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28 October 2022 - NW3114

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1) what are the relevant details of the (a)(i) types and (ii) total tonnage of fertilisers being produced at the Foskor mine in the past 10 years and (b) full capacity of the production of each of the fertilisers; (2) whether the specified mine is producing at its full capacity; if not, (a) why not and (b) how are the challenges being addressed; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) how does his department intend to ensure that Foskor is able to produce to its full capacity and (b) by what date will the specified company be able to produce to its fullest capacity; (4) whether the Government has a stake within Foskor; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the specified company is for sale; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons for selling the company?

Reply:

The CEO of the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) has advised me that the following total production volumes were achieved for the 10 year period from 2013-2022:

  • Phosphate rock: 18 860 000 tons (on average 73% of capacity)
  • Mono-ammonium phosphate 2 678 000 tons (on average 59% of capacity).

The Mine and acid plant had not been operating at full capacity for a number of years. Improvements to the infrastructure, power supply and additional technical capacity is required to improve production and capacity utilisation. The IDC has regularly engaged the Foskor leadership to improve operational performance and works with Transnet on logistics and Eskom on the energy related issues.

Following operational improvements made and favourable market conditions, a projected improvement in output for the current financial year is expected to increase capacity utilisation at the mine to 95% and a substantial improvement at the plant.

The IDC is the majority shareholder in Foskor, holding 59% of the Foskor shares. The IDC does consider potential Strategic Equity Partners for businesses that it is involved in.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3093

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

(1)       Whether he will furnish Mr M J Cuthbert with copies of all of the public submissions received by his department through the public participation process for the Draft Policy Proposals On Measures to Restrict and Regulate Trade in Ferrous and Non-Ferrous Metals Waste, Scrap and Semi-Finished Products to Limit Damage to Infrastructure and the Economy; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2) Whether all the requested documents were submitted by 26 August 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3604E

Reply:

A large number of public comments were received by the due date and a few stakeholders requested additional time and were granted a short extension. Comments ranged from pro-forma views in favour or against the proposals; to substantive submissions that engaged specifically with the policy, legal or economic aspects of the proposals. These comments are currently being evaluated and considered by the Ministry.

Copies of submissions are not normally made available to the public or to Members of Parliament, as respondents to a request for comment did not make representations in anticipation that their comments would be made available to the public.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW2992

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she and/or her department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Mr W F Faber with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

All official government policy and review documents must be widely consulted with and made known to the public in all its manifestations.

28 October 2022 - NW2598

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

On what basis, understanding, research, historical first nation and/or indigenous history did her department rely when it decided that only five Khoisan groups be identified and recognised in the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, Act 3 of 2019?

Reply:

 

Government engaged in a consultation process to recognise the 5 groupings of Khoi-San namely the Griqua, Koranna, Nama, San and Cape-Khoi as per the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act, 2019 (Act No. 3 of 2019).

Should there be any evidence submitted to government of the existence of an additional Khoi-San main grouping other than the Cape-Khoi, Griqua, Koranna, Nama or San, government will consider amending the Traditional and Khoi-San Leadership Act to include that main grouping.

28 October 2022 - NW3013

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Whether he and/or his department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Dr N V Khumalo with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (the dtic) regularly provides documents for public and stakeholder comment as feedback can assist to strengthen policy documents.

Section 195(1)(e) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), prescribes that Public administration must be governed by the democratic values and principles enshrined in the Constitution, including the principle that the people’s needs must be responded to, and the public must be encouraged to participate in policy-making.

Copies of the dtic Policy documents are available on the Department website: www.thedtic.gov.za.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3255

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the programme that supports the InvestSA unit, which has been allocated a budget and has set targets for each year, (a) what are the reasons that reports are based on key performance targets instead of tangible service delivery targets such as job creation, (b)(i) who generates the reports and (ii) at what cost for each report and (c) what total number of compiled reports have actually translated into (i) a tangible service delivered and (ii) real projects that created jobs of the investment pledged? [

Reply:

InvestSA reports on metrics outlined in the dtic’s Annual Performance Plan, which sets out the key actions to be undertaken. By acting as a facilitator in the business eco-system, Invest SA plays a role in companies investing and expanding. The outcomes are in turn reported on as set out below.

The following six examples as outlined in the dtic Annual Report presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Trade, Industry and Competition, provides tangible evidence of targets being attained:

  • R176 billion-investment pipeline.
  • 642 investor consultations for rapid implementation
  • Assisted with the evaluation of 305 visa recommendations for technical experts of various companies
  • 54 ease of doing business engagements i.e., Technical Working Groups, Business meetings , Stakeholder engagements
  • 179 intra-company transfers, critical skills and permanent residency visas facilitated.

There are several more examples of outcomes achieved by Invest South Africa and I will report on some of these to the Portfolio Committee when reporting on the department’s quarter 1 and quarter 2 performance for this financial year.

Reports are generated internally through the branch in cooperation with other branches such as the Economic Research and Policy Branch in the Department.

Reports are generated internally and there are no costs involved.

Quarterly reports are compiled by Invest SA based on reports submitted by companies.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW3331

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

Given that he has been in office for more than a year, what number of formal businesses and start-up companies, whose primary business operandi involve technologies related to mobile connectivity, artificial intelligence, big data analytics, machine-to-machine communication and the internet of things which make use of machines to optimise efficient manufacturing and the production of goods in the small, medium and micro enterprises sector have been registered in the past two financial years?

Reply:

The Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) informs me that it uses standard industrial classification codes (SIC) that does not include the level of detail set out in the question. For example, if a company’s business is in the computer industry, it will be classified as Information and Communication Technology and will not be specific as to whether that entails Artificial Intelligence or Robotics etc. The Companies Act, 2008 (Act No. 71 of 2008), did away with the concept of primary business being contained in a Companies Memorandum of Incorporation and made same general.

-END-

28 October 2022 - NW2772

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she will use the (a) findings and (b) recommendations of the report of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State to investigate if her department and/or the entities reporting to her contributed towards state capture; if not, why not; if so, (a) which part of the report is relevant to her department and (b) on what date will the investigation start?

Reply:

(a) and (b) No, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) will not use the Report on the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegation of State Capture to investigate whether the Departments and/or Entities reporting to her contributed towards state capture.

(a) On reading the various reports, there is an indication that there are no parts of the report that are relevant to the Departments and Entities reporting to the Minister of COGTA. Although, there are certain issues affecting a municipality that were highlighted in the report, there are no specific findings and/or recommendations in relation to the affected municipality. Officials from the Department have collaborated with officials from the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) to assess all the recommendations emanating from the various reports of the Commission. Should this broader assessment in collaboration with the DPME identify matters that require my attention, I will ensure that the necessary steps are taken, especially where legislative or institutional changes would be required and prepare motivated implementation plans, indicating how each recommendation ought to be addressed.

(b) Not applicable.

 

28 October 2022 - NW2909

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) What (i) total number of employees of his department are currently working from home, (ii) number of such employees have special permission to work from home and (ii) are the reason for granting such special permission and (b) on why date will such employees return to their respective offices; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

28 October 2022 - NW2737

Profile picture: Groenewald, Mr IM

Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with reference to section 57A(1) and (2) (details furnished) of the Local Government: Municipal Systems Act, Act 32 of 2000, as amended, she has yet to determine the different periods for the different categories of misconduct; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date does she intend to prescribe the different categories as required by the specified Act; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No. The President of the Republic of South Africa assented to the Local Government: Municipal Systems Amendment Act No. 3 of 2022 on 17 August 2022 which Act will be operational on 1 November 2022. New regulations relating to this matter will be finalised and gazzeted in due course.

2. The Minister of COGTA will not make a statement on the matter.

28 October 2022 - NW2949

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) total amount was allocated to the Commission for Khoi-San Matters in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years and (b) is the breakdown of expenditure on (i) traveling, (ii) accommodation and (iii) administration for the public meetings for each visit to each province?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii)

The total amount that was allocated to the Commission for Khoi-San Matters (i) during the 2021-22 financial year was R6,320,135,18 and in the 2022-23 financial year R9,781,111.00

The following table indicates the (b) Breakdown of expenditure on (i) traveling, (ii) accommodation and (iii) administration for the public meetings per province as at the beginning of October 2022:

Spending Item

2022/23 FY

2021/22 FY

Traveling (Summary)

R307,790.17

R94,878.90

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R55,590.94

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R15,762.19

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R25,270.66

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R23,595.00

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R22,401.49

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R34,163.76

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R43,928.72

R94,878.90

Accommodation (Summary)

R185,760.00

R18,500.00

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R10,080.00

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R25,920.00

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R28,800.00

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R23,040.00

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R31,680.00

R18,500.00

Administrative costs (Summary)

R 66,529.19

R12,402.35

  • Eastern Cape campaign

R12,323.12

R0.00

  • Free State Campaign

R10,001.66

R0.00

  • Gauteng Campaign

R0.00

R0.00

  • Kwa-Zulu natal Campaign

R12,158.85

R0.00

  • Limpopo Campaign

R3,258.97

R0.00

  • Mpumalanga Campaign

R2,382.82

R0.00

  • Northern Cape Campaign

R10,771.86

R0.00

  • North-West Campaign

R3,565.89

R0.00

  • Western Cape Campaign and Launch in the prior FY

R12,066.02

R12,402.35

28 October 2022 - NW3203

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With regard to the findings of alleged corruption that has been flagged in her department relating to tenders to repair state-owned properties that were damaged during the April 2022 floods, what (a) forms of consequence management will her department be instituting against the workers who have been fingered in the malpractice and (b) corrective measures does her department intend to take to ensure that employees of her department do not delay the process to repair the properties any further; (2) Whether her department has taken any steps that seek to include women, youth and individuals with disabilities in departmental programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1)

a) I have been informed that disciplinary processes will be instituted against employees who may be fingered in the malpractices as soon as internal investigation is concluded.

b) The department has developed a task team that monitors and ensures the smooth running of the process.

2. Empowerment initiatives for Women, Youth & People with disabilities are tabled below:

As per Quarter 1 REPORT

April -June 2022/2023 Financial Year from SCM

INITIATIVES

ACHIEVEMENTS

DISAGGREGATED DATA ON BENEFICIARIES

   

WOMEN

MEN

YOUTH

DISABILITY

       

MALE

FEMALE

MALE

FEMALE

               

Participation of designated Groups in the DPWI Programmes through Procurement For all transactions within quotation threshold, a mandatory Preferential Procurement Requirements for B-BBEE Level 1, 2 & QSE/EME applies.

Majority of quotations awarded to Designated Groups in line with Preferential Procurement Regulations 2017

475

Transactions to the value of

R24 442 932,97

858

Transactions to the value of R77 674 599,64

224

Transactions to the value of R23 816 608,54

97

Transactions to the value of R10 839 286,51

1

Transactions to the value of R384 999,54

1

Transactions to the value of R2 9000,00

 

3. The department leverages its procurement spend to promote transformation and empowerment of historically disadvantaged individuals and designated groups as listed in the Preferential Procurement Regulations of 2017. The department has implemented a transformation agenda that utilizes pre-qualification criteria and mandatory subcontracting when inviting bids and quotations.

For the period 01 April 2022 – 31 August 2022, 62 tenders worth R 329 224 983 were awarded to designated/ targeted groups. 57 of these tenders to the value of R316,797,325 were awarded to Level 1 BEE service providers and 5 tenders to the value of R12,427,658 were awarded to Level 2 BEE service providers.

