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05 August 2022 - NW1700

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the right to practice cultural and religious believes being guaranteed in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, what action has been taken by her department to introduce national legislation that will rescind discriminatory by-laws relating to permits often required in municipalities to slaughter cows and goats for customary purposes in urban areas?

Reply:

Government has not introduced additional legislation on the slaughtering of animals in urban areas for customary purposes. These practices are currently guided by municipal by-laws and guidelines which are also informed by the Abattoirs Hygiene Act. The CRL Rights Commission has also released a Guidelines Report on the African Ritual of animal slaughter. The Report notes, amongst others, that seeking a municipality’s permission to slaughter should be encouraged and approached as a courtesy, as no municipality may refuse an individual’s right to slaughter animals.

Municipal by-laws are there to ensure that the slaughtering of animals is not done in an inhumane manner and takes into consideration applicable health requirements as well as the rights of others. In the recent work done by the CRL Rights Commission on the review of by-laws that impact on the slaughtering of animals for cultural and religious purposes in the 8 Metropolitan Municipalities in the previous financial year, the Commission observed that the time period for application for slaughtering of animals in some of the Metropolitan Municipalities needs to be revised to accommodate slaughtering for funerals. Similarly, the Commission found that in other municipalities, the by-laws need to be made more explicit when it comes to expectations regarding slaughtering in a residential area. As part of its intervention to assist, the Commission is arranging to meet with these municipalities to take these matters forward.

Based on the above work of the Commission and its on-going engagements with affected municipalities, we believe that it may not be necessary to promulgate national legislation at this stage. However, in the meantime where communities feel that they face discrimination when they want to slaughter for cultural purpose, they may liaise with the CRL Rights Commission for the necessary assistance.

01 July 2022 - NW2303

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the intervention into the administration and governance of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, what progress has been made in respect of revenue and expenditure management?

Reply:

Revenue Management

As part of revenue raising mechanisms, the Intervention Team will be undertaking stakeholder engagement including Premier’s Office and Public Works to discuss and agree on payment arrangement of outstanding debt owed to the Municipality by government departments.

Regarding disconnection of water services and collections, the Municipality has insufficient institutional capacity and resources to execute disconnections. Therefore, the Intervention Team will source expertise to assist with issuing notices to discontinue services of non-paying consumers failing to conclude payment arrangements with the municipality.

In addition, The Intervention Team is partnering with CENTLEC (municipal entity responsible for electricity reticulation and distribution) by entering Memorandum of Understanding to strengthen coordinate efforts and strategies to collect debt generally owed to the Municipality.

Expenditure Management

The intervention team is implementing corrective measures to reduce excessive overtime and acting allowances that has been paid in the past. These includes enforcing the legislative requirement that pre-approval is to be obtained for any overtime to be worked, limiting the monthly overtime to between 40 - 60 hours per employee where overtime is to be worked and filling of critical vacancies that are funded. 

The repairs and maintenance of critical service delivery fleet and equipment is to be prioritized to further alleviate excessive and unauthorized overtime expenditures. This will also by and large significantly reduce the expenditure on contracted services provided there is proper planning, coordination, and control of resources by responsible departments within the city.

The Intervention Team has commenced discussions with Bloemwater on cost of bulk water supply which is unfordable to the Metro. The Metro is in discussions with Bloemwater to review the current outdated service level agreement and review bulk water tariffs. There is a plan to refurbish and upgrade the Masselpoort Water Treatment Plant in the 2022/23 budget year which will diversify the Metro’s sorurces for bulk water supply. The Intervention Team is currently implementing water conservation demand management plan whereby it is envisaging to reduce water losses from 46% to below 20% within the next five years.

01 July 2022 - NW2304

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the intervention into the administration and governance of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, what progress has been made to address the failure of the municipality to render basic services in respect of the (a) maintenance of roads and (b) removal of solid waste on a sustainable basis?

Reply:

a) Maintenance of Roads

The current road infrastructure network is in a very poor state within the Municipality and maintenance needs to be prioritised. On 02 May 2022, The Acting HOD: Engineering Services commenced his services, and the critical road maintenance areas were identified for urgent attention and priority. Road maintenance is dependent on a fully functioning fleet department within the municipality which is operating at suboptimal level.

Current interventions and priorities on Road Maintenance

The municipality has urgently undertaken roads assessments to identify the critical roads in needs of repairs. These repairs are categorised as pothole repairs and complete re-sealing of critical roads. There are continuous pothole repairs on-going across the metro and re-sealing of roads of estimated 18,8km of length which has started 25 May 2022 and will be complete by end of June 2022. The current benefitting areas are Ward 19(Vista Park), Ward 30(Botshabelo), Ward 31(Botshabelo) and Ward 41(Thaba Nchu). The road maintenance will continue as planned from July 2022 onwards.

(b) Removal of Solid Waste on a sustainability basis (Integrated Waste Management)

Current interventions and priorities

  • Maintenance - Southern Landfill site was inaccessible due to the lack of maintenance and illegal dumping around access roads.
  • Resources was deployed to clean access roads.
  • Law enforcement was deployed to assist with enforcement of illegal dumping around entrances.
  • Workers from the Presidential Employment Programme (PEP) were deployed to assist with cleaning.
  • The Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment has procured the services of a contractor for 12 months to assist on the Southern Landfill site.
  • Commencement date of the service provider was 01 June 2022. However, the service provider is not on site yet. The Intervention Team planned meeting with management from the service provider on 16 June 2022 for planning and identification of critical activities.
  • Vehicle reallocation from the Southern to Northern site will commence as soon as the service provider is on site to assist with maintenance and operational matters on the Southern site. This will also provide augment maintenance of current fleet that is not operational.
  • Fleet assessment -Fleet status quo analysis has been conducted to determine critical fleet that needs urgent attention. As mentioned, the current compactor fleet that deliver domestic waste collection is currently operating at under 40%, that make it impossible to deliver proper domestic waste collection within the Metro.

Key priorities for waste and fleet management in the next 30 days.

  • Provide status quo and request support and intervention by the Acting Chief Financial Officer.
  • Provide status quo and request support and assistance from National Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment for possible assistance regarding Yellow Fleet by:
  • Revisit current waste collection practices to streamline service in line with current challenges.
  • Development of strategies to strengthen management oversight and accountability and consequence management.
  • Standardisation of reporting mechanisms to ward councillors
  • Boost and improve morale of workers.

Summary

The success of the intervention as well as the efforts to stabilize the current dysfunctional Waste Management system of the Municipality will and must be supported by proper tools and equipment. The Intervention Team is committed to provide the necessary direction and support to stabilize the current challenges experienced by our communities. Further interaction is urgently needed between Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment and National Treasury to investigate measures of support as most of the grand funding resources within the Municipality has been allocated in the 2022/2023 budget.  

24 June 2022 - NW1405

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) led to the collapse of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality where section 139 of the Constitution of the Republic, 1996, was evoked, (b) are the names of the persons who were responsible for the dysfunction of the municipality and (c) consequence management has been applied to the specified persons?

Reply:

a) The Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (MMM) was officially placed under section 139(5)(a) and (c) intervention by the Free State Provincial Executive Council on 19 December 2019, due to a financial and service delivery crisis in the municipality.  However, no significant progress has been made to implement the Financial Recovery Plan developed by National Treasury as a result of significant political interference in the administrative functioning of the Metro.  Cabinet received a formal request from the Provincial Executive for a national intervention.

b) Cabinet approved a national intervention in terms of Section 139(7) of the Constitution on 6 April 2022 to create stability and improve service delivery in Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality.  A National Cabinet Representative supported by a multi-disciplinary team of experts are being deployed with responsibilities that will amongst others ensure and oversee the execution by the Accounting Officer of the functions referred to in Section 67(1)(h) and Schedule 2 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 (Act No. 32 of 2000), read with any other relevant legislative provisions dealing with disciplinary matters, including criminal, disciplinary and civil action.

24 June 2022 - NW2393

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to the fixed property situated on the banks of the Thukela River at Ezakeni in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal on which the UThukela District Municipality pump station and water purification works is located, what are the details of the (a) owners of the fixed property on which the pump station and water works are built, (b) legally enforceable contract for the use of the property by the UThukela District Municipality and (c) rentals payable to the owners of the property; (2) whether the pump station and water purification works are national key points; if not why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The reply below was provided by UThukela District Municipality:

1. The Ownership of Zakheni Water Treatment 

     (a) Ownership of specified property

     The plant is owned and operated by uThukela District Municipality (WSA)

               

(b)  Legal Contract for the use of the property

By virtue, the plant was transferred from Local Municipality to the (WSA) and therefore the property belong to the DIstrict hence this no no contract obligation.

                  

(c) Rental Payable to the owner of the property

None - the District owns the Property.

 

(2)      National Key Point Status

The Ezakheni plant supply only 9 wards out of 37 ward in Alfred Duma Local Municipality therefore it currently not a National key Point. The District will therefore need to be guided in terms of the National Key Point Act 102 of 1980 South African Government. 

24 June 2022 - NW2420

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will issue a statement on the improvement of the (a) 89 unqualified municipal audits, (b) 66 qualified, (c) 6 adverse audits and (d) 12 disclaimers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Subsequent to the release of the 2020/21 Local Government Audit Outcomes by the Auditor General of South Africa, we issued a media release on 15 June 2022. We noted the improvements in the number of municipalities with unqualified audit outcomes. In addition we outlined the department’s position and interventions in place to assist under-performing municipalities.

The media release is attached herewith as annexure A.

