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16 November 2020 - NW1634

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the additional social workers, (a) how have the 1 089 social workers been deployed, (b) in which provinces are they delivering services, (c) under which national and/or provincial services and (d) who is paying their salaries; (2) whether she will provide Ms L L van der Merwe with a table showing the numbers distributed across the different geographical areas, agencies and services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details? NW2020E

Reply:

1 (a) Social Workers have been recruited from the social work graduate database. The deployment of Social Workers has been informed by the possible risk of the spread of the virus, the vastness and geographical spread of provinces, the population size and density in the province and the number of service offices.

(b) Provincial Departments of Social Development in Limpopo, Gauteng, North West, Mpumalanga, Free State, KwaZulu Natal, Eastern Cape and Northern Cape.

(c) Social Workers have been appointed under the Victim Empowerment and Prevention of Gender Based Violence Programme.

(d) The National Department of Social Development is paying their salaries.

(2) Province

Allocation per province

Total Social Workers employed

Northern Cape

33

32

Eastern Cape

171

175

Western Cape

0

The provincial department declined the allocation of social workers and didn’t participate in the process.

Limpopo

116

116

Free State

92

92

Mpumalanga

128

113

North West

81

81

Gauteng

676

160

KZN

266

268

Total

1809

1037

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 1634 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 November 2020 - NW2464

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Regarding the recruitment process within her department, (a) on what date was the position of General Manager: Fraud and Compliance advertised and (b) what (i) criteria were used to recruit the candidate and (ii) interview process was followed; (2) whether the candidate was asked to declare anything; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of what was declared; (3) whether a certain person (name furnished) was a candidate for a position in her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) whether the candidate has been withdrawn; if so, on what grounds?

Reply:

1) (a) The position of General Manager: Fraud and Compliance was advertised on 08 September 2019, with the closing date of 23 September 2019. (b) (i) the following criteria was utilised to recruit the candidate:

  • NQF Level 7 qualification;
  • Five (5) years’ experience at Senior Managerial level in the relevant field;
  • Employment Equity Target: African Female, Coloured Female and African Male;
  • Valid drivers’ license;
  • Computer Literacy; and
  • SA Citizenship / Permanent Resident.

(b) (ii) the following interview process was followed:

  • Interview session (question and answer session) (80%);
  • Technical Test (20%) (Presentation)

(2)The candidate was not asked to declare anything since this is not part of the process, however, the process requires that candidates complete the HR checklist. Amongst the questions outlined in the mentioned checklist, these two (2) questions are included: (a) Have you ever been dismissed or is there any pending disciplinary actions, cases against you; and (b) are you aware of anything that can hamper your service delivery in the post. The answers to both questions were “no”.

(3) The mentioned name was the selected candidate for the position of General Manager: Fraud and Compliance Management.

(4) The candidate was not withdrawn, he declined the offer through an email dated 21 July 2020, wherein he indicated that certain personal issues had arisen which prevent him from accepting the offer and he further expressed his sincere gratitude for the HCM team’s professionalism.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2464 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 November 2020 - NW2088

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she has been informed of reports regarding (a) nonpayments, (b) budget cuts and/or (c) payment delays to (i) old age and (ii) children’s homes of over three months before and/or during the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus; if not, what is the current status of the specified payments nationally; if so, what are the reasons?

Reply:

Yes, upon learning of the non-payments. I requested all MEC’s furnish me with the updated report from all provinces.

The non-payments were experienced in the Eastern Capeand North West Provinces.

Reasons given are as follows:

1. Eastern Cape Province non-payments were due to lockdown and other factors including six months strike of Social Work Managerswho are responsible for various programmes. This created a void resulting in non-payments and delays in the entire process as the finalization of the master-lists took longer and the verification of the information which was also rejected by the IT payment system causing errors.The Province is also experiencing challenges with office accommodation as the building is not safe for occupation and this wascoupled with the closure of offices due to covid-19 positive cases.

2. North Westdelays were due to the migration from BAS system to LOGIS which delayed the paymentsas NPOs were required to register on the Central Supplier Database.

a) There were no budget cuts to (i) old age and (ii) children’s homes of over three months during the lockdown as residential care facilities are prioritised for full subsidy payments. The budget cutswere applied to other programmes that were not fully operational during the lockdown period. These NPOs that were not funded fully, they were paidfor personnel and operational costs. Also, budget cuts for other programmes were as a result of a call from the Provincial Treasuries for the Departments to cut budgetsin response to the Covid-19 budget adjustment. These measures impacted on the allocations that were initially considered for the NPOs as the available budget had to be reviewed and re-prioritised.

b) payment delays to (i) old age and (ii) children’s homes of over three months during the lockdown were experienced in the Eastern Cape, due to reasons mentioned under (a) above and also due to newly funded organisations that had to go through the BAS registration process, and correct documents for this process could not be obtained from the NPOs due to lockdown. Document correction and verification took longer than anticipated due to lockdown restrictions which affected movement between the Department and NPOs. For North West and Limpopo delays are due to migration from BAS payment system to LOGIS which requires registration on the Central Supplier Database. Delays in Free State, Gauteng and Mpumalanga for the second quarter payments were due to covid-19 positive cases resulting to office closures, delayed signing of Service Level Agreements by the NPOs and non-compliant NPOs.

Measures to curb the spread of the virus were put in place by the various provinces in the residential care facilities, including adherence to the regulations issued by the National Department. The gazetted regulations on the management of Covid-19 pandemic were shared with NPO’s that manage residential care facilities.The facilities were encouraged to observe Covid-19 protocols such as social distancing, washing of hands and wearing of masks, creation of spaces for isolation rooms, no discharges allowed and staff members who attended funeral to report to the manager and be put on quarantine.

The current status of the specified payments nationally is as follows:

(i) Old Age Homes

 

#Of Homes

#Paid 1stQtr

% Paid 1stQtr

#Paid

2ndQtr

#Outstanding

%

Paid 2ndQtr

EC

43

0

0%

43

0

100%

LMP

7

7

100%

4

3

57%

NW

26

26

100%

20

6

77%

FS

35

35

100%

19

16

54%

MPU

23

22

96%

19

4

86%

GP

73

73

100%

70

3

95%

KZN

40

40

100%

40

0

100%

NC

25

25

100%

25

0

100%

WC

117

117

100%

117

0

100% 

(ii) Child and Youth Care Centres

Province

Number of CYCCs

# Paid

1stQtr

%Paid 1stQtr

# Paid

2ndQtr

No Outstanding

%

Paid

2ndQtr

LMP

12

12

100%

6

6

50%

NW

9

9

100%

0

9

0%

MPU

23

23

100%

22

1

96%

GP

95

95

100%

73

22

76%

NC

8

8

100%

8

0

100%

WC

53

53

100%

53

0

100%

FS

15

15

100%

15

0

100%  

EC

27

0

0%

27

0

100%

KZN

19

19

100%

19

0

100%

The provinces that have outstanding payments are working towards clearing the backlog for the second quarter by the end of September 2020 and the status is improving on a weekly basis. For Eastern Cape the NPOs are being paid both the first and second tranches simultaneously during the second quarter.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2088 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 November 2020 - NW2273

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department is ready to meet the November deadlines set by the North Gauteng High Court for her department to resolve the foster care backlog which has been a challenge for the past eight years; if not, why will she fail to meet the deadline; if so, what measures has she put in place to ensure that the court directives are adhered to?

Reply:

The department met the November deadlines set by the North Gauteng High Court in relation to the comprehensive legal solution in terms of introducing the Children’s Amendment Bill to Parliament (clause 2.21 of the North Gauteng High Court Order). The Minister submitted the Children’s Amendment Bill in August 2020. The Social Assistance Bill was passed by National Assembly on 09 June 2020 and was referred to the NCOP.

Since the Children’s Amendment Bill is not yet passed due to Parliamentary programme; it is not yet able to effectively address foster care challenges, as a result the Minister will approach the North Gauteng High Court requesting an extension of the Court Order to enable parliament processes to unfold in its consideration of the Children’s Amendment Bill. The North Gauteng High Court Order deems the affected foster care orders to be valid, thus there is no backlog. The provinces are implementing their respective recovery plans to obtain foster care orders with extension dates that are beyond the lapse date of the North Gauteng High Court Order.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2273 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 November 2020 - NW2261

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the special Covid-19 grant to the amount of R350, what (a) total number of persons have been paid to date, (b) is the cumulative amount paid out so far, (c) total number of persons have been rejected in total, (d) total number of appeals are being considered currently, (e)(i) total number of foreign nationals have benefited from the grant to date and (ii) countries are they from, (f) total number of officials who are in the employ of the State have been paid the grant and (g) qualified the specified officials to receive the grant?

Reply:

a) The total number of persons (cumulative) who have been paid across all the months to date is 19 753 894. This is made up as follows:

May 4 423 385

June 4 731 747

July 4 801 860

August 4 564 902

September 616 000

October 616 000

It should be noted that the numbers indicated above change on a daily basis, as payments are made daily. Payments for September and October are currently being done as a single amount of R700 to try and ensure that the backlog of payments is resolved before we move into the extension of the grant for the next 3 months.

b) The cumulative amount paid out so far is R6913862 900

c) The cumulative number of persons who have been rejected in total,across all months is16419 015, as follows:

May 2 180 725

June 2 454 765

July 2 770 269

August 2 927 238

September 3 043 009

October 3 043 009

d) 60 306appeals have been received to date and will be consideredfor the months that they have been declined. However, appeals continue to been received daily, so these numbers will change.

e) Foreign Nationals:

(i) The following applications have been received for foreign nationals but not paid yet as SASSA is still working with other organisations to validate the permit numbers and to verify the income:

750 Asylum Seekers and 1 117 Special Permit holders

(ii) countries from which they emanate:

Angolan Permit Holders 76

Lesotho Permit Holders 551

Zimbabwean Permit Holders 490

f) To date 241 officials who were found to be in the employ of the State were paid the COVID 19 SRD. The reason thereof is that SASSA could not find them on the databases at its disposal, when conducting verification. AGSA has however identified these individuals as Government employees and former government employees who are in receipt of other source of income such as the GEPF. The payment of these grants was immediately stopped when flagged by the AGSA as ineligible applicants for the May applications. SASSA will investigate and has determined a recovery process for grants that were paid to undeserving individuals.

g) The cases are still being investigated and further information will be provided once the investigations are completed.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2261 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

20 October 2020 - NW2004

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 1264 on 19 June 2020, (a) on what date will the process of appointing additional assessment doctors in (i) George and (ii) Boland region be finalised and (b) what other measures does the SA Social Security Agency have in place to ensure that the backlog of assessments in George is cleared up?

Reply:

SASSA George Local Office:

Currently, the George Local Office has 3 contracted medical doctors with the focus on medical assessments for clients who could not fulfil their medical appointments due to the lockdown.

The SASSA George Local Office has also engaged the District of the Department of Health for the opening of the clinics and to make more doctors available for client initiated medical assessments. The District of the Department of Healthcould only assist with the opening of the clinics for theSASSA contracted doctors to commence with the client initiated medical assessments.

b) The following measures are in place to eradicate the existing backlog of clients waiting to be assessed.

  • Fridays are dedicated for disability applications/appointments at SASSA local offices
  • 9 contracted doctors are available to render services with the process to contract more doctors underway.
  • Bookings for assessments are done according to a schedule agreed between SASSA and Department of Health.
  • Clients are contacted and given a date for assessment.
  • Only a limited number of clients can be booked on a specific day at a specific site due to the need to comply with the health measures in place.
  • The Department of Health also follows a health initiated process where the treating doctor requests and completes the medical form for clients that they deal with and where they feel a disability grant is warranted. SASSA will then contact the client for an appointment to complete the administrative application process.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2004 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 October 2020 - NW2086

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the more than 20 000 fraud cases reported by the SA Social Security Agency in 2019, what (a) total number of the specified cases have been resolved, (b) total amount has been recovered, (c) total number of implicated persons have been (i) fired, (ii) suspended, (iii) imprisoned and (iv) found not guilty and (d) total amount has been (i) lost through fraud and (ii) spent on investigations?