The targeted (designated) groups benefited as follows;

  • Black majority owned, 60 awards (97%) to the value R283,838,371
  • Women black owned, 15 awards (24%) to the value of R26,256,604
  • Youth black owned, 8 awards (13%) to the value of R30,734,232
  • Contractor Co-operative, 4 awards (6.5%) to the value of R2,125,567
  • Companies in Rural/ Underdeveloped/ township areas, 26 awards (44%) to the value of R50,940,120

The above statistics are indicative of the department’s commitment to empowerment and transformation.

28 October 2022 - NW3183

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs  QUESTION

On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) Whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

The question by the Honourable WF Faber is vague. It would assist the response if the Honourable Faber were to indicate the specific structures and/or fora external to Government to which he refers.

28 October 2022 - NW2117

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to the disaster relief funding, donations and resources from the State, businesses and non-governmental organisations that were provided as an immediate response to the flood in KwaZulu-Natal, and in view of the announcement by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, on 26 April 2022 that the AuditorGeneral is working with the National Treasury to conduct real-time audits on the emergency flood relief funds (details furnished), what is the (a) total amount of money that has been allocated to date from the (i) Government and (ii) Solidarity Fund and (b) breakdown for each?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Honurable Member may request the National Treasury for the full allocations for government as a whole. For its part the Department of Cooperative Governance (DCoG) has allocated a total of R516 748 000 from the Municipal Disaster Relief Grant. This does not include allocations in terms of Reprioritisation and Reallocations made by other sector departments.

(ii) The Honourable Member may contact the Solidarity Fund for the information requested.  

(b)

Disaster Response Grant Allocation (2022/2023)

Approved amount

(KZN Phase 1)

Approved amount

(KZN Phase 2)

Approved amount

(EC Phase 3)

Approved amount

(EC Phase 4)

Recommended amount

(KZN- Phase 5)

(Awaiting NT approval)

Municipal Disaster Response Grant:

R371 420 000

Inkosi Langalibalele LM:

R 48 950 000

Alfred Duma LM:

R14 414 000

Port St Johns LM:

R 13 300 000

Winnie Madikizela LM: R 12 790 132

eThekwini MM:

R 185 087 026

 

ILembe DM:

R 19 523 000

Kwa –Dukuza LM:

R109 043 000

Ingquza Hill LM:

R 4 130 000

Mbashe LM:

R 14 415 000

 
 

UMsunduzi LM:

R 620 000

Ray Nkonyeni LM:

R11 000 000

Nyandeni LM:

R 2 692 902

OR Tambo DM:

R 46 872 163.23

 
 

Mkhambathini LM:

R 8 200 000

 

Umzimvubu LM:

R 10 500 000

   
 

Ray Nkonyeni LM:

R 8 100 000

 

Ntabankulu LM:

R 5 110 777

   
 

uGu DM: R 2 000 000

       

Provincial Disaster Response Grant:

R145 328 000

R 145 328 000 of the Provincial Disaster Response Grant was moved to the Municipal Disaster Response Grant where it was allocated to municipalities

R516 748 000

R87 393 000

R134 457 000

R35 733 678

R 74 077 296

R 185 087 026

28 October 2022 - NW2451

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Finance

Given that the fuel price per litre is R24,17, and that the State is absorbing some of the levies for an extended two months, what effective long-term plans are in place to ensure that citizens are not exposed to such high tariffs; (2) what assurance do we have that the levy system, especially for the embattled Road Accident Fund, is still effective; (3) what projects, in detail, have been funded by the levy system in place?

Reply:

1. In March 2022, government responded to the escalating fuel prices by implementing a package of short-term measures comprising temporary fuel levy relief, release of strategic stocks and structural adjustments to fuel prices to assist consumers and vulnerable households. A temporary reduction in the general fuel levy of R1.50 per litre was implemented from 6 April 2022 until 31 May 2022 to provide limited short-term relief to households from rising fuel prices following the Russia/Ukraine conflict. The revenue foregone of R6 billion will be recouped through the sale of a portion of the strategic crude oil reserves held by the Strategic Fuel Fund (SFF) and will not have an impact on the fiscal framework.

Government extended the temporary fuel levy relief for a two-month period consisting of a continuation of the relief of R1.50 per litre for the first month, from 1 June 2022 to 6 July 2022, and a reduction in the relief for the second month to 75c per litre of fuel from 7 July 2022 to 2 August 2022. This temporary relief was withdrawn from 3 August 2022 and the revenue foregone from the extension of the relief is estimated at R4 billion. Unlike the previous announcement, this is expected to have an impact on the fiscal framework as it will not be funded through a sale of strategic oil stocks. The extension of the fuel levy relief will be accommodated in the current fiscal framework in a manner that is consistent with the fiscal strategy outlined in the Budget and to be dealt with in the October 2022 MTBPS.

Government remains committed to the fiscal framework outlined in the 2022 Budget and any further relief should be done in a fiscally neutral manner or it would undermine government’s efforts at consolidation. Due to the tight fiscal position, there is limited space to fund additional tax relief.

As announced in May 2022, the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) has also taken further measures to help reduce fuel prices in a more sustainable manner. The DMRE removed the demand side management levy of 10c per litre applied to 95 unleaded petrol sold inland effective from 1 June 2022. After a review and consultation by the DMRE, it is proposed that the basic fuel price is also decreased by 3c per litre in the coming months.

Government intends to continue with consultations and proposals to remove the price cap on 93 ULP, which will partially deregulate the market and introduce more competition to lower pump prices. A review on the Regulatory Accounting System (which includes the retail margin, wholesale margin and secondary storage and distribution margins) will be completed by the DMRE to assess the potential to lower margins over the medium term.

Government continues to monitor the impact off the Russia/Ukraine conflict and zero-COVID policies in some countries, which continue to have an impact on energy and food prices and result in supply chain shocks, with the aim of investigating further measures to make households and businesses less vulnerable to such shocks.

2. Section 5(1)(a) of the Road Accident Fund Act (1996) stipulates that Road Accident Fund (RAF) is funded by means of Road Accident Fund levy, as contemplated Customs and Excise Act (1964). The funds collected, subject to any deductions in the Customs and Exercise Act, is a direct charge against the National Revenue Fund, for the credit of the RAF. With the levies earmarked in law, the revenue for the RAF is protected.

3. A general principle in public finances is earmarked funds for expenditure should be avoided, as it is inefficient and could be wasteful. Earmarked funds also limit budget flexibility in the delivery of priorities. It is only under exceptional circumstances that funds are earmarked and the general practice in South Africa is that all taxes revenues are deposited into the National Revenue Fund for general use.

Section 213(1) of the Constitution provides for a National Revenue Fund into which all revenue received by the national government must be paid, except money reasonably excluded by an Act of Parliament. Money is only withdrawn from the National Revenue Fund, in terms of Section 213(2) through an Act of Parliament.

With taxes and levies funding general budget programmes, in terms of Section 213 of the Constitution, it is impossible to list detailed projects funded through the general fuel levy for specific projects.

28 October 2022 - NW3389

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has received any correspondence from attorneys in Potchefstroom regarding the inadequate maintenance of infrastructure at the Magistrate’s Court building in Potchefstroom; if so, what steps were taken by his department to address the specified challenges; (2) Whether he was informed of the collapse of the roof of the Magistrate’s Court building; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the cost of the damage to the building and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that court proceedings continue to prevent a backlog of cases as a result; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department has received correspondence regarding maintenance of infrastructure at Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court. On 27 February 2020, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) handed over the site to the contractor in order to carry out planned maintenance to the entire building of the Magistrate’s Court but the project was disrupted due to COVID-19 lockdown regulations. However, as soon as the restrictions were lifted and the contractor came back on site, the local business forum intimidated the workers, and added to the delay. The contractor returned on site from 1 August 2022.

2. I have been informed about the collapse of the roof at the Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court.

a) The DPWI provided a report, titled “Preliminary Investigation Report: Current Condition of the Roof Covering and Safety of the Building”, dated 21 September 2022. Thereafter, a full investigation report on the current condition of all wooden roof trusses will be provided. Once the survey is completed, the Department is expecting to receive the cost estimates of the damages from the DPWI.

b) A contingency plan was compiled together with all the stakeholders at the magistrates’ court as follows:

  1. Potchefstroom Magistrate engaged JB Marks Municipality to assist in identifying alternative accommodation. The Municipality made the Town Hall and the Traffic Court available for use by the Department.
  2. The District Courts B and E were accommodated at the Town Hall for all cases where the accused persons are out on bail or warning.
  3. The Regional Court is accommodated at the Traffic Court for all cases where the accused persons are on bail or warning.
  4. All Regional Court matters, where the accused persons are in custody including sexual offences related matters, are heard at the Regional Court.
  5. All the cases, whereby the accused persons are in custody including first appearance matters and bail applications, are dealt with at the only available court room, Regional Court 3.
  6. The Children’s Court matters are dealt with at the boardroom of the Head of Court.
  7. The rest of the Family Court matters (Domestic Violence and Protection from Harassment) including District Civil Court matters are dealt with at the dedicated Children’s Court.
  8. The quasi-judicial functions (Small claims, Maintenance applications, Clerk of the Civil Court, Cash Hall, Offices for the Magistrates Regional and District and Public Prosecutors) are accommodated at the additional office space made available on the 1st floor.
  9. Transport is made available to transport members of public, accused persons on bail/warning and witness to the respective alternative accommodation.
  10. To ensure effective implementation of the contingency plan, 08:00 morning meetings are held with all the JCPS stakeholders to discuss the circumstances prevailing on a daily basis.

3. On 20 September 2022, the Department issued a media statement, titled: “Potchefstroom Magistrates’ Office temporarily evacuated after roof collapse”.

28 October 2022 - NW3398

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has received any correspondence from attorneys in Potchefstroom regarding the inadequate maintenance of infrastructure at the Magistrate’s Court building in Potchefstroom; if so, what steps were taken by his department to address the specified challenges; (2) Whether he was informed of the collapse of the roof of the Magistrate’s Court building; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the cost of the damage to the building and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that court proceedings continue to prevent a backlog of cases as a result; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department has received correspondence regarding maintenance of infrastructure at Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court. On 27 February 2020, the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) handed over the site to the contractor in order to carry out planned maintenance to the entire building of the Magistrate’s Court but the project was disrupted due to COVID-19 lockdown regulations. However, as soon as the restrictions were lifted and the contractor came back on site, the local business forum intimidated the workers, and added to the delay. The contractor returned on site from 1 August 2022.