21 June 2022 - NW1697

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What measures has her department taken against municipalities, such as the Sekhukhune District Municipality, that have returned money that was meant for service delivery to the National Treasury?

Reply:

It is recommended that the question be transferred to the National Treasury as they have overview of the funds returned by the municipalities, causes of the inability to spend their budgets and the corrective measures to deal with this challenge.

17 June 2022 - NW2216

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the National Treasury divides conditional grants to municipalities in each financial year in terms of the equitable shares, what (a) are the impediments that prevent the provision of water, roads, toilets and streetlights in the (i) Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality, (ii) Amathole District Municipality, (iii) Phokwane Local Municipality and (iv) Bela-Bela Local Municipality, (b) oversight and monitoring mechanisms have been undertaken in the specified rural areas, (c) are the time frames for sending engineers to the areas and (d) are the reasons that it has taken long to deliver on the services?

Reply:

The department is currently obtaining the responses from the abovementioned munucipalities and we will provide response as soon as we receive it.

17 June 2022 - NW1370

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date does she envisage the drainage problem in Mangaung will be fixed, as roads are flooded and water runs into residents’ houses each time it rains?

Reply:

According to a report from the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (MMM), MMM has just finalized the appointment of a contractor to attend to the flooding spots as and when required.

It is however expected that the acting senior personnel, including the Acting Municipal Manager and Acting Engineering Services Head of Department, will ensure that service delivery plans are in place within three (3) months, budgeted for and implemented. The service delivery plans will provide timelines.

The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) will provide technical support to MMM with regard to infrastructure development and service delivery.

 

17 June 2022 - NW1647

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What measures is her department taking to prevent the deterioration of (a) finances and (b) provision services in the Manguang Metropolitan Municipality, especially in light of the specified municipality’s inability to service its bulk debt to Bloem Water and the resultant water restrictions experienced by residents?

Reply:

The national executive intervened in the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (the Metro) in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, read with section 150 of the Municipal Finance Management Act No. 56 of 2003. The intervention is jointly led by the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) and the National Treasury.

On 20 April 2022, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (CoGTA), together with senior officials from the DCoG, attended and addressed a special council meeting of the Metro. Also in attendance were officials from the Free State Government led by the Premier and accompanied by the provincial MEC’s of Finance and CoGTA, as well as senior officials from their respective Departments.

The purpose of the special council meeting was to communicate the Cabinet decision for placing the Metro under national intervention and the implications thereof. Subsequently, on 28 April 2022 the Minister of Finance published the Terms of Reference (copy attached) to guide the work of the intervention team that have been seconded to the Metro by DCoG, National Treasury, and sector Departments from national and provincial government.

The areas of financial management and the provision of services are amongst the various areas of work that the intervention team will be focusing on.

17 June 2022 - NW2178

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the fixed property situated on the banks of the Thukela River at Ezakeni in the Alfred Duma Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal on which the Uthukela District Municipality pump station and water purification works is located, what are the details of the (a) owners of the specified property, (b) legally enforceable contract for the use of the property by the Uthukela District Municipality and (c) rentals payable to the owners of the property; (2) whether the pump station and water purification works is a national key point; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department is currently obtaining the response from the District Munucipality and we will provide response as soon as we receive it.

17 June 2022 - NW2140

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the assassination of traditional leaders in KwaZulu-Natal that has become an alarming matter requiring urgent attention, and in view of the fact that residents are being robbed of the traditional leaders’ valuable leadership skills, what action has the Department of Traditional Affairs taken to address the surge in the killing of traditional leaders; (2) whether she has taken any steps to open a formal commission of inquiry into the killings, as has been repeatedly called for by the Inkatha Freedom Party; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the time frames in this regard; (3) what total number of arrests have been made since 2012, relating to the killing of traditional leaders? NW2549E

Reply:

1. Government is extremely concerned about the killing of traditional leaders, I have requested the Minister of Police to put together a team to investigate this matter. We have also raised the matter with the Kwa-Zulu Natal CoGTA and they have advised that they are collaborating with law enforcement agencies. A number of interventions have been effected including entering into a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Department of Community Safety and Liaison and the Provincial House of Traditional and Khoi-San Leaders, hosting of Imbizo’s in all eleven (11) Districts and a Provincial Imbizo to listen to the views of traditional leaders and reporting this matter to the Justice Crime Prevention and Security Cluster (JCPS) and the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Executive Council that has directed that the Provincial Priority Committee on Chieftaincy be re-established as a sub-committee of the Provincial Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure and further that the incidents of killings of traditional leaders be filtered within the Provincial Peace and Stability Strategy.

(2) A Commission of inquiry has not been established; however, a number of interventions have been put into place including the establishment of the Community Safety Intervention Unit within the Department of Community Safety and Liaison to primarily deal with these violent crimes.

(3) The Provincial Department has advised that a total of twenty-six (26) arrests have been made.

17 June 2022 - NW2139

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the recent floods in KwaZulu-Natal that have exposed the weaknesses in disaster management response in the specified province, what measures have been put in place to evaluate the effectiveness of the disaster management centres in the province to ensure that the centres are properly equipped to deal with future disasters of this kind?

Reply:

The National Disaster Management Centre each year monitors legislative compliance to the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) in all Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMC) and two Municipal Disaster Management Centres (MDMC) located in each province. These assessments are done with the PDMC and then feedback is provided immediately on key issues that have been identified.  Provinces and each municipality to ensure that they comply with the requirements of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), including to develop and implement a comprehensive disaster management plan. The District Development Model (DDM), presents an opportunity that, in the context of “Joint One Plans” and  “One Budgets”, organs of state and institutional role-players will be able to coordinate and align the implementation of their disaster (risk) management plans within each District and Metropolitan space across the country.

17 June 2022 - NW2137

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with regard to the intervention by the national Government into the administration of the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality in terms of section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, and the terms of reference issued by her in respect of the intervention, the intervention team is empowered to determine whether motions of no confidence in elected office bearers of the council of the specified municipality may be allowed to serve before the municipal council while the intervention is in place; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what legislative provisions does the intervention team rely on in this regard?

Reply:

The intervention team in Managung Metropolitan Municipality is not empowered to determine whether motions of no confidence in elected office bearers may be allowed or not, while the intervention is in place. Thus, the scope and responsibilities of the intervention team are mainly related to the implementation of the Financial Recovery Plan, and not extended to cover matters relating to political decisions, and thus, Municipal Council resolutions on whether or not to remove an elected office bearer is not part of the implementation of the Financial Recovery Plan. The procedural requirements pertaining to a political decision that a Municipal Council is entitled to take, are prescribed in sections 29, 30, 40 and 58 of the Municipal Structures Act, No. 117 of 1998.

17 June 2022 - NW2124

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What were the findings of the report from Analytical Forensic Investigation Services in the Emalahleni Local Municipality in terms of section 106(1)(B) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000; (2) whether the specified report has been tabled in the council; if not, on what date will the report be tabled before the council; if so, on what date; (3) whether anyone implicated in the report has been criminally charged based on the findings of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the full details of the (a) charges, (b) dates on which charges were laid, (c) case numbers, (d) police stations where the charges were laid and (e) implicated persons?

Reply:

The below response was provided by the Mpumalanga province: 

1. The Emalahleni municipality section 106 investigation report has not yet been officially released by the provincial government.  The report is yet to be tabled before the provincial executive council and then be tabled before the municipal council for them to adopt and develop an action plan to respond to the findings. It would be premature to make any pronouncements on the contents of the report until it is tabled at both the executive council and the municipal council.

2. The report will be tabled before the municipal council after it has been tabled before the provincial executive council. 

(3) As indicated above the report has not yet been officially released by the provincial government.

(a) Not applicable.

(b) Not applicable.

(c) Not applicable.

(d) Not applicable.

(e) Not applicable.

17 June 2022 - NW2102

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What (i) is the name of the person who was designated in terms of section 34 of the Disaster Management Act, Act 57 of 2002, to co-ordinate the response to the flood in KwaZulu-Natal and (ii) are the terms of reference linked to the appointment, (b) on what date was the Provincial Disaster Management Centre (PDMC) established and (c) what are the total amounts spent to date on the PDMC; (2) whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the dates and minutes of all meetings since the establishment of the forum; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) and (ii)A person appointed as the head of the provincial disaster management centre is responsible for the exercise by the centre of its powers and the performance of its duties. Mr Sibongiseni Ngema has been appointed as the Head: KZN Provincial Disaster Management Centre in terms of the Public Service Act.

(b)The Provincial Disaster Management Centre (PDMC) was established in 2007.

(c) The budget allocation that is accessible on the financial system depicts the following allocation

No.

Year

Budget Allocated

1.

2018

R 51 017 000.00

2.

2019

R 65 218 000.00

3.

2020

R 48 229 000.00

4.

2021

R 17 083 000.00

5.

2022

R 52 583 000.00

The system could not retrieve information dating back beyond 2018 as Disaster Management did not have a separate vote. The budget was under Programme 3. 

(2) The Department of Cooperative Governance does not keep records of the provincial government. The Provincial Disaster Management Centre (PDMC) indicated that due to the changes in staff and technology, it is difficult to access the information dating back to 2007. The Provincial Disaster Management requires at least a month to locate these documents and furnish them to Ms E L Powell. This is mainly because the staff at the PDMC is still busy assisting with the coordination and supporting the stabilisation and recovery, the rehousing of people who have lost homes and restoring provision of services as a result of the flood disaster that have taken place.

17 June 2022 - NW2100

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) her department and (b) any of the entities reporting to her have found any ghost workers within their system in the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) total number of ghost workers was discovered, (ii) total amount was paid to them and (iii) steps have been taken to (aa) recover the money lost and (bb) hold the offending parties accountable?

