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10 October 2023 - NW2527

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether his department (a) intends building clean, safe and usable toilets and (b) provide clean and running water for the community at Smith’s Mine in Barkley West (details furnished); if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the (i) relevant details and (ii) time frames in each case?

Reply:

Dikgatlong Local Municipality is a Water Service Authority and therefore is responsible for the provision of water and sanitation services to all communities within its area of jurisdiction, including Smith Mine which is a Communal Property Association (CPA). There is currently is no Service Level Agreement (SLA) between the CPA and Dikgatlong Municipality.

The municipality reported that the councilor is mediating for an SLA to be put in place to allow Dikgatlong to formally service these residents. Once the SLA is in finalised, formal arrangements will be made in terms of resources required from the Dikgatlong Local Municipality to provide water and sanitation services.

a) The Department supports the water services authority with construction, upgarde and refurbishment of infrastructure through conditional Water Services Iinfrastructure Grant (WSIG) and Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) funding for project prioritised by Municpalities their water services development plans.

The Municipality and the Smith Mine community require a process of formalisation of the settlement into the township in order for the municipality to access the grant funding available for sanitation services.

b) The existing water infrastructure in the community was built by the mining company and is now under the custodianship of The Dikgatlong Local Municipality. The water supply system consists of boreholes and a reservoir in which chemical dosing was being done using a specialized purification system that is container based. The size of the reservoir is approximately 0.05ml/day, however, the municipality has reported that the purification plant was vandalised and is currently not functional. A case of vandalism and theft was opened by the Dikgatlong Local Municipality with SAPS. The Municipality has reported that procurement processess are currently underway for the repairs of the plant in order to restore water supply.

As an interim measure, the municipality is providing water to the residents of Smith Mine through water tankering from Barkley West Water Treatment Works. Two 10 000 litres water tanks are placed at strategic points and are filled by two 10 000 litre water trucks. The Municipality reports that water tanks are filled twice a week, and when necessary the ward councillor communicates any additional needs. The water tankering is fully funded by Dikgatlong.

In order for the municipality to access grant funding for water services refurbishment, augmentation or upgrading, the requirement is that the residential area be a formal township.

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10 October 2023 - NW2740

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Majola, Mr TR to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What total amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her pay for printed copies of the integrated annual reports in the (aa) 2020-21, 2021-22 and (cc) 2022-23 financial year, (b) who were the suppliers in each case and (c) what total number of copies of the report were printed (i) in each case and (ii) in each specified financial year?

Reply:

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10 October 2023 - NW2706

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Smalle, Mr JF to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the total number of boreholes drilled by his department in each (i) local and (ii) district municipality in the (aa) 2020-21 and (bb) 2021-22 financial years, (b) amount did each borehole cost his department and (c) was the total volume of water supply added to each municipal jurisdiction?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) does not drill and equip boreholes in local or district municipalities. However, funding is allocated to prioritised district municipalities through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG), to accelerate backlog reduction and improve the sustainability of services particularly in rural municipalities.

(aa) In the 2020-2021 financial year, the DWS allocated R 471, 794,000 to various municipalities across the country, for the drilling and equipping of boreholes, mainly in the rural areas.

(bb) During the 2021-22 financial year the department further allocated R 537, 657, 000 towards projects for boreholes across various municipalities.

The funding provided by the DWS to municipalities for boreholes is meant to facilitate quick interventions where there are serious water shortages. It is also intended to ensure water availability in those areas where it is foreseen that construction of bulk infrastructure will take a long time.

However, it should be noted that there are instances where boreholes are drilled, tested, and found not to be viable due to the inability to yield enough water or where boreholes are operational for a limited period before drying up. These include instances where the water tables are low due to inadequate rainfall which prevents groundwater recharge or where localised drought causes a decline in groundwater available for extraction. The DWS may have in some instances funded boreholes in municipalities, which may have not yielded sufficient water to be viable or may have provided water for a limited period before drying up.

(b-c) The DWS can provide the details of funding transferred to municipalities for the drilling of boreholes but is not able to indicate the total volume of water supply added to each municipal jurisdiction through boreholes, due to the factors indicated above.

Information on municipalities that were funded by the DWS for the drilling of boreholes in each province is indicated in the table appended as Annexure A.

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ANNEXURE A:

No

Province

Municipalities funded for boreholes

Funding provided

   

District Municipalities

Local Municipalities

2020/2021 fy

2021/2022 fy

 

Eastern Cape

Amathole DM

Amahlathi, Great Kei, Mbhashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa and Raymond Mhlaba

R21,984,000

R14,600

   

Alfred Nzo DM

Ntabankulu, Matatiele, Mbizana

R69,000,000

R45,000,000

   

Sarah Bartman District Municipality

Blue Crane Route

R5,499,000

 
   

Chris Hani DM

Emalahleni, Engcobo

R18,200,000

R10,170,000

   

Joe Gqabi DM

Senqu, Elundini, and Walter Sisulu

-

R10,000,000

   

Sarah Bartman District Municipality

Makana

-

R5,000,000

   

OR Tambo DM

Qumbu, Tsolo, Lusikisiki, Flagstaff, Libode, Ngqeleni, Port St Johns & Mqanduli

-

R7,140.000

   

Sarah Bartman DM

Dr Beyers Naude

-

R11,999,000

 

Free State

Xhariep DM

Letsemeng

R13,800,000

R13,800,000

   

Thabo Mofutsanyana DM

Phumelela

R1,892,000

 
   

Thabo Mofutsanyana DM

Maluti a Phofung

 

R14,127,000

   

Lejweleputswa DM

Tokologo

 

R15,921,000

 

KwaZulu -Natal

uMkhanyakude DM

uMhlabuyalingana Jozini

R37,164,000

R61,288,000

   

Amajuba DM

eMadlangeni & Dannhauser

-

R3, 000,000

   

Zululand DM

Ulundi

R11,347.000

 
   

Umzinyathi DM

Msinga

-

R38,799,000

     

Mzimkhulu, Ubuhlebezwe, Dr Nkosazane Dlamini Zuma

-

R65,274,000

   

King Cetshwayo DM

Nkandla, uMfolozi

-

R18,652,000

 

Limpopo

Capricorn DM

Blouberg

R27,784,000

R13,606,000

     

Lepelle Nkumpi

R14,078,000

-

     

Molemole

R27,983,000

R3,800,000

     

Polokwane

R38,000,000

R20,976,000

   

Mopani LM

Greater Giyani

R15,600,000

R13,984,000

     

Greater Letaba

R15,000,000

R18,455,000

     

Greater Tzaneen

R10,000,000

-

     

Ba-Phalaborwa

R10,000,000

-

     

Maruleng

R10,000,000

-

   

Waterberg DM

Lephalale

-

R30,114,000

     

Mogalakwena

-

R8,928,000

 

Mpumalanga

Nkangala DM

Emakhazeni

R2,500,000

-

   

Gert Sibande DM

Mkhondo

-

R23.685,000

 

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe DM

Ga-Segonyana

R16,640,000

R952,000

     

Gamagara

R11,072,000

R5,700,000

     

Joe Morolong

R50,998,000

-

   

Namakwa DM

Hantam

R4,200,000

R4,000,000

     

Kamiesberg

-

R4,000,000

     

Richtersveld

R5,167,000

R11,151,000

     

Karoo Hoogland

-

R4,000,000

   

Pixley Ka Seme DM

Emthanjeni

-

R5,300,000

     

Ubuntu

-

R4,000,000

   

ZF Mgcawu DM

Dawid Kruiper

-

R5,186,000

     

Tsantsabane

-

R4,000,000

 

North West

Bojanala Platinum DM

Kgetlengrivier

R22,542,000

-

   

Dr Ruth S Mompati DM

Greater Taung

R1,344,000

-

   

Ngaka Modiri Molema DM

Ramotshere Moiloa

 

R11,050,000

 

Western Cape

Garden Route District Municipality

Kannaland

R10,000,000

R10,000,000

TOTAL

R 471, 794,000

R 497, 657, 000

10 October 2023 - NW2736

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the recent African Peace Mission to provide mediation in the war between Russia and Ukraine, what (a)(i) arms and ammunition were onboard the SA Airways plane and (ii) was the quantity of the arms and ammunition, (b) was the intended purpose of the arms and ammunition and (c) was the total cost of the arms and ammunition?