Reply:

a) A total of 19448 cases out of 23240 SASSA card related fraud cases reported in 2019 have been resolved. The bulk of these cases involved the fraudulent re-issuance of SASSA/SAPO cards resulting in genuine grant beneficiaries not receiving their money.

b) The money lost during 2019 was reimbursed by the South African Post Office to the value of R45 150 091.32.

c) Regarding implicated officials, this fraud happened within the SAPO environment. In total;

(i) A total of 14 SAPO employees have been dismissed

(ii) Information on the number of employees who have been (ii) suspendedand (iv) found not guilty has been requested from SAPO.

(iii) Seventy two (72) people were arrested of which 14 were SAPO employees.

d) In 2019, the total amount

(i) lost through the SASSA card fraud was R54 055 131.70.

(ii) spent on all fraud investigations in SASSA, including investigations conducted by the Special Investigation Unit was R18 915 137.00.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2086 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 October 2020 - NW2066

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department has done any study on the total number of unregistered early childhood development (ECD) centres in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what is the total number of ECD centres; (2) Whatsteps will she take to ensure that unregistered ECD centres adhere to Covid-19 requirements for social distancing?

Reply:

1. Yes , the total number of unregistered ECD centres identified is50 118; and 1041 non centre based programmes.

2. ECD centres will submit self-administered re-opening assessment accompanied by an application for support. Application must be verified by the department or appointed NGO/ECD forums/community network (NGO partner) available in the community. The SOPs prescribes 1.5m social distancing measures which both registered and unregistered ECD centres should adhere to as one of the COVID 19 requirements.ECD programmes are encouraged to put measures in place to adhere to social distancing.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2066 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 October 2020 - NW1669

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What were the reasons that her department procured 80 000 1L alcohol-free hand sanitisers for welfare service facilities in the nine provinces from a certain company (name furnished) to the value of R6 716 000,00 instead of alcohol based sanitisers containing a minimum of 60% alcohol as prescribed by the World Health Organization, the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention and other respected health organisations; (2) what is the name of each welfare facilities where the alcohol free hand sanitisers were distributed?

Reply:

1. The non-alcohol sanitizers were procured for substance abuse facilities to prevent the likelihood of misuse by the inmates. It should however be noted that even alcohol based sanitizers were procured for other facilities which do not face a risk of abuse by the beneficiaries.

2. The national Department of Social Development procured the sanitisers,which were distributed to facilities by ProvincialDepartments.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 1669 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

16 October 2020 - NW1281

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether (a)(i) her department and (ii) its entities reporting to her, (b) the SA Social Security Agency and (c) the National Development Agency utilised a certain law firm (name furnished) over the past five financial years ending on 31 March 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what total number of legal cases has the firm concluded for the period listed above and (ii) cases does the firm have pending currently, (iii) what was the total cost implications of all the legal cases, (iv) why did her department not utilise the state attorney offices in the above listed matters and (v) what was the success rate of cases; (2) whether she will provide Ms A L A Abrahams with a list of legal representation done by non-state legal firms on behalf of her department in the specified period?

Reply:

1. (b)SASSA has not utilised the services of this law firm.

2. (c) NDA - Yes

(i) There is one (1) case pending.

(ii) There is one (1) case pending.

(iii) The NDA paid R817 462.68 to date and an amount of R1 235 992,35 has accrued but not yet paid.

(iv) According to the State Attorneys Act, 1957 the functions of the state attorney and of its branches shall be in any court or in any part of the Republic.

(v) 100% success rate. They successfully obtained the order in favour of the NDA but the other party is taking the matter on appeal.

DSD:

  1. (a) There are no records indicating that the Department utilised the service provider of Barnabas Xulu and Partners Inc. over the past five financial years ending on 31 March 2020
  2. Yes, Harris NupenMolebatsi Attorneys

National Assembly written Reply: 1281 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

PROPOSED

DSD

SASSA

NDA

NO OF

  1. (a) There are no records indicating that the Department utilised the service provider of Barnabas Xulu and Partners Inc. over the past five financial years ending on 31 March 2020

 

(b) sassa has not utilised services of this law firm

( c ) yes

 
  1. Yes, Harris NupenMolebatsi Attorneys
     
       

14 October 2020 - NW2087

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the details of the work that a certain company (name furnished) is doing for (a) the SA Social Security Agency and/or (b) its partners with regard to the distribution of grants?

Reply:

(a) SASSA does not have any contract with Blue Label

(b) N/A

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2087 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

14 October 2020 - NW2068

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Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What total number of applicants for the Covid-19 social relief grant have had their applications approved, but are yet to receive the specified grant and (b) by what date will she ensure that all the specified applicants whose applications were approved will receive their social relief grants?

Reply:

Below is a table depicting the applications for each month which were considered, rejected, approved and paid.

PROCESS

MAY

JUNE

JULY

AUGUST

Applications considered for the month¹

6 605 445

7 518 308

8 346 136

8 881 380

Applications Rejected²

2 180 725

2 454 765

2 770 122

Means tested

Applications Approved

4 424 720

5 063 543

5 576 014

 

Applications in Payment Process³

1 335

331 796

774 154

 

Clients Paid

4 423 385

4 731 747

4 801 860

 

Consideration¹:

Every month every application from the previous months as well as new applications received in that month are reconsidered and re-verified against all databases (even if they were rejected in the previous months) as circumstances of applicants may have changed.

Validation Process to determine rejected or approved²

During the consideration and validation process, applications are validated against various databases such as SASSA Social Grants, UIF, NSFAS, Persal, Correctional Services etc. Applications are also sent to SARS to validate whether the applicants are registered on the IRP-5 database at SARS and results are then provided to SASSA.

Any findings which AGSA may have raised are also considered and applied, since AGSA has databases which SASSA does not yet have.

From the month of August the bank accounts of applicants are also tested to determine whether there was any income into the account in the prior month.

The above tests are all applied to confirm that approved applicants have no income, as required in terms of the signed Directions for this grant.

Applications in the Payment Process³

Once an applicant is approved he/she is informed of the outcome and his/her banking preference is requested (either being paid in his own account or paid through cash send to his mobile number). Unfortunately a significant number of clients are slow in providing details, provide incorrect details or want their money to be paid into someone else’s account. (SASSA cannot pay the money into someone else’s account or cellphone number.)When an applicant provides the banking details, an account verification process is undertaken whereby National Treasury verifies the bank details with the Banks. This process ensures that the bank account belongs to the applicant and that all details are correct.

As indicated, experience has shown that the applicants make quite a number of errors such as indicating their account is a savings account instead of a transmission account, etc. The technical team attempts to resolve these minor challenges for instance incorrect account type (saving vs transmission etc.). Where it is not possible to assist in resolving the challenges, SASSA opens accounts with Post Bank for the clients who did not provide banking details, provided incorrect details or where the bank verification process failed. For high risk clients, accounts are opened with Post Bank for initial face-to-face contact and verification.From August cellphone numbers are validated and added to a specialized Risk Management Process to ensure that SASSA pays the correct applicant.

The group of applicants outstanding for May, June and July are all clients where SASSA has not received banking details, received incorrect details or other challenges exist. The remaining unpaid May clients are currently in the process of being contacted individually by SASSA to assist them in resolving their challenges, where after the same will be done for the June and July clients.

SASSA has recently concluded a week where clients were invited to update their banking details and all these details have now been sent for account verification. It is trusted that a number of the June and July clients would now have provided their banking details which will facilitate the payments.

For the August clients, the means test with banks have been concluded and payments will commence from 10 September. The delay has been as a result of the above processes, but also to stagger the payments which are accessed through the Post Office, which has been busy with the normal social grant payments until 7 September 2020.The staggering of payments is done to limit the numbers of people who report to Post Offices daily to collect their money, to minimise the exposure to the COVID threat.

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 2068 of 2020

28 September 2020 - NW1576

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to 849 requests for food assistance that have been sent from ward 99, 100, 103 and 104 in Tshwane in the requisite format and sent to the electronic mail support@gauteng.gov.za since 14 April 2020 to date, (a) what is the (i) plan and (ii) timeline for the applicants in the specified wards to receive food relief as none of them have received food relief, (b) what number of applicants in the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality have not yet received food relief, (c) what is the (i) plan and (ii) timeline for the applicants who have not received food relief in the Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality to receive food relief (d) what oversight measures have been put in place by her department to ensure that provincial governments attend to all food relief requests submitted; (2) whether she can provide a food relief delivery schedule to ensure oversight is undertaken in constituencies regarding the distribution of the food parcels; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date and/or (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) (b) (c) The Department and SASSA were not involved in the progress you refer to in your question and as a result we are not able to provide the required details.

(1) (d) The Department’s oversight measures that have been put in place to ensure that provincial governments attend to all food relief requests submitted includes the following;

  • Reporting by the provinces to National DSD on the progress in processing application received from the public,
  • Oversight visits by National Officials in service delivery points in Provinces

(2) Not applicable

28 September 2020 - NW1480

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What are the reasons that her department has been telling persons who apply for the disability grant to rather apply for the R350 social relief of distress grant?

Reply:

During the lockdown levels 4 and 5 restrictions imposed to prevent the spread of the corona virus, SASSA offices were initially closed, and when they were opened under level 4 restrictions, only limited services were offered. As a result, no applications for disability grants could be dealt with, as the assessments, which are done at health facilities, could not take place. The medical assessment is a prerequisite for any disability grant application.

When level 4 regulations were announced, it was unknown how long the restrictions would remain in force. This resulted in some staff members advising potential applicants for disability grants to apply for the special relief grant of R350, in an effort to ensure that they would at least receive some income for the period until the disability related services could commence once again.

However, under level 3 restrictions, SASSA has started reintroducing disability related services, and accepting applications once again according to an approved strategy. This means disability services will be limited where there is a dependency on health facilities.

In order to facilitate access to assessment services, SASSA has engaged with the Provincial Departments of Health to identify facilities where assessments can be done by the SASSA contracted doctors. Where this is not possible, SASSA has identified spaces within the local offices for assessments to be undertaken. Despite these measures, services cannot yet be offered at full capacity. This will be progressively increased, in line with available resources.

21 September 2020 - NW1983

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 829 on 11 June 2020, and the indication by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) in a Portfolio Committee on Social Development on 13 May 2020 that it was in the process of restructuring its operating model, which will likely include a reduction in the number of SASSA’s regional offices, what (a) is the current organogram of SASSA which includes (i) regional, (ii) provincial and (iii) district offices, (b) are the full names and titles of the current managers at each specified office, (c) are the reporting lines for the managers in the offices and (d) is the physical addresses of the regional, provincial and district offices?

Reply:

(a)(b)and (c)

In line with the reply provided in Question 829, SASSA’s proposed operating model has not been implemented. However, the three existing Regional Executive Managers have been seconded on a temporary basis to manage additional Regions each for a period of six months. The secondments are in line with the Staffing Practices Policy of SASSA.

The full names and titles of the current managers at each specified office, and (c) the reporting lines for the managers in the offices are listed on the attached list (Annexures A1-A10)

The current Organisational Structure as approved by the Minister of Social Development comprises of Head Office (Pretoria) and nine (9) Regional Offices.The Agency’s organogram caters for 9 Regional (Provincial) Executive Managers that report directly to the Chief Executive Officer (CEO)of SASSA (i.e., 1 Regional Executive Manager for each province). For ease of reference, the Organisational structure is attached below.

