Questions and Replies

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18 November 2022 - NW3429

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What are the rehabilitative programmes that his department has put in place to ensure that child offenders are rehabilitated and do not fall back into a life of crime, once released?

Reply:

Section 16 (1) of the Correctional Services Act (CSA),111 of 1998, as amended, states that: “The Department may provide correction, development and care programmes and services even when not required to do so by this Act”, and in Section 41 of the Act, it provides, under subsection “Treatment, development and support services. (1) The Department must provide or give access to as full a range of programmes and activities, including needs-based programmes as is practicable to meet the educational and training needs of sentenced offenders”.

Children offenders are children aged between 14-17 years of age. This category of offenders are given the opportunity to access formal education programmes. The following formal education programmes are offered to all offenders: -

  • Further Education and Training (FET): Grades 10-12. All those offenders that have successfully completed the above-mentioned programme get an opportunity to pursue studies in the FET Band following a curriculum known as Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS), similar to all external schools within the education system of the country.
  • Children are also given the opportunity to attend Adult Education and Training (AET) Levels 1-4 if they do not want to attend Grade 10-12 mainstream education. This is equivalent to Grades 1-9 in normal mainstream education and it’s for offenders who want to pursue studies in the General Education and Training (GET) Band.
  • Child offenders who enter Correctional centres late in the academic year, might only be enrolled in the following academic year for formal education programmes. However, all offenders, including children have access to a range of Sports, recreation, arts, and culture programmes and also have access to libraries.

The department is also rendering needs based rehabilitative programmes to child offenders by Social Workers among other professionals.

The following programmes and services were rendered to sentenced children, including parolees, probationers and children in remand detention for the Financial Year 2021/2022 by Social Workers.

 

Programmes and services

Sentenced Children

Remand Children

 

Correctional

Centres

Community Corrections

 

Substance Abuse

3

1

5

Life-Skills

25

16

20

Marriage and Family Care

25

17

18

Sexual Offender

3

7

0

Anger Management,

9

4

6

Orientation Treatment

0

2

0

Cool and fit for life

0

1

0

Parenting

1

0

0

Supportive Services

13

4

0

Trauma

2

0

2

Assessment

64

19

0

TOTAL

145

71

51

NB: Some child offenders attended multiple programmes

 

END

18 November 2022 - NW3168

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister in the Presidency

What (a) did the Office of The Presidency contribute towards the funeral of the Enyobeni tavern victims and (b) are the itemised costs associated with the specified funeral?

Reply:

(a) There was no contribution from The Presidency

(b) N/A

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2574

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in The Presidency

Whether there are any red-tape reduction reforms to the benefit of small, medium and micro enterprises that can be reported by the Red Tape Reduction Unit, given that the specified unit was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, more than 120 days ago during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date can South African taxpayers expect to experience any benefit from the announcement; if so, will he furnish Mr H C C Kruger with a list of the (i) reforms that have been introduced and (ii) expected economic impact thereof? NW3087E

Reply:

The Red Tape Reduction initiative led by Mr Sipho Nkosi is working on reducing red tape that impacts investment and business, including small, medium and micro enterprises. In order to be effective, the initiative is focused on working on a limited number of obstacles, and has identified ten priority areas for intervention. This includes initiatives that will benefit SMMEs, namely, faciliting the issuing of tourism transport operating licences, including reducing the backlog in applications; reviewing the regulations hindering informal traders and the township economy; and, identifying obstacles to the growth and operation of the early childhood development sector, the majority of which consists of women-run small businesses.

It is however not possible to quantify the expected economic impact at this stage.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3719

Profile picture: Msimang, Prof CT

Msimang, Prof CT to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(1)Given that remand detainees make up more than 30% of the prison population, and noting that according to the Judicial Inspectorate of Prisons up to 2 700 of the specified prisoners have been given bail but cannot afford it, does he have a plan in place to assist prisoners who have been given bail which they are unable to afford; 2) What is the total cost incurred by the State in the 2020-21 financial year for remand detainees who have been granted bail?

Reply:

1. There is a plan which is continuously implemented throughout all our Remand Detention (RD) Facilities in the form of Bail Protocol and referral of remand detainees to court for bail review in line with section 63(1) of the Criminal Procedure Act (51, 1977).

a) Bail Protocol Section 63(A) of the Criminal Procedure Act - CPA) allows the Head of the Centre to submit an application to court for review of bail of RDs who have been charged with Schedule 7 crimes. The criteria for submitting an application is when a particular centre/detention facility is reaching such proportions that it constitutes a material and imminent threat to the human dignity, physical health or safety of remand detainees. These must be the lower court cases i.e., the Regional and Magistrate courts. The possible outcomes are as follows: -

• Release of the RD;

• Release and placement on warning;

• Placement under Section 62(f) of the CPA: Supervision by a correctional official;

• Reduction of the amount of bail;

• Placement in a secure care facility if the RD is a child; and

• Decline to review bail (Unsuccessful application).

b) Section 63(1) of the Criminal Procedure Act: This section allows the RD or the prosecutor to approach the court for a review of bail. All the RDs with bail qualify for bail review, however, DCS cannot initiate the process without the permission of the RD.

c) Furthermore, remand detainees are assisted by contacting their relatives and family members and advised to utilise the telephones at the correctional centres / remand detention facilities in this regard.

(2) The determination of the total cost incurred by the State in the 2020/21 financial year for remand detainees who have been granted bail is an estimate based on the per capita cost and monthly averages. The 2020/2021 average monthly per capita cost for unsentenced inmates was R12 493.44 per inmate and the annual average of the RDs was 4 212. The cost of 4 212 RD per month for 2020/2021 was R52 622 369.28. The annual estimated cost is R631 468 431.36.

END

18 November 2022 - NW3474

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Given the high number of repeat offenders, how has his department ensured that individuals appointed as parole board members receive adequate support and enough time to conduct assessments effectively in order to make an informed decision on granting or denying parole to an inmate?

Reply:

The Department has implemented the following material support systems to Parole Boards:

  • DCS has expedited the filling of parole board vacancies that have existed across all regions to ensure that boards function at full complement
  • The Department has been building capacity in Case Management Committees in order to improve the quality of sentence plans, case management processes and profiles that are ultimately submitted to the Parole Board to better assist them in arriving at a decision.
  • Ongoing training is provided to the Correctional Supervision and Parole Boards (CSPBs). The training focuses on parole policy procedures, decision making tools and calculation of release dates amongst others.
  • Profile reports are submitted 3 months prior to offenders reaching their minimum detention periods to the CSPBs for consideration for possible placement on parole.

END.

18 November 2022 - NW3191

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)On what date did he attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in his Office and/or entities reporting to him; (2) whether any appointments to his Office and/or entities reporting to him were discussed during his attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

  1. The Minister in the Presidency has never participated in any process wherein individuals were seconded or recommended for appointments in any Department and Entities under my Portfolio.
  2. No instructions were ever issued to any accounting officer to appoint an individual(s) to a position. All positions follow a due process as set out by the Public Service regulations for the recruitment, review and appointment of personnel in government departments and entities under my portfolio.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3801

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1) (a) What water sources do the mining companies in Koingnaas in the Kamiesberg Local Municipality use for mining purposes and (b) do the mining companies use any water from the Somnaas-Noup aquifer in the specified municipality. (2) what companies applied for water licences in the specified area. (3) whether any water licences were granted to the mining companies; if not, why not; if so, (a) to whom were the licences granted, (b) what were the specifications of each licence and (c) on what date was each licence granted. (4) whether an environmental impact study has been conducted to ensure what the effect of mining will be on the (a) water tables of the area, specifically Somnaas-Noup aquifer and (b) town of Koingnaas; (5) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a copy and/or copies of the licence(s) issued; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1a)  Groundwater is the main source of water for domestic supply in the region. The settlements of Koingnaas, Hondeklip Bay and Samson Bak derive water from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 km north of Koingnaas. Two boreholes, BH 12 and BH 14, are currently in use. A third borehole, BH15 adjacent to BH 12, is equipped and used as a standby borehole.

b) the mining companies use water from the Somnaas-Noup aquifer in the specified municipality.