Reply:

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10 October 2023 - NW2626

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

In light of the dire situation in Emfuleni Local Municipality where thousands of residents lack access to water despite over R65 million being paid to contractors, what are the details of the oversight mechanisms his department has in place to ensure that funds allocated for water services are effectively utilised and that such critical service delivery failures are addressed promptly?

Reply:

The department has not paid R65 million to contractors for water services in Emfuleni Local Municipality, and neither has Rand Water. Rand Water has been paying contractors to work on waste water treatment systems in Emfuleni. It is possible that Emfuleni Local Municipality might have appointed contractors to work on its water systems using its own funds, but DWS would not have this information.

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10 October 2023 - NW2863

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What time frames have been put in place to repair the sewerage plants in Mangaung as they are still not fixed, despite his previous commitments to have them repaired within three months?

Reply:

The response for NA 2230 previously submitted to the National Assembly, was specifically in relation to repairs to the Sterkwater Wastewater Treatment Works (WWTW) and not all the WWTWs in the Mangaung Metro Municipality (MMM).

The municipality has indicated that although the programme to restore the Sterkwater WWTW back to functionality is behind schedule, the following progress has been made:

  • The municipality is using security cameras and armed response and managed to arrest the crippling cable theft.
  • The municipality has started primary treatment of sewers such as mechanical screens and the screw pumps.
  • Electric cables have been ordered and will be installed upon arrival. The municipality will begin testing all the stagnant equipment that needs to be repaired. The secondary treatment is affected in the main by this.

The MMM has also reported that instability at senior management level (position of Chief Financial Officer and City Manager) is also contributing to delays in implementation of some of the projects.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) issued a Notice for intention to issue Directive in terms of Section 19(3) of the National Water Act, in July 2023 and will proceed to issue a Directive due to the fact that the Sterkwater WWTW has not been restored to functionality and sewer spillages continue to pollute the environment.

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10 October 2023 - NW2864

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) number of members constitute the Regulator Commission and (b) are the detailed reasons for a separate commission being in place whereas there are already internal systems in place to assist with the strengthening and improvement of the regulatory function?

Reply:

a)  The Regulator Commission has eleven (11) members.

b) The Commission is not a separate entity. It is established as part of the internal systems to strengthen the regulatory autonomy in decision making. It is for this reason that the commission is provided for in the revised National Water Act and the Water Services Act.

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10 October 2023 - NW2701

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) Given the reported allocation of a long-term contract to Marshalls Aerospace in the United Kingdom, what (a) the reasons that the contract was not allocated to Denel Aeronautics, as clearly expected by them, (b) upgrade and service work will be done under the specified contract by Marshalls Aerospace and their subcontractors and (c) will be done by Denel Aeronautics. (2) What (a) will the monetary value of the work and provided for by (i) Marshall Aerospace and (ii) Denel Aeronautics if any and (b) number of C130 aircraft will be (i) upgraded and serviced by Marshall Aerospace, (ii) at what costs and (iii) over what timeline. (3) whether there are any discussions between the Department of Defence and the Department of Public Enterprises, on whether Denel Aeronautics will play any role now and in the future with regards to the upgrade, service and maintenance of strategic prime mission airframes; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so what are the (a) extent, (b) costs and (c) timelines involved?

Reply:

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10 October 2023 - NW2663

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education

As at 6 June 2023, what number of schools (a) in the Republic and (b) in each province (i) use only (aa) plain pit and bucket latrines and (bb) ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines and (ii) have (aa) plain pit and bucket latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises and (bb) VIP latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises?

Reply:

As at 6 June 2023, what number of schools (a) in the Republic and (b) in each province (i) use only (aa) plain pit and bucket latrines and (bb) ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines and (ii) have (aa) plain pit and bucket latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises and (bb) VIP latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises?      

What number of schools (a) in the Republic and (b) in each province (i) use only

(aa) plain pit and bucket latrines

  • In 2018, the Department of Basic Education launched the Sanitation Appropriate For Education (SAFE-2018) initiative.
  • This programme focused on providing appropriate sanitation at schools dependent on basic pit toilets.
  • There were initially 3 898 schools on the SAFE programme (This number decreased to 3 382).

(bb) ventilated improved pit (VIP) latrines

  • Of the 3 382 sanitation projects, 2 911 have been completed through SAFE.
  • The remaining 471 sanitation projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.

What number of schools (a) in the Republic and (b) in each province (ii) have

(aa) plain pit and bucket latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises

  • In 2018, there were initially 3 898 schools on the SAFE programme (This number decreased to 3 382).

(bb) VIP latrines and other sanitation facilities on their premises? 

  • Of the 3 382 sanitation projects, 2 911 have been completed through SAFE.
  • The remaining 471 sanitation projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.

The table below provides requested information in each province.

 

09 October 2023 - NW2797

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Dyantyi, Mr QR to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation: [487]

(a) What are the details of the plans that have been put in place to strengthen and/or improve the overall work of her Office and (b) how does she intend to repurpose and realign her Office to focus more on planning for development?

Reply:

  1.  REPLY(a)

  2. The overall work of the office is strengthened by putting the National Development Plan (NDP) at the centre of the work and programmes being implemented. The National Planning Commission (NPC) is critical in this process through the periodic reviews of different sectors and production of diagnostic reports identifying challenges and opportunities in order to register progress.
  3. Furthermore, the Minister has signed a Performance Agreement with the President outlining the priority areas which she will be reporting to the President on. This serves as a strategic guideline in the work of the Ministry.
  4. The work of the Ministry is strengthened by the coordination between the Office of the Minister, the Deputy Minister, the department through the Office of the Director-General, the NPC through the Office of the Secretary of the NPC. This ensures that all the components under the leadership of the Minister are in sync and complement each other in the execution of the mandate of the Minister and the Department at large. Regular meetings are held to monitor work such as strategic stakeholder engagements and other priority areas.
  5. The Minister has appointed a competent team of core support staff, in line with the Ministerial handbook, to support her in the execution of her duties. In this regard the Minister has appointed two Special Advisors in line with the Section 12 of the Public Service Act:-

a) to advise the executive authority on the exercise or performance of the executive authority's powers and duties;

b) to advise the executive authority on the development of policy that will promote the relevant department's objectives; and

c) to perform such other tasks as may be appropriate in respect of the exercise or performance of the executive authority's powers and duties.

