Questions and Replies

Filter by year

14 December 2021 - NW2393

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)       Whether she communicates with small businesses to find ways of boosting their productivity given the devastating effects of Eskom’s power cuts on small businesses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) are the estimated losses that have been incurred by small businesses because of power cuts in 2021 and (b) intervention strategies has her department put in place to assist small businesses in this regard? NW2766E”

Reply:

(1) – (2) The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) has a mandate to lead and coordinate an integrated approach to the promotion and development of entrepreneurship, Small, Micro and Medium Enterprises (SMMEs) and Co-operatives, and to ensure an enabling legislative and policy environment to support their growth and sustainability. This includes ensuring that the SMMEs and Co-operatives are kept productive, not only during the periods of the unfortunate Eskom’s power cuts, but as a standard support provided by the Department to the SMMEs and Co-operatives.

The ongoing widespread rolling blackouts were not anticipated, however, through messaging and support to SMME’s in this regard, the department seeks to communicate to all SMME’s of the impact of power outages to their businesses and encourage them to employ contingency arrangements and planning in accordance with the ESKOM’s power alerts schedules on outages.

In so doing, SMME’s will experience minimum disruption through proper planning until the electricity crisis is resolved by ESKOM and respective supporting departments.

The department has not done an estimate as it has not engaged in an exercise of assessing the impact of power outages to the SMME’s. Further, power outages not only affect the economic sector alone but South African society as a whole and it is not clear from ESKOM, DPE and DME when these outages will end.

The Department has in earnest started considering green energy interventions, which will assist SMMEs and Co-operatives to stay abreast amidst the power cuts, thereby boosting their productivity and sustainability. A partnership has been formalised in this area of work with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment and progress being made towards the implementation of the planned interventions is reported as part of the Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan.

The DSBD’s agency, sefa, has also prioritised green industries (renewable energy, waste, and recycling management) as one of the sectors that the agency funds for qualifying business ventures.

The Minister for Small Business Development launched the Youth Challenge Fund (YCF) on 18 November 2021, which is a youth start-up programme co-designed by the DSBD and its entities, sefa and Seda to contribute towards resilient, green and inclusive economic recovery. One of the innovative sectors targeted as part of the YCF is the green economy – focusing on funding youth entrepreneurs that are in the business of energy, renewables and recycling.

Despite the constant communication with the SMMEs and Co-operatives, there has not been an indication, to DSBD, of the losses that they have incurred due to the Eskom’s power cuts. However, it is understood that small business owners do from time to time approach the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE), as Eskom is DPE’s entity, with an indication of the loss they incurred due to the power cuts; and DPE, working with Eskom, assists those small business where possible. It should be emphasised that DSBD’s support of small businesses is not limited to challenges faced by SMMEs and Co-operatives due to power cuts, which will be addressed through the green energy initiatives outlined above, but it's a holistic support.

 

MS STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

13 December 2021 - NW2685

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). What (a) total number of sports facilities have been built by his department in the Northern Cape in the past five years and (b)(i) are the locations of the specified facilities and (c) at what cost have the facilities been built; (2). whether his department built any sport facilities in the Namaqua District; if not, why not; if so, what are the names of the towns in which the facilities were built? NW3197E

Reply:

The Department does not have a dedicated allocation within its own budget for the provision of Sports Facilities. This responsibility lies with the Local Government Sphere in terms of the Constitution. The Department however made vigorous representation to COGTA to ensure that the allocation for Sport and Recreation Infrastructure in MIG should be located within the budget in the Department responsible for Sport. COGTA however ring-fenced funding that the Department could allocate towards the construction of Sports Facilities.

1. Since the inception of the ring-fenced Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) in 2016/17, the Department used as a funding mechanism for development of sport facilities in municipalities. Fifteen (15) municipalities have been allocated in the Northern Cape Province, and their list with corresponding budgets is as follows:

No

LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

PROJECT NAME

YEAR OF PROJECT

BUDGET ALLOCATED

1

Khai Ma

Namakwa

Construction of a multi-purpose sport field in Poffader

2016/17

R8,000,000.00

2

Umsobomvu

Pixley ka Seme

construction of Noupoort Community Indoor Gym

2016/17

R6,500,000.00

3

Gamagara

Johnn Taolo Gatsewe

Contruction of Kathu multi-purpose sport facility

2016/17

2018/19

R10,000,000.00

R2,009,250.00

4

Hantam

Namakwa

Construction of Calvinia Sports field

2017/18

R6,866,588.00

5

Sol Plaaitjie

Francis Baard

Refurbishment of Galeshewe stadium

Construction of Florenville Swimming pool

Refurbishment of De Beers Stadium

2017/18

R6,866,588.00

(Co-funding)

6

Kamiesberg

Namakwa

Upgrading of Kharkama Sport Facility

2018/19

R4,370,000.00

7

Phokwane

Francis Baard

Construction of Ganspan Sports Complex

2018/19

R11,290,750.00

8

Gasegonyane

John Taole-Gaetsewe

Upgrading and Refurbishment of Mothibastad Sports Complex

2018/19

R10,545,000.00

9

Emthanjeni

Pixley Ka Seme

Upgrading of Khwezi Sport Grounds

2019/20

R11,941,000.00

10

Dawid Kruiper

ZF Mgcawu

The development of sports ground in Rosedale

2019/20

R9,000,000.00

11

Magareng

Francis Baard

Upgrading of Ikhutseng stadium

2019/20

R8,000,000.00

12

Renosterberg

Pixley Ka Seme

Upgrading of Vanderkloof Sport Facility.

2020/21

R 11,500,000.00

13

Thembelihle

Pixley Ka Seme

Development of Steynville Sport Facility

2020/21

R 11,500,000.00

14

Khei

ZF Mgcawu

Development of Grootdrink Sport Facility.

2020/21

R 9,330,000.00

15

Nama Khoi

Namakwa

Buffelrivier Sport Facility

2020/21

R 7,500,000.00

Noteworthy to also indicate that municipalities like Siyancuma and Kamiesberg in Pixley Ka Seme District and Namakwa District respectively were also allocated during initial years of the programme, but their projects were not registered due to certain MIG requirements and their allocation went back to Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, and those allocations are not included in this count.

However, Kamiesberg was re-allocated in 2018/19 for Upgrading of Kharkama Sport Facility.

1. So far the Department has allocated projects in three Municipalities in Namakwa District; which are:

i) Kamiesberg – the facility built is Kharkama

ii) Khaima - allocation made for Pofadder but the Council decided to thinly spread the R 8 000 000 allocated among its three towns without consent from the Department, and this impacted negatively on deliverables.

iii) Hantam – allocation made for Calvinia sport facility but part of it was used for upgrades in Niewoudtville.

iv) Nama Khoi – the facility is built in Buffelrivier.

13 December 2021 - NW2448

Profile picture: Adams, Ms R C

Adams, Ms R C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps are being taken by (a) his department and/or (b) the entities reporting to him to promote and support the creative sector in (i) forging social cohesion and (ii) advocating against social ills such as gender-based violence and femicide, given that the forging of social cohesion is a national imperative and one of the seven apex priorities of the sixth administration in which the creative sector can play a major role in communicating a positive message which heightens national consciousness through music, poetry, literary works, sport and many other creative works?

Reply:

a) My Department promote and support the creative sector by providing funding to Entities reporting to me, these Entities then engage the creative sector to forge social cohesion and advocate against social ills. Examples on how the Department’s entities directly and indirectly support the sectror are as follows;

  • The Market Theatre Foundation, is currently creating a play about gender-based violence for teenagers, to be disseminated digitally to high schools nationwide. The play is designed to help high school learners identify gender-based violence and the way it affects their lives, as well as equip them with knowledge, skills, and resources to support them in situations in which they survivors of gender-based violence. In addition, the Market Theatre Laboratory works extensively with its own students on building awareness around gender-based violence through a series of workshops. The students create plays throughout the year exploring this and other socially relevant themes. In 2021, the Market Theatre Laboratory partnered with an independent theatre company to host performances of the play “Text Me When You Arrive: a guide on how not to get raped and killed in South Africa”, a play also grappling with this theme.

The National Film and Video Foundation’s stance has been reflected through the following projects:

  • Research conducted in partnership with Sisters Working in Film & TV (SWIFT) entitled “Gender Matters in the South African Film Industry” (2018) which aimed at providing information and statistics on women participation, challenges and roles in the local film industry,
  • An MOU signed with SWIFT which covered amongst other things, the implementation of a Code of Good Practice: Handling Sexual Harassment in the Film and Television Industry (“The Code”) which promotes workplaces that are free of sexual harassment, where employers and employees respect one another’s integrity and dignity, their privacy, and their right to equality.
  • In partnership with GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH), the NFVF institutionalised gender sensitivity training and GBV training with industry proessionals and AFDA students respectively

The Robben Island Museum hosted a social cohesion programme in the form of an Annual Spring School programme held on the island aimed at capacitating the youth and recently held one on 04 - 09 October 2021. The main objective of all the Nation Building Youth Camps facilitated by Robben Island Museum is to create an opportunity and space to debate on social ills, pertinent issues affecting communities, inclusivity and leadership skills. The theme of the 2021 Spring School was Young people acknowledging that the epidemic of gender-based violence and femicide in South Africa is a national crisis. The 2021 Spring School Programme was made possible with the support from the DSAC’s Sub-Directorate on Social Cohesion and Nation Building.

In addition to the above, other specific programmes implemented include the following:

Social Cohesion Advocates Programme

Through the Social Cohesion Advocates Programme, the Department has been able to implement GBV Dialogues and Seminars in churches, institutions of higher learning such as at then Vaal University of Technology (VUT). As part of creating platforms for promoting Social Cohesion and Nation Building Social Cohesion Advocates have engaged in After School care programmes to empower girls and young women.

During the July 2021 Unrest, Social Cohesion Advocates have been able to participate in fact finding missions. They have engaged communities in dialogues including trainings on Mediation, Conflict Resolution and Peace Building. There have also been initiatives on Healing of Memories and Trauma and Trauma Counselling session.

Preventing Gender Based Violence

Where Gender Based Violence (GBV) is concerned, the idea is to prevent it from happening as opposed to providing interventions when it has happened as that tends to be costlier and unsustainable. As the adage goes Prevention is better than cue. Communities need to understand the Concept of Gender so that they can understand why the scourge is called GBV. Capacity Building in the form of Training has therefore been engaged into including two (2) Gender Sensitisation and GGBV Workshops have been held. A Gender Sensitisation and GBV Workshop was conducted for Albinism Advocacy Access (AAA) on 20 – 22 October 2021 Another one was conducted at Inanda which is one of 30 hotspot areas in KwaZulu Natal (KZN) as communicated by the Minister of Police, Mr Bheki Cele. The Department intends massifying these awareness creation workshops including in areas such as Delft and Lusikisiki.

Funding to Non Profit Organisations

Over and above these, the Departments funds several Non Profit organisations that encourage Prevention of GBV. In this financial year, three (3) such organizations. These organisations have programmes such as After school Programmes that reduce the exposure of children to GBV plus unwanted and or unplanned pregnancies.

Campaigns led by the Department

The Department has also engaged in active campaigns such as The Orange Day Campaign which marks the 25th as a day to wear orange and unite to end violence Against women and Girls (VAWG). This way, on a monthly basis, 365/24/7. we are able to promote the message of GBV prevention as opposed to focusing exclusively on 16 Days of Activism on No Violence Against Women and Children (VAWC). This also ensures that there is monitoring of progress especially as DSAC reports on a monthly basis to the Department of Women Youth and People with Disabilities, under Pillar 2 of the Gender Based Violence National Strategic Plan 2030.

Further, Department has launched two programmes in an aid to raise awareness against GBVF. The programmes are Golekane and Baqhawafazi. Golekane is a campaign which endorses a call to action for men by men to end GBVF through behavioural dialogs, panel discussions, grassroots anti GBVF activations and father and son camps.

Baqhawafazi is a movement that seeks to raise awareness against gender based violence, intimate partner violence and femicide in South Africa. It is comprised of testimonials telling the untold stories of GBVF through raw footage from survivors of GBVF. Some of the activities implemented include The Survivors Guild- August 2021, A walk fit for purpose- August 2021, Digital Content on Social Media pages – September 2021, Filming and production of interviews – September 2021, Media Placement- Erection of billboards and Street pole ads- September 2021.

13 December 2021 - NW2627

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, in light of the eviction of traditional healers from the Motouleng Caves in 2020, where farm owners and private land owners blocked black persons from accessing caves and other historically spiritual places on the basis that the caves were on private property, his department is considering to declare such areas as heritage sites that can be accessed by our people; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the progress made in that regard?

Reply:

The honorable member should note that the site is privately owned, although the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) and the Free State Provincial Heritage Resources Authority (FSPHRA) can declare the sites at provincial or national level, the owner reserves the right to admission.

It is our considered view that a negotiated Management Conservation Management Plan (CMP) can aid an amicable agreement. The site is nominated and served at the Free State Provincial Heritage Resources Authority (FSPHRA) grading and declaration committee.

  • The Committee considered giving this site a Grade II status due to its importance to people in the Free State and recommend that an application be submitted to South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) for Grade I due to the site’s national significance.
  • The FSPHRA is will meet with Setsoto Municipality to discuss and to map a way forward regarding the protection of the site.

13 December 2021 - NW2532

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)With reference to COVID-19 relief funding via the Tourism Relief Fund, what (a) processes, procedures and controls are in place to investigate and criminally charge officials who processed non-qualifying beneficiaries who applied for the fund and (b) are the timelines, time frames and deadlines in this regard respectively; (2) what total (a) number of beneficiaries and (b) amount was paid to each (i) SA Social Security Agency grant beneficiary, (ii) Unemployment Insurance Fund beneficiary, (iii) deceased person, (iv) person in the employ of the State in any capacity, (v) person with invalid identity numbers and (vi) person with incorrect identity numbers?

Reply:

1. The Department will conduct an independent investigation into the double payment to one beneficiary. This is scheduled to conclude by end of April 2022.

2. Only (iv) person in the employ of the State in any capacity, is applicable as part of the findings related to Tourism Relief Fund (TRF). The Department is liaising with the Accounting Officers of the Directors/Owners of such beneficiary businesses to establish whether they had permission to conduct business. This is scheduled to conclude in March 2022 and the outcome will guide the department’s actions.

13 December 2021 - NW2727

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with a list of all forensic investigation cases undertaken in his department over the past three years, indicating the (a) cost of each investigation and (b) outcome and/or status of each investigation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2). whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with (a) a list of all court cases that have been brought by the arts sector against (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him and (b) the reasons for each of the cases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) &(2). Yes, I will provide Mr.Mhlongo with the required information, see attached documents

CASES BY ARTS SECTOR

REASON FOR EACH CASE

Timbila TA Afrika // Minister of Arts and Culture

The matter emanates from the contract MOA between the Department and Limpopo Arts and Culture Youth Forum in August 2018. The plaintiff was contracted by the Beneficiary to supply the sound system, jumping castles and security.

Golola Consultancy (Pty) Ltd // Department of Arts and Culture

Department awarded a tender on 06 July 2004 to a consortium of which Golola (Pty) Ltd was a member. The tender was for the rendering of professional and technical services to the department regarding the project known as Telephone Interpreting Services of South Africa (TISSA). Golola Consultancy is suing the Minister of Arts and Culture for the alleged outstanding invoices for the services rendered in 2005.

The Plaintiff withdrew the matter and tendered wasted costs and party costs.