(2) West coast Resources Pty Ltd: Namaqualand Mine applied for a water use licence which was issued on 23 June 2017. Conditions of the licence includes the following:

  • Monitoring: The licensee should establish ground water network monitoring within 1 year from the date of issuance of licence.
  • Water Conservation and Water Demand management (WC/WDM): The licensee shall develop WC/WDM and submit to Provincial Head or responsible authority, which amongst other should quantify the water use efficiency of the activity.
  • The WC/WDM shall be updated annually and submitted to Provincial Head or responsible authority.
  • The licensee shall provide any water user whose water supply is impacted by use with potable water

(3) Please refer to the response above.

(4) It is a prerequisite for any mining licence holder to conduct an environmental impact study to ensure what the effect of mining will be on the water resources. A report on geohydrological impact assessment for West Coast Resources Diamond mining operations along the west coast around Koingnaas, Northern Cape province: was concluded in 2016 with a Ref number: 2016/ENV008, dated July 2016, amongst others the report made the following reference “Groundwater represents the main source of water for domestic supply in the region. The settlements of Koingnaas, Hondeklip Bay and Samson Bak derive water from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 km north of Koingnaas. Two boreholes, BH 12 and BH 14, are currently in use. A third borehole, BH15 adjacent to BH 12, is equipped and used as a standby borehole”.

a-b) For the town of Koingnaas, the report made the following reference:

  • Available water quality data indicate that the entire area proposed for mining is characterised by highly saline groundwater with electrical conductivity of above 1000 mS/m. This is supported by the fact that there are no water supply boreholes around, and south of Koingnaas. Potable groundwater is currently sourced from the Somnaas Noup aquifer located about 20 kilometres north of Koingnaas.

(5) A copy of the licence is attached as Annexure A.

18 November 2022 - NW3005

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether he and/or his Office submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will he furnish Mr M S Mabika with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reasons that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

Government Policy documents are Public documents unless otherwise classified or specified. As part of a democratic process, the development or drafting of a policy document is subjected to a range of consultative processes to ensure that the country's best interests are being served. To this end, the policy development process includes the drafting process, which could involve experts in the field, and the consultative process, which may include a “think tank” of sector specialists or broad-based stakeholder consultation. To facilitate the consultative process, the draft policy documents will be shared with the relevant stakeholders or any other individual who might have a direct or indirect interest in the matter raised in the Policy Document.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2966

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What number of people have been appointed in the Red Tape Reduction Unit situated in The Presidency, which was announced by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, during the State of the Nation Address on 10 February 2022; (2) what is the (a) total budget allocated to the Red Tape Reduction Unit and (b) budget allocated to the remuneration of people who form part of the specified advisory unit in each year; (3) whether there are any plans in place to expand the unit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Mr Sipho Nkosi has been seconded from BUSA on a part-time basis to lead the Red Tape Reduction initiative. The Presidency is only responsible for operational costs that may arise . The Red Tape Reduction Team provides coordination and leadership to the work of government to reduce red tape, working with existing government initiatives, in particular those falling under the Department of Small Business Development, and the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition through InvestSA.

Mr Nkosi is supported by current Presidency staff as well as receiving part-time assistance through the Department of Small Business Development.

There is no budget allocated as no new Unit has been set up . The Red Tape Reduction was part of the MTEF document. However, no additional funding has been provided over the MTEFperiod.

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW2745

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(a) By what date does he envisage will a Head of Administration for the Public Service be appointed to manage the career incidents of (i) Heads of Department (HODs) and (ii) Directors-General (DGs) and (b) will the specified appointment be done before and/or after the coming into effect of the policy proposal to increase the term of office for HODs and DGs from the existing 5 years to 10 years, subject to performance?

Reply:

The role of Head of Public Administration was factor into the contract of the current Director-General in the Presidency and Secretary of the Cabinet, Ms Phindile Baleni, who was assumed this role on 01 April 2021. However, for this function to be performed optimally, legislative ammendments are required. As such, in April 2021, the Ministry of Public Service and Administration released the Public Service Amendment Bill. This Bill seeks to amend Section 7 of the Public Act of 1994 to align to the proposal of the National Development Plan (NDP) by providing additional functional responsibilities and powers to the Director-General in the Presidency, among other proposed ammendments. The Bill is still being consulted in the National Economic Development and Labour Council (NEDLAC). After that process, it will be resubmitted to Cabinet and Parliament for final public consultations using the normal legislative review processes.

The policy proposal on extending the term of office of the Heads of Departments and Directors General is not yet approved by Cabinet. It may as well form part of the legislative reforms that could be incorporated into the Public Service Ammendment Bill since such tenure is prescribed in the Public Service Act, 1994.

NW3326E

Thank You.

18 November 2022 - NW3577

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(1)Given that parts of the Republic are experiencing water shedding at present, what significant progress has been made in the water sector under Operation Vulindlela in relation to the water shortages in certain parts of the Republic; (2) (a) how has his department contributed to modernising and transforming the outdated bulk water infrastructure of the Republic and (b) what proactive measures are in place to prevent water shedding from becoming a semi-permanent fixture similar to load shedding in South African households?

Reply:

1. The main purpose of the Operation Vulindlela is to accelerate the implementation of structural reforms and support economic recovery, as such the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is implementing following projects under Operation Vulindela:

  • Revival of the Green Drop, Blue Drop and No Drop Assessment Programme: The asessment programmes are aimed at improving the wastewater quality, water supply quality and water use efficiency in all the 144 Water Service Authorities. The Department published the Green Drop report in March 2022 and will publish the Blue and No Drop programme in next financial year.
  • Improvement of Water Use Authorisation: The Department is revising the water use authorisation process with the intention being able to process all water use applications within 90 days to ensure economic development and access to water.
  • Independent Economic Regulator: The Minister has appointed the Regulator Commission for the period of 3 years. The aim of an independent economic regulator to regulate tariffs, standards, and performance in the water services sector.

2. (a)The department is funding refurbishment of infrastructure through its Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) programme. Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) facilitates achievement of targets for access to bulk water and sanitation through successful execution and implementation of bulk projects of regional significance. The main purpose of this grant amongst others is to:

  • To develop new, refurbish, upgrade and replace ageing bulk water and sanitation infrastructure of regional significance that connects water resources to infrastructure serving extensive areas across municipal boundaries or large regional bulk infrastructure serving numerous communities over a large area within a municipality
  • To implement bulk infrastructure with a potential of addressing Water Conservation and Water Demand Management (WC/WDM) projects or facilitate and contribute to the implementation of local WC/WDM projects that will directly impact on bulk infrastructure requirements. This is achieved through project planning, where diversification of water resources is encouraged as part of calculating the Water Balance to ensure sustainability of supply

(b)The Department undertakes planning studies over different planning horizons, to derive interventions that are implemented to ensure water security for the entire country. These interventions cover the enablers like governance, financing, human capacity building and science and innovation which facilitate implementation of water projects at National, Provincial and District and Local Municipality level. The interventions implemented for our water security are contained in the National Water Resource Strategy (NWRS), the instrument by which the Minister gives effect to the National Water Act, as well as the master plans that emanate from the NWRS. The various studies informing the NWRS are available on the DWS website, at http://www6.dwa.gov.za/iwrp/projects.aspx and the National Water and Sanitation Master Plan (NW&SMP) is available at http://www.dwa.gov.za

The DWS also monitors the capacity of municipalities to deliver water and sanitation through the Municipal Strategic Self-Assessment (MuSSA); a web-based system that enables municipalities to conduct their self-assessment on critical aspects service delivery performance. The outcomes of the assessment position the Department and other sector role players to provide targeted support to local government through various support and intervention programmes aimed at improving services delivery, governance and business health. Priority areas are identified and addressed through the development of a Municipal Priority Action Plan (MPAP).

Lastly, Five-Year Reliability Water and Sanitation Plans will soon be rolled out in all forty-four (44) District Municipalities. The plans are meant to:

  • Ensure sustainable and reliable water services with the service-standard yardstick that has a 100% compliance to functionality, water security and effective governance to maintain appropriate levels of service delivery
  • Conduct primary situational assessments of the water services and infrastructure supply conditions and classify each situation into a reliability category. The solution options are then integrated to proposed projects, specifically integrating all funding programmes to alleviate new infrastructure needs and achieve reliability of water services.