 

 

REPLY (b)

  1. planning for development means we must pursue or implement an integrated, multi-sectoral process through which governmental institutions streamline social, economic and spatial growth and development.
  2. The NDP defines the desired development outcomes to be achieved by 2030 and it also provides a strategic framework within which more detailed planning and budgeting takes place.
  3. The Minister is advocating active citizenry for the private sector and civil society to play an active role in to promote and accelerate the implementation of Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the African Union Agenda 2063, and the NDP.
  4. The framework to repurpose the department is being developed. Among others it will seek to initiate coordination of development agencies within a “hub” for coherence and clear articulation of the role and contribution of different sectors and stakeholders in achieving the outcomes envisaged in the NDP.
  5. The Integrated Planning Framework Bill is being finalised and will be presented to Cabinet. The Bill when finalised and passed into legislation is intended to help government focus more on planning for development:
  6. We are also conducting benchmarking with our counterparts on the continent and elsewhere in order to share experiences and ideas on how to optimise the department for development planning.

 

 

THANK YOU

 

09 October 2023 - NW2651

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the temporary disability grant backlog in the Western Cape and the fact that there are only 11 assessment doctors in the province, what (a) measures has her department taken to address the shortage of assessment doctors and (b) total number of assessment doctors have been successfully recruited to date?

Reply:

a) It is important to put the backlog into context. The current medical assessment backlog in the Western Cape comprises of persons who wish to apply for a disability-related grant for the first time, applications that have been previously rejected and or persons who were granted temporary Disability Grant (TDG).

To address the shortage of assessment doctors, SASSA WC has since inception, entered into Service Level Agreements (SLA’s) with all districts of the Provincial Department of Health for the provision of medical assessment services. The implementation of the SLA Provincial is hampered by the shortage of doctors and other health practitioners who can perform proper medical assessments.

b) In July this year, SASSA embarked on a procurement process for Independent Health Practitioners. An advert for a three (3) year tender was issued with a closing date of 14th July 2023. SASSA WC is in the process of issuing award letters to fourteen (14) successful bidders. The appointed doctors will be provided with schedules to speed up medical assessments, with specific focus on areas where the need for medical assessments remain high.

09 October 2023 - NW3113

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Given that the Presidential Hotline is a referral unit, (a) what total number of cases were referred to each government department since the Sixth Administration took office and (b) how long did it take on average for the departments to acknowledge receipt and resolve those complaints? NW4181E

Reply:

a) The total number of cases that were referred to each government department for the period of 2019 – 2023:

  • All correspondence including telephone calls, emails from the presidency mailbox, walk-ins by citizens, complaints lodged by citizens during the Presidential Izimbizo to date are 51 278 cases.

b) How long did it take on average for the departments to acknowledge receipt and resolve those complaints?

  • On average it took 179 days for Provinces to resolve 8 113 complaints out of 11 912.
  • On average it took 112 days for a National government department to resolve 16 743 complaints out of 28 189. No information on acknowledge is available as the system is not design to report on it.
  • On average it takes 18 days for Presidential Hotline team to resolve 10 717 cases out of 11 177.
  • The acknowledgement of receipt by departments is done within 5 days upon receipt of cases as per the framework.

Interventions undertaken to date:

  • Through participation on Presidential Izimbizo for citizens engagements. This has improved our reach and provided access to the citizen who are in rural areas, that has no access to government information
  • National Public Liaison Officer’s forum, took place during 2022/23 and in May 2023, the next one scheduled is for October 2023. This is a peer learning platform where we share best practices and institutionalization of PH.
  • Letters of engagement to non-performing departments were sent to accounting officers, in the 2022/23 Q4
  • Presentation on department performance on case resolution was done at GSCID, in the 2022/23 Q3

 

THANK YOU

09 October 2023 - NW2582

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Bilankulu, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

What measures and mechanisms are in place to curb the practice of parents who do not use child support grants for the children’s needs which contributes to the proliferation of child stunting?

Reply:

The Child Support Grant was introduced specifically to ensure the best interest of the child at all times and to address child poverty, including malnutrition and stunting. The person who receives the CSG must be the primary caregiver of the child.

We encourage members of the public to report cases of the abuse of the CSG SASSA and social workers who will investigate and based on the findings, the grant may then be transferred to a new primary caregiver.

The Department has developed draft policies on integration of children’s grants with other services and maternal support. The two draft policies emphasise the need of building linkages between children’s grants and other developmental services for children amongst others education, health and early childhood development. We are currently preparing to initiate Cabinet approval processes for the policy, which will be followed by amendment of relevant legislation to enable the Department to share data with the Department of Health and Basic Education, amongst others. In this manner, the Department will be empowered to monitor and track health indicators including the prevention of stunting.

09 October 2023 - NW2539

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether she intends to implement socio-economic projects in Mitchells Plain and the 50 villages mobilised by the Parliamentary Constituency Office to benefit from the job-creation initiatives of her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she implemented any socio-economic projects for job-creation initiatives in the Women’s Month of August, to empower women and take them out of poverty; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As the Honourable Member is aware, the Department has facilitated a number of meetings between the identified communities, including Mitchells Plain and potential funders such as the World Food Programme and the Turkish Cooperation and Coordination Agency (TİKA), with the view to support socio-economic projects targeting women, youth and persons with disabilities.

These projects identified for potential funding by development agencies that we work closely with include the peanut butter manufacturing cooperative in KwaZulu-Natal and the group of women interested in textile at Mitchells Plain. The partner organisations have taken keen interest in these projects as they have a huge potential to create sustainable job opportunities and to economically empower both women and youth.

2. Yes, during the Women’s Month I partnered with the National House of Traditional and Kho-San Leaders (NHTKL) focusing on youth and women empowerment programmes at Magadimana Ntweng Traditional Authority in Limpopo Province. We are looking at implementing a number of youth and women empowerment projects in the area.

09 October 2023 - NW2796

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Pillay, Mr KB to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

What (a) measures are being undertaken to assess the impact of the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework and (b) progress can be highlighted as it is the last financial year of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework?

Reply:

(a) What measures are being undertaken to assess the impact of the implementation of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework

Various interventions to assess the impact of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF)

  1. Annual Performance Plans (APPs) analysis to ensure that they are aligned with the MTSF
  2. Biannual reports that are submitted to the clusters and Cabinet with clear recommendations
  3. Recommendations are considered in the Budget Prioritisation Framework
  4. Frontline monitoring undertaken to validate implementation
  5. Secondary data from Stats South Africa (Stats SA) and Government Communications and Information System (GCIS) and other state and non-state actors considered especially in relation to the views of South Africans
  6. The National Planning Commission (NPC) also engages with the stakeholders.
  7. There is a need to improve on this depending on the availability of resources.

(b) What progress can be highlighted as it is the last financial year of the Medium-Term Strategic Framework.

  1. Management of Covid-19 including relief measures for vulnerable groups including business
  2. Cabinet decisions on the professionalization of the public service and implementation ongoing
  3. Stable performance management system of HODs/DGs even though it needs continuous evaluation and improvement.
  4. Establishment of the National Anti-Corruption Advisory Council and ongoing efforts to implement the recommendations of the Zondo Commission and the SIU.
  5. Ministers performance agreements signed and assessments ongoing
  6. Ongoing interventions to improve the performance of the electricity and logistics sectors led by the President and involving the private sector
  7. Infrastructure South Africa (ISA) established and has commenced functioning to support municipalities to improve planning and implementation. Amongst others this focuses on rural roads and bridges.
  8. Successful hosting of the 2023 BRICS Summit
  9. Implementation of SA Connect to connect government buildings and communities ongoing. This follows the successful licensing of the radio frequency spectrum in 2022.
  10. Presidential Employment Stimulus, since its launch in 2020, the Presidential Employment Stimulus initiative has achieved 86.7% of its target, with a total of 1.085 million opportunities created.
  11. SMME support, as at 31 March 2023, a total of 809 products produced and services rendered by SMMEs and Co-operatives have been linked to domestic private sector markets. Furthermore, the Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme, which aims to build the industrial base for both the domestic and external markets, has disbursed R548 million to 74 SMMEs.

