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21 November 2022 - NW3905

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What plans did his department put in place to provide adequate water to residents of new stands at Boitekong in Rustenburg?

Reply:

Due to the current high water demand exacerbated by the ongoing power outages, the Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM) is implementing water demand management in the greater Boitekong areas including the new stands (Extention 13). According to the Rustenburg LM, the water restrictions schedules have been communicated with relevant Ward Councillors and the affected residents.

In the medium to long term, funds have been made available through Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) administered by Department of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) for the upgrade of Bospoort Water Treatment Works from the 12ML/d to 24ML/d. I have been advised that the outstanding mechanical and electrical works is envisaged to be completed by the end of June 2023. This will ensure adequate water provision to the Boitekong area.

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21 November 2022 - NW4097

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the many corruption cases which have been closed for various reasons including the inability to locate key witnesses, what key strategies has his department put in place to have perpetrators brought to book in order to discourage continued widespread corruption in his department?

Reply:

1. the dtic does not have any reported corruption cases that have been closed due to the inability to locate key witnesses.

2. the dtic recognises fraud prevention as an integral part of strategic management. the dtic is committed to the elimination of fraud and strives towards maintaining and implementing the highest standard of prevention and detection. the dtic prevents fraud through implementing the following strategies:

a) Prevention Strategy –

  1. the dtic has implemented a fraud and corruption email hotline address fraudandcorruption@thedtic.gov.za which is on the dtic’s website.
  2. Fraud Awareness Training: Employees in the department and provided with Fraud prevention training.
  3. Assessment of Fraud Risks: The Office of the Chief Risk Officer (OCRO) within the dtic, conducts annual risk assessments to identify potential fraud risks based on the risk profile of the Department.
  4. Internal Control: Internal controls are the first line of defence against fraud and are essential elements in the overall anti-fraud prevention strategy. the dtic promotes an internal control culture through the mapping of business processes to ensure that controls are built in, regular communication on ethics and ethical behaviour in the performance of daily activities, implementation of additional controls to prevent any fraud risks, and forensic investigations where required.
  5. Pre-Employment Screening: Screening is an effective means of preventing fraud such as falsifying qualifications or employment history, as well as previous criminal convictions for offences.
  6. Disclosure of interests: All staff members are required to disclose their financial interests on an annual basis. Failure to disclose fully incurs disciplinary action.
  7. Approval of Other Remunerative Work Outside Public Service: All staff are reminded, via regular communications and newsflashes, to obtain prior written approval of other remunerative work outside the Public Service in terms of Section 30(1) of the Public Service Act. Failure to obtain such approval incurs disciplinary action.
  8. Reviewing systems and procedures: When fraud is detected it is referred to the dtic’s Internal Audit unit for an investigation and recommendation of action. the dtic re-assesses the adequacy of the internal control environment and actively plans and implements improvements where required. The instances of fraud are received either through the whistle blowers hotline, National Anti-Corruption hotline or by management.
  9. Whistle Blowers protection: Individuals are encouraged to come forward with any information without fear of victimisation as the dtic has institutionalised the protection afforded to whistle blowers by the Protected Disclosures Act by approving its own Whistle Blowing Policy.

(b) Detection Strategy: Despite the existence of fraud prevention programmes, fraud may still occur. An anti-fraud reporting facility via the Presidential hotline and Whistle Blower’s line complements and underpins the commitment of the dtic to fighting fraud.

(c) Response Strategy -

    1. Disciplinary Action: Subsequent to a full investigation, the dtic takes disciplinary action in all cases where warranted. Any member of staff found guilty of dishonesty or fraud will be considered to have committed a serious disciplinary offence and will be dismissed.
    2. Recovery of money or property lost through fraud: the dtic will actively pursue the recovery of money or property lost through fraud and will refer the matter for criminal prosecution.

(d) Forensic Investigation -

  1. In the event that fraud is detected or suspected, the matter is fully investigated by Internal Audit Forensic Investigators.
  2. All fraud cases are tabled, discussed and monitored at the Pre-Risk Committee.
  3. All fraud cases are referred to SAPS for further prosecution.
  4. The findings of the SIU investigation of the National Lotteries Commission (NLC), have been prioritised and is being addressed as recommended in the SIU report. In addition, a fraud and corruption hotline has been created and placed on the NLC website to enable anonymous reporting by the public, of fraud and corruption at the NLC. This hotline is managed by the dtic, independently from the NLC.

(e) Anti-Corruption Unit and measures in progress: An Anti-Corruption unit within the dtic is in the process of being capacitated with the objective of intense focus on anti-fraud and corruption initiatives and measures across the dtic group, inclusive of all public entities reporting into the dtic.

-END-

__________________

Mr Ebrahim Patel

Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Date: ….../….../ 2022

Approved/Not Approved

21 November 2022 - NW4091

Profile picture: Tambo, Mr S

Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to his utterances in the public domain regarding the funding for the so-called missing middle and getting the private sector, particularly the banks, to provide loans to students for their studies, his department has entered into any formal and/or informal agreements with the banking sector to fund education; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether there has been any feasibility study done on (a) the impact of loans as a method to fund students and (b) whether loans as a method to fund students will not create massive debt traps as seen in countries such as the United States; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No, the Department has not entered into any agreements with the banking sector to provide loans to missing middle students. However, there have been engagements with banks about the possibility of a loan scheme supported by government guarantees. 

(2) Issues relating to the feasibility of loans were explored in earlier work conducted by the Department, particularly by a Ministerial Task Team that reported in 2016. The findings of this work were incorporated into the report of the Ministerial Task Team, whose recommendations are currently under discussion. The work of this MTT reviewed previous policy advice provided to government. In addition, the report reflected on the findings of the Heher Judicial Commission on the funding of higher education, which included recommendations for an income-contingent loan model, which would include the tax-collection authority. In investigating a possible future loan model, the Department will be mindful of the student debt situation and the feasibility of collecting loans.

21 November 2022 - NW3890

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With regard to his department’s mandate to promote a dynamic industrial and globally competitive economy, what proactive action has his department taken to ensure that the Republic continues to positively participate in the global economy amidst looming grey list status and the high inflation rates which have had a negative impact on consumers?

Reply:

The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) is focused on supporting domestic businesses and foreign and domestic investors.

This support includes the conceptualisation and implementation of sectoral Masterplans by Government, Business and organised Labour. the dtic’s interventions include the provision of globally competitive financial and non-financial incentives; support for localisation through targeted private and public procurement interventions; careful use of trade policy measures to support investment in the industrial sector; measures in the competition policy space which encourage investment and localisation; and unblocking activities to assist investors to navigate South Africa’s regulatory environment as efficiently as possible. These efforts bear fruit with new investments publicly launched in the first six months of this financial year valued at R26, 9 billion and R329 billion worth of manufactured goods were exported in the same period

In common with its key trading partners, South Africa is experiencing a rise in inflation. Supply-chain disruptions experienced during the COVID-19 outbreak, the impact of generous fiscal packages in large economies, and the effect that the war in the Ukraine has had on both the energy and food value-chains, all contribute to inflationary pressures. Rising inflation affects the poor in South Africa disproportionately since food purchases account for a relatively large proportion of these consumers’ monthly expenditure. Consequently, the dtic seeks to strike a careful balance when taking policy or programme decisions which support industrialisation and which may have an impact on poor consumers. In some cases, a trade-off is required and the Department considers all relevant factors in taking such decisions.

Industrialisation increases South Africa’s ability to manufacture a range of products and this ability often mitigates or reduces inflation, especially when global prices for a particular product are rising or when international value-chains are disrupted. The dtic responds to this need and the value of approvals in more than 300 projects approved by the dtic, IDC and NEF amounted to R12,6 billion in incentives disbursed in the first six months of the financial year. Projects are located in 23 of the 52 municipalities. 11 of these are from largely rural districts. Localisation is driven by the steel industry with contribution from motor vehicle parts, renewable energy components and poultry.

I draw the Honourable Member’s attention to the efforts by both the Minister of Justice and the Minister of Finance, dealing with greylisting.

-END-

21 November 2022 - NW3214

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In view of the criminal justice reforms in the National Development Plan (NDP) and other reviews spanning the past 15 years that have not been implemented, what are the reasons that a member of the Executive has not yet been appointed to co-ordinate and manage implementation of the Seven-Point Plan in the 2007 Criminal Justice Review that was adopted by the Cabinet and reiterated in the NDP?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development is currently accountable for the overall delivery of the IJS Programme, and accounts for the entire IJS budget. The newly revised IJS governance arrangements seek to clarify and strengthen the roles of the Director-General (DG) as the accounting officer of the programme, and that of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services as the executive authority of the program.

The IJS Board has been reconfigured into an IJS Implementation Committee which is accountable to the CJS Directors-General. The formation of the IJS Board of DGs has offered an opportunity for the JCPS Directors-General to provide oversight and strategic leadership over this important transformation project as JCPS management collective. The formation of the IJS Ministerial Committee (IJSMC) provides political oversight and direction of the whole IJS Programme. The Committee comprises of the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services as the Convenor, Minister of Police, Minister of Social Development and Minister of Home Affairs.

END

21 November 2022 - NW4114

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

What are the full details of economic data and/or evidence that he can provide to prove that foreign direct investment in the Republic has had a direct proportional relationship with (a) economic growth and (b) job creation (i) in the 2021 22 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2022?

Reply:

Domestic economic growth is the aggregation of multiple, complex streams of for example: production, consumption, expenditure, imports and exports. These are in turn affected by a wide range of domestic and global factors. It is not advisable to reduce these complex interactions to a simple direct and/or proportional relationship. Subject to this caution, the following information has been provided to me by the dtic.

In the Financial year 2021-22, Foreign direct investment (FDI), measured as investment liability inflows by the South African Reserve Bank (SARB), increased from R17.3 billion at the beginning of the 2021/22 financial year to R39.9bn at the end of the financial year, growing by 130.8% during the 2021/22 financial year. In the same period, GDP grew by 1.3%, from R4.5 trillion (tr) to R4.6trn during the same period. Some studies indicate that in South Africa, FDI and economic growth are positively related (Masipa, 2014[1]; Awolusi and Adeyeye, 2016[2]; Makhoba and Zungu, 2021[3]).

In Quarter 1 2022/23 (April to June 2022), FDI declined (-34.2%) quarter-on-quarter while economic growth contracted (-0.7%) quarter-on-quarter.

Regarding Job creation, in the Financial year 2021/22: Foreign direct investment (FDI), measured as investment liability inflows, by the South African Reserve Bank (SARB), increased from R17.3 billion at the beginning of the 2021/22 financial year to R39.9bn at the end of the financial year, growing by 130.8% during the 2021/22 financial year. During the same period, Statistics South Africa (StatsSA) reported that employment contracted by 0.2%, with employment declining from 14.94 million to 14.91 million. Some empirical studies have found a positive relationship between FDI and job creation in South Africa (see Masipa, 2014).

Quarter 1 of this Financial Year 2022/23, Employment increased by 4% quarter-on-quarter while FDI declined (-34.2%) quarter-on-quarter.

Lags in an increase (or decrease) in investment and a subsequent increase (or decrease) in employment may also not follow in the same year, but may lag the change.

-END-

  1. Masipa, T. 2014. The Impact of Foreign Direct Investment on Economic Growth and Employment in South Africa: A Time Series Analysis. Mediterranean Journal of Social Sciences, 5(25), 18-27.

  2. Awolusi, OD. and Adeyeye, OP. (2016). Impact of foreign direct investment on economic growth in Africa. Problems and Perspectives in Management, 14(2-2), 289-297. doi:10.21511/ppm.14(2-2).2016.04.

  3. Makhoba, BP. and Zungu, LT. 2021. Foreign Direct Investment and Economic Growth in South Africa: Is there a Mutually Beneficial Relationship? African Journal of Business and Economic Research, 16(4).

21 November 2022 - NW4085

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures of intervention have been taken to ensure that more students’ residences are built in order to accommodate the thousands of students enrolled at the University of Zululand?

Reply:

1. To accommodate thousands of students enrolled at the University of Zululand, the Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department) has taken steps to ensure that the institution build more residences by undertaking of a feasibility. The feasibility study originally targeted the construction of 3500 beds at the institutions Kwa-Dlangewzwa Campus to eradicate student housing backlogs, and the Department is working closely with the institution to finalise the feasibility study.

2. In the short-term, the following measures and interventions were taken. This include the approval of a sum of R235 million from the previous approved funding enabling the institution to develop an immediate number of 783 beds at its KwaDlangezwa Campus while it’s finalising its feasibility study, and the contractor is currently onsite. 

3. The long-term measures and interventions included the following: that the feasibility study should be redirected and focus on two campuses, namely the KwaDlangezwa and the Richards Bay Campuses as the study seeks to address the student housing backlogs at both KwaDlangezwa and the Richards Bay Campuses. One of the interventions seeks to balance the provision of beds by allocating 1500 beds at both campuses to accommodate students enrolled at the institution. 

4. Once the feasibility study has been completed, the Department will work with the institution to determine a suitable funding approach to ensure that the institution builds more accommodation to ensure that most enrolled students are accommodated at the institution’s own accommodation facilities.

21 November 2022 - NW3952

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)Whether, with regard to communications, media and marketing services contracts of the National Lottery Commission in the past three financial years, he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with (a) a list of service providers, (b) the nature of services provided, (c) the date when services were provided and (d) the total monetary value of each contract; (2) What supply chain management process was followed for the (a) tender, (b) preferred supplier, (c) treasury database and (d) single-source in respect of each specified contracts?

Reply:

The National Lotteries Commission has furnished me the following reply on their communications, media and marketing services in the past three years.