Recently the Department has developed the Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP). The aim of WSIP is to guide Department in initiating and leading the national support and regulatory interventions to reverse the decline in the provision of water and sanitation services in all municipalities. The programme consists of the following four key elements:

  • In terms of the Water Services Act, DWS will issue updated and more comprehensive norms and standards for water and sanitation services.
  • DWS will publish a National Regulatory Dashboard showing the extent of compliance with national norms and standards for water services for all Water Service Authorities, drawing on existing monitoring information, including from the Drop reports, NT, and COGTA reports (no new additional reporting requirements will be put on municipalities).
  • DWS will develop rolling regional support and intervention plans based on the evidence in the Regulatory Dashboard, managed by its regional offices, in consultation with provincial governments, municipalities and DDM structures.
  • The support and intervention plans will draw on a range of support programmes which will be developed at national level.

---00O00---

18 November 2022 - NW1892

Profile picture: Seitlholo, Mr IS

Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister in the Presidency

Whether, in light of the fact that The Presidency issued proclamation 210 of 2021 to investigate the matter relating to the R103 million in advanced payment to Ayamah Consulting, which was done without following the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999 (details furnished), the investigation was completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) has the report of the investigation been given to the President and (b) on what date is it envisaged that the report will be made public?

Reply:

It is indeed correct that the President, acting in terms of section 2(1) of the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act, 1996, referred the matters in respect of the North West Provincial Department of Public Works and Roads (“the Department”) to the Special Investigation Unit (“SIU”) for investigation.

The matters which are investigated by the SIU as contained in proclamation 210 of of 12 March 2021 inculde:

  1. The procurement of or contracting for works or services by or on behalf of the Department for―
    1. Project management for the Transport Infrastructure Directorate of the Department;
    1. the rehabilitation of flood damaged road infrastructure in the North West Province; and
    1. the installation of perimeter fencing at the Eagle Waters Wildlife Resort.

The investigation by the SIU in the matter is still ongoing. As such, the SIU has not yet submitted a report to the President. As per the normal practice, upon receipt of the final report from the SIU, the Presidency will process the report and ensure that the report is also given to all relevant stake holders.

Thank You.

17 November 2022 - NW3106

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What is the legal and/or policy framework that provides for the compulsory security vetting of senior public servants by the State Security Agency (SSA); (2) what total number of (a) senior public servants were subjected to security vetting by the SSA in the (i) 2019-20, (ii) 2020-21 and (iii) 2021-22 financial years in each (aa) national and (bb) provincial department and (b) the specified senior public servants received a top secret security clearance from the SSA?

Reply:

1. The compulsory vetting is carried out in terms of the National Strategic Intelligence Act and the Minimum Information Security Standards:

National Strategic Intelligence Act of 1994 as amended by the General Intelligence Laws Amendments Act of 2013:

The State Security Agency is mandated by the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act No 39 of 1994) and Intelligence Services Act, 2002 (Act No 65 of 2002) as amended by General Intelligence Laws Amendment Act, 2013 (Act No 11 of 2013), to conduct vetting investigations to determine the security competence of a person if such a person:

• is employed by or is an applicant to an Organ of State; or

• is rendering a service or has given notice of intention to render a service to an organ of state, which service may:

  • Give him or her access to classified information and intelligence in the possession of the organ of state; or
  • Give him or her access to areas designated national key points in terms of the National Key Points Act, 1980 (Act 102 of 1980).

Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS) of 1996 as approved by Cabinet as national information security policy:

Chapter 5, Section 1.5 states the following:

Political appointees (Director-Generals, Ambassadors, etc.) will not be vetted, unless the President so requests or the relevant contract so provides. From the lowest level up to Deputy Director-General, all staff members and any other individuals who should have access to classified information, must be subjected to security vetting.

2. Vetting figures for senior civil servants

(aa) National

National Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top Secret Clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2

2

0

0

2

2

Basic Education

1

1

1

0

1

0

Civilian Secretariat for Police

0

0

2

2

1

1

Communications and Digital Technologies

8

6

4

3

1

0

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

15

1

18

1

23

0

Correctional Services

2

2

0

0

2

2

Employment and Labour

2

2

0

0

0

0

Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment 

5

5

2

2

2

2

Government Communication and Information System (GCIS)

2

2

2

0

2

2

Government Printing Works

3

3

0

0

0

0

Health

13

1

24

2

32

3

Higher Education and Training

3

3

1

1

1

0

Home Affairs

3

3

5

5

4

4

Human Settlements

14

4

20

3

24

2

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

10

3

14

0

21

2

International Relations and Cooperation

260

39

221

12

209

24

Justice and Constitutional Development

8

8

2

2

4

4

Military Veterans 

2

2

0

0

0

0

Mineral Resources and Energy 

4

4

2

2

2

2

National Treasury

60

11

49

4

45

2

Planning Monitoring and Evaluation

5

5

2

2

1

1

Public Enterprises

6

6

1

1

1

1

Public Service and Administration

4

4

1

1

0

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

2

2

1

1

0

0

SA Police Service

0

0

0

0

0

0

SA Revenue Service

32

3

29

4

25

1

Science and Innovation

1

1

1

1

1

1

Small Business Development

3

3

0

0

0

0

Social Development

1

1

2

2

1

1

Sport, Arts and Culture

2

2

0

0

0

0

State Security Agency

0

0

0

0

0

0

Telecommunications and postal services

0

0

0

0

1

1

The Presidency

33

3

30

3

27

2

Tourism

12

1

11

1

10

1

Trade, Industry and Competition

5

2

3

1

2

1

Transport

27

2

25

0

25

1

Water and Sanitation

43

1

42

2

40

0

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

15

0

15

1

14

0

(bb) Provincial

Provincial Departments

i) 2019/2020

ii) 2020/2021

iii) 2021/2022

 

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a) Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b) Top secret clearances Issued

(a)Senior managers subjected to vetting

(b)Top secret clearances Issued

Agriculture and Rural Development

299

8

326

4

523

5

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

2

 

12

 

0

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

1

 

0

Arts and Culture

 

0

 

4

 

1

Community Safety (& Police Oversight) (&Security and Liaison)

 

11

 

5

 

10

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

8

 

21

 

9

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (& Human Settlements)

 

5

 

1

 

13

Cultural Affairs and Sport

 

1

 

0

 

0

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

2

 

0

 

1

Economic Development

 

4

 

0

 

6

Economic Development and Tourism

 

2

 

1

 

3

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

 

4

 

3

 

0

Economic Development, Small Business, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

1

 

0

 

3

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

 

6

 

8

 

0

Education

 

13

 

6

 

15

e-Government

 

8

 

4

 

5

Employment and Labour

 

2

 

0

 

0

Environment Affairs and Development Planning

 

1

 

0

 

0

Finance

 

2

 

1

 

0

Health

 

0

 

0

 

1

Health

 

8

 

10

 

23

Home Affairs

 

0

 

0

 

1

Human Settlements

 

15

 

3

 

8

Infrastructure Development

 

5

 

0

 

6

Justice

 

1

 

0

 

0

Office of the Premier

 

22

 

12

 

24

Police, Roads and Transport

 

6

 

0

 

2

Provincial Legislature

 

4

 

1

 

1

Provincial Treasury

 

19

 

14

 

25

Public Works

 

0

 

9

 

1

Public Works (Roads & Infrastructure)

 

2

 

1

 

0

Public Works and Infrastructure

 

3

 

0

 

0

Roads and Transport

 

0

 

1

 

2

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

 

0

 

0

 

1

SA Revenue Service

     

3

 

3

Safety and Liaison

 

1

 

2

 

1

Social Development

 

6

 

8

 

10

Sport and Recreation

 

0

 

1

 

0

Sport, Art and Culture

 

2

 

0

 

1

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

 

3

 

4

 

6

Transport

 

2

 

11

 

4

Transport and Community Safety

 

6

 

2

 

0

Transport and Public Works

 

1

 

0

 

2

17 November 2022 - NW4066

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Regarding the Government Printing Works system crashes in February 2021, 31 January 2022, 25 Μarch 2022 and 11 April 2022 that caused complete audit data loss, (a) what are the reasons that on 31 January 2022, almost a year after the total data loss of February 2021, there was no backup in place, causing yet another complete audit data loss, (b) what is the total cost of data recovery to date as a result of the system crashes, (c) by what date will the data recovery project be completed and (d) what are the total estimated costs for the completion of the data recovery project?