A total of 136 184 competitive small businesses and Co-operatives were supported through the Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) and the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (SEFA) using their non-financial and financial instruments, exceeding the MTSF target to support 100 000 competitive small businesses and Co-operatives by 2024.

12. Black Industrialists support programme

13. Land given to entrepreneurs [ 700 000 hectors]

14. Natural Spatial Development Framework finalized. DPME and others aligning the NSDF with the District Development Model [DDM]

15. NHI Bill approved by the Portfolio Committee on Health. Second reading of the Bill in the National Assembly (NA) occurred in June 2023 and the Bill was approved by the NA.

16. Education -NSFAS has grown (numbers)

-Support for TVET and community colleges

-General access has grown

17. GBVF remains a priority of this government

18. Resources allocated to improve the performance of the South African Police Services [SAPS]

However, through our monitoring and evaluation we have identified some limitations on the capacity of the state to deliver services and achieve developmental outcomes. These include:

a) State of Local government i.e. 163 municipalities distressed and 66 municipalities dysfunctional

b) Challenges related to the intersphere coordination (Report to the Presidential Coordination committee which includes Cabinet, Premiers and the Executive Mayors of the Metros and SALGA

 

THANK YOU

09 October 2023 - NW2821

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as (a) the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, (b) the Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative and (c) any other sanitation programmes?

Reply:

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as (a) the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative, (b) the Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative and (c) any other sanitation programmes?

What are the relevant details of her department’s plans to ensure the improvement and/or demolition of the plain pit and bucket latrines identified by programmes such as

(a) The Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative,

  1. In 2011, the Department of Basic Education launched the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI-2011).  This programme focused on the following:
    • Providing appropriate building for schools made entirely of inappropriate materials.
    • Providing appropriate water supply to schools with no water.
    • Providing appropriate sanitation at schools with no toilets.
    • Providing appropriate electricity supply to schools with no electricity supply.
  2. In 2011, there were initially 510 schools on the ASIDI programme made entirely of inappropriate materials. This number decreased to 332.
    1. Of the 332 schools made entirely of inappropriate materials, 330 have been replaced.
    2. The remaining 2 replacement schools are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.
  3. In 2011, there were initially 1 117 schools on the ASIDI programme with no water supply. This number increased to 1 306.
    1. Of the 1 306 water supply projects, 1 292 have been completed.
    2. The remaining 14 water supply projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.
  4. In 2011, there were initially 701 schools on the ASIDI programme with no toilets. This number increased to 1 087.
    1. All of the 1087 sanitation projects have been replaced.
  5. In 2011, there were initially 902 schools on the ASIDI programme with no electricity. This number decreased to 373.
    1. All of the 373 electricity supply projects have been completed.

(b) The Sanitation Appropriate For Education initiative

  1. In 2018, the Department of Basic Education launched the Sanitation Appropriate For Education (SAFE-2018) initiative.  This programme focused on providing appropriate sanitation at schools dependent on basic pit toilets.
  2. There were initially 3 898 schools on the SAFE programme. This number reduced to 3 382, as some of the schools were either provided with approrpiate sanitation facilities, or the schools were due for rationalisation as they were found not to be viable.
  3. Of the 3 382 sanitation projects, 2 911 have been completed through SAFE.
  4. The remaining 471 sanitation projects are scheduled for completion in 2023/24.

(c) any other sanitation programmes?

Through Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) Provincial Education Departments have ongoing programmes on Provision / Replacement of Sanitation.

09 October 2023 - NW2547

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) are the details of the resources her department has allocated to implement Pillar 4: Response, Care, Support and Healing of the National Plan of Action Against Gender-based Violence since 2021 and (b) has she found to date has been achieved through the implementation of Pillar 4 in the fight against gender-based violence?

Reply:

a) The National and Provincial Departments allocate funds to NGOs that render prevention and support services to survivors of violence and crime, including gender-based violence as guided by Pillar 4 of the National Strategic Plan on GBVF. These are inclusive of those rendering immediate response services, shelter ss well as psycho-social support services.

In addition, the department has formed strategic partnerships with a number of funders such as the Global Fund, NEDLAC, Solidarity Fund, European Union, SANAC and the HWSETA. These partners availed resources for the recruitment, training and appointment of the different cadres such as volunteers, social workers and coordinators to provide and increase provision of psycho-social support services across the country. Refer to the table below for the budget allocation for implementation of Pillar 4: Response, Care, Support and Healing:

ITEMS

AMOUNT APPROX.

Criminal and Asset Recovery Account (CARA)

R 100 MIL

Global Fund/NACOSA

R 19.6 Mil

VEP Good and Services

R 16 Mil

GBVF Ambassadors HWSETA

R 4,3 Mil

Transfer Payments to National NGOs

R 4.2 Mil

Overall

R 144,1 Mil

b) There are many successes, including:

  • Intersectoral Shelter Policy and Policy on Provision of Psycho-Social Support Services). Both policies are meant to standardise and strengthening services offered to victims of Gender Based Violence and Femicide. All nine provinces were reached through capacity building on both policies targeting different stakeholders including those from the JCPS Cluster.
  • In partnership with the HWSETA, DSD secured a budget of 4.3 mil for the appointment and capacity building of GBVF ambassadors deployed in the thirty (30) National GBVF hotspots found in six (6) provinces which are (Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape, Western Cape, Free State, and North West)
  • Ensured increased capacity in response, care, support and healing services through the facilitation of the establishment of shelters for abused women as part of response and prevention interventions that address socio-economic needs of women within shelters in the Free State (QwaQwa, Sasolburg and Koffiefontein).
  • A partnership has been established between the Department of Social Development (DSD) and the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to identify public facilities that are re-purposed for use as shelters for GBV survivors. To date, a total of 95 public facilities have been earmarked for this purpose.
  • Provided funding to 332 NGOs rendering psychosocial support services through transfer payments and CARA funding.
  • Successfully appointed permanently over 200 Social Workers across all nine provinces to deal specifically with GBV cases. Through the Global Fund, the Department was able to deploy on contract 65 Social Workers dealing with GBV cases in the 30 National GBVF hotspots. The Department has also capacitated frontline workers including those from the NGOs in all nine provinces on GBV-related matters.

09 October 2023 - NW2784

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Whether, with reference to the identification of a number of challenges related to the payment of social grants and other forms of social assistance by the Government, her Office has put measures in place to monitor and/or ensure that the relevant government departments (a) address the issues it had identified relating to security issues around the SA Social Security Agency cards and Post Office accounts and (b) find alternative mechanisms for making safe payments; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) Whether her office has addressed the issues it had identified relating to security issues around the SA Social Security Agency cards and Post Office accounts?

Yes, the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation conducted an extensive frontline monitoring at the paypoints and produced a report that has been shared with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies.

