationalise moving away from coal as an energy resource amidst the increased importance of coal in nations such as China?

Reply:

a) The department is initiating social dialogue with other spheres of government, labour, business, employers, workers, communities, and historically marginalised people to solicit their views in the design of a plan to protect jobs as we transition.

b) The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP2019) continues to provide a balanced policy mix of coal, renewables, gas, hydro and nuclear as part of our transition from high emitting to low emitting energy sources.

25 October 2022 - NW3794

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there are still schools that make use of pit latrines; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total number of the specified schools in each province, (b) headway has her department made to address the matter and (c) are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

1. Of the initial list of 3898 schools included in the Sanitation Appropriate for Education (SAFE) programme, work proceeded at 2786 schools.  The balance of schools was either closed, merged or found to have appropriate sanitation.  All of the 2786 schools were allocated to implementing agents for planning, design, tender and construction.

2. Of the 2786 school on the original list of SAFE, sanitation projects at 2359 schools have already progressed to practical completion.  The balance of 324 sanitation projects are scheduled for completion in 2022/23.

3. During 2021/22, an additional 622 schools dependant on basic pit toilets were identified.  These additional schools were subsequently allocated to implementing agents.  Some of the sanitation projects at these schools may achieve practical completion in 2022/23, but the bulk of the sanitation projects at these additional schools are scheduled to achieve practical completion in 2023/24.   

25 October 2022 - NW3699

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In light of the fact that the Economic Community of West African States is looking at establishing a common currency for the bloc, on what date is it envisaged that the SA Customs Union will look into such ideas?

Reply:

At the onset, it should be clarified that the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) is a Regional Economic Community (REC), while the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) is a trade bloc, which is composed of a free trade area with a common external tariff amongst the member countries.

The SACU is the oldest Customs Union in the world which was formed in 1910 among countries of Southern Africa namely: - Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia, and South Africa, with headquarters in Windhoek, Namibia. Since adopting the 2002 Agreement, SACU has often been used as a benchmark for arrangement of this nature, particularly in the African continent where different regions seek to integrate their economies further.

The SACU is complemented well by the Common Monetary Area (CMA) wherein four of the

five countries are member namely: - South Africa, Eswatini, Lesotho and Namibia. Under this arrangement, the South African Rand is a legal tender. The South African Rand therefore is the common currency in the CMA.

Botswana is the only member of SACU that does not recognise the Rand as a legal tender due to its withdrawal from the arrangement in 1975, which replaced the Rand as the official legal tender in 1976. The revised and improved version of this arrangement was adopted in February 1992 when the Multilateral Monetary Agreement (MMA) which underpins the CMA was signed and came into force in 1994. The South African Rand is therefore a common currency in four of the five Member States of SACU, which also belong to the CMA. No date has been set to get Botswana back into the CMA.

25 October 2022 - NW3624

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       (a) What programmes and procedures did her department put in place to mitigate the dropout rate of learners, (b) what do the specified programmes and procedures entail, (c) does each province have its own programmes and procedures, (d) how are the programmes and procedures monitored and  audited and (e) what number of learners have been guided to finish their schooling through the programmes (i) nationally and (ii) in each province; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with the (a) audit and (b) monitoring reports for each of the programmes nationally and provincially?

Reply:

(1) (a) What programmes and procedures did her department put in place to mitigate the dropout rate of learners,

Ensuring that children attend school during the compulsory schooling age band, and striving to increase the percentage of youths who successfully complete twelve years of schooling, in other words Grade 12, are central to the mission of the Department. A large range of activities and initiatives are aimed at advancing this mission. They have been successful insofar as dropping out before successful completion of the National Senior Certificate has been on the decline, and schooling among children at the compulsory ages has for many years been kept at almost 100%, though there were some setbacks during the pandemic. Successful completion of twelve years of schooling in South Africa is approximately on a par with that seen in other middle income countries, as explained in several of the Department’s annual reports on the results of the National Senior Certificate (available on the DBE website).

The problem of learners not successfully completing Grade 12 (or anything equivalent outside the schooling system) should be seen in the context of relatively weak results among many of those learners who do obtain the NSC. Here South Africa is behind other economically similar countries. The problem is reflected in the comparably low Grade 9 TIMSS results, even in 2019 and after a couple of decades of improvements, improvements attributable in large part to government’s focus on quality schooling. Clearly, these improvements should continue. It is this need that lies behind certain high-level targets in government’s Medium Term Strategic Framework, for instance that more Grade 12 youths should obtain the mark thresholds in mathematics and physical science needed to enter university programmes generating critical skills in areas such as engineering, chemistry and financial accounting.

To sum up, existing initiatives have contributed to a reduction in dropping out over many years, and this trend shows no sign of slowing down, as will be explained below. South Africa’s international rankings suggest that currently an even larger problem than dropping out is the levels of skills among youths who do succeed in obtaining the National Senior Certificate. While the Honourable Member of Parliament’s question relates to dropping out, the response must be understood in this wider context.

Moreover, it is critical to understand efforts to promote successful completion of schooling in terms of the reasons why youths drop out of school. The current research confirms that it is those learners who do not cope with their studies who are the most likely to drop out, and poverty in the home plays a large role here. According the 2019 General Household Survey, 34% of youths aged 16 to 18 are not at school essentially because they are not coping academically. Another large factor, according to this source, is the 25% of youths indicating ‘no money for fees’. Even here, coping academically plays a role: parents and guardians may decide that a child who is not performing well as school is not worth investing in. (See the Department’s series of publications General Household Survey (GHS): Focus on Schooling.)