Reply:

(a) No audit data/information was lost on the 31 January 2022. The system disruption that happened on this day was in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) environment, which does not have finance/audit information. GPW used the disk-backup to restore the affected systems in the DMZ environment.

(b) The following organisations were consulted to assist with data recovery:

  • Hewlett Packard (OEM)
  • CSSI data recovery specialists
  • State Security Agency (SSA)

GPW did not raise purchase orders for all the above organisations, therefore no costs were incurred.

(c) The Original Equipment Manufacturer (HP) communicated with GPW that the data which was lost as a result of EVA hardware crash cannot be recovered. There is currently no project underway to recover lost data.

(d) GPW will not incur any costs.

END

17 November 2022 - NW4103

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What (a) steps have been taken to ensure that communities living in rural areas are easily accommodated in the new online application system and (b) online awareness campaigns related to the new application system have been undertaken; (2) whether any community education programmes aimed at empowering persons with the know-how were conducted; if not, why not; if so, what enabling resources does his department offer to persons to make the system more user friendly?

Reply:

(1)(a) We continue to make efforts to ensure that all communities, including those in rural areas, are accommodated in the new online application system. The Branch Appointment Booking System (BABS) is one of the Home Affairs interventions for improving services, including for our people located in rural areas.

Members of Parliament have been very helpful in the development and rollout of the online application system, particularly on the inclusion of offices in more rural communities in the pilot phase and also in the rollout of the project.

The online application system is only available for smart ID card and passport applications. Citizens are still welcome to visit Home Affairs front offices for other services.

The booking system is run on a hybrid model, with both online bookings and ‘walk-ins’ allowed. The Department allows and encourages walk-ins and also provides tablets to officials in order to help those who do not have data and would prefer to make a booking for another day instead of waiting in a queue. This is to ensure that as we rollout the new system, no one is left out, and all have access to services.

Following the launch, in June 2022, the booking system has been extended and is currently utilised in 163 of the 198 offices that have the ability to process smart ID cards and passports. At end of October 2022, more than 200 000 people have used this system.

(1)(b) I made a public announcement about the online booking system (BABS) during in my Budget Vote Speech, on 24 May 2022. This was followed by numerous radio and television interviews which I handled with the help of the Deputy Minister and delegated officials, to promote awareness on the new booking system. These interviews were in national, regional and community media platforms.

On 13 June 2022, I held a question-and-answer radio phone-in programme with 26 community radio stations.

The Communication Unit has also undertaken activations with Metro FM at Menlyn Mall, on 21 to 24 September 2022. This Unit has also developed videos and digital posters which it regularly runs on social media platforms of the Department and those of other Government departments.

(2) Yes, education programmes were and continue to be conducted, including the booking system’s activations I’ve alluded to. The Department has provided tablets to officials for them to take clients through the system and in this way we trust that those who were assisted will also be able to spread the message to others. Offices have floor walkers, queue marshalls and Office Managers to assist clients in the queues to make bookings.

To support this migration of service delivery platforms, the Communications Unit in collaboration with the BABS Project Management Office, did activations in selected offices in June 2022 where they were explaining to clients and officials how the system works.

The education programme explaining the new system was extended to cover officials in order to empower them to serve clients intending to use the new system. In this regard, information and posters were shared with Provincial and Office Managers to ensure that they assist in preparing their teams for the changes. A leaflet on the booking system was published in the in-house newsletter, Ikhaya, and the Director-General dedicated an issue of the online newsletter – Notes from the DG’s Desk – to the BABS and what it entails.

END

16 November 2022 - NW3897

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In view of reports that gang-related activities in secondary schools, theft and violence is on the rise, (a) what total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools since the beginning of 2022 have been reported to her department and (b) how has her department responded to such incidents; (2) what are the relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks?

Reply:

1 a Total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools

The Department has received a total of 411 gang-related incidents. 

1 b The Department’s response to such incidents

The Department has trained schools on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF), which is a guiding framework in addressing all forms of violent incidents in schools, including gangsterism.  The NSSF empowers schools to identify and manage all safety threats in schools; establish school safety committees, comprising of stakeholders, such as teachers, police officers, school governing body members, and learner representative council members.  Furthermore, the NSSF also empowers schools to develop incident reporting mechanisms; establish collaborations with external stakeholders, such as the South African Police Service (SAPS), the Department of Social Development, and civil society organisations; as well as develop school safety plans and policies to respond to safety challenges.

The Department has also empowered schools to develop and implement Codes of Conduct for learners.  These Codes of Conduct enable schools to address ill-discipline related to gangsterism, such as bullying, physical and verbal assaults, as well as the selling and distribution of drugs, truancy and theft in schools.

The Department also has an established Protocol with the South African Police Service (SAPS) to address crime and violence in schools, including gang violence.  The Protocol has enabled all schools to be linked to their local police stations.  SAPS conducts searches and seizures in schools, and conduct crime awareness campaigns in schools.  Regularly, schools work with SAPS, local community police forums and social workers to address gangsterism-related issues.  Regular searches and seizures of illegal drugs and weapons are done in schools and anti-gangsterism campaigns, in collaboration with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, are conducted in schools.   

The Department also encourages learner participation in sport and school enrichment programmes in order to promote healthy lifestyles.

 

2 a The relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks

Bullying and physical fights committed by gangsters in schools are influenced by social issues, originating in the communities and spilling over to the schools.  In addition, gangsterism in some schools is also influenced by faction fighting between learners from different villages.  This form of gangsterism is common in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal.  Furthermore, gangsterism is closely linked to drug peddling in schools.

16 November 2022 - NW3821

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of mother tongue education facilities and schools exist (a) nationally and (b) provincially; (2) what is the (a)(i) name, (ii) town and/or city and (iii) province of each specified education facility and/or school and (b) language of teaching of each; (3) what is the matric pass rate of each facility and/or school since each school and/or education facility was established?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)

The Department of Basic Education advocates for learners to learn through their home languages.  This is particularly so in the Foundation Phase, where learners learn the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and numeracy.  Post the Foundation Phase, the majority of our learners from African languages background switch to English First Additional Language as the medium of instruction.

Learners in schools that adopted English Home Language and Afrikaans Home Language, as their languages of learning and teaching continue to use these two languages up to Grade 12.  The table below attempts to provide a response for 1(a) nationally and (b) provincially.

Row Labels / Province

COMBINED SCHOOL

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

SECONDARY SCHOOL

Grand Total / National

 

EC

1 324

8

3 255

905

5 492

 

FS

146

 

754

333

1 233

 

GP

214

33

1598

819

2 664

 

KZN

375

3

3858

1718

5 954

 

LP

165

45

2 435

1 318

3 963

 

MP

73

146

1 042

513

1 774

 

NC

113

3

316

121

553

 

NW

89

6

994

400

1 489

 

WC

116

1

1114

460

1 691

 

Grand Total

2 615

245

15 366

6 587

24 813

 

2.(a)(i)(ii)(iii) and (b) 

The Eastern Cape Bilingual Based Mother Tongue Education programme has 1 953 schools, where English, together with IsiXhosa and Sesotho, are used as languages of learning and teaching up to Grade 8.  The list of schools is herein attached as Annexure A. 

3. The attached document (Annexure B) provides matric pass rate from a sample of seven schools.

15 November 2022 - NW3843

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the fact that the age of consent in the Republic is 16 years old, therefore it is against the law for anyone to have sex with someone who is under 16 and constitutes a statutory rape with exceptions (details furnished), and noting that in the republic girls as young as nine years old give birth, which is a cause for concern, in the period 2018 up to the latest specified date for which information is available, what is the total number of (a) successful convictions, (b) cases dismissed and/or acquitted as a result of poor and/or incomplete investigations by the SA Police Service, (c) cases withdrawn by the victim and/or victim’s family, (d) cases awaiting trial and (e) cases awaiting sentencing in each province?

Reply:

  1. It must be noted that the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) does not collate offence specific data in general. However, court statistics, regarding statutory rape and statutory sexual assault matters, as reported and dealt with at the NPA SOCA Thuthuzela Care Centres, are herewith provided for the financial years as reflected below:
  2. 2019/2020 financial year:
  3. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 119 verdict cases with 116 convictions – 97.5 % conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 15 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 2 verdict cases with 2 convictions – 100% conviction rate.