The Department is recovering the wasted cost

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) // South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) & Others wherein the DAC has been joined as a third party

This matter concerns a 2005 lawsuit wherein the GEPF is suing the SABC for payment of arrear rental (including damages) owed by the former Bophuthatswana (BOP) Broadcasting Corporation (now part of the SABC). The lease was for a period of 20 years starting on 1/12/91 and terminating on 30/11/11. It is alleged that the National Government through the Department of Communications and the former DACST were obliged to implement Cabinet Resolutions relating to the settlement of this intergovernmental dispute. Cabinet has in fact instructed DOC and DAC to establish an adjudication and evaluation panel to ensure the protection of fiduciary duties of stakeholders and government objective to empower, support and promote SA music content

Outlook Security Services and Cleaning and Mr Collins Mabaso

The Department received copies of the pleadings from the Acting CEO of Downtown Music Hub who are the First and Second defendants in this matter and the Department and the DG Mr Mkhize are cited as the Third and Forth Defendants. Plaintiffs are suing the Defendants for the alleged breach of the security contract and claims damages in the sum of R758 000

Trade Union for Musician of South Africa (TUMSA) // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Equality Court matter- TUMSA alleges that the criteria for the covid-19 relief funding unfairly discriminates against its members-a social group of musicians who have suffered financial prejudice

Guild of Choral and Indigenous Music Practitioners NPC and Thomas Kolo // Minister of Arts and Culture and Others

The Plaintiff/s brought an action against the Department alleging that the Department failed to pay the amount agreed to as per the Memorandum of Agreement

   

University of KwaZulu Natal // Minister of Sports Art and Culture

The Plaintiff has issued summons against the Minister for breach of contract

CASES BY PUBLIC ENTITIES

RESON FOR EACH CASE

Zixolisile Feni // Minister of Arts and Culture and PanSALB

Review Application launched on 09/11/2012 at the North Gauteng High Court

The Applicant, Mr. Feni is a former employee of the PanSALB who is challenging the Ministers authority and power to appoint a Caretaker CEO of PanSALB and ultimately the decisions taken by the Caretaker CEO who is alleged not to have been appointed in compliance with the legislation.

Karabo Mbele & 17 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: 50349/15

High Court, PTA

Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to initiate an investigation to determine the fitness and suitability/ dissolution of all members of the PanSALB Board

Karabo Mbele & 20 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: J823/15

Labour Court , Braamfontein

The Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to declare as unlawful and setting aside the appointment of the Second respondent as the Acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Third Respondent(PanSALB) and directing the Second and Fourth Respondents to immediately retrospectively reinstate the Applicants.

Mbulungeni Madiba and 9 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture and 2 Others

Former Board of PanSALB is challenging the Minister’s decision to dissolve the Board of PanSALB

TN Monyela // Ditsong Museum of South Africa and the Minister of Arts and Culture

The Plaintiff, a Director at Ditsong Museum of South Africa is suing the Ditsong Museum and the Minister of Arts and Culture for damages

Atlantis Corporate Travel (Pty) Ltd // National Heritage Council (NHC) and Another

Atlantis has sued the National Heritage Council for breach of contract.

RRM Monareng // the Minister of Arts and Culture and Pan South African Language Board

The Applicant is challenging the Minister’s decision to discipline him as the CEO of PANSALB in the absence of the Board of PanSALB –

Johannesburg Labour Court.

B.D Mabasa // National Library of South Africa and Others

Case No: 22483/19

The Plaintiff claims that the Defendants breach the conditions of the Settlement Agreement between the him and the First Defendant (NLSA) when the First Defendant made statements in Parliament regarding the Defendant’s case and alleges that those statements were misleading and made with intention to injure the Plaintiff’s professional

reputation

The National Arts Council of South Africa // The Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture and 4 Others

The Applicant brought an application to review and set aside the Public Protector’s report No. 125 of 2019/2020 dated 15 June 2020, its findings and the recommendations arising therefrom. There is no relief sought against the Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture

Classic Arms (Pty) Limited // The Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and 3 Others

The Applicant brought an application declaring the decision of the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) dated 14 October 2020 invalid and setting aside the decision to stop the processing of Section 32(9) permits for heritage firearms. An order ordering The National Commissioner of the South African Police Services to process permanent export applications for firearms that require Section 32(19) permits in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999

Asstej SA and Others // National Arts Council and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court Western Cape Division as a Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (“NAC”), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the First, Second and Third Applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and Applicants, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

National Arts Festival vs National Arts Council and Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court of SA Gauteng Local Division as Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (”NAC”), its executive council or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the first applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and applicant, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

The NAF is claiming R8, 000, 000.00 from the NAC

The Applicant lodged an appeal with the Minister on 12 March 2021 to set aside the decision taken by the NAC.

Sonwabile Mancontywa // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and National Heritage Council

The applicant brought an urgent application amongst others to declare that the Minister lacked the authority and acted ultra vires in the appointment of the administrators for the Second Respondent

VR Theatrical (Pty) Ltd and Another // National Arts Council (NAC) and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the Western Cape Division, Cape Town as Second and Third Respondents for an application amongst others reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent (the NAC), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilaterally reduce amounts to be paid to the applicants in accordance with Grant Agreements concluded between the NAC and the applicants, for payment of amounts under the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package (the “Grant Agreements”).

The table below provide a summary of legal cases against public entities

NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL

PARTIES

DESCRIPTION OF THE MATTER

STATUS OF MATTER

QUANTUM CLAIMED

NAC // National Arts Festival NPC (NAF) Gauteng Local Division

Case no.: 14206/2021

High court application in terms of which the NAF sought an order declaring that the terms of the grant agreement concluded on 28.01.2021 remain in force and are binding on the NAC in particular that the NAF be entitled to grant amount of R8 000 000.00 and directing that the NAC make forthwith payment to the NAF in the amount of R5 600 000.00.

Application for special leave was dismissed by the SCA with costs.

The original claim was for R8 000.000.00 of which

R3 486 400.00 has already been paid per judgment of Wepener J, balance owing in terms of judgment is R4 513 600.00 of which

R3 000 000.00 was paid on 18.10.2021 and the balance is to be paid on 15.12.2021. bills of costs are to be prepared which will either be taxed or agreed upon to

determine the quantum of costs.

NAC/ ASSITEJ & 2 others Western Cape (CT)

Case no.: 5380/2021

High court application in terms of which ASSITEJ seek an order

reviewing the NAC’s decision to reduce the amount to be paid to the applicants in accordance with the grant agreements concluded between them and the NAC; directing the NAC to abide by the grant agreements and to pay the

applicants the sum of R269 810.00

The NAC has filed its answering affidavit to the claim and awaits confirmation of the allocation of a court date. The factual matrix of this matter is substantially to that in the NAF case and the outcome in that case although not binding on the court in a different jurisdiction will have

significant persuasive influence.

Total combined claim is

R269 810.00 plus costs.

NAC/ Schoeman Smit

High court application (combined with VR Theatrical) in terms of which an order reviewing the NAC’s decision to reduce the amount to be paid to the applicants in

accordance with the grant agreements concluded between

Application

Claim R200 000.00.

NATIONAL ARTS COUNCIL

PARTIES

DESCRIPTION OF THE MATTER

STATUS OF MATTER

QUANTUM CLAIMED

 

them and the nac; directing the nac to abide by the grant agreements.

   

NAC/ VR Theatrical

High court application (combined with smit) in terms of which an

order reviewing the NAC’s decision to reduce the amount to be paid to the applicants in accordance with the grant agreements concluded between them and the NAC; directing the NAC to abide by the

grant agreements.

 

Claim R389 840.00

Downtown Music Hub // NAC gauteng local division

case no.: 39800/2021

High court application in terms of which downtown seek relief on the basis that the NAC provide downtown with a contract for the approved stream 1 relief and pursuant thereto that the NAC pay downtown an amount of

R8 289 493.00

Answering affidavit filed on 15.10.2021. await applicant’s replying affidavit.

Claim per nom is R8 289 493.00.

NATIONAL FILM AND VIDEO FOUNDATION

PARTIES

DESCRIPTION OF THE MATTER

STATUS OF MATTER

QUANTUM CLAIMED

Golden Nugget / NFVF

On 05 March 2020, the NFVF entered into a service level agreement with Golden Nugget for the latter to source sponsorships and assist the former with the production of the 14th Annual South African Film and Television Awards (SAFTAs) as a project manager. The SAFTAs were scheduled to take place on 27 and 28 March 2020 at the Sandton Convention Centre, with the production cost funded from the sourced funds by the service provider as sponsorship. On 12 March 2020, the NFVF received a letter from the service provider requesting an advance of R2 645 000.00 against Purchase Orders received from prospective sponsors. The NFVF agreed to advance the funds upon the conclusion of an addendum to the service level agreement and on the premise that the NFVF will not incur production costs. When awards were cancelled Golden nuggets returned only R1 150 000. NFVF withheld the commission in lieu of monies owed. The service provider then instituted legal claim against the NFVF for general damages and loss of income.

The Matter has gone for pre-trial, however NFVF still hope to settle the matter through mediation and arbitration.

R 31 009 018

IZIKO MUSUEMS OF SOUTH AFRICA

PARTIES

DESCRIPTION OF THE MATTER

STATUS OF MATTER

QUANTUM CLAIMED

Iziko

Alleged copyright infringement relating to an image use of an individual used on a poster by Iziko

Case not pursued since no further correspondence has been received from the claimant

Unknown

(2) Whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with (a) a list of all court cases that have been brought by the arts sector against (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him and (b) the reasons for each of the cases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

CASES BY ARTS SECTOR

REASON FOR EACH CASE

Timbila TA Afrika // Minister of Arts and Culture

The matter emanates from the contract MOA between the Department and Limpopo Arts and Culture Youth Forum in August 2018. The plaintiff was contracted by the Beneficiary to supply the sound system, jumping castles and security.

Golola Consultancy (Pty) Ltd // Department of Arts and Culture

Department awarded a tender on 06 July 2004 to a consortium of which Golola (Pty) Ltd was a member. The tender was for the rendering of professional and technical services to the department regarding the project known as Telephone Interpreting Services of South Africa (TISSA). Golola Consultancy is suing the Minister of Arts and Culture for the alleged outstanding invoices for the services rendered in 2005.

The Plaintiff withdrew the matter and tendered wasted costs and party costs.

The Department is recovering the wasted cost

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) // South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) & Others wherein the DAC has been joined as a third party

This matter concerns a 2005 lawsuit wherein the GEPF is suing the SABC for payment of arrear rental (including damages) owed by the former Bophuthatswana (BOP) Broadcasting Corporation (now part of the SABC). The lease was for a period of 20 years starting on 1/12/91 and terminating on 30/11/11. It is alleged that the National Government through the Department of Communications and the former DACST were obliged to implement Cabinet Resolutions relating to the settlement of this intergovernmental dispute. Cabinet has in fact instructed DOC and DAC to establish an adjudication and evaluation panel to ensure the protection of fiduciary duties of stakeholders and government objective to empower, support and promote SA music content

Outlook Security Services and Cleaning and Mr Collins Mabaso

The Department received copies of the pleadings from the Acting CEO of Downtown Music Hub who are the First and Second defendants in this matter and the Department and the DG Mr Mkhize are cited as the Third and Forth Defendants. Plaintiffs are suing the Defendants for the alleged breach of the security contract and claims damages in the sum of R758 000

Trade Union for Musician of South Africa (TUMSA) // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Equality Court matter- TUMSA alleges that the criteria for the covid-19 relief funding unfairly discriminates against its members-a social group of musicians who have suffered financial prejudice

Guild of Choral and Indigenous Music Practitioners NPC and Thomas Kolo // Minister of Arts and Culture and Others

The Plaintiff/s brought an action against the Department alleging that the Department failed to pay the amount agreed to as per the Memorandum of Agreement

   

University of KwaZulu Natal // Minister of Sports Art and Culture

The Plaintiff has issued summons against the Minister for breach of contract

CASES BY PUBLIC ENTITIES

RESON FOR EACH CASE

Zixolisile Feni // Minister of Arts and Culture and PanSALB

Review Application launched on 09/11/2012 at the North Gauteng High Court

The Applicant, Mr. Feni is a former employee of the PanSALB who is challenging the Ministers authority and power to appoint a Caretaker CEO of PanSALB and ultimately the decisions taken by the Caretaker CEO who is alleged not to have been appointed in compliance with the legislation.

Karabo Mbele & 17 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: 50349/15

High Court, PTA

Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to initiate an investigation to determine the fitness and suitability/ dissolution of all members of the PanSALB Board

Karabo Mbele & 20 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: J823/15

Labour Court , Braamfontein

The Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to declare as unlawful and setting aside the appointment of the Second respondent as the Acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Third Respondent(PanSALB) and directing the Second and Fourth Respondents to immediately retrospectively reinstate the Applicants.

Mbulungeni Madiba and 9 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture and 2 Others

Former Board of PanSALB is challenging the Minister’s decision to dissolve the Board of PanSALB

TN Monyela // Ditsong Museum of South Africa and the Minister of Arts and Culture

The Plaintiff, a Director at Ditsong Museum of South Africa is suing the Ditsong Museum and the Minister of Arts and Culture for damages

Atlantis Corporate Travel (Pty) Ltd // National Heritage Council (NHC) and Another

Atlantis has sued the National Heritage Council for breach of contract.

RRM Monareng // the Minister of Arts and Culture and Pan South African Language Board

The Applicant is challenging the Minister’s decision to discipline him as the CEO of PANSALB in the absence of the Board of PanSALB –

Johannesburg Labour Court.

B.D Mabasa // National Library of South Africa and Others

Case No: 22483/19

The Plaintiff claims that the Defendants breach the conditions of the Settlement Agreement between the him and the First Defendant (NLSA) when the First Defendant made statements in Parliament regarding the Defendant’s case and alleges that those statements were misleading and made with intention to injure the Plaintiff’s professional

reputation

The National Arts Council of South Africa // The Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture and 4 Others

The Applicant brought an application to review and set aside the Public Protector’s report No. 125 of 2019/2020 dated 15 June 2020, its findings and the recommendations arising therefrom. There is no relief sought against the Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture

Classic Arms (Pty) Limited // The Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and 3 Others

The Applicant brought an application declaring the decision of the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) dated 14 October 2020 invalid and setting aside the decision to stop the processing of Section 32(9) permits for heritage firearms. An order ordering The National Commissioner of the South African Police Services to process permanent export applications for firearms that require Section 32(19) permits in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999

Asstej SA and Others // National Arts Council and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court Western Cape Division as a Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (“NAC”), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the First, Second and Third Applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and Applicants, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

National Arts Festival vs National Arts Council and Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court of SA Gauteng Local Division as Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (”NAC”), its executive council or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the first applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and applicant, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

The NAF is claiming R8, 000, 000.00 from the NAC

The Applicant lodged an appeal with the Minister on 12 March 2021 to set aside the decision taken by the NAC.

Sonwabile Mancontywa // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and National Heritage Council

The applicant brought an urgent application amongst others to declare that the Minister lacked the authority and acted ultra vires in the appointment of the administrators for the Second Respondent

VR Theatrical (Pty) Ltd and Another // National Arts Council (NAC) and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the Western Cape Division, Cape Town as Second and Third Respondents for an application amongst others reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent (the NAC), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilaterally reduce amounts to be paid to the applicants in accordance with Grant Agreements concluded between the NAC and the applicants, for payment of amounts under the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package (the “Grant Agreements”).

(2) Whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with (a) a list of all court cases that have been brought by the arts sector against (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him and (b) the reasons for each of the cases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

CASES BY ARTS SECTOR

REASON FOR EACH CASE

Timbila TA Afrika // Minister of Arts and Culture

The matter emanates from the contract MOA between the Department and Limpopo Arts and Culture Youth Forum in August 2018. The plaintiff was contracted by the Beneficiary to supply the sound system, jumping castles and security.

Golola Consultancy (Pty) Ltd // Department of Arts and Culture

Department awarded a tender on 06 July 2004 to a consortium of which Golola (Pty) Ltd was a member. The tender was for the rendering of professional and technical services to the department regarding the project known as Telephone Interpreting Services of South Africa (TISSA). Golola Consultancy is suing the Minister of Arts and Culture for the alleged outstanding invoices for the services rendered in 2005.

The Plaintiff withdrew the matter and tendered wasted costs and party costs.