In each province/region there are a number of District Managers that are appointed and they report to the Regional Executive of the province/region. The diagram below depicts the high-level structure as approved which includes 9 provincial/regional offices. Attached are organograms demonstrating reporting lines of all the regional,provincial and districts offices, including reporting lines for managers.

Vacant posts;

  • Ms Dunkerley is managing functions of Grants operations and Policy implementation
  • Vacant Regional Executive Managers posts (6) have the 3 Regional Managers seconded as incumbents acting in clusters positions
  • GM Office of the CEO position is vacant, but has been advertised.
  • The position of COO is identified as a key and critical position,and funded, but currently vacant.

d) Physical Addresses Regional, Provincial and District Offices, please refer to (Annexure B)

National Assembly Written Reply: 1983 of 2020

_______________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 September 2020 - NW1350

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of food parcels did her department distribute in the City of Ekurhuleni since 26 March 2020 and (b) is the total breakdown of the number of food parcels distributed in each ward?

Reply:

a) The total number of food parcels distributed by SASSA and DSD in the City of Ekurhuleni since 26 March 2020 is 73 089 as reflected below, 2 929 by SASSA and 70 160by DSD.

b) Breakdown per ward of SASSA food parcels distributed is detailed in the table below:

Local Office Name

Number of parcels = 2929

Ward Number(s) or Local Office

Germiston

9

W33=1,W35=1, W38=1, W40=1, W41=1, W42=2, W45=2                

Benoni

12

Benoni/Daveyton

Tsakane

30

Tsakane

Vosloorus

43

W44=16, W46=11, W47=9, W107=7

Thokoza

118

W40=8, W47=6, W50=13, W54=14, W56=19, W58=21, W60=18, W109=19                

Benoni

24

Benoni/Daveyton

Germiston

27

W21=4, W41=4, W43=12, W93=7,                              

Tsakane

86

W84=86                          

Thokoza

66

W40=1, W45=1, W48=11, W49=4, W50=2, W51=12, W56=6, W57=5, W60=24                

Benoni

19

Benoni/Daveyton

Tembisa

50

W91=5, W13=9, W6=23, W104=7, W10=6                

Germiston

27

W35=19 , W42=3, W93=5

Germiston

18

W34=1 , W35=13 , W41=3, W45=1             

Benoni

30

Benoni/Daveyton

Springs

44

Springs

Kwa-Thema

62

Kwa-Thema

Thokoza

115

W37=4, W40=5, W48=9, W50=7, W51=10, W52=6, W53=6, W54=8, W57=9, W58=12, W60=7  (Thokoza)                             

Tembisa

40

W1=6, W91=8, W104=4, W5=22                             

Germiston

28

W21=14 , W34=3, W35=7, W36=2, W45=1, W32=1                                  

Benoni

38

Benoni/Daveyton

Vosloorus

135

W35=1, W41=3, W43=4, W44=39,W45=25, W46=2,W48=10,W47=2, W50=2,W58=1,W60=1, W64=3, W95=22   (Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe)                                

Tsakane

22

W83=5, W82=7, W81=10,                

Springs

16

W75=16                              

Kwa-Thema

11

W75=11                         

Duduza

21

W86=9, W87=7, W89=5                

Vosloorus

72

 Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Tembisa

37

W104=23, W14=4, W91=2, W13=4, W5=3, W7=1                                

Tembisa

47

W6=34, W14=5, W2=1, W11=1, W10=2, W102=1, W91=1, W1=1, W10=1                                

Thokoza

130

W37=3, W40=3, W48=9, W49=24,W50=24, W51=1,W52=20,W53=2, W54=6,W55=1,W56=4, W57=4, W58=2, W60=13, W61=7, W63=1, W103=2, W107=4                                   

Germiston

42

W21=10, W33=13, W34=10, W35=3, W40=1, W42=2, W53=1, W93=2                                                             

Benoni

21

W24=1, W25=2, W28=1, W29=1, W31=2, W68=2, W69=4, W70=3, W90=1, Benoni/Daveyton

Germiston

35

W21=12, W35=3, W38=1, W40=16, W93=2, W99=1                                                              

Tembisa

73

W2=3, W11=4, W14=20, W6=10, W12=9, W19=2, W90=2, W104=17, W5=3, W3=3, W9=2  (Tembisa)                                                           

Duduza

6

Duduza/Nigel

Tsakane

39

Tsakane

Kwa-Thema

17

W78=7, W79=10                         

Springs

37

Springs

Benoni

46

W24=1, W28=3, W29=9, W30=3, W31=5, W65=3, W66=1, W69=14, Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Vosloorus

62

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Vosloorus

130

W95=31, W107=22, W41=8, W47=4, W45=10, W65=5, W63=1, W62=1, W61=1, (Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe)

Tembisa

61

W9=14, W5=4, W11=2, W91=17, W3=3, W6=3, W2=3, W1=6, W14=1, W4=4, W12=1, w9=3                                                     

Thokoza

139

W47=1, W48=5, W49=5, W50=40, W52=7, W55=7, W58=16, W63=45, W95=1, W103=1, W107=11   (Thokoza)                                                

Germiston

27

W21=8, W34=3, W35=5, W38=1, W40=3, W41=2, W42=1, W93=1, (Germiston/Reiger Park/Primrose)

Duduza

7

Duduza/Nigel

Kwa-Thema

8

Kwa-Thema

Springs

18

Springs

Tsakane

21

Tsakane

Benoni

35

W24=4, W35=2, W28=3, W29=2, W30=10, W65=6, W69=4, W71=2, W92=1, W125=1                               

Thokoza

57

W56=57                                                       

Vosloorus

71

W61=50, W62=21                                                      

Vosloorus

54

W95=54                                                      

Germiston

37

W15=1, W19=1, W21=3, W32=3, W34=5, W35=2, W39=2, W40=4, W41=1, W42=1, W53=1, W93=2, W99=4, (Germiston/Primrose/Reiger Park/Boksburg)                                                     

Germiston

39

W32=1, W35=14, W40=15, W41=1, (Germiston/Primrose/Reiger Park/Boksburg)                                  

Benoni

26

Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Benoni

60

W24=1, W25=1, W28=5, W29=5, W30=23, W31=1, W32=1, W65=8, W69=14, Benoni/Daveyton/Actonville

Germiston

9

W18=1, W21=2, W33=1, W35=2, W34=1, W40=2

Thokoza

40

Thokoza/Katlehong/Palm Ridge

Thokoza

50

Thokoza/Katlehong

Thokoza

50

Thokoza/Katlehong/Palm Ridge

Thokoza

50

Eden Park/Thokoza

Thokoza

52

Eden Park/Thokoza

Vosloorus

49

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

Vosloorus

84

Vosloorus/Zonkezizwe

                 

Total number of food parcels delivered

Ward Number(s)

883

1

3

4

5

 

 

 

 

 

7853

2

6

7

9

10

11

 

 

 

323

8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

11

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

93

12

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

404

13

66

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27

14

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

745

15

16

17

90

106

 

 

 

 

158

15

91

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68

17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

446

18

19

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

769

21

20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

353

21

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

430

22

32

73

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

22

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

99

23

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

766

24

110

108

 

 

 

 

 

 

511

25

96

100

 

 

 

 

 

 

1205

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

598

25

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5895

26

69

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

136

27

28

29

 

 

 

 

 

 

935

30

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

442

33

93

34

 

 

 

 

 

 

1040

33

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

885

34

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

552

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2745

36

35

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

332

36

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

37

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

173

39

35

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

441

40

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

940

40

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

883

41

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2554

41

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25

42

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1998

43

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3485

44

64

45

94

102

47

 

 

 

33

49

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1836

52

50

51

56

59

 

 

 

 

372

53

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

54

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

358

57

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1441

58

111

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

102

60

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1481

61

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

600

62

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1052

68

67

70

26

65

 

 

 

 

254

69

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

21

70

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

110

71

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

554

72

75

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

250

76

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

793

77

80

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

498

78

77

112

 

 

 

 

 

 

319

78

109

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

684

79

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3479

81

85

84

83

86

 

 

 

 

755

82

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1246

84

87

98

 

 

 

 

 

 

919

88

104

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1657

89

49

103

102

94

52

58

57

40

7568

89

57

55

63

58

40

49

46

48

871

92

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

439

93

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

123

94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

891

95

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

394

97

105

74

 

 

 

 

 

 

912

99

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

50

101

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

200

107

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

206

110

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70 160

Total Number of Food Parcels Distributed from April 2020- July 2020

 

 

National Assembly written Reply: 1350 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 September 2020 - NW1853

Profile picture: Ngwenya, Ms DB

Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

The SA Social Security Agency has reported that over 7 million Social Relief of Distress grant applications were received from May 2020 with just over 5 million applications approved and out of the 5 million approved applications, only 4 million applicants have been paid out, by what date will she ensure that all the approved applications are paid out?

Reply:

For the month of May the following represents the applications received and paid:

Many applications and queries were received after the special relief grant was announced, but after all duplicate applications were removed, 6 605 445 applications remained that represented a single, complete application per applicant.

These 6 605 445 applications were all validated against databases such as UIF, NSFAS, IRP-5, National Population Register, Social Grants, and Correctional Services. After reconsideration, 2 180 725 applications were rejected as they were found on the aforementioned databases as provided by the relevant Departments.

SASSA approved 4 424 720 applications to receive the grant.(The just over 5 million approved in the above question is only from June 2020). Clients whose applications failed as the personal information did not match that held by Home Affairs were then requested to correct their personal details (it must be reflected as per the National Population Register) and to provide their banking preferences. Once the clients provided their banking preferences the bank details are verified through National Treasury with the Banks. The delay in providing either updated personal details or banking details delays the payment process.

A number of clients requested their money to be paid into the accounts of other people (family members or spouses). SASSA can only pay into an account which is registered to the client. In an attempt to expedite matters, SASSA requested Post Bank to open accounts for the clients where the account details could not be verified.

Challenges experienced with the provision of banking details include the capturing of incorrect banking details (wrong account numbers, which could be attributed to finger faults or wrong account types). Unfortunately this delays the process of being able to pay the clients.

To date SASSA has paid 4 423 387 clients of the 4 424 720 approved for May. There are currently 1 333 clients who qualify for payment for the month of May which SASSA still needs to pay. The breakdown of this number is as follows:

826 clients who have recently provided SASSA with their banking details are with National Treasury for account verification with the banks.

The 507 remaining clients for May have been sent to a team of SASSA officials who are currently actively assisting these clients to provide SASSA with their banking details and correct personal details. They will be paid as and when the required information has been received and verified.

It is extremely important to note that the number of May applicants who are approved and paid for the grant might still increase as more applicants correct their banking information or even as SASSA proceeds with its reconsideration process. It therefor does not mean that SASSA did not pay all people months later, but should rather be seen as SASSA being able to increase the accessibility to the grant as SASSA assists these clients through reconsideration.

The validation process for every application is redone monthly, to ensure that everyone paid does indeed qualify for the grant.

National AssemblyWritten Reply: 1853 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

17 September 2020 - NW1195

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has any contractual agreements with (a) a certain company (name furnished) and (b) its affiliates; if so, will she furnish Ms A L A Abrahams with the (i)(aa) memorandum of understanding and (bb) service-level agreements between her department and (aaa) the specified company and (bbb) its affiliates and (ii) names of the members of boards of directors of (aa) the specified company and (bb) its affiliates; if not, why not; if so, by what date, in each case?