Reply:

a. Department of Cooperative Governance & MISA

During the last five years, the Department has found no ghost workers within its system. No ghost employees were found within the Department of Cooperative Governance and MISA in the past five years. The department and MISA conducts regular employee verification and ensures payroll certification by employees monthly.

b.Community Work Programme

(i) & (ii) The Department identified that some implementing agents made payments to 909 deceased participants totalling R2,483,605.50.

(iii) Payments to deceased participants are being recovered from CWP Implementing Agents.

 

17 June 2022 - NW2215

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to her reply to question 233 on 22 April 2022, what are the details of (a) the report and (b) consequence management of the incident of gender-based violence unleashed by a security company on Councillor Nanziwe Rulashe of Amathole District Municipality?

Reply:

(a) The Executive Mayor, Councillor Ndikinda issued a media statement condemning the assault of the Councilor Rulashe and committed to investigate the matter further. In addition the ADM has been visited by several delegation from Minister of CoGTA and MEC to engage relevant parties affected by the incident. (b) The Executive Mayor requested protection services for Councilor Rulashe from the MEC for Safety and Liaison in the Province. Furthermore, a Threat and Risk Assessemnt report by Crime Intelligence was recieved whereby protection services were commissioned for three months to Councilor Rulashe. The Executive Mayor launched a preliminary report whose findings were reported to Council where it was resolved that an external independant legal firm be commissioned to conduct full investigation and report on its findings. Further steps taken by ADM is that the ADM official responsible for the incident was suspended, secondly a correspondence was made to the Secuirty Company to take disciplinary steps on their employees involved on the incident. 

17 June 2022 - NW2027

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)       Whether, with regard to the R17 million bridge that was constructed about two years ago in Ha-Lambani Village outside of Thohoyandou that has already developed cracks because of poor workmanship, her department conducted any quality assurance, monitoring and evaluation prior to the hand over; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons that the faults were not detected; (2) Whether the contractor has been (a) instructed to redo the work and/or (b) blacklisted; if not, why not; in each case; if so, what are the relevant details, in each case?

Reply:

1. The bridges project mentioned in PQ 2027 belongs to Thulamela Local Municipality (TLM). The pertinent details of the project are outlined below.

The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) is responsible, in terms of section 154 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996 among others, to provide support and strengthen the capacity of municipalities including TLM to manage their own affairs, to exercise their powers and to perform their functions. To that end, DCOG through the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) provides technical support to TLM in accordance with the District Development Model (DDM). The MISA technical support includes the following:

  • Development or review of technical reports and other related documentation for project registration at project funding approval stage.
  • Development and review of project planning documents, supporting with preparation of procurement documents for service providers.
  • Support the municipality by giving technical advice, review reports submitted by the professional service provider appointed by TLM and conduct site inspections.

The cracks on the bridges are part of the defects that the contractor is required to fix within 21 days from the issue of the Practical Completion Certificate done on 23 May 2022. MISA conducts site visits and inspections to monitor the fixing of the defects as part of the support to TLM.

2. The contractor was instructed to fix the defects, which include the cracks, within 21 days. The days are counted from 23 May 2022 when the Practical Completion Certificate was issued as indicated in the background above.

17 June 2022 - NW1368

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date does she envisage that basic services such as water and electricity will be provided to the community of Esdale in Ward 8 in the Kagisano-Molopo Local Municipality?

Reply:

The response below were provided by the Kagisano-Molopo Local Municipality.

There is a plan in place for implementing the project in 2022/23 Municipal FY under the Bulk infrastructure cluster funded by DWS under RBIG. The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has confirmed that the Engineers/Consultants are busy with the design and finalization of the technical report which will be presented to the department for approval of the funding under the 2022/23 Municipal Financial Year, which starts on the 01 July 2022.

With regards to electricity, Esdale village is electrified, However, there is few newly built homes which have not yet received electricity. The municipality applies every financial year to Eskom for electrification of infills and Esdale will be included in 2023/2024 municipal financial year.

03 June 2022 - NW1688

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

Following the recent findings by the Special Investigating Unit regarding a service provider (name furnished), that is accused of overcharging the Fetakgomo Tubatse Local Municipality when it was contracted to conduct a R326 million project to electrify 20 000 rural households in 2013, as well as other cases across the Republic, what (a) policies is her department, in collaboration with other departments, putting in place to ensure that municipalities and/or service providers do not waste money on tenders that do not result in effective service delivery, (b) plans have been developed to help municipalities build internal capacity to provide their own services and (c) steps have been taken by her department to recover the monies that the specified service provider had overcharged the specified municipality?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is requested to refer the question to the National Treasury as they are well positioned to provide response on the issues raised. A number of measures have been put in place by National Treasury aimed at enhancing the tender system to ensure there is value for money.

03 June 2022 - NW1648

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has been informed that sanitation infrastructure built by a certain company (name furnished) on contract to the Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality around 2019 in Zone 1 of Thaba Nchu in Ward 41 of the specified municipality has collapsed and/or is otherwise defective, leading to sewage spills in the community; if not, will she (a) intervene to assist the municipality to take remedial action and/or (b) report on the progress of refurbishing the infrastructure; if so, what measures are being taken by her department to assist the municipality to remedy the situation?NW1975

Reply:

This and other poor service delivery issues of Mangaung Metropolitan Municipality (MMM) were brought to our attention.

a) To that end Cabinet approved an intervention in terms of section 139 (7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa 1996 aiming to create stability and improve service delivery. DCOG is in the process of appointing senior managers as was highlighted in the background above.

b) It is expected that the acting senior personnel, including the Acting Municipal Manager and Acting Engineering Services Head of Department, will ensure that service delivery plans are in place within three (3) months, budgeted for and implemented to remedy the situation.

The Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) will provide technical support to MMM with regard to infrastructure development and service delivery.

03 June 2022 - NW234

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether there is a system in place to sort out the mess created by the Municipal Demarcation Board in terms of the election of ward committees, given the nature of pre-local government elections delimitation of wards, wherein many residents were not voting in their wards of residence; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Municipal Demarcation Board is responsible for delimiting metropolitan and local municipalities into wards, a Councillor representing a ward is elected by the voters registered in that specific ward. The finalisation of ward boundaries was informed by a comprehensive public participation and consultative process that was undertaken by the MDB, and the number of wards in the country increased from 4,392 in 2016 to 4,468 in 2021.

In terms of Section 73 of the Municipal Structures Act (as amended), metropolitan and local municipalities must establish ward committees within 120 days after the election of a municipal council. If the ward committee is not established within the 120 days, the Speaker must request the MEC for an extension. Section 73(3) of the Act requires metropolitan and local municipalities to make rules regulating the procedure to elect members of ward committees, taking into account the need to for women to be equitably represented in the committee and for a diversity of interests in the ward to be represented.

The Department is currently monitoring the establishment of ward committees in all metropolitan and local municipalities across the country.

20 May 2022 - NW1574

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department has no commercial contracts with the government of the Russian Federation

20 May 2022 - NW648

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1) Whether (a) she and/or (b) her department have made any submissions to the High Level Task Team on the Framework towards the Professionalisation of the Public Service that was appointed by the Minister of Public Service and Administration in May 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will she furnish Mr C Brink with a copy, record and/or summary of the submissions; (2) whether she has found that the local government sector has been sufficiently represented in the process of producing a final version of the Framework to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? (2) whether she has found that the local government sector has been sufficiently represented in the process of producing a final version of the Framework to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW786E

Reply:

1. (a) and (b) Yes. The Department was consulted on the development of a framework aimed at professionalising the public service and its inputs were shared with the Department of Public Service and Administration. A copy of the submission is annexured hereto.

2. Apart from participating in various processes during the development of the said framework, the Department recently promulgated the Municipal Staff Regulations setting out uniform standards and procedures governing career incidents of municipal staff below management echelon. The Regulations were consulted with the Minister of Public Service and Administration whose valuable inputs were received and incorporated into the Regulations.

BACKGROUND:

1. Government in its transformation role of enuring that South Africa becomes a truly nonracial and democratic country, it continues to be grappling with developmental challenges. To respond to these challenges, in 2012, government adopted the National Development Plan (NDP) Vision 2030 as a long-term strategic goal to address the triple challenges of reducing poverty, inequality and unemployment. In the context of the role of the state, Chapter 13 of the NDP envisions South Africa as a Capable and Developmental State. The NDP further makes an assertion that the state needs to play a transformative and developmental role. Accordingly, this requires a well-run and effectively coordinated state institutions with skilled public servants who are committed to the public good and capable of delivering consistently high quality services, while prioritising the nation’s developmental objectives.

2. To realise the above mentioned NDP 2030 vision, in 2018, the Public Service Commission conducted a roundtable discussion on the professionalisation of the pubic service. The roundtable recommended that the implemnentaion of key recommendations in Chapter 13 of the NDP need to be fasttracked, led by Office of the President. These include the creation of the Administrative Head of the Public Service and a strengtherned role for the Public Service Commission. It further recommended that the DPSA should be the champion of the project to professionalise the Public Service.

3. Emanating from the above, the Minister for the Public Service and Administration approved the publication of the draft National Implementation Framework towards the Professionalisation of the Public Service for public comments. The Framework recommends among other provisions, that the public service be merit-based and insulated from party politics. Five critical professionalisation pillars are proposed, namely;

a) Pre-entry recruitment and selection within the public service

b) Induction and onboarding

c) Planning and performance management

d) Continuous learning and professional development

e) Career progression and management of career incidence

4. A number of stakeholders, including government departments, professional bodies, civil society organisations etc were invited to participate and make written submissions during the consultation process.