The Department is recovering the wasted cost

Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) // South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) & Others wherein the DAC has been joined as a third party

This matter concerns a 2005 lawsuit wherein the GEPF is suing the SABC for payment of arrear rental (including damages) owed by the former Bophuthatswana (BOP) Broadcasting Corporation (now part of the SABC). The lease was for a period of 20 years starting on 1/12/91 and terminating on 30/11/11. It is alleged that the National Government through the Department of Communications and the former DACST were obliged to implement Cabinet Resolutions relating to the settlement of this intergovernmental dispute. Cabinet has in fact instructed DOC and DAC to establish an adjudication and evaluation panel to ensure the protection of fiduciary duties of stakeholders and government objective to empower, support and promote SA music content

Outlook Security Services and Cleaning and Mr Collins Mabaso

The Department received copies of the pleadings from the Acting CEO of Downtown Music Hub who are the First and Second defendants in this matter and the Department and the DG Mr Mkhize are cited as the Third and Forth Defendants. Plaintiffs are suing the Defendants for the alleged breach of the security contract and claims damages in the sum of R758 000

Trade Union for Musician of South Africa (TUMSA) // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Equality Court matter- TUMSA alleges that the criteria for the covid-19 relief funding unfairly discriminates against its members-a social group of musicians who have suffered financial prejudice

Guild of Choral and Indigenous Music Practitioners NPC and Thomas Kolo // Minister of Arts and Culture and Others

The Plaintiff/s brought an action against the Department alleging that the Department failed to pay the amount agreed to as per the Memorandum of Agreement

   

University of KwaZulu Natal // Minister of Sports Art and Culture

The Plaintiff has issued summons against the Minister for breach of contract

CASES BY PUBLIC ENTITIES

RESON FOR EACH CASE

Zixolisile Feni // Minister of Arts and Culture and PanSALB

Review Application launched on 09/11/2012 at the North Gauteng High Court

The Applicant, Mr. Feni is a former employee of the PanSALB who is challenging the Ministers authority and power to appoint a Caretaker CEO of PanSALB and ultimately the decisions taken by the Caretaker CEO who is alleged not to have been appointed in compliance with the legislation.

Karabo Mbele & 17 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: 50349/15

High Court, PTA

Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to initiate an investigation to determine the fitness and suitability/ dissolution of all members of the PanSALB Board

Karabo Mbele & 20 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture, Case Number: J823/15

Labour Court , Braamfontein

The Applicants (Former employees of PanSALB) instituted an application against the Minister of Arts & Culture and Others for amongst other things, to declare as unlawful and setting aside the appointment of the Second respondent as the Acting Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Third Respondent(PanSALB) and directing the Second and Fourth Respondents to immediately retrospectively reinstate the Applicants.

Mbulungeni Madiba and 9 Others // Minister of Arts and Culture and 2 Others

Former Board of PanSALB is challenging the Minister’s decision to dissolve the Board of PanSALB

TN Monyela // Ditsong Museum of South Africa and the Minister of Arts and Culture

The Plaintiff, a Director at Ditsong Museum of South Africa is suing the Ditsong Museum and the Minister of Arts and Culture for damages

Atlantis Corporate Travel (Pty) Ltd // National Heritage Council (NHC) and Another

Atlantis has sued the National Heritage Council for breach of contract.

RRM Monareng // the Minister of Arts and Culture and Pan South African Language Board

The Applicant is challenging the Minister’s decision to discipline him as the CEO of PANSALB in the absence of the Board of PanSALB –

Johannesburg Labour Court.

B.D Mabasa // National Library of South Africa and Others

Case No: 22483/19

The Plaintiff claims that the Defendants breach the conditions of the Settlement Agreement between the him and the First Defendant (NLSA) when the First Defendant made statements in Parliament regarding the Defendant’s case and alleges that those statements were misleading and made with intention to injure the Plaintiff’s professional

reputation

The National Arts Council of South Africa // The Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture and 4 Others

The Applicant brought an application to review and set aside the Public Protector’s report No. 125 of 2019/2020 dated 15 June 2020, its findings and the recommendations arising therefrom. There is no relief sought against the Minister of Sport, Arts & Culture

Classic Arms (Pty) Limited // The Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and 3 Others

The Applicant brought an application declaring the decision of the South African Heritage Resources Agency (SAHRA) dated 14 October 2020 invalid and setting aside the decision to stop the processing of Section 32(9) permits for heritage firearms. An order ordering The National Commissioner of the South African Police Services to process permanent export applications for firearms that require Section 32(19) permits in terms of the National Heritage Resources Act of 1999

Asstej SA and Others // National Arts Council and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court Western Cape Division as a Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (“NAC”), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the First, Second and Third Applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and Applicants, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

National Arts Festival vs National Arts Council and Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the High Court of SA Gauteng Local Division as Second and Third Respondents for an urgent application in reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent that is National Arts Council (”NAC”), its executive council or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilateral reducing the amounts to be paid to the first applicants in accordance with the Grant Agreement concluded between the NAC and applicant, for payment of amounts under Presidential Employment Stimulus Package.

T

he NAF is claiming R8, 000, 000.00 from the NAC

The Applicant lodged an appeal with the Minister on 12 March 2021 to set aside the decision taken by the NAC.

Sonwabile Mancontywa // Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture and National Heritage Council

The applicant brought an urgent application amongst others to declare that the Minister lacked the authority and acted ultra vires in the appointment of the administrators for the Second Respondent

VR Theatrical (Pty) Ltd and Another // National Arts Council (NAC) and Others

The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture has been served with papers from the Western Cape Division, Cape Town as Second and Third Respondents for an application amongst others reviewing and setting aside the decision of the First Respondent (the NAC), its executive council, or any other committee or person, taken during or before March 2021, purporting to unilaterally reduce amounts to be paid to the applicants in accordance with Grant Agreements concluded between the NAC and the applicants, for payment of amounts under the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package (the “Grant Agreements”).

13 December 2021 - NW2440

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What (A) are the reasons that he is purportedly pushing ahead with the Resistance and Liberation Museum in the Eastern Cape as the proposed construction would merely be a duplication of Freedom Park, which was built for this very purpose and has yet to fulfil its purpose and mandate and is struggling to survive, (B) is the budget allocation for this project and (C) is the purpose and rationale as we already have numerous sites of liberation that honour the struggle, which receive either minimal or no financial support from the Government, like the Apartheid Museum which closed its doors and Liliesleaf Farm in Rivonia; (2) whether he has found that concerns that have been expressed by segments of the professional community that the construction of the museum is not viable or feasible is correct; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how will it be made feasible; (3) whether he has found that this is wasteful and fruitless expenditure, which could be put to more productive and efficient use in supporting the sector in its totality; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) There is no construction of a Resistance and Liberation Museum in the Eastern Cape.

b) When Cabinet approved the implementation of the recommendations of the feasibility study to establish a Resistance and Liberation Movement Museum called for by the Inter-Ministerial Committee, the purpose and rationale was that there is no museum expressing the horror of colonialism and apartheid without sanitization. The feasibility study acknowledged the existence of museums on the liberation struggle but these museums deal with specific aspects of the liberation struggle and do not depict the liberation struggle in an unsanitised manner so that current and future generations have a full understanding of the price paid for a democratic dispensation. Cabinet approved that this museum be developed in Tshwane.

2. The feasibility study to establish a Resistance and Liberation Movement Museum called for by the Inter-Ministerial Committee and approved by Cabinet, found that the establishment of such a museum was viable and feasible.

13 December 2021 - NW2548

Profile picture: Adams, Ms R C

Adams, Ms R C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps are being taken by (a) his department and/or (b) the entities reporting to him to promote and support the creative sector in (i) forging social cohesion and (ii) advocating against social ills such as gender-based violence and femicide, given that the forging of social cohesion is a national imperative and one of the seven apex priorities of the sixth administration in which the creative sector can play a major role in communicating a positive message which heightens national consciousness through music, poetry, literary works, sport and many other creative works?

Reply:

a) My Department promote and support the creative sector by providing funding to Entities reporting to me, these Entities then engage the creative sector to forge social cohesion and advocate against social ills. Examples on how the Department’s entities directly and indirectly support the sectror are as follows;

  • The Market Theatre Foundation, is currently creating a play about gender-based violence for teenagers, to be disseminated digitally to high schools nationwide. The play is designed to help high school learners identify gender-based violence and the way it affects their lives, as well as equip them with knowledge, skills, and resources to support them in situations in which they survivors of gender-based violence. In addition, the Market Theatre Laboratory works extensively with its own students on building awareness around gender-based violence through a series of workshops. The students create plays throughout the year exploring this and other socially relevant themes. In 2021, the Market Theatre Laboratory partnered with an independent theatre company to host performances of the play “Text Me When You Arrive: a guide on how not to get raped and killed in South Africa”, a play also grappling with this theme.

The National Film and Video Foundation’s stance has been reflected through the following projects:

  • Research conducted in partnership with Sisters Working in Film & TV (SWIFT) entitled “Gender Matters in the South African Film Industry” (2018) which aimed at providing information and statistics on women participation, challenges and roles in the local film industry,
  • An MOU signed with SWIFT which covered amongst other things, the implementation of a Code of Good Practice: Handling Sexual Harassment in the Film and Television Industry (“The Code”) which promotes workplaces that are free of sexual harassment, where employers and employees respect one another’s integrity and dignity, their privacy, and their right to equality.
  • In partnership with GIZ (Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit GmbH), the NFVF institutionalised gender sensitivity training and GBV training with industry proessionals and AFDA students respectively

The Robben Island Museum hosted a social cohesion programme in the form of an Annual Spring School programme held on the island aimed at capacitating the youth and recently held one on 04 - 09 October 2021. The main objective of all the Nation Building Youth Camps facilitated by Robben Island Museum is to create an opportunity and space to debate on social ills, pertinent issues affecting communities, inclusivity and leadership skills. The theme of the 2021 Spring School was Young people acknowledging that the epidemic of gender-based violence and femicide in South Africa is a national crisis. The 2021 Spring School Programme was made possible with the support from the DSAC’s Sub-Directorate on Social Cohesion and Nation Building.

In addition to the above, other specific programmes implemented include the following:

Social Cohesion Advocates Programme

Through the Social Cohesion Advocates Programme, the Department has been able to implement GBV Dialogues and Seminars in churches, institutions of higher learning such as at then Vaal University of Technology (VUT). As part of creating platforms for promoting Social Cohesion and Nation Building Social Cohesion Advocates have engaged in After School care programmes to empower girls and young women.

During the July 2021 Unrest, Social Cohesion Advocates have been able to participate in fact finding missions. They have engaged communities in dialogues including trainings on Mediation, Conflict Resolution and Peace Building. There have also been initiatives on Healing of Memories and Trauma and Trauma Counselling session.

Preventing Gender Based Violence

Where Gender Based Violence (GBV) is concerned, the idea is to prevent it from happening as opposed to providing interventions when it has happened as that tends to be costlier and unsustainable. As the adage goes Prevention is better than cue. Communities need to understand the Concept of Gender so that they can understand why the scourge is called GBV. Capacity Building in the form of Training has therefore been engaged into including two (2) Gender Sensitisation and GGBV Workshops have been held. A Gender Sensitisation and GBV Workshop was conducted for Albinism Advocacy Access (AAA) on 20 – 22 October 2021 Another one was conducted at Inanda which is one of 30 hotspot areas in KwaZulu Natal (KZN) as communicated by the Minister of Police, Mr Bheki Cele. The Department intends massifying these awareness creation workshops including in areas such as Delft and Lusikisiki.

Funding to Non Profit Organisations

Over and above these, the Departments funds several Non Profit organisations that encourage Prevention of GBV. In this financial year, three (3) such organizations. These organisations have programmes such as After school Programmes that reduce the exposure of children to GBV plus unwanted and or unplanned pregnancies.

Campaigns led by the Department

The Department has also engaged in active campaigns such as The Orange Day Campaign which marks the 25th as a day to wear orange and unite to end violence Against women and Girls (VAWG). This way, on a monthly basis, 365/24/7. we are able to promote the message of GBV prevention as opposed to focusing exclusively on 16 Days of Activism on No Violence Against Women and Children (VAWC). This also ensures that there is monitoring of progress especially as DSAC reports on a monthly basis to the Department of Women Youth and People with Disabilities, under Pillar 2 of the Gender Based Violence National Strategic Plan 2030.

Further, Department has launched two programmes in an aid to raise awareness against GBVF. The programmes are Golekane and Baqhawafazi. Golekane is a campaign which endorses a call to action for men by men to end GBVF through behavioural dialogs, panel discussions, grassroots anti GBVF activations and father and son camps.

Baqhawafazi is a movement that seeks to raise awareness against gender based violence, intimate partner violence and femicide in South Africa. It is comprised of testimonials telling the untold stories of GBVF through raw footage from survivors of GBVF. Some of the activities implemented include The Survivors Guild- August 2021, A walk fit for purpose- August 2021, Digital Content on Social Media pages – September 2021, Filming and production of interviews – September 2021, Media Placement- Erection of billboards and Street pole ads- September 2021.

13 December 2021 - NW2511

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether each national sports federation received their grants; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date is it envisaged that they will get their allocations; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he can furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a list indicating the number of federations that (a) received their grants and (b) did not receive their grants; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the (a) swimming and (b) gymnastics federations received their grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether all the federations received a letter of grant allocation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2934E

Reply:

1. Not all of the sport and recreation bodies have received the grants for 2021/2022 financial year.

(a). Before the 2020/2021 financial, this prior to the COVID-19 Pandemic the Department allocated funds to the sport and recreation bodies utilizing the historical data. This enabled the Department to manage the process of allocating and transferring funds with relative ease.

However, after considering the representations made by Federations through SASCOC on the devastating effects of COVID-19 the Department had to review the approach in order to respond to the immediate needs of the Federations.

Whilst in the pre COVID-19, a small portion of the grant was set aside for Administration, with the larger portion being for programmes and projects. This had to be reviewed. The priority has now been given to

(i). job retention, (ii). organizational sustainability, and (iii) programmes and projects and identified priorities.

In terms of the revised approach, the sport and recreation bodies have to submit the compliance documents as well as business plans prior to allocations being made after assessment of each application.

The Department made a call to sport and recreation bodies to submit the documents on 11 June 2021. The key documents are primarily for compliance requirements in line with particularly section 38 (1) (j) of the PFMA which requires transferring departments to ensure that funds are transferred to entities that administer sound financial management systems and controls.

It should be noted that by the 12 of October 2021 only 24 out of 68 sport and recreation bodies has submitted the documents. This made it difficult for the Department to make the allocation because ideally the total budget for sport and recreation bodies, which is R114, 142,000, should be allocated across the 68 sport and recreation bodies at the same time. This to avoid overcommitting to a selected few (24) that have complied.

In order to avoid further delays, the Department proceeded to assess the submitted applications assisted by a representative from SASCOC. This with some checks and balances to avoid the risk of over committing to the 24 bodies. We also noted that some sport and recreation bodies could not spend their entire allocated budget from the 2020 / 2021 financial year.

In this regard, these sport and recreation bodies were granted permission to roll-over the funds to the current financial year perhaps resulting in the slow process of submitting for 2021 / 2022 financial year.

(b). The dates for transfers depends on when the sport and recreation body signs and returns the Allocation Agreement which is prepared after the assessment of fully compliant documents. The Department however requires a week to process a transfer provided all compliance requirements have been fulfilled. Therefore, it is impossible to indicate specific dates on which the transfers would be made.

2(a) and (b) A list showing the status of each sport and recreation body is attached.

3. (a) The following 24 sport and recreation bodies have received allocation letters and agreements. This because they have submitted the required documents;

SPORT AND RECREATION BODY THAT HAVE RECEIVED ALLOCATION LETTERS AND AGREEMENTS

1. South African Rugby Union

2. South African Hockey Association

3. South African Gymnastics Federation

4. Sport Coaches Outreach

5. Cricket South Africa

6. South African Fencing

7. South African Handball Federation

8. Lifesaving South Africa

9. Canoeing South Africa

10. Cycling South Africa

11. South African Aerobics and Fitness Federation

12. Fencing South Africa

13. South African Baseball Union

14. Motorsport South Africa

15. Master sports South Africa

16. Sailing South Africa

17. Snow Sport

18. Transplant South Africa

19. South African Wrestling Federation

20. Volleyball South Africa

21. Gary Kirsten Foundation

22. South African Deaf Sport Federation

23. Badminton South Africa

24.South African Orienteering Federation

(3). Swimming SA only submitted their last batch of compliance documents on the 11 November 2021, which will still be adjudicated. The South African Gymnastics Federation (SAGF) submitted a Draft Financial Statements in July and the original, final Audited Financial Statements on 22 November 2021. The transfer payment for SAGF is being processed because it has been assessed and is now fully compliant. It should be noted that the Department is unable to transfer funds before the sport and recreation body meets all compliance requirement.

