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10 November 2022 - NW3401

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What are the reasons that the Government intends to sell its shares in Telkom without consulting with the public?

Reply:

As the shareholder representative of Telkom, I am unaware of any intention to sell Government’s shares in the company.

Authorised for submission by

____________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3701

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What measures of intervention have been put in place to prevent the projected water deficit by the year 2040, (b) to what extent will the plan benefit rural communities in small rural municipalities and (c) what are the timelines for implementing the specified intervention measures?

Reply:

a)  The Department undertakes planning studies over different planning horizons to derive interventions that are implemented to ensure water security for the entire country. These interventions incorporate enablers like governance, financing, human capacity building and science and innovation that facilitate implementation of water projects at National, Provincial and District and Local Municipality level.

The interventions implemented for our water security are contained in the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), the instrument by which the minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the master plans that emanate from the NWRS. The various studies informing the NWRS are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx, and the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NW&SMP) is available at http://www.dwa.gov.za.

Some of the work done by the department in relation to long term planning includes the development of the:

  • Water Reconciliation Strategies
  • Five-year Water and Sanitation Reliability Plans for all District Municipalities in South Africa.

The key outputs of the scenario planning are strategies to reconcile water requirements and availability for all large integrated systems in the country as well for localised water resource systems that secure water for small towns, villages, or clusters of settlements. Reconciliation strategies inform water security perspectives into national, provincial, and local planning instruments such as the National Development Plan, NWRS, Provincial Growth and Development Strategy, Water Service Development Plans and vice-versa

The objective of the Five-year Water and Sanitation Reliability Plans for all District Municipalities is to develop a Water and Sanitation Services Situational Assessment of the current service levels and infrastructure referenced to households at community level. The situational assessment information knowledge base is then interpreted into a needs perspective that categorises each supply need and gap analysis into a reliability category. Projects are then identified to address each of the reliability needs classification categories and a funding model developed that enables a five-year pipeline of projects implementation plan that integrates all grant funding. The full development of the plans for all 44 District Municipalities is scheduled to be completed by March 2024.

b) The identified interventions cover the whole country and benefit all the municipalities and communities in the country.

c) The plans extend cover continuous daily and weekly monitoring of water levels, to the Annual Operating Analyses which optimise annual water management, to at least 25-year planning horizons for the water resource reconciliation studies and beyond. The plans conducted as indicated in (a) above provide the direction of strategies for the country’s water security, which are continuously firmed up on a progressive basis to make them dynamic. The plans are continuously monitored and updated every 3 to 5 years to ensure that they remain current and relevant.

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10 November 2022 - NW3497

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether she will furnish Ms D Kohler with (a) a complete list of the (i) names and (ii) addresses of the branches of the SA Post Office (SAPO) that she has decided to close and (b) the reasons for the closure of each specified branch; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies did not decide to close any post office branch.

 

Authorised for submission by

_______________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

_______________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

___________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3228

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of non-profit organisations (NPO) have been funded by her department in the past five years, (b) was the total amount of funds in each case and (c) are the names of the specified NPOs?

Reply:

a) The total number of non-profit organisations (NPO) that have been funded by her department in the past five years is as follows:

Name of Province

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

EC

2665

3576

3427

3866

4029

FS

1763

1809

1812

1904

2027

GP

3261

3223

3066

3037

3435

KZN

3644

3759

3771

4076

4287

LP

2607

2742

2742

2957

2923

MP

1339

1318

1323

1344

1641

NC

777

751

720

684

638

NW

700

624

459

740

927

WC

2300

2300

2300

2300

2300

 

(b) The total amount of funds in each province is as follows:

Name of Province

2017/18

R’000

2018/19

R’000

2019/20

R’000

2020/21

R’000

2021 /22

R’000

EC

487 852

298 264

340 950

319 082

311 113

FS

416 808 

466 233 

471 348 

528 907 

579 716 

GP

2 396 240 

1 879 899 

2 246 252 

2 434 251 

2 466 828 

KZN

926 206

957 899

999 432

1 130 018

1 268 364

LP

529 833

220 142

248 566

333 363

305 777

MP

430 256

459 179

489 795

485 507

613 122

NC

205 182

195 578

161 920

203 662

247 965

NW

285 758

309 272

341 419

300 172

405 797

WC

1 136 307

888 588

962 387

1 026 954

1 043 359

(c) Please refer to the attached Annexures for the names of the specified NPOs.

NAME OF PROVINCE

ANNEXURES

EC

A

FS

B

GP

C

KZN

D - Response not received

LP

E - Response not received

MP

F

NW

G - Response not received

NC

H

WC

I

10 November 2022 - NW2380

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

(1) With reference to the Broadcasting Digital Migration, what number of households have applied for set-top boxes through the SA Post Office to date; (2) Whether she has found that her department will meet its targets for the deadline of 30 September 2022; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. About 1, 5 million registrations have been recorded since the commencement of registrations in September 2015 to date.

2. A date of 30 September 2022 is gazetted and remains the deadline for citizens to make application for Government subsidised Set-top box. We have created sufficient awareness around the final registrations date, and the Minister does not intend issuing another gazette to extend the registration deadline.

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3680

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the progress report on the Central Drug Authority board members who were interviewed and appointed by the Portfolio Committee on Social Development in November 2020 and (b) has the board achieved in the past two years?

Reply:

a) The Central Drug Authority board members who were interviewed and appointed by the Portfolio Committee on Social Development in November 2020 have submitted two annual reports on time to the Minister of Social development. These reports detail the progress report of the CDA members on the implementation of the National Drug Master Plan (NDMP) 2019-2024 for financial years 2020/2021 and 2021/2022.

b) The Central Drug Authority board members who were interviewed and appointed by the Portfolio Committee on Social Development in November 2020 have implemented the 7 goals of the NDMP aimed towards a South Africa free from substance abuse and achieved the following:

Goal 1: Demand reduction through prevention and treatment of drug use, misuse and abuse.

Achievements:

1.1 This goal is implemented by government departments and entities, led by the departments of Social development, Basic Education, Sports Arts and Culture, Correctional services and Health. The CDA was able to increase the number of annual reports from 8 national departments and entities in 2020/2021 to 16 in 2021/22 and all the reports from the 9 Provincial Substance Abuse Fora (PSAFs) were received. There is an improvement on accountability on the implementation of this goal. Details of the work of government and other stakeholders to implement this goal is well captured in the annual report.

1.2 To monitor programmes on treatment of substance use, misuse and abuse, the CDA undertook oversight visits to in-patient treatment centres managed and funded by Government in all 9 provinces. The CDA also undertook a benchmarking visit to out-patient treatment centres that offer Opioid Substitution Therapy (OST) in Cape Town in order to measure their effectiveness in communities and in particular with users. The CDA is now addressing the findings of these visits with relevant government departments and other stakeholders.

Goal 2: Supply reduction through multi-sectoral cooperation.

Achievements:

2.1 The implementation of this goal is led by the departments of South African Police and Justice and Constitutional development and the achievements of these and other departments and entities are well captured in the annual report.

2.2 In order to oversee the implementation of this goal and to foster collaboration, The CDA participated at the Gender-based Violence and Substance Abuse Dialogue held on 19 February 2022 and; the Substance Abuse Seminar held on 11 March 2022, which was jointly convened by the Departments of Justice and Constitutional Development, Basic Education and Social Development. This approach promotes multi-sectoralism in addressing the problem of substance abuse and illicit trafficking.

Goal 3: Ensuring availability of and access to controlled substances exclusively for medical and scientific purposes, while preventing their diversion.

Achievements:

3.1 The implementation of this goal is led by the department of Health and SAHPRA and their achievements are well captured in the annual report.

3.2 In order to monitor the implementation of this goal and to gather evidence-based approaches from the other countries, the CDA participated in the 65th Commission on Narcotics and Drugs on 14th-18th March 2022, which was organised by the United Nations Office Against Drugs and Crime (UNODC). Lessons learned are being shared with implementers of the NDMP.

3.3 The Deputy Minister of Social Development introduced the CDA to the EGYPT-SA Hepatitis project task team, with a view to discussing a partnership with the Egyptian Ministry of Health and Population and the Egypt Mission of SA for the screening and treatment of Hepatitis C, especially among PWUD (people who use and inject drugs). The CDA participates fully in this project to find evidence-based approaches to reduce transmission of Hepatitis infection especially amongst people who inject drugs.

Goal 4: Identify trends and control of new psychoactive substances.

Achievements:

4.1 The implementation of this goal is led by the department of South African Police and International Relations. Their achievements on this work are well captured in the annual report.

4.2 To gather world-wide evidence-based strategies to control New Psychoactive Substances, The CDA’s attendance of the 65th session of the Commission on Narcotic Drugs mentioned above, also discussed the trends and control of NPS and amphetamine-type stimulants in the world, as well as the need to address the diversion of precursors and the non-medical use and misuse of pharmaceuticals containing narcotic drugs and psychotropic substances. These evidence-based programmes will enrich the work of relevant government departments, entities and the private sector to control New Psychoactive Substances.