2. I have been informed about the collapse of the roof at the Potchefstroom Magistrate’s Court.

a) The DPWI provided a report, titled “Preliminary Investigation Report: Current Condition of the Roof Covering and Safety of the Building”, dated 21 September 2022. Thereafter, a full investigation report on the current condition of all wooden roof trusses will be provided. Once the survey is completed, the Department is expecting to receive the cost estimates of the damages from the DPWI.

b)  A contingency plan was compiled together with all the stakeholders at the magistrates’ court as follows:

  1. Potchefstroom Magistrate engaged JB Marks Municipality to assist in identifying alternative accommodation. The Municipality made the Town Hall and the Traffic Court available for use by the Department.
  2. The District Courts B and E were accommodated at the Town Hall for all cases where the accused persons are out on bail or warning.
  3. The Regional Court is accommodated at the Traffic Court for all cases where the accused persons are on bail or warning.
  4. All Regional Court matters, where the accused persons are in custody including sexual offences related matters, are heard at the Regional Court.
  5. All the cases, whereby the accused persons are in custody including first appearance matters and bail applications, are dealt with at the only available court room, Regional Court 3.
  6. The Children’s Court matters are dealt with at the boardroom of the Head of Court.
  7. The rest of the Family Court matters (Domestic Violence and Protection from Harassment) including District Civil Court matters are dealt with at the dedicated Children’s Court.
  8. The quasi-judicial functions (Small claims, Maintenance applications, Clerk of the Civil Court, Cash Hall, Offices for the Magistrates Regional and District and Public Prosecutors) are accommodated at the additional office space made available on the 1st floor.
  9. Transport is made available to transport members of public, accused persons on bail/warning and witness to the respective alternative accommodation.
  10. To ensure effective implementation of the contingency plan, 08:00 morning meetings are held with all the JCPS stakeholders to discuss the circumstances prevailing on a daily basis.

3. On 20 September 2022, the Department issued a media statement, titled: “Potchefstroom Magistrates’ Office temporarily evacuated after roof collapse”.

27 October 2022 - NW3430

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Following the video of the seventy-year-old veteran actor, Mr. Vusi Thanda, begging for financial assistance on social media, what steps has he taken to mitigate the embarrassing financial situation which thespians often find themselves in?

Reply:

This matter has over the years affected various creatives across all domains and genres. It could be attributed to the unfavourable contractual agreements between creatives and their employers and/or management, lack of financial management including tax and budgeting.

The Department has over the years supported and will continue supporting various initiatives to empower and educate creatives in these matters quite early in their careers to have a ‘soft landing’ during troubling times since their sector operates mainly on free lancing.

Over and above that, the Department has a Program that supports Living Legends Legacy Project; creatives over 70 years old and above.

In the last three years the department has also established a Silapha Wellness Program, which is an initiative geared towards sensitising the creatives about such challenges.

27 October 2022 - NW3489

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether Bodybuilding South Africa (BBSA) paid the fine of R300 000 issued by SA Institute for Drug-Free Sports in 2018; if not, what steps were taken against BBSA; if so, on what date was it paid. (2). what action and/or recommendations were taken by the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and his department to stop BBSA from repeated doping offences. (3). what (a) is the anti-doping record for BBSA during the 2021-22 financial year and (b) were the results?

Reply:

  1. No, Body Building South Africa (BBSA) has not paid the fine. South African Institute for Drug-Free Sports has sent the federation Letters of Demand provided for the debt owed to it in our Annual Financials. BBSA responded with lawyer’s letters despite being informed that the SA Anti- Doping Regulations (2021) and the World Anti- Doping Code (2021) do not provide recourse for a national federation to dispute the fine.
  2. The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) has not indicated what actions they have taken to stop BBSA from repeated doping offenses. Section 17(A) that deals with Punitive Measures and specifically Subsection (1) of The South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport Amendment Act; the Department on written recommendations of SASCOC, may cause an investigation to be conducted as it deems fit to ascertain whether the federations comply with the provisions of the Act. The Department is still awaiting written recommendations from SASCOC.
  3. (a) As disclosed in the SAIDS 2021/22 Annual Report, eleven (11) tests were conducted at the National Bodybuilding Championships. (b) Ten (10) tests returned positive for various anabolic steroids. The names of the athletes and the substances are disclosed, as is required by the World Anti-Doping Code, in the Annual Report.

27 October 2022 - NW3372

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What (a) are the reasons that the Waterberg District Municipality in Limpopo is not a water authority (b) municipality, entity and/or department is accountable for water provision in the Waterberg District; and (c) total number of communities are affected by the water shortage in the specified district?

Reply:

The oversight role over water services institutions as per the Water Services Act is the responsibility of the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS), and this question should be referred to that relevant Department for reply.

27 October 2022 - NW3302

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in view of media reports of the terrible condition of the buildings and animals at the Potchefstroom College of Agriculture, she will provide the (a) reasons for the deterioration of the upkeep of the specified college and animals and (b) relevant details of (i) how her department intends to improve the specified conditions at the college, (ii) the detailed budget allocation towards the upkeep of the college in each year of the past 10 financial years and (iii) the work done at the college to maintain the college in the past 10 financial years; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, what are the relevant details in each specified case?

Reply:

(a) The upkeep and day-to-day maintenance of this College is administered by the North the West Provincial Department of Agriculture as College is currently residing and reporting under that Department.

(b)(i) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) and the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) are in a process of transferring Colleges of Agriculture to a national competence and having them declared as Higher Education Colleges governed by the Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No. 101 of 1997) but will be funded and managed administratively under the Minister responsible for Agriculture. This will benefit the Colleges in that DHET has established programmes for support to Higher Education Institutions, developing needy colleges towards attaining semi-autonomy and eventually full autonomy to Colleges leading to quicker decision-making and more effective implementation of decisions. College of Agriculture students as well will be able to access bursaries from the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) as it is only available to students at higher education institutions. Collaborations and coordination within the Higher Education sector will assist in improving the conditions of the Colleges of Agriculture especially in respect of infrastructure that supports curriculum offerings.

(b)(ii) The Potchefstroom College of Agriculture is administered by the North West Provincial Department of Agriculture, however, DALRRD provides support to the College through the College Revitalisation Plan since 2012. The allocations over the years are as follows:

Financial year

Name of College

Allocation

2011/2012

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R4 500 000,00

2012/2013

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R6 000 000,00

2013/2014

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 524 000,00

2014/2015

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R10 000 000,00

2015/2016

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R11 800 000,00

2016/2017

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R9 500 000,00

2017/2018

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 000 000,00

2018/2019

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R7 000 000,00

2019/2020

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R2 986 000,00

2020/2021

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R2 466 000,00

2021/2022

Potchefstroom College of Agriculture

R8 500 000,00

Total

 

R77 276 000,00

(b)(iii) The following Infrastructure, equipment and machinery were developed or procured at Potchefstroom College of Agriculture through Colleges Revitalisation Plan since 2012.

New building constructed

Buildings renovated

Procurement of equipment and machinery

Others

  • Construction of Poultry house
  • Construction of 20 sow-unit Piggery house
  • Construction of Poultry Abattoir
  • Construction of Greenhouse, Office and Palisade Fencing
  • Renovation of Lecture halls, Examination Hall and the assessment rooms security system– Phase 2
  • Construction of new Laboratories (Practical Training Facilities)
  • Building of One multi-purpose lecture hall with a capacity of 150 student
  • Construction of mini pack house for the horticultural unit
  • Renovation and installation of new machines in the Dairy
  • Refurbishment of student kitchen and dining hall
  • Renovation of students infrastructure and Alex/ Pampoen boere pit (6 hostels and 2 Halls)
  • Procurement of stand-by Generators
  • Procurement of 89 KW tractor
  • Procurement of nine double cab bakkies
  • Procurement of 24 row wheat drill
  • Procurement of farm agricultural equipment
  • Procurement of ICT equipment; computers, laptops, printers, projectors, etc
  • Procurement of Tractor GPS, Air Conditioners and Installation of 2 X Canopies
  • Supply and delivery of Tractor, Ridger, Plough and Slasher,
  • Installation of Bio-metric Access Control System in the Admin Block and student hostels
  • Installation of galvanized steel palisade for the centre pivot, Piggery House, layer house and whole campus
  • Installation of High Mast Lights
  • Provision of Wi-Fi on the campus

27 October 2022 - NW3215

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Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reformand Rural Development

(1) What (a) steps is her department taking to challenge the reported ban by Botswana and Namibia of the import of produce from the Republic, mainly vegetables and certain fruits and (b) has she found would be the impact of the ban on the Republic’s farmers and consumers. (2) whether she is in communication with her Namibian and Botswana counterparts in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3938E

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) undertook consultations with the relevant industries and the Department of Trade Industry and Competition (DTIC) as the lead Department on trade policy matters. The engagements resolved that the trade challenge should be addressed through a bilateral Ministerial meeting with the affected countries. DALRRD is implementing this resolution. The Director General wrote to his counterparts requesting urgent bilateral engagements on the matter. The outcome of the engagements will be shared with organised industry.

(b) The impact of such closures is lost market opportunities for the industry and loss of revenue to the State. This also undermines the efforts of free trade as contemplated in the African Continental Free Trade Agreement (AfCFTA). Furthermore, consumers of the affected products in these countries are more likely to experience an increase in prices of these commodities due to shortages/supply constraints.

According to the 2nd Quarter Agricultural Economic Review, vegetable prices registered a marked decrease, and this could be directly attributed to the short effects of the import bans. Price depression likely occurred as producers redirected, (as a short-term measure) these export consignments into the domestic market.

The current import ban includes tomatoes, carrots, beetroots, potatoes, cabbage, lettuce, garlic, onions, ginger, turmeric, chili peppers, butternut, watermelons, sweet peppers, green corn, and fresh herbs. Over the past 5 years, 98% of vegetables in Botswana originated from South Africa.

(2) No. The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has not yet communicated with her counterparts in Botswana and Namibia. She is awaiting the outcome of the meetings of the Director General with his counterparts in Botswana and Namibia.

27 October 2022 - NW3355

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) What action has been taken to resolve the accommodation allowance crisis after the protests at the University of Limpopo and (b) how will this unfortunate event of accommodation allowances not being paid because of administrative processes and delays be avoided in future?

Reply:

a) In relation to the University of Limpopo, NSFAS took a decision to deploy Senior Officials to attend to the conflict between the University of Limpopo, landlords and the students. At a meeting attended by these stakeholders and NSFAS in Polokwane on 22 September 2022, an agreement was reached on how to proceed. This agreement will be submitted for consideration and approval by the Board and the Minister. It should be noted that NSFAS only pays allowances upon receipt of claims on behalf of qualifying students by the University. However, the University has been busy with a verification exercise in order to comply with the Norms and Standards of DHET and the funding guidelines by NSFAS. The verification exercise took longer than expected and was met with some resistance from some of the landlords and students, especially the decision by NSFAS that off-campus allowances be paid directly into the landlords’ bank accounts. The agreement reached at the meeting was that for the rest of the 2022 academic year, off-campus allowances should be paid to the students who will settle their rental obligations with the landlords, as has been the case to date. The verification exercise should be continued until 2023 to allow landlords to make the necessary improvements to their properties so as to eventually comply with the minimum standards set by DHET. The meeting recommended that a fixed allowance of R1 820 be paid to all qualifying students until the verification exercise is concluded. 

b) As part of the student-centred model NSFAS took the decision to improve the administration of student accommodation. This will include accreditation of accommodation, grading and assigning costs to the different grades, linking students to accommodation, and ultimately paying accommodation providers directly. Part of the model will include increased capacity for accommodation. NSFAS plans, as of 2023, take over the accreditation of student accommodation. A system will be available for all potential housing suppliers to enlist their properties so that students can have a wider choice of accommodation. NSFAS will use this platform to expedite the allocation of suitable student accommodation and ensure that landlords are paid a fair value according to the accommodation provided directly.

27 October 2022 - NW3365

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the total budget set aside by his department for physical therapy for prisoners living with disabilities?