(4). A letter of grant allocation is issued to sport and recreation body that has submitted the required documents, and assessed by the department. As of now the following fifteen (15) sport and recreation bodies have recently submitted required documents which have been assessed and their allocation letters and agreements are being prepared;

SPORT AND RECREATION BODIES THAT HAVE RECENTLY SUBMITTED DOCUMENTS WHOSE ALLOCATIONS LETTERS AND AGREEMENTS ARE BEING PREPARED

1. Softball South Africa

2. South African of Cue Sport

3. South African Table Tennis Board

4. Karate South Africa

5. South African Football Association

6. Jukskei South Africa

7. Archery South Africa

8. Surfing South Africa

9. Athletics South Africa

10.Cycling South Africa

11. South African Sports For the Physically Disabled

12.Bowls South Africa

13. Ringball South Africa

14. South African Equestrian Federation

15. South African National Amateur Boxing Organisation

13 December 2021 - NW2414

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the details of (a) the progress made with locust outbreak control operations in the Northern Cape since 2020, (b) the service providers who were responsible for the locust outbreak control operation and (c) the total cost of the operation; (2) whether the service providers were paid within 30 days; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department worked with Organised Agriculture and appointed Locust Control Contractors. Organised Agriculture submitted the names of the people to be appointed as locust control contractors for each locust district. All appointed Locust Control Contractors were trained and supplied with insecticide, spray pumps and protective clothing. Reimbursement of the Locus Control Contractors was informed by number of days worked and distance travelled.

The Helicopter Service Provider was appointed to supplement the ground control teams in reaching inaccessible areas.

The officials of the Department monitored and evaluated the locust control operations. The locust outbreak was successfully controlled in 45 locust districts in the Northern Cape Province from January 2020 to August 2021.

(b) The Department appointed a total number of 1076 Locust Control Contractors and Helicopter Service Provider to control the outbreak.

(c) The total cost of the operation for Eastern Cape, Free State, Northern Cape and Western Cape was R 74 667 464.14. It is not possible to give cost only for Northern Cape due to centralization of items such as insecticides, protective clothing, etc at the depot in the Northern Cape from where it is dispatched as required.

(2) Not all service providers were paid within 30 days. The reasons for not paying within 30 days were:

  • closure of departmental buildings due to exposure to Covid-positive cases (processing of payments cannot be done remotely); and
  • incorrect banking details of the service providers (which required another process of engaging the service provider).

13 December 2021 - NW2601

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What is the total number of cases of abuse of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) Child Support Grant that have been reported to her department in each province since 1 January 2015; (2) what is the total number of cases in which the Child Support Grant (CSG) has successfully been transferred to an alternative caregiver; (3) what happens to the (a) CSG and (b) child in question in cases where there is no alternative caregiver; (4) what mechanisms have been put in place by her department and/or the SASSA to mitigate against the abuse of the CSG grant by the caregiver; (5) what support does her department and/or SASSA offer in order to assist the caregiver who has been reported as allegedly abusing the CSG grant?

Reply:

The data requested from 2015 is not readily available and a script has to be written to retrieve information from Socpen.  The Business Intelligence System used by SASSA for reporting was only commissioned in 2018.  This has resulted in SASSA needing to retrieve historical data from Socpen.

It is also extremely difficult to separate cases where the reason for the change of care giver is attributed to abuse of the grant, as this information is not captured on the system.  However, information will be provided on change of care givers which were processed.

The expected date by which this may be ready is 17 December 2021.

13 December 2021 - NW2560

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that he opposed the Culture Promotion Act, Act 35 of 1983, and is reluctant to apply the specified Act to support those independent entities that are in desperate need of funding, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

The Minister has not opposed the Culture Promotion Act 35 of 1983. The Department applies itself according to the Cultural Institutions Act 119 of 1998, which specify that Declared Cultural Institutions are the responsibility of the Department regarding funding support for operational and specific artistic activities.

For an example; several Independent entities received support in the past few months from the Presidential Employment Stimulus Program; and evidence of this is available. Further, the department opens opportunities through the different work-streams within the Mzansi Golden Economy, which are not excluding anyone in the industry; as long as they meet the set requirements. The department has multiple demands on its very limited financial resources and is not capable to cater for all. In order to afford equal opportunities for all in the entire creative and cultural landscape, including independent entities, funding entities such as NAC, NFVF, NHC etc. have been established to administer the disbursement of funding to all who meets the set out criteria. Funding efforts have been especially heightened during covid-19 pandemic.

13 December 2021 - NW2510

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). What was the (a) daily and (b) total allowances that was paid to (i) each athlete, and (ii) the President of the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) for attending both the Summer Olympic Games and Paralympic Games in Tokyo in 2021; (2). whether any allowance was paid to any other SASCOC elected and/or appointed Board member; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the detailed amounts and (b) from which funding sources was it paid?

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) in its response indicated the following;

1)(a)(i). Each Athlete received a flat allowance of 400USD for their attendance at both the Olympics and Paralympics Games.

(a)(ii).The SASCOC President received a daily allowance of 350USD for each of the games. SASCOC policy provides that the President is to receive a daily allowance of 500USD. However, the Finance Committee has requested that the entire policy be reviewed and in the interim, subject to this review, the Presidents allowance be reduced to the second tier level as per the policy.

The SASCOC Policy Development Commission is currently undertaking a rewrite of all policies and the SASCOC Remunerations Committee will be attending to the review of all policies related to board and staff allowances and remuneration.

(b)(i). The total allowances paid are as follows:-

Athletes at Olympics Games: 72 000usd (180 x 400)

Athletes at Paralympics Games: 14 400usd (36 x 400)

(b)(ii). The total allowances paid to the Board President is as follows:-

Olympics: 5 512.50USD

Paralympics: 4 462.50USD

(2) No other SASCOC elected and/or appointed Board member attended the Tokyo Games

13 December 2021 - NW2531

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to COVID-19 relief funding via the Tourism Relief Fund, what (a) processes, procedures and controls are in place to ensure that funds are properly paid to the correct beneficiaries and (b) are the timelines, timeframes and deadlines in this regard; (2) what (a) processes, procedures and controls are in place to recoup funds paid incorrectly to beneficiaries and (b) are the timelines, time frames and deadlines in this regard; (3) what (a) processes, procedures and controls are in place to criminally charge non-qualifying beneficiaries who applied for the fund and (b) are the timelines, timeframes and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

1. (a) The Tourism Relief Fund (TRF) processes were put in place based on segregation of responsibilities as a control measure. These enabled the separation of application processing, verification, evaluation, validation and approval through different functionaries. Furthermore, payments were completely separated and processed through South African Tourism.

(b) The TRF was a once off capped grant assistance to Small Micro and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMMEs) in the tourism sector relief funding measure implemented during 2020/21 financial year.

2.(a) The Department instituted a recovery process for part of the double payment to one beneficiary business through the State Attorney’s office. Furthermore, the Department is liaising with the Accounting Officers of those Directors/Owners identified as state employees to establish if they had permission to do business. The Department will be guided by the outcome of this process in terms of the way forward.

(b) The process with the Accounting Officers is scheduled to conclude by March 2022.

3. The independent investigation into the double payment (R50 000) is scheduled to conclude by end of April 2022.

13 December 2021 - NW2764

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(a) To what extent did a certain person (name and details furnished) play a role in securing funding from his department for a certain person (name and details furnished), (b) what were the terms and conditions of the funding and (c) what is the name of the person in his department who approved the funding? NW3279E Original Question:-To what extent has, the former Speaker of Parliament Mrs. Baleka Mbete influenced the funding for Actress Natasha Thahane for a New York scholarship? What were the terms and conditions of this funding to Natasha? And who approved the funding in the department?

Reply:

(a). My Department is not aware of the role played by the former Speaker of Parliament, Mrs. Baleka Mbete towards securing the funding for the, Actress Natasha Thahane. What we know is that Ms. Thahane made a request for financial support towards her studies at the New York Film Academy directly to me as the Minister.

This request is similar to many others that my office and the Department constantly receives from members of the public. The public does this possibly because I am the political head of the Department.

(b). The funds were for Ms. Thahane’s tuition fees at the New York Film Academy in New York (USA) and the terms for her contract with the department was for her film studies and the condition was that she should complete her studies in film.

(c). The funding was approved by Deputy Director-General (DDG/IG) for Institutional Governance branch, (as DDG for the branch in 2017).

13 December 2021 - NW2496

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) is the allocated budget for the Tourism Chefpreneur Programme, (b) number of applicants can the programme accommodate, (c) is the content of the programme and (d) is the time frame of the programme?

Reply:

(a) The budget allocated to the Food Services Tourism Incubator which is being implemented in partnership with SEDA is R 6 million over two years.

(b) The programme can accommodate 100 participants.

(c) The purpose of the Tourism Food Services Incubator is to empower trained food services candidates to become owners and operators in the food services business. In view of the rising unemployment figures particularly in the tourism and hospitality industry, the Department saw it fit to maximise its investment in the food services training and skills development by supporting youth wanting to engage in new venture creation in areas where there are viable markets.

(d) The programme will be implemented over two financial years: 2021/22 and 2022/23.

 

13 December 2021 - NW2561

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) investigations have been conducted at the National Arts Council of South Africa, (b)(i) are the names of the persons and (ii) is the name of the company and/or institution who were appointed to do the investigation (c) are the names of the persons who appointed the investigators, (d) was the date on which the investigative service were advertised, (e) was the (i) cost and (ii) outcome of the investigation and (f) steps have been taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

The National Arts Council of South Africa conducted four (04) investigations as explained hereunder:-

INVESTIGATION 1

a) Forensic audit regarding the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package at the NAC

b) (i) CEO and CFO

(ii) Appointed company was Mazars Forensic services

c) Company was appointed by Council of the National Arts Council

d) Services were advertised on 21 May 2021

e) (i) Cost of the investigation was R1572 486.08

(ii) Outcome of the investigation was as follows:

  • There were several irregularities pertaining to the management of the PESP. These include financial mismanagement, process irregularities and lack of adequate oversight
  • All funds have been accounted for at the NAC;
  • Newly appointed Council Members (from the 1st of January 2021) were all cleared of any wrong-doing;
  • The Report confirmed the findings of the State Law Advisor stating that newly appointed Council members whose organisations had applied for the PESP could not have been conflicted, as they had not commenced their appointment at the NAC at the time of applying and completion of adjudication.
  • The Report however did identify conflict of interest in respect of some Former Council Members, who contravened Section 8(5) of the NAC Act by participating in the PESP processes and failing to declare their directorship in companies that applied to the PESP.
  • Former Council Members disregarded their own resolution of 19 September 2020 by allowing five Council Members to actively participate in the evaluation of applications, thereby contravening the provisions of the NAC Act.
  • The five former Council members were cumulatively paid R511, 452 for performing work of independent Panel Members. These payments are regarded as irregular expenditure as these Council members contravened the provisions of the NAC Act.
  • Failure to meet deliverables within the timeline of the PESP Programme.
  • Failure to take effective and appropriate steps to prevent irregularities in the adjudication process, including irregular spending.
  • Failure to provide financial oversight regarding the implementation of the PESP within the allocated budget of R285 million, resulting in an over-commitment amount of R428,073,778 (More than double the allocated budget)

f) The Department has mandated Council to implement the recommendations of the forensic report. Disciplinary steps are currently underway.

INVESTIGATION 2

a) The investigation was to identify the person/s within the NAC who may have leaked information to the media, Sunday Times and the Sowetan.

b) (i) Ms. Molekwa, Ms. Makgoka and Ms. Diphofa.

(ii) Grant Thornton

c) The appointment was through the normal Supply Chain Management process and the appointment was signed off by the CEO.

d) The investigative service advertisement cannot be traced

e) (i). The cost for the service was R388 252.00

(ii) The outcome of the investigation was that:

  • Ms. Makgoka appeared to have contravened the NAC’s Code of Ethics, Information Technology Policy and her conditions of employment by leaking confidential information.
  • Ms. Molekwa appeared to have contravened the NAC’s Code of Ethics, Information Technology Policy and her conditions of employment by leaking confidential information to Ms. Makgoka as recorded in the Molemo letter of appeal.

f) The Department tasked the NAC Council to implement the recommendations of the investigation report, which led to disciplinary charges being instituted against the implicated official.

INVESTIGATION 3

a) Allegations that a grant application by the South African Roadies Association was deliberately declined because the NAC Senior Management failing to adhere to the grant funding policies of the NAC

b) (i) Ms. Mangope, Ms. Makwetla and Ms. Diphofa.

(ii) Business Innovation Group (BIG)

c) The investigation was commissioned by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

d) The advertisement was through Request for Quotation as it was below the threshold for open tender.

e) (i). the cost for the service was R235 812.

(ii) A report was released, and the findings included:

  • DAC Management inform Mr Nyathela about the outcome of the investigation
  • The DAC Management provides feedback about the outcome of the investigation to the NAC and its Board/ Council.
  • The NAC conducts an audit to establish whether all awards made under the Expired projects, Surplus policy adhered to all applicable Acts and Regulations, and that the projects awarded achieved the objectives of the NAC.
  • The NAC conducts training awareness and workshops with staff and other stakeholders during which the policies and procedures of the NAC are explained.
  • NAC should as a matter of urgency seek legal opinion on the validity of the Expired and Surplus Policy GR003/4/2015. The policy might be in breach of the PFMA and Treasury Regulations, if funding received from the National Government is not declared and disposed of in terms of the regularity framework applicable. In addition, the policy could be used to favour particular grant applicants as the discretion for award rests solely with the NAC.

f) The NAC Council was tasked implementing the recommendations of the forensic report.

INVESTIGATION 4

a) An investigation was authorised for the following allegations: Conflict of interest involving BIG employee

Review of the awarding of a grant of R50 000.00 in 2013

Review of the awarding of a grant of R1 889 000.00 in 2016

Conflict of interest involving the CEO and Lalela Projects Administrator

b)(i), Ms. Mangope, Ms. Son and Ms. Diphofa

(ii) Gobodo Forensic and Investigative Accounting Investigations (GFIA)

c) The investigation was instructed by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture

d) The investigation was not advertised as it was below the threshold for tendering. Request for Quotations was sourced.

e) (i) The cost for the service was R373 061 000

(ii) A report was released, and the outcome was that the CEO was charged with the following:

    • Gross Negligence
    • Gross Dishonesty
  • Bringing the name of the institution/organisation into disrepute
  • Failing to act in the best interest of the employer
  • Contravention of section 38 (iii) of the PFMA

The Arts Development Manager was charged with the following:

  • Charge 1: Approval of funding of the Lalela project whilst it was classified as an expired project
  • Charge 2: Approving the Lalela project payment whilst it did not follow the proper funding application process

The CFO was charged with the following:

  • The NAC charged Ms. Son for non-disclosure of her NFVF investigation. This was the only charge the NAC could pursue against the CFO.

f) The Department instructed the NAC to implement the recommendations of the report and the 3 people concerned were taken through a disciplinary process with the following outcomes:

  • The CEO was exonerated from all charges, and she was recalled to resume her duties at the NAC.
  • The Arts Development Manager was exonerated from all charges, and she resumed her duties immediately.
  • The CFO tendered her tendered her resignation and her hearing did not sit as scheduled.

13 December 2021 - NW2494

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the time frame for finalisation of the White Paper on Tourism policy review process?

Reply:

The time frame for the finalisation of the tourism white paper review process is planned as follows:

The Department of Tourism seeks to have in place a Green Paper on the Development and Promotion of Tourism in South Africa by the end of 2021/22 financial year. Thereafter, the White Paper on the Development and Promotion of Tourism in South Africa will be ready in 2022/23.

13 December 2021 - NW2591

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the (a) extent of the commonage land in the Western Cape and (b) current usage of the commonage land; (2) whether the commonage land has any water rights to allow farming to take place; if not, what steps will her department take to ensure that there are water rights; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are farming activities taking place on the commonage land; if not, why not; if so, what farming activities are taking place on the pieces of land; (4) whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with the relevant information regarding (a) land that has been invaded and (b) the action(s) that were taken regarding the situation; if not, why not; if so, by what date?

Reply:

(1)(a) The extent of the commonage land in the Western Cape is 8 617,0442 hectares.

(b) The current usage of the land is for horticulture, crop, and livestock farming.

(2),(3) Please refer to Annexure A.

4. Yes.

  • a) The land that has been invaded is Erf 3617 in Citrusdal in Clanwilliam Registration Division measuring 87,4921 hectares and which is under the ownership of Cederberg Municipality.
  • b) There is a Notarial Deed registered against the property to be used only for agricultural purposes. The Department had previously supported the famers through the One Household One Hectares Programme.