A number of transactions of the NLC have been flagged by the Auditor General. This follows a letter addressed by the Ministry to the Auditor General, drawing attention to findings of the SIU.

The NLC advised that the adverse findings made by the Auditor-General will be investigated and disciplinary steps taken. I have requested the NLC to update me on the progress of the investigation and disciplinary steps taken.

The reply from the NLC follows:

“(1)(a),(b),(c),(d) and (2)(a),(b),(c),(d)

Please refer to the tables below for a list of service providers, the nature of the services provided, date when the services were provided, the total monetary value and the Supply Chain Management process that was followed.

Sole supplier and single source were used in instances where the NLC was targeting a specific audience and when there was one service provider running a campaign to which the NLC wanted to participate in. These transactions have since been declared as irregular expenditure by the AGSA on the basis that it was not impractical for the NLC to obtain three quotations for those below R500 000 and that the transactions above R500 000 should have been procured through competitive bidding process or deviation approved by the National Treasury and not by the Commissioner. The NLC is currently undertaking a determination exercise on these transactions as required by the National Treasury framework, disciplinary steps will be taken against all that have been found to be in contravention of the supply chain regulations

Tender relates to the transactions which have been procured through the marketing panel that the NLC procured after following a competitive bidding process.

Treasury database relates to the transactions that were procured through sourcing quotations from the Central Supplier Database.

2022

1(a)

1(b)

1( c )

1 (d)

2 (a),(b),(c),(d)

Service Provider

Service rendered

Invoice date

Value (Rands)

SCM Process

Anzomode

NLC Board Road shows

11/6/2021

1 307 750,00

Tender

Anzomode

Videography, Photography and Live Streaming

30/07/2021

59 000,75

Tender

Arena Holdings

Publishing of Funding Priorities for 2021/2 – Print media 24

06/04/2021

95 440,80

Single Source

Arena Holdings

Invitation to Bid for Eastern Cape Office fence, air-condition

24/02/2022

9 439,20

Single Source

Be Sure Events Solutions

Appointment of a service provider to provide Videography and Photography

25/07/2021

69 000,00

Tender

CEED Media & Publishing

NLC Media Campaign Advertorial – Soweto Life Online Magazine

23/08/2021

50 000,00

Single Source

Cheniwell IMC

Advert Flighting, Artwork Production and Artwork Placement

13/12/2021

1 818 750,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Advert Flighting

20/12/2021

746 250,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Free State and Limpopo Radio Interviews

10/06/2021

629 950,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Photography, Videography, Live Streaming and Provincial Travel

01/10/2021

355 375,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Photography, Videography, Live Streaming and Provincial Travel

13/10/2021

355 375,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

40 Radio Adverts for Western Cape and KwaZulu Natal

11/05/2021

315 119,95

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Publishing of Funding Priorities Community
Radio Stations Free State and North West Province

31/05/2021

371 219,31

Tender

CTP Limited T/A Lowveld Media

Advertising for the Installation of electric fence in Mpumalanga office

02/02/2022

5 035,80

Single Source

CTP Limited T/A Lowveld Media

Publication of Award Bid Number description of Bid

06/10/2021

4 874,80

Single Source

CTP Limited T/A Lowveld Media

Request for Proposal

Bib number description of Bid

29/05/2021

4 668,30

Single Source

Ebonoko Holdings

NLC Graphic Design and Animation Services

25/03/2022

121 000,00

Treasury database

FR Communications

Media Monitoring

09/03/2022

32 200,00

Tender

FR Communications

Media Monitoring

09/03/2022

32 200,00

Tender

Fundudzi Media

Title Sponsorship Sunday World Unsung Heroes

21/06/2021

2 645 000,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertisement

25/04/2021

881 000,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

6 Page Glossy Print Special Report

30/06/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising

25/07/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising – Funding for Impact Women’s Month

22/08/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Heritage Month Edition

26/09/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Newsprint Special Report

31/10/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Glossy Print Special Report

28/11/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Print Special Report

10/12/2021

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Newsprint Special Report

30/01/2022

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Newsprint Special Report

28/02/2022

740 600,00

Single Source

Fundudzi Media

Sunday World Advertising - Newsprint Special Report

28/03/2022

740 600,00

Single Source

INCE(PTY)Ltd

NLC Integrated Annual Report Phase 1

30/07/2021

723 599,55

Tender

INCE(PTY)Ltd

NLC POPIA Compliance Manual Infographics

26/07/2021

61 582,50

Tender

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Display Metro Run of Paper – Sunday Independent & Cape Times

09/04/2021

181 560,16

Single Source

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Display Metro Run of Paper – The Star

09/04/2021

116 418,86

Single Source

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Display Metro Run of Paper – Isolezwe

09/04/2021

77 338,44

Single Source

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

ACM Digital Web and Class Display

4/2/2022

5 152,00

Single Source

Insight2Lead

Appointment of a Service Provider to Conduct a Brand Survey

30/06/2021

165 513,75

Tender

Insight2Lead

Consulting for a Brand Survey

30/09/2021

164 074,50

Tender

Insight2Lead

Consulting for a Brand Survey

25/10/2021

164 074,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Outside Broadcast Media Gauteng

04/05/2021

365 097,40

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Publishing of Funding Priorities Community
Radio Stations Limpopo and Mpumalanga Province

26/05/2021

289 643,40

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Corporate Flyers

26/08/2021

64 227,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Law Booklets

26/07/2021

50 611,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Production of Embroided Mandela Day Badges

21/07/2021

21 217,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Video – Creative Broader Value

06/05/2021

20 240,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Creating a video look of content

04/11/2021

18 400,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Corporate Flyer

22/09/2021

17 997,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Design

23/06/2021

16 962,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Creative Design, Social Media Poster and Web Banner

02/12/2021

13 685,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Creative Design - Staff Awards

07/12/2021

11 086,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Corporate Flyers

27/05/2021

7 360,00

Tender

Mail & Guardian

Supplement Top 200 Young South Africans

31/05/2021

2 127 500,00

Sole Supplier

Market IQ

Print Media, Online and Broadcast Monitoring

01/11/2021

32 648,50

Tender

Market IQ

Print Media, Online and Broadcast Monitoring

01/11/2021

32 648,50

Tender

Market IQ

Print Media, Broadcast and Social Monitoring

01/01/2022

9 688,75

Tender

Media24

Advertising – Daily Sun North, City Press and Daily Sun On the Go

14/04/2021

324 007,90

Single Source

Media24

Vista – Legal Notices Tender

03/02/2022

4 443,60

Single Source

MSG Group Sales

Women Flash Mob Activation

26/08/2021

2 875 000,00

Single Source

Ndabana Media Production

Media Campaign - Advertorials on Business Unusual Magazine

25/08/2021

290 000,00

Single Source

Nolo Communications CC

Promotional Materials (NLC Branded Mugs for Staff)

15/03/2022

33 670,00

Treasury database

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest - Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review and Polokwane Observer

28/11/2021

13 796,32

Single Source

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest - Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review and Polokwane Observer

21/11/2021

13 796,32

Single Source

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

30/06/2021

14 531,86

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

01/07/2021

14 531,86

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

31/07/2021

14 531,86

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

31/08/2021

14 531,86

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

01/04/2021

12 636,40

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

01/07/2021

11 372,70

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Advert and Social Media Monitoring

01/07/2021

3 159,16

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

01/04/2021

2 007,46

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Public Relations Retainer October

30/11/2021

73 000,00

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Public Relations Retainer November

23/11/2021

73 000,00

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Public Relations Retainer December

14/12/2021

64 035,09

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Monthly Retainer Fee

27/01/2022

10 333,00

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Monthly Retainer

28/02/2022

10 333,00

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Monthly Retainer

04/03/2022

10 333,00

Tender

PR & Brand Network

Public Relations Retainer December

14/12/2021

8 964,91

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Pull up banners, Wall banners, Curved wall banners, Triangle pop-up banners, Telescopic banners and Management Fees

10/09/2021

274 907,50

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Advertising on Gauteng Radio Stations

18/05/2021

239 948,28

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Booklets

27/10/2021

97 750,00

Tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Licence Disc Holders Branded

19/07/2021

8 380,35

Tender

Top Media & Communications

Balance for the Top Women Summit 2021

10/11/2021

126 500,00

Single Source

   

Closing balance

26 712 479,65

 

2021

1(a)

1(b)

1( c )

1 (d)

2 (a),(b),(c),(d)

Service Provider

Service rendered

Invoice date

Value (Rands)

SCM Process

Anzomode

Third Party Payment Media & Broadcasting Consulting

02/07/2020

94 875,00

Tender

Anzomode

NW Virtual Event

23/08/2020

34 327,50

Tender

Anzomode

Media Buying : NC Regulatory Compliance Campaign

13/07/2020

145 797,97

tender

Anzomode

North West ECD Virtual Launch

14/08/2020

453 945,25

Tender

Anzomode

Mpumalanga ECD Launch

24/08/2020

499 404,75

Tender

Anzomode

Variation

13/08/2020

151 472,25

Tender

Anzomode

Design & Production of branded folders

27/11/2020

60 007,00

Tender

Anzomode

Cancelled Event Fee

3/12/2020

204 045,65

Tender

Anzomode

Design and Printing

30/11/2020

149 995,56

Tender

Anzomode

Equipment Branding

30/03/2021

54 050,00

Tender

Arena Holdings

Advert

22/01/2021

10 062,50

Single Sourced

Arena Holdings

Advert

22/01/2021

9 025,37

Single Sourced

Arena Holdings

Audit Campaign

20/12/2020

157 872,00

Single Sourced

Be Sure Events Solutions

Newspaper article

2020/03/08

110 547,59

Tender

Be Sure Events Solutions

NLC Branded Face Masks

2020/10/09

57 730,00

Tender

Be Sure Events Solutions

Billboard Advertising

31/01/2021

890 560,00

Tender

Black Moon Advertising

Printing Of Proactive Brochure

21/10/2021

1 702,00

Tender

Black Moon Advertising

GP ECD Virtual launch

26/10/2020

643 356,00

Tender

Botho D Trading and Projects

Fleet booklet

2020/11/11

51 993,75

Treasury database

Cheniwell IMC

Inkambu Corporate Identity Development

20/07/2020

3 500,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Media Buying : Limpopo

22/07/2020

114 000,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

NLC Logo Adjustment

20/07/2020

456 000,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Western Cape Media Buying

22/07/2020

98 100,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

WC ECD Virtual Launch

22/10/2020

663 740,04

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Corporate Gifts : Braai Set

10/12/2020

229 800,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Corporate Gifts : Braai Set

14/12/2020

108 933,03

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Third Party Payment to Rap Studios vernacular translation

09/03/2020

10 795,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Design Graphics

04/04/2020

9 000,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Design : Banner, Advertorial

02/06/2020

5 600,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Graphic Designs

30/06/2020

19 600,00

tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Media Buying : North West

22/07/2020

55 590,60

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Branding

11/08/2020

94 239,42

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

MS Teams and Email Signature

25/08/2020

10 200,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Brand Positioning – KwaZulu Natal Province

2020/11/09

84 815,25

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

NLC Designs

2020/07/09

24 600,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Branding

23/11/2020

32 150,00

Tender

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

21/05/2020

57 500,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

20/05/2020

1 305 846,40

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

29/06/2020

1 200 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

10/10/2019

69 176,64

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

27/07/2020

1 200 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Run of paper advert

24/08/2020

1 200 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Run of paper advert

28/09/2020

1 200 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Full Colour 8 pages Special Report

2020/09/11

990 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Full Colour 8 pages Special Report

2020/09/11

6 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

08/12/2020

996 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Media Buying : Sunday world

07/12/2020

996 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Brand Positioning

31/01/2021

996 000,00

Single Sourced

Fundudzi Media

Full Colour 8 pages Special Report

8/3/2021

996 000,00

Single Sourced

Government Printing Works

Tender/ New Bids

07/08/2020

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/ New Bids

20/03/2020

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/ New Bids

28/02/2020

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/ New Bids

27/07/2022

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/ New Bids

07/08/2022

252,20

Single Sourced

Government Printing Works

Tender/Invitation to bid/

06/11/2020

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/Invitation to bid/

27/10/2020

252,20

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/Invitation to bid/

6/11/2020

756,59

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/Invitation to bid/

12/10/2020

504,40

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender/Invitation to bid/

19/08/2020

3 026,40

Sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bulletin notices

2020/07/08

252,20

Sole supplier

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender/Invitation to bid/

22/11/2019

2 752,94

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender/Invitation to bid/

04/02/2020

23 183,14

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender/Invitation to bid/

15/02/2020

23 183,14

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender/Invitation to bid/

25/08/2020

11 127,91

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Isolezwe Main Body

25/02/2021

4 318,34

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Daily News Main Body

25/02/2021

5 246,99

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Publication : Cape Times, The Mercury,