Reply:

There is no budget set aside for physical therapy for inmates living with disabilities specifically, costs for physical therapy for inmates are accommodated under the budget for Health Care Services for inmates. The budget for health care services for inmates is one hundred and eleven million, six hundred and twenty-nine thousand and two hundred (R111 629 200.00).

END

27 October 2022 - NW2655

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with regard to the Government’s commitment to gender sensitivity, his department included gender sensitivity into their policies and budget; if not, why not; if so, (a) how does his department (i) implement and (ii) monitor its gender sensitivity policy and/or programmes and (b) what total number of (i) legal practitioners, (ii) magistrates and (iii) maintenance officers are fully trained and knowledgeable on the Maintenance Act, Act 99 of 1998?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii) Yes, the Department has included gender sensitivity into its policies and budget. Further, the Department has developed Gender Indicators/Analysis Tools for Finance, HR, Supply Chain Management and the generic one for other Branches that assist them in the implementation and monitoring of the gender sensitivity policies and /or programmes. These Gender Indicators are used as guiding tools by different Branches within the Department on how to include gender sensitivity into their policies and/or programmes. Furthermore, the Gender Directorate monitors the implementation of the policies and programmes of the Department.

b) (i) The application of the Maintenance Act is covered in terms of training on Marriage

and Divorce for all PVT candidates, both the PVT Schools and those in PVT contracts.

For the past four (4) years, the numbers are tabulated below:

2022 (to date)

4 010

2021

4 303

2020

4 014

2019

4 335

 

Additionally, for practitioners, this is also covered in the training of Marriage, Divorce and Child Law seminars, which is discretionary.

2022 [As at July 2022]

130

2021

272

2020

135

2019

168

(iii) Maintenance officers are fully trained and knowledgeable on the Maintenance

Act, Act 99 of 1998?

The Department do make provisioning to fund training programmes that address various sets of skills. These sets of skills encompass core competencies, scarce & critical skills and/or transversal skills.

Maintenance Officers falls within core competencies, scarce & critical skills of the Department. The table below illustrate the total number of Maintenance Officer trained per programme:

Name of the Programme

Number of Maintenance Officers

Period

a) Training on the Maintenance Act 99 of 1998

3 African Females, 3 African Males, 1 Coloured Female, and 2 Coloured Males.

Total: Nine (9)

1 April to August 2022

b) Records Management

1 African Male.

Total: One (1)

 

c) TransUnion

1 African Female, 3 African Males, and 2 Coloured Females.

Total: Six (6)

 

d) Departmental Induction

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

 

e) Anti-Corruption and fraud

1 African Female.

Total: One (1)

 

f) Sexual harassment policy and procedure

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

1 April to August 2022

g) Ethics in the workplace

1 African Male and 1 Coloured Female.

Total: Two (2)

 

h) Labour Relations

1 African Male

Total: One (1)

 

i) Grievance and disciplinary procedure

2 African Male

Total: Two (2)

 

j) Employee Assistance Programme

3 African Females, and 4 African Males.

Total: Seven (7)

 

k) Service Excellence

1 African Female and 1 African Male

Total: Two (2)

 

l) Maintenance Clerks and Officers Training

6 African Females, 4 African Males, 9 Coloured Females, and 4 Coloured Males.

Total: Twenty-three (23)

 

m) Domestic Violence Act Workshop

1 Coloured Female

Total: 1 (One)

 

n) ICMS Domestic Violence

1 African Female

Total: One (1)

 

o) ICMS Maintenance

1 African Female

Total: One (1)

 

p) Crafting of Performance Agreement

1 African Male

Total: One (1)

 

GRAND TOTAL

Sixty One (61)

 

On annual basis, the Department develops the Workplace Skills Plan (WSP), and the training for Departmental officials are implemented and/or coordinated throughout the specified financial year in line with the WSP. Furthermore, the annual training report is compiled to verify the implemented training against the WSP.

27 October 2022 - NW3415

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Tambo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether, considering that the procurement practices in recent times have been a hindrance to infrastructure development in the higher education sector, with corruption and lack of services being rendered for payments made characterising procurement processes, his department has any policy in place to streamline and/or centralise procurement at public institutions of higher learning; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Higher Education and Training (the Department) centralised procurement of infrastructure for 16 TVET colleges. Nine colleges have since been finalised, three are an 85% to 99% completion rate and four below an 85% completion threshold. The Department continues to engage TVET colleges on the monitoring of their infrastructure delivery. 

The centralisation of infrastructure at universities is limited by the autonomous nature of university councils. However, the Department has set in place monitoring mechanisms to trace the procurement, delivery and expenditure on projects in order to improve the coordination and delivery of infrastructure across all institutions the Department has: 

  • Appointed a Chief Director: Infrastructure to facilitate streamlining of infrastructure delivery; and 
  • Appointed Implementing Agents to accelerate the infrastructure procurement processes, as well as project management of infrastructure. 

The Implementing Agents will also assist with capacity building at institutions where challenges of delivery have been experienced. The Department is currently in the process of following the guidelines as outlined in the Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS) and the Framework for Infrastructure Delivery and Procurement Management (FIDPM). It is also in the process of developing a portfolio and programme plans. Priority projects have been identified and included in the draft plans. 

27 October 2022 - NW3520

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1159 on 4 May 2022, in which he indicated that proposed amendments to the definition of indigenous languages contained in the Policy Framework are underway, the specified amendment to recognise Afrikaans as an indigenous language have been implemented; if not, what are the reasons that the amendments to recognise Afrikaans as an indigenous language have not been implemented despite his undertaking on 4 May 2022 to implement them; if so, what are the details of the amendments; (2) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with proof that the amendments have been gazetted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As I had indicated previously, the Department has received, considered and accepted the legal advice on the status of Afrikaans as an indigenous language, and the need for policy adjustment to clearly reflect this fact so that we are not unduly distracted from the important task of developing our historically marginalised languages. The adjusted definition will be published in a Government Gazette. Officials from my Department have been having discussions with officials from the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture and there is consensus on the need for an explicitly inclusive definition of indigenous languages in the policy framework.

2. The Honourable member must rest assured that the amendment will be published as per the advice, and I hope this will close this matter once and for all and re-focus our attention on the main task at hand which is bringing dignity and respect to all our historically marginalised indigenous languages as the Constitution of the Republic demand of us.

27 October 2022 - NW3693

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What long-term plans have been put in place to combat the challenge of large-scale illegal mining operations in the Republic?

Reply:

The South African Police Service is to launch the Economic Infrastructure Task Team (EITT) whose role will be to address the scourge of crimes within the non-ferrous metals, essential infrastructure, critical infrastructure, extortion, and illegal mining. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy will work together with the envisaged unit.

27 October 2022 - NW3400

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Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority has received any documents regarding the prosecution of a certain person (name furnished) in connection with an investigation into a diamond scheme in which investors invested approximately R100 million; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it envisaged that the case will be before the court; (2) Whether there is a delay in the court hearing on the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what has he found is the reason for the delay; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has confirmed that the matter is a project driven investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) Northern Cape. The Organised Crime component within the Office of the Director of Public Prosecutions, Gauteng Division, Pretoria has been guiding the investigations.
  2. The investigation is at an advanced stage. An expert report is awaited. On conclusion of the investigation, the prosecutor will decide whether to institute a prosecution, and if so, on what charges.
  3. There is no need to release a statement on the matter.

27 October 2022 - NW3394

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In the light of several protests at the universities and technical vocational education and training (TVET) colleges on account of inefficiencies of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), what (a) turnaround strategy is in place to ensure that the inadequacies of NSFAS is completely a thing of the past and (b) total number of such protests have been recorded in the 2022 academic year at (i) universities and (ii) TVET colleges?

Reply:

No.

Institution/University

Turnaround strategy

Total number of protests recorded in 2022

1.

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

The allowances were paid on time to students. The university made some concessions to allow NSFAS qualifying students to register whilst await for the advancement from NSFAS.

There were no protests reported.

2.

University of Cape Town

The University advances all NSFAS funded students with meals, books and accommodation allowance until funds are received from NSFAS.

The university had minor protests this year that were contained. Not all the protests were NSFAS-related.

3.

Central University of Technology

The NSFAS to issue the Funded List and Guidelines to all the universities & TVET colleges at the beginning of the academic year

Bloemfontein Campus:

  • 23-24 February 2022
  • 28 February 2022
  • 07 March 2022
  • 13-14 March 2022
  • 17 March 2022
  • 22 March 2022
  • 24-25 March 2022
  • 06-07 June 2022

8 in total

Welkom Campus

  • 04 February 2022
  • 27-30 March 2022
  • 03-04 April 2022

3 in total

4.

Durban University of Technology

There was a delay in payment of the upfront payment by NSFAS as a result payment of allowances to students delayed.

On 8 -11 March 2022

The protests were not only about NSFAS matters. However, the concerns raised by students included the delays in payment of allowances

5.

University of Fort Hare

The university extended the registration period to allow NSFAS funded students to register upon confirmation of funding by NSFAS.

In the beginning of the academic year, there were pockets of demonstrations due to delayed NSFAS lists of funded students

6.

University of the Free State.

All other concerns were addressed during registration period. Only the issue of accommodation took longer and was addressed in May 2022 through engagements between DHET, NSFAS, Students represented by SRC, and UFS management.

From 21 to 23 February 2022 in both Bloemfontein and Qwaqwa campus

The concerns raised include withdrawal of offers due to late confirmation of funding from NSFAS for first-time entering students, late confirmation of funding for continuing students, immediate payment of allowances to NSFAS students, N+1/2 Rule,

Accommodation for NSFAS funded students

7.

University of Johannesburg.

The University administers funds on behalf of NSFAS for over 25 600 students registered in 2022. All efforts are made to ensure that potential NSFAS students are assisted with registration and allowances at the beginning of the year while waiting for NSFAS to confirm funding whilst waiting for the upfront payment from NSFAS.

The University lifted a financial block to 8998 students who were identified as potential NSFAS beneficiaries. This includes 872 SASSA beneficiaries.

 

The university also set aside a budget for the SRC Trust Funds. A total number of 4462 students were approved for SRC trust fund during the academic registration period.

The University of Johannesburg advances all NSFAS funded students with meals, books and accommodation allowance until funds are received from NSFAS in April 2022.

The experienced protests were sectional (groups of common interest protesting – not led by the SRC).

On the10th of February 2022, about 50 students attempted to disrupt registration process but the University responded in time to prevent the disruption.

All the protests were managed successfully by of course pressurizing the relevant sectors to be responsive by addressing the problems.

8.

University of KwaZulu-Natal

The vast majority of list of demands received from the SRC, includes issues, as students experience them, with respect to NSFAS. Concerns raised include poor communication, non-responsiveness, perceived inequity/bias in applying NSFAS rules, systems, e.g., for appeals, not working well

NSFAS funded students were assisted whilst waiting for communication and funds from NSFAS.

27 May 2022, 6 & 14 June 2022.

9.

University of Limpopo

The challenging area with regard to the NSFAS funding has been around the student’s allowances, and in particular, Off-Campus accommodation allowances.

The matter was resolved immediately with NSFAS taking full responsibility of the administration of the process as such, further challenges would be resolved within the shortest turnaround time.

14 September 2022.

10.

Mangosuthu University of Technology

NSFAS qualifying students are assisted to register

On 23 June 2022, not NSFAS related

11.

University of Mpumalanga

No protests experienced

 

12.