4.3 The CDA has decided to undertake research into the trends and prevalence of NPS, based on the submission developed by the Research, Data Collection, Monitoring and Evaluation Committee (RDMEC). The implementation of this project is dependent on availability of adequate resources.

Goal 5: Promote governance, leadership, and accountability for a coordinated multi-sectoral effective response, including economic development at community levels.

Achievements:

5.1 The Minister appointed the Chairperson of the CDA and the CDA appointed the Deputy Chairperson in line with the Act. The CDA also established governance structures to carry out its mandate and to coordinate the implementation of the NDMP. These include:

5.1.1 Five CDA Committees namely:

  1. Governance Committee
  2. Research, Development, Monitoring and Evaluation
  3. Programmes and Projects
  4. Communications and Marketing and
  5. Finance, Social and Ethics

All these committees have Chairpersons and Deputy Chairpersons. They are all functional and they meet once a month.

5.1.2 The CDA Executive Committee comprised of the CDA Chairperson, Deputy Chairperson and Chairpersons of Committees. Its functional and it meets once a quarter.

5.1.3 The CDA General Meeting which is comprised of all CDA members is functional and it meets once a quarter.

5.1.4 The Extended General Meeting comprised of all members of the CDA, the Provincial Substance Abuse Fora and other strategic stakeholders from civil society and business is functional and meets twice a year.

5.2 All the above governance structures have CDA approved terms of reference to manage execution of the CDA mandate.

5.3 The CDA reviewed the 2014 CDA Rules and developed a new set of Rules in accordance with the Act. The CDA Rules will now be reviewed and promulgated by the Minister.

5.4 The CDA visited and supported the Provincial Substance Abuse Forums and in fact helped to capacitate all provinces on the NDMP. The CDA also started to encourage the launch of the Local Drug Action Committees across the 9 provinces and is capacitating these whenever there’s a request.

5.5 The CDA has engaged the stakeholders with a view to forging partnerships in the interest of service integration and coordination. The stakeholders engaged includes: the Commission on Narcotic Drugs, UN Office on Drugs and Crime, World Health Organisation, African Union, The Colombo Plan, Formal Anti-Drug Committee, International Technology Transfer Centre (ITTC), International Consortium of Universities for Drug Demand Reduction, International Society of Substance Use Professional South Africa, Medical Research Council, South African Community Epidemiology Network on Drug Use (SACENDU), South African Network of People Who Use Drugs, South African Local Government Association (SALGA), The South African National Aids Council (SANAC), and International Network on Hepatitis in Substance Users.

5.6 To monitor the performance of role-players and stakeholders, the CDA has regularly demanded submission of reports through the DG’s, Provincial HOD’s and Heads of other stakeholder organizations. The CDA has studied and analysed the reports of government departments and its entities, national and international partners and given departments the opportunity to present their draft before the Annual Report is compiled and submitted to the Minister of Social Development.

5.7 As such there has been great improvement and increase in numbers of departmental representatives in the CDA and an increased number of reports received from member departments and the PSAFs. In addition, CDA ‘s engagement with other strategic partners who are not necessarily members of the CDA has led to submission of their reports to the CDA, enhancing sharing of information and best practices.

5.8 For the first time, the CDA has developed a website and social media pages including the face book and twitter, using member’s own personal resources. This has opened up communication channels and access to the CDA information by members of civil society and the CDA members are able to assist those who connect with the CDA through these channels.

Goal 6: Strengthening data collection, monitoring, evaluation and research evidence for an evidence-based response.

Achievements:

6.1 The implementation of this goal is led by the CDA and the departments of social development and performance monitoring and evaluation. The CDA has received reports from the department of health and social development on the research work done by the South African Medical Research Council on data collection, analysis and on trends of substance use and abuse through SACENDU.

6.2 The CDA is monitoring the implementation of the NDMP by all role-players and stakeholders through its governance structures.

6.3 The CDA has a clearing house with information and documents but it needs to be re-organised.

Goal 7: Stimulate robust and sustainable economic growth aimed at reducing poverty, unemployment and inequalities.

Achievements:

7.1 The implementation of this goal is supposed to the led by the department of economic development (who has not yet appointed a representative to sit in the CDA) as well as the departments of performance monitoring and evaluation and trade and industry. Some achievements of these departments and PSAFs are captured in the annual report, although very scanty.

In conclusion the CDA recorded significant achievements in coordinating the implementation of the NDMP 2019-24 in the past two years and these are reflected in the two annual reports, 2020/2021 and 2021/2022 that have been submitted on time to the Minister of Social development and tabled in parliament. The CDA is experiencing many challenges but has continued to focus on executing its mandate, in the interest of working towards a South Africa free from substance abuse.

10 November 2022 - NW3450

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What led to the delays in the appointment of the Chief Director for Corporate Management in her department?

Reply:

The reasons for the recruitment of the Chief Director: Corporate Management having been finalised by 1 July 2022 were due to the following:

  1. During the recruiting period the responsible unit only had 1 Human Resource Practitioner and 1 Deputy Director (total staff compliment for the unit) at that stage, this while having to deal with the normal workload as well.
  2. The festive period impacted the recruitment timeframe. This refers to the months for December 2021 and January 2022 and these are normally considered “dead” months since most staff and participants to the process are not available. The process tends to get suspended over this period.
  3. The Recruitment mailbox was a challenge and could not handle the quantity of applications. Human Resource Management also found that applications from internal candidates did not go through to the mailbox. This was resolved by moving servers. However, the transfer between servers further contributed to these challenges. Additional challenges included the sorting of online mailboxes where different number of applications had to be reconciled in order to make sure the process was not compromised.
  4. The final steps of the process transpired as follows:
  • a) Interviews were concluded in March 2022. This includes all administrative processes including finding panel members, confirming availability which in itself is a challenge.
  • b)  Then process of the competency assessment and personnel suitability followed which took approximately a month.
  • c) The internal administrative appointment processes followed and were completed in May 2022.
  • d) 1 June 2022 was the notice month and the successful candidate assumed duty on 1 July 2022.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

10 November 2022 - NW3678

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that the SA Social Security Agency recently indicated that Electronic Funds Transfer payment method requires smart phones with corresponding applications for transaction, what total number of beneficiaries who are entitled to the Social Relief of Distress Grant do not receive the grant due to limited budget constraints to buy smart phones?

Reply:

Access to an electronic funds transfer (EFT) payment for the COVID SRD does not require a smartphone. Below are the methods of payments that clients can choose from:

  • EFT into the clients own bank account of choice. A client paid through this process can collect funds at an ATM, participating merchants or Bank branches. Clients can also transact directly with their cards at participating merchants.
  • EFT into a Post Bank account (if the client does not have their own account).Clients will have to collect their funds at retailers (PnP, Boxer, Shoprite, Usave or Spar). These clients are expected to be in possession of any type of mobile phone that can receive a one-time pin via USSD message. It is important for clients to use the same mobile numbers they registered with when applying for their social grant.
  • Mobile money (cash send) option. A client will receive an sms with a voucher number to collect the funds from the bank of their choice. This method requires any kind of mobile phone that can receive an sms.

10 November 2022 - NW3449

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Which fundamental areas still need to be worked on in order to achieve the goals set for the Administration programme as there is a significant drop in the first quarter performance of her department?

Reply:

The DSBD’s Programme One (Administration) underperformed in three of its eight indicators, registering 62.5% performance for quarter one of 2022/23 financial year. The three targets that were not met are:

a) The DSBD had 47.1 % female representation against a target of 50 % and above. This was due to appointments and terminations in SMS during the previous cycle. For example: changes in the Administration (as indicated in the annual report). During quarter one of 2022/23 the status quo also remained since there were no appointments or terminations in SMS during this reporting period.

b) The two targets on Approved System specification and roadmap design for Phases 4 and 5 were not met due to lack of capacity within the Directorate in ICT and similarly within the agencies of the Department. The Department, by means of an existing multi-party Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) across government, had enlisted the CSIR as an entity of government to assist with the systems development capacity challenges faced. The Department had initiated the process of a deviation for this appointment on the basis that the CSIR had developed complex systems for other government departments and in light of ensuring that the Intellectual Property remains within the public sector domain. Unfortunately, the process concluding the costing and agreements had taken time as it involved multiple scoping and specification sessions to determine the costing.

The following are processes in place for fundamental areas to reach the targeted goals:

a) The Organisational Structure has been approved by the Minister and process to continue with the approved recruitment plan of vacant and funded continues. The Human Resource Management directorate monitors the Employment Equity plan to inform the panel members at shortlisting stage for posts that should be earmarked to increase the representation of woman in SMS positions.

b) Targets on Approved System specification and roadmap design for Phase 4 and 5: The Department will be using EU donor funding for this project and hence also needed to ensure that such funding is allocated. The approach is to ensure a portfolio development approach to ensure an all-inclusive one-stop shop for SMME’s, although the process to deviate was initiated timeously, the process was curtailed because of the request from the Seda not to include DIMS module on the work being done by CSIR. This created a delay and necessitated the resubmission of the deviation request.