21/05/2020

173 973,15

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

20/12/2020

231 328,71

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

20/12/2020

50 966,64

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

20/12/2020

359 124,30

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

20/12/2020

149 988,89

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

23/12/2020

73 600,00

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

23/12/2020

12 650,00

Single Sourced

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Class Display

28/02/2021

10 313,66

Single Sourced

Khanya PR and Media

NLC 20 years Legacy Video

13/03/2020

108 560,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Legacy Video

06/05/2020

13 800,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Brand Positioning

01/07/2020

104 554,55

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

10 ECDs NLC Legacy Projects launch

28/09/2020

695 865,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

NLC Branded Notepads

2020/10/09

20 642,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Scam alert posters

2020/10/09

1 897,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

2020/11/11

4 140,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

2020/10/09

1 897,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

2020/04/12

6 210,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

14/12/2020

2 530,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

24/02/2021

22 310,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

18/01/2021

8 510,00

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

31/03/2021

12 017,50

Tender

Khanya PR and Media

Graphic Designs

18/01/2021

15 467,00

Tender

Mandla-Matla Publishing

Tender/Invitation to bid/

21/11/2019

3 245,76

Single Sourced

Media & Broadcasting Consultants

Professional Advisory services

29/07/2020

75 000,00

Single Sourced

Media24

Media Buying

18/11/2019

271 975,00

Single Sourced

Ndabana Media Production

Advertorial on business unusual

18/11/2020

400 000,00

Treasury database

Nolo Communications CC

Translation of NLC posters

2019/09/11

124 800,00

Tender

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review, Polokwane Observer

25/06/2020

12 730,01

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review, Polokwane Observer

05/07/2020

12 730,01

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review, Polokwane Observer

12/07/2020

12 730,01

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review, Polokwane Observer

19/07/2020

12 730,01

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review,

26/07/2020

8 740,00

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Capricorn Voice, Polokwane Review, Polokwane Observer

22/11/2020

12 730,01

Single Sourced

Northern Media Group

Expression of Interest Polokwane Observer

15/11/2020

4 600,00

Single Sourced

Novus Group

Media Monitoring

12/05/2020

10 407,50

Treasury database

Novus Group

Media Monitoring

12/06/2020

10 407,50

Treasury database

Novus Group

Media Monitoring

10/07/2020

10 407,50

Treasury database

Novus Group

Media Monitoring

2020/12/08

10 407,50

Treasury database

Novus Group

Online and Social Media Monitoring

14/09/2020

10 407,50

Treasury database

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

29/02/2020

1 362,80

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

31/01/2020

9 980,19

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

01/07/2021

14 643,86

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

01/4/2021

12 636,40

Tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring

04/5/2021

2 007,46

Tender

Professional Evaluation and Research

Media Monitoring

30/10/2020

26 277,50

Tender

Professional Evaluation and Research

Media Monitoring

30/11/2020

26 277,50

Tender

Professional Evaluation and Research

Media Monitoring

11/12/2020

26 277,50

Tender

Professional Evaluation and Research

Media Monitoring

31/01/2021

26 277,50

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Gauteng News Papers :

27/07/2020

159 925,97

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Fees and Disbursement

15/09/2020

722 512,80

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Compilation of Jerusalem Video

2020/10/11

19 550,00

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

HCM Induction video

13/01/2021

108 100,00

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Media Buying

2021/01/24

283 327,49

Tender

Roadshow Marketing

Marketing

2021/01/13

108 100,00

Tender

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

17 077,50

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

165 600,00

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

85 905,00

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

238 308,75

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

409 239,00

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

94 702,50

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

131 962,50

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

265 011,70

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

98 583,75

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

105 647,63

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

160 683,75

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

240 016,50

Sole supplier

SABC

NLC Live Reads : Open Call Applications

30/04/2020

183 971,25

Sole supplier

SABC

Media Buying SA FM

26/02/2021

292 853,25

sole supplier

SABC

Media Buying SA FM

5/3/2021

164 606,40

sole supplier

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Brand Positioning Regulatory Compliance

22/07/2020

160 310,00

Tender

   

Total cost

24 536 205.63

 

2020

1(a)

1(b)

1( c ) Invoice date

1 (d)

2 (a),(b),(c),(d)

Service Provider

Invoice description

Invoice date

Value (Rands)

SCM Process

ABN Publishing

Advertising in Forbes Magazine

2019/11/30

253 000,00

single sourcing

Aganang Community Radio Station

Outside Live Broadcast

2019/07/10

35 000,00

single source

Alfred Nzo Community Radio

Media Buying - Outside Broadcast

2019/01/01

30 000,00

single sourcing

Anzomode

Media Buying North West

2019/05/09

297 275,00

tender

Anzomode

Live Feeds

2019/09/11

68 597,59

tender

Anzomode

Videography & Photography

2019/09/10

252 999,98

tender

Anzomode

NLC Scam alert(Print Media)

2019/11/04

569 387,25

tender

Anzomode

Videography and photography

2019/12/05

252 999,98

tender

Anzomode

Beneficiary Video and Content development

2019/12/09

711 816,08

tender

Anzomode

Video/photography for 16Days Activism

2019/12/13

211 600,00

tender

Anzomode

Video/Photography for Sandton Great Fund

2020/03/24

79 948,00

tender

Back to Basics Media

Design, Layout and Placement of advertorial/ write up Back to basics Magazine

2022/04/17

369 750,00

single source

Back to Basics Media

NLC Brand Positioning Q3 media campaign

2019/11/18

600 000,00

single sourcing

Back to Basics Media

NLC Brand Positioning Q3 media campaign

2019/12/10

250 000,00

single sourcing

Back to Basics Media

NLC Brand Positioning Q3 media campaign

2020/01/10

150 000,00

single sourcing

Back to Basics Media

advertorial

2020/03/20

95 000,00

single sourcing

Be Sure Events Solutions

Print, Supply and delivery of NLC Table cloth

2019/12/02

34 500,00

tender

Be Sure Events Solutions

Brand positioning-Billboard Media Campaign

2019/12/04

1 188 698,16

tender

Be Sure Events Solutions

Closing Call for Applications

2019/12/04

2 158 615,81

tender

Black Moon Advertising

Design & printing of Pro Active Brochure

2019/11/11

13 644,64

single sourcing

Bojanala FM

Live Outside Broadcast

2019/07/17

25 000,00

single source

Cheniwell IMC

Full page Advert in various Newspaper

2019/06/24

173 693,45

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

MEDIA Buying for Call for Applications on Radio and Print Media – Western Cape Province

2019/04/29

330 649,88

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

30 Live Reads

2019/08/11

642 606,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Letter Reds & Branded Doek

2019/08/02

46 988,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

NLC Branded Doek

2019/10/03

44 410,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Community Radio - Scam Alerts Live reads

2019/10/17

400 991,85

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Logo Design

2019/09/13

19 350,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Closing of Applications

2019/11/28

1 515 490,19

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Design & printing of brochures & Flyers

2019/11/17

314 550,00

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Billboards campaign

2020/03/20

1 809 786,20

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Media Buying – Eastern Cape Province E

2020/03/19

446 532,35

Tender

Cheniwell IMC

Media Buying-KwaZulu Natal

2020/03/19

270 598,20

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Provincial Offices branding

2019/05/16

278 745,30

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Office Branding Provincial Office 2019

2019/07/18

20 250,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Office Branding Provincial Office 2019

2019/07/25

176 343,44

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Office Branding Provincial Offices 2019

2019/08/29

188 478,84

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Social media brand awareness campaign

2019/11/13

21 525,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Provincial Offices branding

2019/12/02

94 239,42

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Media Buying-MP

2020/03/12

439 999,19

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

OHS induction video for Human Capital

2020/03/12

193 800,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

NLC Promotional Items

2020/03/19

174 132,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Graphic design work

2019/07/25

27 628,38

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Graphic design work

2019/05/16

4 550,00

Tender

Chilo Group(PTY)Ltd

Media Buying - Mpumalanga Community Media

2019/06/01

331 192,09

tender

Christopher Africa

Artificial Intelligence for social media

2019/12/23

46 000,00

Single sourcing

Entice Communications & Media

Media Campaign Print and Broadcast. Soweto 2 Day

2019/08/30

40 000,00

Single sourcing

Espial Infinity Trading Enterprise

Schweizer Renake Training

2019/10/19

65 000,00

Treasury database

Esvinin Media Solutions

Media Campaign, 4 Pages Advertisement

2019/08/28

68 400,00

Treasury database

Fundudzi Media

Print Media campaign 20 Years

2019/10/21

1 200 000,00

Single sourcing

Fundudzi Media

To communicate the closing of Application

2019/11/18

46 561,20

single sourcing

Fundudzi Media

Print Media Campaign-NLC 20 years

2020/01/27

1 200 000,00

single sourcing

Fundudzi Media

media buying

2020/03/02

69 248,40

single sourcing

Gaming Regulators Africa Forum

NLC Brand positioning opportunity

2019/08/13

150 000,00

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/06/25

504,39

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/06/25

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/08/27

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/06/25

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/06/25

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/06/25

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/10/11

504,4

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/10/11

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2019/05/20

1 008,80

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2020/02/14

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2020/02/14

504,4

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2020/02/07

252,2

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Tender Bid notice

2020/01/31

252

sole supplier

Government Printing Works

Advert for Bid NLC 2015-12(Panel of Cons

2020/01/31

252,2

sole provider

Independent Newspaper

Media Buying

2019/05/04

19 102,65

single sourcing

Independent Newspaper

Media Buying

2019/05/05

21 419,33

single sourcing

Independent Newspaper

Media Buying

2019/05/29

89 125,00

single sourcing

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Publication Cape Times & Argus

2019/11/16

23 183,14

single source

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

2019/05/29

89 125,00

single sourcing

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Media Buying

2019/05/29

89 125,00

single sourcing

Independent Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

20 Years Commemoration

2019/05/19

87 990,52

single sourcing

Inkonjane FM

Outside Broadcast

2019/04/29

13 500,00

single source

Khanya PR & Media Services

Staff Gifts

2022/05/03

390 039,75

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Khanya PR- Provincial Corporate Gifts : O

2019/11/18

33 438,55

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Male branded Ties - Marketing & Communication

2019/11/29

43 909,30

tender

Khanya PR and Media

USBs for Legal Division

2020/01/21

21 129,53

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Notice of Office Relocation – Northern Cape & Eastern Cape

2020/01/30

460 920,00

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Car stickers

2020/03/20

4 600,00

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Media Buying-NC

2020/03/20

227 556,25

tender

Khanya PR and Media

Media Buying-WC

2020/03/20

364 987,00

tender

Khanyisa Newspaper

Advert

2019/08/30

40 000,00

single source

Mahikeng FM Community Radio

Outside Live Broadcast North west office Launch

2019/07/10

40 000,00

single sourcing

Media24

To communicate the closure of Application

2019/11/18

300 274,20

single sourcing

Media24

Scam Alert Publication

2019/10/31

271 975,00

single sourcing

Media24

Open Call for Applications

2020/03/03

221 917,80

single sourcing

Molo Consulting

Design & deliver skills programme for be

2020/03/02

65 000,00

tender

MP's Finest Media

Videography for Handing Over Project

2020/03/13

34 200,00

treasury

MTech Communications

NMD Designer Short Sleeve T shirt

2019/07/22

115 345,74

Treasury database

Naka Media

Advert

2019/09/09

51 000,00

Treasury database

Ndabana Media Production

Advertorial

2019/03/01

430 000,00

single source

Nolorile Trading & Consulting

Digital Secretariat Services 2020

2020/02/28

69 250,00

Treasury database

Nolorile Trading & Consulting

Digital Secretariat Services 2020

2020/03/12

69 310,00

Treasury database

Nolorile Trading & Consulting

Digital Secretariat Services 2020

2020/03/25

352 840,00

tender

Nongoma FM

Outside Broadcast KwaZulu Natal School launch

2019/09/23

40 000,00

single sourcing

North West Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender Bid notice

2019/10/11

26 046,72

single source

North West Newspapers (Pty) Ltd

Tender Bid notice

2019/10/11

504,4

single source

Novus Group

media monitoring

2020/08/13

10 407,50

tender

Ornico Group Pty Ltd

NLC Media Monitoring

2022/04/16

175 341,35

single source

Phaswana Production

NLC Brand Champion Programme

2019/04/12

385 000,00

Single Source

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring Services

2019/12/31

9 880,19

tender

Ponelelo Media Monitoring

Media Monitoring Services

2019/12/01

8 562,84

tender

Reached Media

NLC Videography

2019/08/22

137 977,00

Treasury database

Roadshow Marketing

Media Buying Northern Cape

2019/05/14

289 557,35

tender

Roadshow Marketing

Marketing Collaterals – Presidential INA

2019/05/28

989 460,00

tender

Roadshow Marketing

702 Walk the Talk

2019/07/29

164 244,31

tender

Roadshow Marketing

Branded Unilsex Rubber Bracelet

2019/07/16

84 599,75

tender

Roadshow Marketing

Preparation for 2020/2021 Focus areas: Broadcast Media

2019/10/30

655 172,39

tender

Roadshow Marketing

Dairies for 2020/21 financial year

2019/10/16

204 096,94

tender

Rosette Trading Enterprise

Design & deliver skills programme in KwaZulu Natal

2019/09/25

300 000,00

tender

SABC

Outside Broadcast

2019/04/30

264 500,00

single source

Sapphire Media 360

Media Buying

2019/08/30

1 388 625,00

single sourcing

Sedibu General Trading and Projects

Advert

2019/09/03

56 000,00

Treasury database

SABC

SA FM

2019/08/31

183 712,50

single sourcing

SABC

Local Programme

2019/08/31

386 684,95

single sourcing

SABC

SABC 2 Local Programme

2019/09/30

386 684,95

single sourcing

SABC

SABC 2 Local Programme

2019/10/04

386 684,95

single sourcing

SABC

SABC 2 Local Programme

2019/11/30

386 660,65

tender

SABC

Media Campaign to Communicate the Closing

2019/11/30

732 780,00

single sourcing

SABC

Placement of NLC Videos

2019-11-31

1 587 000,00

single sourcing

SABC

media buying

2020/04/06

8 625,00

single sourcing

Sowetan

Open call for Application

2020/03/03

95 440,80

single sourcing

Stokvel Media

Advert

2019/08/19

56 000,00

Treasury database

Tau Ya Phoka

NLC Photo and Video Archives Northern Cape

2019/06/13

141 833,34

tender

Tau Ya phoka

Brochures Including Cover- Getting to know NLC

2019/07/02

153 000,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives Gauteng and Limpopo