ANNEXURE A OF NA-QUES 2591 0F 2021: COMMONAGE PROPERTIES

Farm/ Project name

Property Description

Hectares Acquired

Commodity

Production Type 1

Water Rights (including relevant details) Yes or No and what steps to be taken to ensure water rights

Current Situation

Vredendal Saamwerk Boerdery

The Remaining Extent of Erf 771 in Vredendal (Matzikama Municipality) in the Vanrhynsdorp registration Division

21,7302

Vegetables

Horticulture

Yes, 5ha of water rights is registered

This commonage is not in optimal use as the farmers are not using the full 21.7 ha but is farming on a piece of the adjacent land which is an airstrip. The farmers have formal leases with the Municipality.

Petersfield

Erf 3617 in Citrusdal in Clanwilliam Registration Division

87,4921

Vegetables

Horticulture

Yes, 10ha of water rights is registered

The property is under ownership of Cederberg Municipality and currently illegally occupied. Absence of formal contracts between Municipality and Farmers. There is a Notarial Deed registered against the property to be used only for agricultural purposes. The Department had previously through the One Household One Hectares Programme supported the famers.

Prince Albert Commonage

Portion 1 of the farm Damascus Nr 153, Prince Albert Municipality

5 580,3060

Crops and Livestock

Crops and Livestock

No, the land has Schedule 1 water, as it is only suitable for livestock use, therefore no water rights are required to be registered.

Commonage is still under the ownership of the Municipality and leased to farmers.

Beaufort West Commonage

Farm Bulskop No.423

2 667,0374

Red Meat

Livestock

No, the land has Schedule 1 water, as it is only suitable for livestock use, therefore no water rights are required to be registered. The Municipality has registered boreholes on the property.

Beaufort West Municipality sold the commonage to a commercial farmer to purchase Hansrivier for water for the town.

Bitou Commonage

Remainder of Farm No. 487

196,4785

Vegetables

Horticulture

Yes

Commonage transferred back to the DALRRD. This property forms part of the PLAS projects allocation done and 30 years lease signed.

Oudtshoorn Commonage

Remainder of Portion 11 of Welgemeend

64,0000

White Meat

Livestock

No, the land has Schedule 1 water, as it is only suitable for livestock use, therefore no water rights are required to be registered. The Municipality has registered boreholes on the property.

The Municipality is currently leasing the land to the Oudtshoorn community farmers farming with pigs on a three years renewal contract. DALLRD Recap branch previously tried to support famers through 1hh1ha unfortunately the program was discontinued.

13 December 2021 - NW2674

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) is the total cost for investigating irregular activities involving the (i) former Chairperson of Council and (ii) former Chief Executive Officer of the SA Heritage Resources Agency, (b) are the names of the persons who (i) were appointed to do the investigation and (ii) appointed the investigators, (c) date was the investigative service advertised, (d) was the outcome of the investigation and (e) steps have been taken by his department in this regard?

Reply:

a) The National Treasury covered cost of the investigation.

b) (i) Price Waterhouse Coopers conducted the investigation;

(ii) The National Treasury appointed the investigators.

c) The National Treasury did the procurement process.

d) The recommendations of the forensic investigation were as follows:

  • Disciplinary action should be taken against Ms Baduza for contravening the legislative prescripts and practice notes of SAHRA’s Supply Chain Management Policy.
  • SAHRA should assess the extent to which Ms Motsisi, Ms Baduza and Anix Consulting can be held liable for the losses incurred on the project.
  • SAHRA should recover the VAT overcharged by Anix Consulting and determine whether disciplinary action should be taken against the officials involved in the payment process.
  • Engage with the Law enforcement agencies for them to determine whether any SAHRA official illegally benefited from the irregular appointment of Anix Consulting and extension of scope.
  • Institute a further investigation into payments made to service providers (Trans Pacific, Creative Axis, and Anix Consulting) through the law enforcement agency to quantify the loss suffered by SAHRA and initiate a recovery process.
  • Consult with legal advisors to determine what amounts can be claimed from Anix Consulting and to commence with this process.

.e) The Department played its oversight role to ensure that Council of SAHRA implements the recommendations of the forensic report. This has led to the dismissal of the former CEO, after undergoing a disciplinary process. In addition, the matter is currently being investigated by the Law enforcement agencies as per the recommendations of the report. The Special Investigation Unit is currently conducting further investigation on the matter under Proclamation 38 of 2019 issued on 12 July 2019.

 

13 December 2021 - NW2520

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

a) What (i) are the reasons that the Liliesleaf Trust is the only heritage site that will be saved from closing down and (ii) (aa) other heritage sites are closing down, (bb) is their total number, (cc) are their names, (dd) is their location, (b) how did his department save the other heritage sites and (c) what plans does his department have to save all heritage sites from closing down?

Reply:

(a)(i). My Department has not received a request from the Liliesleaf management and Board of Trustees for assistance to prevent closure of the museum. The department will consider such a request when it is received.

(ii) (aa) The Department has not received notification of heritage sites closing down. It should be noted that Heritage sites in the country are managed at different spheres of Government while other heritage sites are managed as private heritage sites either through Trusts or foundations.

(bb). The Department is therefore not in a position to know the number of heritage sites that are closing down.

(cc) The Department is therefore not in a position to know the names of heritage sites that are closing down.

(dd) The Department is therefore not in a position to know the locations of heritage sites that are closing down.

b). The request for operational funding for the next three years by the Steve Biko Museum is being considered by the Department. The three requests received for operational funding through the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package has been funded.

c) The Department has been affected by budget cuts due to the Covid 19 pandemic. Some of the funds had to be redirected towards the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP), which is designed to support a spectrum of opportunities, focusing on job creation through public employment; on job retention in vulnerable sectors; on direct support to livelihood strategies; as well as on fast-tracking high-impact employment enablers. The PESP programme has already been implemented but the department will consider how best to assist heritage sites facing closure when such a request is received.

13 December 2021 - NW2454

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What total number of cases of procurement fraud have been identified in her department in the past five financial years and (b)(i) who has been held accountable for the specified fraud and (ii) what have been the consequences in this regard?

Reply:

(a) Two cases of procurement fraud were identified by the department in the past five financial years.

(b) (i) and (ii) in the first case, the official was charged with financial misconduct but resigned from the Department before the disciplinary proceedings could be finalised. The matter was subsequently reported to the South African Police Service (SAPS) for their further handling and a legal application was also made for the suspension of the contract.

In the second case, the matter was reported to the SAPS for further handling as it only involved the service provider and the project had reached conclusion.

13 December 2021 - NW2602

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the reasons that a means test is used to determine rights to a disability grant (details furnished); (2) whether she has found that Foster Care Grants should be subject to a means test like the disability grants; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will she introduce it?

Reply:

1. In terms of section 27 of our constitution, everyone is guaranteed the right of access to Social Security and “if needed”, social assistance. By its nature, social assistance in the form of social grants are only provided to those with low or no incomes to supplement their income. Hence, all the social grants, including the disability grant, are means tested on income; and in the case of grants for adults, on assets as well.

2. The Foster Child Grant (FCG) is slightly different from the other grants. In the case of foster care, the child is removed from their parent(s) or guardian(s) by the state and consequently is under the legal custody of the state. The maintenance of the child is thus the responsibility of the state. The state partners either with child care homes or individuals to assist, on temporary basis, with the care and protection of children in its custody, for which it provides either a subsidy (in the case of children’s homes) or a grant (in the case of person(s)

13 December 2021 - NW2569

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the National Sports Federation (NSF) receiving its grant from his department, (a) on what date is it envisaged that the NSF will receive the allocation letters for the 2021-22 financial year, (b) what are the reasons that the grant allocation for the 2020-21 financial year has still not been paid out and (c) by what final date is it envisaged that all federations will have received their full payment of the grant from his department?

Reply:

The status remains the same as indicated to the response to question 2511. Delete the rest.

13 December 2021 - NW2307

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will furnish Mr N P Masipa with a detailed progress update regarding the blended finance which includes the (a) contracts that the entities reporting to her have entered into in order to provide the blended finance support and (b) details of funding provided to farmers through the programme?

Reply:

Yes.

a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has signed agreements to implement blended finance with Land Bank and the Industrial Development Cooperation (IDC).

  • The 1st Memorandum of Agreements (MOA) made and entered into between the former Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) and Land Bank was signed on March 2018;
  • The 2nd one was a tripartite that was entered into between former DAFF, Land Bank and former Department of Rural Development and Land Reform (DRDLR) signed in September 2018; and
  • The 3rd one was between DALRRD and IDC signed in March 2021.

b) Details of funding provided to farmers: Please refer to Annexure A.

ANNEXURE A OF NA-QUES 2307 OF 2021

(i) Land Bank support during the proof of concept phase (2018/2019 financial year):

Farmers supported during the proof of concept phase in 2018/19 financial year.

Province

Type of Support

Commodity

Total Value (R'000)

Approved Grant (R'000)

Approved Loan (R'000)

Amount Drawn (R’000)

Insurance (Y/N)

Permanent Jobs

Status

KwaZulu Natal

Mortgage and production loan

Sugarcane

15 000

7 000

8 000

15 000

Y

13

Operational. Although the client experienced a small fire which burnt ± 39 ha of sugar cane, ±21 ha was mature cane. On 4 November 2019 the client lodged claim against insurance for the damage to the 18 ha. Despite the above, the client is on track with farming operations and payments. The instalment has already been provided for.

Northern Cape

Mortgage and Production loan

Livestock

8 152

4 000

4 152

8 152

N

3

Operational. Although drought is still persistent in NC, supplements continue to be given to livestock and farmer drilled borehole.

Mpumalanga

Mortgage and Production loan

Mixed (crops and Livestock)

51 386

33 826

17 560

51 386

N

23

Operational. 15 Cattle were reported stolen in December 2019. 70ha under production.

North West

Mortgage and production loan.

Broilers and Cattle

10 214

2 714

7 500

10 214

N

29

Operational. Sells broilers to Supreme chickens.

North West

Mortgage and Production loan

Broilers

19 158

13 858

5 300

19 158

N

8

Operational. Sells broilers to Supreme chickens.

North West

Mortgage and Production loan

Mixed (crops and Livestock)

55 000

35 500

19 500

55 000

N

5

Operational.

Gauteng

Mortgage and Production loan

Broilers

6 852

4 710

2 142

6 852

N

7

Operational although the farmer experienced challenges with poor project management during construction of 3 poultry houses. Contract with Avon chickens.

Total

 

 

165 762

101 608

64 154

165 762

 

88

 

PS: It took the Land Bank 272 days on average from approval to disbursement.

PS: The agreement with Land Bank is still effective however, the current liquidity challenges at Land Bank has prevented Land Bank to support the farmers through Blended Finance after it was relaunched on 18 March 2021 as they are still awaiting their challenges to be resolved before supporting new transactions.

(ii) Support through IDC (the spreadsheet with details is attached)

The IDC started implementing blended finance after the re-launch by Ministers of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development and Trade, Industry and Competition on 18 March 2021. The following is the IDC performance since the launch:

a) DALRRD transferred R200 million to IDC in March 2021. The second Tranche will be disbursed before end November 2021;

b) The base target contribution from IDC is R4 billion and Dalrrd has committed R1 billion in five years to the IDC;

c) Approvals as at 30 September 2021 – IDC has approved total funding of R260,340 million, of which R182,340 million is loan and R78 million grant; supporting 5 enterprises and creating 128 permanent jobs as shown in the table below:

Producers supported through IDC as at end September 2021

Province

Type of support

Commodity

Total Value R'000

Grant Approved

Loan Approved

Total Drawn

Insurance (Y/N)

Permanent Jobs

Comment

KZN

Acquisition Production loan

Timber (Forestry)

25 400

10 000

15 400

0

Y

26

Expansionary acquisition

GP

Production loan (Capex & Opex)

Agro-processing (vegetables)

11 000

4 000

7 000

0

Y

32

Support working capital and machinery

MP

Production loan (Capex & Opex)

Broilers

75 400

23 000

52 400

0

Y

21

Start up: 360 000 chickens per cycle

GP

Production loan (Capex & Opex)

Broilers

72 640

23 000

49 640

0

Y

25

Expansion:380 000 to 680 000 chickens per cycle

MP

Production loan (Capex & Opex)

Broilers

75 900

18 000

57 900

0

Y

24

Expansion:545 000 to 845 000 chickens per cycle

Total

 

 

260 340

78 000

182 340

0

 

128

 

Final conditions to be met before transfers are made.

Furthermore the current pipeline is as follows:

d) Eight (8) transactions are at Due diligence phase (DD) requiring R534 million and R168 million grant, creating 656 permanent jobs;

e) Transactions that have passed the deal development forum (DDF) and are moving to Due diligence phase are four (4), requiring R199 million loan and R38 million grant, creating 314 permanent jobs;

f) Lastly there are 13 transactions that are at assessment phase requiring R1, 320 billion and R337 million grant, creating 260 permanent jobs;

g) The commodities supported include poultry, beef, piggery, Horticulture, agro-processing and forestry.

ii) Jobs Fund Facility

  • DALRRD has received funding amounting to R300 million from the Jobs Fund to support 108 smallholder producers towards their commercialisation. The fund received from the Jobs Fund required match funding of an equal amount of R300 million from DALRRD. A contract has been signed with the Land Bank as the authorised credit provider. The Land Bank has been appointed as the Implementing Agent for DALRRD’s Jobs Fund project.
  • The R300 million from the Jobs Fund coupled with the R300 million match fund from DALRRD is allocated to producers as 50% loan and 50% grant. The loan is repayable at a 7.5% interest to be used as a revolving fund to support additional producers.

13 December 2021 - NW2521

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department received any funding from any external sources to assist with the aftermath of the KwaZulu-Natal riots that took place in July 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount, (b) from which (i) country and/or (ii) entity and (c) what (i) was funding used for and/or (ii) will it be used for?

Reply:

No.

(a),(b)(i)(ii),(c)(i)(ii) Falls away.

13 December 2021 - NW2650

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With regard to the allegations that Cricket South Africa has on numerous occasions been racially profiling its members, what steps are being taken to compensate and rehabilitate players affected by racial profiling?

Reply:

During June/July 2020, noting the developments in the country with the Black Lives Matter (#BLM) campaign lead taken by National Cricket player Lungi Ngidi. That triggered many allegations of racial discrimination in cricket from other former Cricket Players like Makhaya Ntini, Ashwell Prince and others, the Minister convened a meeting with sports persons who indicated their experiences of racism.

The Minister communicated with Cricket SA (CSA) to ascertain how Cricket was dealing with the matter.

Cricket South Africa responded to indicate that they developed the Integrated Transformation Strategy that was meant to ensure that players and stakeholders (including staff and fans) could raise their complaints and pro-actively address the scourge of racism and discrimination within their ranks. The Board’s intention was to deal with all matters of discrimination, racism, and privilege in cricket in general.


They indicated that in August 2020 the CSA Board approved the Cricket for Social Justice and Nation Building (SJN) Concept proposed by the Transformation Committee.

The concept included the establishment of the Office of the Transformation Ombudsman, whose core function was to manage an independent complaints system, to deal with the complaints received from the ex-players and coaches, and any stakeholder in Cricket and convene National SJN hearings. The Office of the Transformation Ombudsman is a separate entity within CSA, with powers to make recommendations to the Board and is funded by the CSA.

Advocate Dumisa Ntsebeza was appointed as the Ombudsman of the Cricket for Social Justice and Nation Building (SJN) project. Hearings were held from 20 July 2021 to 29 October 2021.

According to CSA, the report from this independent panel is expected by 10 December 20201.CSA will then consider the recommendations on all matters that stems from this report

13 December 2021 - NW2542

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that he does not allocate funding to independent institutions that urgently require it under the Culture Promotion Act, Act 35 of 1983, which gives him the power and discretion to provide funding to independent institutions, which meet the goals, objectives and vision of his department without the National Treasury approval?

Reply:

The Minister through the Departmental National Agencies i.e. NAC, NHC, NFVF provides funding support to all kinds of entities and arts practitioners within the specific promulgated Acts governing these the Cultural and Creative Industries in the country. These funding opportunities led by the Departmental Agencies are open to all role-players within the creative and cultural industries including the independent entities as long as they are compliant with the pronounced funding prescripts.

13 December 2021 - NW2553

Profile picture: Malomane, Ms VP

Malomane, Ms VP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Noting that numerous sporting bodies have been experiencing transformation and governance challenges which have a negative impact on the different sporting codes and that his department has been intervening in various sporting bodies, what has been the outcomes in building and strengthening sporting bodies such as (a) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and (b) other sporting bodies?