Unfortunately, the delays had resulted in the lack of achievement of the quarter two target as the development of the system was to proceed. The deviation request had been approved on 12 September 2022. The agreement was to initiate an advance to CSIR on the basis that a contract or Service Level Agreement (SLA) be in place. This is currently in progress and will ensure that the targets for quarter three and four will be attained.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

10 November 2022 - NW2963

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Bodlani, Ms T to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

(1) (a) What is the rationale for the pending merger of Sentech and Broadband Infraco, (b) how is it anticipated that the merger will impact the (i) workers and (ii) board directorship of the two entities, respectively; (2) what are the (a) full relevant details of the financial ramifications of the merger and (b) timelines for the completion of the merger?

Reply:

I have been informed by the entities as follows:

(1)(a)The State-Owned Company (SOC) Rationalisation project seeks to harmonise and align SOCs capabilities within the DCDT to form a coherent agent for the efficient delivery of ICT services to South African citizens.. Broadband Infraco holds an Electronic Communications Network Service (ECNS) licence whilst Sentech has both Electronic Communications Service  (ECS) and ECNS licences. The two entities capabilities are complementary in completing the service value chain and therefore logical to merge and equip for the growing service demand.

(1)(b)(i) Both the SENTECH and BBI capabilities will exist in the merged entities and will require workforce to manage these capabilities. Secondly, the merger is premised on Growth and to improve ICT services for South African. It therefore anticipated that the merger will not result in job losses. It will also create opportunities in other areas of the merged entity.

(1)(b)(ii) The Board directorship will be revised for efficiency and effective Leadership of a Merged entity in alignment with the market shifts.

(2)(a) A financial Due Diligence process is being undertaken by the two entities, whereafter the report will be shared with the Minister during third quarter of FY23.

(2)(b) The process is scheduled to be completed by the end of the financial year 2023.

Authorised for submission by

___________________

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

________________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

____________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3605

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Whether she has found that the current co-operative business model used by her department has been successful in the creation of jobs; if not, what strategy will she implement to ensure that the specified model works; if so, what is the total number of jobs that were created by co-operatives using the model in the 6th Parliament?

Reply:

The co-operatives development support model that we use has been moderately successful in the creation of jobs. Through the Co-operatives Incentives Scheme (CIS) that was implemented from 2015/16 until 2021/22, the DSBD supported 928 co-operatives to the tune of R380.6 million which resulted in the creation and retention of 5 583 jobs. It is important to note that this performance was anchored on the principles and pillars espoused in the government’s Integrated Strategy on the Development and Promotion of Co-operatives (the Co-operatives Strategy). The Co-operatives Strategy sets out an implementation framework for the Co-operatives Development Policy of 2004 and the Co-operatives Act, No. 14 of 2005, as amended. It also ensures that government, through the utilisation of various partnership models, engages in joint initiatives with all relevant stakeholders, to promote strong, viable, self-reliant, autonomous, and self-sustaining the co-operatives movement in the country.

Our two implementing agencies, namely the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) and Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), also played a pivotal role in the development of co-operatives in the country. Agencies’ interventions are also based on the pillars of the abovementioned Co-operatives Strategy. Through the provision of pre and post formation training as well as business skills training, Seda has supported 3 057 co-operatives, which resulted in the improvement of the co-operatives’ performance in respect of growth as well as job creation and retention. In respect of funding support, sefa supported 49 co-operatives to the value of R37.5 million, which resulted in the creation and retention of 510 jobs.

While the Co-operatives Strategy has made a marked contribution to the growth and development of co-operatives in the country, it is apparent that additional measures must be taken to improve the aforesaid contribution. Chief among these measures is the intensification of market access efforts for co-operatives products and services in both the public and private sectors. This will ensure that co-operatives are able to increase their assets base as well as have healthier income statements and balance sheets.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

10 November 2022 - NW2990

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Dr L A Schreiber with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

1. All Policy Documents of the Department undergo public consultation with relevant stakeholders. Some of the consultations may require closed meetings and such are undertaken when requested included by political parties.

(i) The Draft White Paper on Audio and Audio-visual Content Services Policy Framework, Gazette No. 43797, published on 09 October 2020, was consulted with commercial media companies including eTV, Multi Choice, Primedia, National Association of Publishers.

(ii) The Draft Next Generation Networks Spectrum Policy was consulted with ACT,and WAPA, and the Department is currently considering a request from the individual telecommunications companies for private session to discuss the Draft policy.

(iii) The reason is to solicit the views of critical industry players through frank deliberations without fear of compromising business strategy.

 

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3047

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

What strategies are in place to ensure that Parliamentary, Legislatures and Council plenary sittings and committee meetings are accessible to the public through broadcasting platforms which are free to air?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

Parliamentary sittings are broadcasted to South Africans through Commercial, Public, and Community broadcasting platforms. Secondly the parliament channel is accessible through various streaming platforms.

  1. Currently the public may follow sittings live on Parliament Radio and TV (DStv Channel 408), via live stream on Parliament YouTube channel and Twitter and Facebook pages. The public may subscribe to the Parliament YouTube channel to receive instant notification of live feeds, videos and streaming of the plenaries of the National Assembly and National Council of Provinces.
  2. The SABC’s 2020 editorial policies define events of national importance to include “the opening of Parliament, the budget speech, major Parliamentary debates, and the opening of provincial legislatures…” that it will broadcast from time to time on its national television and radio platforms.
  3. Parliamentary Channel is accessible through the Free-to-Air DTT platform together with other SABC television services..
  4. Sentech is syndicating the Parliamentary channel to over 100 community broadcasters across the country
  5. To further enhance above efforts, Parliament, Provincial and Local Legislatures must approve targeted funding to ensure that Parliamentary, Legislatures and Council plenary sittings and committee meetings that will ensure that they are accessible to the public through broadcasting platforms which are free to air.  This is at the core of the public service mandate of the SABC and various community media broadcasters of promoting universal access and making Parliamentary, Legislatures and Council plenary sittings, committee meetings and activities more accessible to the masses or for all South Africans on a free-to-air basis. It requires deliberate and targeted funding by the three spheres to ensure that it happens daily.
  6. South Africa has sufficient DTT Multiplexes and streaming capacity to achieve greater accessibility, however content production and distribution costs must be covered

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3770

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What steps has he taken in reducing the struggles of the communities who are subjected to inhumane conditions of having no clean water supply and proper sanitation in the Mopani District Municipality that is riddled with corruption?

Reply:

The Mopani District Municipality (DM) is a Water Service Authority (WSA) in its area of jurisdiction comprising of five local municipalities (Greater Tzaneen, Ba-Phalaborwa, Greater Letaba, Maruleng and Greater Giyani). The district area has been experiencing water shortages due to various causes, namely:Raw Water Shortages (low level dams)

  • Dilapidated and aging infrastructure
  • Population growth

The Mopani DM receives funding from the Department through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) schedule 6B and under schedule 5B. The municipality utilises these grants to provide short- and long-term water provision interventions.

The municipality also receives Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) from the Department of Cooperative Governance which they utilise for their water and sanitation projects.

Table 1: Water Provisioning Status and Backlogs in Mopani

NUMBER OF HOUSEHOLDS PER MUNICIPALITY

MUNICIPALITY

BPM

GGM

GLM

GTM

MLM

MDM

Total No. of HH

41 115

63 548

58 261

108 925

24 469

296 320

HH with access

39 889

54 003

52 838

82 552

20 101

249 384

HH without access

1 226

9 545

5 423

26 373

4 368

46 935

% Backlog

2.98%

15.02%

9.31%

24.21%

17.85%

16%

% HH with access

97.02%

84.98%

90.69%

75.79%

82.15%

84%

The following are projects that are currently being implemented by the Mopani DM through funding from DWS and COGRA (MIG, RBIG and WSIG) to improve water supply services in the short, medium to long term:

  • Tours Water Scheme: Bulk Lines refurbishment and Reticulation
  • Hoedspruit Bulk Water Supply
  • Thapane Regional Water Scheme (Upgrading of Water Reticulation and Extensions)
  • Sefofotse to Ditshosine Bulk Water Supply/Ramahlatsi Bulk and Reticulation
  • Lulekani Water Scheme (Benfarm)
  • Rural Household Sanitation (Maruleng)
  • Rural Household Sanitation (Greater Tzaneen LM)
  • Rural Household Sanitation (Greater Giyani LM)
  • Rural Household Sanitation (Greater Letaba LM)
  • Rural Household Sanitation (Ba-Phalaborwa LM)
  • Ritavhi 2 Water Scheme (Sub-Scheme 1)
  • Giyani Water Reticulation to the outstanding villages
  • Refurbishment of the Giyani Water Treatment Works
  • Mametja Sekororo RWS Phase 1
  • Mametja Sekororo RWS Phase 1A (Edlin)
  • Mametja Sekororo RWS Phase 1B (Eternity)
  • Mametja Sekororo RWS Phase 2

---00O00---

10 November 2022 - NW2903

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

With women reportedly making up 31% of Telkom’s Board of Directors, what steps is she taking to ensure better gender representation at the State-owned entity at board level?