DPME made extensive recommendations to improve the payment mechanism. Engagements on this report is ongoing and will be considered in the review of the MTSF in preparations for the 7th administration. In the meantime, DPME continues to monitor the immediate interventions being introduced by the Department of Social Development and Department of Communications and Digital through their entities, SASSA and the Postbank.

B. Whether her office has found alternative mechanisms for making safe payments; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Yes, this is ongoing as the recommendations of the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation are being discussed internally within government.

 

THANK YOU

09 October 2023 - NW2798

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Phiri, Ms CM to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

Considering her role and/or mandate as Chairperson of the National Planning Commission, what has she found to have been the impact of the Commission towards the implementation of the National Development Plan?

Reply:

The current National Planning Commission (NPC) of which I am chair is the third Commission. As members know the first Commission drafted the NDP. The second commission started the process of institutionalising planning in government and undertook research into long-term trends, analysing implementation of short- to medium-term plans and recommended improvements to Government to inform policy and planning. This included a review of the NDP.

The current NPC’s mandate is, inter alia, to:

  • Mobilise society to promote the acceleration in implementing the National Development Plan towards 2030, recognising the changes that have ensued since its initial adoption.
  • Assist in forging a conversation among key stakeholders, leading to effective and impactful interventions on several key issues facing the country.
  • Undertake research and build a body of evidence on critical matters for the long-term planning and development of South Africa. Strengthen the use of evidence and the quality of empirical data, generated from impact assessments for national planning.

In the short time that I have been the Minister responsible for the Department of Planning, Monitoring, and Evaluation and Chair of NPC, I have had the opportunity to engage with the NPC, who displayed a passionate loyalty to seeing South Africa and all its people succeed.

They have done this by identifying objectives that will make a difference not only in terms of long-term planning by ensuring the implementation of the National Development Plan, but that can be implemented in the short-term. The work being undertaken relate to areas that cover social protection, which covers education, health, and social assistance, among others, growing the economy in an equitable and inclusive manner, and addressing governance broadly through developing state capacity.

In this regard, and through establishing partnerships, the NPC has welcomed the adoption of the National Framework Towards the Professionalisation of the Public Sector by Cabinet in October 2022; provided practical advice that has since been adopted by government with respect to alleviating the energy crisis; and has played an active role in guiding the implementation of the District Development Model.

The NPC will soon launch its Ten-Year Review of the NDP. This review interrogates the factors that affected the implementation of the NDP since its adoption, including consideration of domestic and international crises such as the Covid-19 pandemic, the civil unrest in Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal in July 2021, and the Ukraine-Russia war. In particular, the review assesses the progress made with the key NDP targets of eliminating poverty and reducing inequality and unemployment. The analysis evaluates the extent to which planning has been institutionalised and the reform of the country’s planning system across all spheres of government following the adoption of the NDP.

Given the body of work I can only conclude by indicating that the Commission is having a positive impact in ensuring the implementation of the NDP

THANK YOU

 

09 October 2023 - NW3010

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)What total amount did the Industrial Development Corporation invest in each specified copper smelting company through debt and equity in the past three financial years; (2) whether his department has provided any tax or other incentives to copper smelters in the past three financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total amount and (b) to who in each specified financial year? NW4075E

Reply:

The Industrial Development Corporation has not invested in copper smelting activities in the past three financials years being, FY2022/23, FY2021/22 and FY2020/21.

The Department does not have a dedicated funding facility for smelters in its budget, approved by Parliament, and no disbursements were made in the financial years concerned to copper smelters.

Tax incentives are announced by the Minister of Finance.

-END-

09 October 2023 - NW2717

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Alexander, Ms W to ask the President of the Republic

Whether he intends to sign a proclamation that extends the scope of the investigation of the Special Investigating Unit into alleged corruption in the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) to include investigation of procurement by the NLC; if not, why not; if so; on what date does he intend to sign a proclamation in this regard?

Reply:

I am advised that allegations relating to procurement irregularities and maladministration at the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) are currently undergoing the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) internal assessment processes.

Once the internal assessment processes are complete, the SIU will decide whether to submit a motivation to amend the scope of the proclamation.

09 October 2023 - NW2892

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the (a) addresses and contact details of each SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) (i) district and (ii) local office in the Eastern Cape and (b) names and contact details of each SASSA district director in the Eastern Cape;(2)(a) what is the total number of (i) staff employed and (ii) vacancies at each district and local office and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled; (3)what is the total number of the SASSA recipients of each grant in each district and local municipality; (4) what (a) methods are utilised by grant recipients to withdraw their grant payments in each district and (b) total number of recipients withdraw their funds via each specified method in each district and local municipality?

Reply:

1. (a) i and ii and (b) See Annexure 1

2. (a) i and ii and (b) See Annexure 2 (limited by the POPI Act we have as such provided office contact details of the various positions in the different offices)

3. (a) i and ii See Annexure 3

(b) There is progress currently in filling of vacancies across all regions in adherence with HR processes. Positions are advertised and filled as determined by the Critical Post Committee (CPC) within the limited available budget.

4. (a) and (b) refer to the table below:

EC Region payment trends

   

 

202309

 

Methods of payment

Sum of Number Of Beneficiaries

Sum Amount

ABSA BANK

86,153

R153,674,039.00

ACCESS BANK (SOUTH AFRICA

3,461

R7,262,323.00

AFRICAN BANK

13,285

R23,285,919.00

BIDVEST BANK

5,897

R9,656,835.00

CAPITEC BANK

373,155

R561,245,938.00

DISCOVERY BANK

22

R38,179.00

FINBOND MUTUAL

5,646

R11,303,171.00

FINBOND NET1

208

R360,921.00

FIRSTRAND BANK

141,267

R261,672,748.00

GRINDROD BANK

186,623

R303,855,833.00

INVESTEC BANK LTD

4

R7,980.00

ITHALA

57

R113,380.00

NEDBANK LIMITED

94,238

R165,479,761.00

POSTBANK

730,238

R1,088,461,320.00

IGPS

726,294

R1,081,926,187.00

MZANSI

3,944

R6,535,133.00

STANDARD SA

90,869

R164,139,097.00

TYMEBANK

8,751

R12,429,224.00

Grand Total

1,739,874

R2,762,986,668.00

09 October 2023 - NW3117

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has she and/or her department taken to ensure that blind persons are provided with the necessary tools such as Braille Machines, Braille Printers, Computers and Audio Technology, as early as at basic education level, so as to enforce their rights to dignity and equality as enshrined in the Constitution of the Republic, 1996?

Reply:

In 2017, the Minister appointed the Advisory Committee on Provisioning for Learners with Visual Impairments, whose terms of reference include the following: 

  • Identifying challenges related to the education of learners with visual impairment and advise on mediation, best practices, and resources;
  • Advising on ongoing development, printing and delivery of Learning and Teaching Support Materials, including assistive technology and devices; and
  • Advising on training programmes and resource toolkits to capacitate educators, teacher aides and school support staff to achieve excellence in the field of visual impairment.

In 2021, the DBE purchased over 26 master copies of Braille and Large Print language textbooks from Pioneer printers and Blind SA service providers. The master copies were uploaded on the DBE website for schools to download, reproduce or print for learners with visual impairment. Subsequently, the link was forwarded to provinces to ensure easy access for them to support schools. For the past six (6) years, the Department of Basic Education has provided Braille workbooks in Mathematics, Home Languages and Life Skills for Grades  1- 9. The Braille textbooks are procured by provinces directly from services providers. 