2019/08/04

17 468,50

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives Mpumalanga Province

2019/04/24

27 150,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives Mpumalanga Province

2019/04/24

141 833,34

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives Free State Province

2019/06/05

141 833,34

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives Western Cape

2010/06/04

310 000,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

NLC Photo and Video Archives KZN & North West

2019/07/22

230 183,30

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Brochures

2019/07/15

100 000,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Promotional materials(Banners)

2019/10/04

470 925,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Promotional materials(Banners)

2020/01/21

235 462,50

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Media Buying-Limpopo

2020/03/18

222 500,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Media Buying for Call for Applications

2020/03/18

197 225,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Media Buying-Limpopo

2020/03/18

222 500,00

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Media Buying – Free State Provinces

2020/03/18

235 462,50

tender

Tau ya Phoka (Pty Ltd)

Media Buying – Free State Provinces

2020/03/18

197 225,00

tender

The Media List

Annual Subscription to Media List

2019/03/19

9 450,00

single sourcing

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

314 799,85

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

314 799,85

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

13 130,70

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

13 130,70

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/02

13 130,70

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/02

13 130,70

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

44 460,33

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

44 460,33

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

44 460,33

single source

Tiso BlackStar

NLC 20 years commemoration

2019/06/03

44 460,33

single source

Tiso BlackStar

Scam Alert Publication

2019/10/13

840 213,00

single sourcing

Tiso BlackStar Group

National Lotteries publication of EC O

2019/07/04

6 272,10

single source

Tiso BlackStar Group

National Lotteries publication of EC O

2019/07/04

7 203,60

single source

Tiso BlackStar Group

To communicate the closing of Application

2019/11/18

78 568,00

single sourcing

Travel With Flair

Collateral & 3rd Party payment for Walk

2019/05/24

614,52

tender

WritersBloc

Provide media Event Support

2019/04/19

410 000,00

sole supplier

Zululand FM 97.0

Outside Broadcast

2019/09/20

50 000,00

single sourcing

   

Closing Balance

37 252 015,82

 

-END-

21 November 2022 - NW4039

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Considering that the organised land invasions at the forestry plantations in Grabouw and the inability of her department to prevent this from taking place, has led to the sites no longer being viable for forestry activities and her department having to hand them back to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, what is the closet estimate of both the (a) direct and (b) indirect jobs that have been lost as a result of the organised land invasions at the specified sites; (2) whether there are any similar sites in the Grabouw area where her department will be able to replicate the same scale of production and economic opportunity that has been lost on the invaded sites; if not, what is the position in this regard; what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department will provide all relevant information and evidence in their possession to the SA Police Service in terms of their new investigation into organisers of the land invasions as per case 1/09/2022 registered at the Grabouw Police Station; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

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21 November 2022 - NW4082

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What is the purpose of the Chemical Industries Education and Training Authority Smart Skills Centre which was recently opened in Saldanha, (b) what is its current (i) functional status and (ii) capacity in carrying out its purpose and (c) how is it anticipated that the centre will improve the lives of unemployed youth in numerical effect?

Reply:

a)  The purpose of the CHIETA SMART Skills Centre project is aimed at bridging the digital skills divide between urban and rural communities. The Centre’s services are free and include access to data plus training courses aimed at job seekers, business start-ups, and SMMEs that wish to grow their operations. The centre will focus on basic digital skills aimed at addressing the digital skills divide in the district and at helping surrounding businesses and rural community members to learn technology-related skills.

b) (i)The Skills Centre was lunched on 25 October 2022 and will become operational effective from December 2022.

   (ii) Two staff members from Freeport Saldanha Industrial Development Zone will be responsible for receiving the learners and providing access to the various online training programmes. The above personnel will also be assisted by two interns who will be selected from the local community.

c)  The Centre will be opened to both unemployed youth and members of the community. The Centre is expected to target between 5000 and 10 000 unemployed youth over the next three years. This number excludes unemployed adults and other community members who will access the Centre to gain skills as well as to access the free services offered by the Centre including the use of the boardroom by local SMMEs. The Centre will help equip unemployed youth with basic ICT and digital skills needed which will enable them to become more marketable.

21 November 2022 - NW4062

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) are the latest crime statistics for the Town Hill Police Station in the Msunduzi Local Municipality, (b) geographical area does the specified police station serve and (c) total number of (i) households does the station serve, (ii) vehicles does the police station have, ((iii) vehicles are not operational and (iv) detectives are stationed at the police station?

Reply:

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21 November 2022 - NW3950

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether, with reference to the comment made by Mr Paul Mashatile in The Sunday Times on 9 October 2022, that to date eight of the masterplans have been approved by social partners and are in the stage of implementation, already delivering impressive results through sectoral growth, employment creation and expanding economic opportunity for previously excluded designated groups, his department, which is responsible for co-ordinating industry master plans, supplied Mr Paul Mashatile with the necessary empirical evidence to support the claim that the specified master plans are delivering impressive results; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will he furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with the evidence?

Reply:

Details of performance of sectors in the economy are publicly available, as are the submissions made by the Department.

The President has provided information in State of the Nation Addresses, including on progress with specific Master Plans.

Details of relevant Master Plans have also been made available by the dtic to the Portfolio Committee, most recently on 1 November 2022 as part of the Department’s six-monthly report of performance against its Annual Performance Plan.

The report sets out to showcase the economic impact the Department has made in the implementation of the various Master Plans in the first 6 months of 2022/23 financial year, amongst other programmes. Furthermore, the presentation reported on the impact and outcomes of the department on a number of metrics, including jobs, manufacturing, local content, investments and industrial funding. A number of case studies were also provided across the various Master Plans to illustrate the impact of work done by the dtic.

In addition, other government departments responsible for specific master plans also make information available.

A number of businesses and sector leaders also provide information on the performance of Master Plans.

-END-

21 November 2022 - NW3904

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)By what date will his department install a sewer system for residents of Ward 40, Extension 8 in Rustenburg, who had put in a request for installation to his department in 2019 without any response to their application to date. (2)whether he will furnish Mrs S M Mokgotho with the relevant details regarding the installation; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The extension 8 housing development in Ward 40 was funded by the erstwhile Department of Housing in 2005. Two hundred (200) houses were constructed and handed over to beneficiaries. Whereas there was a sewer pipeline network in the areas at the time of construction, some of the houses were not connected to the sewer pipe network. According to the Municipality, the area is fully equipped with a sewerage conveyances system, the only challenge that exists is to connect the few houses to the sewer line.

The Department of Water and Sanitation allocated R70 million from the Water Services Infrastructure Grant for 2022/23 to the Rustenburg Local Municipality. The municipality indicated that it has prioritised the refurbishment of the Boitekong sewer pump station and the outfall sewer. The current budget allocation for WSIG is fully committed, however, the municipality is in the process of reprioritising the Municipal Infrastructure Grant to address the Boitekong sanitation backlog.

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21 November 2022 - NW4037

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment:

(1) With reference to her reply to question 2424 on 26 November 2021, wherein she stated that she \and her department, with support from the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Secretariat, had conducted a thorough investigation and had determined that the export referred to in the specified question were legal, and in light of the primarily commercial nature of the specified exports, as defined in the CITES Regulations and the CITES prohibition on export of Appendix I animal species for primary commercial purpose, (a) how has she found were the exports permissible under South African law and CITES regulations and (b) will she furnish Mr D W Bryant with relevant correspondence between her department and the CITES Secretariat;

Reply:

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21 November 2022 - NW3465

Profile picture: Zondo, Mr  S S

Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What are the details of improved measures that his department has implemented to ensure that the (a) contextual and (b) institutional positions of universities are consistent despite the constantly changing nature of the Republic and that they are equipped to counter challenges that accompany the changes?

Reply:

The improved measures that the Department has implemented to support universities include increase in block grants, earmarked grants, and growth in funding for their NSFAS students. Furthermore, all universities are allocated funds annually through the University Capacity Development earmarked grant to implement programmes that focus on areas of need that must be addressed.  The same grant provides an opportunity for universities to collaborate in the implementation of programmes where there are common challenges in areas of teaching, research, and curriculum development. 

In addition, the Department established the Sibusiso Bengu-Development Programme (SB-DP) to address the inequalities that have impacted the development and sustainability of the Historically Disadvantaged Institutions (HDIs).  The SB-DP has been developed to support capacity development in seven strategic priority areas, i.e.  institutional management governance; institutional infrastructure and facilities; student experience, staff development and support; the academic enterprise; research and innovation; and relationships and partnerships.

18 November 2022 - NW3908

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What (a) has he found are the main causes of water shortages in the cities of (i) Johannesburg and (ii) Tshwane and (b) action has he and/or his department taken to deal with the specified water shortages?

Reply:

Several negative factors occurred simultaneously in Gauteng, which resulted in the recent supply problems. These included:

Severe load shedding affected the ability of both Rand Water and Joburg Water to pump water into their reservoirs. This resulted in the water levels in the reservoirs being too low to gravity-feed water to high-lying areas. As a result, a number of high-lying areas were without water for prolonged periods.

A heat water wave which resulted in increased watering of gardens by residents. In addition, the summer rains arrived late, meaning that residents did not swich off their sprinkler systems as they usually do when the summer rains start. These factors combined to result in a spike in water demand. This spike in water demand also made it difficult for the reservoirs to be filled adequately.

Both Rand Water and Joburg Water experienced several electrical and mechanical failures, which also contributed to the difficulty in filling the reservoirs. Some of these failures may have been a result of damage to equipment caused by the frequent load shedding. Two of Rand Water’s purification plants, namely, Zuikerbosh and Vereeniging as well as two major pumps stations (Palmiet and Eikenhof) supplying large parts of the city were affected by power failures. The equipment has since been repaired.

Rand Water’s operating philosophy is to maintain the reservoir levels between 60-80%. This targeted range is intended to enable the system to be resilient and respond to any challenges. Historically, during September to January, water consumption increases exponentially in Gauteng. It was with this understanding that Rand Water wrote to the high consumers, i.e. City of Tshwane, City of Johannesburg, and City of Ekurhuleni; to encourage reduced consumption in anticipation of the increased demand for water.

Despite these efforts, water consumption continued to increase significantly, and Rand Water’s overall water storage declined from 52% to 38%. Stemming from this decline, a high-level meeting was convened with the Metros to notify them of the intention to apply Stage 1 restrictions. Despite these efforts, water storage levels continued to decline and that prompted Rand Water to apply Stage 2 restrictions. The heatwave also informed the decision to escalate from Stage 1 to 2. The restrictions are necessary to stabilize the system and are aimed at restoring the overall reservoir storage capacity to 60%.

The Department is in the process of temporarily increasing the allocation of water to Rand Water from the Vaal River System, to ensure that the availability of raw water does not become a constraint to Rand Water’s ability to provide treated water during this difficult period.

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18 November 2022 - NW3474

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Given the high number of repeat offenders, how has his department ensured that individuals appointed as parole board members receive adequate support and enough time to conduct assessments effectively in order to make an informed decision on granting or denying parole to an inmate?

Reply:

The Department has implemented the following material support systems to Parole Boards:

  • DCS has expedited the filling of parole board vacancies that have existed across all regions to ensure that boards function at full complement
  • The Department has been building capacity in Case Management Committees in order to improve the quality of sentence plans, case management processes and profiles that are ultimately submitted to the Parole Board to better assist them in arriving at a decision.
  • Ongoing training is provided to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Boards (CSPBs). The training focuses on parole policy procedures, decision making tools and calculation of release dates amongst others.
  • Profile reports are submitted 3 months prior to offenders reaching their minimum detention periods to the CSPBs for consideration for possible placement on parole.

END.

18 November 2022 - NW3808

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What (a) prisoner empowerment programmes and (b) religious services are currently in force in the Eastern Cape (i) prisons and (ii) remand centres; (2) what programmes are offered to awaiting trial prisoners under Section 73(3) of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977, in (a) prisons and (b) remand Centres; (3) whether there are any additional programmes that are being considered for the specified facilities; if not, why not; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Eastern Cape Region is providing needs based Social Work, Psychological Services, Spiritual Care, Education and Training, Production Workshops and Agriculture programmes including 13 correctional programmes aimed at creating awareness and life skills to sentenced offenders in all correctional centres nationally including EC.

i) Sentenced Offenders

ii) Remand Offenders

Management Area

Education Programmes Offered

Number of Offenders attending

Remand Centre

Education Programmes Offered

Number of Offenders attending

East London

AET L1 -  L4

120

N/A

N/A

N/A

Kirkwood

AET L1 -  L4

52

N/A

N/A

N/A

Amathole

AET L1 -  L4

86

N/A

N/A

N/A

Sada

AET L1 -  L4

128

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

Grade 10 - 12

87

N/A

N/A

N/A

St. Albans

AET L1 -  L4

152

N/A

N/A

N/A

 

Grade 10 - 12

19

N/A

N/A

N/A

Mthatha

AET L1 -  L4

104

N/A

N/A

N/A

(1)(a)(ii) Remand Detainees (RDs) are participating in information sharing and awareness programmes which are rendered by Social Workers, Psychologists and Health Care professionals.

RDs who were schooling during the time of incarceration are provided with the necessary education material for continuation of programmes

(1)(b)(i) Religious Services are rendered to all inmates as well as on a needs-based individual pastoral services and church services are conducted in all correctional centres. The following religious services are rendered at the Correctional Centres:

  • Church/Faith Services,
  • Group Sessions,
  • Individual Pastoral Counseling Sessions,
  • Prayer meetings and Bible/Religious studies

Group work programmes like anger management, heartlines, cross roads are some of the programmes that are rendered to offenders.