20 May 2022 - NW1191

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she intends to intervene to implement relief measures for the residents of BelaBela in Limpopo, who have had to deal with stinking, brown, dirty water for a period of over two weeks without any intervention from the municipality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the intervention?

Reply:

Water Service Authorities (WSAs) are required to monitor the quality of drinking water as per the South African National Standard 241 (SANS 241). The SANS 241 is a drinking water specification that provides the minimum requirements for potable water to be considered safe for human consumption. These requirements include microbiological, chemical and physical properties of water.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) monitors the management of drinking water quality compliance by WSAs and further engages the WSAs where non-compliance is detected. WSAs are required to register for the monitoring programme on the DWS’s Integrated Regulatory Information System (IRIS). The monitoring program indicates the sampling point, frequency of monitoring and what determinants are monitored. All the drinking water quality results must be uploaded on the IRIS as required.

According to DWS, DWS has resuscitated the Blue Drop Certification Programme which aims to address the challenges associated with the provision of water. This programme seeks to implement a proactive drinking water quality risk management approach to ensure that quality failures are minimised, but when and where it inevitably occurs that acceptable responses are implemented to safeguard affected communities.

In the event of non-compliance to provide access to potable water, section 63 of the Water Services Act, No. 108 of 1997 provides, among other things, as follows:

“(1) If a water services authority has not effectively performed any function imposed on it by or under this Act, the Minister (Minister of Water and Sanitation) may, in consultation with the Minister for Provincial Affairs and Constitutional Development (then), request the relevant Province to intervene in terms of section 139 of the Constitution.

(2) If, within a reasonable time after the request, the Province—

(a) has unjustifiably failed to intervene; or

(b) has intervened but has failed to do so effectively, the Minister (Minister of Water and Sanitation) may assume responsibility for that function to the extent necessary—

      1. to maintain essential national standards;
      2. to meet established minimum standards for providing services…”

In light of the above, it is suggested that this parliamentary question be redirected to the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS).

 

20 May 2022 - NW1194

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Noting how a number of fire managers do not hold legal fire diplomas in accordance with the South African Qualifications Authority Act, Act 58 of 1995, but are made to run the emergency services of the public whereas qualified managers hold junior positions, what (a) action has she taken to hold municipalities accountable for such irregularities and (b) oversight mechanisms has her department implemented to monitor the redress of the situation?

Reply:

It is important to note that the Fire Brigade Services Act, 1987 (Act 99 of 1987) is the primary legislation regulating the provision of fire services. Section 5 (1)  a controlling authority shall appoint a person who possesses the prescribed qualifications and experience, as chief fire officer to be in charge of its service. In response to the above questions:

a) What  action has she taken to hold municipalities accountable for such irregularities?

The Directorate facilitated the process of developing Fire Service career path as part of Municipal Staff Regulations which will come into effect from 1 July 2022.

b) What oversight mechanisms has her Department implemented to monitor the redress of the situation?                                                

The Department is in the process of developing an oversight mechanism for Municipal Fire Services career path once the Regulations is effective. The Directorate will monitor and support the implementation of the Municipal Staff Regulations.

The link to the Municipal Staff Regulations is below

https://www.gov.za/sites/default/files/gcis_document/202109/45181gon891.pdf

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

20 May 2022 - NW1536

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What remedial action has been taken by her department to assist local and provincial governments to strengthen the (a) Provincial Disaster Management Plan and (b) District Disaster Management Plan in order to better respond to the changing climate?

Reply:

(a) Provincial Disaster Management Plan (s)

It is encouraging to note that all provinces submitted their disaster management plans to the NDMC. Following submission of the plans by these organs of state, the NDMC assesses them to check amongst others the following:

  • Level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act of 2002, other relevant legislative frameworks, policies and bylaws.
  • Alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into sector programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030).

The NDMC further provides written feedback as well as hold engagement sessions on this feedback with provinces through Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs) as the custodians of these plans.

(b) District Disaster Management Plan (s) 

It is encouraging to note that 38 District Municipalities and 7 Metropolitan Municipalities submitted their disaster management plans to the NDMC. Following submission of the plans by these organs of state, the NDMC develops the “municipal support schedule” in line with the APP project to “provide support to a number of municipalities in priority disaster areas to prevent, prepare and mitigate disaster risks through implementation of applicable disaster management plans”. In line with the developed Support Schedule, the NDMC assesses these identified disaster management plans to check amongst others the following:

  • Level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act of 2002, other relevant legislative frameworks, policies and bylaws.
  • Alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into sector programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030). 

The NDMC further provides written feedback as well as hold engagement sessions with municipalities and PDMCs in the provinces within which municipalities whose disaster management plans were assessed belong. The NDMC further developed the “Support Plan” to assist and guide municipalities to address identified challenges prohibiting them to develop fit-for-purpose disaster management plans. Also, the NDMC developed “Guidelines on the integration of DRR, IDPs and DDM-One Plans of each District and Metropolitan Municipalities”. Both (Guidelines and the Support Plan) will be rolled out in all the provinces through the Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMC) for the duration of the current financial year. The  DG of DCOG regularly writes letters to Accounting Officers within provinces and municipalities for non-submission of, as well as a reminder to update and review their plans that were previously developed and are outdated.

To complement all NDMC efforts in (a) and (b) above, the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) supported all district municipalities to develop the district climate change adaptation plans. Furthermore, all provinces have been supported to develop their provincial climate change adaptation strategies. DFFE further provided capacity building programmes on climate change to all district municipalities with the view to facilitate mainstreaming of climate change considerations into the municipal planning system. This was done with the development of various tools such as Greenbook and Let-respond Toolkit which are aimed at offering municipalities with tools that could be used for climate change response planning. All the inter-institutional support complements the current and planned work of the NDMC on disaster management planning and Impact Based Early Warning training that the NDMC does with the South African Weather Service. In the 2022/23 financial year, the NDMC and SAWS will conduct Impact Based training for all districts in KZN. Both will continue to issue weekly Impact Based Early Warnings for the approaching severe weather systems, especially in the eastern coastal area. The NDMC Autumn and Winter seasonal plans highlighting hazard prone areas will also be distributed to all disaster management stakeholders in the province of KZN for the medium-term planning.

20 May 2022 - NW1543

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Noting how the floods in KwaZulu-Natal claimed the lives of more than 400 persons, what measures is her department putting in place with municipalities in order to better deal with the impact of severe weather conditions in future?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) will be strengthening the support to municipalities in the following:

  • The development and implementation of disaster management plans as per Sections 38, 39, 52 and 53 of the Disaster Management Act 57 of 2002;
  • The assessment of submitted disaster management plans to check amongst others the level of compliance with the Disaster Management Act as well as the alignment with the guidelines on “development and structure of a disaster management plan”.
  • Whether these plans incorporate disaster risk reduction (DRR) and climate change adaptation measures for inclusion into municipal programmes and projects as required for by the priorities and targets of the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction (2015-2030).
  • Engagement sessions with municipalities and Provincial Disaster Management Centres within respective provinces to discuss the respective assessment feedbacks. 

DCOG will continue to collaborate with the Department of Forestry, Fisheries and Environment (DFFE) in supporting the district municipalities to develop the district climate change adaptation plans as well as providing capacity building programmes to the district municipalities on climate change with the view to facilitate mainstreaming of climate consideration into the municipal planning system. This will be done with the development of various tools such as Greenbook and Let-respond Toolkit which are aimed at offering the municipality with tools that could be used in planning for climate change response.

The above-mentioned inter-institutional support complements the current and planned work of the NDMC on disaster management planning and Impact Based Early Warning training with the South African Weather Service. The NDMC and the South African Weather Service will conduct Impact Based training for all districts in KZN for the 2022/23 financial year. The South African Weather Service and the NDMC will continue issuing of weekly Impact Based Early Warnings for approaching severe weather systems, especially in eastern coastal area. The NDMC will continue to distribute seasonal plans to all disaster management stakeholders highlighting hazard prone areas for medium term planning. and informed decision-making.

20 May 2022 - NW1544

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What measures have been put in place by her department to ensure that funds allocated by her department to assist families affected by the devastating floods will not be embezzled in the same way COVID-19 funds were?

Reply:

The public finances are governed by legislative prescripts and regulatory frameworks that stipulate the conditions including the roles and responsibilities of all relevant stakeholders. It is therefore important that the accounting officers of organs of state and stakeholders ensure that funds are utilised in accordance with the applicable regulatory frameworks. For the response and recovery measures of the recent flooding, government through relevant organs of state has strengthened the monitoring systems through the following key measures:

  1. Tracking of expenditure by National Treasury where changes to the fund and project segment have been implemented in the Basic Accounting System (BAS),
  2. Tracking procurement where all institutions affected by the flood disaster must report to National Treasury all procurement transactions related to flood interventions,
  3. Real time auditing by the Office of the Auditor-General focussing on the following areas:

Prevention – testing the implementation of the preventative controls and the remaining risks will be reported to the accounting officer/authority, 

Detection - high-risk transactions will be subjected to an audit and key observations reported to the accounting officer/authority; and

Reporting on work done by the AGSA, the outcome thereof and the responses by accounting officers and authorities to any weaknesses identified are reported in a special report. The audits are meant to provide independent assurance on whether public funds have been appropriately accounted for and were used for its intended purpose.

20 May 2022 - NW1553

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will a bridge be built in Valdezia, Makhado, Limpopo, where the community is left stranded when it rains, as the bridge is the only entrance to Mphombo Block in Valdezia?