One of the priorities identified for special schools for the Blind has been the improvement of teacher competencies in Braille. For instance, in 2022/23, 84 teachers were trained in Braille. The training of teachers in specialised areas, such as Braille, is an indicator in the Annual Performance Plan of the Department of Basic Education.

Provinces continue to procure ICT-related gadgets that cater for learners with special educational needs.  The provinces that are doing so, are using a tranversal tender under the Chief Procurement Officer at National Treasury to procure identified ICT-related gadgets.  Constant training and support is provided to the provinces by the service providers of these ICT-related gadgets.

09 October 2023 - NW3038

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the President of the Republic

Noting that the outcome of the Lady R investigation has cleared the Government of any wrongdoing, what has been the total monetary cost to the Republic in terms of Rands lost due to the loss of confidence in the Republic; (2) whether the Republic will dismiss and/or request the United States of America to recall the American Ambassador, Mr Reuben Brigety, who was seemingly misleading the public and the international community by accusing the Republic of loading arms to Russia?

Reply:

A preliminary analysis by the National Treasury considered that there was a significant depreciation in the rand against the US dollar in May 2023, as much as 2.4%. While this was in part due to the pronouncements of the US Ambassador to South Africa regarding the Lady R vessel, other variables would need to be considered to arrive at a monetary cost, such as concerns about high inflation, debt servicing costs and the impact of loadshedding. To assign a monetary value to a single event would therefore be speculative. There is no doubt, however, that the elevated geopolitical risk was to blame for the Rand’s further depreciation.

Following the allegations made by US Ambassador Reuben Brigety, he was démarched by DIRCO and admonished by the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, Dr Naledi Pandor, who expressed her outrage and displeasure at the manner in which the allegations were made. There are prescribed diplomatic protocols which should have been used to convey any concerns of the US Government in relation to the Lady R vessel.

06 October 2023 - NW3121

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

What are the details of the (a) total number of vacant positions at the SA Tourism, (b) level of each vacant position and (c) time frames that have been put in place to the fill the vacancies?

Reply:

I have been informed by South African Tourism that the details of the total number of vacancies, level of each position and timeframes to fill the vacancies, are contained in the table, below.

(a) Total number of vacant positions at the SA Tourism

(b) Level of each vacant position

(c) Time frames that have been put in place to the fill the vacancies

5

Executive

6 months

2

Senior Management

Work-in-progress

20

Management

Work-in-progress

6

Officer/administration

Work-in-progress

SAT will prioritise appointments for consideration by the Minister, following due process.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3136

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department has plans in place for the wide establishment of small-scale miners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the DMRE has established a Small-Scale mining component with officials at nine regional offices whose functions is to handle enquiries, guide and advice and assist with the application process. Furthermore, a policy was gazetted in 2022 to develop the mechanisms to formalise artisanal and small-scale mining operations and bring them within the mainstream economy.

06 October 2023 - NW3086

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

By what date will the ordinance be effectively repealed as there are discrepancies between national and provincial legislation and the hunting and other ordinances in several provinces are outdates and no long in line with national legislation and with scientific evident in terms of biodiversity loss?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2924

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What is the current status of the implementation of the Just Transition to a Decarbonised Economy for South Africa?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3084

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) How prevalent is snaring (a) in and (b) on the borders of the Kruger National Park; (2) whether snaring is concentrated in any particular areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether there are any discernible snaring trends; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether snaring is increasing or decreasing overall and/or in any particular areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are relevant details; (5) what total number of snares were detected and/or removed in the Kruger National Park in the (a) 2020, (b) 2021 and (c) 2022 calendar years?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3125

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Mhlongo, Ms N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) measures have been put in place to ensure that residents who were affected by the Jagersfontein Dam disaster in Free State have been compensated, (b) steps have been taken against the mine to ensure that they are held accountable for the disaster and (c) is the current progress on rebuilding the community?

Reply:

The Department does not have the authority to regulate the processing of residue deposits at the Jagersfontein dam. This is as a result of the De Beers court judgment over Jagersfontein mine residue deposits (De Beers Consolidated Mines Ltd v Ataqua Mining (Pty) Ltd & others, case no. 3215/06, Free State Provincial Division, 13 December 2007). The judgement held that historical mine residue deposits (those created before the coming into operation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MPRDA) on the 01st of May 2004) are not minerals as contemplated in the MPRDA and such they are not regulated under provisions of the MPRDA. The processing of historical mine residue deposits does not constitute mining and the area where they are situated is not classified as a mine. This was again confirmed by the court judgment in the case of Ekapa Minerals (Pty) Ltd & Others vs Lucky Seekoei & Others (2057/2016) [2017] ZANCHC 5 (13 January 2017).

However, The Department engaged the Minerals Council South Africa to provide assistance to the affected community even though the facility is legally not a mining operation. About R2.75 million was spent by the Minerals Council on the following emergency relief through three Public Benefit Organisations, namely Gift of the Givers, Soul Provider and the Red Cross:

  • Distributing 15,000 food parcels, each providing an average of 25 meals totalling 375,000 meals at a cost of R1,250,000. An estimated 4,500 people received nutritious meals for four months. The percentage of black South Africans benefiting from the programme is 100%.
  • Providing running water from water boreholes at two schools for learners and the surrounding community at a cost of R1 million.
  • Distributing mattresses, blankets, clothing, underwear, sanitary packs, water and cooking utensils at a cost of R500,000.

Following a series of meetings by the Minerals Council with the Kopanong Local Municipality and the Free State Government, 6 projects were initially earmarked. Further assessments identified 3 of the 6 projects being potentially sustainable and within the objectives and mandate of the Fund:

  1. Working towards a sustainable water solution for the Jagersfontein community. The assistance does not include services that are the responsibility of local, provincial and national government.
  2. Aiding local schools and learning centres to enhance learning and education in the community. The assistance does not include services that are the responsibility of local, provincial and national government.
  3. Establish an internet and Wi-Fi service for the community at the Jagersfontein library.

06 October 2023 - NW3109

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to the reported R500 million in revenue that her department will generate through the sales of various properties across the globe, (a) what total amount will be lost through commissions and taxes related to the sales and (b) how does her department plan to spend the remaining money from the sales?

Reply:

(a) The process for the disposal of some of the identified superfluous properties is currently at the approval stage, whilst others are at an advertisement stage. The total amount for commissions and taxes will only be determined at conveyancing stage and when sales have been successfully concluded by estate agents.

(b) Subject to approvals by National Treasury, the generated revenue will be used by the Department to fund new acquisitions/constructions and major refurbishments, using the National Treasury Self-Financing Mechanism

06 October 2023 - NW3100

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2675 on 1 September 2023 by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs and the 2020-21 report of the Auditor-General which stipulates that 84% of municipalities in the Republic failed to pay their creditors within the mandated 30-day period, (a) the National Treasury has conducted a detailed quantitative and qualitative assessment of the resultant socio-economic ramifications, specifically the adverse impact on job losses and business viability for small companies, sole proprietors and cooperatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (i) assessment and (ii) strategic measures under consideration to rectify the systemic issue?

Reply:

Payments not made within 30 days are in breach of the Municipal Finance Management Act and the oversight over compliance to laws and regulations is that of the Municipal Council. Therefore, the questions should be directed to the respective municipalities as these relate to contractual obligations entered between municipalities and their respective service providers.