((1)(b)(ii) In addition to the RDs, Group Work Programmes like anger management, heartlines, cross roads are some of the programmes that are rendered by DCS taking to consideration that some are first time offenders and being in confined space may have a negative impact.

(2) Section 73(3) of the Criminal Procedure Act, Act 51 of 1977 relates to assistance for criminal proceedings and not correctional programmes. The section reads as follows:

  • In addition to the provisions of sections 3 (g), 38 (2), 44 (1) (b) and 65 of the Child Justice Act, 2008 (Act 75 of 2008),relating to the assistance of an accused who is under the age of eighteen years by his or her parent, an appropriate adult or a guardian at criminal proceedings, any accused who, in the opinion of the court, requires the assistance of another person at criminal proceedings, may, with the permission of the court, be so assisted at such proceedings.’

(3) There are currently no additional programmes other than those that are rendered by DCS except Spiritual Care.

END.

18 November 2022 - NW3817

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) How will he assist the community of Doornkop in the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, who lack service delivery of water and are in serious need for boreholes as there is no infrastructure. (2) whether he will intervene as the existing bore holes cannot meet the demand as the supply is not enough to provide water to the entire area and occupants are connecting pipes to the main supply water line and they use all the water before it reaches the community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date and (b) how; (3) whether he has been informed that on 19 September 2020 a notice was going to be delivered to those occupiers of Doornkop that illegally connected to the borehole and /or main supply; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) was the notice served, (b) will he furnish Ms A M M Weber with a copy of the notice and (c) how will he ensure that the notice will be enforced; (4) whether he intends to assist the Steve Tshwete Local Municipality to have a security company to take guard over the pump station and borehole area where the illegalities are taking place in order for the community to have access to their basic human right to water; if not, why not; if so, what process needs to be followed?

Reply:

1)  It should be noted that Doornkop is illegally occupied as the land is owned by Doornkop Communal Property Association (CPA). The area is not yet formalised by the municipality as it is still subject to a land claim. The area is supplied with water through six boreholes which are utilized as the main water source. However, one borehole is not operational due to vandalism. The municipality is in the process of fixing the borehole and is supplementing water supplies through water tankering.

2) The municipality has intervened by providing thirty-five water storage tanks that are servicing Doornkop Village, the tanks are placed in strategic areas across the Doornkop Village. The municipality has seven water tankers that are allocated to supply water to Doornkop Village daily to supplement the boreholes.

3) The municipality is not aware of any notice that was circulated on19 September 2020. On 22 September 2021 the municipality arranged a stakeholder engagement meeting with the community including political parties to try and address the issue of illegal connections through public engagement.

The Municipality officials with the support of the former Member Mayoral Council (MMC) for infrastructure Mr Johannes Matshiane were chased away by the community. The community clearly indicated that they will not allow the municipality to disconnect those who are illegally connected as they need water in their yards not from communal standpipes or tankers. The municipality has put on hold their long term plans due to the pending litigation of the land dispute by the CPA.

4) The existing infrastructure which are boreholes are secured, they are equipped with locks and cannot be tampered with. Currently, the municipality has no intention of hiring security personnel as this is a privately owned land and this would require permission from the CPA.

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18 November 2022 - NW3168

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) did the Office of The Presidency contribute towards the funeral of the Enyobeni tavern victims and (b) are the itemised costs associated with the specified funeral?

Reply:

(a) There was no contribution from The Presidency

(b) N/A

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3429

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What are the rehabilitative programmes that his department has put in place to ensure that child offenders are rehabilitated and do not fall back into a life of crime, once released?

Reply:

Section 16 (1) of the Correctional Services Act (CSA),111 of 1998, as amended, states that: “The Department may provide correction, development and care programmes and services even when not required to do so by this Act”, and in Section 41 of the Act, it provides, under subsection “Treatment, development and support services. (1) The Department must provide or give access to as full a range of programmes and activities, including needs-based programmes as is practicable to meet the educational and training needs of sentenced offenders”.

Children offenders are children aged between 14-17 years of age. This category of offenders are given the opportunity to access formal education programmes. The following formal education programmes are offered to all offenders: -

  • Further Education and Training (FET): Grades 10-12. All those offenders that have successfully completed the above-mentioned programme get an opportunity to pursue studies in the FET Band following a curriculum known as Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS), similar to all external schools within the education system of the country.
  • Children are also given the opportunity to attend Adult Education and Training (AET) Levels 1-4 if they do not want to attend Grade 10-12 mainstream education. This is equivalent to Grades 1-9 in normal mainstream education and it’s for offenders who want to pursue studies in the General Education and Training (GET) Band.
  • Child offenders who enter Correctional centres late in the academic year, might only be enrolled in the following academic year for formal education programmes. However, all offenders, including children have access to a range of Sports, recreation, arts, and culture programmes and also have access to libraries.

The department is also rendering needs based rehabilitative programmes to child offenders by Social Workers among other professionals.

The following programmes and services were rendered to sentenced children, including parolees, probationers and children in remand detention for the Financial Year 2021/2022 by Social Workers.

 

Programmes and services

Sentenced Children

Remand Children

 

Correctional

Centres

Community Corrections

 

Substance Abuse

3

1

5

Life-Skills

25

16

20

Marriage and Family Care

25

17

18

Sexual Offender

3

7

0

Anger Management,

9

4

6

Orientation Treatment

0

2

0

Cool and fit for life

0

1

0

Parenting

1

0

0

Supportive Services

13

4

0

Trauma

2

0

2

Assessment

64

19

0

TOTAL

145

71

51

NB: Some child offenders attended multiple programmes

 

END

18 November 2022 - NW3577

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Given that parts of the Republic are experiencing water shedding at present, what significant progress has been made in the water sector under Operation Vulindlela in relation to the water shortages in certain parts of the Republic; (2) (a) how has his department contributed to modernising and transforming the outdated bulk water infrastructure of the Republic and (b) what proactive measures are in place to prevent water shedding from becoming a semi-permanent fixture similar to load shedding in South African households?

Reply:

1. The main purpose of the Operation Vulindlela is to accelerate the implementation of structural reforms and support economic recovery, as such the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is implementing following projects under Operation Vulindela:

  • Revival of the Green Drop, Blue Drop and No Drop Assessment Programme: The asessment programmes are aimed at improving the wastewater quality, water supply quality and water use efficiency in all the 144 Water Service Authorities. The Department published the Green Drop report in March 2022 and will publish the Blue and No Drop programme in next financial year.
  • Improvement of Water Use Authorisation: The Department is revising the water use authorisation process with the intention being able to process all water use applications within 90 days to ensure economic development and access to water.
  • Independent Economic Regulator: The Minister has appointed the Regulator Commission for the period of 3 years. The aim of an independent economic regulator to regulate tariffs, standards, and performance in the water services sector.

2. (a)The department is funding refurbishment of infrastructure through its Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) programme. Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) facilitates achievement of targets for access to bulk water and sanitation through successful execution and implementation of bulk projects of regional significance. The main purpose of this grant amongst others is to:

  • To develop new, refurbish, upgrade and replace ageing bulk water and sanitation infrastructure of regional significance that connects water resources to infrastructure serving extensive areas across municipal boundaries or large regional bulk infrastructure serving numerous communities over a large area within a municipality
  • To implement bulk infrastructure with a potential of addressing Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WC/WDM) projects or facilitate and contribute to the implementation of local WC/WDM projects that will directly impact on bulk infrastructure requirements. This is achieved through project planning, where diversification of water resources is encouraged as part of calculating the Water Balance to ensure sustainability of supply

(b)The Department undertakes planning studies over different planning horizons, to derive interventions that are implemented to ensure water security for the entire country. These interventions cover the enablers like governance, financing, human capacity building and science and innovation which facilitate implementation of water projects at National, Provincial and District and Local Municipality level. The interventions implemented for our water security are contained in the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), the instrument by which the Minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the master plans that emanate from the NWRS. The various studies informing the NWRS are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx and the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NW&SMP) is available at http://www.dwa.gov.za

The DWS also monitors the capacity of municipalities to deliver water and sanitation through the Municipal Strategic Self-Assessment (MuSSA); a web-based system that enables municipalities to conduct their self-assessment on critical aspects service delivery performance. The outcomes of the assessment position the Department and other sector role players to provide targeted support to local government through various support and intervention programmes aimed at improving services delivery, governance and business health. Priority areas are identified and addressed through the development of a Municipal Priority Action Plan (MPAP).

Lastly, Five-Year Reliability Water and Sanitation Plans will soon be rolled out in all forty-four (44) District Municipalities. The plans are meant to:

  • Ensure sustainable and reliable water services with the service-standard yardstick that has a 100% compliance to functionality, water security and effective governance to maintain appropriate levels of service delivery
  • Conduct primary situational assessments of the water services and infrastructure supply conditions and classify each situation into a reliability category. The solution options are then integrated to proposed projects, specifically integrating all funding programmes to alleviate new infrastructure needs and achieve reliability of water services.

Recently the Department has developed the Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP). The aim of WSIP is to guide Department in initiating and leading the national support and regulatory interventions to reverse the decline in the provision of water and sanitation services in all municipalities. The programme consists of the following four key elements:

  • In terms of the Water Services Act, DWS will issue updated and more comprehensive norms and standards for water and sanitation services.
  • DWS will publish a National Regulatory Dashboard showing the extent of compliance with national norms and standards for water services for all Water Service Authorities, drawing on existing monitoring information, including from the Drop reports, NT, and COGTA reports (no new additional reporting requirements will be put on municipalities).
  • DWS will develop rolling regional support and intervention plans based on the evidence in the Regulatory Dashboard, managed by its regional offices, in consultation with provincial governments, municipalities and DDM structures.
  • The support and intervention plans will draw on a range of support programmes which will be developed at national level.

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18 November 2022 - NW2745

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) By what date does he envisage will a Head of Administration for the Public Service be appointed to manage the career incidents of (i) Heads of Department (HODs) and (ii) Directors-General (DGs) and (b) will the specified appointment be done before and/or after the coming into effect of the policy proposal to increase the term of office for HODs and DGs from the existing 5 years to 10 years, subject to performance?

Reply:

The role of Head of Public Administration was factor into the contract of the current Director-General in the Presidency and Secretary of the Cabinet, Ms Phindile Baleni, who was assumed this role on 01 April 2021. However, for this function to be performed optimally, legislative ammendments are required. As such, in April 2021, the Ministry of Public Service and Administration released the Public Service Amendment Bill. This Bill seeks to amend Section 7 of the Public Act of 1994 to align to the proposal of the National Development Plan (NDP) by providing additional functional responsibilities and powers to the Director-General in the Presidency, among other proposed ammendments. The Bill is still being consulted in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC). After that process, it will be resubmitted to Cabinet and Parliament for final public consultations using the normal legislative review processes.

The policy proposal on extending the term of office of the Heads of Departments and Directors General is not yet approved by Cabinet. It may as well form part of the legislative reforms that could be incorporated into the Public Service Ammendment Bill since such tenure is prescribed in the Public Service Act, 1994.

NW3326E

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW4038

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Following the commitment by a certain person (name furnished) to the Portfolio Committee on Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment that the 87 vacant posts in the Kruger National Park will be filled by the end of the 2023 financial year, (a) what total number of posts have been advertised, (b) on what dates were they advertised and (c) what total number of the specified posts have been filled at the end of October 2022; (2) by what date she envisage the relevant rangers will be trained and deployed; (3) (a) what total number of vacant posts remain for fence monitors and (b) by what date does she envisage the specified vacancies will be filled?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

18 November 2022 - NW3719

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Given that remand detainees make up more than 30% of the prison population, and noting that according to the Judicial Inspectorate of Prisons up to 2 700 of the specified prisoners have been given bail but cannot afford it, does he have a plan in place to assist prisoners who have been given bail which they are unable to afford; 2) What is the total cost incurred by the State in the 2020-21 financial year for remand detainees who have been granted bail?

Reply:

1. There is a plan which is continuously implemented throughout all our Remand Detention (RD) Facilities in the form of Bail Protocol and referral of remand detainees to court for bail review in line with section 63(1) of the Criminal Procedure Act (51, 1977).

a) Bail Protocol Section 63(A) of the Criminal Procedure Act - CPA) allows the Head of the Centre to submit an application to court for review of bail of RDs who have been charged with Schedule 7 crimes. The criteria for submitting an application is when a particular centre/detention facility is reaching such proportions that it constitutes a material and imminent threat to the human dignity, physical health or safety of remand detainees. These must be the lower court cases i.e., the Regional and Magistrate courts. The possible outcomes are as follows: -

• Release of the RD;

• Release and placement on warning;

• Placement under Section 62(f) of the CPA: Supervision by a correctional official;

• Reduction of the amount of bail;

• Placement in a secure care facility if the RD is a child; and

• Decline to review bail (Unsuccessful application).

b) Section 63(1) of the Criminal Procedure Act: This section allows the RD or the prosecutor to approach the court for a review of bail. All the RDs with bail qualify for bail review, however, DCS cannot initiate the process without the permission of the RD.

c) Furthermore, remand detainees are assisted by contacting their relatives and family members and advised to utilise the telephones at the correctional centres / remand detention facilities in this regard.

(2) The determination of the total cost incurred by the State in the 2020/21 financial year for remand detainees who have been granted bail is an estimate based on the per capita cost and monthly averages. The 2020/2021 average monthly per capita cost for unsentenced inmates was R12 493.44 per inmate and the annual average of the RDs was 4 212. The cost of 4 212 RD per month for 2020/2021 was R52 622 369.28. The annual estimated cost is R631 468 431.36.