Reply:

Makhado Local Municipality (MLM) is currently constructing the culvert bridge and the progress on the 3rd of May 2022 is as per pictures below. According to MLM, the completion date is the 31st of May 2022.

A group of people working on a construction site

Description automatically generated with medium confidenceA picture containing ground, outdoor, sky, stone

Description automatically generated A picture containing ground, outdoor, dirt

Description automatically generated

20 May 2022 - NW1560

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

By what date will mass lights be installed in Ward 6 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality?

Reply:

Moses Kotane Local Municipality (MKLM) provided for installation of high mast lights in Ward 6 in its current 3-year capital budget plan and 2021/22 Integrated Development Plan. According to MMKLM, MKLM installed high mast lights in Motlhabe village in Ward 6 this financial year and has planned to install high mast lights in Mapaputle and Molorwe villages in Ward 6 in the 2022/23 financial year by the 30th of June 2023.

20 May 2022 - NW1646

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total amount of her department’s budget has been spent on (i) infrastructure development and (ii) maintenance in the past five financial years, (b) percentage of the specified budget was spent on dealing with the COVID-19 virus, (c) total amount has been spent on drainage and flood alleviation measures and (d) total amount (i) of the infrastructure grants has eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality received in the past five financial years and (ii) has been returned to the National Treasury in each specified year?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) is administered by the Department of Cooperative Governance with the aim of developing infrastructure to provide poor households with at least a basic level of service. Municipalities have been allocated R15,6 billion in 2021/22 that is aligned to the municipal financial year that will end on 30 June 2022.

Municipalities have reported expenditure on the MIG over the last 5 years 2016/17 - 2020/21) as follows:

Financial year

Transferred

Spent by receiving municipalities

% spent against transferred

2016/17

14,914,028

13,784,509

92.40%

2017/18

15,891,252

14,545,025

91.50%

2018/19

15,287,685

13,831,893

90.48%

2019/20

14,816,103

11,720,688

79.11%

2020/21

14,491,065

13,226,723

91.28%

Total

75,400,133

67,108,838

89.00%

Disaster Grant contribution to Infrastructure Development (NDMC):

Funding allocations have been done from the Disaster Grants within the NDMC to augment resources of affected organs of state regarding infrastructure development: The funds were allocated from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant, Provincial Disaster Relief Grant and Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant mainly in addressing the drought conditions in affected provinces and municipalities. The allocations were as follows:

Financial years

Type of grants

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2017/2018

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R341 373 000

Drought interventions: Infrastructure

 

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R78 000 000

 

2018/2019

Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant

R 1 025 484 000

 

2019/2020

No disaster grant allocations

 

2020/2021

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R138 489 000

 

2021/2022

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R 173 132 000

 
 

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R48 100 000

 

Total (infrastructure development)

R1 804 578 000

 

(ii) According to the MIG Framework, which stipulates the conditions under which the funds allocated to municipalities must be used, indicates that funds for the maintenance of roads must be in line with the maintenance priorities identified through the Rural Roads Asset Management System (RRAMS) administered by the Department of Transport. Although this provision has been made within the MIG no maintenance on roads maintenance has been funded form the MIG within the last 5 years.

(b) MIG receiving municipalities reported that:

- In 2019/20 MIG allocations were reprioritised in April 2020 to address Covid-19 related areas. The expenditure reported on projects was R204 million.
- In 2020/21 (period 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2022) MIG receiving municipalities reported expenditure of R609 million.

Disaster Grant allocation to Covid-19 response measures

Financial years

Type of grants

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2019/2020

Provincial Disaster Relief Grant

R 466 392 000

Covid-19 response measures

2020/2021

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R150 970 000

 

Total (Covid-19)

 R617 362 000

 

(c)

Financial years

Type of grant

Amounts transferred

Purpose of allocation

2016/2017

No disaster grant allocations

 

2017/2018

Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant

R26 147 000

Interventions to sinkhole formation conditions

   

R16 304 000

Interventions to storm damages

 

2018/2019

 

R200 654 000

 

2019/2020

No disaster grant allocations

 

2020/2021

Municipal Disaster Relief Grant

R157 137 000

 

Total (flood and storm damage interventions)

R400 242 000

 

(d) (i) The total amount of R14,7 billion was transferred to the eThekwini over the last 5 years and (ii) R909 million had to be returned to the National Fiscus.

The eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality has received various grants (conditional and unconditional) from the national fiscus over the last five years to assist with infrastructure development. They are:

  • Municipal Emergency Housing Grant
  • Neighbourhood Development Partnership Grant
  • Integrated National Electrification Programme (Municipal) Grant
  • Energy Efficiency and Demand Side Management Grant
  • Municipal Disaster Recovery Grant
  • Public Transport Network Grant
  • Urban Settlements Development Grant
  • Integrated City Development Grant

Financial tear

Grants received

 

Actual Expenditure reported

 

Total unspent

Approved Rollover

Amount to be returned

2016/17

2,976,972

2,948,818

28,154

28,154

2017/18

3,036,370

2,700,090

336,280

554

335,726

2018/19

2,984,325

2,482,135

502,190

2,662

499,528

2019/20

3,189,069

3,120,680

68,389

32,449

35,940

2020/21

2,515,345

2,497,398

17,947

8,528

9,419

Total

14,702,081

13,749,121

952,960

44,193

908,767

National Treasury

(ii) The total amount of R908.7 million was recorded as unspent conditional grants by the National Treasury (this amount has since returned to the NRF). This amount excludes the grants allocated for operational purposes, unconditional grants, indirect grants and the rollover approved amount of R44.2 million. 

06 May 2022 - NW1399

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Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has the power to act against political office bearers in local government arena; if not, why not; if so, what consequence management actions were applied to political office bearers who omitted to play their oversight role in accordance with section 32 of the Local Government Municipal Finance Management Act, Act 56 of 2003, on all matters which were investigated by the Special Investigating Unit with regard to whistle-blowers?

Reply:

The conduct of members of municipal councils is guided by the Code of Conduct for Councillors as provided in schedule 7 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act No. 117 of 1998 (as amended). If a Councillor has breached the Code, item 16(2) of the Code provides that the municipal council may impose sanctions on the Councillor, including requesting the MEC to remove the Councillor from office.

It is the responsibility of the municipality to act against officials and political office bearers who have failed to address unauthorised, irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure as required in terms of section 32 of the MFMA. Section 32 of the MFMA enables the municipal council to resolve on the recoverability or write off of unauthorised, irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

Where the municipal council fails to address the unauthorised, irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure, then section 173 of the MFMA read together with Chapter 3 of the Municipal Regulations for Financial Misconduct Procedures and Criminal Proceedings and the Code of Conduct for Councillors, sets out the processes that must be followed including when a councillor fails to or does something that impedes compliance with the MFMA etc. Therefore, under the MFMA, the Minister has not been granted the power to act specifically against political office bearers.

The MFMA provides in section 38, for the National Treasury to stop funds for serious or persistent breach of the measures in line with section 216 of the Constitution or breaches or fails to comply with any conditions subject to which the allocation is made.

If a Councilor fails to adhere to the legislative prescripts and the Minister becomes aware of any maladministration, fraud, corruption, or any other serious malpractice which, in the opinion of the Minister, has occurred or is occurring in a municipality, the Minister will request the MEC, in terms of section 106(4) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act No. 32 of 2000 to investigate the matter. Council may then be requested to institute appropriate disciplinary proceedings where required, and where instances of corruption, fraud and related offences have been identified, such reports are handed over to law enforcement agencies for further processing.

Further, it is important to indicate that the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) referrals to municipalities are not done through the Minister, but through the MEC. If the MEC does not take the necessary action, then the SIU will escalate the matter to the Premier in the Province.

06 May 2022 - NW1480

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the total number of izinduna in the Republic; (2) whether all izinduna are paid by the government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who determines the salaries of izinduna and (b) what are the details of the criteria used in this regard?

Reply:

1. It is assumed that the Honorable Member is referring to headmen/women as defined in national legislation. According to information received from provinces, there is currently a total of 6 677 headmen/women in the country.

2. All duly recognised headmen/women are paid by the government. It should however be noted that there is a backlog in the payment of headmen/women in Kwa-Zulu Natal. The province is making arrangements to address the matter.

a) The salaries are determined by the Independent Commission on the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers.

b) A job description was developed and approved by the Independent Commission on the Remuneration of Public Office Bearers. This followed a job grading that informed the level at which headmen/women should be paid.

06 May 2022 - NW1380

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What actions have been taken by her department to (a) close the infrastructural backlog in townships and informal settlements regarding (i) sewer spillage, (ii) pit toilets, (iii) disaster management and (iv) fire departments and (b) monitor water in rural areas under water services authorities?

Reply:

a) The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) has taken various actions aimed at improving service delivery and eradicating infrastructure backlogs that include the following:

(i) DCOG together with the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA), all provincial departments responsible for local government and provincial treasury departments, under the leadership of the Minister of COGTA, prepared the State of Local Government (SOLG) report that was tabled and considered by Cabinet in June 2021. Cabinet’s resolutions on the SOLG report included that COGTA and National Treasury should lead the process of the development of the Municipal Support and Intervention Plans (MSIPs) in collaboration with sector departments, SALGA, provinces and municipalities. MSIPs have since been prepared that aim, among other things, to address sewer spillages and eradication of infrastructure backlogs.