No diversions applied

  1. 2020/2021 financial year:
  2. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 64 verdict cases with 61 convictions – 95.3% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 2 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007
  • Finalised 2 verdict cases with 2 convictions – 100% conviction rate.
  • No diversions applied.
  1. 2021/2022 financial year:
  2. Statutory rape – section 15 of Act 32/2007:
  • Finalised 85 verdict cases with 80 convictions – 94.1% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 12 cases.
  1. Statutory sexual assault – section 16 of Act 32/2007:
  • Finalised 12 verdict cases with 12 convictions – 100% conviction rate.
  • Diversions in 2 cases.

In the analysis of the data, it is evident that the Covid-19 pandemic had a negative impact on the reporting and finalisation of cases as reflected in 2020/21 and 2021/22 financial years respectively. In comparison to the 2020/21 financial year, the 2021/22 financial year shows an increase in these numbers.

The information to sub-question (b) regarding the acquittals are included supra in the actuals and conviction rates as provided.

The information to sub-questions (c), (d) and (e) are not available. It is respectfully submitted that the Police Ministry is better placed to respond to the questions asked.

In addition, it must be noted that these offences of statutory rape and statutory sexual assault as mentioned, inter alia, are covered in the training curriculum provided to prosecutors. These manuals are annually reviewed and updated with the latest legislation and case law to ensure that prosecutors are proficient in the application of the said law.

15 November 2022 - NW3825

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether his department has a plan in place to address the untenable state of affairs of several toilet facilities at the Plettenberg Magistrates Court designated for the disabled which have no functioning lights nor globes, rendering them unusable; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) time frames and (b) further relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

I have been informed, by the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development’s Provincial Head: Western Cape, that facilities related challenges were resolved on 18 October 2022. Contractors were called to conduct an assessment and repair. Using the Departmental delegation, all lights were repaired, and globes were also fitted. This was confirmed when the Provincial Head and in his delegation visited the service point to test functionality. The newly appointed Area Court Manager conducts weekly inspections on the building to ensure that all defects are noted and resolved.

Ablution facilities, CCTV, generator gauge and emergency lights are linked to the central biometric system. This system was affected during the municipal electrical power outage which affected the entire area including the court. As soon as the municipal power was restored, the Court Management logged a call to ensure that affected biometric system is also restored.

15 November 2022 - NW3630

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With reference to the Quarter One SA Crime Statistics for the 2021-22 financial year, pertaining to crimes committed against children, what is the total number of (a) successful convictions, (b) cases that were dismissed and/or acquitted as a result of poor and/or incomplete investigations by the SA Police Service, (c) cases withdrawn by the victim and/or victim’s family, (d) cases awaiting trial, (e) cases awaiting sentencing and (f) cases referred back to the police for further investigation in each province for (i) attempted kidnapping and (ii) human trafficking?

Reply:

The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) prioritises all Gender-Gased Violence and Femicide (GBVF) matters and more especially where the victims are children. The Sexual Offences and Community Affairs (SOCA) Unit within the NPA is tasked with, inter alia, ensuring increased access to justice for victims of GBV as well as optimal management of these matters in a victim centric manner. This is done by providing pre-trial and court preparation services, often in collaboration with Civil Society Organisations (CSO), at its sixty-one (61) Thuthuzela Care Centres (TCCs) across the country. These one-stop centres provide a variety of essential psycho-social, medical and legal services thus creating a safe space for child victims to report offences against them and receive services that are empowering them to transform into survivors. Specialised training is also provided to prosecutors in dealing with child victims and their testimonies. Whilst prosecutors in court are prioritising these matters, data is not kept for offences committed against children specifically.

During Quarter 1 of 2021/22 financial year (April to June 2021), the following was not recorded in respect of crimes against children:

  1. The total of successful convictions;
  2. The total number of dismissals or acquittals, nor the reason(s) for the acquittal;
  3. The information regarding cases withdrawn by the victim and /or victim’s family;
  4. The number of cases awaiting trial;
  5. The number of cases awaiting sentencing; and
  6. The NPA is also unable to supply information pertaining to cases still under investigation in each province for (i) attempted kidnapping and (ii) human trafficking.

Having regard to the above, it is respectfully submitted that the Police Ministry is better placed to respond to the questions asked.

15 November 2022 - NW4108

Profile picture: Msane, Ms TP

Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the mediatory role the Republic will play in bringing stability in Tigray region of Ethiopia?

Reply:

South Africa was requested by the African Union to host the Peace Talks between the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front, and also to nominate a representative to join the Facilitation Team.

The request was received positively by South Africa and in addition, nominated former Deputy President of the Republic of South Africa, Dr Phumzile Mlambo Ngcuka, to serve on the Facilitation Team, together with the former President of the Republic of Kenya, Mr Uhuru Kenyatta, in support of the African Union High Representative for the Horn of Africa, and former President of the Federal Republic of Nigeria, Mr Olusegun Obasanjo. The Peace Talks took place from 24 October until 3 November 2022.

South Africa’s role is as per the invitation by the African Union Commission and remains ready to contribute should the Union and/or the Parties request further contribution in the implementation of the “Agreement for lasting peace through a permanent cessation of hostilities between the Government of Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and the Tigray People’s Liberation Front” signed on 2 November 2022 in Pretoria.

South Africa, therefore, plays an important role in the process and will continue to do whatever is required to ensure that this historic Agreement is implemented, so as to silence the guns in Ethiopia.

15 November 2022 - NW4090

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What are the reasons that municipal officials implicated and arrested for corruption get bail so easily without bail being opposed; (2) Whether the crimes of corruption are not viewed as serious cases against the State; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

APPLICABLE LEGISLATION

A. The Constitution

a) Section 12(1)(a) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (the Constitution), states that a person cannot be deprived of his or her freedom arbitrarily or without just cause.

B) Section 35(1)(f) of the Constitution reads:

Everyone who is arrested for allegedly committing an offence has the right (f) to be released from detention if the interests of justice permit, subject to reasonable considerations’.

B. Criminal Procedure Act No. 51 of 1977

(a)  Section 60(1)(a) of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977 (the Criminal Procedure Act) states: “An accused who is in custody in respect of an offence shall be entitled to be released on bail at any stage preceding his or her conviction in respect of such offence, if the court is satisfied that the interests of justice so permit”.

(b) Section 60(4) of the Criminal Procedure Act lists the grounds on which it would not be in the ‘interests of justice’ to grant an accused bail. Broadly, these are, where there is likelihood that the accused, if released on bail, would:

  1. endanger the safety of the public or any person or will commit a schedule 1 offence;
  2. attempt to evade trial;
  3. attempt to influence or intimidate witnesses or to conceal or destroy evidence;
  4. undermine or jeopardise the objectives or the proper functioning of the criminal justice system; or
  5. where in exceptional circumstances, there is the likelihood that the release of the accused would disturb the public order or undermine public peace or security.

These interests must be weighed against the right of the accused to his or her personal freedom, in particular, the prejudice he or she is likely to suffer, if not admitted to bail.

c) It is imperative to note that applications for bail are directed to Presiding Officers who must decide if it is in the interest of justice for an accused to be released on bail (where a person is charged with an offence listed in schedule 5 of the Criminal Procedure Act), or if there are exceptional circumstances for an accused to be released on bail (where a person is charged with an offence listed in schedule 6 of the Criminal Procedure Act).

1. (a) The National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), in articulating its attitude on whether

to oppose bail or not, is guided by the legislative framework set out above, being the Constitution and the Criminal Procedure Act.

The role of the NPA in a bail application court process is to adduce evidence which is intended to assist the court to determine whether the accused is a suitable candidate to be released on bail or not, and to also counter evidence submitted by the accused, where one or more of the grounds stated in Section 60 (4) of the Criminal Procedure Act are established.

Every application for bail is approached and dealt with on its own merits, after careful consideration of the merits of the case.

Where a municipal official or any other person is applying for bail, and one or more of the grounds stated in Section 60 (4) of the Criminal Procedure Act are established, the NPA has a duty to oppose the application for bail and does oppose bail.

It, however, remains the discretion of the court to decide whether the accused is granted bail or not.

2. The NPA views the offence of corruption as serious cases against the State, and the people. This was prioritised in the NPA six (6)-months’ planning process. The NPA endeavours to ensure that criminal prosecutions are initiated against persons if there is sufficient evidence that points to them as having committed offence/s of corruption, once investigations are finalised.