Reply:

Telkom has committed to engage with Department, as its significant shareholder. The Minister is confident that the matter will be resolved through the application of the relevant prescripts of the Companies Act, and the applicable JSE Securities Exchange rules and regulations.

Authorised for submission by

 

MS. NONKQUBELA JORDAN-DYANI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (ACTING)

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

__________________________

HON. PHILLY MAPULANE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

Approved/ not approved

________________________________

HON. KHUMBUDZO NTSHAVHENI, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

DATE:

10 November 2022 - NW3636

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

By what date will the Government include the Khoisan on the Z83 application form and all government documents that deal with non-derogative cultural rights of persons in terms of equality according to Chapter 2 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, with reference to section 39(1) to (3) of the Bill of Rights and sections 195 (1)(i) and 195 (2) of Chapter 10 of the specified Constitution?

Reply:

Government policy and processes aims to uphold the principles enshrined in the Constitution. The Z83 and requirements contained therein are aimed at assisting a selection committee to recruit. Aspects such a race and gender for example, as depicted on the form is requested for purposes of upholding national legislation such as the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998. Documentation and or forms of any nature are subject to prescribed processes which include consultation and maintaining the principle of an inclusive South Africa.

End

10 November 2022 - NW3753

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What steps of intervention has the Small Enterprise Finance Agency taken to ensure that micro-lenders were charged fair interest rates by intermediaries in the 2021-22 financial year?”

Reply:

The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa), is required to ensure that all of its clients, that are required to adhere to the National Credit Act (NCA) are compliant and registered throughout the life of any loan from sefa,

All micro finance intermediaries in the sefa micro finance portfolios are registered with the National Credit Regulator (NCR). The NCA regulates all interest and fee charges between the end client and the intermediary client of sefa. All sefa clients are registered with the NCR and their interest rates are therefore regulated by the Act.

sefa as part of its due diligence process and through the life of the loan monitors the clients’ compliance to the act. Additionally, each of the sefa clients must ensure that their NCR certificates remain current throughout their loan period with sefa. The sefa clients therefore needs to provide the NCR with quarterly and annual reports detailing their loans disbursed, their charges and fees as well as other aspects of compliance.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

09 November 2022 - NW3587

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether any trade agreements were signed and/or agreed to at the 9th session of the South Africa-Saudi Arabia Joint Economic Commission; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No trade agreements were signed at the recent South Africa-Saudi Arabia Joint Economic Commission (JEC) meeting held in Pretoria on 3-4 October 2022.

The JEC was convened inter alia in order to prepare the work for the planned State Visit to Saudi Arabia subsequently undertaken by President Ramaphosa on 15-16 October 2022, at which several economic cooperation agreements were signed. The JEC was therefore a useful clearing-house and opportunity to identify the status of negotiations on such proposed agreements.

-END-

09 November 2022 - NW3776

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What steps has he taken to (a) address the issue of illegal mining and (b) transform illegal miners into small-scale miners in Witrankie Village in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality?

Reply:

(a) Illegal mining of chrome in Witrankie is one of the Department’s priority areas. In order to address illegal mining in the village, intelligence led operations were conducted with members of the SAPS and the Hawks. As a result of those operations, cases were opened, and arrests made. There are continuous disruptive operations conducted by the Department and SAPS given the extent of illegal mining in the area.

(b) The profile of illegal mining in South Africa is such that it is dominated by illegal immigrants. Illegal miners cannot be transformed into small scale miners. The Department through its Small-scale division only assists potential miners who intend operating within the boundaries of the law.

09 November 2022 - NW3858

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the relevant details of how his department intends to balance the repairing and maintenance of water supply infrastructure with the plans of his department to expand access to water. (2) considering the magnitude of the irregular expenditure in his department, what are the relevant details of how his department will implement the initiatives to balance the two aspects without the implementation contributing to further wasteful expenditure by his department?

Reply:

1.  The Department of Water and Sanitation (the Department) has a maintenance plan in place for government water schemes which includes all activities to ensure adherence to routine, planned and unplanned maintenance requirements. The maintenance plan is informed by the Asset Management Plan of the Department. Furthermore, the Department has entered into agreements with some Water User Associations (WUAs) and Irrigation Boards (IB) to operate and maintain water schemes to ensure increased water security or sustainable bulk raw water supply for economic and social water users.

2. The Department has, through a competitive bidding process, appointed sixteen (16) mechanical and electrical engineering maintenance contractors for a period of three (3) years, to augment existing capacity.

09 November 2022 - NW3783

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With regard to the Samrad system of his department which has not been serviced and has therefore been outdated for years, (a) what are the reasons that there were no plans (i) drawn and (ii) implemented to service and ensure that the system is regularly updated, (b) how does his department intend to mitigate the backlog which the installation of a new system will cause and (c) what is the action plan to counter the specified backlog?

Reply:

a) (i), (ii) Since its inception, the system has been serviced, however challenges were experienced when the service provider who maintained and serviced the system was liquidated in 2016. No updates were made of the system since then.

b) The norm for implementing ICT related projects is to have a detailed project and migration plan which also include risks identification and how the risks will be mitigated during the project tenure.

c) Refer to b above.

09 November 2022 - NW3589

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

How does his department intend to ensure that the R300 million debt fund, known as the SMME Crisis Partnership Fund, launched by the Gauteng provincial government, the Industrial Development Corporation and the SA SME Fund is protected against (a) corruption and (b) wasteful expenditure?

Reply:

I have been furnished with the information that follows, by the management of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC):

The SMME Crisis Partnership Fund is managed by an independent Fund Manager, that being the SASME Fund.

As an investor in the fund, the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) participates in a governance framework that has been put in place to protect the fund against corruption and wasteful expenditure. This consists of:

• Advisory Board

• Investment Committee

• IDC Oversight

• Reporting and Audit

Advisory Board

The Advisory Board is comprised of members appointed by the Investors. These members are independent in that they are not employees of the Fund Manager. The Advisory Board ensures that the Fund’s Guidelines, Policies and Procedures are adhered to. The Fund Manager may raise reasonable objections to the appointment of a prospective candidate e.g., reputational, or legal (criminal/fraud). The rights and responsibilities of the Advisory Board are to:

  1. approve any variations or waivers to the Fund Guidelines.
  2. approve increases to prudential limits on investments where specifically allowed in the Fund’s guidelines.
  3. advise on any governance issues that may arise in the Fund.
  4. review all expenses of the Fund.
  5. approve the appointment/replacement of the Fund’s Auditor.
  6. review bank statements of the Fund.
  7. review the annual valuations of investments, and to the extent that there is any dispute in respect of a valuation refer the issue to a recognised expert for final determination.
  8. to resolve any material conflict of interest between the Fund Manager and the Investors or the investors themselves arising from a Fund transaction.

Investment Committee

The Investment Committees key role is to:

  1. Approve or decline investments or exits from investments.
  2. Monitor and report to Investors the performance of the investments.
  3. Approve third party expenses to be borne by the Investors in respect of investments or exits.
  4. Ensure that the Fund manager implements the Investment Policy of the Fund as negotiated with Investors.

The committee is established and hosted by the Fund Manager. The Investment Committee members are individuals independent from the Fund Manager who possess the requisite industry, technical and financial skills to make investment decisions in accordance with the investment mandate and terms of the Fund.

IDC Oversight

IDC ensure appropriate oversight of the fund through representation on the Advisory Board and the Investment Committee. IDC has appointed senior staff who possess the requisite experience in respect of deal assessment, development finance and township sector knowledge to sit on these committees.

In addition, the IDC has a senior person responsible for constant oversight of the Fund and the Fund Manager.

Payments to the fund by the IDC are made as the fund invests in the SMMEs and not in a single lump sum. To effect disbursement of monies to the Fund, the Fund Manager must provide to the IDC the minutes of the Fund’s IC meetings showing which applicants have been approved for investment and the value of the investment.

Reporting and Audit

The fund manager is required to:

  1. Provide monthly reports to IDC on the performance of the Fund within 7 days after each month-end. The report will cover but not be limited to relevant fund performance indicators including approvals, cancellations disbursements, impairments, distressed investees, realised and projected financial returns and latest valuation of the Fund (and each of its underlying investments); number of jobs created/ saved, the number and value of investments to black owned investees.
  2. provide management accounts of the Fund and the Fund Manager to IDC on a quarterly basis within 30 days after each quarter-end.
  3. provide the IDC with audited annual financial statements of the Fund and Fund Manager within 6 months after its year-end.

-END-

09 November 2022 - NW3196

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)      On what date did he attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in his department and/or entities reporting to him; (2) whether any appointments to his department and/or entities reporting to him were discussed during his attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum? NW3917E

Reply:

All the appointments of personnel in public sector positions are made in accordance with relevant legislation. No structure outside of those prescribed in legislation can determine the deployment of personnel in public sector positions. Where the legislation requires me to make an appointment, I apply myself to the requirements of the entity concerned, the legislative prescripts and the merits of candidates for the positions.