Reply:

Government, in terms of the National Sport and Recreation Act intervenes in the governance matters of sport when sports organisations themselves have had an opportunity to deal with whatever governance problems they encounter.

(a). With regard to SASCOC itself, the Department appointed a Task Team to help ensure that the recommendations of the Zulman Committee of Enquiry on governance are being implemented. Indeed, a final meeting is being planned on the matter between SASCOC and the Department.

Our agreement with SASCOC is that they first deal with challenges within National Federations on their own, before escalating them to the Department should they fail to resolves the issues. The Department is limited in its capacity and authority to deal with the matter directly.

(b). Several incidents relating to governance like in Basketball South Africa, have indeed brought to the attention of the Minister. The Minister has advised SASCOC to deal with the issues. A steering committee between SASCOC, DSAC and Basketball South Africa was set up that finalised a roadmap towards the successful Annual General meeting that ushered in new Provincial Affiliates and a new National Executive Committee.

In some cases, like in Cricket SA Minister has had to deal with them from his office and to that end, a new Board is in place based on the Nicholson Committee of Enquiry recommendations, and the organisation is now on an upward trajectory.

With regard to Transformation, a Transformation Commission, known as the Eminent Persons Group (EPG), is already in place, which developed the requisite templates to track progress in transformation and ensures that these are completed annually with recommendations being sent to the Minister for possible action.

National Federations that do not meet their own self-set transformation targets are liable to a range of penalties that are applied at the discretion of the Minister.

In terms of MOAs between DSAC (former SRSA), SASCOC and the 19 audited national federations in relation to the transformation of their respective sport, SASCOC has to assist DSAC in the proper implementation and execution of the project by the national federation. They have to further assist DSAC to coordinate and give effect to the satisfactory and proper implementation and execution of the EPG Audit Report and the undertakings by the national federation as and when required by DSAC in writing.

13 December 2021 - NW2442

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1. (a). How far is his department with the process of reviewing the policy on council members who serve on multiple councils within the same sector and (b) what is the time-frame for the implementation of the recommendations of the review process; (2). whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the recommendations of the review process; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. We appoint people to the boards and councils who have applied. To my recollection there is no law that forbids a person from serving in more than one council or board.

13 December 2021 - NW2686

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether any libraries have been built by his department in the Northern Cape in the past five years; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the locations of the specified libraries and (b) at what cost; (2). whether the libraries are operational; if not, why not; if so, are they connected with Wi-Fi; (3). what (a) total number of libraries in the Northern Cape, and with specific referral to the Namaqua District, has been identified by his department as not able to function, because of (i) personnel shortages and (ii) a lack of budget and (b) are the names of the towns in which such libraries are located; (4). (a) what is his department’s budget allocation towards building new libraries in the Republic in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) at which locations in the Republic does his department intend to build libraries?

Reply:

1. A total number of sixteen (16) new libraries were built in the Northern Cape Province in the past five years. The (a) location and (b) costs of the libraries are as follows:

NO.

NAME

LOCATION

MUNICIPALITY

TOWN

COST

1.

Afrika Gaenakgang Library

Tsineng

Joe Morolong

Kuruman

R6 200 000

2.

Ester Molete Library

Churchill

Joe Morolong

Kuruman

R20 900 000

3.

Moeshoeu Piet Melamu Library

Logaganeng

Joe Morolong

Kuruman

R4 300 000

4.

M S Kitchin Library

Kuruman

Gasegonyana

Kuruman

R29 000 000

5.

Ritchie Library

Ritchie

Sol Plaatje

Ritchie

R5 700 000

6.

Greenpoint Library

Greenpoint

Sol Plaatje

Kimberley

R17 300 000

7.

H O Kgadiete Library

Warrenton

Magareng

Warrenton

R4 700 000

8.

Izak September Library

Petrusville

Renosterberg

Petrusville

R7 600 000

9.

Kamasies Library

Kamasies

Kamiesberg

Springbok

R4 300 000

10.

Sisonke Library

Carolusberg

Nama Khoi

Springbok

R6 800 000

11.

Anna Kamfer Library

Askham

Dawid Kruiper

Upington

R4 300 000

12.

Jacky Greef Library

Louisvale

Dawid Kruiper

Upington

R4 500 000

13.

Sandile Present Library

Upington

Dawid Kruiper

Upington

R37 200 000

14.

Homevale Library

Homevale

Sol Plaatje

Kimberley

R2 800 000

15.

Hector Peterson Library

Novalspont

Umsobomvu

Colesberg

R2 600 000

16.

Noxolo Mpinda Library

Noupoort

Umsobomvu

Colesberg

R4 200 000

 

2. The libraries are operational and have internet connection. However, it must be noted some libraries may be occasionally closed due to COVID compliance.

3. There are (a) 218 libraries in the Northern Cape, 50 are located in the Namaqua District, (i) no library has personnel shortages and (ii) no library has a lack of budget.

4. (a) The Department’s budget allocation towards building new libraries in the Republic in the 2019-20 financial year was R317 307 million provided from the community library conditional grant and (b) twenty-six (26) new libraries are intended to be built as follows in the Republic:

NO.

NAME

LOCATION

MUNICIPALITY

1.

Cookhouse Library

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman: Blue Crane Route Local Municipality

2.

Mango Modular Library

Eastern Cape

Alfred Nzo: Umzimvubu Local Municipality

3.

Van Stadenrus Library

Free State

‎Xhariep‎ District: Naledi Local Municipality

4.

Zuurbekom Library

Gauteng

‎Westonaria District: ‎West Rand Municipality

5.

Kocksoord Library

Gauteng

West Rand District: Randfontein Municipality

6.

Mullerstein Library

Gauteng

Sedibeng District: Emfuleni Local Municipality

7.

Dukuduku Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude District: Mtubatuba Local Municipality

8.

KwaMdakane Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Amajuba District: Dannhauser Local Municipality

9.

Nquthu Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Umzinyathi District: Nquthu Local Municipality

10.

Endaleni Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Umgungundlovu District: Richmond Local Municipality

11.

KwaDlangezwa Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Uthungulu District: Umhlathuze Local Municipality

12.

Umzumbe Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Ugu District: Umzumbe Local Municipality

13.

Sankotshe Modular Library

KwaZulu-Natal

Ethekwini Metro

14.

Seleteng Library

Limpopo

Capricorn District: Lepelle Nkumpi Local Municipality

15.

Mavalani Library

Limpopo

Mopani District: Greater Giyani Local Municipality

16.

Botshabelo Library

Limpopo

Mopani District:

17.

Vleifontein Library

Limpopo

Vhembe District: Makhado Local Municipality

18.

Tshaulu Library

Limpopo

Vhembe District: Thulamela Local Municipality

19.

Newtown Library

Mpumalanga

Nkangala District: Steve Tshwete Local Municipality

20.

Schoemansdal Library

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni District: Nkomazi Local Municipality

21.

Provincial Depot Library

Northern Cape

Francis Baard District: Sol Plaatjie Municipality

22.

Lethabong Library

North West

Bojanala District: Rustenburg Local Municipality

23.

Dinokana Library

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema District: Ramotshere Moiloa Local Municipality

24.

Moshana Modular Library

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema District: Ramotshere Moiloa Local Municipality

25.

Wolmaranstad ext 15 Library

North West

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District: Maquassi Hills Local Municipality

26.

Bereaville Modular Library

Western Cape

Overberg District: Theewaterskloof Municipality

13 December 2021 - NW2453

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Tourism

In light of the Auditor-General exposing serious corruption regarding the distribution of the relief funds, where the monies have been paid to (a) deceased persons and (b) applicants with no identification numbers, what (i) are the names of the culprits in the specified cases and (ii) steps are being taken by her department to recover the stolen monies?

Reply:

a) As part of the actions on the audit findings and recommendations of the Auditor-General South Africa (AGSA), the Department will undertake an independent investigation to establish if there was any possible collusion from officials in this regard. The Department aims to conclude this investigation by end of April 2022.

The redemption of funds that were destined for the tourist guides who were in the respective Provincial Registers but were unfortunately found to have been deceased will be reported to the South African Police Services (SAPS) for further handling.

Furthermore, provinces will be informed of the audit findings particularly in relation to their tourist guides registers.

b) (i) and (ii) The Department will undertake a verification process with all the provinces of the forms of identification used by the various tourist guides taking into account the fact that anyone with a work visa may register as a tourist guide provided all other legal requirements are met. Further verification will be conducted with the Department of Home Affairs. Where there may be a case of invalid identification, the Department will institute recovery processes. The verification process is scheduled to conclude by March 2022.

10 December 2021 - NW2661

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 1753 on 18 June 2021, wherein he stated that consequent management processes are still underway and his department still awaits the Special Investigating Unit report to supplement its processes, what (a) are the names of the individuals involved and (b) has his department done to date to make them account for their deeds?

Reply:

Following receipt of the SIU Report (the Report) on 29 September 2021 the investigators appointed to assist the National Department of Health reviewed the Report and supplemented their legal opinion on proposed charges against implicated officials.  Charges were subsequently issued to all affected officials who are identified in the SIU and Ngubane Report’s and based on the advice from the investigators.  The Disciplinary Hearing for the affected officials has commenced and is currently underway. 

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2625

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that (a) the Jane Furse Memorial Hospital has been relying on water delivered by trucks from tenderpreneurs for many years despite having boreholes and the De Hoop Dam nearby, (b) water pipes have not been connected to the bore holes and/or from the De Hoop Dam and (c) his department chooses to spend millions monthly on a service provider who delivers water to the hospital instead of saving those resources for other service delivery issues?

Reply:

a) Jane Furse Memorial Hospital started to experience water shortages following the illegal connections on the main line from De Hoop Dam by the surrounding communities. The Provincial Department of Health through Water Affair Department end up contracting a service provider drilled a borehole on site. Due to challenge with water table level around Jane Furse Hospital, the borehole ran dry. The Sekhukhune District Municipality left with no choice but to fill up the hospital water storage tanks through water delivered by the contracted service provider.

b) Jane Furse Memorial Hospital had been connected to De Hoop Dam from its existence and the borehole is also connected.

c) Jane Furse Memorial Hospital is not involved in any forms of contract but Sekhukhune District Municipality. The Hospital is responsible of paying monthly bills as per the meter reading to Sekhukhune District Municipality.

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2665

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the fact that on 25 October 2021 the world commemorated World Mental Health Day and the acting Director-General of Health, Dr Nicholas Crisp, during a webinar hosted by his department described the current investment into mental health services as frightening while a very low number of persons actually receive the care they need, his department has come up with a solid plan to address the issue; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The Department has the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan.

The number of people with severe mental disorders who do not receive the care, treatment and rehabilitation for their mental health conditions is not only high in South Africa but across the Low and middle-Income Countries. The Department of health has developed a plan to improve access to mental health services in the country and to ensure that people living with mental health conditions receive the care they need.

The plan is derived from the provisions of the Mental Health Care Act, 2002 (Act No 17 of 2002), which among others, aims to make comprehensive and quality mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation services available to the population equitably, efficiently, integrated at all levels, and in the best interest of mental health care users, within the limits of available resources.

The National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan ,which is being updated and reviewed, further provides a blue print for strategic interventions to improve access to mental health services for the general population.

The details of the plan includes:

  1. Mental health promotion and prevention of mental illness initiatives, which are not restricted to the Health Department, but integrated into policies and plans of relevant sectors, such as Social Development, Education, Correctional Services and other stakeholder departments.
  2. Integration of mental health into all aspects of general health care across all levels of the health system to reduce the burden of untreated mental health conditions.
  3. Ensuring that psychotropic medication as provided on the Standard Treatment Guidelines and the Essential Drug List (EDL) are available at all levels of health care.
  4. Strengthening district based mental health services through establishment of district specialist mental health teams to ensure comprehensive services and integration at primary health care.
  5. Enhancing institutional capacity and governance through establishment of Mental Health Review Boards in all provinces. These are quasi-judicial structures appointed by the Members of Executive Councils as prescribed in the Mental Health Care Act, 2002 (Act No 17 of 2002), to oversee that the human rights of mental health care users are upheld.
  6. Improving human resource capacity for mental health services and training of health professionals including ongoing routine supervision and mentoring at all levels of the health system.
  7. Strategic purchasing of services from health professionals through the NHI Conditional Grant to improve capacity for early identification, diagnosis, treatment and referral, at Primary Health Care including forensic mental health services.
  8. Improving infrastructure for mental health services in Primary health care facilities, general hospitals and specialized psychiatric hospitals.
  9. Development of community mental health day care and residential care facilities for people with severe mental illness and severe or profound intellectual disability
  10. Strengthening Inter-sectoral collaboration to address the social determinants of mental illness
  11. Ongoing surveillance and research on mental health services in the country. The Department recently conducted research on the evaluation of the health system cost on mental health services and programmes in the country; and on the mental health investment case to inform evidence based mental health plans and programmes.

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2563

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) total number of provinces have reported to him that they are (i) withdrawing their support to the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme and (ii) stopping payments towards the specified programme and (b) total amount in funds was meant to be paid by his department towards the programme for the 2021 academic year in each province; (2) whether he and/or his department requested the provinces to make an additional payment over and above the payments they were supposed to make; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what is the (a) allocated annual stipend by his department for each student and (b) full breakdown as reported to his department of the costs for the programme in each province with regard to (i) stipends, (ii) insurance, (iii) administrative costs, (iv) wasteful expenditure and (v) any other costs; (4) whether his department is in possession of an audit report of the programme that he can provide to Ms H Ismail; if not, why not; if so; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) None

 (ii) None

(b) The total cost per student to date, depending on the Rand/Dollar Exchange Rate at the time of transfer, is reflected below and based on:

(i) Scholarship Programme, jointly funded by both Governments.

  • Preparatory (one year) : $2000.00 per student
  • 1st – 5th Year (per student) : $5000.00
  • Stipend (per student per year) : $2400.00

(ii) Expanded Training Programme (ETP) is wholly funded by the South African Government is reflected in the table 1 below:

Table: 1

Level

Tuition Fees

Meals & acc.

Ave. cost Med. Ins.

Stipend

Preparatory

$6000.00

$6022

$450

$2400.00

1st – 2nd Year

$12, 500

$6022

$500

$2400.00

3rd – 4th Year

$11, 500

$6022

$500

$2400.00

5th Year

$13, 500

$6022

$600

$2400.00

(iii) Local Universities

Tuition fees at South African universities during the integration since inception until 2018 varies from one university to another. After the agreement signed with local universities, the cost of integration per student has been standardized since July 2018 and adjusted according to Consumer Price Index. Students have all to be in the clinical training platform for 18 months which translates into three (3) semesters. Additional costs included transportation of the final year students to local universities which depends on the mode of transport and distance to the university.

  • July 2018 – June 2019 : R231 325.00 (R115 662.50 per semester).
  • July 2019 – June 2020 : R241 734.63 (R120 867.31 per semester).
  • July 2020 – June 2021 : R252 612.68 (R126 306.34 per semester).
  • July 2021 – June 2022 : R260 696.28 (R130 348.14 per semester).

(2) Yes

This was a shortfall for the 2019/2020 academic period of students in Cuba. The shortfall was because the exchange rate baseline that was used in calculating tuition fees for students in Cuba was at R15 for the 2019/2020 academic period. Since the exchange rate escalated so much above the base line, this meant that the amount transferred to Cuba was lower than the amount received from Provincial Department of Health. The amount transferred to Cuba did not cover the total amount due.

(3) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) See Table 1 above

(iv) None known

(v) Additional costs include two return flight tickets per student during six years and/ or during a bereavement of next of kin.

(4) The department has just concluded an internal audit and reconciliation exercise from October 2021 to November 2021.The findings have been sent to Provinces for review and approval. Provinces have been requested to correct the findings by 17 December 2021.