In line with the international and local evidence, and in line with the policy advice provided by organisations such as UNESCO, government’s strategies aimed at increasing ‘survival’ to Grade 12 are multi-pronged, with a special emphasis on dealing with the effects of poverty and on improving learning and teaching in the classroom. The following can be considered key initiatives behind past reductions in dropping out, and likely drivers of future improvements in this regard:

  • The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP). This intervention encourages children to attend school, and promotes learning by reducing levels of hunger and malnutrition, which inhibit successful learning.
  • No fee schools. This longstanding intervention ensures that children and youths in poorer communities are not prevented from attending school due to the inability of the household to pay for school fees.
  • Policies on teenage pregnancies. Government Notice 704 of 2021 formalised policy on the protection of the schooling of pregnant learners. Among females aged 16 to 18, around 10% did not attend school due to pregnancy, according to the 2019 GHS.
  • Ongoing strengthening of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS). A more focussed curriculum is one reason that has been put forward as a reason for past improvements in South Africa’s performance in international testing programmes – see the Department’s Action Plan to 2024.
  • Efforts aimed at improving learning in the early grades. A key government priority is improving reading, and learning and teaching in general, in the early grades. Several interventions contribute towards this, including the shift in the responsibility for pre-schooling from the social development sector to basic education, the Early Grade Reading Study and associated teacher development innovations, and the introduction of the Systemic Evaluation.
  • Special examination preparation support for Grade 12 learners. Activities here, aimed largely at ensuring that learners leave school with the NSC, include the so-called winter schools.
  • The expansion of the learner-level enrolment and attendance monitoring systems. The Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System (LURITS), the SA-SAMS school management system and the partnership-driven Data Driven Districts (DDD) initiative have all contributed to a more robust approach to monitoring exactly where in the country dropping out is occurring. These systems proved invaluable for providing information on, for instance, where children were not returning to school during the pandemic.

(b) what do the specified programmes and procedures entail,

There is extensive publicly available reporting on all the initiatives listed above. The Honourable Member of Parliament should please consult past annual reports of the Department, and other reports dealing with specific initiatives. The NSNP, as a recipient of a DBE conditional grant, is extensively reported in the annual reports of the provincial education departments. The basic planning framework for no fee schools is regularly updated – see for instance Government Notice 1730 of 2022. Materials relating to the ‘annual teaching plans’ developed to cope with the impacts of the pandemic and its after-effects, are available on the DBE website. How data were used to understand patterns of dropping out during the pandemic can found in a few reports on the DBE website, including Pandemic-related losses in contact time across seven provinces according to SA-SAMS data and The COVID-19 pandemic, enrolments, dropping out and attendance explained.

(c) does each province have its own programmes and procedures

Provinces all have some initiatives of their own, but alignment across the various programmes within each province, across provinces, and between the national and provincial levels is continually promoted, in particular through the HEDCOM structure (functioning in terms of the National Education Policy Act) and its sub-committees.

(d) how are the programmes and procedures monitored and audited

The overriding framework for this is provided by the Public Finance Management Act and the National Education Policy Act. Some initiatives have been evaluated externally by the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME). This includes the NSNP, the CAPS and support to Grade 12 learners. The relevant reports are available in the Evaluations Repository of DPME. Departmental annual reports, which provide details on the whole range of initiatives, are audited with respect to both spending and outcomes.

and (e) what number of learners have been guided to finish their schooling through the programmes (i) nationally and (ii) in each province;

It would be impossible to attribute successful completion for individual learners to specific interventions, as they are highly inter-connected. However, it seems clear that improvements in terms of successful completion of Grade 12 are the result of the variety of programmes aimed precisely at this outcome. According to the last NSC report of the Department, the percentage of youths successfully completing Grade 12 improved from 45% in 2005 to 57% in 2019, and number of matriculants continued to rise beyond 2019, despite the pandemic. The difference between 45% and 57% translates to around 130 000 additional youths achieving the ‘Matric’ in 2019 relative to 2005.

(2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with the (a) audit and (b) monitoring reports for each of the programmes nationally and provincially?

All relevant audit and monitoring reports are available online. The responses provided above point the Honourable Member of Parliament to specific documents.

25 October 2022 - NW3692

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In which year did her department stop issuing matric certificates to non-South Africans, (b) what is the total number of such certificates that have been withheld over the years and (c)(i) on what date and (ii) how does her department plan to address the matter?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education is not responsible for the issuing of certificates. Certification is a competency of the Quality Assurance Council, Umalusi. However, there has never been a distinction  between South African Citizens and Non-South Africans. All candidates that register for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examination and satisfy the requirements of the NSC are issued with the certificate.   

(b) Zero

(c)(i) None

(c) (ii) The matter does not have to be addressed as it is non-existent    

24 October 2022 - NW3746

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will she ensure that the community of the Reutlwile informal settlement in Rustenburg Local Municipality is provided with an adequate supply of water?

Reply:

It is responsibility of Municipalities working together with Department of Water and Sanitation to provide water to communities. It is recommended that the question be redirected to the Ministry of Water and Sanitation as a lead department.

 

24 October 2022 - NW3764

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What remedial action has she taken to ensure the availability of necessary machines to exhume the outstanding bodies in the KwaZulu-Natal floods?

Reply:

It is the competency of South African Police service to conduct exhumation of bodies. It is recommended that this question be redirected to Ministry of Police to respond accordingly.