Reply:

National Assembly written Reply: 1195 of 2020

(a)

Company

(b)

Affiliates

(i)(aa)(bb)(aaa)(bbb)

(ii)(aa)

(bb)

The Department of Social Development procured sanitizers for the officials from ECD Projects for the amount of R1379.50

N/A

N/A

Mr. Edward Schierhout

N/A

17 September 2020 - NW1457

Profile picture: Sukers, Ms ME

Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)(a) What is the breakdown of the costs incurred by her department in theDemocratic Alliance court case and that of1000 Women Trust that was decided on 22 May 2020 in the Cape High Court over the enforced ban on soup kitchens and food distribution regulations and (b) how will these costs impact on her department; (2) whether the legal action could have been avoided through the less expensive and more fruitful course of consultation with the litigating parties; if not, why not; if so, (a) was the course of consultation with the litigating parties pursued and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has not yet been invoiced for the applicant’s costs.

(b) The impact on the department will be that the legal costs are not budgeted for.

(2)  (a) No;

(b) The applicants launched an urgent court application based on internal document which were still being consulted. The department did engage the applicants but did not agree on the material facts. The applicants wanted to prevent the Minister from issuing directions of which she is empowered by the Constitution and by the relevant Disaster Management Act. The court had to pronounce on these fundamental issues and ordered that theMinister is entitled to issue directions in this regard and further that the applicants be afforded an opportunity to look at the final draft directions three days before gazetting.

17 September 2020 - NW1495

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What steps will the SA Social Security Agency take to (a) proceed to back pay or catch up with the R350 grant payments that did not occur for the month of May and (b) ensure that payments are made to all approved applicants for the promised six months which ends in October 2020?

Reply:

a) SASSA is currently finalising all payments for applications approved for May 2020. Of the 4 424 720applications approved for payment in May, a total of 3 429 810 had been paid by 8 July 2020. The delay in paying the remainder was as a result of approximately 1 million additional applications being approved, after SASSA reconsidered all previously declined applications against the refreshed database received from UIF. These clients received new SMS messages requesting them to provide their banking details. SASSA will pay them as soon as wereceive theapplicant’s bank details, and National Treasury completes their accounts verification.

SASSA will request Post Bank to open accounts for those clients who have not provided their banking preferences after a period of 5 days from the date messages are sent to them.

b) Validations for the 938 554 applications received in June, as well as the 6 534 754 applications received in May will commence as from 15 July. Every application will be re-validated on a monthly basis to confirm that the applicant still qualifies to receive the grant, as circumstances could have changed in the interim. The payments for all those approved will be extracted and disbursed before end July. The July payments will then follow the same process and be disbursed by mid-August, with August payments being disbursed by end August. The payments will then be current, with payments for September and October being made in the month, for the month.

17 September 2020 - NW1895

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a)(i) number of officials of the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) have been (aa) suspended and/or (bb) fired for defrauding the institution over the past five financial years and (ii) amount has SASSA lost through fraud by officials in the specified period and (b) measures does she have in place to prevent fraud at SASSA?

Reply:

a) Number of officials suspended and dismissed because of different kinds of disciplinary sanctions

In response to the above mentioned question, a table as well as the graph were used in order to summarise the number of SASSA employees that have been suspended and dismissed for defrauding the Agency over the last 5 financial years

Table1: Different types of disciplinary sanctions per Region for a period of 5 years

Province

Number of employees on precautionary suspension

Number of employees suspended without pay as per disciplinary enquiry sanction/outcome

Number of employees dismissed for fraud

Grand totals per Regions

Eastern Cape

17

0

16

33

Free State

2

3

4

9

Gauteng

5

1

4

10

KwaZulu Natal

111

7

25

143

Limpopo

3

5

16

24

Mpumalanga

7

8

2

17

North West

6

0

7

13

Northern Cape

0

2

1

3

Western Cape

5

0

1

6

Total

156

26

76

258

For further ease of reference, the following graph was used to also depict the different types of disciplinary sanctions per Region for a period of 5 years.

Graph 1:Different types of disciplinary sanctions per Region for a period of 5 years see the link:

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW1895_-_Suspension_and_Dismissal_Table.pdf

Analysis of the above mentioned Table and the Graph

  • A total number of 156, 26 and 76 cases were recoded in the last five financial years for precautionary suspension, suspension without pay and dismissals for fraud respectively;
  • A grand total of 258 cases were recorded in the last five years in all Regions
  • KwaZulu Natal recorded the highest numbers in precautionary and dismissal categories. Overall KZN accounts for 55% which is the highest as compared to other Regions
  • On the other hand Northern Cape and Western Cape recorded the lowest cases which accounts for 1.6% and 2.3% respectively
  • When it comes to suspension without pay, Mpumalanga recorded the highest number namely 8 followed by KZN with 7 cases
  • Both Limpopo and Eastern Cape recorded a total number of 16 cases in the category of employees dismissed for fraud. It is pleasing to note the firm stance taken by both Regions to ensure behavioral changes when it comes to fraud
  • It should be noted that there were no relataed cases recorded at Head Office

(a) ii. Amount of money lost through fraud

The total amount of money lost through fraud over the past 5 financial years is approximately R282, 476,193.

(b) Measures in place to prevent fraud at SASSA

SASSA has a Fraud Prevention Strategy that is premised on four key pillars, namely Prevention, Detection, Investigation and Resolution.

The following Fraud prevention measures and mechanisms are being implemented by SASSA:

(b)1 Policies and Procedures

The Agency has developed and is implementing various policies and procedures in accordance with the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and supporting Treasury Regulations, to which all employees and other stakeholders are required to comply. This creates an environment which is conducive for good corporate governance and the prevention of fraud.

(b)2 Internal controls and compliance

Management regularly identifies significant fraud risks and implements process level controls, systems and procedures to identify and prevent fraud and corruption. Types of controls typically include:

  • Authorisation controls (approval of expenditure or grants)
  • Supervisory controls (supervising day-to-day operations)
  • Process controls
  • System controls
  • Financial controls.

A major control that was implemented since August 2019 is bank account verification to ensure that grant money is paid into the bank account of the rightful grant beneficiary.

SASSA is piloting a biometrics solution for staff who access the grants system in order to ensure that transactions are performed by authorised persons.

(b)3 Fraud Risk Identification and Assessment

Fraud risk identification and assessment is conducted at least annually in order to identify the inherent exposures to fraud within the current operating systems and procedures.

(b)4 Fraud awareness

The Agency conducts fraud and corruption awareness sessions and training for SASSA employees and the public in order to assist in the prevention, detection and reporting of fraud and corruption.

Line managers also share information on fraud prevention measures with employees under their supervision.

(b)5 Code of Conduct and Ethics

SASSA has a Code of Conduct that has been shared with all the employees. The Code is aimed at creating an ethical organization culture, which is essential for fraud prevention.

(b)6 Disciplinary Code and Procedures

The Agency’s Disciplinary Code establishes standards for the conduct of all employees and the relevant disciplinary procedures to be adopted for breaches of the code. Consistent and effective dealing with identified instances of misconduct through fraud and corruption serves to enforce Fraud Prevention, by acting as a deterrent to other employees.

(b)7 Employee Screening

SASSA screens employees during the recruitment process.

(b)8 Communication

SASSA uses various tools to communicate with internal and external stakeholders about some of the anti-fraud awareness messages. The appropriate communication of anti-fraud measures and their results is essential to build trust in the social security system.

(b)9 Partnerships with stakeholders

SASSA is working closely with stakeholders in the banking sector such as the South African Banking Risk Information Centre, SA Reserve Bank, SA Post Office, National Treasury, Banking Association of South Africa, Payment Association of South Africa and various commercial banks in order to prevent fraud targeting social grants money.

SASSA has been sharing data with other government entities in order to validate information supplied by grant applicants to prevent and minimise inclusion errors and fraud.

The Agency also works closely with law enforcement agencies in detecting and combating fraud.

(b)10 Detection

Combined assurance (management, internal and external assurance providers) measures are also being employed to detect fraud and corruption within the Agency. The Internal Audit function plays a vital role in the detection of fraud and corruption. The external audit function is an important control in the detection of fraud. Various controls are also implemented in order to correct the controls weaknesses identified by the Auditor General of South Africa.

SASSA also acts on fraud and corruption cases that are reported through the following mechanisms:

(a) Public Service Commission (PSC) Fraud Hotline

(b) SASSA General Customer Care Contact Centre

(c) Whistle Blowing.

Pro-active fraud detection reviews, utilising data analytics are conducted regularly within business units with a high risk of fraud and error based on historic instances or other risk factors. This acts as an important mechanism in the detection of incidences of fraud and corruption.A critical component of detecting fraud is mutual sharing of data between SASSA, SAPO and other entities.

17 September 2020 - NW1896

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

How regularly does the SA Social Security Agency update its systems to ensure that all persons who receive grants (a) are alive and (b) meet the requirements to benefit from grants?

Reply:

a) All active grants are systematically checked against the Department of Home Affairs on a monthly basis, before payments are extracted for payment in the following month. All deaths which are registered with the Department of Home Affairs at the time of the monthly check result in the immediate cancellation of the grant.

b) Regulation 27(2) to the Social Assistance Act, Act 13 of 2004, makes provision for SASSA to review a social grant

“(a) at any time where it has reason to believe that changes in the beneficiary’s financial circumstances may have occurred;

(b) on expiry of the validity of the identity document of a beneficiary, if the beneficiary is a refugee; or

(c) in case of a foster child grant, on expiry of the court order.”

In addition, Regulation 27(8) makes provision for the review of permanent disability grants when there is reason to believe that changes to the medical condition could have occurred.

The above reviews are all done to ensure that the beneficiary continues to qualify for the grant over time. There is not a set period for reviews provided for in legislation, so the discretion is with SASSA. Since we do not have the resources or capacity to review all grants annually, a policy to give effect to Regulation 27 has been developed and is implemented. In terms of this policy, the reviews are prioritised in terms of grants where the beneficiary information is likely to change, for example, financial reviews are done for clients who declared income on application which either affects the amount of the grant they receive, or is near the threshold limit.

Similarly, medical reviews for permanent disability grants are done in accordance with the recommendation of the assessing doctor, who is best placed to indicate if, and over what time frame, a change in the medical condition is likely to occur.

17 September 2020 - NW1327

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is her department’s involvement in the National Food and Nutrition Security Co-ordinating Committee?

Reply:

The Department is part of the National Food and Nutrition Security Co-ordinating Committee and is a lead department working on the Strategic Objective 3 together with the Department of Basic Education, Health; Home Affairs; Provinces and local government; Civil Society; Development Partners.

Strategic Objective 3

NFNSP Strategic Objective

Rationale

Strategic Objective 3. Expand targeted social protection measures and sustainable livelihood programmes

  • Social protection and sustainable livelihoods are essential for access to safe and nutritious food safe water, sanitation and health care.

 

Working with the Department of Health infants born in public & private health facilities are registered within 30 days in population register. This is intended to ensure that eligible children receive the Child Support Grant on time.

DSD amongst other things responsible to improve the child grant registration system. This is intended to ensure that eligible children are registered for Child Support Grant.

DSD is also developing an integrated social protection information system to improve access to social assistance programmes.

Under strategic objective 3, we also expandingthe network of feeding and food distribution centres. This include the National School Nutrition Programme implemented by Department of Basic Education, children (0-4 years) provided with food through ECDs and DSD centre based nutrition programmes.

 

03 September 2020 - NW628

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Ngwenya, Ms DB to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether the SA Social Security Agency has put measures in place to ensure that mothers of newborn babies who qualify for social grants are able to register?