The National Treasury has not conducted research or an assessment on the adverse impact of late payments. The Department of Small Business Development has a mandate to promote and develop Small, Micro and Medium Enterprises (SMMEs). It is therefore suggested that the Honourable Member directs this enquiry to them.

06 October 2023 - NW3128

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With regard to the dried-up slurry that is dumped and heaped close to the residential areas around the power plants in Lephalale, which must be causing health hazards for the communities during windy seasons, what steps has her department, in collaboration with Eskom, taken to manage the spread of deadly fine particles that get swept into the surrounding communities?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3035

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he will provide Mrs. C Phillips with the records of the written notice and consultation as envisaged by section 26(3) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002, for the beneficiation of chrome currently undertaken by a certain company (name furnished) on Portion 71 of the Farm Groenkloof, in the Bojanala District, North West; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1, The entity referred to has no mining authorisations issued by this Department, furthermore the Department has no records pertaining their application to beneficiate minerals. However, section 26 of the Act was meant to promote beneficiation of mineral in the Republic. Section 26(3) requires any person who intends to beneficiate any mineral outside the Republic to do so with written notice and in consultation with the Minister. The constraints on electricity generation have limited the ability to facilitate local beneficiation.

06 October 2023 - NW2923

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What total number of (a) cheetahs and (b) cubs born later, which were exported to the Republic of India as part of a Memorandum of Understanding, have died as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3139

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) What (a)(i) total number of and (ii) which fishing rights were allocated to (aa) individuals and (bb) companies and/or any other entity in each province and (b) total number of licences were denied in each province; (2) whether it is a requirement for applicants to indicate their racial profile; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what total number of licences were allocated to (a) each race in (b) each province; (3) whether any communities and/or individuals are excluded from applying and/or being awarded fishing rights, permits and/or licences; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what grounds?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3141

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) amount of (i) abalone, (ii) crayfish and (iii) fish are estimated to be poached from the seas of the (aa) Western Cape, (bb) Eastern Cape and (cc) Northern Cape annually, (b) amount of each of the poached species have been confiscated fresh, dried, and in live condition in each of the past five years, (c) happens to the confiscate species and (d) other illegal items were confiscate in the above-mentioned instances from the poachers?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3047

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With reference to the entrance gate at the Three Rondavels of the Panorama route in Mpumalanga, (a) what are the reasons that bank card machines are not operational at the gate, (b) by what date will the bank card machines be fixed, (c) how is the cash received being monitored and controlled and (d) what measures, processes, procedures and mechanisms are in place to ensure that there is not theft of the cash received?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3131

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Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Finance

In light of the latest account provided by the Special Investigating Unit on the malfeasance by the National Treasury in the implementation of the infamous Integrated Financial Management System project, what consequence management steps will he take against officials responsible for the litany of missteps which resulted in hundreds of millions of Rands in irregular and fruitless expenditure?

Reply:

The National Treasury noted the presentation made by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) to the Standing Committee on Public Accountants on Wednesday, 13 September 2023. The National Treasury will comprehensively respond to the matters raised in the referrals by the SIU to the National Treasury, after receipt of the SIU’s final report, including its entire set of supporting documents and annexures. The National Treasury will also fully co-operate with all law enforcement agencies.

06 October 2023 - NW3075

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

What (a) number of megawatts are being transmitted to the Republic from the Cahora Bassa power transmission system, (b) are the details of the extent of financing undertaken by the Republic to build and maintain the specified system since it was put back into operation in 1997 and (c) are the long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

Reply:

(a)Eskom is contracted for 1 150 MW until 31 March 2030.

(b)The extent of infrastructure investment/financing undertaken by Eskom to build/sustain Apollo high-voltage direct-current (HVDC) is provided in Table 1 below for a period of 13 years. Ten of the listed projects have been completed (over R241 million), and eight of the projects are in the execution phase (over R951 million), with the remainder in the development phase (R321 million). The infrastructure includes HVDC key components such as transmission lines, converter transformers, and shunt capacitors, which amounts to a total of R1.5 billion. Obtaining information prior to the year 2010 will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 1: Details of infrastructure investment (from 2010)

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Shunt Capacitor Bank Refurbishment

CAP BANKS

COMPLETED

18 693 718

Apollo CS Breaker 11 kV Replacement

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

31 116 104

Apollo CS Pietersburg Security Fence and Road

SECURITY

COMPLETED

12 342 665

Apollo Bridge 5 Converter Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

11 554 690

Apollo Upgrade DC Harmonic Filters

CAP BANKS

EXECUTION

11 800 000

Apollo CS Line Voltage Divider Replacement

LINE DIVIDERS

EXECUTION

62 143 000

Apollo CS Problematic Bypass Breakers

BREAKERS

EXECUTION

219 225 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1: Tower 322

TOWER

COMPLETED

4 266 123

Apollo Songo PLC refurbishment

PLC

EXECUTION

14 200 000

Apollo Storage Plinths DC Side

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

11 600 000

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 4 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo CS: HVDC Refurbishment Phase 2: Bridge 2 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

EXECUTION

296 156 754

Apollo – Cahora Bassa No. 1 and 2 Quad Spacers

LINES

CONCEPT

130 000 000

Apollo CS: Deluge System Water Storage Tank

NON-PLANT

CONCEPT

17 769 000

Apollo – Cahora Bassa Lines Bird Guards

BIRD GUARDS

CONCEPT

5 400 000

NSP1 Security Build 2 – Apollo (NKP) ERA

SECURITY

EXECUTION

20 450 000

Apollo CS: Replacement of Pole 1 533 kV Reactor

REACTORS

CONCEPT

155 500 000

Apollo HVDC Lines Reinsulation Project

REINSULATION

COMPLETED

44 602 502

Apollo CS: CCTV Installations

SECURITY

COMPLETED

3 834 421

Replacement Bushings for Converter Transformers – Apollo CS

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

17 193 111

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 6

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo CS Install Spare Transformer in Bridge 8

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

10 000 000

Apollo 2 x Converter Transformers + Reactor (Capital Spares)

TRANSFORMERS

COMPLETED

109 145 411

   

TOTAL

1 513 149 254

The maintenance costs component, provided in Table 2 below, for a period of 14 financial years, amounted to over R165 million, which included the following:

  • Servitudes maintenance
  • Maintenance by Rotek Industries
  • Materials
  • Equipment spares
  • Production plant services
  • Facility services

The maintenance costs information can only be provided from the 2009/10 financial year, as Eskom changed to the current SAP system at that point. Obtaining information prior to that period will require more time, as this information has been archived.

Table 2: Maintenance (from the 2009/10 to the 2022/23 financial years)

(C) Are there long-term plans for the system in terms of (i) life-span of the existing infrastructure, (ii) expansion of the system and (iii) on-going usage?

(i) Details of the long-term plans for Apollo HVDC in terms of the lifespan of the existing infrastructure (refurbishment plan) are provided in Table 3 below.