Nelson Mandela University

Nelson Mandela University has been working closely with NSFAS. Ongoing communication with the NSFAS agent has proved valuable in addressing certain operational issues.

A visit to the NSFAS Office in Cape Town with a multi-stakeholder University team, assisted in attending to some strategic interventions that were required. A productive and meaningful relationship with NSFAS is required with institutions to ensure open and constructive flow of information and planning. An academic year requires prior planning to ensure that universities can enrol new and returning students without any significant disruptions. The sector needs to be engaged through a multi-stakeholder task team and informed well in advance if there will be significant policy changes to ensure adequate risk mitigation and preparation for unintended consequences.

The University experienced protests that closed the campus on 14 February, as well as 3 and 4 March.

A management team lead by the Dean of Students engaged on the issues.

The main issues of the closure on 14 February being:

  • Students awaiting funding statuses including NSFAS appeals which then result in allowances not being able to be released. This included the Higher Certificate
  • unfunded students
  • Postgraduate student funding
  • Unfunded students that do not qualify for University concessions for registration
  • Historic debt.

Following positive engagements, the parties found each other on a number of issues raised.

The main issues of the protests on 3 and 4 March being:

  • Extension of the closing date for registration

Management agreed on an extension to the registration period from 4 March to 11 March 2022.

13.

North-West University

The NWU has set aside funds to pay allowances from the end of February albeit that an NSFAS payment had not been received.

An agreed-upon process and measures involving members of the university management and the student leadership has been in place to address concerns that had been raised by students – some of which were related to NSFAS

The University experienced some unrest in February 2022. The issues raised were NSFAS and registrations related. A meeting was arranged between the SRC and management and matters raised, were resolved.

14.

University of Pretoria

There were no protests at UP on NSFAS.

 

15.

Rhodes University

The university committed support initiatives that would make NSFAS more efficient and effective.

No protests experienced.

16.

Sefako Makgatho University

University takes upon itself to process and allocate allowances to funded students and later claim from NSFAS.

So far, no protest actions were experienced at SMU during the 2022 academic year.

17.

Sol Plaatje University

There were no protests experienced.

 

18.

University of South Africa

Protests experienced were not NSFAS related. The protests were led by the labour unions on labour and management related matters.

 

19.

Stellenbosch University

Stellenbosch University had no NSFAS related student protests in 2022.

 

20.

Tshwane University of Technology

TUT has implemented mitigating strategies to try and resolve challenges experienced with NSFAS.

This involved TUT and NSFAS embarking on a series of engagements to address concerns and queries through the NSFAS Service Agent, robust meetings with Financial Aid Practitioners of South Africa (FAPSA) and Usaf (FEF)

(b) The students protest on NSFAS matters were recorded at Tshwane University of Technology in the beginning of 2022, i.e., during February and March. The most challenging issues that affected all six campuses were recorded as follows:

  • Delay in the release the list of NSFAS Funded students;
  • N+2 Rule of NSFAS; and
  • NSFAS appeals process being slow.

. However, there protests were not just limited to NSFAS related concerns. Other student demands also played a role

21.

Vaal University of Technology

NSFAS officials visited the campus to address outstanding challenges regarding NSFAS.

On 10 June 2022, the guard house at the entrance of the campus was set alight.

22.

University of Venda

The University of Venda Strategy is to open registration for all NSFAS potential funded students pending NSFAS confirmation and reimbursement of funds to the university. University decided to pay students allowances towards food and to pay landlords before NSFAS pay to ensure well-being of students and stability on campus. As for book allowances universities decided to wait for NSFAS to pay the university considering the magnitude of the invoice as majority of UNIVEN enrolment is funded by NSFAS.

one protest action was recorded during May 2022.

23.

Walter Sisulu University

The interventions by the University included: Ongoing engagements with institutional and campus SRCs, NSFAS visiting campuses to deal with NSFAS related matters,

Walter Sisulu University encountered protests from February to June 2022 on its four campuses (Zamukulingisa, Mthatha, Ibika and Buffalo City). The concerns raised by students included: unfunded students, and student accommodation not compliant to DHET minimum norms.

24.

University of the Western Cape

No protest actions related to NSFAS issues

.

25.

University of the Witwatersrand

No protest actions related to NSFAS issues

 

26.

University of Zululand

NSFAS qualifying students are assisted whilst NSFAS has not yet paid the upfront payment to the university.

On 9 March 2022 at the KwaDlangezwa. The concerns raised by students were not only NSFAS related. Students complained against students living off campus and inadequate residences. The University managed to source more off-campus accommodation.

27 October 2022 - NW3598

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the challenges faced by the Bjatladi Community Property Association with specific reference to their Zebediela Citrus Estate; (2) whether any investigations were conducted to establish the causes of the problems and the solution put on the table for the community; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The challenges are disputes between the concerned group and the Bjatladi Communal Property Association (CPA) committee, more specifically on governance issues.

2. Yes. The cause of the challenges is the governance issue, coupled with allegations of corruption and maladministration against the current CPA committee. On 16 September 2022, the Limpopo Department of Agriculture and Rural Development together with Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) held a meeting with both the concerned group and the current Bjatladi CPA committee with the intention to resolve their disputes, however, the two groups are not ready to work together.

Professional mediation was recommended, to which they needed to consent within five working days. To date, the two groups have not consented to participate in the proposed mediation.

27 October 2022 - NW3202

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In view of Africa being regarded as contributing about 1% of global knowledge, which further marginalises the continent as a producer of knowledge, what are the (a) relevant details of any improved measures that his department has actioned and/or implemented to ensure that the Republic’s universities and students contribute to the production of global knowledge to close the gap and (b) strides that his department has made thus far to ensure that higher education institutions around the Republic are keeping up to world standards in light of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) implements two policies that are directly geared towards bolstering knowledge productivity in higher education institutions. The first policy is the Research Outputs Policy (2015) which provides a framework for the evaluation and subsidy allocation for research outputs produced by South African universities. The second policy is the Policy on the Evaluation of Creative Outputs and Innovations produced by South African Higher Education Institutions (2017).

Over and above the two policies, there are various initiatives under the umbrella programme we call the University Capacity Development Programme (UCDP) which also incentivises capacity development initiatives of academics at all our universities. The policy recognizes quality creative outputs in the subfields of Fine Arts; Visual Arts; Music; Theatre; Performance and Dance; Design; Film and Television and Literary Arts. Under innovation the policy recognizes Patents and Plant Breeders’ Rights.

Since the implementation of the policy from 2005, South African universities recorded notable growth in the number of research publications produced by academics in the sector. Table 1 below attests to the steady growth of research outputs, from 7 230 units in 2005 to 21 734.4 units in 2020.

The growth of research outputs from the universities has also impacted positively on the growth of academics with doctoral degrees as shown in Table 2 below.

Several independent studies have shown that the policies of the Department and the UCDP have increased research productivity and the number of doctoral graduates from South African universities. The graphs in Table 1 and 2, confirm that research productivity is on the rise in South African universities.

Table 1: Total Publications Units awarded, 2005 - 2020

See the link for Table:  https://pmg.org.za/files/Table_1.pdf

(b) What are the strides the Department has made thus far to ensure that higher education institutions around the Republic are keeping up to world standards in light of the Fourth Industrial Revolution?

 

The Ministerial Task Team on the 4th industrial Revolution established in 2019 sought to investigate and advise the Minister on how the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system should take up opportunities presented by the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR). The Report of the Ministerial Task Team on the Implications of the Fourth Industrial Revolution for Post-School Education and Training was presented to the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 18 September 2020. Since the Report’s release in 2021, the Department and the Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) are developing an Implementation Plan of its recommendations. Progress on implementation was reported to the Social Protection, Community and Human Development (SPCHD) Cluster on 17 August 2022. We have recorded several partnerships and progress by universities, colleges and Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) in advancing 4IR interventions within the PSET Sector.

Various initiatives are taking place in all the four sub-sectors of the Post-School Education and Training (PSET) system, and they are captured in a database that has been developed by the Department. These include initiatives that (a) contribute to the 4IR (research, development and innovation); (b) provide/produce skills that are in line with the needs of the 4IR (building capacity for functioning in the 4IR); and (c) embrace the affordances of the 4IR in the PSET system, how it is managed, administered, equipped, teaching and learning taking place and how assessment is being done (impact of the 4IR on PSET).

Universities, TVET and CET colleges, through already established structures and partnerships are resourced and capacitated in the implementation of 4IR initiatives. The Department is actively supporting institutions, for example, it has, through an EDTP SETA partnership, established 4IR Centres of Excellence in 10 TVET colleges and, through a partnership with Intel, initiated the establishment of a series Artificial Intelligence (AI) Labs. The first was established at Orbit College where 20 mentors were trained to implement AI

Curriculum in the college. In collaboration with the MICT SETA, TVET College Curriculum

was developed in 4IR Technologies and an 4IR Learning Factory was established in collaboration with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), to name a few.

An Inter-Departmental Committee for the 4IR in PSET (4IRIDC) was established in 2021 to coordinate the Department’s efforts in the 4IR; to drive the implementation of the recommendations of the Report; and to monitor its implementation. The 4IRIDC is finalising a Framework for 4IR Implementation in the PSET that will further guide and support PSET institutions in implementation and provide a tool to monitor implementation.

27 October 2022 - NW3595

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). What are the reasons that the approved Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme 3 (PESP3) list for funding was published late. (2). whether he has found to be true the allegations that the National Arts Council (NAC) had spent the two hours that the specified list was late for interfering and fiddling with the final adjudication decisions of the Advisory Panels; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that the NAC was involved in the delay of the publication of the PESP3 list. (3). what are the reasons that the NAC interfered in the process when persons who are not members of the NAC, such as an advisory panel, are in accordance with section 11(3) of the National Arts Council Act, Act 56 of 1997, supposed to advise the NAC on the merits of applications for grants and on any matter relating to the field of the arts for which it was appointed?

Reply:

(1). The List was not published late, the NAC published the approved list on the due date (30th September 2022) on all the social media platforms. The social media sites were our quickest way to disseminate the approved list following the crash of the NAC website due to extremely heavy traffic. The website was then restored after a couple of hours and the information was also made available on that platform.

Council does not and did not adjudicate any applications. Please refer to point 2 above where they clarified the role of Advisors vs the role of Council Members. Additionally, the ACT clearly states that “Panel Members advise the NAC on the merits of applications”. This means that they advise, but do not approve, as that is the role of the Council (as the Accounting Authority of the entity). All final Council-approved Applicants are from the pool of applications that have been adjudicated by the Advisors.

27 October 2022 - NW2796

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Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of business incubators are equipped to provide entrepreneurs with skills that are relevant to the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution such as artificial intelligence and blockchain technologies in each province?

Reply:

The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda) supported Incubation ecosystem provides a bouquet of interventions in multi-disciplined sectors including relevant technologies and all nine verticals of the Fourth Industrial Revolution through Township based Digital Hubs and ICT focused Incubators. To emphasise, these incubation ecosystem are well equipped to provide entrepreneurs with skills relevant to the technologies of the Fourth Industrial Revolution.

No.