Reply:

Mothers with new born babies have been able to apply for the child support grant at SASSA local offices. The need for the care giver to register babies as soon after birth as possible has been emphasized in all communication, as research has shown that the positive benefits of the grant are significantly higher the earlier the grant is paid.

However, under Level 5 lockdown restrictions, SASSA local offices were closed. With the easing of restrictions under level 4, SASSA has progressively re-opened its local offices as from Monday 11 May 2020. The categories of clients who may be assisted under level 4 include mothers of new born babies.

The application service has continued under level 3 without any restriction on the age of the child, although mothers of new born babies are encouraged to apply as soon after the birth as possible.

In order to maintain social distancing and to limit the numbers of citizens who report to the local offices for a service, SASSA has designated specific days for specific grant types. Applications for grants for older persons are done on Mondays and Tuesdays, while applications for child support and foster child grants are attended to on Wednesdays and Thursdays. Fridays will be used to complete work which could not be attended to before the lockdown, as well as any overflow from the previous days in the week.

SASSA is also currently working on accepting on-line applications for the above grant types. This will make it easier for mothers with very small babies to lodge applications without having to go to the local offices to do so in person. This functionality should be available in the course of July 2020 and would just provide an additional channel for applications, in addition to the face to face applications at local offices.

03 September 2020 - NW1640

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department considered a different payment method to beneficiaries of social grants, rather than having persons standing in long queues risking Covid-19 infections?

Reply:

All social grant beneficiaries receive their social grants in a bank account, whether this is their own personal account, or the SASSA card account. Once the money is available in the account, the beneficiary can withdraw the money at any time, everywhere in the country. There is no requirement for the beneficiaries to withdraw the money on the same day, or to withdraw all the cash at once.

Much of the communication SASSA has been doing is to have beneficiaries of social grants understand that there is no need for them to queue to withdraw cash, but that they can use their cards to pay for goods (the SASSA card is a fully functional debit card); that they can withdraw smaller amounts as and when they need this, or that they can go later in the month, when the queues are not as long.

The support of Honourable members in reinforcing this message will assist in changing beneficiary behaviours.

03 September 2020 - NW1670

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the commencement date of employment of the 1 809 social workers in each province and (b) are the terms of their contract?

Reply:

(a)

Province

Date of employment

Northern Cape

1 June 2020

Eastern Cape

1 June 2020

Western Cape

Province chose to use existing employees-not participate in project.

Limpopo

1 June 2020

Free State

1 June 2020

Mpumalanga

1 July 2020

North West

1 June and 1 July 2020

Gauteng

1 July and 16 July 2020

Kwa-Zulu Natal

1 June and 1 July 2020

(b) Social Workers have been employed for a period of three (3) months with a monthly remuneration of R6,000.00. It is important for the honourable Member to note that the Provincial Department of Social Development in the Western Cape refused to participate in this programme.

03 September 2020 - NW1497

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)On what date did applications for the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant close; (2) whether the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) is still accepting and processing new applications; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether SASSA has picked up and dealt with any fraudulent activity since the operation of disbursing the SRD grant began; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

1. As the President Ramaphosa’s announcement the Special COVID-19 SRD Grant will be paid over a period of 6 months until the end of October 2020.

2. Applications are still being accepted through the Whatsapp channel (082 046 8553) and through the SASSA website (https://srd.sassa.gov.za). Of the total of 7 549 842 applications received to date, 6 534 754 were received in May; 938 554 for June and 31 534 for July (to 8 July 2020).

3. There have been no fraudulent activities picked up to date. There are a number of checks and balances built into the application and validation processes, which should ensure that only genuinely qualifying citizens benefit from this grant. In addition, the Auditor General is auditing all the application process and decisions and any anomalies identified will be investigated.

03 September 2020 - NW1383

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department awarded any tenders in relation to the Social Relief of Distress Grant; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses and/or service providers to whom the specified tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded and (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business and/or service provider; (2) whether standard procurement processes were followed; if not, why not; if so, what was the reason for each specified business and/or service provider to be awarded the specified tender; (3) whether her department awarded any tenders in relation to capacity increase on existing grant infrastructure; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses and/or service providers to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each tender awarded, (c) was the service and/or product to be supplied by each business and/or service provider; (4) whether the standard procurement processes were followed; if not, why not; (5) what was the reason for each specified business and/or service provider to be awarded the specified tender? NW1754E

Reply:

 

1. (a) No tender was awarded

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

2. Not applicable

3. (a) Tenders were awarded to Prosense, Vodacom and Govchat.

3. (b)

  • SASSA varied Prosense’s existing contract with R2, 9 million.
  • Vodacom was awarded R15 million for thetender through the existing National Treasury RT15 contract (RT15 is a Government Transversal contract to Supply and deliver mobile communication services to the State during the lockdown period 27 March to 16 April 2020)
  • Govchat services are rendered for free to SASSA

4. Yes, the standard procurement processes were followed.

5. - Prosense was appointed to build the APIS(Application Programming Interface system)for data validation and to develop website for Special SRD Grant (Social Relief of Distress Grant)

  • Vodacom was appointed to develop USSD platform (Unstructured Supplementary Service Data)for SRD Applications
  • Govchat was appointed to develop the Special SRD Application Platform for free

03 September 2020 - NW1391

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department has a safety plan for orphaned and vulnerable youth exiting Child and Youth Care Centres (CYCC) once they turn 18 years old and are no longer protected by the Children’s Act, Act 38 of 2005, and subsidised by the State to stay in the specified centres; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified safety plan; (2) what number of residents over the age of 18 years is currently residing in each CYCC in each province; (3) whether residents over the age of 18 years utilise the same living, bedroom and bathroom facilities as residents who are under the age of 18 years; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what is the age of the oldest resident staying in a CYCC currently?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes.The Children’s Act 38 of 2005 makes provision for an Alternative Care Programme which is inclusive of places of safety, foster care, child and youth care centres (residential care) for vulnerable children. Whilst in alternative care, these children must be provided with a plethora of services which includes among others, the provision of independent living programs. These services are designed to help children and young persons’ transition from alternative care to living independently as productive citizens through structured life skills and educational programmes.

There are transitional and independent living plans based on assessment conducted which focus on assessment of life skills in preparation for life skills training, basic education skills and other skills in preparation for post-secondary education. The assessment of skills is a critical step in designing an individualized independent living plan for any child which is to be reviewed after every six months. These plans indicate steps the child will take to meet his/her goal as well as to outline the task the child will undertake to meet specific challenges identified on his/her personal independent living assessment. The plan must be developed 90 days prior to the date the young person will be discharged from alternative care system at the age of 18 years or older.

There are important considerations when developing the plan. The plan must be based on the child’s strengths and needs with clearly outlined goals and objectives; identification and linking of the child with community services to turn to if he/she need assistance; connecting the child with the adult mentor in the community for mentorship, provision of support, advocacy and assistance with personal, academic and career development.

(b) Yes, Provincial departments are subsidising NGOs to provide services to children to remain in alternative care beyond the age of 18yrs in terms of Section 176(1). Children’s Act, Act 38/2005 makes provision that children turning 18 and are still busy with school can remain in a Child and Youth Care Centre until the age of 21 if they need to complete grade 12, should they prefer to. The court orders are extended in terms of Section 176 whilst the youth is still in school but once they have completed school (Grade 12) they are discharged in terms of Section 175.

(2)Table below indicates the number of residents over the age of 18 years who are currently residing in CYCCs in each province:

Province

Beyond 18yrs

Free State

59

North West

53

Gauteng

138

Eastern Cape

45

Western Cape

CYCC =71 & DSD CYCC =52

Limpopo

34

KZN

72

Northern Cape

3

Mpumalanga

64

(3)Table below outlines relevant details of residents over the age of 18 years utilising the same living, bedroom and bathroom facilities as residents who are under the age of 18 years:

Province

Response

Free State

All Residents are treated as children in the Youth Care Centre and therefore they all utilize the same facilities and abide by the same rules and standards that are expected from the younger children. The 18 year old youths are given a conduct contract to sign with the extension of their Section 176 order and they are fully aware that they are expected to conduct themselves like the children in the youth care centre for their duration of time in the Youth Care Centre, no exceptions to the rules is allowed.

North West

CYCCs differ in terms of their models. SOS is a household or family type of care and young person’s stay with others like typical siblings would. Other CYCCs resemble dormitories type where care givers are assigned to care for a particular number of children andare classified according to age. Mainly they reside together with others to foster sense of belonging.

Gauteng

No, children are placed as per their age group, and there is supervision at all times as per the Norms and standards.

Eastern Cape

This varies from one CYCC to another as it is determined by the number of those over 18, available infrastructure and equipment. However, those who move easily and quicker out of the centre create an opportunity for the long term placements. In some centres they are sharing with 14 year olds and above, in others they have their own bedrooms only sharing a communal kitchen, living room and bathroom which promotes the desired level of independence. Some where possible are allocated a room in the same block as the Child and Youth Care Workers / Caregivers.

Western Cape

CYCCs are responsible for the living arrangements of all residents within their care. Some CYCCs have independent living cottages on the premises, while others have dedicated rooms for those 18 and above. If they have a dedicated room they do share the living room and bathroom with other residents.

In terms of DSD own centres, the residents are placed in separate rooms and where sufficient numbers in a separate unit.

Limpopo

Living arrangement is done according to age group and over 18 years do not share bedrooms with the under 18 years. However, they utilize the same living and bathroom under the supervision of carers.

The children shower at specific times according to their ages and under the supervision of carers.

KZN

Residents are allocated cottage and are housed according to their age groups and gender. Youth aged 16yrs and over are grouped together. At some facilities those young people who are in matric have single rooms and other facilities have separate quarters for over 18 years.

Each young person has his/her own bed and living space.

Ablution facilities and living rooms are shared.

Northern Cape

1= has own room as he is also in matric

1=Shares room with 17-18yrs age group

1=There is only one room in the CYCC for all children, the child shares with other children.

Mpumalanga

  • In all the districts CYCCs children over the age of 18 reside in the senior sections for boys and girls separately.
  • In those centres where there are dormitories 18 year olds will share amongst each other.
  • Where there are houses a specific house will accommodate the 18 yearsand above and there will be a house for boys and house for girls.
  • In some CYCCs they rent a flat for them outside the premises of the centre and assist them in getting employment and sponsors for them until they are solely independent which is the maximum age of 23 though the number is not very high.

(4)Table below illustrates the age of the oldest resident currently staying in a CYCC:

Province

Response

Free State

20 years

North West

20years

Gauteng

21 years.

Eastern Cape

21 years old.

Western Cape

21 years old.

Limpopo

20 years

KZN

22 years

Northern Cape

19 years

Mpumalanga

23 years

03 September 2020 - NW1241

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department is on track to meeting its target of having 55 000 social workers employed by 2030 in accordance with the National Development Plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I would like to inform the Honourable Member that the target of 55 000 projected in the National Development Plan, which you are referring to relates to social service professionals, not only social workers.

1. With regard to social workers, the Department has developed the Supply and Demand Model during the 2016/17 financial year. The model projects that in 2017, the country had 32 261 social service practitioners of which 18 733 were social workers

2. In terms of the model, universities are projected to supply the sector with social work graduates at an estimated rate of 23% between 2017 and 2030. This amounts to 3 600 social work graduates who are eligible for employment in the social development sector on an annual basis. There are currently 16 140 social work students registered for the Bachelor of Social Work degree in various universities.

3 Using the same model projections for the 2019-2024 MTSF it means that the social sectorwill have 43 577 social workers employed by 2023/24. Then in 2024 – 2030 MTSF the social development sector would have 65 177 social workers employed by 2030.