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2590

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Whether he will re-introduce a requirement for the (a) SA Nursing Council and (b) training colleges registered with the National Qualifications Framework to include courses in Gerontological Nursing Science and/or Gerontology including Geriatrics in the up-coming nursing training curricula as the requirements of the National Health Act, Act 61 of 2003, indicate a clear need for the training of nursing care staff members in residential care facilities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Nursing Council (SANC) as the regulator of nurses and midwives in South Africa, takes responsibility, amongst others, for –

  • Setting and maintaining standards of education, training, and practice and
  • Providing mandatory guidance and additional advice to people designing and developing education programmes

Gerontology Nursing/ Geriatrics is currently not listed as a Post Graduate Diploma (Nursing Speciality) programme. However, the content of Gerontology nursing/ Geriatrics is covered in the curricula of the legacy professional nurse qualifications, the new higher education 4-year Bachelor degree as well as the new 3-year diploma programme under the following exit level outcome:

  • Provide nursing care throughout the lifespan in various healthcare settings of which the following criteria are evaluated:
  • Preventive, promotional, curative and rehabilitative nursing care is provided to different age groups in various health care settings,

Based on the above information, all professional nurses trained whether through the legacy professional nurse qualifications and the new qualifications at higher education level are full capacitated to holistically nurse geriatric patients throughout the levels of care. All other categories of nurses work under the direct supervision of the professional nurse who guide the nursing process. Should there be specific gerontology nursing needs that have to be developed, the establishment can provide that by way of in-service training and continuous professional development.

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2464

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Transport

What immediate interventions will be implemented by his department regarding the taxi riots in Atteridgeville, which are affecting the transportation of pupils to school during the examination period?

Reply:

The Department enquired about the taxi riots in Atteridgeville from the Gauteng Department of Roads and Transport as well as the Taxi Industry in the Tshwane Region. Their response is that they are not aware of such an occurrence of taxi riots in that area.

10 December 2021 - NW2558

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Pelonomi Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein, Free State, is maintained in accordance with a five-year maintenance plan; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified plan; (2) whether his department has reviewed the plan; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was it reviewed and (b) what changes were implemented; (3) what are the relevant details of the current shortages of (a) beds, (b) medicine, (c) oxygen, (d) theatre beds, (e) theatre equipment and (f) general medical equipment; (4) (a) what are the names of the various suppliers contracted for the specified resources and (b) how frequently is medical waste products removed from the specified hospital (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. It can be confirmed that Pelonomi Hospital is maintained in accordance with a 5-year maintenance plan. The objective of the departments’ maintenance plan is to address maintenance backlog, user needs, clinical standards, and statutory requirements (as per the occupational health and safety act).

2. The department is reviewing the plan on an annual basis through the User Asset Management Plan and Infrastructure Programme Implementation Plan (IPMP). This is to allow for new activities that need to be added and escalation of costs.

3. (a) The hospital is experiencing shortages in beds due to the maternity ward not yet being complete. The contractor terminated when progress was still at 40% to complete due to poor workmanship. New contractor is expected to be on site by March 2022 for 14 months.

(b) Medicine Shortages experienced as per the table below:

Medicine Name

Suppliers

Amphotericin B

Waiting for Buy-Out

Acetylcysteine Vials

Equity not paid by depot

Ganciclovir 500mg vials

Waiting for Buy-Out

Nylon 3/0

Waiting for Buy-Out

Phenylephrine drops

Waiting for Buy-Out

Prontosan cleaning solution 350 and 1000ml

Waiting for Buy-Out

Tramadol 100mg ampoules

Waiting for Buy-Out

Sodium Valproate 400mg vials

Waiting for Buy-Out

Nylon 1/0

Waiting for Buy-Out

Soda Lime

Depot cancelled order and awaiting buy-out

AMIKACIN 100 MG

Waiting stock – Medical Depot (DDV)

Cefepime 1g and 2g

Waiting stock – Medical Depot (DDV)

SALBUTAMOL RESP SOL 5MG/1ML 20

Depot out of stock

FLUMAZENIL 0.5 MG/5 ML AMP

Waiting for Buy-Out

CARBIMAZOLE 5 MG TAB

Waiting Buy-Out

CLOTHIAPINE 40 MG TAB

Waiting Buy-Out

DIGOXIN 0.25MG 28'S 1 TAB

Depot out of stock

RINGER'S LACTATE SOLUTION 200

Waiting stock – B-Braun awaiting stock

Saline 50ml, 100ml and 200ml

Waiting stock – B-Braun awaiting stock

Paracetamol syrup

Barrs not being paid

Augmentin syrups

Sandoz not being paid

Aldactone tabs

Sandoz not being paid

Hydralazine 25mg

Sandoz not being paid

Hibiscrub and Steriprep

Barrs not being paid

Tuberculin PPD

Company out of stock

Actilyse

Awaiting buy-out

Artesunate

Equity not being paid

Midazolam 5 and 15mg

Worldwide problem

(c) Oxygen Shortages

There is currently no challenge with oxygen. All vacuum and oxygen points are serviced. The medical gas plant room was upgraded to provide the following capacity:

  • Main tank = 19 500 Tons
  • Standby tank = 8 500 Tons

Tanks were also furnished with sensors that are directly linked to Afrox supply chain platform. Afrox is thus informed when levels go beyond 50% and is then actioned to refill such.

(d) Theatre Beds Shortages:

There are currently 4 theatre beds shared between surgical and maternity. This shortage dur to the maternity Ward and its theatre still being under upgrade and renovation.

(e) Theatre Equipment Shortages:

The following equipment is required:

  • Orthopaedic Drills = 6
  • Operating Light with Camera = 6
  • Anesthetic Machine = 3
  • Dermatome = 2
  • Tourniquet Machine = 4
  • Autoclave for non-heat item = 2
  • Mobile Suction Machine = 20
  • Electrical Suction Machine = 10
  • Theatre Chair = 18
  • CMAC = 2
  • Video System, Laparoscopic, General Surgery with Instruments = 1
  1. f) General Medical Equipment Shortages

The following general medical equipment shortages exists:

  • Cardiotocography (CTG) or Fetal Monitor = 15
  • Transport Incubator = 3
  • Hemodialysis Machine = 16
  • Mobile Theatre Light = 2
  • Dental Chair = 10
  • CPAP Machine = 10
  • Examination Light = 6
  • Ultrasound (Sonar) Machine = 4
  • Plaster (Cast) Cutter with Vacuum System = 6
  • Defibrillator = 15
  • AEEG Machine = 2
  • Instrument Washer = 2
  • Bronchoscope = 1
  • Electrosurgical Unit Tester = 2
  • ECG Simulator = 4
  • Examination Couch, Paediatric = 4
  • Electrical Safety Analyzer = 2
  • Digital Bucky X-Ray Machine = 4
  • Anesthetic Machine, MRI Compatible = 1
  • Contrast Warmer = 1
  • Injector Pump = 1

4. (a) Suppliers:

• Medical waste service provider is Buhle Waste.

• General waste service provider is Mangaung Metro Municipality.

• Recyclable waste: (e.g. white paper, card boxes and plastic cartons) the service is Waste Recyclers.

(b) Medical waste services are provided daily from Monday to Friday.

(5) No.

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2726

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) will resume the duties he fulfilled before his suspension in 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the terms and time frames of the appointment of a certain person (name furnished) in an acting capacity?

10 December 2021 - NW2589

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What concrete measures has the Government taken to prioritise the (a) dissemination of information regarding the necessity to be vaccinated (details furnished) and (b) vaccination of poorer, older persons living in rural communities; (2) what number of persons living in the rural areas have received vaccines?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health (NDoH) and the GCIS has worked together on a national information dissemination strategy, supported by a range of non-government partners. The strategy is informed through analysis of national and sub-national surveys and social listening, analysed by the Risk Communication and Community Engagement Committee of the NDoH and the multi-sectoral Demand Acceleration Task Team mandated by the NDoH. Together these structures have produced a variety of communication outputs, including:

  • Mass dissemination of over 25 million information brochures in all 11 languages (distribution with the support of the PEPKOR group)
  • Distribution of 300,000 posters in 14 languages through health facilities, retail stores and 40,000 spaza shops;
  • Production and broadcast of radio public service announcements on 11 public radio stations and talk-shows and live reads on over 60 community radio stations;
  • Production of videos for people with hearing disability and pamphlets in large print and Braille for people with visual impairment;
  • Extensive use of social media through the use of both banners and voice clips in all 11 languages.

The use of this material has been mediated through partnership with trade unions, faith-based organisations, traditional and Khoi-San leadership, the business sector and community-based organisations. This is facilitated through the National Communications Partnership convened by GCIS. In addition, a number of other social partners have facilitated large-scale public communication and social mobilisation strategies, including the ‘Roll Up Your Sleeves” campaign and UNICEF outreach vehicles.

Working with these partners, the private sector and clinical operators of outreach programmes at SASSA queues, provincial departments of health have extended services to poorer, older people living in rural communities. It is particularly gratifying that the highest vaccination first dose coverage for people aged 60 years and older is in Limpopo (77%), closely followed by the Western Cape (70%), Eastern Cape (68%), Free State (67%) and KwaZulu-Natal (61%) respectively. It is of concern to the Department that the highest number of unvaccinated older people in fact reside in Gauteng, with over half a million people aged sixty years and older still to be vaccinated. This illustrates the fact that urban informal settlements and inner city areas should equally be regarded as national priorities.

 

The National toll-free COVID hotline is promoted in all communication as an accessible channel through which the public discuss/can get answers to questions and concerns re vaccination, registration/booking, side effects etc. In addition, Govt leads specific communication and engagement campaigns to maximise key moment uptake, or focus on key groups i.e. Vooma Vaccination weekend launched in October,  and Vooma III week scheduled for 3 to 10 December, linking pop up sites with Vooma media (community radio imbizos and talkshows and on the ground activation of community networks and stakeholders for imbizos and one to one discussions, Festive Season Noku Mashaba communication campaign launching on 13 December, through multiple communication channels: commuter TV, billboards, community and national radio PSAs,  digital banners, digital videos, posters and social media.

Zwakala #takeyourshot youth focused campaign led by community youth influencers, across multiple mass media channels and rapidly extending into community activations and micro level co-ordination around vaccination drives, TheTruck community engagement campaigns in collaboration with provincial departments of health, district health services and UNICEF,  a multimedia truck broadcasting local stories in local languages has visited multiple high risk areas in all provinces, to focus attention of local communities on real stories of COVID 19, and encourage them to engage with ground support teams and services around COVID prevention and vaccination  This adds to existing community engagement and door to door work conducted by provinces.

 

The national Vax Champs programme launched in November, invites everyone living in South Africa to sign up to become an ambassador for vaccination against Covid-19by by encouraging friends, family and neighbours to vaccinate. This will grow a network of local champions to lead the way to higher vaccination rates.

Vaccination of poorer, older persons living in rural communities:

  • R200 Vooma Voucher (Checkers/Shoprite/USave) for every person over 50 who vaccinates for the first time during November/December
  • Pop up vaccination sites activated through Vooma campaigns, in December will focus on shopping malls, taxi ranks and recreational areas, in addition to existing vaccination sites.
  • NDoH campaign for youth to get older family members vaccinated.
  • Young people in communities volunteering to assisting older persons to register/access vaccination e.g. Grandkids4Gogos.
  • Involving the elderly tell their stories of vaccination in the stories broadcast on theTruck.

2. The following table reflects the details in this regard.

Province

District

Subdistrict

Total No of Individuals Vaccinated

Eastern Cape

Alfred Nzo

Matatiele LM

56117

Eastern Cape

Alfred Nzo

Umzimvubu LM

57755

Eastern Cape

Amathole

Amahlathi LM

37925

Eastern Cape

Amathole

Great Kei LM

10287

Eastern Cape

Amathole

Mnquma LM

68125

Eastern Cape

Amathole

Ngqushwa LM

19193

Eastern Cape

Amathole

Raymond Mhlaba LM

54348

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Emalahleni LM

35617

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Engcobo LM

40251

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Enoch Mgijima LM

80015

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Intsika Yethu LM

35129

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Inxuba Yethemba LM

21098

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

Sakhisizwe LM

17292

Eastern Cape

Joe Gqabi

Elundini LM

36567

Eastern Cape

Joe Gqabi

Senqu LM

43327

Eastern Cape

Joe Gqabi

Walter Sisulu LM

25860

Eastern Cape

OR Tambo

Mhlontlo LM

48888

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Blue Crane Route LM

13550

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Dr B Naude LM

25911

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Kouga LM

34558

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Kou-Kamma LM

10512

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Makana LM

46295

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Ndlambe LM

16273

Eastern Cape

Sarah Baartman

Sundays River Valley LM

19808

Free State

Fezile Dabi

Mafube LM

10470

Free State

Fezile Dabi

Moqhaka LM

41052

Free State

Fezile Dabi

Ngwathe LM

28278

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Masilonyana LM

14156

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Matjhabeng LM

165221

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Nala LM

17612

Free State

Lejweleputswa

Tswelopele LM

17908

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Dihlabeng LM

98363

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Mantsopa LM

17315

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Nketoana LM

11677

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Phumelela LM

10440

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Setsoto LM

26445

Free State

Xhariep

Kopanong LM

24237

Free State

Xhariep

Letsemeng LM

9441

Free State

Xhariep

Mohokare LM

8126

Free State

Mangaung

Botshabelo SD

43328

Free State

Mangaung

Thaba N'chu SD

26697

Gauteng

Sedibeng

Lesedi LM

30662

Gauteng

Sedibeng

Midvaal LM

34739

KwaZulu-Natal

Amajuba

Dannhauser LM

15412

KwaZulu-Natal

Amajuba

Emadlangeni LM

5385

KwaZulu-Natal

Harry Gwala

Dr N Dlamini Zuma LM

31651

KwaZulu-Natal

Harry Gwala

Gr Kokstad LM

21176

KwaZulu-Natal

Harry Gwala

Ubuhlebezwe LM

28615

KwaZulu-Natal

King Cetshwayo

Mthonjaneni LM

11360

KwaZulu-Natal

King Cetshwayo

Nkandla LM

25250

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

Impendle LM

8758

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

Mkhambathini LM

13862

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

Mpofana LM

11545

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

Richmond LM

20912

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

uMngeni LM

37759

KwaZulu-Natal

uMgungundlovu

uMshwathi LM

19527

KwaZulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude

Big 5 Hlabisa LM

45860

KwaZulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude

Jozini LM

39606

KwaZulu-Natal

Umkhanyakude

uMhlabuyalingana LM

42313

KwaZulu-Natal

Umzinyathi

Endumeni LM

30232

KwaZulu-Natal

Umzinyathi

Msinga LM

29791

KwaZulu-Natal

Umzinyathi

Umvoti LM

25456

KwaZulu-Natal

Uthukela

Inkosi Langalibalele LM

45722

KwaZulu-Natal

Uthukela

Okhahlamba LM

22102

KwaZulu-Natal

Zululand

AbaQulusi LM

45325

KwaZulu-Natal

Zululand

eDumbe LM

15334

KwaZulu-Natal

Zululand

Ulundi LM

33722

KwaZulu-Natal

Zululand

uPhongolo LM

25392

Limpopo

Capricorn

Blouberg LM

56965

Limpopo

Capricorn

Lepelle-Nkumpi LM

67007

Limpopo

Capricorn

Molemole LM

34635

Limpopo

Mopani

Ba-Phalaborwa LM

44320

Limpopo

Mopani

Greater Giyani LM

74173

Limpopo

Mopani

Maruleng LM

44626

Limpopo

Sekhukhune

E Motsoaledi LM

82495

Limpopo

Sekhukhune

Ephraim Mogale LM

27245

Limpopo

Vhembe

Collins Chabane LM

61997

Limpopo

Vhembe

Makhado LM

139444

Limpopo

Vhembe

Musina LM

35627

Limpopo

Waterberg

Bela-Bela LM

24078

Limpopo

Waterberg

Lephalale LM

50594

Limpopo

Waterberg

Mogalakwena LM

111255

Limpopo

Waterberg

Mookgophong/Modimolle LM

42416

Limpopo

Waterberg

Thabazimbi LM

56965

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni

Bushbuckridge LM

150730

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni

Thaba Chweu LM

39159

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Chief Albert Luthuli LM

39955

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Dipaleseng LM

7464

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Dr Pixley Ka Isaka Seme LM

12970

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Lekwa LM

30997

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Mkhondo LM

17138

Mpumalanga

Gert Sibande

Msukaligwa LM

46778

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Emakhazeni LM

17010

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Steve Tshwete LM

67574

Mpumalanga

Nkangala

Victor Khanye LM

18563

North West

Bojanala

Kgetlengrivier LM

15879

North West

Bojanala

Moses Kotane LM

64412

North West

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

JB Marks LM

80366

North West

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Maquassi Hills LM

23957

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung LM

36109

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Kagisano-Molopo LM

24018

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Lekwa-Teemane LM

14557

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Mamusa LM

16013

North West

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Naledi LM

36651

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ditsobotla LM

60547

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema

R Moiloa LM

53031

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou LM

30624

North West

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing LM

26478

Northern Cape

Frances Baard

Dikgatlong LM

11806

Northern Cape

Frances Baard

Magareng LM

5917

Northern Cape

Frances Baard

Phokwane LM

19391

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gamagara LM

19338

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Ga-Segonyana LM

43067

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong LM

3410

Northern Cape

Namakwa

Hantam LM

9113

Northern Cape

Namakwa

Kamiesberg LM

3536

Northern Cape

Namakwa

Khai-Ma LM

6452

Northern Cape

Namakwa

Nama Khoi LM

19393

Northern Cape

Namakwa

Richtersveld LM

2749

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Emthanjeni LM

16908

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Renosterberg LM

350

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Siyancuma LM

7222

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Siyathemba LM

9357

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Ubuntu LM

6798

Northern Cape

Pixley ka Seme

Umsobomvu LM

9032

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu

!Kheis LM

221

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu

Dawid Kruiper LM

34303

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu

Kai !Garib LM

33835

Northern Cape

ZF Mgcawu

Tsantsabane LM

17278

Western Cape

Cape Winelands

Breede Valley LM

71510

Western Cape

Cape Winelands

Langeberg LM

35492

Western Cape

Cape Winelands

Witzenberg LM

48771

Western Cape

Central Karoo

Beaufort West LM

13220

Western Cape

Central Karoo

Laingsburg LM

2470

Western Cape

Central Karoo

Prince Albert LM

2950

Western Cape

Garden Route

Bitou LM

17872

Western Cape

Garden Route

George LM

72928

Western Cape

Garden Route

Hessequa LM

19894

Western Cape

Garden Route

Kannaland LM

8067

Western Cape

Garden Route

Knysna LM

31696

Western Cape

Garden Route

Mossel Bay LM

40162

Western Cape

Garden Route

Oudtshoorn LM

28566

Western Cape

Overberg

Cape Agulhas LM

13656

Western Cape

Overberg

Overstrand LM

44048

Western Cape

Overberg

Swellendam LM

13671

Western Cape

Overberg

Theewaterskloof LM

50439

Western Cape

West Coast

Bergrivier LM

23371

Western Cape

West Coast

Cederberg LM

26012

Western Cape

West Coast

Matzikama LM

20566

Western Cape

West Coast

Saldanha Bay LM

37267

Western Cape

West Coast

Swartland LM

39939

   