Incubator

Province

Digital Hubs

1

Botshabelo Digital Hub

Free State

2

Galaxcoc Digital Hub

Gauteng

3

Kwamashu Digital Hub

KwaZulu Natal

4

Limpopo Digital Hub

Limpopo

5

Mafikeng Digital Hub

North West

6

Mpumalanga Digital Hub

Mpumalanaga

Technology Business Incubators

7

SmartXchange

KwaZulu Natal

8

Softstart Business Technology Incubator (SBTI)

Gauteng

9

IHub Nelson Mandela Bay

Eastern Cape

10

Africa Beyond 4IR (AB4IR)

Gauteng

11

Propella

Eastern Cape

12

Tucsnovation

Gauteng

13

Firi JHB

Gauteng

14

Firi CPT

Western Cape

15

Daily Grind

Western Cape

No.

Province

Number of Incubators

1

Eastern Cape

2

2

Free State

1

3

Gauteng

5

4

KwaZulu Natal

2

5

Limpopo

1

6

Mpumalanga

1

7

North West

1

8

Western Cape

2

15

Seda is planning to establish a Township and Digital Hub (proposals are currently at adjudication stage) in the Northern Cape (Namakwa region) which will operate within the 4IR space moving forward.

The DSBD is further entering into strategic partnership with NEMISA which would be anchored around the following: (a) physical technology production, (b) transformative tech applications, (c) digital platforms, and (d) digitally traded services. This partnership, together with some that we will explore in the digital space as we expand our incubation footprint, will go a long way in providing needed skills in new technologies driven by the fourth industrial revolution.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

27 October 2022 - NW3777

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 3254 on 29 September 2022, in which she indicated that Phase 1 of the settlement of the Lower Zingcuka Land claim will take place during this quarter and that the settlement will depend on the co-operation of the community, what (a) total number of phases will it take to settle the long outstanding claim, (b) will each phase entail and (c) sort of co-operation is expected from the community in order to fast-track the settlement of the specified claim?

Reply:

a) The claim was to be settled in two (2) phases, however due to policy changes in the processing and the settlement of claims in the Commission, full and final settlement of the claim at once is planned.

b) The claimant beneficiaries comprises of three (3) villages, namely Lower Zingcuka, Upper Zingcuka and Lower Ngqumeya. The household verification for Lower Zingcuka and Lower Ngqumeya has been completed and the household verification for Upper Zingcuka is currently underway.

c) Submission of verification documents by Upper Zingcuka beneficiaries to finalise the household verification process.

END

27 October 2022 - NW3466

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has inclusive programmes for subjects such as those in the liberal arts area which fall outside the scope of science, technology, engineering and mathematics in order to ensure a much more diverse appreciation for the subjects in the university space and labour market; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Universities in South Africa have a wide range of liberal arts in their Programme and Qualification Mixes. These are academic fields in history, literature, philosophy, sociology, drama and visual arts, to name but a few.

Traditional and comprehensive universities offer a range of classic and world-renowned liberal arts, with various schools within faculties dedicated to such studies, e.g. the University of Johannesburg has the Faculty of Art, Design and Architecture that offers qualifications in creative, hospitality and the visual arts; the University of South Africa, Stellenbosch University, University of KwaZulu-Natal, University of the Witwatersrand, University of Pretoria, University of Fort Hare and University of Zululand have a long history in the offering of liberal arts.

Universities of Technology also have a long history in the liberal arts, e.g. the Tshwane University of Technology has a campus dedicated to the liberal arts and the Durban University of Technology boasts of a well-known Faculty of Art and Design.

The Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation established the National Institute for the Humanities and Social Sciences (NIHSS) through the publication of Government Notice No. 37118 on 5 December 2013. The role of the NIHSS is broadly to enhance and support the Human and Social Sciences (HSS) in South Africa and beyond, and to advise government and civil society on HSS related matters. It does so through its various programmes, including the Doctoral school scholarships, catalytic projects and African Pathways Programme. The NIHSS works with universities, think tanks and research bodies to convene and coordinate PhD-level academic programmes, catalytic research and international research collaboration. The Doctoral scholarships programme is the Institute’s largest programme and works in collaboration with the South African Humanities Deans’ Association and Council for the Development of Social Science Research in Africa.

Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges such as the College of Cape Town and Tshwane North TVET College offer qualifications in art and design.

27 October 2022 - NW3035

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total number of parolees in the period 1 January 2019 to date, (i) have not been found by departmental officials during routine visits and/or (ii) did not turn up at departmental offices as part of their parole conditions and (b) number of the total specified number of parolees (i) have been returned to finish their sentence and (ii) are still on the run, being sought to be returned?

Reply:

(a)(i) The total number of parolees that have not been found by departmental officials during routine visits are as follows:

Region

01 January 2019-31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

1 338

1 221

1 278

1 087

WC

4 1834

21 854

21 889

9 392

KZN

3 411

2 743

3 265

3 670

EC

1 301

1 029

1 320

829

LMN

1 02

405

525

72

GP

1 391

831

1 255

982

National

49 377

28 083

29 532

16 032

(a)(ii) The total number of parolees that did not turn up at departmental offices as part of their parole conditions are as follows:

Region

01 January 2019-31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

708

371

574

372

WC

4 368

1 949

2 352

864

KZN

1 077

976

1 922

1 747

EC

811

695

966

747

LMN

83

81

81

50

GP

241

158

344

299

National

7 288

4 230

6 239

3 279

(b)(i) The following are the number of parolees that have been returned to complete their sentence in correctional centres:

Region

01 January 2019 to 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

606

453

443

259

WC

1471

636

771

389

KZN

410

151

320

236

EC

440

380

402

331

LMN

83

81

81

50

GP

666

197

296

236

National

3 676

1 898

2 313

1 501

(b)(ii) The following are the number of parolees still on the run and being sought to be returned to correctional Centres:

Region

01 January 2019 to 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial year

2021/2022 Financial year

01 April 2022 to 31 August 2022

FS/NC

377

259

296

161

WC

6163

6370

6449

6384

KZN

735

352

363

152

EC

1741

1710

1674

1615

LMN

1003

1001

894

797

GP

426

575

483

323

National

10 445

10 267

10 159

9 432

END

27 October 2022 - NW3395

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

In light of the fact that there has been an outcry regarding the backlog in the printing of certificates and diplomas in the technical vocational education and training (TVET) colleges, what total number of TVET college (a) certificates and (b) diplomas are yet to be (i) printed and (ii) handed over to the students by his department?

Reply:

Emanating from the Examination IT System, the Resulting and Certification IT System directorate has no outstanding printing of certification and diplomas to qualifying candidates. The Examination IT system could not identify and extract any outstanding qualification to qualifying candidates. Any and other candidates whose achievement records across different examinations (over multiple examination cycles) must apply via their respective TVET colleges for consolidation to meet qualification requirements. 

(a) CERTIFICATION PROGRESS FOR THE PERIOD 31 JANUARY 2022 TO 30 JUNE 2022

Business Studies 

As at 30 June 2022, 571 230 certificates for candidates who sat for Business Studies N4 to N6 qualification examinations between the period November 2021 to June 2022 were issued. This figure represents a total of 192 examination center at 50 TVET Colleges.

Engineering Studies 

As at 30 June 2022, 142 606 certificates for candidates who sat for Engineering Studies N1 to N2 and N4 to N6 qualification examinations between the period November 2021 to June 2022 were issued. This figure represents a total of 28 examination centers.

3.3 NC(V) 

As at 26 September 2022, 149 874 out of 170 300 certificates for candidates who sat for NC(V) Level 2 to 4 qualification for the 202111 examination cycle were issued. Different types of documents are created. These represents the full certificates for candidates who passed all 7 subjects in one examination cycle. The outstanding certificate are a representation of subject statements for candidates who passed less than 7 subjects and candidates who failed all subjects or candidates who were absent for all subjects. No documents are printed for these candidates, but need to be issued with an Umalusi document number for further processes once the student re write the subjects and qualify for a full certificate.

For the period November 20211 to March 2022 the certificates for 2978 candidates are still being processed. The candidates enrolled for the supplementary examination are excluded from the batch certification submitted to Umalusi for approval and printing. The reason being that a candidate could have passed or bettered a mark during the supplementary examination. This is done per level, since the issuing of the higher level is dependent on the issuing of the lower level. This means the candidates must have passed the lower levels before a higher-level certificate can be issued. 

Once this consolidation process is finalized, the records for candidates who passed subjects over multiple examination cycles are consolidated and certificates issued for qualifying candidates.

(b) 3.4 DIPLOMAS 

The following is an update progress made in issuing of diplomas during the period between 01 January 2022 to 30 June 2022 reporting period:

(i) The Certification and Historical records unit issued 34 588 diplomas to qualifying candidates who meet the theoretical and practical component requirements. 

While the number of potential candidates who are eligible for diplomas seemed to be less, consideration should be taken that this is a three years’ qualification comprising of 18 months Business Studies /12 months Engineering Studies theoretical achievement accompanied by 18 months or 2000 hours of relevant evidence of practical experience in commerce or industry, while Engineering requires 24 months or two years of relevant practical experience respectively.    

National N Diploma application declined to candidates not meeting the requirements must resubmit their applications for appeal. 

The above figure represents a total of 50 TVET Colleges.

INTERVENTIONS

Department of Higher Education and Training courier all Certificates and National N Diplomas printed and awarded to TVET colleges and campuses to be issued to qualifying candidates. These qualifications are captures and recorded on the Examination IT System with tracking waybill number for easy tracking and retrieval. It is the responsibility of the TVET colleges to inform candidates to collect their qualification upon receipt by their respective colleges/campuses. 

While it is expected of college to hand over certificates and diplomas to qualifying candidate’s challenges does occur especially with private colleges relocations.

27 October 2022 - NW3068

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of women have benefited from the land reform programme to date?

Reply:

Since the inception of the Land Reform programme, a total of 2.8 million hectares had been redistributed to municipalities under Commonage grant (COMG), Settlement Land Acquisition Grant (SLAG) for settlement and Land Redistribution for Agricultural Development (LRAD) for agricultural purposes and this land is held in title by communities and individuals. This involves a total of over 67 000 women benefiting in the form of accessing land for various needs including agriculture and tenure security.

For the implementation of the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP), the state has acquired over 2.4 million hectares of land which benefited about 5 000 women mostly in the form of allocation and leased agreements for a period of 30 years extendable for another 20 years.

The Restitution programme has settled 172 933 land claims to female headed households.

27 October 2022 - NW2889

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has concluded its assessment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) cases; if not, by what date is it envisaged that the NPA will take a decision on the remaining cases; if so, what are the reasons that the remaining cases were not referred for investigation and/or prosecution; (2) Which TRC cases have already been referred to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation?

Reply:

1. I have been informed that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has not yet concluded its re-assessment of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) cases. It is not possible to stipulate a specific date as it is an ongoing process. However, efforts are made to ensure that the matters are referred as speedily as possible.

2. The hundred and twenty-nine (129) investigations referred to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI) are as follows:

a) Prior to September 2021, a total of 59 TRC cases were under investigation by DPCI. These were overseen by Priority Crimes Litigation Unit (PCLU) until the matters were migrated to the respective provinces in April 2019.

b) A further 55 cases were identified for re-opening by the PCLU. These pertain to the deaths in detention, where detainees who were detained for contravention of security legislation or died under circumstances which necessitated further investigation. Some investigations also pertain to deaths where the deceased died in alleged confrontations with the police.