4. The model also projected a shortfall towards achieving the NDP target. In this regard, in 2017, the social development sector had a gap (shortage) of 9 167 social workers for the 2017 – 2019 MTSF period. The implication therefore is that for 2020 – 2024 MTSF period the gap would be 8 494 and for 2025 – 30 MTSF period it would be 7 456 social workers.

5. On an annual basis for the three MTSF cycles, social development sector required 1 833 for the 2017 – 2019 MTSF period, and will require 1698 for the 2020 – 24 and 1 491 for the 2025 – 2030 MTSF periods. Should the public service employ social workers and other social service practitioners at the projected rate, then the National Development Plan target of 55 000 is achievable by 2030.

6.The Department of Social Development is the main employer of social workers in the country.

There are currently 16 926 social workers employed by the Departments at both national and provincial departments. The employment rate by the Department will therefore be informed by the Sector Human Resource Plan and organisational structures of both National and Provincial Departments of Social Development.The project is included in the Sector Human Resource Plan for 2020/21

National Assembly written Reply: 1241 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

02 September 2020 - NW1543

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she will (a) disclose the variance in the grant collections before the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 on 26 March 2020, and grant collections during the specified lockdown, (b) give an explanation of the reason(s) for the decline and/or increase variance in the collection of grants before the lockdown and during the lockdown and (c) highlight the regions where a huge decline in grant collections were experienced; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) On a monthly basis for the period prior to lockdown, approximately 0,5% of all grants paid are not collected.

The table below shows the number of SASSA accounts credited every month, the number of grants collected and the number not collected for the month prior to lockdown, and the months after lockdown.

Transfers into SASSA Card

 Month

Number of
SASSA cards Credited

Number of
Grants collected

Number of grants not collected

% Not collected

Mar-20

8,066,894

8,028,568

38,326

0.5

Apr-20

8,100,671

7,993,672

106,999

1.3

May-20

8,109,539

8,061,907

47,632

0.6

Jun-20

8,144,519

8,101,019

43,500

0.5

         

 

b) The increase in the number of uncollected grants in April was due to level 5 lockdown, where many beneficiaries were reluctant to leave their homes to access the grants.

The decrease in the number of uncollected grants in May and June is believed to be as a result of the relaxation of lockdown rules.

c) SASSA experiences non-collection of grants on monthly basis. The table belowindicates the top three(3) regions that experienced the highest number of decline in the collection of grants from March 2020 (before Covid-19 and lockdown) and April to June 2020 (during lockdown)

In April the high decline is caused by the total shutdown due to level 5 lockdown, beneficiaries were afraid to leave their homes to collect their grants

In May, KwaZulu-Natal and Gauteng remained with the highest number of grants not collected even though the number declined. Western Cape is the third highest due to the increase in the number of COVID-19 positive cases.

In June,the above provinces remained the highest but the overall number of grants not collected has reduced.

02 September 2020 - NW530

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Did she make the decision to appoint the current SA Social Security Agency Chief Executive Officer (SASSA CEO) alone; if not, who else was part of the decision making when appointing the CEO; (2) (a)(i) on what date and (ii) where were interviews held for the position of the SASSA CEO and (b) who were the candidates that were interviewed; (3) who formed part of the interview panel for the CEO position; (4) (a) what are the determining factors considered for the salary of this position, and (b)(i) what is the salary scale used for the CEO’s salary and (ii) when last did the salary scale change and (III) what changes were made to the salary scale?

Reply:

1. No, The SASSA CEO was appointed before my deployment in this portfolio.

According to the available records the recommendation to appoint the CEO of SASSA was made by an interview panel chaired by Ms Shabangu, the former Minister of Social Development. The interviewing panel comprised:

Mr T Nxesi, former Minister of Public Works,

Mrs A Motshekga, Minister of Basic Education; and

Mr V Madonsela, former Director-General: Justice and Constitutional Development.

Furthermore, concurrence was obtainedfrom Cabinet for the intended appointment of the CEO.

(2) According to the available records the below:

2 (a)(i) 18 December 2018.

(a)(ii) National Department of Social Development, HSRC Building, 134 Pretorius Street, Pretoria.

(2)(b) According to the available records the following were candidates: Ms SD Ntukwana, Ms BJ Memela-Khambula and Mr AS Mahlangu

(3) As Indicated above, the CEO appointed was before my deployment to the portfolio and therefore I am referring to the details.

(4)(a) The determining factors for the salary include amongst others, the level of responsibility, accountability and leadership capabilities, equivalent to that of a National Head of Department.

(4)(b)(i) SMS salary level 16 was used for the CEO’s salary (R 1 880 736.00 per annum).

(4)(b)(ii) 1 April 2019, with the cost of living adjustment.

(4)(b)(iii) Awarding of a total cost to employer package of R 2 650 000.00 per annum was offeredin line to the preferred candidate.

25 August 2020 - NW972

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) What are the processes that were followed in constituting the technical task team of her department, (b) for how long was the team set up, (c) what amount has been paid to each task team member, (d) what are the details of the (i) terms of reference and (ii) reports of the task team and (e) what has been done with the recommendations of the reports?

Reply:

a) The Technical Committee for SASSA was appointed by the previous Minister of Social Development to assist SASSA in implementing the Constitutional Court judgement of 23rd March 2018 and to advice on business model review of SASSA.

Various Constitutional Court judgements in the course of 2017 made it clear that there were challenges with the existing contract with service providers for cash payment, without which SASSA would not be able to execute its mandate and the extra capacity for a period of time was required.

b) The Technical Committeewas appointed from May 2018 until October 2018

c) The members of the Technical Committee were paid as follows:

Name of Committee Member

Total Amount Paid

Ms.Dipuo Peters

R468,503.05

Ms ManokoNchwe

R449,040.00

Ms.Totsie Memela

R235,592.00

Mr.SelwynJehoma

R383,466.00

Ms.ZodwaManase

R348,580.00

Mr.SiphoShezi

R649,650.00

d) The Terms of Reference is attached for ease of reference

e) The six reports from the Technical Committee are attached for ease of reference

  • The project recommendations identified in the reports were implemented
  • Governance and Institutional Review is underway. The new Chief Executive Officer had to be appointed to drive the review.
  • The Agency is in the process of developing a business case for replacement of SOCPEN and also evaluating options and approach to replace the system depending on availability of budgetary resources.

25 August 2020 - NW1384

Profile picture: August, Mr SN

August, Mr SN to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, considering that her department now does not need to pre-approve plans to enable nongovernmental organisations to provide food relief to citizens in need, the regulation includes that takeaway and/or disposable containers would be acceptable for soup and food kitchens that can provide the specified take-away containers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what arethe relevant details; (2) whether homeless persons will be exempted from the requirement that soupkitchens and food parcel distributors provide the names and addresses of allrecipients, since homeless persons do not have an address (details furnished); ifnot, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1755E

Reply:

1. Yes, theDepartment (DSD) does not need to pre-approve plans to enable nongovernmental organisations to provide food relief to citizens in need. The DSD was rather seeking to better coordinate all food distribution activities and ensure vulnerable people receive food in a dignified manner in partnership with individuals and organizations involved in food distribution.

The permission of take away and/or disposable containers is acceptable for soup and food kitchens that can provide the specified take-away containers.

The measures introduced by DSD are not prohibitive but intended to protect the health and well-being of our people. Health inspectors had warned the food programme against use of inappropriate materials, hence the Department had provided cutlery and crockery in the centres. The take away provision was to enable centres to not have congestion whilst we striving for social distancing during the COVID-19 period.

2. No, the homeless persons are supported by the shelters and in the case where they do not have IDs and addresses our officials use their names to identify and register them. A portfolio of evidence is part of accounting for resources distributed by government and the soupkitchens and food parcel distributors providingfood to the homeless without addresses do still register the recipients using their names, surname and the centre or area they come from.

20 August 2020 - NW1561

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department is still issuing the food parcels that were distributed at the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus to indigent persons and those whose income was affected; if not, why not; if so, what number of persons does the programme reach in each month?

Reply:

Yes, The Department is still issuing the food parcels that were distributed at the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of the coronavirus to indigent persons and those whose income was affected;

From the beginning of Covid-19 response till the end of Quarter 1 (April - June), the programme has distributed a total of 800 968 food parcels to about 4 004 840persons.

The programme reach in each month is as follows:

March food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food parcels distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/household)

Eastern Cape

0

0

Free State

0

0

Gauteng

807

4 035

Kwa Zulu Natal

0

0

Limpopo

0

0

Mpumalanga

0

0

Northern Cape

0

0

North West

0

0

Western Cape

16 788

83 940

Total

17 595

87 975

April food parcel distribution to households per province

PROVINCE

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

8 054

40 270

Free State

14 732

73 660

Gauteng

58 944

294 720

Kwa Zulu Natal

20 156

100 780

Limpopo

36 772

183 860

Mpumalanga

27 817

139 085

Northern Cape

25 554

127 770

North West

18 396

91 980

Western Cape

44 518

222 590

Total

254 943

1 274 715

May food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

23 415

117 075

Free State

33 020

165100

Gauteng

106 598

532 990

Kwa Zulu Natal

12 120

60 600

Limpopo

52 692

263 460

Mpumalanga

56 212

281 060

Northern Cape

24 672

123 360

North West

7 638

38 190

Western Cape

22 780

113 900

Total

339 147

1 695 735

June food parcel distribution to households per province

Province

Food Parcels Distributed

Estimated number of people reached

(5/Household)

Eastern Cape

860

4 300

Free State

860

4 300

Gauteng

129 190

645 950

Kwa Zulu Natal

18 184

90 920

Limpopo

18 245

91 225

Mpumalanga

860

4 300

Northern Cape

860

4 300

North West

860

4 300

Western Cape

860

4 300

Total

170 779

853 895

19 August 2020 - NW1319

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What number of (a) new and (b) renewed SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grant recipients are currently on waiting lists to see an assessment doctor in each province; (2) what is the prescribed duration in number of days and months that a grant recipient will need to wait to see an assessment doctor in each province; (3) what number of assessment doctors are currently assigned to each province; (4) how does her department and SASSA intend to address the growing backlog?

Reply:

1. All clients seeking to apply for disability related grants are booked at SASSA Local Offices using the Electronic Medical Assessment Statistical Template. Such clients are booked for an assessment at a particular assessment site on a particular date and there is no differentiation between new and existing beneficiaries. Thebooking is to assist the Agency to monitor service demands and monitor the time it takes for clients before they are assessed. As at 29 June 2020, status is as below:

Region

Assessments

Eastern Cape

835

Free State

309

Gauteng

2 553

KwaZulu-Natal

1 632

Limpopo

1 664

Mpumalanga

1 165

Northern Cape

359

North West

4 574

Western Cape

4 945

Total

19 053

2. SASSA strives to ensure that all clients booked are assessed within a month and clients waiting for more than a month are referred to as backlogs.Programme managers are required to come up with innovative measures to address backlogs and avoid the emergence of backlogs. The current numbers have been exacerbated as a result of the lockdown and closure of SASSA Local Offices under level 5; as well as the limited resources at local offices during levels 4 and 3.

3. SASSA implements a hybrid model for disability management, which relies on both contracted medical officers as well as medical officers from Department of Health. The numbers of doctors provided by Department of Health is not a fixed number – it depends on resources available within the various assessment sites.

The total number of doctors contracted directly by SASSA is 475 nationally. The number per province is indicated below:

Region

Contracted doctors

Eastern Cape

28

Free State

44

Gauteng

52

KwaZulu-Natal

134

Limpopo

72

Mpumalanga

27

Northern Cape

80

North West

28

Western Cape

10

Total

475

4. All requests for assessments are captured on the Electronic Medical Assessment Template (EMAST) which flags all clients waiting more than 30 days for an assessment from the date of booking. In such situations programme managers are expected to either add a resource in the form of a doctor, another assessment day within that week or recruit either doctor from other further areas and in certain instance ask for services of doctors from neighbouring provinces.