(ii) MISA continues to provide technical support by deploying professionally registered Engineers and Town and Regional Planners to low and medium capacity municipalities, in accordance with the District Development Model. Currently MISA has deployed over 150 technical personnel to support and build the capacity of municipalities in infrastructure development and service delivery. The technical support by the MISA technical personnel includes assisting municipalities to develop operation and maintenance plans of the sewage system and implementation thereof. MISA also builds municipalities’ technical capacity by placing built environment learners in various low and medium capacity municipalities as part of the apprenticeship programme, the experiential learnership programme and the young graduates’ programme. In the last financial year MISA enrolled a total of 252 learners and candidates of the three programmes in various municipalities. Furthermore MISA, trains municipal officials in technical refresher courses. MISA trained 519 municipal officials in the last financial year in technical courses.

DCOG is administering the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) whose purpose is to provide specific capital finance for eradicating basic municipal infrastructure backlogs for poor households, microenterprises and social institutions servicing poor communities. The infrastructure includes for sanitation services. MISA supports municipalities with the implementation of projects throughout the project life cycle. Some of the specific activities of support are as follows:

  • Review of projects business plans and technical reports for registration processes,
  • General project management and project implementation planning
  • Verification of work done on infrastructure projects
  • Invoice verification on the MIG funded projects prior payment to ensure value for money is created on the ground.

(iii) All 44 District Municipalities and all 8 Metropolitan municipalities have established and operates disaster management centres in its municipal areas. These disaster management centres in partnership with the respective national, provincial municipal organs of state develop disaster management plans setting out the way in which the concept and principles of disaster management are to be applied in its functional area. These plans form part of and is implemented through the Integrated Development Plan and the Service Delivery Budget Implementation Plan.

Furthermore, the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) provides support through Disaster Grant funding allocations to augment the resources of the municipalities affected by disaster in case their resources have been depleted and municipalities are unable to cope only utilising own funding. During financial year 2021/2022, grant funding allocations were made to municipalities affected by disasters for drought and flood intervention measures, particularly infrastructure projects.

(iv) The NDMC has developed the White Paper on Fire Services which provides a framework for understanding the philosophy and approach in the delivery of fire services in the country going forward and these build on the good practice found in today’s fire service across the country and globally. In the past financial year 2021/2022, the NDMC has conducted Ten (10) Fire Safety and prevention capacity assessment across the country and reports were submitted to relevant accounting officers for immediate attention and implementation. In addition, the NDMC has also supported municipalities via different provinces with Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) training. Thus, capacity building projects were provided to North West, KZN, Gauteng and Western Cape and will proceed to other provinces.

b) MISA continues to support low and medium capacity municipalities by deploying technical personnel in accordance with the District Development Model (DDM).

In the 2021/22 financial year, MISA prioritized interventions through the mainstreaming of groundwater projects by rehabilitating and drilling of boreholes, spring refurbishment and protection, providing storage and reticulation across the country through its own budget and in some instances in collaboration with the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA). The groundwater mainstreaming interventions in 2021/22 financial year resulted in a total of 78 boreholes drilled and springs protected as follows:

  • 39 boreholes were completed
  • 3 springs were protected and completed
  • 32 borehole projects from last financial year are continuing in the 2022/23 financial year, and
  • 4 springs protection projects are continuing in the 2022/23 financial year.

The monitoring of water quality is done by the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS). MISA supports municipalities to ensure to compliance with legislation and meeting service standards.

06 May 2022 - NW1381

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the findings by the Auditor General for the 2019-20 financial year that 156 municipalities appointed consultants to compile financial statements without the transfer of skills to the employees of the specified municipalities for an amount of R1,02 billion, what (a) remedial action has been taken to ensure capacity building in terms of municipal internal audit teams in order to curb the over-reliance on consultants, (b) is the value for money that the specified municipalities received, (c) number of municipalities have been able to use the Municipal Standard Charts of Account and (d) are the root causes for appointing consultants to compile financial statements without transferring the skills to the municipal employees?

Reply:

a) In September 2021, I promulgated Local Government: Municipal Staff Regulations, which contributes towards the professionalisation of local public administration as envisaged in the National Development Plan (NDP) inter alia include a set of uniform norms and standards and procedures for municipal staff establishments, recruitment, selection and appointments, performance management, skills development and other career incidents of municipal employees below management echelon. In addition, the Staff Regulations are linked with competency frameworks for all occupational streams to ensure standardisation in the sector and this should be viewed as a game changer. Municipal Cost Containment Regulations promulgated in 2019, advocates for development of consultancy reduction plans to reduce reliance on consultants and ensure transfer of skills by consultants to municipal officials. Implementation of these regulations will assist municipalities to build their capacity and minimise reliance on consultants.

b) In respect of value for money it is a mixed bag, some municipalities managed to improve their performance/ audit outcomes, some municipalities recorded little improvement while others their audit outcomes remained unchanged and/ or regressed. The use of consultants for financial reporting is not sustainable, and it comes at a cost, hence municipalities are encouraged to channel resources towards improvement on internal controls and capacity building.

c) National Treasury support municipalities on the implementation of Municipal Standard Charts of Account (mSCOA) and this question can be directed to Ministry of Finance who would help with the number of municipalities that are adequately implementing mSCOA.

d) The root causes include poor management of consultants, lack of review of work done by consultants, reluctancy by municipal officials to be actively involved in the process, late appointment of consultants, and lack of appropriate evidence to support schedule/ figures disclosed in the financial statements and vacancies.

22 April 2022 - NW1173

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she and/or her department intends to assist the Msunduzi Local Municipality to take action against a ward councillor who, without any court order, demolished residents’ homes in Ward 17 in the Msunduzi Local Municipality, KwaZuluNatal, on 7 March 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the steps she will take in this regard?

Reply:

This is a legal matter between the council and the councilor concerned, hence as a department we will await the council to report any actions taken by the council and the MEC responsible for local government in the province. We will forward the report to the honourable member as soon as it is received.

The Department, through the Municipal Structures Act, established Code of Conduct  for councilors to deal with matters such as this.

22 April 2022 - NW1125

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)    What are the reasons that the (a) report of the forensic audit into the affairs of Dipaleseng Local Municipality that was commissioned by the former Member of the Executive Council in Mpumalanga has not been tabled in the specified local municipality (details furnished) and (b) recommendations were not implemented; (2) How was the (a) Chief Financial Officer (CFO), (b) the Municipal Manager and (c) others in director positions allowed to renegotiate salary increases that were way above their salary scale as stipulated in the local government upper limits; (3) Whether, given that the specified employees caused an unnecessary and unjustifiable expense for the municipality, she will ensure that monies paid in excess of the stipulated salaries as detailed in the section 106 of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000, report must be recovered from the former employees; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (4) Whether she will ensure that allegations of financial misconduct levelled at the former CFO (name furnished) by a certain company (name furnished) will be investigated further; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) What measures will she put in place to strengthen the oversight roles in local municipalities across the Republic?

Reply:

The response below was provided by the Mpumalanga province:

 (1) (a) The report was tabled before the municipal Council on 10 February 2022.

(b) The municipal Council discussed the report and developed an action plan on how they will implement the recommendations.  

(2) The matter of the salary increases and other matters were some of the reasons why the provincial department instituted an investigations in terms of section 106 (1)(b) of the Municipal Systems Act 2000 at the municipality. The report has indicated that there were clear breaches of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 and regulations on the appointment and conditions of employment of Senior Managers. The recommendations have been made that all monies paid unlawfully as a result of the illegal salary increases must be paid back to the municipality and that disciplinary action must be taken against all those implicated.

 (3) As indicated above, the investigation conducted has revealed that there were clear breaches of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, 2000 and regulations on the appointment and conditions of employment of Senior Managers.  The recommendations have been made that all monies paid unlawfully as a result of the illegal salary increases must be paid back to the municipality and that  disciplinary action must be taken against all those implicated. The monies will be recovered and the municipality has started the process of recovering such monies.

 (4) The recommendations of the investigation report are clear on what actions need to be taken on each of the findings in the report. Some matters will be dealt with by the municipality, whilst those with criminality will be handed over to law enforcement agencies for further action. The matter of the former CFO and the company implicated is one of those which will be investigated further by the law enforcement agencies.

(5) Workshops have been conducted in all provinces targeting relevant officials in municipalities on the regulations on the appointment and conditions of employment of Senior Managers. The Local Government Anti-Corruption Forum will also assist in terms of strengthening oversight on corruption related matters. Working with MECs for COGTA in the provinces we will ensure that there is compliance to the regulations.

22 April 2022 - NW233

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What action has been taken against the (a) Municipal Manager of the Amathole District Municipality and (b) security company whose security guards unleashed violence on Councillor Nanziwe Rulashe at the offices of the specified municipality?

Reply:

The Amathole District Municipality has appointed an independent panel to investigate the matter and to submit the report to Council. I have requested the Municipality and MEC of COGTA to furnish me with the report, and I will update the response as soon as it is rceived.

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

22 April 2022 - NW1084

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, in light of the fact that on 19 December 2017, the Gauteng North High Court placed the Municipal Councillors Pension Fund (MCPF) under curatorship as a result of irregular financial conduct by the MCPF board, the SA Local Government Association  (SALGA) took any disciplinary and/or other steps against its representatives who represented SALGA on the board of the MCPF; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) According to information received from the South African Local Government Association (SALGA), SALGA has no corresponce or record implicating its representatives on the Board of Trustees of the Municipal Councillor Pension Fund (the MCPF) in misconduct and consequently has not instituted any disciplinary proceedings or taken other steps against its representatives on the board of the MCPF.

(2) Not applicable.

All further queries regarding pension fund must be referred to Minister of Finance.