Table 3: Long-term refurbishment plan

PROJECT NAME

PLANT TYPE

INITIATIVE PHASE

TOTAL (rand)

Apollo Install New Earth Electrodes

ELECTRODE

PRE-CONCEPT

14 000 000

Apollo CS: Permanent Bipole Bypass

ISOLATORS

PRE-CONCEPT

69 010 000

Apollo CS: Replace Bridge 1, 3, and 7 Transformers

TRANSFORMERS

PRE-CONCEPT

888 470 262

Apollo CS Repeater Station Pietersburg Battery System

BATTERY

PRE-CONCEPT

15 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 1 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS HVDC Line No. 2 Refurbishment

LINES

PRE-CONCEPT

230 000 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 2

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

105 600 000

Apollo CS Problematic Equipment Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

124 200 000

Apollo SS Auxiliary Transformer Bund Walls

NON-PLANT

PRE-CONCEPT

10 300 000

Apollo CS: HVDC System Ref. Upgrade Phase 3

SUBSTATION

PRE-CONCEPT

1 700 562 263

   

TOTAL

3 387 142 525

(ii) Currently, there is no long-term plan for expansion for the Apollo Converter Station.

(iii) Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB) has indicated that it would like to start engagements in terms of the contractual extension beyond 2030. Eskom will be open to such engagements, as HCB power forms part of the baseload power supply mix.

06 October 2023 - NW2907

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Mbatha, Ms SGN to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) are the relevant details of the process to empower communities in the forestry industry to ensure the prevention of deforestation and (b) is the state of pilot projects in this regard?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2914

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What assistance is being offered by her department to black-owned small-scale mussel farmers on the West Coast of the Western Cape, who experienced serious setbacks during COVID-19, to ensure their ventures become viable and successful

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW2919

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Finance

What consultation process does the National Treasury undertake before finalising the cost-containment measures to assist national departments, public entities and provinces to close a fiscal gap?

Reply:

Various high-level forums of government have been briefed about the fiscal challenges in the current fiscal year and the need for urgent and difficult measures to be taken to forestall their damaging impact during the course of the financial year. This includes briefings and discussions at Cabinet, the Minister’s Committee on the Budget, the Budget Council, the Forum of South African Directors-General (FOSAD), and the Technical Committee for Finance, which is a committee of Provincial Treasuries. In addition, the National Treasury has publicly highlighted the difficult financial constraints facing government and its implications during a meeting of NEDLAC as well as in the 2024 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budgeting guidelines, which are published on the website of the National Treasury.

In all of these engagements, the National Treasury emphasized that measures will be required to achieve savings, improve efficiency and contain costs.

06 October 2023 - NW2915

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What measures are in place to protect the coast and fishing grounds of the Republic against foreign fishing vessels?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3120

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What are the reasons that the Acting Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is also acting as the Chief Executive Officer and (b) which processes were followed in the appointment?

Reply:

(a) What are the reasons that the Acting Chief Financial Officer of SA Tourism is also acting as the Chief Executive Officer?

I have been informed by South African Tourism (SAT) that an investigation into the attendance of SAT officials at the Soccer World Cup was initiated by the previous board of SA Tourism.

After consideration of the final report, the current board resolved that conclusion of this matter required the then-acting CEO to revert to her role as COO while a fair, independent, and transparent process is conducted.

Since the recruitment process for the Chief Executive Officer is still in progress, the board considered options available for a new acting CEO from within the current executive management. In light of the reduced capacity at the exco level, the board resolved to appoint the CFO as the acting CEO for the short term and to put in place mitigations to manage any associated risks.

(b) Which processes were followed in the appointment?

At various meetings, the board deliberated on the available options. Having resolved to appoint the CFO as ACEO, the board approached the Minister for concurrence on its decision in line with the Tourism Act, 2014. With the Minister’s concurrence received on 6 September 2023, the CFO was appointed as acting CEO with compensating controls including exco participation in decision making, as well as reporting to Board on decisions taken. It must be noted that, in the letter of concurrence, the Minister strongly advised the Board to speedily appoint a new CFO.

06 October 2023 - NW3085

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

How did SANParks take into account the conclusions of the 2020 Elephants Alive Recommendations Concerning the Proposed Elephant Offtakes of the Associate Private Nature Reserves (APNR) in supporting and/or commenting on the proposed APNR Elephant Offtake of 55 elephants, as Elephants Alive recommended that only 35 elephants be hunted (details furnished)?

Reply:

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06 October 2023 - NW3076

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What number of megawatts (MWs) (a) has Mozambique undertaken to provide to the Republic in terms of the contractual relationship with Mozambique and (b) is the Republic currently using; (2) whether the Republic uses all the allocated MWs; if not, what are the reasons for the underutilisation of electricity in the midst of the loadshedding crisis; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the terms of the agreement in respect of (a) the period, (b) the pricing matrix and (c) other material elements of the agreement?

Reply:

(1)(a)Mozambique is currently developing a number of power plant projects and is engaging with South Africa at present. At this point, there are no firm commitments. The projects would need to be incorporated into the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP).

(1)(b) Yes, Eskom is currently using the power from Hidroeléctrica de Cahora Bassa (HCB), as well as purchasing power from the Southern African Power Pool (SAPP) competitive markets, which, at times, includes power from Mozambique. Eskom has aspirations to buy power from cross-border countries. Depending on the pricing and technical feasibility, Eskom will procure power from Mozambique in terms of a fair, transparent, and equitable process.

(2) Eskom utilises the allocated megawatts (MWs) most of the time. On odd occasions, Eskom is unable to access the power when there are limiting factors, including infrastructure faults.

(3) (a) 31 March 2030.

(b) The price is based on avoiding the cost of building a baseload station.

(c) 1 150 MW capacity.

06 October 2023 - NW3127

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)Noting the positive reports regarding bringing units back from planned maintenance like Unit 4 in Kusile Power Station, the expected new capacity soontobe unleashed by Unit 5 and the successes of fuel gas desulphurisation plant for clean emissions, what is the point of pursuing the various bid windows for the unreliable renewable generators?

Reply:

The supply of South Africa’s energy demand is broadly determined by the energy mix as set out in The Integrated Resource Plan (IRP) 2019. Based on the 2019 IRP, Coal constitutes 43% of installed capacity followed by Wind (22.53) Solar PV (10.5) CSP (0,76) Nuclear (2,36) and Gas and Diesel (8.1) Hydro (5.84).

Whilst the IRP is currently being reviewed, Coal, Nuclear and Gas is expected to continue to be significant contributors to SA’s base load demand in the foreseeable future, with investments in cleaner technologies to mitigate negative environmental impacts, coupled with and battery storage to neutralise and solar/wind hybrid solutions to stabilise the intermittency challenges of renewables.

 

06 October 2023 - NW3126

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Electricity

(1)What amount of sulphur has been extracted through the fuel gas desulphurisation unit in Kusile Power Station; (2) whether the sulphur has been sold to other industries like agriculture, pharmaceuticals and rubber industries; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the consequences of storing such a corrosive chemical; if so, what amount in revenue has Eskom derived from the sales?

Reply:

1. Eskom removes sulphur dioxide (SO2), which is a by-product of fossil fuel combustion, from the flue gases. This SO2 is removed by means of a wet flue gas desulphurisation system. The flue gas flows through a spray of calcium carbonate (limestone) slurry and forms an end product of calcium sulphate (gypsum).

2. (2)(a) Therefore, no sulphur in its pure, corrosive form is extracted from the absorber, and no sulphur is being sold. The gypsum is currently disposed of on site in a designated area on the power station premises as per licence. The future plan is to sell the gypsum as it can be used in the industry.

(2)(b) No corrosive chemical is being stored and no revenue is being generated at this stage from gypsum.

 

06 October 2023 - NW2921

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she is actively exploring additional funding mechanisms for the implementation of the Just Transition to a Decarbonised Economy for South Africa to supplement the initial $8.5 billion commitment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

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