END

18 November 2022 - NW3852

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Considering that mining companies are demolishing houses in Merafong City Local Municipality instead of donating such houses to the community, due to the shortage of residential availability, what are the reasons that he is allowing this to happen instead of donating houses to the Department of Human Settlements in order to deal with the shortage of houses?

Reply:

Sibanye Stillwater has a mining right for Driefontein operations which is located within the Merafong Local Municipal jurisdiction. The mine has four (4) mining villages under this mining right namely; Letsatsing, Phomolong, East village and West village. These villages comprise of approximately 1 367 housing units collectively currently occupied by the mine employees. The mine is currently negotiating with the Merafong Local Municipality (“MCLM”) to donate its mining village’s under Driefontein operations to the Municipality. These villages are earmarked for demolishing if they are not taken over by the local authority and be incorporated into the municipality’s Spatial Development Framework (SDF) and formalised.

The mine has only demolished houses it deems to be posing serious danger to locals as these houses may be unsafe for occupation and or may harbour criminals and criminal activities. These are mostly houses that have been vandalised and or illegally occupied by amongst others illegal miners.

18 November 2022 - NW3801

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) (a) What water sources do the mining companies in Koingnaas in the Kamiesberg Local Municipality use for mining purposes and (b) do the mining companies use any water from the Somnaas-Noup aquifer in the specified municipality. (2) what companies applied for water licences in the specified area. (3) whether any water licences were granted to the mining companies; if not, why not; if so, (a) to whom were the licences granted, (b) what were the specifications of each licence and (c) on what date was each licence granted. (4) whether an environmental impact study has been conducted to ensure what the effect of mining will be on the (a) water tables of the area, specifically Somnaas-Noup aquifer and (b) town of Koingnaas; (5) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a copy and/or copies of the licence(s) issued; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1a)  Groundwater is the main source of water for domestic supply in the region. The settlements of Koingnaas, Hondeklip Bay and Samson Bak derive water from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 km north of Koingnaas. Two boreholes, BH 12 and BH 14, are currently in use. A third borehole, BH15 adjacent to BH 12, is equipped and used as a standby borehole.

b) the mining companies use water from the Somnaas-Noup aquifer in the specified municipality.

(2) West coast Resources Pty Ltd: Namaqualand Mine applied for a water use licence which was issued on 23 June 2017. Conditions of the licence includes the following:

  • Monitoring: The licensee should establish ground water network monitoring within 1 year from the date of issuance of licence.
  • Water Conservation and Water Demand management (WC/WDM): The licensee shall develop WC/WDM and submit to Provincial Head or responsible authority, which amongst other should quantify the water use efficiency of the activity.
  • The WC/WDM shall be updated annually and submitted to Provincial Head or responsible authority.
  • The licensee shall provide any water user whose water supply is impacted by use with potable water

(3) Please refer to the response above.

(4) It is a prerequisite for any mining licence holder to conduct an environmental impact study to ensure what the effect of mining will be on the water resources. A report on geohydrological impact assessment for West Coast Resources Diamond mining operations along the west coast around Koingnaas, Northern Cape province: was concluded in 2016 with a Ref number: 2016/ENV008, dated July 2016, amongst others the report made the following reference “Groundwater represents the main source of water for domestic supply in the region. The settlements of Koingnaas, Hondeklip Bay and Samson Bak derive water from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 km north of Koingnaas. Two boreholes, BH 12 and BH 14, are currently in use. A third borehole, BH15 adjacent to BH 12, is equipped and used as a standby borehole”.

a-b) For the town of Koingnaas, the report made the following reference:

  • Available water quality data indicate that the entire area proposed for mining is characterised by highly saline groundwater with electrical conductivity of above 1000 mS/m. This is supported by the fact that there are no water supply boreholes around, and south of Koingnaas. Potable groundwater is currently sourced from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 kilometres north of Koingnaas.

(5) A copy of the licence is attached as Annexure A.

18 November 2022 - NW4072

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) What amount of strategic fuel stock is currently held by (i) his department and/or (ii) private entities, (b) in what form is the stock held and (c) what actions have been taken and/or contemplated to ensure that a security of supply of refined petroleum products is sufficient to meet the demand of the market in the Republic as it is experiencing a perfect storm with regard to refined petroleum products, arising from inadequate port infrastructure, ongoing strike action and labour issues in the ports, failure to have any kind of strategic reserve of refined products and a shortage of refining capacity due to the closure of various refineries?

Reply:

a) The Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) until recently held (i) 10, 023 million barrels (Ten Million and 23 Thousand barrels) of strategic stocks on behalf of the state.

The current stock is down by approximately 0,3 million barrels ( 300, 000 barrels). Approximately 300 000 barrels was recently sold to Total-energies for processing at the Natref refinery. The sale followed a force majeure that had been declared by the Nigerian supplier to Total-energies.

(ii) Private entities keep commercial stock to cater for their share of the petroleum market.

b) The stock held by SFF is in crude oil form

c) SFF is implementing a strategy of developing and accessing infrastructure at import terminals and primary depots closer to the market. This will allow SFF to respond to Security of Supply disruptions and ensure availability of emergency stock of finished products. SFF has purchased a primary depot in Cape Townthat will provide open access to third parties to store their fuels. This will ensure that there is diversity of suppliers in the market place and therefore minimise supply risk.

18 November 2022 - NW2966

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What number of people have been appointed in the Red Tape Reduction Unit situated in The Presidency, which was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; (2) what is the (a) total budget allocated to the Red Tape Reduction Unit and (b) budget allocated to the remuneration of people who form part of the specified advisory unit in each year; (3) whether there are any plans in place to expand the unit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Mr Sipho Nkosi has been seconded from BUSA on a part-time basis to lead the Red Tape Reduction initiative. The Presidency is only responsible for operational costs that may arise . The Red Tape Reduction Team provides coordination and leadership to the work of government to reduce red tape, working with existing government initiatives, in particular those falling under the Department of Small Business Development, and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition through InvestSA.

Mr Nkosi is supported by current Presidency staff as well as receiving part-time assistance through the Department of Small Business Development.

There is no budget allocated as no new Unit has been set up . The Red Tape Reduction was part of the MTEF document. However, no additional funding has been provided over the MTEFperiod.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3886

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Following reports that the residents of the Amathole District Municipality, which includes the towns Peddie, Stutterheim, Kei Mouth and Haga Haga have been without water for weeks, and noting that the water issues are due to a lack of maintenance, whilst the specified municipality has not spent the allocated funds (details furnished) set aside for maintenance and infrastructure repairs, what intervening steps does he intend to take to (a) assist the municipality to (i) spend the allocated funds for maintenance and (ii) perform maintenance on ageing infrastructure and (b) avoid a water crisis as a result of ageing infrastructure?

Reply:

Amathole District Municipality (ADM) is receiving the Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG), Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) to implement water services infrastructure development projects within their area of jurisdiction for accessibility of water and sanitation services and to reduce backlogs.

RBIG and WSIG are administered by the Department of Water and Sanitation and MIG is administered by the Department of Cooperative Governance.

In terms of section 227 of the Constitution, local government is entitled to an equitable share of national revenue to enable it to provide basic services and perform its allocated functions. The local government equitable share is an unconditional transfer that supplements the revenue that municipalities can raise themselves (including revenue raised through property rates and service charges). The equitable share provides funding for municipalities to deliver free basic services indigents and subsidises the cost of administration and other core services for those municipalities with the least potential to cover these costs from their own revenues.

The operations and maintenance of water services infrastructure is the responsibility of the Municipalities and should be funded by the equitable share and the revenue that the Municipalities can raise.

Recent challenges across this municipality have been as a result of labour issues which were resolved about two weeks ago. This we believe this will ensure full operations of the systems across the district.

During the 2021/22 financial year the DWS allocated a total of R 172,2 million funding through RBIG and WSIG to the ADM, as follows:

Grant

Allocation

R’ 000

Revised allocation

Expenditure

R’ 000

Expenditure

%

Balance

R’ 000

WSIG 5B

75 000

75 000

20 147

27

54 853

RBIG 6B

153 715

97 162

88 503

91

8 660

Total

228 715

172 200

108 650

63%

63 513

ADM applied to National Treasury for a rollover of the unspent WSIG allocation to the amount of R49,5 million. National Treasury did not approve the rollover application as the Municipality did not meet the set criteria in terms of section 21(2) of the 2021 Division of Revenue Amendment Act, (Act No. 17 of 2021).

During the 2022/23 financial year, a total revised allocation of R 172,2 million funding was allocated by DWS through RBIG and WSIG to the ADM, as follows:

Grant

Allocation

R’ 000

Revised allocation

Transferred

Expenditure

R’ 000

Expenditure

%

Balance

R’ 000

WSIG 5B

86 000

86 000

15 200

0

0

86 000

RBIG 6B

222 935

110 000

N/A

36 689

33

73 311

Total

228 715

172 200

 

108 650

63%

159 311

a) The intervention steps are as follows:

i) Peddie – This area is one of the areas having inadequate bulk water supply. Bulk water in Ngqushwa Municipal area is supplied by Amatola Water (AW). AW is continuously engaged in trying to come up with a Long-Term Plan for this area and have promised to be developing a plan. The ADM is also currently implementing interventions where boreholes are currently being drilled and equipped for the following villages, Ntilini, Hamburg, Upper Gwalana and Celetyume through WSIG funding budgeted in the 2022/23 Financial Year benefiting about 24 000 people. ADM is also busy implementing the Bulk and Reticulation Phase 2 project funded through MIG in the current MIG 3-year Capital Plan. The whole Peddie Town and surrounding areas will benefit from the project (about 24 000 people). ADM continues to cart water as and when required utilising its Equitable Share.

ii) Stutterheim – This town is supplied with water through the Gubu Dam as well the Kubusie River and Scotchmans Weir. ADM operates and maintains its infrastructure efficiently while continuing to cart water as and when required. To improve service delivery, ADM is also implementing the Stutterheim Water Pipe Replacement Programme funded through WSIG also in this financial year.

iii) Kei mouth - This town is supplied with water through the Cwili Dam. The ADM is also in the process of upgrading the Kei Bridge Komga Water Treatment Works funded through MIG also prioritised the current financial Year.

iv) Haga haga - This town is supplied with water through the Haga Haga Dam. ADM has also prioritised Upgrading of the Haga Haga Water Treatment Works which is currently at implementation stage funded through MIG and also prioritised this current 2022/23 Financial Year.

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18 November 2022 - NW4030

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)What (a) total amount does his department owe to the (i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) Senqu Local Municipality and (b) is the age analysis of the monies owed in each case; (2) what (a) are the specific details of the buildings in respect of which his department owes the specified municipalities and (b) is the use of each specified building; (3) whether his department has any plans to address the debts; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of his department’s plan and (b) is the time frame in which the debts will be settled?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) There is no amount owed to the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD).

            (ii) There is no amount owed to the Senqu Local Municipality by the DoJ&CD.

(b) Falls away.

2. (a) (i) The age analysis indicates that there are no specific buildings in respect of which the Department owes the municipality. All the accounts of the    

buildings under the jurisdiction of the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality are timeously and fully paid.

(ii) Falls away.

(b) The use of the buildings under both Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and Senqu Local Municipality is for the purposes of Magistrate Courts and all the        buildings municipal services accounts are fully paid.

3. Falls away.

18 November 2022 - NW3191

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)On what date did he attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in his Office and/or entities reporting to him; (2) whether any appointments to his Office and/or entities reporting to him were discussed during his attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

  1. The Minister in the Presidency has never participated in any process wherein individuals were seconded or recommended for appointments in any Department and Entities under my Portfolio.
  2. No instructions were ever issued to any accounting officer to appoint an individual(s) to a position. All positions follow a due process as set out by the Public Service regulations for the recruitment, review and appointment of personnel in government departments and entities under my portfolio.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW4104

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What total number of persons from the surrounding communities are currently employed at SANParks through the Expanded Public Works Programme?

Reply:

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18 November 2022 - NW3932

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

What total amount has his department spent on replacing and/or refurbishing water infrastructure in the past five financial years, as 37% of drinking water was lost through pipe leakages and other infrastructure failures?

Reply:

The amounts spent by the Department of Water and Sanitation to replace and refurbish water infrastructure in the past five financial years were spent on Water Trading Entity infrastructure and not municipal infrastructure where these losses are occuring.

The following amounts have been spent on replacing and/or refurbishing water infrastructure by the Water Trading Entity (WTE):

Financial Year

Total

 

R'000

2017/18

390 787

2018/19

177 123

2019/20

164 457

2020/21

137 315

2021/22

227 250

 Grand Total

1 096 932

The following amounts have been spent on replacing and/or refurbishing water infrastructure by the Main Account:

Financial Year

RBIG

WSIG

Total

 

5B

6B

5B

6B

 

2017/18

1 829 002

3 747 243

3 305 237

819 416

9 700 899

2018/19

1 963 000

3 061 848

4 777 267

578 398

10 380 514

2019/20

2 028 516

2 768 746

3 669 319

548 284

9 014 865

2020/21

2 005 605

2 998 971

3 360 456

330 186

8 695 218

2021/22

2 237 370

2 246 121

3 620 327

404 797

8 508 615

Grand Total

10 063 493

14 822 930

18 732 606

2 681 081

46 300 110

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18 November 2022 - NW3005

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he and/or his Office submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

Government Policy documents are Public documents unless otherwise classified or specified. As part of a democratic process, the development or drafting of a policy document is subjected to a range of consultative processes to ensure that the country's best interests are being served. To this end, the policy development process includes the drafting process, which could involve experts in the field, and the consultative process, which may include a “think tank” of sector specialists or broad-based stakeholder consultation. To facilitate the consultative process, the draft policy documents will be shared with the relevant stakeholders or any other individual who might have a direct or indirect interest in the matter raised in the Policy Document.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3913

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the total number of water boards that dissolved in the current financial year and (b) on what date will the new boards be appointed?