As part of building a capable state, I make all reasonable efforts to strengthen the skills mix in those public sector appointments within my remit. I therefore consider carefully the suitability of candidates on the information available to me and the need to have a diverse set of skills and experiences on an entity’s board.

-END-

09 November 2022 - NW2942

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to vulnerable learners receiving the child support and foster care grant who (a) are frequently absent from school and/or (b) have stopped attending school all together, what (i) support and interventions does her department provide for the learners in order to actively get them to attend and/or re-enrol in school and (ii) has been the success rate of the interventions over the past five years?

Reply:

Ensuring that children attend school during the compulsory schooling age, and striving to increase the percentage of young people, who successfully complete twelve years of schooling - in other words reach and complete Grade 12, are central to the mission of the Department.  A large range of activities and initiatives are aimed at advancing this mission, especially to ensure that vulnerable children, such as those receiving Child Support Grants (CSG) or under foster care, have an opportunity to succeed in school.

These initiatives have been successful insofar as addressing dropping out of school before learners successfully complete the National Senior Certificate; and schooling among children of  compulsory school-going age, has for many years been kept at almost 100%, especially up to Grade 9; though there were some setbacks during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The successful completion of twelve years of schooling in South Africa, is approximately on a par with that seen in other middle income countries.  This fact is provided in several of the Department’s Annual Reports on the results of the National Senior Certificate examinations (available on the DBE website).

Not only has there been steady improvement in the overall rates of school participation amongst children in the compulsory schooling age, and in the overall Grade 12 completion rate, but there have also been improvements for children who are orphans, Child Support Grant recipients and those with disabilities.  According to the STATS-SA's General Household Surveys, in the years 2002-2006, only 68% of 19-21 year-olds with both biological parents deceased, had completed at least Grade 9.  For the years 2018-2021, this percentage had increased to 77%.  Turning to Grade 12 completion rates amongst young people with disabilities, for example, we see that in the years 2002-2006 that only 19% of 21-29 year-olds with a disability, had completed at least completed Grade 12, compared to an estimated 34% in the years 2018-2021.  School attendance rates amongst 7-15 year-olds receiving the Child Support Grants has hovered around 99% ever since 2010.

The problem of learners not successfully completing Grade 12 (or anything equivalent outside the schooling system), should be seen in the context of relatively weak results among many of those learners who do obtain the NSC.  The problem is reflected in the comparably low Grade 9 TIMSS results, even in 2019, and after a couple of decades of improvements, improvements attributable in large part to government’s focus on quality schooling.  Clearly, these improvements should continue.  It is this need that lies behind certain high-level targets in government’s Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF).  For instance, more Grade 12 candidates should achieve above the mark thresholds in mathematics and physical science, enable them to enter university programmes generating critical skills in areas such as engineering, chemistry and financial accounting.

Moreover, it is critical to understand our efforts to promote successful completion of schooling compared to young people dropping out of school.  The current research, conducted by [WHOM]confirms that it is those learners who do not cope with their studies who are the most likely to drop out; and poverty in the home plays a large role here.  According the 2019 General Household Survey, 34% of young people aged 16 to 18 years, are not at school, essentially because they are not coping academically.  Another large factor, according to the same source, shows that 25% of young people blame their parents' inability to pay school fees as their reason to drop out.. Even here, coping academically plays a role; parents and guardians may decide that a child who is not performing well as school, is not worth investing in (See the Department’s series of publications General Household Survey (GHS): Focus on Schooling).

In line with the international and local evidence, and in line with the policy advice provided by organisations, such as the UNESCO, government’s strategies aimed at increasing ‘survival’ to Grade 12, are multi-pronged; with a special emphasis on dealing with the effects of poverty and on improving learning and teaching in the classroom.  The following can be considered key initiatives behind past reductions in dropping out, and likely drivers of future improvements in this regard:

  • The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP). This intervention encourages children to attend school, and promotes learning by reducing levels of hunger and malnutrition, which inhibit successful learning.
  • No fee schools. This longstanding intervention ensures that children and youths in poorer communities are not prevented from attending school due to the inability of the household to pay for school fees.
  • Policies on teenage pregnancies. Government Notice 704 of 2021 formalised policy on the protection of the schooling of pregnant learners. Among females aged 16 to 18, around 10% did not attend school due to pregnancy, according to the 2019 GHS.
  • Ongoing strengthening of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS). A more focussed curriculum is one reason that has been put forward as a reason for past improvements in South Africa’s performance in international testing programmes – see the Department’s Action Plan to 2024.
  • Efforts aimed at improving learning in the early grades. A key government priority is improving reading, and learning and teaching in general, in the early grades. Several interventions contribute towards this, including the shift in the responsibility for pre-schooling from the social development sector to basic education, the Early Grade Reading Study and associated teacher development innovations, and the introduction of the Systemic Evaluation.
  • Special examination preparation support for Grade 12 learners. Activities here, aimed largely at ensuring that learners leave school with the NSC, include the so-called winter schools.
  • The expansion of the learner-level enrolment and attendance monitoring systems. The Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System (LURITS), the SA-SAMS school management system and the partnership-driven Data Driven Districts (DDD) initiative have all contributed to a more robust approach to monitoring exactly where in the country dropping out is occurring. These systems proved invaluable for providing information on, for instance, where children were not returning to school during the pandemic.

09 November 2022 - NW3672

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)Noting that the Republic has been facing an energy crisis, frequent load shedding and uncertainty from Eskom and his department as to when the country will reach stability again, what initiatives, outside opening bids for private entities and/or collaborations, have been started by the Government to build the Republic’s green energy industry, (2) whether he has found that the current reliance on Independent Power Producers and opening bids is the Government’s way of shifting some of its responsibilities to services providers and the private sector and thus dismantling the Republic’s sovereignty; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Through the National Energy Crisis Committee (NECOM) established by the President of the Republic, short – medium term initiatives are being pursued to bring online both renewable and non-renewable energy-based power generation technologies. With regard to building “the Republic’s green energy industry”, outside opening bids for private entities and/or collaborations, limits on the maximum power that can be generated and traded through bilateral arrangements without the need to apply for a license from the National Energy Regulator of South Africa are in the process of being removed; and shopping centres, households and mines are now at liberty to generate and sell excess green power from rooftop and/or utility scale PV installations through necessary wheeling arrangements.
  2. Through the national power utility, electricity generation largely remains, and will remain for the foreseeable future, in the hands of government. Therefore, the Government is not shifting some of its responsibilities to services providers and the private sector in a manner that dismantles the Republic’s sovereignty. However, to competitively trade in the global market, South Africa needs to keep pace with global developments such as the liberalisation of the electricity market, that being done without compromising its developmental imperatives. In response to this global trend of market liberalisation, government is facilitating, through a regulated procurement programme, carefully managed participation of Independent Power Producers in the electricity generation space.

09 November 2022 - NW3330

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Given that the contribution of the small, medium and micro enterprises (SMME) sector to the national gross domestic product is 34%, what is the share contributed by each industry to the total value added by the SMME sector?

Reply:

South Africa’s official statistical agency is Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) and it is responsible for calculating South Africa’s national gross domestic product (GDP). I am advised that StatsSA does not publish data in the form requested by the Honourable Member.

-END-

09 November 2022 - NW3909

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What action has he and/or his department taken to stop illegal mining in Burgersfort?

Reply:

The Department and SAPS established a stakeholder forum named “Illegal Mining Forum” in Limpopo Province in 2017 for the purpose of implementing measures to ultimately eradicate illegal mining activities in all the illegal mining hotspots, including Burgersfort.

This forum is assisted by the recently established Essential Infrastructure Task Team, which is a specialised unit within SAPS to deal, amongst others, with illegal mining.

09 November 2022 - NW3586

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) What are the relevant details of the update on (a) gains and (b) challenges experienced by the One Stop Shop by InvestSA. (2) Whether any successful businesses have come out of the programme and successfully employed more South Africans: if not, why not, if so what are the relevant details? W4393E

Reply:

The One-Stop Shop is part of Government’s services to improve the investment climate and make it easier to operate a business in South Africa.

To this end the One-Stop Shop provides an investment facilitation service, at the National One-Stop and the three (3) Provincial in Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal and Western Cape.

This consists of support with respect to:

  • pre investment (information and advisory) services to investors
  • set up (roll out and implementation) and
  • post investment services.

The role of the One-Stop Shop is to support new investments, expansions and retention of investment through assisting investors. Examples of the type of support rendered to foreign investors include support with:

  • addressing challenges at local government level
  • environment impact licenses
  • water usage licenses
  • construction permits
  • electricity connections
  • information to facilitate compliance with standards
  • port clearances and
  • work visas for managers and investors

Investment cuts across the three (3) sphere of Government (National, Provincial and Local) and Government agencies and InvestSa thus work with these various entities.

The One-Stop Shop provides an investment facilitation service throughout the investment life cycle journey in South Africa. The One-Stop Shop facilitates investment projects to be implemented and operationalised so that production plants and services can start, thereby creating new jobs and retaining jobs.