BACKGROUND:

1. On 25 March 2022 the Department received Parliamentary Question 1084 from Mr IM Groenewald (FF Plus) asking the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (1) whether, in light of the fact that on 19 December 2017, the Gauteng North High Court placed the Municipal Councillors Pension Fund (MCPF) under curatorship as a result of irregular financial conduct by the MCPF board, the SA Local Government Association (SALGA) took any disciplinary and/or other steps against its representatives who represented SALGA on the board of the MCPF; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details, and (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

2. The Pretoria High Court granted an application brought by the Registrar of Pension Funds on 19 December 2017 in terms of section 5(1) of the Financial Institutions Act, 2001 (Protection of Funds), for the appointment of curators to the Municipal Councillors Pension Fund (the MCPF). The court appointed Mr Juanito Martin Damons and Ms Sophie Thabang Kekana as the joint curators of the MCPF.

3. The application was brought pursuant to an inspection report as well as reports by the section 26(2) board to the Registrar, which revealed several serious irregularities pertaining to poor investment decisions and lack of governance in the fund. The curatorship is intended to stabilise the management and operations of the fund and to protect the interests of its members.

4. The Board of Trustees of the MCPF (the BoT) and the curators are accountable to the Registrar of the Pension Funds acting with the concurrence of the Minister of Finance.

5. According to information received from the South African Local Government Association (SALGA), SALGA has no correspondence or record implicating its two (2) representatives on the BoT of the Municipal Councillor Pension Fund in misconduct and consequently has not instituted any disciplinary proceedings or taken other steps against its representatives on the board of the MCPF. In light of this developments, the question whether the Minister will make a statement on the matter is not applicable.

22 April 2022 - NW1195

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Following the delimitation of wards before the 2021 local government elections by the Municipal Demarcation Board, (a) what considerations and/or criteria were used in ensuring spatial development of affected wards and (b) which standards were used to determine and delimitate Ward 28 of the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality which has more than 800 registered voters?

Reply:

The below responses are based on information provided by the Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB):

a) The Municipal Demarcation Board (MDB) delimit wards in accordance with the criteria provided in schedule 1 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act. The following guidelines and principles, emanating from the above-mentioned criteria, are applied by the MDB:

(i) Keep the total number of registered voters per ward, as close as possible to the norm (average number of registered voters per ward), within the minimum and maximum allowed; 

(ii) Avoid splitting obvious communities / groupings of villages / suburbs, traditional areas, etcetera, if at all possible;

(iii) Take physical characteristics into account, such as adequate road networks, and physical barriers such as a freeways, rivers, mountains, etcetera; 

(iv) Keep the existing number of wards and boundaries the same, if possible; 

(v) Use voting districts as building blocks and ensure that wards are contiguous; and

(vi) Avoid splitting voting districts, and cluster voting districts together to make up wards.

b) Ward 28 was delimited with the assistance of planning officials from the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality during the technical consultation session in September 2019. The draft ward comprised of the following voting districts:

 

NO.

VOTING DISTRICT

 NO. OF REGISTERED VOTERS

1.

LD Moetanalo Secondary School

3,680

2.

Tent at Ward 28

10

3.

Olifant River Lodge

277

4.

 Uitkyk Sports Ground (Tent)

443

TOTAL

4,410

 

The minimum, average and maximum norm allowed for the municipality, as follows:

 

NORM

 NO. OF REGISTERED VOTERS

Minimum Norm

3,276

Average Norm

3,853

Maximum Norm

4,430

 

There were no objections lodged against ward 28 during the objection phase, and the MDB therafter resolved to confirm the ward and published its final determination in the Gazette.

22 April 2022 - NW1229

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What action has been taken by her department to compel provinces and municipalities who are sitting on section 106 reports to submit such reports?

Reply:

The Department engages with provinces and municipalities through correspondences and meetings to ensure that they submit such copies of investigation reports conducted in line with Section 106 of the Local Government Municipal Systems Act, 2000. The Department continues to collaborate with law enforcement agencies and provinces through the recently established Local Government Anti-Corruption Forum (LGACF) to ensure the implementation of recommendations emanating from such investigation reports.  Amongst others, the formation of the LGACF is vital for the purpose of fostering collaboration amongst the stakeholders at the local government level in order to effectively prevent corruption and coordinate efforts amongst all the key stakeholders including law enforcement agencies.

Further, if the Honourable Member is aware of such a report/s which have not been shared with the Department or law enforcement agencies, the Honourable Member is requested to provide more details so that officials from the Department can follow up on the matter.  

22 April 2022 - NW1214

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, in light of the fact that in terms of section 73 of the Local Government: Municipal Structures Act, Act 117 of 1998, municipalities must establish ward committees within 120 days after a local government election, any municipalities failed to comply with the specified provision; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which municipalities failed to comply and (b) what are the reasons for their non-compliance; (2) whether the specified municipalities that failed to comply, rectified it after the 120 day-provision to date; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) In terms of Section 73 (1A) (a) of the Local Government Municipal Structures Amendment Act, if a metropolitan or local council is unable to establish a ward committee or ward committees in accordance with subsection (1), the speaker must, prior to the expiry of the 120 days after the elections, in writing and on good cause shown, request the MEC, responsible for local government in the province concerned, for an extension. Municipalities that could not meet the deadline have been guided to request extensions from their respective MECs to ensure compliance. The following municipalities did not meet the deadline:

PROVINCE

DISTRICT

MUNICIPALITY

NUMBER OF WARDS

EASTERN CAPE

Nelson Mandela Bay

60

 

Chris Hani

Sakhisizwe LM

9

 

Alfred Nzo

Umzimbuvu LM

27

   

Sundays River Valley LM

8

 

Sara Baartman

Kou - Kamma LM

6

   

Kouga LM

15

   

Ndlambe LM

10

   

Makana LM

14

   

Dr Beyer's Naude LM

14

   

Blue Crane LM

6

 

FREE STATE

Mangaung Metro

51

 

Lejweleputswa

Tokologo LM

7

 

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Mantsopa LM

9

   

Maluti A Phofung LM

35

   

Setsoto LM

17

 

Xhariep

Kopanong LM

9

   

Mohokare LM

7

 

GAUTENG

City of Johannesburg

135

 

City of Tshwane

107

 

West Rand District

Merafong LM

28

 

KWAZULU-NATAL

Umzinyathi

Umvoti LM

14

 

MPUMALANGA

Gert Sibande

Lekwa LM

15

 

NORTHERN CAPE

Frances Baard

Dikgatlong LM

8

   

Phokwane LM

10

 

ZF Mgcawu

Kai Garib LM

10

   

Tsantsabane LM

7

 

Pixley ka Seme

Thembelihle LM

6

   

Kareeberg LM

6

   

Renosterberg LM

5

   

Siyathemba LM

6

 

NORTH WEST

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

Maquassi Hills LM

11

 

Bojanala

Moretele LM

26

   

Moses Kotane LM

34

 

WESTERN CAPE

Cape Winelands

Witzenberg LM

12

 

Eden

Oudtshoorn LM

13

TOTAL

13

35

743

(b) The reasons for non-compliance or not being able to meet the 120 days deadlines by certain municipalities were due to the late constitution of some municipal councils, especially in hung municipalities, non-adopted public participation and ward committee establishment policies, disputes lodged by communities as well as human resource changes experienced in the Offices of the Speaker.

(2) Yes, some municipalities failed to comply requested extensions and were granted such by their respective MECs. These municipalities are proceeding with the establishment of ward committees.

08 April 2022 - NW578

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has found that section 100 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, as invoked in the North West, has yielded positive outcomes in terms of solving problems of municipalities entangled in the non-existing synergy and service delivery within the municipal council in Tswaing, Mamusa, Ditsobotla, Makwassi Hill and Moses Kotane Local Municipalities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

When Cabinet resolved to put the province under administration, it invoke section 100(1)(a) to provincial CoGTA department. The Section 100 intervention succeded to stabilise the the province in general, however musch still needs to be done to support municipalities to perform and deliver on their mandate. Directives were issued by the CoGTA Minister directing the MEC to review the organisational structure of Provincial CoGTA to be fit for purpose to support municipalities, other directives that related to failure in municipal governance, financial management and service delivery were passed over to municipalities by the MEC.

My department’s assessment of municipalities in the North West revealed that they are facing serious governance, financial management and service delivery challenges. Cabinet then resolved that section 154 support packages in the form of Individual Municipal Support Plans have to be developed. Multi-disciplinary Task Teams were established to monitor implementation. This process have been led by both MEC Finance and MEC CoGTA.

Post Local Government Elections Tswaing, Mamusa, Ditsobotla, Maqquassi Hills and Moses Kotane are facing serious challenges that negatively impact on service delivery. 

The Premier has established Political and technical teams that is by MEC for CoGTA, MEC for Finance and MEC for Community Safety in particular for Ditsobotla,Mamusa, Maqquassi Hills and Moses Kotane to deal with some criminal elemenst interferring with municipal services. Currently we are providing support to both Political and Technical structures that’s are engaging the municipalities in order to develop intervention plans.

 

08 April 2022 - NW1114

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she has been informed that the Msunduzi Business Forum has conducted an assessment of the service infrastructure of the Msunduzi Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal following months of prolonged and repeated water and electricity outages suffered by the community, and that the Forum has offered to share the information with Government to assist the province and the specified municipality in the fulfilment of their executive obligations; if not, will she meet with the Forum and other stakeholders in the municipality to consider the information; if so, what steps are being taken by the (a) national and (b) provincial government to act on the information?

Reply:

I have not been informed about the said assessment by the Msunduzi Business Forum (MBF).