Reply:

a)  To date, two (2) Boards for Water Boards, have been dissolved. The Board for Amatola Water was dissolved in March 2022 and the Interim Board of Sedibeng Water was automatically dissolved as a result of the disestablishment of Sedibeng Water in July 2022.

b) The process of appointing the new board for Amatola Water has commenced, and it should be finalised before the end of the current financial year.

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18 November 2022 - NW4106

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What contingency plans have been put in place to keep the mouth of St Lucia open?

Reply:

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18 November 2022 - NW1892

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in light of the fact that The Presidency issued proclamation 210 of 2021 to investigate the matter relating to the R103 million in advanced payment to Ayamah Consulting, which was done without following the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999 (details furnished), the investigation was completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) has the report of the investigation been given to the President and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the report will be made public?

Reply:

It is indeed correct that the President, acting in terms of section 2(1) of the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act, 1996, referred the matters in respect of the North West Provincial Department of Public Works and Roads (“the Department”) to the Special Investigation Unit (“SIU”) for investigation.

The matters which are investigated by the SIU as contained in proclamation 210 of of 12 March 2021 inculde:

  1. The procurement of or contracting for works or services by or on behalf of the Department for―
    1. Project management for the Transport Infrastructure Directorate of the Department;
    1. the rehabilitation of flood damaged road infrastructure in the North West Province; and
    1. the installation of perimeter fencing at the Eagle Waters Wildlife Resort.

The investigation by the SIU in the matter is still ongoing. As such, the SIU has not yet submitted a report to the President. As per the normal practice, upon receipt of the final report from the SIU, the Presidency will process the report and ensure that the report is also given to all relevant stake holders.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2574

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in The Presidency

Whether there are any red-tape reduction reforms to the benefit of small, medium and micro enterprises that can be reported by the Red Tape Reduction Unit, given that the specified unit was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, more than 120 days ago during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date can South African taxpayers expect to experience any benefit from the announcement; if so, will he furnish Mr H C C Kruger with a list of the (i) reforms that have been introduced and (ii) expected economic impact thereof? NW3087E

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative led by Mr Sipho Nkosi is working on reducing red tape that impacts investment and business, including small, medium and micro enterprises. In order to be effective, the initiative is focused on working on a limited number of obstacles, and has identified ten priority areas for intervention. This includes initiatives that will benefit SMMEs, namely, faciliting the issuing of tourism transport operating licences, including reducing the backlog in applications; reviewing the regulations hindering informal traders and the township economy; and, identifying obstacles to the growth and operation of the early childhood development sector, the majority of which consists of women-run small businesses.

It is however not possible to quantify the expected economic impact at this stage.

Thank You.

17 November 2022 - NW4103

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) steps have been taken to ensure that communities living in rural areas are easily accommodated in the new online application system and (b) online awareness campaigns related to the new application system have been undertaken; (2) whether any community education programmes aimed at empowering persons with the know-how were conducted; if not, why not; if so, what enabling resources does his department offer to persons to make the system more user friendly?

Reply:

(1)(a) We continue to make efforts to ensure that all communities, including those in rural areas, are accommodated in the new online application system. The Branch Appointment Booking System (BABS) is one of the Home Affairs interventions for improving services, including for our people located in rural areas.

Members of Parliament have been very helpful in the development and rollout of the online application system, particularly on the inclusion of offices in more rural communities in the pilot phase and also in the rollout of the project.

The online application system is only available for smart ID card and passport applications. Citizens are still welcome to visit Home Affairs front offices for other services.

The booking system is run on a hybrid model, with both online bookings and ‘walk-ins’ allowed. The Department allows and encourages walk-ins and also provides tablets to officials in order to help those who do not have data and would prefer to make a booking for another day instead of waiting in a queue. This is to ensure that as we rollout the new system, no one is left out, and all have access to services.

Following the launch, in June 2022, the booking system has been extended and is currently utilised in 163 of the 198 offices that have the ability to process smart ID cards and passports. At end of October 2022, more than 200 000 people have used this system.

(1)(b) I made a public announcement about the online booking system (BABS) during in my Budget Vote Speech, on 24 May 2022. This was followed by numerous radio and television interviews which I handled with the help of the Deputy Minister and delegated officials, to promote awareness on the new booking system. These interviews were in national, regional and community media platforms.

On 13 June 2022, I held a question-and-answer radio phone-in programme with 26 community radio stations.

The Communication Unit has also undertaken activations with Metro FM at Menlyn Mall, on 21 to 24 September 2022. This Unit has also developed videos and digital posters which it regularly runs on social media platforms of the Department and those of other Government departments.

(2) Yes, education programmes were and continue to be conducted, including the booking system’s activations I’ve alluded to. The Department has provided tablets to officials for them to take clients through the system and in this way we trust that those who were assisted will also be able to spread the message to others. Offices have floor walkers, queue marshalls and Office Managers to assist clients in the queues to make bookings.

To support this migration of service delivery platforms, the Communications Unit in collaboration with the BABS Project Management Office, did activations in selected offices in June 2022 where they were explaining to clients and officials how the system works.

The education programme explaining the new system was extended to cover officials in order to empower them to serve clients intending to use the new system. In this regard, information and posters were shared with Provincial and Office Managers to ensure that they assist in preparing their teams for the changes. A leaflet on the booking system was published in the in-house newsletter, Ikhaya, and the Director-General dedicated an issue of the online newsletter – Notes from the DG’s Desk – to the BABS and what it entails.

END

17 November 2022 - NW4066

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Regarding the Government Printing Works system crashes in February 2021, 31 January 2022, 25 Μarch 2022 and 11 April 2022 that caused complete audit data loss, (a) what are the reasons that on 31 January 2022, almost a year after the total data loss of February 2021, there was no backup in place, causing yet another complete audit data loss, (b) what is the total cost of data recovery to date as a result of the system crashes, (c) by what date will the data recovery project be completed and (d) what are the total estimated costs for the completion of the data recovery project?

Reply:

(a) No audit data/information was lost on the 31 January 2022. The system disruption that happened on this day was in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) environment, which does not have finance/audit information. GPW used the disk-backup to restore the affected systems in the DMZ environment.

(b) The following organisations were consulted to assist with data recovery:

  • Hewlett Packard (OEM)
  • CSSI data recovery specialists
  • State Security Agency (SSA)

GPW did not raise purchase orders for all the above organisations, therefore no costs were incurred.

(c) The Original Equipment Manufacturer (HP) communicated with GPW that the data which was lost as a result of EVA hardware crash cannot be recovered. There is currently no project underway to recover lost data.

(d) GPW will not incur any costs.

END

17 November 2022 - NW3106

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the legal and/or policy framework that provides for the compulsory security vetting of senior public servants by the State Security Agency (SSA); (2) what total number of (a) senior public servants were subjected to security vetting by the SSA in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21 and (iii) 2021-22 financial years in each (aa) national and (bb) provincial department and (b) the specified senior public servants received a top secret security clearance from the SSA?

Reply:

1. The compulsory vetting is carried out in terms of the National Strategic Intelligence Act and the Minimum Information Security Standards:

National Strategic Intelligence Act of 1994 as amended by the General Intelligence Laws Amendments Act of 2013:

The State Security Agency is mandated by the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act No 39 of 1994) and Intelligence Services Act, 2002 (Act No 65 of 2002) as amended by General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act, 2013 (Act No 11 of 2013), to conduct vetting investigations to determine the security competence of a person if such a person:

• is employed by or is an applicant to an Organ of State; or

• is rendering a service or has given notice of intention to render a service to an organ of state, which service may:

  • Give him or her access to classified information and intelligence in the possession of the organ of state; or
  • Give him or her access to areas designated national key points in terms of the National Key Points Act, 1980 (Act 102 of 1980).

Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS) of 1996 as approved by Cabinet as national information security policy:

Chapter 5, Section 1.5 states the following:

Political appointees (Director-Generals, Ambassadors, etc.) will not be vetted, unless the President so requests or the relevant contract so provides. From the lowest level up to Deputy Director-General, all staff members and any other individuals who should have access to classified information, must be subjected to security vetting.

2. Vetting figures for senior civil servants

(aa) National

National Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2

2

0

0

2

2

Basic Education

1

1

1

0

1

0

Civilian Secretariat for Police

0

0

2

2

1

1

Communications and Digital Technologies

8

6

4

3

1

0

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

15

1

18

1

23

0

Correctional Services

2

2

0

0

2

2

Employment and Labour

2

2

0

0

0

0

Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment 

5

5

2

2

2

2

Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

2

2

2

0

2

2

Government Printing Works

3

3

0

0

0

0

Health

13

1

24

2

32

3

Higher Education and Training

3

3

1

1

1

0

Home Affairs

3

3

5

5

4

4

Human Settlements

14

4

20

3

24

2

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

10

3

14

0

21

2

International Relations and Cooperation

260

39

221

12

209

24

Justice and Constitutional Development

8

8

2

2

4

4

Military Veterans 

2

2

0

0

0

0

Mineral Resources and Energy 

4

4

2

2

2

2

National Treasury

60

11

49

4

45

2

Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

5

5

2

2

1

1

Public Enterprises

6

6

1

1

1

1

Public Service and Administration

4

4

1

1

0

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

2

2

1

1

0

0

SA Police Service

0

0

0

0

0

0

SA Revenue Service

32

3

29

4

25

1

Science and Innovation

1

1

1

1

1

1

Small Business Development

3

3

0

0

0

0

Social Development

1

1

2

2

1

1

Sport, Arts and Culture

2

2

0

0

0

0

State Security Agency

0

0

0

0

0

0

Telecommunications and postal services

0

0

0

0

1

1

The Presidency

33

3

30

3

27

2

Tourism

12

1

11

1

10

1

Trade, Industry and Competition

5

2

3

1

2

1

Transport

27

2

25

0

25

1

Water and Sanitation

43

1

42

2

40

0

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

15

0

15

1

14

0

(bb) Provincial

Provincial Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a)Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b)Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture and Rural Development

299

8

326

4

523

5

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

2

 

12

 

0

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

1

 

0

Arts and Culture

 

0

 

4

 

1

Community Safety (& Police Oversight) (&Security and Liaison)

 

11

 

5

 

10

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

8

 

21

 

9

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (& Human Settlements)

 

5

 

1

 

13

Cultural Affairs and Sport

 

1

 

0

 

0

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

2

 

0

 

1

Economic Development

 

4

 

0

 

6

Economic Development and Tourism

 

2

 

1

 

3

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

 

4

 

3

 

0

Economic Development, Small Business, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

0

 

3

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

6

 

8

 

0

Education

 

13

 

6

 

15

e-Government

 

8

 

4

 

5

Employment and Labour

 

2

 

0

 

0

Environment Affairs and Development Planning

 

1

 

0

 

0

Finance

 

2

 

1

 

0

Health

 

0

 

0

 

1

Health

 

8

 

10

 

23

Home Affairs

 

0

 

0

 

1

Human Settlements

 

15

 

3

 

8

Infrastructure Development

 

5

 

0

 

6

Justice

 

1

 

0

 

0

Office of the Premier

 

22

 

12

 

24

Police, Roads and Transport

 

6

 

0

 

2

Provincial Legislature

 

4

 

1

 

1

Provincial Treasury

 

19

 

14

 

25

Public Works

 

0

 

9

 

1

Public Works (Roads & Infrastructure)

 

2

 

1

 

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

 

3

 

0

 

0

Roads and Transport

 

0

 

1

 

2

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

 

0

 

0

 

1

SA Revenue Service

     

3

 

3

Safety and Liaison

 

1

 

2

 

1

Social Development

 

6

 

8

 

10

Sport and Recreation

 

0

 

1

 

0

Sport, Art and Culture

 

2

 

0

 

1

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

 

3

 

4

 

6

Transport

 

2

 

11

 

4

Transport and Community Safety

 

6

 

2

 

0

Transport and Public Works

 

1

 

0

 

2

16 November 2022 - NW3897

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In view of reports that gang-related activities in secondary schools, theft and violence is on the rise, (a) what total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools since the beginning of 2022 have been reported to her department and (b) how has her department responded to such incidents; (2) what are the relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks?

Reply:

1 a Total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools

The Department has received a total of 411 gang-related incidents. 

1 b The Department’s response to such incidents

The Department has trained schools on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF), which is a guiding framework in addressing all forms of violent incidents in schools, including gangsterism.  The NSSF empowers schools to identify and manage all safety threats in schools; establish school safety committees, comprising of stakeholders, such as teachers, police officers, school governing body members, and learner representative council members.  Furthermore, the NSSF also empowers schools to develop incident reporting mechanisms; establish collaborations with external stakeholders, such as the South African Police Service (SAPS), the Department of Social Development, and civil society organisations; as well as develop school safety plans and policies to respond to safety challenges.

The Department has also empowered schools to develop and implement Codes of Conduct for learners.  These Codes of Conduct enable schools to address ill-discipline related to gangsterism, such as bullying, physical and verbal assaults, as well as the selling and distribution of drugs, truancy and theft in schools.

The Department also has an established Protocol with the South African Police Service (SAPS) to address crime and violence in schools, including gang violence.  The Protocol has enabled all schools to be linked to their local police stations.  SAPS conducts searches and seizures in schools, and conduct crime awareness campaigns in schools.  Regularly, schools work with SAPS, local community police forums and social workers to address gangsterism-related issues.  Regular searches and seizures of illegal drugs and weapons are done in schools and anti-gangsterism campaigns, in collaboration with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, are conducted in schools.   