Total

4969800

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2617

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to the meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs on 9 November 2021 at which his department was identified as one of the departments that has not yet provided the necessary input for the section 97 Presidential Proclamation to be signed to transfer the relevant border law enforcement functions to the Minister of Home Affairs, he has been informed that this lack of input is holding up the implementation of the Border Management Authority; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the reason for delayed response and (b) by what date will he provide the necessary input?

Reply:

Yes.

a) The services provided by officials in the port of entry environment spans various areas, various legislation and some provided by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA). The nature of the various legislative mandates implemented in the border environment necessitated thorough assessment and engagements of the identified legislation to ensure relevant sections implemented within the border law environment are transferred to the Minister of Home Affairs. Engagements have had to be conducted with the Department of Home Affairs and the Border Management Authority office to ensure clear understanding of the intention so as to ensure BMA is adequately empowered with the correct provisions within the respective Acts. The SAHPRA has had to be engaged with respect to Acts enforced by the Entity and to receive their concurrence. Meetings between SAHPRA, Home Affairs and BMA have been facilitated by the department.

The department has been heavily involved in the Covid-19 response for the period under review, and that Port Health Service has been at the centre of the cross border monitoring and response to the pandemic in line with the Internaitonal Health Regulations. The Department has played a leading role in the response activities to mitigate against the spread of COVID-19 and strenghthening of our public health system in general. As we continue to respond to the COVID-19 pandemic, we experienced various challenges faced by ordinary South Africans and within our own work environment. It is my view that had things been normal, we would have responded much quicker to the section 97 proclamation as requested by the Minister of Home Affairs.

b) We await final response from SAHPRA, but are hopeful a response should be expected within the next month. It must be noted that SAHPRA has a Board and decisions are taken at the Board level. The meetings of the Board are scheduled on certain dates in a year. Fortunately SAHPRA is currently attending to the provisions of the Acts to be transferred to the Minister of Home Affairs.

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2663

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the Auditor-General’s Budgetary Review and Recommendation Report dated 10 November 2021, which was presented to the Portfolio Committee on Health, wherein it was noted under consequence management that investigations within his department are either not initiated or those initiated were not completed and, therefore, no one was held accountable for the irregular or fruitless expenditure, what (a) total number of current investigations have been launched by his department regarding irregular and fruitless expenditure in this financial year, (b) is the status of the investigations referred to in (a) and (c) total number has been completed in specific?

Reply:

(a) In the financial year 2021/22, there are no new irregular expenditure cases for the two quarters reported. 

There are 8 Irregular expenditure and 25 Fruitless and Wasteful expenditure cases registered from previous financial years. 

(b)  A total of 8 irregular expenditure cases are under investigations and 25 Fruitless and wasteful expenditure cases are pending investigation. 

(c)   None has been finalised to-date, but cases are reported to our Audit and Risk Committee on a quarterly basis to ensure regular oversight on irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure cases. 

Delays noted in finalizing cases are mostly due to Covid-19 and the move of the Department of Health offices from the Civitas building to Dr. AB Xuma building.  

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2603

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With regard to the publication in the Government Gazette on 19 October 2021 of a notice enforcing new banking information requirements for the compensation of occupational injuries and disease related claims, (a) what is the rationale behind the regulations and (b) what are the reasons that the Compensation Fund is determined to stifle third-party pre-funding administrators?

Reply:

a) what is the rationale behind the regulations?

The Minister of Employment and Labour has not issued any a regulation on the 19th October 2021. The Compensation Commissioner issued a notice to prescribe administrative rules for the payment of claims using the Account Verification System. The notice highlights the intention by the Compensation Fund to strictly enforce the payments of claims to claimant’s bank account using validations that come with the Account Verification System.

This notice is part of the Compensation Fund’s efforts to strengthen systems of internal control the Fund by the implementation of Account Verification System (AVS).

b) what are the reasons that the Compensation Fund is determined to stifle third-party pre-funding administrators?

There is nowhere in the notice published on the 19th October 2021 where reference is made to third party pre-funding administrators.

10 December 2021 - NW2562

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to the oversight measures that he implemented for the COVID-19 Vaccine Injury No-Fault Compensation Scheme, which includes the creation of the Governance Oversight Committee, what (a) are the reasons that the draft regulations state that the specified committee will be headed by a retired judge, (b) is the date on which the final members for the committee will be chosen and (c) are the relevant (i) qualifications and (ii) job descriptions for all the positions in the committee; (2) (a) through which system and/or entity will disbursements be made and (b) what are the criteria for (i) disbursements for claimants and (ii) deciding on the amounts payable; (3) whether he will provide Ms H Ismail with a list of candidates nominated for the committee; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Initially the National Department of Health (NDOH) anticipated that the adjudication and appeals process of the NFC Scheme would be complicated and onerous and that a retired judge would be better placed to oversee the scheme and adjudicate the appeals.  Upon re-assessment the NDOH has realised that the processes and caseload are not as complicated and burdensome hence the requirement for a retired judge and a Governance Oversight Committee has been done away with and this will reflect in the amended Regulations and Directions that will be published soon.  All oversight powers will now vest with the DG as the Accounting Officer of the NDOH.

(b) No committee members have been appointed on the basis that the Governance Oversight Committee will no longer be required.

(c) See (a) and (b) above.

2. (a)-(b) The disbursements will be done by the NDOH.  Disbursements will be made once claimants have been able to establish a causal link between the vaccine and the injury.  This will be assessed by the National Immunisation Safety Expert Committee and the Adjudication Panel will set the quantum.

3. The NDOH is not able to provide a list of nominated candidates for the Governance Oversight Committee since the Committee was never established based on the reasons outlined above.

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2672

Profile picture: Denner, Ms H

Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)Whether, with reference to a certain consulting company (name furnished) which was appointed by the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF) to manage risk at the UIF, he will indicate how often the risk register is communicated to the management of the UIF; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the shortcomings of the Information and Communications Technology (ICT) system of the UIF were identified by the specified company and relayed to the management of the UIF; if not, why not; if so, what steps were taken by his department to address the shortcomings in the ICT system of the UIF; (3) whether any other risks were identified by the company that could have resulted in erroneous and fraudulent payments of UIF-Temporary Employer/Employee Relief Scheme funds; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of such risks; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter

Reply:

1. UIF appointed Vindya Systems in July 2018 to support and maintain the UIF claim management system which was developed in Java. NB: that was before. Their scope of work is not to update the risk register as that is done by risk management directorate. Every month the risk register is updated by ICT risk officer and Risk Management Directorate.

2. Due to pressures to process payments the shortcomings were identified while the Fund was paying claims and continued to be addressed. The scope of work was to enable the employers to apply online since applying on email was having huge delays.

The shortcomings of the systems which were identified were addressed on the system release of the 21 September 2020. The short comings include integration with Correctional services, DPSA, live link with Home Affairs and the link with SARS.

Also the link between the DEL and Home Affairs was not sending the updates captured on Saturdays and Sunday because the old configuration of sending updates was Mondays to Fridays. The system was initially intended to be used to process claims of those who were already in the systems i.e the UIF beneficiaries which was having less risk as UIF was processing such claims.

3. The major risk identified was that employers who were not UIF contributors were also claiming at the beginning of TERS as result out of 16 000 employees applied for only 57 that were meeting all requirements to qualify for TERS. The departmental management together with UIF then took a decision not to punish employees because their employers didn’t contribute for them. That decision opened the UIF to lot of fraudulent claims as it meant that any company can claim for people that never worked for if as long as they managed to source ID numbers. More than 90% of wrongly paid people result from this decision which was not taken by ICT management of the company maintaining the system.

4. The above serves as a statement on the matter

10 December 2021 - NW2660

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 2344 on 18 November 2021, wherein he stated the total number of clinics situated in townships which offer speech and occupational therapy, what are the (a) names and (b) locations of each such clinic in (i) Gauteng and (ii) the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The details of the names and locations of the clinics are being collated in consultation with the Gauteng and the Eastern Cape Provincial Departments of Health. These details will be furnished to the Honourable Member and to Parliament as soon as they have been received from the provinces concerned.

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2554

Profile picture: Gela, Ms A

Gela, Ms A to ask the Minister of Health

What steps will be taken by his department to intensify the COVID-19 vaccination rollout to ensure that the nation reaches herd immunity by the end of the year, especially now in the post-elections period?

Reply:

The goals of the vaccination programme are to save lives by vaccinating those at highest risk of severe disease and death, and to vaccinate as many people as possible so that society and the economy can open up and resume full capacity, thus protecting livelihoods.

Herd or population immunity refers to a situation where a high enough proportion of the population are immune (as a result of natural infection or immunisation) that the virus is unable to circulate; as a result even those who are not immune are protected from infection. Whilst it was initially thought that herd immunity for Covid-19 was achievable, scientists now consider this unlikely because of factors such as vaccine hesitancy, the emergence of new variants and the delayed approval of vaccinations for children.

The immediate target of the vaccine roll-out is to ensure that at least 70% of adults have received at least one dose of vaccine. As of 2nd December, 41% of adults had been vaccinated. Sufficient vaccines and capacity to vaccinate are now available, and the main constraint to achieving higher vaccination coverage relates to poor uptake of vaccines. In response, a comprehensive Demand Acceleration Strategy has been put in place in an effort to generate demand and increase the number of individuals accessing vaccination. Key components of this strategy include:

Raising the profile of the vaccine roll-out

  1. Vooma Vaccination weekends were held during October and November 2021. These included a national call to action led by the President, as well as other political, trade union, religious, traditional and other leaders. Events were also hosted by national, provincial and local leadership at vaccination sites.
  2. Working with a range of stakeholders at national, provincial and local levels in order to mobilise communities through a range of activities including mobilisation at events (e.g. religious gatherings), in public spaces (e.g. taxi ranks) and through door to door campaigns.
  3. Recognition of good performance at provincial and district level, and of outstanding performance by healthcare and other workers during Vooma Vaccination weekends.

Making reliable information regarding the safety and effectiveness of vaccines widely available

4. Increasing the availability of reliable information regarding vaccination through various media platforms including TV, radio and print media.

5. Improved signage at vaccination sites, and improving locally available information regarding location and opening times of local vaccination sites.

6. Monitoring and addressing misinformation circulating on social media.

7. Developing a network of local vaccination champions who volunteer to motivate those around them to vaccinate and report any problems with vaccination sites.

Providing incentives and rewards to vaccinated individuals

8. Limiting access to sports and other events to those who are vaccinated.

9. A pilot project whereby individuals 50 years and older can access a R100 (recently increased to R200) grocery voucher to offset any costs incurred through vaccination (e.g. transport costs).

10. Encouraging retail stores and other companies to provide rewards (e.g. entry to a lucky draw) for those who are vaccinated.

11. Consideration of making vaccines mandatory in some settings providing that these are implemented within the current legislative and regulatory framework.

Removing barriers to vaccination

12. Increasing the number of outreach and pop-up sites in an effort to take vaccinations as close as possible to people and communities.

13. Ensuring that as many sites as possible are open during weekends (especially but not exclusively during Vooma Vaccination weekends).

14. Pilot projects including provision of free transport to vaccination sites.

 

END.

10 December 2021 - NW2400

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the pending final court ruling on the Langa rail occupancy matter, what are the full details of the measures that (a) his department and (b) the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa have put in place to relocate the rail occupants?

Reply:

a) There is currently in excess of 7800 households in the Western Cape Province who have illegally occupied the PRASA railway reserve along the Central Line. The areas occupied covers the rail reserves in Langa, Phillipi and Khayelitsha. Therefore, it is currently impossible for PRASA to rehabilitate or upgrade railway infrastructure or resume commuter rail services in the Central Line.

The Department, together with the National Departments of Human Settlements, Public Works & Infrastructure, Western Cape Provincial Departments of Human Settlements, Transport and Public Works, the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality and PRASA has decided that a joined approach will be taken to come up with sustainable solutions to be able to relocate households who have illegally occupied the railway reserve. In order to effect this decision, the parties has decided to enter into an Implementation Protocol that will facilitate decisions taken to find suitable alternative land to resettle the households and to ensure a process to restore the rail services in the Central Line corridor.

b) PRASA is working together with the Western Cape Department of Human Settlement and the City of Cape Town to identify suitable parcels of land and to install minimum services on this land to relocate the illegal occupants. Two (2) land parcels were identified in Eersterivier offered by the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and the Western Cape Provincial Department of Transport and Infrastructure for the Langa Relocation Program.

The Court Order stipulates that the relocation should take place on or before 26th November 2021, subject to conditions, including implementation of services which will necessitate preparation of the two land parcels. To access the identified state land, a motivation was made to the City of Cape Town to undertake an internal application to declare these two land parcels as emergency relocation sites so that immediate access could be obtained and land preparation could resume. On 22 September 2021, PRASA and the Housing Development Agency made this application to the City of Cape Town. On 18 October 2021, the City of Cape Town declined the application on the basis that there is threat of opposition from a Developer owning an Estate in the Eersterivier area and that there is a petition from the receiving community in opposition of the relocation.

PRASA is currently addressing the matter through intensive consultations with the City of Cape Town, WC Provincial Government, the Eersterivier receiving community and the Langa affected communities. The consultations are currently on-going.

 

10 December 2021 - NW2605

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether the Special Investigating Unit has uncovered any officials of (a) his department and/or (b) the Unemployment Insurance Fund who conspired to illegally claim COVID-19 Temporary Employee Relief Scheme benefits; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the officials’ names and designations, (ii) is the nature of their alleged crimes and (iii) are the criminal charges and/or disciplinary measures instituted against them by his department?

Reply:

(a) Yes, at the Department under Compensation Fund in the Western Cape province (b) the Department has zero tolerance on all employees who conspire to defraud UIF

(i) The name of the official is Ms Pumla Kenya working as a Nurse at the Compensation Fund

(ii) The official unlawfully received TERS benefit to the amount of R7 594.62 and used it

(iii) The matter was investigated and referred to the Hawks for prosecution. The matter is currently in court, however the funds were fully recovered from the official. The disciplinary measures were not taken because the employee immediately resigned after the commencement of the investigation.