The backlog has been exacerbated as a result of the lockdown. Limited disability related services at Local Offices have resumed under Level 3 lockdown. A strategy has been developed to progressively resume with the assessment related activities as from 1 July 2020. The ability to provide these services does depend on the ability for assessments to be undertaken, as there is still limited access to health facilities.

The strategy prioritises the following categories of applicants in order of priority:

  • Those who were assessed prior to lockdown but who were unable to complete the application process;
  • Those who were booked for assessments but could not be seen as a result of the lockdown – these clients will be rebooked for assessments;
  • Urgent new applications, where the assessment is already done by the health facility and only the application needs to be done;
  • New applications in accordance with available capacity of assessing doctors.

The number of assessments booked per assessment schedule has been reduced to 20 from 40 to ensure compliance with the COVID-19 protocols related to sanitation, social distancing and hygiene.

A particular challenge exists in Western Cape, where the majority of the assessments are undertaken in health facilities. The ability of SASSA to accept new applicants for disability grants is there for seriously, negatively impacted by this. In order to address this, SASSA Western Cape has been granted authority to deviate from normal tender processes by National Treasury to appoint doctors in the George and Boland areas through a closed bidding process by approaching all doctors listed on the HPCSA database as a fairness measure.

19 August 2020 - NW1318

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)In view of her department’s Covid-19 lockdown directives which continue to keep early childhood development (ECD) centres closed under alert level 3 risk-adjusted lockdown, resulting in many ECD centres being under severe financial strain and/or facing permanent closure, what financial and/or other relief packages will her department provide to registered ECD centres to assist them to re-open once they are allowed to; (2) whether her department will procure and/or financially subsidise personal protective equipment for the learners and staff at the ECD centres?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Social Development is not in the financial position to provide any additional financial support to registered ECD centres that remain closed under the state of national disaster as there is no budget specifically allocated for this purpose. However,on 9 May 2020, the Minister of Social Development issued Directions that “The Department must continue to subsidize the early childhood development centres during the state of national disaster” (See Government Notice 517 published in Government Gazette No 43300 of 9 May 2020). This Direction immediately waived the requirement that early childhood development programmes that already receive subsidy need to submit a new application for funding for the 2020/2021 financial while the national state of disaster is in place. The collective amount being paid annually towards this funding is R3.1 billion, targeting early childhood development programmes in poor communities in particular. This funding continues to be paid out to early childhood development centres through the nine provincial departments of social development, which is a provincial competency as contemplated in section 93(1) of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005. This is a significant step that is intended to buffer the impact of the measures implemented during the national state of disaster risk-adjusted lockdown.

(2) The Department is currently in discussion with the National Treasury to repurpose the current ECD infrastructure conditional grant towards supporting early childhood development programmes with personal protective equipment for personnel and staff. If successful, priority will be given to those unfunded registered ECD programmes serving poor communities as required in terms of section 93(4)(a) of the Children’s Act 38 of 2005; and unregistered ECD programmes serving poor communities will also be considered. It should be noted that provision of ECD programmes is private and NPOdriven, government only regulates and subsidise these programmes.

19 August 2020 - NW1242

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of social workers are currently employed by (a) the (i) State and (ii) private sector and (b) nongovernmental organisations?

Reply:

The number of social workers currently employed by

(a)(i) The State is 14 599.

(a)(ii) The department does not have statistics of social workers employed in the private sector.

(b) Non-governmental organisations is 1 970

19 August 2020 - NW1579

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) are the details of the origin and development of the Social and Behaviour Change (SBC) programmes to be implemented by the social services professionals (SSPs), (b) are the details regarding the training of SSPs in this SBC programme, (c) is the implementation plan of the SBC programme in communities across the Republic, (d) time lines are attached to the implementation of the SBC programme in communities across the Republic and (e) is the budget attached to the development, training and implementation of the programme?

Reply:

The HIV pandemic has over the years taught us that biomedical approaches alone are not able to prevent and stem out the spread of new infections, hence a multi-sectoral approach is required to respond to the epidemic.

a) In 2008, UNAIDS noted that new HIV infections were not declining in most countries including South Africa, but continued to increase rapidly. This therefore prompted UNAIDS to call uponall countries to engage in a ‘know your epidemic, know your response’ exercise to allow governments to understand the drivers of the epidemic in order to base HIV prevention efforts on evidence and not on perceptions.The Human Science Research Council (HSRC) therefore conducted a study called Know Your Epidemic, Know Your Response in 2011 for South Africa. This study found that HIV is more than a health issue but a developmental issue because factors that fuel HIV&AIDS are due to human behaviour as well as social and structural in nature andtherefore a social approach was required in addressing these factors. This assisted South Africa to develop the National Strategic Plan on HIV, STIs and TB (NSP) 2012-2016 which mandated the Department of Social Development (DSD) to lead the goal on addressing social and structural drivers of HIV because DSD’s mandate and commitment is on social transformation and we focus mainly on facilitating human development and improving the quality of lives of people by addressing the social and structural barriers to this quality of life.

DSD therefore developed a Compendium of Social and Behaviour Change programmes using the social ecology approachwhich aims at addressing all levels of society, including the individual, interpersonal relationships, family, communities, and systems. The social ecology model has enabled DSD to develop (1) social and behaviour change programmes that seek to address risky behaviours with a view to motivate behaviour change within individuals and social units by use of a range of educational, counseling, motivational, peer-group, skills-building approaches, and community normative approaches which are delivered in small interactive groups; as well as (2) incorporate structural strategies that already exist in the Department (such as social grants, poverty alleviation programmes) which seek to change the context that contributes to individuals’ vulnerability and risk to HIV. The following are the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes which DSD has developed: YOLO, ChommY, Families Matter programme, Men Championing Change programme, Boys Championing Change programme, Community Capacity Enhancement programme and Traditional Leaders programme. These programmes are implemented alongside DSD’s existing programmes that target the structural drivers of the pandemic e.g. social grants and food security programmes. These programmes target different target groups within the social ecology model.

b) The Department partnered with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) since 2011. This partnership assisted the Department to establish a Government Capacity Building and Support Program (GCBS) which aims at strengthening the capacity of the Department of Social Development to respond to HIV&AIDS. The GCBS programme assisted in training Social Services Professionals (SSPs) on the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes in the country. A Train-the-Trainer approach was adopted for each programme and this has ensured that each province has a pool of SSPs that are able to cascade and roll-out the trainings in each district.To-date, a total number of 1 694 SSPs were trained on the social and behaviour change programmes since 2017. The Department also partnered with the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) to roll-out the training of Non Profit Organisations (NPOs) on the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes.SANAC has to-date trained 557 SSPs in all 9 provinces since 2016. The Department had planned to train a further 300 SSPs for this financial year 2020/21, however this has been reviewed to 100 SSPs due to the lockdown restrictions since the trainings are face-to-face with interactive exercises and role-modelling. These trainings will commence in November 2020. Each SSP will be trained on each of the seven (7) social and behaviour change programmes mentioned under (a) above. Each training comprises a minimum of 4 days. This means that each SSP requires a total number of 28 days to complete the entire Compendium of Social and Behaviour Change programmes.

c) These seven (7)social and behaviour change programmes, mentioned above under (a), are implemented together as a package within the same given community, in an integrated manner. Each programme has a Facilitator’s Manual and a Participant’s Manual. The implementation of these programmes is complemented by other DSD existing programmes such as the KeMoja programme. TheDepartment is currently funding 17 NPOs in the country, since 2016, to implement the compendium of social and behaviour change programmes in 30 Districts which have the highest rate of new HIV infections. The NPOs have appointed SSPs that implement the programmes using different approaches which include interactive group facilitated workshops for the different target groups, as well as facilitated community dialogues which include YOLO Jam Sessions, Community Capacity Enhancement sessions, Boys Assemblies, Men’s Lounges, National and District Men’s Parliaments.

d) Implementation of these social and behaviour change programmes commenced in 2016 and is still continuing in all 9 provinces in the 30 districts in the country. Due to budgetary constraints, the Department is not able to expand the implementation of the programmes to all 52 districts.

e) The entire budget for the training and implementation of the social and behaviour change programmes for the 2020/21 financial year is R93m. This budget is for all nine (9) provinces and it is not enough to cater for all 52 Districts.

19 August 2020 - NW1562

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she has been informed that the Premier of Mpumalanga, Ms Refilwe Mtshweni allegedly divided the people of Dr J S Moroka Local Municipality in Nkangala by giving councillors of a certain organisation (name furnished) food parcels to distribute to only 14 of the 31 wards of the specified municipality at the beginning of May 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has she taken in this regard?

Reply:

The Department is not aware of this allegation. The Department did not issue any food parcels to the Premier for distribution to any community.

19 August 2020 - NW1496

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, since the Minister of Finance, Mr T Mboweni, tabled the Special Adjustments Budget on 24 June 2020, she has found that the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) is confident that it will be able to pay all 3,2 million approved applicants, including qualifying asylum-seekers, from the new revised budget that was provided to her department; (2) what total number of (a) asylum-seekers and/or (b) foreign nationals will receive the R350 grant from SASSA?

Reply:

1. Yes, the funding is adequate for the 3,2 million beneficiaries referred to. However, it should be noted that the number of approved applications now stand at 4 424 720. The budget is adequate to cover these and the projected number of asylum seekers and special permit holders who are expected to apply. Should these numbers increase in line with projections done by SASSA, the funds allocated will not be sufficient.

2. It’s not possible to predict exactly how many foreign nationals will receive the grant. We do however know that in the country there are:

(a) 173 036 refugees, of which 2 288 have been approved as at 15 July 2020; and

(b) 188 296 asylum seekers,

(c) 178 615 Special Permit Holders from Zimbabwe,

(d) 25 382 Special Permit Holders from Lesotho,

(e) 1 686 Special Permit Holders from Angola;

who may qualify for the Special Covid SRD if they meet the other qualifying criteria.

In addition, the special relief grant has been approved for 115 670 permanent residents in South Africa (non- South African citizens who hold permanent residence status).

19 August 2020 - NW1387

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 703 on 22 June 2020 regarding the value of the contracts awarded to service providers for the delivery and distribution of food parcels, what is the detailed breakdown of the products and services received according to each specified contract in each province?

Reply:

The content of the food parcels issued by SASSA in each province was standardised. The content of the food parcels is as follows:

Food item

Brand Name

Weight

Quantity

Maize Meal

Ace, white Star, Iwisa, Impala, Pitsana or equivalent in nutritional value.

12,5kg

1

Nutritional

Supplement

Movite Porridge or approved substitute with equivalent in nutritional value.

1 kg

2

Cooking Oil

Sunflower cooking oil or equivalent in nutritional value.

750 ml

2

Pilchards

Glendryck, Saldhana, Lucky Star or equivalent in nutritional value.

400 g tins

6

Soya Mince

Imana, Knorrox, Top Class, Vitamince, Mealtime, Trojan or equivalent in nutritional value.

1 kg

3

Sugar

Huletts, Illovo, Selati or equivalent in nutritional value.

2,5 kg

1

Sugar Beans

Econo, Imbo, Plaza, Olympic or equivalent in nutritional value.

2 kg

1

Bread Flour

Golden Cloud, Sasko, Snowflake or equivalent in nutritional value.

2,5 kg

1

Tea Bags

Five Roses, Glen, Teaspoon Tips, Joko, Trinco, Rooibos or equivalent in nutritional value.