This also relates to allegations of corruption emanating from the State Capture Commission recommendations. In this regard, the NPA undertook, and has fulfilled its public commitment made to Parliament in May 2022, to enroll nine (9) seminal cases related to State Capture by the end of September 2022.

In those six (6) months, the NPA also made significant progress in prosecuting another wave of cases which are of equal importance in its drive to ensure accountability for corrupt activities. Although these cases do not get the same level of public and media attention, they collectively involve billions of rands that have been stolen from the public purse, often by collusion between officials of the State and people in the private sector, and enable the NPA to deal, bit by bit, with corruption across the public and private sectors.

These include several cases being pursued in the provincial divisions by Specialised Commercial Crime Unit (SCCU) prosecutors and other prosecutors tasked with guiding criminal investigations and conducting prosecutions.

Of pertinence in the novel approach to expediting State Capture and complex corruption cases, is the role of the Task Force, which brings together in closer collaboration, key role players in these cases. The Task Force includes several NPA units, including Directors of Public Prosecutions, Asset Forfeiture Unit, Investigating Directorate, Strategy, Operations and Compliance (SOC) Unit as well as the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI). In some cases, working with Counsel from the private sector has also borne remarkable fruits.

The recent enrolment of the seminal cases and other complex corruption cases guided through the Task Force, has therefore been by design and not by default. This has been a collective effort by prosecutors, investigators, analysts and other DPP and NPA staff members with specialised skills and is indicative of the seriousness the NPA views corruption allegations.

(a) Further, the 2022/23 Annual Performance Plan (APP) of the NPA provides that, while ensuring justice for the many victims of crime is core to the operations of the National Prosecutions Service (NPS), its priorities include dealing with corruption, fraud, and complex commercial crime.

As such, the NPA recognises that corruption, amongst others, disproportionately affects the poor and vulnerable, and is a burden to the South African economy.

15 November 2022 - NW3824

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

During a recent unannounced oversight visit to the Magistrates Court in Plettenberg Bay, it became apparent that the court designated for the hearing of children’s cases cannot be used as the video technology is not operative, the separate entrance designated for use by child and women victims is unable to be used as the door does not open, forcing them to use the general entrance and leaving them vulnerable to intimidation, is there some plan in place to rectify the unsatisfactory state of affairs?

Reply:

The designated Sexual Offences area in the Plettenberg Bay Magistrates’ Court, including waiting areas, are controlled and secured through the biometric system (central pool). This system was affected by the electrical power outage which occurred and affected the entire area. When the municipality restored electricity, the courts conducted a functionality test, and a call was logged to restore the biometric system, which is a security function that controls and restricts access to protect court users. As of 21st October 2022 the system is now functional.

END

14 November 2022 - NW4167

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With reference to the (a) Walter Sisulu Local Municipal area and (b) Senqu Local Municipal area in the past five financial years, (i)(aa) what total number of schools has her department started to build and (bb) where have they started building and (ii) what number of the specified schools have been completed; (2) whether any of the projects are over their allocated duration period; if so, (a) which schools, (b) how long over and (c) what is the extra cost for going over the build time; (3) what is the envisaged time frame and relevant details of her department’s plan to finalise schools that are still incomplete?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Construction of schools is not within the mandate of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, however, our sister department, Department of Basic Education, whose mandate entails development, maintenance and support for schools will be best suited to provide a response to this question.

14 November 2022 - NW3869

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

Since his reply to question 2474 on 15 September 2022, what (a) is the current extent of the backlog of surgeries in the public health sector and (b) steps has his department taken to address the specified backlog?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is still consulting with Provincial Departments of Health to get the required information in this regard. The full response will be furnished to the Honourable Member as soon as the information is received from Provinces.

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3854

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What steps has (i) he and (ii) his department taken in response to the safety crisis at healthcare facilities where it is reported that close to 50 robberies and incidences of violence have happened at Limpopo health facilities between 2018 and 2022, (b) what plans have been put in place to strengthen the security at (i) the specified healthcare facilities and (ii) others across the Republic generally to protect patients and healthcare workers from violent attacks and robberies of healthcare facilities and (c) by what date will the plans be implemented?

Reply:

(a) In 2018, the Minister of Health, the Member of Executive Council (MEC of Health) Limpopo and the Minister of Police met to discuss safety and security challenges emanating from the incident where a doctor was shot in Limpopo at Letaba Hospital. It was resolved that an Inter-Departmental Task Team should be established comprising of the SAPS, the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA), Department of Labour and Employment, Department of Home Affairs, State Security Agency and all Health Provincial Security Managers.

The Task Team in collaboration with National Joint Operational and Intelligence Structure (NATJOINS) developed a plan with the following deliverables:

• Development security infrastructure norms and standards

• Memorandum of Agreement between SAPS and Department of Health

• Deployment of Police Reservist at identified hot spot hospitals

• Development of a Health Security Dispensation

• Physical assessment of Hot Spot Hospitals

• Normalisation of Hot Spot hospitals

• Safety of Emergency Medical Services practitioners

(b) The following plans are put in place to curb robberies and incidence of violence in both specified and others across the public healthcare facilities:

• Improving and maintaining physical security infrastructure by implementing security guidelines from Infrastructure Unit Support System (IUSS) across all public health facilities.

• Intensifying private security contract management and access control.

• Deployment of Police reservists on public health hot spot facilities to conduct security compliance inspection at public health facilities with SAPS, PSIRA, State Security Agency, Department of Labour and Employment and Department of Home Affairs.

(c) Security interventions are being implemented in all provincial departments of health and the maintenance thereof is continuous. The Task team meets monthly and has also included organised labour.

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3862

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the decrease in the number of ideal and high clinics over the past year due to a lack of leadership from him and his department that has resulted in a failure to ensure infrastructural renewal and capacity, (a) what will happen to healthcare facilities that do not reach the standards required by the National Health Insurance for accreditation and (b) who will cover the cost of medical care in the specified facilities in the private and public sector?

Reply:

We are not aware of any designation of a ‘high clinic’ so we cannot respond to any assertion in this regard.

The National Health Insurance Bill makes provision for accreditation of service providers and for the Fund to conclude a legally binding contract with a health establishment certified by the Office of Health Standards Compliance and with any other prescribed health care service provider that satisfies requirements provided for in the Bill.

  • Establishments will be required to obtain certification as compliant with a set of prescribed standards by the Office of Health Standards Compliance
  • Individual providers (professionals) will be required to have proof of registration by a recognised statutory health professional council
  • Providers will be required to:
    • deliver a minimum required range of personal health care services
    • allocate appropriate health care professionals to deliver the health care that they are accredited to provide
    • adhere to treatment protocols and guidelines, including prescribing medicines and procuring health products from the Formulary
    • adhere to health care referral pathways
    • submit information to the national health information system to ensure portability and continuity of health care services and performance monitoring and evaluation; and
    • adhere to the national pricing regimen for services delivered

a) The implementation of National Health Insurance will be a process over several years and budget cycles as contemplated in the transitional provisions. Engaging providers that will be paid by the Fund will evolve in accordance with guidelines and services specified by the Minister in consultation with the National Health Council and the Fund, and published in the Gazette from time to time as required.

All healthcare facilities (providers), both public and private, including those that do not, at the outset, reach the standards required by the National Health Insurance Fund for either standards compliance or accreditation will be part of quality improvement programmes, such as the Ideal Clinic Programme, that will allow them time to effect the necessary improvements. The phases and processes for the required improvements will be outlined in the Gazetted guidelines once the law is enacted.

b) The NHI Fund which will be established once the Bill is enacted will cover the cost of “medical care in the specified facilities in the private and public sectors”.

Clause 41 provides the framework for payment of health care service providers (mechanisms of payment) and clause 49 with the source of income. Over time as benefits are included, or amended as technology evolves, the Fund will manage the sole risk pool for everyone and will purchase the services from all available accredited providers in both public and private sectors.

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3617

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has been informed of the extended water outages experienced by many residents in Rustenburg in the North West due to load shedding at the water purification plant, the sewerage treatment plant that provides grey water to some of the platinum mines and at the pump stations pumping water to both the command and supply reservoirs; if not, what (a) is the position in this regard and (b) mitigating measures will he urgently implement to ensure that residents and businesses do not continue to be deprived of their basic human right of access to water; if so, what mitigating measures has he put in place to prevent the outages from continuing?