Division

Number of Matters under Investigation

1. Western Cape

9

2. Free State

2

3. Mthatha

10

4. Eastern Cape

13

5. North West

5

6. Kwazulu-Natal

29

7. Mpumalanga

4

8. Northern Cape

3

9. Johannesburg

25

10. Pretoria

11

11. Limpopo

10

We are in possession of a list of matters under investigation. However, it must be emphasized that this information is confidential, and the risk in the release of this information is that it might compromise further investigations. This creates challenges for investigators and prosecutors alike, once suspects/witnesses/persons of interest are made aware of matters under investigation.

On 20 June 2022, the National Director of Public Prosecutions directed, through an internal memorandum which was circulated to all the divisions, that in all TRC matters that are under investigation, dedicated prosecutors must ensure that contact with the families is made. It was also emphasised that families must be updated regularly on the progress made in their matters. It was also directed that a name list of all families together with their contact numbers be obtained. This name list was also forwarded to the office of the Deputy National Director of Public Prosecutions. Prosecutors were encouraged to engage actively with families to ensure that a more victim-centred approach is followed.

END

27 October 2022 - NW3566

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Zondo, Mr S S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)In line with arguments by experts from the Scientific Officer at the African Regional Centre for Space Science and Technology Education in English, that Africa’s outer space programme is integral to meeting many needs that African countries have, resulting in the Department of Science and Innovation’s funding of the Maritime Domain Awareness (MDA) programme at the Cape Peninsula University of Technology since 2008, with the launch of the first South African mini-constellation of three satellites for Maritime Domain Awareness (MDASat-1) in January 2022, of which the aim of the mission is to provide data gathered by the specified satellites to the South African government to contribute to the effective management of South African territorial waters, what total amount in funding has been provided for the MDA programme to date; (2) whether his department will provide a detailed update on the MDA programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department will furnish Mr S S Zondo with the relevant details of how the data gathered by the MDASat-1 has been utilised by the Government to fulfil the aims of the programme and enhance the security and protection of South African marine resources; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. To date, a total of R28 048 067 (twenty-eight million forty-eight thousand and sixty-seven Rands) has been provided to the Cape Peninsula University of Technology (CPUT) towards the Maritime Domain Awareness Satellite (MDASAT) constellation. The funding covers research and development costs, including compensation of non-academic staff (engineers), student bursary support and constellation launch costs. The cost of the full constellation of nine satellites is R97 978 338 (Ninety-seven million nine hundred seventy-eight thousand three hundred thirty-eight), the balance of which has not yet been secured.

2. Since its launch on 13 January 2022, the MDASAT-1 constellation has been in the commissioning phase of its mission, which is the first phase of satellite operation and begins immediately after deployment. The satellites automatically deployed their antennas and the immediate message about battery voltages reading were excellent. Both the primary ground station at CPUT and the secondary at the Houwteq Assembly, Integration and Testing Facility (DenelSpaceteq) successfully tracked, commanded, and decoded the signals. Automatic beaconing was switched off, after some tests were performed with the Telemetry, Tracking and Command (TT&C) communications. All the satellites’ subsystems responded well, and all communication links, power operations and TT&C of all three satellites report a healthy status.

There has been a delay in the full commissioning of the Attitude Determination and Control System (ADCS) and payloads due to a few technical challenges related to the orientation (spin and tumbling) of the satellites in space. These challenges are being investigated by reproducing them on the engineering models in the lab before developing a software update that will be installed through the onboard software-defined radio.

3. The data currently being received from MDASAT-1 is being used to commission the various satellite subsystems and payload. Maritime domain awareness data has not yet been acquired due to the satellites still being in the commissioning phase of the mission. Once the satellites are fully commissioned, data will be integrated into the National Oceans and Coast Information Management System that will provides decision support tools for oceans governance and marine protection.

27 October 2022 - NW2969

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)What are the details of Ikhala Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges (TVETs) in Sterkspruit, Eastern Cape, that are in (a) the planning, (b) construction and (c) completed phase; (2) whether any of the TVETs that are in the construction phase are currently unfinished; if so, (a) in which area and (b) what are the details of progress and/or plans to deal with unfinished buildings?

Reply:

1. The details of the new Ikhala TVET College Campus situated in Sterkspruit are:

a) In planning: None

b) Construction: The new Campus is currently at 96% physical completion and a dispute is in progress between the Principal Agent, MSW Project Managers and Consultant Engineers and the Contractor, Uphala Construction. The resultant determination founded in favour of the Contractor. As a result, an application for additional budget is in progress. Once the funds have been approved, the buildings will be brought to completion. This process is expected to take three to four months. In the meantime, the site is secured by onsite security.

c) in Completion: None.

2. There are currently 4 sites in construction in addition to Sterkspruit that are not yet fully completed:

a) Gert Sibande TVET College, Balfour Campus, 98% Physical Completion with Estimated Completion date of end November 2022; Mthashana TVET College, Vryheid Engineering Campus, 34% Physical Completion, Estimated Completion October 2023; Umfolozi TVET College, Bhambanani Campus, 64% Physical Completion, awaiting new tender processes for Phase 2 and new contractor. Tender will be published once Departmental procedures are in place; UMgungundlovu TVET College, Greytown Campus, 75% Physical Completion Phase 2, Tender Documentation in development.

b) As indicated above, the phase 2 process for the Bhambanani and Greytown sites will commence once the Department has finalized its tender processes and appointed the new contractors. The following sites have been completed:

      • Umfolozi TVET College, Nkandla A Campus in Nkandla Town;
      • UMgungundlovu TVET College, Msinga Campus near Tugela Ferry;
      • Esayidi TVET College, Umzimkhulu Campus at Umzimkhulu;
      • Ikhala TVET College, Aliwal North Campus in Aliwal North;
      • Ingwe TVET College, Ngqungqushe Campus in Lusikisiki;
      • Waterberg TVET College, Thabazimbi Campus in Thabazimbi,
      • Mthashana TVET College, Nongoma;
      • Kwagqikasi Campus in Nongoma; and
      • East Cape Midlands TVET College, Graaff Reinet Campus in Graaff Reinet

27 October 2022 - NW3252

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) Which land redistribution programmes have been initiated recently that target women and youth on farms and (b) what total number of (i) women and (ii) youth were allocated farms in their own right in each (aa) province and (bb) district from 1 January 2021 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

a) The land redistribution programmes have initiated the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP) wherein the state has acquired the land and later allocated and leased it out to farmers for a period of 30 years through the Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation Policy (BSLAP). BSLAP was formulated to ensure transparent allocation of land with priority being given to vulnerable groups such that 50% is allocated to women and 40% is allocated to youth.

(b)(i),(ii),(aa),(bb) Please refer to the table below.

(aa) Province

(bb) District

(i) Women

(ii) Youth

Eastern Cape

Amathole

1

1

 

Chris Hani

0

2

Free State

Fezile Dabi

1

1

 

Mangaung Metro

1

0

 

Xhariep

2

1

Gauteng

Sedibeng

2

3

 

West Rand

1

0

Kwazulu-Natal

Umgungundlovu

3

1

 

Zululand

1

1

Limpopo

Waterberg

1

1

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni

1

0

 

Gert Sibande

3

5

 

Nkangala

4

2

North West

Bojanala

2

2

 

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

4

1

 

Ngaka Modiri Molema

1

0

Northern Cape

Namakwa

1

0

 

Pixley Ka Seme

0

1

 

ZF Mgcawu

3

0

Western Cape

West Coast

5

3

Total

 

37

25

27 October 2022 - NW3097

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her department’s mission statement, what mechanisms has her department implemented since 1 April 2019 to (a) accelerate land reform and (b) catalyse integrated rural development in the Republic?

Reply:

a) To accelerate Land Reform, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implemented the Proactive Land Acquisition Policy (PLAP) in terms of which the state has acquired over 170 000 hectares of land to date. The land is allocated and leased out to farmers for a period of 30 years and the lease can be extended for another 20 years.

In order to ensure equitable access to land, the Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation Policy (BSLAP) was formulated to ensure transparent allocation of land with priority being given to vulnerable groups, i.e. women, youth and people with disabilities. Over 76 000 hectares of land was allocated to women, over 52 000 hectares to youth and about 489 hectares to people with disabilities. The policy also prioritises the allocation of land to communal farmers to decongest communal areas.

The Department further identified and released 700,000 hectares of state land for agricultural purposes.

DALRRD has also developed the Land Donations Policy to encourage landowners to contribute to land reform, as recommended by the Advisory Panel on Land Reform and Agriculture. The policy provides a framework on how a donation can be done including associated incentives to those who donate land i.e. tax incentives.

DALRRD is currently processing applications for awards of land by labour tenants, which were lodged not later than 31 March 2001. The Department is, therefore, working with the Special Master on Labour Tenants to settle all outstanding labour tenant claims as ordered by the Land Claims Court.

Communal tenure remains another priority for Land Reform: following the Communal Land Tenure Summit held from 27-28 May 2022, and taking into account the outcomes of the Summit, the draft Communal Land Tenure Policy and Communal Land Tenure Bill have been formulated and once finalised will follow the normal processes of government before it is tabled in Parliament.

Regarding Tenure Policies and Legislative Development: The Upgrading of Land Tenure Rights Act 112 of 1991 (ULTRA) Bill was passed into law to comply with the Court Judgement and the Regulations have been finalized and will be published during the 2022/2023 financial year.

The Communal Property Associations Amendment Bill was approved by Cabinet and the Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 1997 (Act No. 62 of 1997) (ESTA) Amendment Bill was also passed into law. Regulations will be published in the 2022/23 financial year.

The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights has developed a backlog reduction strategy to accelerate the finalization of land claims. These mechanisms are at an implementation stage.

b) The Department’s Rural Development Mandate Outcome 6: Integrated and inclusive rural economy:

The Department is engaged in the finalisation of the Draft Integrated Rural Development Strategy, building on the lessons learnt from the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (ISRDS). The Department continues to play its role to “initiate, facilitate, coordinate and act as a catalyst for the implementation of a comprehensive rural development programme leading to sustainable and vibrant rural communities”, working closely with provincial and other national departments through the District Development Model (DDM) and Rural District Plans as well as with Traditional Councils.

The Strategy further recognises that rural development and rural economy objectives are transversal in nature and cannot be successfully implemented without the collaboration of Traditional leaders and traditional communities because rural areas are largely under the custodianship of Traditional Councils. Sustainable communities and inclusive rural economies require a bottom-up community-driven participatory approach that places traditional communities and rural people at the centre of development.

The National Development Plan (NDP) (2012) identifies the following four key points relating to rural development: (i) Rural communities require greater social, economic, and political opportunities to overcome poverty; (ii) To achieve this, agricultural development should introduce a land reform and job-creation/livelihood strategy that ensures rural communities have jobs; (iii) Ensure quality access to basic services, health care, education, and food security; and (iii) plans for rural towns should be tailor-made according to the varying opportunities in each area.

Intergovernmental relations should be addressed to improve rural governance.

The Department in conjunction with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation have also finalized the first National Spatial Development Framework (NSDF) for the country, which was approved by Cabinet in March 2022. The NSDF is a strategic long-term spatial planning instrument with a 2050 – time horizon. One of the key objectives of NSDF is to assist in the redress of multiple social and economic problems and ensure decisive, collaborative, integrated state and non–state action. The NSDF proposes the identification, development and strengthening of a series of Regional Rural Development Anchors to create a functional polycentric rural service delivery network, that will enhance rural development and more efficient land reform delivery.