According to Msunduzi Local Municipality (MLM), MLM is also not aware of any assessment or study that has been conducted by the MBF, but is aware of the following assessments done:

  • The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) together with the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA), all provincial departments responsible for local government and provincial treasury departments, under the leadership of the Minister of COGTA, prepared the State of Local Government (SOLG) report that was tabled and considered by Cabinet in June 2021. Cabinet’s resolutions on the SOLG report included that COGTA and National Treasury should lead the process of the development of the Municipal Support and Intervention Plans (MSIPs) in collaboration with sector departments, the South African Local Government Association (SALGA), provinces and municipalities. MSIPs, including that of MLM, have since been prepared.
  • The Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) Asset Management Care assessment that is currently underway.
  • The KwaZulu Natal (KZN) COGTA assessment on electricity outages that was done in December 2021.

Government has adopted the District Development Model (DDM) to plan, implement and monitor developmental work in all 52 district spaces that cover the whole country. The DDM approach includes whole of government and all other interested and affected parties, including community forums.

To that end, the implementation of MSIPs will be done in accordance with the DDM approach.

Furthermore, DCOG, through MISA supports MLM through the deployment of technical professionals, in accordance with the District Development Model (DDM), to ensure that internal capacity is created with time for optimal delivery of basic services infrastructure. This is in terms of section 154(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

08 April 2022 - NW1083

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With reference to her reply to question 11 on 10 March 2021, what is the latest number of municipalities in each province that have (a) infrastructure maintenance plans in place and (b) implemented such plans (i) fully and/or (ii) partly; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Infrastructure maintenance plans are developed per service. To that end municipalities are considered to have infrastructure maintenance plans if the municipality has in place the full spectrum of infrastructure maintenance plans for all services. This implies therefore that if a municipality has a roads maintenance plan but does not have a water and sanitation maintenance plan, it is not regarded as having a full spectrum of infrastructure maintenance plans in place. It will be regarded as partly having infrastructure maintenance plans in place.

a) Infrastructure maintenance plans in place:

Province

Water & Sanitation

Roads & Stormwater

Energy / Electricity

Full Spectrum

  1. Eastern Cape

11

17

7

7

  1. Free State

4

 

7

4

  1. Gauteng

4

8

4

4

  1. KwaZulu Natal

10

37

20

20

  1. Limpopo

7

5

3

3

  1. Mpumalanga

10

11

7

7

  1. North West

6

4

2

2

  1. Northern Cape

15

12

11

11

  1. Western Cape

21

24

17

17

Table 1: Infrastructure maintenance plans in place per service

b) (i) Implemented infrastructure maintenance plans implemented fully:

Province

Water & Sanitation

Roads & Stormwater

Energy / Electricity

Full Spectrum

1. Eastern Cape

7

11

5

5

2. Free State

2

7

5

5

3. Gauteng

3

7

3

3

4. KwaZulu Natal

7

28

15

15

5. Limpopo

5

3

3

3

6. Mpumalanga

7

7

5

5

7. North West

3

3

2

2

8. Northern Cape

11

10

9

9

9. Western Cape

19

19

13

13

Table 2: Infrastructure maintenance plans per service implemented fully

(ii) Implemented infrastructure maintenance plans implemented partly:

Province

Water & Sanitation

Roads & Stormwater

Energy / Electricity

Full Spectrum

1. Eastern Cape

4

6

2

2

2. Free State

2

4

2

2

3. Gauteng

1

1

1

1

4. KwaZulu Natal

3

9

5

5

5. Limpopo

2

2

0

0

6. Mpumalanga

3

4

2

2

7. North West

3

1

0

0

8. Northern Cape

4

2

2

2

9. Western Cape

2

5

4

4

Table 3: Infrastructure maintenance plans per service implemented partly

Summary:

  • 75 municipalities across the country have a full spectrum of infrastructure maintenance plans:
  • A total of 60 municipalities are fully implementing the infrastructure maintenance plans:
  • 18 municipalities are partially implementing their infrastructure maintenance plans.

The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG) through the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent (MISA) provides technical support to low and medium capacity municipalities by deploying professionally registered technical professionals, in accordance with the District Development Model (DDM), to develop, review and implement infrastructure maintenance plans as part of the support package. MISA further endeavours to build a local government skills pipeline by placing young technical qualifications graduates and built environment learners so that internal capacity is created with time for optimal delivery of basic services infrastructure. This support is provided in terms of section 154(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

08 April 2022 - NW1115

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department will consider the deployment of personnel and/or other resources of the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agency (MISA) to prevent the further deterioration of service infrastructure in the Msunduzi Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal following months of prolonged and repeated water and electricity outages suffered by residents; if not, what other steps will the Government take in terms of section 154(1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, to prevent the further deterioration of service infrastructure in Msunduzi; if so, (a) by what date will such support be given and (b) what is the (i) nature and (ii) extent of the support?

Reply:

The Department of Cooperative Governance (DCOG), through the Municipal Infrastructure Support agent (MISA) is already supporting Msunduzi Local Municipality (MLM) through the deployment of professionally registered technical professionals, a Civil Engineering young graduate, as well as a Town Planning young graduate in accordance with the District Development Model (DDM), to ensure that internal capacity is created with time for optimal delivery of basic services infrastructure.

The MLM is also a beneficiary of two Presidential Economic Stimulus (PES) programmes that MISA is implementing viz the Labour-Intensive Construction (LIC) and the Innovative Solid Waste Management (ISWM). The LIC programme aims to instutionalise LIC methodology and training of municipal officials in an effort maximise creation of work opportunities during project implementation as well as operation and maintenance. The involvement of the local community in infrastructure development contributes, among other things, towards asset ownership, less vandalism and improvement in service reliability. The ISWM programme includes the following activities:

    • Waste Collection & transportation by appointed Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs):
    • Clearing and cleaning of illegal dumping sites:
    • Recycling and separation of waste at source:
    • Ward specific clean up campaigns:
    • 1000 participants working under the ISWM programme.

The above support to MLM is in terms of section 154 (1) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 which provides that “the national government and provincial governments, by legislative and other measures, must support and strengthen the capacity of municipalities to manage their own affairs, to exercise their powers and to perform their functions.”

According to MLM, there is further support provided by government and public institutions. The KwaZulu Natal (KZN) COGTA support includes the deployment of several technical experts for infrastructure delivery, financial management, disaster management and for the revision of the Local Economic Development (LED) Plan. Eskom entered into a partnership agreement with MLM whereby Eskom committed to provide project management and training support to MLM. Umngeni Water also entered into an agreement with MLM regarding the Darvill sewer outfall pipe that requires urgent major repairs. The planning of the works is at an advanced stage.

Government has also taken other steps to support local government including MLM. DCOG together with MISA, all provincial departments responsible for local government and provincial treasury departments, under the leadership of the Minister of COGTA, prepared the State of Local Government (SOLG) report that was tabled and considered by Cabinet in June 2021. Cabinet’s resolutions on the SOLG report included that COGTA and National Treasury should lead the process of the development of the Municipal Support and Intervention Plans (MSIPs) in collaboration with sector departments, the South African Local Government Association (SALGA), provinces and municipalities. MSIPs, including that of MLM, have since been prepared.

The implementation of MSIPs will be done in accordance with the DDM approach. The DDM approach includes the whole of government and all other interested and affected parties to plan, implement and monitor developmental work in all 52 district spaces that cover the whole country.

MLM is allocated infrastructure grant funding annually by national government that includes the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) and the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) to fund the implementation of basic services.

08 April 2022 - NW928

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)       What (a) is the total number of municipal entities in the Republic and (b) number of the specified municipal entities are development agencies reporting to her; (2) (a) what total number of (i) municipal development agencies and (ii) other South African Municipal Government Entities were audited and (b) which of the specified agencies and/or entities received unqualified audit reports for (i) 2018, (ii) 2019 and (iii) 2020; (3) which of the South African Municipal Government Entities fulfilled their annual objectives and mandates for every year since 2018?

Reply:

1. (a) The number of municipal entities is 64.

(b) Municipal entities do not report to the Minister; however, the entities account to their respective parent Municipalities.

2. (a) and (b). The details of municipal entities are included in Annexure A, which contain list, names, audited and audit opinions of the municipal entities.

3. All entities fulfilled their reporting objectives except those that are dormant and Maluti a Phufong Development agency as per Annexure A referred above.

08 April 2022 - NW445

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to a media briefing on 21 February 2022, during which she mentioned a few factors which needed to be considered before the Government would decide to end the national state of disaster, she will furnish Ms S A Buthelezi with the full relevant details of the factors that would inform Government’s decision to declare an end to the national state of disaster; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details; (2) what has been her assessment of the manner in which the Government handled the national state of disaster?

Reply:

1. The National State of Disaster was terminated on the 4th of April 2022. This followed a process of consultations which included a consultation where my department was asked to get input from with sector departments whether they still needed the regulations under the NSOD.

2. The COVID-19 pandemic was difficult for all countries and governments to handle because of its novel nature. We were forced to learn how to deal with it as we went along and as the virus was and is continues to mutate. Having said that, there is no doubt that measures that were taken by government were necessary under the given circumstances and given the knowledge at its disposal.

The declaration of the National State of Disaster on 15 March 2020 empowered government to take the measures that prevented many more people from becoming severely ill and saved countless lives.

These measures were effective in slowing down the rate of infection, easing pressure on our hospitals, and providing the time we needed to develop the infrastructure, resources, and capacity to manage many people who became ill because of COVID-19.

All these measures were necessary not only to respond to the devastating effects of the pandemic on human health, but also to limit the great cost to society and the economy.