Recent examples include facilitating visas and electricity connections for Ford’s $1 billion new production line at the Tshwane Special Economic Zone (SEZ); as well visas for P&G and technical engagements with the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) for industrial products.

The quarterly reports of the Department submitted to Parliament, provides additional information on the successes of InvestSA.

-END-

09 November 2022 - NW3915

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) What steps will he take with regard to the responses he received to the withdrawal of the Gas Amendment Bill, [B9-2021], on which extensive public hearings across the Republic were held and that now leave many stakeholders like the National Energy Regulator of South Africa in the dark and concerned that the withdrawal has dealt the entity a serious blow and (b) how does he plan to remedy the (i) wasteful spending of public funds on a bill that will never be processed and (ii) legislative shortcomings that the absence of the bill causes for the industry and the Republic?

Reply:

a) The Department has not received any responses to the withdrawal of the Bill.

b) The inputs from public consultations will be used to strengthen and improve on the Bill which will be resubmitted in next financial year.

08 November 2022 - NW3439

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) By what date will she verify figures given on the number of claims (a) lodged, (b) settled and (c) outstanding on labour tenants land claims; (2) whether a credible database exists which can verify such numbers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a),(b),(c) The verification process on the applications received was undertaken in 2001 by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) through the appointment of service providers, HSK Simpson and Lima.

2. Yes. The outcome of the verification process resulted in the database that is being used by DALRRD in processing the labour tenant claims decentralized in all affected provinces.

08 November 2022 - NW3876

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Mulder, Dr CP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she will confirm reports from her department and the Iranian media that the Government will be welcoming the President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Ayatollah Dr Seyyed Ebrahim Raisi Ebrahim, and other Iranian Delegates to the Republic ; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the date of the meeting; (2) Whether, considering that the Islamic Republic of Iran is currently under sanctions from countries in Europe and America, she has found that the engagement with the Islamic Republic of Iran puts the Republic of South Africa at odds with our key trading partners and puts agreements such as the African Growth and Opportunity Act trade agreement at risk; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) Whether, considering that the Iranian regime ascribes to values that are diametrically opposed to the principles *on which the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, is based, such as democratic, egalitarian principles and women’s rights, her department has found that the specified visit could undermine the fight against gender – based violence in the Republic and around the world; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) What is the position of the Republic on the repression of women’s rights by the Islamic Republic on the repression of women’s rights by the Islamic Republic of Iran; (5) Whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. An invitation was extended by President Ramaphosa to the former President of the Islamic Republic of Iran, Dr Hassan Rouhani to undertake a State Visit to South Africa in 2020. However, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the visit did not materialise. Following the elections in Iran in June 2021, an invitation was extended to the new Iranian President, Dr Raisi, to undertake a State Visit to South Africa in 2023. The exact dates for the State Visit are yet to be confirmed and mutually convenient dates are being discussed through diplomatic channels.

Dr Hossein Amir-Abdollahian, the Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Islamic Republic of Iran, will participate in the 15th Session of the South Africa-Iran Joint Commission of Cooperation (JCC), which will be hosted in South Africa on 29 November 2022. The previous Session of the JCC was held in 2019 and could not convene in 2020 or 2021 because of COVID-19.

2. South Africa honours United Nations sanctions in keeping with the traditional Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and African Union (AU) positions of not recognising unilateral coercive measures. In this regard, South Africa does not recognise the unilateral and secondary sanctions imposed by countries outside of the United Nations sanctions mechanisms. However, South Africa is mindful of the impact thereof on its political and economic engagements and the relevant stakeholders. Furthermore, South Africa conducts its bilateral relations within the context of international law and in the context of the relevant international organisations such as the World Trade Organisation.

3. A State Visit by President Raisi to South Africa will allow for engagement at the highest political level with the objective of strengthening bilateral relations and exchanging views on a number of political, economic and social issues including issues on human rights as South Africa will serve as a member of the Human Rights Council from 2023. Sectoral visits to Iran earlier this year in May, August and October already focused on policies and programmes by the two countries to support women empowerment. In this regard, I am of the view that an engagement between the two Presidents could enrich the efforts of both countries towards the empowerment of women. A delegation from South Africa participated in the 2nd Session of the South Africa-Iran Structured Dialogue Forum on Human Rights held in Iran, Tehran from 3 - 4 October 2022.

South Africa welcomed the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) when it was adopted in 2015, between Iran and the United States of America, the United Kingdom, France, Russia, China, and Germany (the P5+1 countries) as well as the European Union (EU). South Africa noted that the JCPOA was probably the most important diplomatic achievement in the area of nuclear non-proliferation since the signing of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). United Nations Security Council (UNSC) Resolution 2231 (2015) endorsed the JCPOA and lifted all nuclear-related sanctions against Iran.

However, in May 2018, the US - under the administration of former President Donald Trump –unilaterally withdrew from the JCPOA and re-imposed all US sanctions lifted under the agreement. This has tentatively remained the status quo under President Biden, with the US preferring to negotiate with Iran on the terms of its return to the JCPOA. This follows Iran’s approach (in response to the US withdrawal) to gradually reduce its compliance with the JCPOA in the face of the US’s enforcement of punitive sanctions against it, in a quid pro quo manner. The other parties to the JCPOA have also been involved in efforts to determine the terms under which both the US and Iran would return to compliance with the agreement.

South Africa has strongly supported the talks taking place between Iran and the United States and continues to encourage all Parties, especially the United States and Iran, to undertake every effort to reinstate the Plan of Action in full and without delay. South Africa reiterates that given the current outstanding issues on the agreement, only strong political will on the side of Iran and the United States to reach an agreement, can break the deadlock.

4. We are concerned about discrimination and oppression based on race, sex, gender, sexual orientation, religion and origin as outlined by our Constitution. In this regard, South Africa makes its views heard in different forums, depending on the context and individual incidents. We will engage with Iran on concerns we have regarding discrimination and violence against women.

5. No.

08 November 2022 - NW3685

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In each (a) province and (b) district in the Republic, what is the (i) total number, (ii) race and (iii) age of (aa) women and (bb) young person whose agricultural products or produce found markets in various SA Development Community states in the past three financial years?

Reply:

(a),(b)(i),(ii),(iii),(aa),(bb) Please refer to the table below.

(a) Free State Province

(b)District

(aa) No of Women

(iii) Age

(ii)

Race

(bb) No of Young People

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

Mangaung Metro

0

-

-

0

-

-

Fezile Dabi

0

-

-

0

-

-

Xhariep District

1

61

Coloured

1

36

Black

Thabo Mofutsanyana District-Makholokoeng FPSU

18

25-68

Black

8

25-35

Black

Lejweleputswa District

56

25-70

Black

17

25-35

Black

TOTAL

75

-

-

25

-

-

(a) Gauteng Province

(b) District

(aa)No of Women

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

(bb) No of Young People

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

City of Tshwane

0

0

0

1

35

African

TOTAL

-

-

-

1

-

-

(a) Limpopo Province

(b) District

(aa) No of Women

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

(bb) No of Young People

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

Mopani

0

n/a

n/a

0

n/a

n/a

Vhembe

0

n/a

n/a

0

n/a

n/a

Sekhukhune

0

n/a

n/a

0

n/a

n/a

Waterberg

1

45

African

0

n/a

African

Capricorn:

2

29-56

African

4

29-33

African

TOTAL

3

-

 

4

-

-

(a)Mpumalanga Province

(b) District

(aa) No of Women

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

(bb) No of Young People

(iii) Age

(ii) Race

Ehlanzeni District

Nkomazi Vegetable FPSU

482

35 -62

Black

187

24 - 35

Black

Ehlanzeni District

Nkomazi Cotton FPSU

401

36 and older

Black

82

18-35

Black

Ehlanzeni District

Huntington FPSU

48

35- 64

Black

25

25-35

Black

Ehlanzeni District

Thulamahashe

193

21-75

Black

56

21-35

Black

Ehlanzeni District Malelane/Nkomati FPSU

220

36 and older

Black

7

18-35

Black

Nkangala District-Sybrandskraal FPSU

45

27-55

Black

19

22-30

Black

Nkangala District-Kameelrivier FPSU

33

30-55

Black

17

25-30

Black

Gert Sibande - Dundonald FPSU

125

18-60

Black

17

19-35

Black

Gert Sibande – Mkhondo FPSU

80

18-60

Black

15

19-35

Black

TOTAL

1627

   

425

   

(a)North West Province

None

(a)Northern Cape Province

None

(a)Western Cape Province

None

(a)Eastern Cape Province: None

None

(a)KwaZulu-Natal Province

None

 

08 November 2022 - NW3471

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of notices of birth were issued by his department to migrants who have given birth in the Republic in the past 10 years?

Reply:

The Department does not keep statistics of the manually issued notices of birth to migrants as there’s no provision on the National Population Register (NPR) to register such notices.

The Live Capture birth register module has been designed to capture such information in the future once birth registration migrate from NPR to Live Capture.

END

08 November 2022 - NW3954

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) amount does his department owe to the (i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) Senqu Local Municipality, (b) is the age analysis in each case on monies owed and (c) are the details of the (i) building and (ii) use thereof; (2) whether his department has any plans in place to address the debts; if not, why not; if so, what (a) plan and (b) are the time frames in which the debt will be settled?