The District development model (DDM) provides a platform to align and integrate multi-sectoral contributions from all spheres of government toward sustainable rural development. The DALRRD has also developed Rural Development Sector Plans (RDSPs) to reflect the Department’s programmes and priorities in line with the mandate of the Department. The RDSPs are plans that package the Department’s interventions and contributions at a district level and elements of these plans are incorporated into the District One Plans to ensure better integration in Rural Development interventions in line with spatial development opportunities and priorities.

The Department remains the driver of the Agri-Parks Programme that aims to uplift impoverished rural communities into the agricultural value chain. The Department provides critical infrastructure such as fencing and irrigation to rural communities to assist them, with improving their production. These communities are linked to Farmer Production Support Units, which are constructed in rural areas to provide communities with agricultural support services. The Department continues to construct Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) that provide rural communities with a range of facilities such as mechanisation, pelleting machines for feed, silos to store grain, pack houses with refrigeration, access to state vets and training. Many of these services were in the past only reserved for commercial farmers in rural areas. This allows rural communities to improve their production and enter the agricultural value chain with their small-scale production and creates a sustainable path out of poverty.

The current programmes through which the Department executes its work include the following:

  • Socio-economic infrastructure projects to support Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs), Animal and Veld Management Programme (AVMP) and River Valley Catalytic Programme (RVCP). This includes mechanization such as: fencing, animal handling facilities, stock water dams, boreholes, canals, dip tanks, pump houses, pack houses, irrigation pipes and schemes, silos and storage facilities and rural roads.
  • The AVMP, focuses on bringing arable and grazing land into production by providing all the required infrastructure like fencing, boreholes, irrigation systems, cattle handling and dipping facilities, dams etc. In addition, the AVMP supported re-greening and soil rehabilitation.
  • The RVCP, focuses on the catalytic utilization of river systems to bring the land into production and would typically develop irrigation schemes with all the associated infrastructure. Both the AVMP and RVCP provide infrastructural support to commonages, communal areas, traditional areas and farmers occupying state-owned facilities (where requested by Land Reform).
  • Road infrastructure remains a high priority in national, provincial, municipal and farm roads to promote economic viability through safer, swift transport logistics of agricultural produce. As part of the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP), repair and rehabilitation of rural roads are critical to facilitate road logistics from farm to harbor and to market. The Department is coordinating a Public-Private Partnership initiative which will include national, provincial and local governments as well as agricultural organisations. Rural Roads are economic catalysts for impoverished rural communities. It provides entry for communities to access basic services and to take produce to the markets. The Department will work with farmer organisations and their counterparts in all spheres of government to implement the repairing and rehabilitation of rural and farm access roads to facilitate improved access for rural communities into the agricultural value chain and broader rural economy.
  • Development and Implementation of skills development opportunities for rural youth through the National Rural Youth Services Corps (NARYSEC) which aims to build the capacity of rural youth through various skills development interventions and working with public and private sector partners to facilitate the transitioning of recruited youth into economic activities.
  • Research of new innovative technologies, including Information and Communications Technology (ICT), and promote indigenous knowledge systems in rural communities to contribute towards improving the quality of lives of rural communities working in partnership and collaboration with institutions of higher learning, research agencies and technology agencies.

27 October 2022 - NW3099

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Groenewald, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department, as the custodian of Tourism in the Republic, has established any functional mechanisms to ensure that all government departments (a) support and protect the promotion of internal and international tourism and (b) protect the tourism infrastructure and heritage; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) and (b)

The Department and SA Tourism work with Provinces and Local Government through the MINMEC structures. The Department also works with sister departments as well as entities at a National level through the government clusters and bilateral mechanisms. Furthermore, the Department convenes the National Tourism Stakeholder Forum (NTSF) which is a platform that amongst others enables engagements between industry and the various departments that contribute to tourism growth and development. These platforms cover the entire spectrum of matters pertaining to tourism growth and development including marketing and promotion of destination South Africa, product development and enhancement amongst others in as far as government’s role is concerned.

(2) No

26 October 2022 - NW2884

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

(1)Whether, noting the 2019 study by the North West Chamber of Commerce that indicated that 82% of North West small businesses and most within the Republic are owned by foreigners, she has found that the R5 million restriction bill is successful to combat such; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether small and medium-sized enterprises (SMMEs) owned by South Africans will receive exemption from taxes and/or subsidies to recover from the implications of the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) how does her department intend to ensure that state (a) contracts and (b) tenders to uplift SMMEs are depoliticised?

Reply:

1. The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is aware of the interview of the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the North West Chamber of Commerce, and has researched for this study, but to no avail. The DSBD nonetheless note that there is a high number of foreign owned informal and small businesses but unfortunately there is no definite statistics in this regard.

Section 15 of the Immigration Act of 2011 provides for the Minister of Trade and Industry to stipulate the minimal financial and capital contribution or investment required for a Business Visa which as off 2014 has been set at R5million. The Department is of the firm view that this requirement does regulate and manage the entry and participation of foreign nationals in the small business sector. It seems that many foreign owned small businesses are operated by foreign nationals who have applied or secured Refugee or Asylum seeker status, rather that foreign nationals who have secured a business visa. The DSBD perspective is that the Refugee and Asylum seeker system has been heavily abused and corrupted with many economic migrants claiming refugee status. In this regard, the DSBD has engaged and supported the Minister of Home Affairs in his efforts to clamp down on corruption and abuse of our immigration laws.

The Immigration Act of 2011 also provides for designation of sectors that are undesirable for a business visa – meaning that while a foreign national may get a business visa – they may not engage in the sectors that have been designated as undesirable for a business visa. The following business undertakings are currently listed under the regulation or directive of the noted Act as undesirable:

  • List of undesirable business undertakings in relation to an application for Business Visa [Section 15(1A)]
    1. Business that imports second hand motor vehicles into the Republic of South Africa for the purpose of exporting to other markets outside the Republic of South Africa.
    2. The exotic entertainment industry.
    3. Security industry.
  • List of undesirable business undertakings in relation to an application for a Corporate Visa [Section 21(1A)]
  1. Exotic entertainment.
  2. Hospitality industry.
  3. Fast food outlets and franchises.
  4. Cosmetic and beauty industry.

The DSBD has also been made aware that some South Africans are fronting on behalf of foreign nationals when applying for these work permits, which are then handed over to the foreign nationals upon approval.

The DSBD is currently reviewing the Businesses Act no.71 of 1991 with the intention of introducing provisions that will be aligned to the Immigration and provide for further powers to the Minister of Small Business Development in regulating the entry of foreign nationals to the small business sector; as well as better protections for South African informal traders including spaza shops.

Furthermore, the DSBD is mindful of the extent to which South Africa SMMEs are disadvantaged by the encroachment of foreign owned business. It is for this reason, that the DSBD is supporting the SMMEs especially the micro and informal enterprise through financial and non-financial programmes such as Informal Micro Enterprises Development Programme (IMEDP). To make these South African businesses more competitive, IMEDP provides appropriate tools and equipment to business (spaza shops, hair salons, garden services etc.) and the support is in a form of a grant.

2. DSBD has implemented the support to the SMMEs and Co-operatives that were affected by the Covid 19 through the Debt Relief Fund and Township and Rural Enterprise Programme (TREP). In this regard, DSBD spent an amount of R500m to support Covid affected SMMEs. Regarding tax relief National Treasury as the custodian of tax policy has also implemented tax relief to all business affected by Covid 19.

3. State contract and tenders are regulated by Preferential Procurement Framework and PFMA to ensure their implementation and remove corruption in the process.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

26 October 2022 - NW2511

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Mafanya, Mr WTI to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) are the details of the current status of the SA National Defence Force deployment to other parts of the continent and (b) total amount do the deployment cost the Republic annually?

Reply:

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26 October 2022 - NW3026

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

With the reported merger of BrandSA and SA Tourism, what steps are being taken to (a) introduce a smooth transition for employees of the specified entities and (b) prevent having an overbloated staff structure?

Reply:

(a) and (b) In light of the fact that such a process will have implications for affected parties, e.g.employees it is prudent that the relevant information will be made available upon conclusion of the whole process.

These are some of the issues that will be considered in the merger. It is not at this stage the intention nor the indication that jobs will be lost. The purpose of the merger is a decision taken in the Cabinet meeting of 9 June 2021 that there should be a cut down on the number of entities so that there is a consolidation of purpose. The intention was never about cutting off of jobs.

26 October 2022 - NW3371

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Chabangu, Mr M to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

Noting how 20% of small businesses fail in their first year and 30% in the second, which intervention measures has her department put in place to prevent this from happening?

Reply:

The mitigating measures that the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) is implementing to prevent and minimise business failures are as follows:

1. Rolling out Business Development Support Services as part of the non-financial support component through the Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda), Incubators and Digital hubs with a view to provide a broad range of enterprise development support to small businesses including Co-operatives.

2. Implementing various financial support incentives such as Township and Rural Entrepreneurship Programme (TREP), Informal and Micro Enterprises Development Programme (IMEDP), Business Viability Programme, Small Enterprise Manufacturing Support Programme (SEMSP) and Shared Economic Infrastructure Facility (SEIF) to support the growth and sustainability of small businesses.

3. On the reform side, the Department is implementing the localisation policy framework and finalising the SMMEs and Co-operatives Funding Policy, NISED Master Plan as well as Incubation and Business Development Services Policy. In addition to the above, the Department is a key participant in the Financial Sector Development Reform Programme and is leading the SMME Access to Finance Action Plan that is aimed at alleviating challenges confronting small businesses in the country. The primary objective is to ensure that small businesses flourish, and potential entrepreneurs are incentivised to consider entrepreneurship as a career option.

4. The DSBD has developed a new programme called the Co-operatives Development Support Programme (CDSP) with an objective to support co-operative enterprises financially and non-financially. DSBD, together with its agencies, the Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa) and Seda seek to assist co-operative enterprises to address the following identified and encountered market failures:

The Department of Small Business Development has developed a new programme called the Co-operatives Development Support Programme (CDSP) with an objective to support co-operative enterprises financially and non-financially.

DSBD, together with its agencies, sefa and Seda seek to assist co-operative enterprises to address the following identified and encountered market failures:

      1. Lack of participation in the formal economy by co-operatives,
      2. Lack of effective and professional managerial capacity within the co-operative entities capable of efficiently running and managing both the association and business component of the co-operative to minimize tension between the two and thus grow and develop the co-operative
      3. Low or non-participation by co-operative enterprises on all other incentive programmes
      4. Lack of access to finance
      5. Lack of working capital to allow effective market entry
      6. Lack of improved assets value
      7. Lack of targeted business development support.

As part of ensuring the growth, development, and sustainability of these co-operative enterprises, Seda was tasked with assisting the co-operatives with non-financial support inclusive of, but not limited to pre-formation, business development services, trainings and workshops etc., while DSBD through sefa, will be supporting the co-operatives financially and providing programme oversight.

DSBD has also concluded a Memorandum of Understating (MoU) with the German Co-operative and Raiffeisen Confederation (DGRV) with an objective to facilitate job creation through supporting and capacitating communities, officials, and groups for development of viable and sustainable co-operatives within their space.

STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS

MINISTER: SMALL BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

26 October 2022 - NW2617

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether the Armaments Corporation of South Africa sells arms and ammunition, propellant powder and/or explosives to the Russian Federation (1); if not, what is the position in this regard (2), if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

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