The Department also encourages learner participation in sport and school enrichment programmes in order to promote healthy lifestyles.

 

2 a The relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks

Bullying and physical fights committed by gangsters in schools are influenced by social issues, originating in the communities and spilling over to the schools.  In addition, gangsterism in some schools is also influenced by faction fighting between learners from different villages.  This form of gangsterism is common in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal.  Furthermore, gangsterism is closely linked to drug peddling in schools.

16 November 2022 - NW3821

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of mother tongue education facilities and schools exist (a) nationally and (b) provincially; (2) what is the (a)(i) name, (ii) town and/or city and (iii) province of each specified education facility and/or school and (b) language of teaching of each; (3) what is the matric pass rate of each facility and/or school since each school and/or education facility was established?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)

The Department of Basic Education advocates for learners to learn through their home languages.  This is particularly so in the Foundation Phase, where learners learn the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and numeracy.  Post the Foundation Phase, the majority of our learners from African languages background switch to English First Additional Language as the medium of instruction.

Learners in schools that adopted English Home Language and Afrikaans Home Language, as their languages of learning and teaching continue to use these two languages up to Grade 12.  The table below attempts to provide a response for 1(a) nationally and (b) provincially.

Row Labels / Province

COMBINED SCHOOL

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

SECONDARY SCHOOL

Grand Total / National

 

EC

1 324

8

3 255

905

5 492

 

FS

146

 

754

333

1 233

 

GP

214

33

1598

819

2 664

 

KZN

375

3

3858

1718

5 954

 

LP

165

45

2 435

1 318

3 963

 

MP

73

146

1 042

513

1 774

 

NC

113

3

316

121

553

 

NW

89

6

994

400

1 489

 

WC

116

1

1114

460

1 691

 

Grand Total

2 615

245

15 366

6 587

24 813

 

2.(a)(i)(ii)(iii) and (b) 

The Eastern Cape Bilingual Based Mother Tongue Education programme has 1 953 schools, where English, together with IsiXhosa and Sesotho, are used as languages of learning and teaching up to Grade 8.  The list of schools is herein attached as Annexure A. 

3. The attached document (Annexure B) provides matric pass rate from a sample of seven schools.

15 November 2022 - NW3824

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

During a recent unannounced oversight visit to the Magistrates Court in Plettenberg Bay, it became apparent that the court designated for the hearing of children’s cases cannot be used as the video technology is not operative, the separate entrance designated for use by child and women victims is unable to be used as the door does not open, forcing them to use the general entrance and leaving them vulnerable to intimidation, is there some plan in place to rectify the unsatisfactory state of affairs?

Reply:

The designated Sexual Offences area in the Plettenberg Bay Magistrates’ Court, including waiting areas, are controlled and secured through the biometric system (central pool). This system was affected by the electrical power outage which occurred and affected the entire area. When the municipality restored electricity, the courts conducted a functionality test, and a call was logged to restore the biometric system, which is a security function that controls and restricts access to protect court users. As of 21st October 2022 the system is now functional.

END

15 November 2022 - NW3630

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the Quarter One SA Crime Statistics for the 2021-22 financial year, pertaining to crimes committed against children, what is the total number of (a) successful convictions, (b) cases that were dismissed and/or acquitted as a result of poor and/or incomplete investigations by the SA Police Service, (c) cases withdrawn by the victim and/or victim’s family, (d) cases awaiting trial, (e) cases awaiting sentencing and (f) cases referred back to the police for further investigation in each province for (i) attempted kidnapping and (ii) human trafficking?

Reply:

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) prioritises all Gender-Gased Violence and Femicide (GBVF) matters and more especially where the victims are children. The Sexual Offences and Community Affairs (SOCA) Unit within the NPA is tasked with, inter alia, ensuring increased access to justice for victims of GBV as well as optimal management of these matters in a victim centric manner. This is done by providing pre-trial and court preparation services, often in collaboration with Civil Society Organisations (CSO), at its sixty-one (61) Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) across the country. These one-stop centres provide a variety of essential psycho-social, medical and legal services thus creating a safe space for child victims to report offences against them and receive services that are empowering them to transform into survivors. Specialised training is also provided to prosecutors in dealing with child victims and their testimonies. Whilst prosecutors in court are prioritising these matters, data is not kept for offences committed against children specifically.

During Quarter 1 of 2021/22 financial year (April to June 2021), the following was not recorded in respect of crimes against children:

  1. The total of successful convictions;
  2. The total number of dismissals or acquittals, nor the reason(s) for the acquittal;
  3. The information regarding cases withdrawn by the victim and /or victim’s family;
  4. The number of cases awaiting trial;
  5. The number of cases awaiting sentencing; and
  6. The NPA is also unable to supply information pertaining to cases still under investigation in each province for (i) attempted kidnapping and (ii) human trafficking.

Having regard to the above, it is respectfully submitted that the Police Ministry is better placed to respond to the questions asked.

15 November 2022 - NW3825

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has a plan in place to address the untenable state of affairs of several toilet facilities at the Plettenberg Magistrates Court designated for the disabled which have no functioning lights nor globes, rendering them unusable; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) time frames and (b) further relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

I have been informed, by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development’s Provincial Head: Western Cape, that facilities related challenges were resolved on 18 October 2022. Contractors were called to conduct an assessment and repair. Using the Departmental delegation, all lights were repaired, and globes were also fitted. This was confirmed when the Provincial Head and in his delegation visited the service point to test functionality. The newly appointed Area Court Manager conducts weekly inspections on the building to ensure that all defects are noted and resolved.

Ablution facilities, CCTV, generator gauge and emergency lights are linked to the central biometric system. This system was affected during the municipal electrical power outage which affected the entire area including the court. As soon as the municipal power was restored, the Court Management logged a call to ensure that affected biometric system is also restored.

15 November 2022 - NW3843

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the fact that the age of consent in the Republic is 16 years old, therefore it is against the law for anyone to have sex with someone who is under 16 and constitutes a statutory rape with exceptions (details furnished), and noting that in the republic girls as young as nine years old give birth, which is a cause for concern, in the period 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, what is the total number of (a) successful convictions, (b) cases dismissed and/or acquitted as a result of poor and/or incomplete investigations by the SA Police Service, (c) cases withdrawn by the victim and/or victim’s family, (d) cases awaiting trial and (e) cases awaiting sentencing in each province?

Reply:

  1. It must be noted that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) does not collate offence specific data in general. However, court statistics, regarding statutory rape and statutory sexual assault matters, as reported and dealt with at the NPA SOCA Thuthuzela Care Centres, are herewith provided for the financial years as reflected below:
  2. 2019/2020 financial year:
  3. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 119 verdict cases with 116 convictions – 97.5 % conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 15 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 2 verdict cases with 2 convictions – 100% conviction rate.

No diversions applied

  1. 2020/2021 financial year:
  2. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 64 verdict cases with 61 convictions – 95.3% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 2 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 2 verdict cases with 2 convictions – 100% conviction rate.
  • No diversions applied.
  1. 2021/2022 financial year:
  2. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007:
  • Finalised 85 verdict cases with 80 convictions – 94.1% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 12 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007:
  • Finalised 12 verdict cases with 12 convictions – 100% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 2 cases.

In the analysis of the data, it is evident that the Covid-19 pandemic had a negative impact on the reporting and finalisation of cases as reflected in 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years respectively. In comparison to the 2020/21 financial year, the 2021/22 financial year shows an increase in these numbers.

The information to sub-question (b) regarding the acquittals are included supra in the actuals and conviction rates as provided.

The information to sub-questions (c), (d) and (e) are not available. It is respectfully submitted that the Police Ministry is better placed to respond to the questions asked.

In addition, it must be noted that these offences of statutory rape and statutory sexual assault as mentioned, inter alia, are covered in the training curriculum provided to prosecutors. These manuals are annually reviewed and updated with the latest legislation and case law to ensure that prosecutors are proficient in the application of the said law.

15 November 2022 - NW4090

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What are the reasons that municipal officials implicated and arrested for corruption get bail so easily without bail being opposed; (2) Whether the crimes of corruption are not viewed as serious cases against the State; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

APPLICABLE LEGISLATION

A. The Constitution

a) Section 12(1)(a) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (the Constitution), states that a person cannot be deprived of his or her freedom arbitrarily or without just cause.

B) Section 35(1)(f) of the Constitution reads:

Everyone who is arrested for allegedly committing an offence has the right (f) to be released from detention if the interests of justice permit, subject to reasonable considerations’.

B. Criminal Procedure Act No. 51 of 1977

(a)  Section 60(1)(a) of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 (the Criminal Procedure Act) states: “An accused who is in custody in respect of an offence shall be entitled to be released on bail at any stage preceding his or her conviction in respect of such offence, if the court is satisfied that the interests of justice so permit”.

(b) Section 60(4) of the Criminal Procedure Act lists the grounds on which it would not be in the ‘interests of justice’ to grant an accused bail. Broadly, these are, where there is likelihood that the accused, if released on bail, would:

  1. endanger the safety of the public or any person or will commit a schedule 1 offence;
  2. attempt to evade trial;
  3. attempt to influence or intimidate witnesses or to conceal or destroy evidence;
  4. undermine or jeopardise the objectives or the proper functioning of the criminal justice system; or
  5. where in exceptional circumstances, there is the likelihood that the release of the accused would disturb the public order or undermine public peace or security.

These interests must be weighed against the right of the accused to his or her personal freedom, in particular, the prejudice he or she is likely to suffer, if not admitted to bail.

c) It is imperative to note that applications for bail are directed to Presiding Officers who must decide if it is in the interest of justice for an accused to be released on bail (where a person is charged with an offence listed in schedule 5 of the Criminal Procedure Act), or if there are exceptional circumstances for an accused to be released on bail (where a person is charged with an offence listed in schedule 6 of the Criminal Procedure Act).

1. (a) The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), in articulating its attitude on whether

to oppose bail or not, is guided by the legislative framework set out above, being the Constitution and the Criminal Procedure Act.

The role of the NPA in a bail application court process is to adduce evidence which is intended to assist the court to determine whether the accused is a suitable candidate to be released on bail or not, and to also counter evidence submitted by the accused, where one or more of the grounds stated in Section 60 (4) of the Criminal Procedure Act are established.

Every application for bail is approached and dealt with on its own merits, after careful consideration of the merits of the case.

Where a municipal official or any other person is applying for bail, and one or more of the grounds stated in Section 60 (4) of the Criminal Procedure Act are established, the NPA has a duty to oppose the application for bail and does oppose bail.

It, however, remains the discretion of the court to decide whether the accused is granted bail or not.

2. The NPA views the offence of corruption as serious cases against the State, and the people. This was prioritised in the NPA six (6)-months’ planning process. The NPA endeavours to ensure that criminal prosecutions are initiated against persons if there is sufficient evidence that points to them as having committed offence/s of corruption, once investigations are finalised.

This also relates to allegations of corruption emanating from the State Capture Commission recommendations. In this regard, the NPA undertook, and has fulfilled its public commitment made to Parliament in May 2022, to enroll nine (9) seminal cases related to State Capture by the end of September 2022.

In those six (6) months, the NPA also made significant progress in prosecuting another wave of cases which are of equal importance in its drive to ensure accountability for corrupt activities. Although these cases do not get the same level of public and media attention, they collectively involve billions of rands that have been stolen from the public purse, often by collusion between officials of the State and people in the private sector, and enable the NPA to deal, bit by bit, with corruption across the public and private sectors.

These include several cases being pursued in the provincial divisions by Specialised Commercial Crime Unit (SCCU) prosecutors and other prosecutors tasked with guiding criminal investigations and conducting prosecutions.

Of pertinence in the novel approach to expediting State Capture and complex corruption cases, is the role of the Task Force, which brings together in closer collaboration, key role players in these cases. The Task Force includes several NPA units, including Directors of Public Prosecutions, Asset Forfeiture Unit, Investigating Directorate, Strategy, Operations and Compliance (SOC) Unit as well as the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI). In some cases, working with Counsel from the private sector has also borne remarkable fruits.

The recent enrolment of the seminal cases and other complex corruption cases guided through the Task Force, has therefore been by design and not by default. This has been a collective effort by prosecutors, investigators, analysts and other DPP and NPA staff members with specialised skills and is indicative of the seriousness the NPA views corruption allegations.

(a) Further, the 2022/23 Annual Performance Plan (APP) of the NPA provides that, while ensuring justice for the many victims of crime is core to the operations of the National Prosecutions Service (NPS), its priorities include dealing with corruption, fraud, and complex commercial crime.

As such, the NPA recognises that corruption, amongst others, disproportionately affects the poor and vulnerable, and is a burden to the South African economy.

15 November 2022 - NW4108

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the mediatory role the Republic will play in bringing stability in Tigray region of Ethiopia?

Reply:

South Africa was requested by the African Union to host the Peace Talks between the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, and also to nominate a representative to join the Facilitation Team.

The request was received positively by South Africa and in addition, nominated former Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa, Dr Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka, to serve on the Facilitation Team, together with the former President of the Republic of Kenya, Mr Uhuru Kenyatta, in support of the African Union High Representative for the Horn of Africa, and former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Mr Olusegun Obasanjo. The Peace Talks took place from 24 October until 3 November 2022.

South Africa’s role is as per the invitation by the African Union Commission and remains ready to contribute should the Union and/or the Parties request further contribution in the implementation of the “Agreement for lasting peace through a permanent cessation of hostilities between the Government of Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front” signed on 2 November 2022 in Pretoria.

South Africa, therefore, plays an important role in the process and will continue to do whatever is required to ensure that this historic Agreement is implemented, so as to silence the guns in Ethiopia.