Reply:

I am aware of the water supply interruptions at the Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM). An urgent notice was issued by the municipality on 27 September 2022, informing consumers of the expected water interruptions due to load shedding implemented by ESKOM. This has resulted in Water Treatment Plants not operating optimally. The municipality also reported a 40% reduction within the Magalies Water supply system, which has since recovered and is currently operating at 100%. However, the Bospoort system is still operating at 40% supply.

As a relief measure, the municipality began implementing a Water Demand Management Strategy on 14 October 2022. Based on the strategy, water supply is isolated and rotated to specific areas at a time. A schedule of water supply has been issued, detailing the supply times for different areas.

I have been advised that the municipality requested Eskom to exempt the Bospoort area from load shedding to mitigate water supply challenges and meet the current demand. However, Eskom only approved the Bospoort Water Treatment Plant to be exempted for a total of two days. The municipality has since committed to equip the Bospoort Water Treatment Plant with backup power.

I am also aware of the grey water that is supplied to the mines. The supply of treated effluent from the Rustenburg Wastewater Treatment Works to Anglo American and Impala Platinum mines was authorised in the water use authorisations for the mines as a way of promoting the wate re-use. At no point is the treated effluent pumped to any water supply reservoirs.

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14 November 2022 - NW3944

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Mrs M O Clarke with (a) a copy of the report regarding the possible deletion of comments on the draft health regulations in April 2022 and (b) the comments on the regulations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes. Investigation report into alleged deleted email has been prepared. The National Department of Health has utilized the following emails to receive the comments and submissions per the published draft Health Regulations as per Gazette No 46048 and Government Gazette No: 46243:

Email used to receive commends

Regulation

1.1 Tsakane.Furumele@Health.gov.za

National Health Act: Regulations relating to the surveillance and control of notifiable medical conditions: Amendment.

1.2 Funeka.Bongweni@health.gov.za

International Health Regulations Act: Regulations relating to public health measures in points of entry.

1.3 Daniel.Nkuna@health.gov.za

National Health Act: Regulations relating to the management of human remains.

1.4 Murdock.Ramathuba@Health.gov.za

National Health Act: Regulations relating to environmental health.

The Department uses the Microsoft Exchange online as the cloud-based email system, and the mimecast cloud solution for email backup, archiving and security. All emails are archived before they are received by each individual user account and each email is archived for 100 years. There is therefore no possibility of permanently loosing emails even for those that may have been erroneously deleted.

In general, the email system in the Department is designed based on good practices and common standards. These standards are used if an incorrect email is sent to the email system, where a standard notification will be sent back to the initiating email system and notify the sender of non-delivery and the reason for non-delivery is given and explained in the notice.

Similarly, this is the case for rejected emails. Rejected emails may be due to how the Cyber Security community have classified the email system of the sender and mostly emails are rejected when the email system of the sender is classified in one of the categories of cyber security threats, like being classified as the spam email system, which means that the emails may have been classified not as ethical or acceptable to other organizations. This category is classified as such by the ICT Security Industry and not the Department.

The Microsoft Exchange Cloud Platform used by the Department has data protection that allows all deleted emails of files on the cloud platform to be recoverable for at least a period of three months from the “Trash-Folder”. This is the build-in protection for any accidental deletion that may be experienced by individual users.

The Department established a team that worked on consolidating the received submissions and inputs. The team from the Information and Communication Technology Directorate met on 17th March 2022 and agreed on creating an email platform called legalreviews@health.gov.za. This platform has provided access and relief to the colleagues who needed to work on the received submissions and inputs to unclog their individual email accounts.

Furthermore, a special folder was created in each of the email accounts that were published in the Gazette and all emails that were identified as submissions and inputs were moved to the created folder named legalreviews@health.gov.za. This was done to ensure that the account holders of emails published in Gazette can attend to their day-to-day duties and are not affected by the massive amounts of received submissions, comments and inputs.

The Email-rules were created using “catch-phrases” to identify submissions and inputs and the rules forwarded all identified emails to the email address legalreviews@health.gov.za. The rules were also used to identify emails from website platforms and forwarded accordingly.

The Department of Health confirms that all received emails are not lost and have been accounted for. A picture graph of all received emails from the published email accounts between 15 March 2022 until 21 April 2022 has been developed to record the email backup and the archive system. The Department also has the user activity log showing all actions each user undertook during the period of receiving the public comments. The records include all emails that were received, rejected, bounced, and the reports can be presented for audit purposes.

Rejected or bounced email messages maybe due to incorrect email address that does not exist in the system that the sender of the email might have used, and the email system will notify such user that the email was not delivered as the recipient does not exist. The Department is also in a position to track any email that may have been deleted, if the details of the sender and the date on which the emails were sent and time as well as date emails may have been deleted by Department of Health officials.

b) There is substantial progress in processing the public comments. This started with processing of raw comments from emails and other platforms used to submit the comments (meaning capturing, allocating to officials to capture them under the regulations they are commenting on). All comments received were directed to a central platform where they were consolidated and handed over to the team responsible for processing.

Members of the public did not only use the communicated means of submission reflected in the published draft regulations but also used other email addresses of officials in the Department which were not published for this purpose. All these comments had to be harvested from the Department’s email system for processing. The Department continues to check and move such comments to the central platform of legalreviews@health.gov.za.

The above issues have affected the finalization of the number of comments received and the final number of received comments can only be confirmed once all the comments from other platforms, including personal emails of officials, have been moved to legalreviews@health.gov.za. It must be noted that the processing of comments is ongoing and to date, a total of 446 067 comments have been received and accounted for. Furthermore, over 430 915 of these comments have been processed and about 15 152 of them are still outstanding, and the performance thereof is at 97%. The work of evaluating comments is continuing and the technical team is looking at the technical contents to either accept, propose rejection, discuss further, or seek guidance thereon prior to incorporating such comments into the final set of Regulations.

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3671

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

On what date is it envisaged that the Reutlwile Informal Settlements at Zinniaville in Rustenberg, which was developed in 2015, will be formalised according to the request of the community?

Reply:

At present, the municipality has indicated that it is not in a position to pronounce on the timeframe for the formalisation of Reutlwile Informal Settlement at Zinniaville in Rustenberg as there are a number of informal settlements in the process of being formalised, including budgetary constraints as well as the existing court order on Reutlwile Informal Settlement.

14 November 2022 - NW3867

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Given that there is a shortage of doctors in the public health sector, what steps has his department taken to ensure that community service doctors awaiting placement for a year and/or longer are placed quickly in the public health sector?

Reply:

The Department has put in place processes to alleviate unnecessary waiting period for eligible applicants who are due to perform community service as doctors:

There are two annual allocation cycles. The first annual cycle allocates a sizeable number of applicants who are eligible by 30th of December to commence duty on 1 January of each year and the second (midyear) cycle allocates applicants who could not take up positions in January, thus allowing them to take up posts in July. The System ensures that there are no applicants who wait for a period of one year and/or longer to do community service, unless if the person voluntarily opts to wait longer due to personal reasons. Amongst other reasons, applicants state that they will wait to be allocated at their preferred cities, due to religious beliefs. This means they do not want to serve at rural and underserved areas defeating the purpose of the objective of the Community Service Policy. .

The Department has also put in place financial means to ensure that all statutory community service posts for medical doctors are absorbed within the Provincial Equitable Share and the Human Resources Training Grant (HRTG) Budgets.

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3938

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of primary health care patients have been screened for mental disorders in each year since 1 January 2018 and (b) is the breakdown for each province?

Reply:

According to information received from the Provinces, the response is as follows:

a) Screening of primary health care patients for mental disorders is conducted using the Adult Primary Care (APC) manual algorithms as well as a screening tool that was developed using the APC manual. Data on screening for mental disorders at primary health care was collected through the District Health Information System (DHIS) until March 2020 when the data element was dropped from the National Indicator Data Set (NIDS). Available data that is captured below is up to March 2020 for all provinces except for Free State Province as the only province that continues to collect data on screening for mental disorders at primary health care as part of their Provincial Indicator Data Set (PIDS).