Reply:

(1)&(2)

The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) does not owe Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and Senqu Local Municipality any money for rates and services. In this regard, please note that the municipal accounts for rates and services in respect of buildings occupied by the DHA are managed and paid for by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI). The DHA reimburses the DPWI on a monthly basis for such expenditure.

END

08 November 2022 - NW3064

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What is a total number of service providers that have been blacklisted for shoddy workmanship on Reconstruction and Development Programme houses in the past 10 years, (b) who are the directors of the companies that have been blacklisted and (c) what vetting process are in place to assess service providers who want to engage in work with the Government?

Reply:

The National Department is currently in the process of profiling service providers that have been blacklisted by the National Treasury and contractors who may be involved in illegal activities or defaulted in contracts in the conducting of business with all spheres of government.

a) There are no contractors that have been requested by the National Department of Human Settlements to be blacklisted.

b) Not applicable based on (a) above.

c) The process of vetting of service providers in the Department and Provincial Departments of Human Settlements must include the following aspects;

  1. Ensure all contractors are registered in the Central Supplier Database
  2. Ensure all contractors are tax compliant
  3. Ensure that contractors have a valid CIDB status
  4. Ensure that contractors have disclosed all interests in line with appropriate SBD forms
  5. Ensure that contractors are not previously blacklisted from doing business with the state
  6. Submission of relevant BBB-EE score cards to ensure calculation of points as per the relevant supply chain management prescripts
  7. In the case of construction of a house, the service provider has a National Home Builders Regulatory Council (NHBRC) certificate as proof of enrolment before any commencement of construction.
  8. All applicable and relevant processes and procedures as per SCM prescripts are followed, adhered and complied with.

08 November 2022 - NW3695

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Mogale, Mr T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total number of social housing schemes are currently(a) under her department,(b) being planned and/or (c) under construction? (NW 4524E)

Reply:

​a) There is a total of 194 completed and tenanted social housing projects representing a portfolio of 42 797 units as at end March 2022

b) The pipeline of new social housing projects planned and not yet approved include seventy-eight (78) projects with the potential for delivery of 46 646 social housing units.

c) Fifty-three (53) social housing projects with 25 891 social housing units have been approved and are at different stages of construction.

08 November 2022 - NW3696

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Mogale, Mr T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total (a) amount of the budget was allocated for the residential relief programme for tenants affected by COVID-19 lockdowns and (b) number of tenants (i) benefitted from the relief programme nationally and (ii) from Thembelihle in Tshwane were beneficiaries of the programme; (2) whether she has been informed of the hostile relationship between the managing agency and the tenants in Thembelihle; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps have been taken to resolve issues raised by the tenants in relation to excessive billing by the private metering companies?

Reply:

1. (a) A total of R300 million was allocated for the rent relief programme for tenants affected by the impact of the National State of Disaster on COVID-19.

(b) Based on information received from the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA), two hundred and one (201) households have benefitted nationally from the programme. In addition, post-March 2022 applications have been reassessed based on further revisions to the policy in February 2022, based on representations to the Minister. Thus, an additional two hundred and eight (208) households have been approved to benefit from the programme, subject to the approval of the retention of the surplus by the National Treasury.

(2) A Memorandum was submitted in June 2020 to Yeast City Housing which developed and managed the Thembelihle Village Social Rental Project and these required several interventions, which are in various stages of agreement and resolution. This included cancelling the contract Sand’s several interventions were actioned. This included cancelling the contract of a utility billing service provider, procuring the prepaid metering systems, installation of biometric access systems, and instituting legal process cases for non-payers and instigators of violence in the Thembelihle Village Social Rental Housing project.

Additional Information on the Thebelihle Village and Landlord Dispute

The current hostility is caused by some tenants who do want to comply with the provisions of their lease agreements signed with the Social Housing Institution, namely Yeast City Housing, when they rented the units at Thembelihle Village in the City of Tshwane between 2018 and 2020 the billing of utilities was outsourced. Yeast City Housing did not have the resources and capabilities to undertake the billing function. The rates charged aligned with the charges by the City of Tshwane to its residential customers (although this was challenged).

From October to December 2020 some tenants boycotted the project and destroyed equipment, intimidated staff, and tampered with the meters. The service provider was forced to resign, and some tenants were found by the Court to have caused the violence and tampered with the meters and given five (5) year suspended prison sentences.

Yeast City Housing staff now undertake meter readings, and the calculations of the amount payable is outsourced and currently, tenants appear to be satisfied as the billing is done in accordance with the rates per unit prescribed by the Municipality (City of Tshwane). However, as at 31 March 2022 the tenants owe Yeast City Housing R17 million (rental arrears) and also did not pay for utilities, which results in the City of Tshwane being owed R9, 9 million. The City disconnected water and electricity due to non-payment of the arrears and tenants again became agitated damaging the company’s property and intimidating the staff.

Tenants requested prepaid electricity meters (at a cost of approximately R5 million) and Yeast City Housing agreed to this. However, the equipment is held by the supplier, which is the City of Tshwane and cannot be installed before payment of 60% of outstanding arrears of 9, 9 million (which is approximately 5, 5 million) of the municipal arrears and payment arrangements for the remainder.

This was communicated to the tenants on 31 March 2022, but tenants remain unwilling to pay and legal action has been initiated against the tenants who refuse to pay their rentals and the outstanding utilities. The Local Ward Councillor, Cllr. Conride Ngoveni, is fully aware of the situation and was also involved in the negotiations for the tenants to pay their arrears.

08 November 2022 - NW3928

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What were the outcomes of her and/ or her department’s engagement with Zimbabwe on the conduct of the Member of the Executive Council of Health in Limpopo, regarding her inhumane treatment of a Zimbabwean female patient who was awaiting surgery?

Reply:

Following the comments to a Zimbabwean patient by Dr Phophi Ramathuba, MEC for Health in Limpopo, that appeared in a video clip recorded in Bela Bela hospital, His Excellency, Mr DD Hamadziripi, Zimbabwean Ambassador to South Africa has had engagements with my Department on this matter.

In discussions between my Department and Zimbabwe’s Ambassador to South Africa, both sides agreed that the concerns raised by the MEC should be discussed through existing diplomatic channels and existing bilateral mechanism instruments as contained in the Bi-National Commission Agreement.

Both parties agreed that the Bela Bela incident should not be looked at in isolation but holistically as a problem that both our governments need to urgently address to the benefit of both our peoples.

In addition, my Department reminded Ambassador Hamadziripi of the continued collaboration that South Africa and Zimbabwe has with each other within the context of the Agreement on Health Matters.

It should further be noted that the National Department of Health issued a statement on 24 August 2022 regarding this matter. Furthermore, President Ramaphosa also addressed this matter during his oral replies to the Q and A Session of Parliament held in the National Assembly on 30 August 2022.

08 November 2022 - NW3251

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

Which steps of intervention have been taken in ensuring that houses and toilets built for residents of Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality also accommodate persons living with disabilities?

Reply:

The Limpopo Provincial Department of Human Settlements has committed itself to ensuring that houses and toilets that are constructed do accommodate specifications for persons living with disabilities throughout the Province. It has indicated that in terms of the National Building Regulations, the departmental house layout includes the house plan for persons with disabilities as guided by the applicable SANS 10400 Part S providing specifications for both houses and toilet facilities.

Furthermore, the Limpopo Provincial Department of Human Settlements has also undertaken to ensure that the above specifications are adhered to and that both houses and toilet facilities built for residents in the Ba-Phalaborwa Local Municipality do accommodate persons living with disabilities.

08 November 2022 - NW3979

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Republic intends to renew the Treaty on the Grand Inga Hydropower Project with the Democratic Republic of the Congo; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what provision will be made by her department for public input regarding the opinion that must be obtained from the State Law Advisors as to the specified agreement’s consistency with domestic law and international obligation?

Reply:

The Department of International Relations and Cooperation’s Office of the Chief State Law Adviser OCSLA(International Law) has not received a request for legal advice on the Renewal of the Treaty on the Grand Inga Hydropower Project with the Democratic Republic of the Congo.   The responsible Department, namely, the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy would be best placed to provide an answer on the policy decision to be taken to renew the Treaty.

08 November 2022 - NW3132

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has been informed of the land invasion at Buildfontein farm on the D615 which is owned by her department; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did the land invasion start, (b) what steps has her department taken to protect the specified property and (c) who is the intended beneficiaries of the property; (2) whether there is truth in the statement by the Greater Kokstad Municipal Manager, Mr S R Zwane, that her department has applied for an urgent court interdict to prevent the land invasion; if so, what are the relevant details of the status of the interdict; if not, (3) whether her department has considered an urgent interdict; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the reasons that her department did not proceed with the application and (b) how will her department compensate the intended beneficiaries; (4) whether she and/or her department has been informed that on 12 December 2017, the acting Director-General confirmed that a certain person (name furnished) is the beneficiary of the property; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether she was informed that the Department of Agriculture confirmed during a sight visit on 8 March 2018 that the same farm was under attack in another effort for a land invasion; if not, why not; if so, what steps did she take at this point to protect the property?