100 tea bags

2

Yeast

NCP, Anchor, Super bake or equivalent in nutritional value.

10 g

2

Peanut Butter

Skippy, Black Cat, Yum Yum or equivalent nutritional value.

800g

1

Milk

Full cream powder milk (must be “Real Diary” OR

Full cream long life milk (1 box of 6 L).

1 kg

1 Box

1

6 L

Toothpaste

All brands acceptable (consider price).

100 g

2

Washing Soap(VI)

Sunlight Bar Soap or equivalent.

500g

2

Sanitary towels

All brands (consider price) 8 towels per pack.

Pack of 8

3

The services rendered by the contracted suppliers was to deliver food parcels on receipt of an order from SASSA.

The attached Annexure confirms the amount paid to each service provider for the provision of food parcels in the period of April and May. Payments made in June are not yet available, as the BAS system is not yet closed for the month of June.

19 August 2020 - NW1222

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What amount did her department set aside to roll-out the Social Relief of Distress Grant?

Reply:

The budget for the Social Relief of Distress Grant in the current financial year department initially received is R3.4 billion for the roll-out of the COVID-19 Special Social Relief of Distress Grant. Following the Supplementary Budget allocations, the available amount has been increased to R11 billion. No additional administrative budget was provided, and SASSA has re-prioritised within the existing budget to be able to fund the development of the system, the communication channels and other administrative costs associated with the roll out of this grant.

12 August 2020 - NW820

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department’s requirement of a bank account for the R350 SA Social Security Agency social relief of distress grants will disqualify an unemployed person who does not have a bank account from qualifying for such relief; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what will happen to the claims of unemployed persons who do not have a bank account?

Reply:

Having a bank account is not a requirement for an application for the special relief grant. Where an applicant does have a bank account, the benefit, if approved, will be paid directly into his / her bank account.

However, where the applicant does not have a bank account, he /she will receive a money transfer through one of the banks which are supporting SASSA with the implementation of this grant. The applicant will indicate which the most convenient bank is for him / her and the money transfer will be sent to his/her mobile phone, once the necessary checks have been done to ensure that it is indeed a mobile phone belonging to that applicant. The money transfer may then be cashed at the ATM and the funds used as required.

12 August 2020 - NW1324

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)In view of the 2013-18 South African Integrated Programme of Action: Addressing Violence Against Women and Children which expired in 2018 at a time when incidents of violence against women and children are so high, by what date will the 2019-23 programme of action be tabled and/or published; (2) whether there is a report on the expired 2013-18 programme; if not, why not; if so, will she provide Ms B S Masango with the specified report?

Reply:

1. The Integrated Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children (POA: VAWC) was approved by Cabinet and published on 18 September 2013.

2. The 2013-2018 Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children was reviewed by the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation in 2016 through a diagnostic review.

3. The Draft reviewed Programme of Action on Violence Against Women and Children is attached.

12 August 2020 - NW264

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What number of children was taken away from their parents (a) without a court order and (b) with a court order in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

According to the Children’s Act 38 of 2005; Section 151 and 152, as well as Regulation 53 (1)(a)(b) gives the authority to the designated social worker or a police official to make a decision that is in the best interest of a child to effect removal of a child and places such a child in temporary safe care for the safety and well-being of the child. Such removal can either be by means of:

  • A court order (Section 151) where there is evidence given by a designated Social Worker that a child is in need of care and protection. Upon presentation of such evidence before the presiding officer; the presiding officer issues an order authoring a designated Social Worker to remove a child toa temporary safe care while the matter is being investigated.
  • Without a court order, which is an emergency removal situation through Section 152 and completion of Form 36 as prescribed in Regulation 53. Emergency removal is done in instances where there are reasonable grounds that the child is in need of care and protection and delays obtaining a court order for the removal and placing the child in temporary safe care may jeopardise the child’s safety and well-being.

The completed Form 36 must be submitted to the temporary safe care person or CYCC as soon as it is practical. The clerk of the children’s court must be informed about such a removal not later than the next court day.

Province

Year

Number of children taken away from their parents

Mpumalanga

 

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/2017

27

68

 

2017/2018

21

95

 

2018/2019

46

88

Free State

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

402

24

 

2017/18

432

48

 

2018/19

296

70

Limpopo

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

245

 

2017/18

0

243

 

2018/19

0

258

North West

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

46

 

2017/18

0

51

 

2018/19

0

66

Gauteng

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

25

836

 

2017/18

16

788

 

2018/19

26

953

Western Cape

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

New indicator

1 883

 

2017/18

4 694

1 793

 

2018/19

8 266

1 949

Eastern Cape

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

0

849

 

2017/18

0

653

 

2018/19

37

517

Kwa-Zulu Natal

Year

Without a court order

With a court order

 

2016/17

112

462

 

2017/18

121

658

 

2018/19

97

681

Total (eight provinces)

 

14,619

13,324

Northern Cape:

It is impossible to provide disaggregated data on the removal of children with or without court orders in the Northern Cape. It can be confirmed that the following number of children were removed in accordance with Section 151 and 152 of the Children’s Act, 38 of 2005.

Northern Cape

Year

Number of children removed with and without court orders

 

2016/17

134

 

2017/18

176

 

2018/19

93

Total

 

403

06 August 2020 - NW1280

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her department’s response to Covid-19 whereby the National Development Agency (NDA) will pay 120 civil society organisations R5 000 per month over a period of 6 months as an administration fee to manage 1 200 NDA volunteers, for what reasons did her department not engage and utilise the municipalities’ existing Expanded Public Works Programme databases for this Covid-19 action response?

Reply:

The National Development Agency Act 108 of 1998 (as amended) section 4(1) (d) gives the NDA duties and powers to “ create and maintain a database on civil society organisations, including, but not limited to, the scope and subject matter of their work and their geographical distribution, and share the information in that database with relevant organs of state and other stakeholders.” To this end the NDA has a database comprised of 15 858 CSOs that have been assessed and profiled. The CSOs that provided the volunteers were drawn from this database instead of the Municipalities’ existing Expanded Public Works Programme databases. Furthermore, the aim of using the NDA CSO database was to expand job opportunities to other young people who are not currently benefitting from any of government’s programs. The NDA does maintain strategic relationship with both the provincial and local governments in the implementation of its programmes.

05 August 2020 - NW1152

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered; hether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Whether her department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered;

Yes, the Department did purchase goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic.

(a)

(b)

(c)

Name of Company

Amount

Service/ Product rendered

EDS Projects

R 1,379.50

Hand sanitiser alcohol free for DSD officials

Time2go Transport and Logistics

R 116,000.00

Latex Powder Free disposable gloves for DSD officials

Time2go Transport and Logistics

R 196,000.00

Hand sanitiser 70% alcohol for DSD officials

Bioclin

R4,140.00

Surgical face masks

Lesole Facilities Management

R 299,700.00

30 000 Surgical face masks for daily visitors to DSD

302k Emporium

R 125,005.00

5000 cloth masks for DSD officials

Baltimore Media

R 38,822.85

Various items -Equipment for the COVID-19 isolation room

Democratic Cleaning Services

R 8,564.16

4 x sanitary refuse container - Medical waste removal

Amoka Solutions

R 478,818.60

Sanitising of the HSRC Building, Harlequins Office Park and GBV Centre on a monthly basis for three months

Sesla General Services

R33 474.00

Catering provided for training of social workers on COVID-19

Modifho-Fela

R34 960.00

Catering provided for training of Social Workers on COVID-19

Sizzling Catering

R15 870.00

Catering for training of social workers on COVID-19.

NICDAM

R313 030.00

Appointment of a facilitator for training of social workers on COVID-19.

Orion Hotels and Resorts

R182 183.00

Conference venue and facilities for the training of nurses and medical

practitioners in the 9 Provinces

Maribelo

R61 755.00

Catering service provided.

(2) Whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case;

 

(a)(b)

Name of Company

Why and what the relevant details in each case

EDS Projects

Deviation- due to urgency, only one quotation was received.

Time2go Transport and Logistics

Deviation- due to urgency, only one quotation was received.

Time2go Transport and Logistics

Deviation- due to urgency, only one quotation was received

Bioclin

Deviation- due to urgency, only one quotation was received

Amoka Solutions

Deviation- due to urgency, only one quotation was sourcedfrom the cleaning company.

NICDAM

Deviation- due to urgency and it was during lockdown.

Maribelo

Deviation- due to urgency and it was during lockdown.

Orion Hotels and Resorts

Deviation- only hotels with video conferencing which were prepared to avail themselves to assist the Department during lockdown.

Sizzling Catering

Deviation- due to urgency and it was during lockdown.

Sesla General Services

Deviation- due to urgency and it was during lockdown.

Modifho-Fela

Deviation- due to urgency and it was during lockdown.

(3)What were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies;

 

All good and services received were to ensure that DSD complies with Covid-19 Regulations and were procured to safeguard staff and to ensure conducive work environment for staff to return to work.

  • Sanitising of the HSRC Building, Harlequins Office Park and GBV Centre was an urgency as staff needed to return for duty.
  • Sanitisers, masks, gloves, hand sanitising machines, various items in the examination room were urgently required to adhere to the COVID-19 regulations.
  • Catering was provided for social workers during training and for war room and natjoint meetings held during lockdown.
  • Emergency procurement of the facilitator was done as social workers had to be trained onCOVID-19.

(4) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

At the right time, and when such a need arises, yes.

04 August 2020 - NW1025

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) measures does her department have in place to (i) identify homeless children and (ii) ensure that they go to school and (b) challenges has her department experienced in implementing the specified measures?

Reply:

(a)(i)According to the Department of Social Development’s prescripts homeless children are considered as street children. Therefore measures used to identify them are provided for in the Children’s Act 38/2005. For an example,section 191 (2)(k) makes provision for therapeutic intervention services for them.

Furthermore, section 150 (1) (c) makes room for street children to be found or identified as children in need of care and protection after the social worker has conducted the home investigation and recommended to Children’s Court that they be found children in need of care and protection.

(ii) Like any other child, street children are covered by section 28 of the Constitution of the Republic, 1996which guarantees right to education.

(b) Rendering services to street children is not easy because they have lived long on the street, have learnt street life and it may be difficult for them to live a normal life.

The department has developed Stabilization programme to assist the Child and Youth Care Centres to manage the behaviour of street children.

Furthermore the Department has developed Strategy and Guidelines on Drop in Centres to inform provision of services of Orphans and Vulnerable Children, which includes street children. The Department also developed a Strategy and Guidelines that inform various programmes for street children using the following levels of interventions: Prevention; Early Intervention; Statutory Services; Reunification and After Care.

At all levels, children are encouraged and motivated to attend school. It is compulsory for those who have been admitted in a child and youth care centre to attend school, therefore all of them do attend school once they are in a child and youth care centre.

The main challenge is that the street children are nomadic and most of the time they abscond from the intervention centres. They are used to uncontrolled environment.

31 July 2020 - NW1578

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With regard to the procurement of personal protective equipment (PPE) for early childhood development centres (ECDs) and programmes by her department, (a) what are the details of the qualifying criteria for ECDs to receive the procured PPEs, (b) how will the procured PPEs be allocated to ECDs across the Republic and (c) by what date will ECDs receive the procured PPEs?

Reply:

a) The ECD programmes that qualify to receive PPEs are those both registered and unfunded; and unregistered ECD programmes that are located in poor communities and serve children from poor households

b) Funding has been repurposed from the existing conditional grant allocation and each provincial Department of Social Development will source from their local cooperatives and Small Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) for the procurement of PPEs

c) The procurement process will take 4-6 weeks and already started the process on 29 June 2020. Expected delivery is mid-August 2020.