Reply:

1. Yes.

(a) The exact land invasion start date cannot be determined; however the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) noticed land invasions on 9 March 2020 while conducting routine property inspection.

(b) DALRRD opened a case at Franklin Police Station and approached the State Attorney to get an urgent court interdict to stop the invaders.

(c) The intended beneficiaries of the property will be identified by the beneficiary selection process pending finalization of the farm eviction process.

2. Yes. DALRRD through the Office of the State Attorney has appointed an advocate who has drafted an urgent application on 7 October 2022 to place the matter on the court roll.

3. Yes.

(a) DALRRD applied for an urgent interdict to evict the invaders and is proceeding with the application. The Case Number for the interdict is 13523/22P and is set down for an interim order; the Prevention Of Illegal Eviction Act, 1998 (Act No. 19 of 1998) (PIE) application is under Case Number 13528/22P.

(b) The interdict to evict the invaders is intended to pave way for the prospective beneficiary to take full occupation of the farm and participate in commercial farming.

4. No. DALRRD has no knowledge or record of this matter, and the person (name furnished) is not traceable, therefore the Department is not in a position to respond to this question.

5. No. There is no communication or report related to any inspections of 8 March 2018 indicating any land invasion.

08 November 2022 - NW3601

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether there is a State Veterinarian allocated to the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality; if not, why not; if so, (a) who is the State Veterinarian, (b) where will the State Veterinarian be based, (c) on what date was he or she appointed and (d) what are the responsibilities and duties of the State Veterinarian;

Reply:

1. Yes.

a) Dr Roaul Strydom.

b) Graaff-Reinet.

c) He was appointed in December 2006.

d) A state veterinarian is responsible for disease control, facilitation of veterinary international trade, veterinary public health as well as animal welfare amongst other things.

2. Many factors are considered when establishing a new state veterinary office including, but not limited to the number of livestock, number of farms and sometimes homesteads and farms, risk of disease incursion, number of establishments that need to be inspected, and even exports certification that may happen from that area.

3. There is already a state veterinarian in the specified municipality. The details are:

Graaff-Reinet SVA

Petrus de Klerk Building, 15-31 Bourke Street,Graaff-Reinet,6280

Dr Roaul Strydom

Chief State Veterinarian

Office: 049 892 2970

Cell : 0828308307

Email: roaulstrydom@hotmail.com

   

Lizelle Nutt

Office: 049 892 2970

Cell : 0728291511

Email: lizelle.nutt@drdar.gov.za

4. Each district has a dedicated Deputy Director: Veterinary Services who is a state veterinarian, who ensures that services are provided in the district. The contact details are attached as Annexure A.

07 November 2022 - NW3939

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether any assessments have been done on the state of the infrastructure of the Luxolo Intermediate School in Aberdeen, Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the findings; (2) whether any budgetary allocations have been made for (a) day-to-day maintenance, (b) upgrading of facilities and (c) cleaning; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether any staffing provision has been made at the school for (a) maintenance and (b) cleaning; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The question asked by the Hon Member is asking for information that is in the purview of the MEC for Education in the Eastern Cape Department  of Education, not the Hon Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to refer the question to the respective province.  

07 November 2022 - NW3941

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of early childhood development (ECD) centres are registered in (i) Graaff-Reinet, (ii) Aberdeen, (iii) Nieu-Bethesda, (iv) Steytlerville, (v) Jansenville, (vi) Klipplaat and (vii) Willowmore and Rietbron in the Sarah Baartman District Municipality, (b) number of the specified ECD centres cater for people with disabilities and (c) number of learners are each of the ECDs registered for?

Reply:

The questions the Honourable Member has asked require information on a function which falls within the remit of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) of the Eastern Cape Provincial Education Department, and not the Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to submit the questions to the MEC for Education in the Eastern Cape. 

07 November 2022 - NW3899

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, considering that her department promised a number of schools in Limpopo including the Ndzalama Primary School, Dingamanzi Primary School, Chameti Secondary School and Bvuma Primary School infrastructure projects years before the COVID-19 lockdown, and in some cases allocated funds for delivery of the specified projects, thereafter infrastructure projects were suspended indefinitely and school communities continued to suffer the consequences, her department will provide an audit of all schools in Limpopo and other provinces at which it promised infrastructure projects and/or started and subsequently suspended such projects indefinitely; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details of funds allocated to unfinished projects and (b) reasons for the indefinite suspension of the projects?

Reply:

The question asked by the Hon Member is asking for information that is in the purview of the MEC for Education in Limpopo Department  of Education, not the Hon Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to refer the question to the respective province.  

07 November 2022 - NW3870

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has put any mechanisms in place to ensure that provinces transfer the full amount allocated to schools in the various quintiles in terms of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding as gazetted annually; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) confirms the allocations to schools through telephonic surveys and physical monitoring in schools. To support and corroborate information provided by schools, the schools surveyed are also required to provide copies of the allocation letters they received, as well as copies of bank statements reflecting transfers received. The findings, and areas of non-compliance, are communicated to Members of the Executive Council (MECs) wherein, they also requested to ensure that, where applicable, the necessary corrective measures are implemented to aspects of non-compliance raised in the report.

07 November 2022 - NW3953

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2968 on 26 September 2022, she was guided by a legal opinion; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what statutory provisions lead to her department’s position that is developing legislation and/or policy dealing with this phenomenon that will be institutionalising unfair labour practice; (2) whether she will furnish Ms A M van Zyl with details of (a) the specified statutory provision and (b) who and/or what informed her department to take the stance?

Reply:

 1. No, The Minister of Basic Education did not require legal opinion on whether the Department has any policy or legislation in place to deal with the displaced educators. The Department cannot make legislation or policy in this regard. A legal opinion cannot be sought based on the phenomenon that is fundamentally flawed. Educators who are forced out of the workplaces by communities on allegations that are not proven are treated unfairly because their labour rights are infringed.

Suggested (1) No. The Department has not identified any need to develop a specific policy or legislation on the matter. Displaced educators remain the employees of a Provincial Education Department that employed them and this follows an assessment and confirmation that the allegations against them are unproven and that they cannot be charged for misconduct of any kind. 

2. (a) There is no statutory provision with which the Minister could furnish the honourable Ms AM van Zyl as we have status that there is no policy or legislation in place that specifically deal with displaced educators.  

(b)  As indicated above, the phenomenon of pushing educators out of schools infringes on the teachers' rights and thus perpetuates unfair labour practice. Departments must find a way of investigating issues raised by the complainant in a fair and legal manner.

Suggested. (b) The Department is satisfied that the existing processes, practices and procedures are adequate to deal with instances of displacement that occur from time to time.

07 November 2022 - NW4016

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a)What outstanding amounts are owed by her department in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) to the Msunduzi Local Municipality in terms of outstanding rates for schools in the specified municipality, (b) what payment arrangements has been entered into with the municipality to honour monies owed for the specified schools, (c) what are the time frames for such arrangements, (d) has the municipality acknowledged the payment arrangements or refused the payment arrangements, and (e) what engagements has she had with the municipality to address constant school disconnections due to monies owed by her department?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

With regard to outstanding amounts that are owed by schools in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) to the Msunduzi Local Municipality in terms of outstanding rates for schools in the specified municipality; payment of municipal rates for schools is not in the purview of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, therefore this question can be best responded to by our sister department/s, Department of Basic Education and/or Department of Higher Education and Training, respectively.

07 November 2022 - NW3907

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the relevant details of the steps that her department has taken to ensure the safety and security of teachers and learners within the confines of the schools?

Reply:

The steps that the Department has taken to ensure the safety and security of teachers and learners within the confines of the schools are:

  1. The  Department developed the National School Safety Framework  to assist schools in dealing and managing incidents of crime and violence, furthermore, it contains tools that assess physical security (safety audits) and learner safety surveys.
  2. The Department  further developed  the protocol that deals with incidents of corporal punishment and the Protocol for the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools. 
  3. The Department signed a collaborative protocol with the South African Police Service to manage school-based crime prevention programmes. 
  4. The Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) assist in bringing parents and social partners to address the challenges faced by schools.
  5. All schools must have a learner code of conduct that each learner and their parent should sign.
  6. All schools must develop safety plans based on the audits conducted.

07 November 2022 - NW3860

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Yabo, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the (a) progress of the Vangasali campaign to register early childhood development centres and (b) target number for her department for the current financial year?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has continued to train provincial officials on Vangasali, to particularly capacitate all officials post the ECD function shift. To date, seven (7) provinces have been trained on the programme. For the two (2) outstanding provinces, training in the North West is scheduled to take place on 26 and 27 October 2022; while for Western Cape, it will take place early November 2022. These capacity-building sessions are meant to support provinces which continue to register ECD programmes as part of the Vangasali drive. 

(b) In total, provinces have targeted 6 361 ECD programmes to be registered for 2022/23 financial year.