 

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Number of primary health care patients screened for mental disorders

38,470,755

44,964,174

12,321,412

228,132 (only Free State)

216,946 (only Free State)

b) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

PROVINCE

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Free State

2,494,565

2,867,434

780,069

228,137

216,945

Eastern Cape

3,711,637

4,816,564

1,412,852

Data no longer collected

Gauteng

10,192,937

11,958,945

3,207,381

 

KwaZulu Nata

11,308,313

12,383,715

3,355,876

 

Limpopo

5,416,012

6,328,129

1,733,645

 

Mpumalanga

3,276,454

3,966,918

1,074,509

 

Northern Cape

349,395

498,150

140,346

 

North West

1,721,442

2,144,319

616,734

 

Western Cape

Data not collected

Data not collected

Data not collected

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3376

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

What steps has she and/or her department taken to curb the wasteful expenditure caused by contractors who have not completed their contracts in the North West?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that there has been no wasteful expenditure incurred due to contractors failing to complete their contracts. It has been reported that contractors had been paid on the basis of progress related to milestones completed, inspected and approved by the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) and the Department.

14 November 2022 - NW3863

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the vaccine hesitancy that has continued to persist in the Republic as a result of misinformation, mistrust of the Pfizer and Johnson & Johnson vaccines that were chosen and procured by his department, as well as his department’s failure to provide a platform for education and engagement on the fears of society and legitimate claims over the bias the Republic has shown in favour of Bill Gates vaccines, what (a) is the reason that his department insisted to procure vaccines in a magnitude that did not match the demand in society and (b) is going to happen to the vaccines that were procured in excess despite the fact that his department was aware that the demand was low?

Reply:

The Honourable Members is well aware that there are no such vaccines called ‘Bill Gates vaccines’ and the department procured vaccines from global manufacturers of vaccines.

a) At the start of the pandemic, there were no vaccines available globally as part of the armamentarium in the fight against Covid-19. You will recall that South Africa opted to purchase those vaccines where clinical efficacy and safety data was available, published in peer reviewed journals.

However, even prior to the availability of this information, wealthier countries, particularly in the Northern Hemisphere, concluded contracts with a multitude of suppliers to secure vaccines for their population in what is known as vaccine nationalism. This meant that poorer countries, such as ours, were pushed to the back of the queue and were not guaranteed access to vaccines. The kind of purchase commitments made by richer countries could not be made in our context in the absence of clinical evidence to purchase the best performing vaccines and without the necessary funding.

However, as soon as clinical evidence of safety and efficacy was made available, we moved with speed to conclude purchase agreements with suppliers. At the time, the aim was to achieve herd immunity, which the WHO recommends being 70% of the population. Along with the uncertainty of future availability of vaccines, the expected demand was extremely high as evidenced by the plethora of media reports.

It is in this dynamic context that agreements for vaccines were concluded. Contracts were finalised in early 2021 to receive 62 million doses of vaccine. No new contracts were entered into thereafter.

Based on current available evidence informing the vaccination schedules, South Africa purchased sufficient vaccines to fully vaccinate and provide booster doses for approximately 51% of our population.

b) Attempts are being made to donate doses that are unlikely to be used. Currently, there is a global surplus of vaccines, a situation that is in total contrast to what was occurring two years ago. Unused doses that reach manufacturers expiry date that are in central storage will be destroyed.

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3943

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) total number of dedicated grants have been allocated to (i) appoint critical clinicians and (ii) equip theatres, (b) is the amount of the grants in each case and (c) hospitals have the grants been allocated to (i) nationally and (ii) in each province; (2) what total amount of his department’s budget is allocated towards (a) equipment autoclaves and (b) the need for certain consumables nationally and in each province?

Reply:

1. (a) There are three dedicated grants allocated.

(i) Human Resources and Training Grant (HRTG) and National Tertiary Services Grant (NTSG) to appoint critical clinicians.

(ii) National Tertiary Services Grant and Health Facility Revitalisation Grant (HFRG) to equip theaters.

(b) Total amount allocated as per Division of Revenue Act for NTSG amount to R14.3 billion, HRTG R5.4 billion and HFRG R6.7 billion.

(c) The hospital that amount allocated:

(i) Nationally as per Division of Revenue Act as gazetted the NTSG amount to R14.3 billion, HRTG R5.4 billion and HFRG R6.7 billion

(ii) Provincially as per the National Tertiary Services Grant.

Provinces

Facility

NTSG

 

R Thousand

Eastern Cape

Livingstone Hospital

R341,228

 

Nelson Mandela Hospital

R371,288

 

Frere Hospital

R330,102

 

Fort England Hospital

R77,072

 

Provincial Head Office

R29,263

 

Total

R1,148,953

Free State

Universitas Hospital

R771,870

 

Pelonomi Hospital

R453,326

 

Total

R1,225,196

Gauteng

Charlotte Maxeke Hospital

R1,109,010

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

R957,851

 

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

R960,333

 

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

R1,003,943

 

Kalafong Hospital

R270,668

 

Helen Joseph Hospital+1

R239,180

 

Thembisa Hospital

R210,713

 

Nelson Mandela Childrens Hospital

R299,000

 

Sterkfontein Hospital

R5,804

 

Tara Hospital

R5,840

 

Wits Oral Health

R4,496

 

Medunsa Oral Health

R5,904

 

Pretorial Dental Hospital

R5,040

 

Weskopies Hospital

R6,104

 

Total

R5,083,886

Kwazulu Natal

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital

R909,961

 

Greys Hospital

R538,866

 

King Edward VIII Hospital

R469,945

 

Ngwelezane Hospital

R125,952

 

KZN Provincial Office

R1,130

 

Total

R2,045,854

Limpopo

Pietersburg Hospital

R342,889

 

Mankweng Hospital

R135,687

 

Provincial Office

R2,475

 

Total

R481,051

Mpumalanga

Rob Ferreira Hospital

R73,387

 

Witbank Hospital

R71,998

 

Total

R145,385

Northen Cape

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

R420,514

North West

Klerksdorp/Tshepong Complex

R219,015

 

Job Shimakana Tabane Hospital

R64,741

 

Mahikeng Hospital

R59,252

 

Provincial Office

R11,155

 

Total

R354,163

Western Cape

Groote Schuur Hospital

R1,497,693

 

Tygerberg Hospital

R1,497,693

 

Red Cross Childrens Hospital

R397,536

 

Diagnostic Related Group

R8,135

 

Total

R3,401,057

TOTAL NATIONALLY

R14,306,059

(c)(i)(ii) As per Health Facility Revitalisation Grant an amount of R6.7 billion has been allocated for the 2022/23 financial year of which R3.4 billion has been set aside for the implementation of hospitals projects across the nine provinces.

(c)(i)(ii) As per Human Resources and Training Grant total amount allocated Nationally amount to R5.4 billion and for each province total amount allocated for Eastern cape R578.8 million, Free State R264.0 million, Gauteng R1.8 billion, KwaZulu-Natal R754.8 million, Limpopo R372.7 million, Mpumalanga R274.3 million, Northern Cape R155.6 million, North West R277.2 million and Western Cape R899.4 million.

2. Total budget allocated towards equipment Autoclaves and consumables Nationally and Provincially for Assistive devices, medical and allied equipment and certain consumables, the provinces tap into the overall budget indicated as the need arises.

Province

(a) Autoclave Equipment when need arises the province tap into the overall allocated budget indicated

(b) Certain Consumables: when need arises the province tap into the overall allocated budget indicated

 

R Thousand

R Thousand

Eastern Cape

R193,369

R7,546

Free State

R37,644

R3,050

Gauteng

R33,000

R5,089

KwaZulu-Natal

R59,958

R968

Limpopo

R5,200

R6,255

Mpumalanga

R10,563

R93

Northern Cape

R19,000

R168

North West

R42,183

R1,717

Western Cape

R293,086

R29,125

National (Total)

R694,004

R54,011

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3942

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department monitors and/or maintains records of the number of patients awaiting surgery at all public hospitals in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) what (a) is the breakdown of the of patients awaiting surgery (i) nationally, (ii) in each province and (iii) in each public hospital, (b) is the average (i) length of the waiting list and (ii) waiting time at each public hospital and (c) are the reasons for delays at each public hospital; (3) what are the details of the steps that his department plans to take to ensure that waiting list times are shortened?

Reply:

The National Department of Health does not have this information readily available, it is consulting with the provinces to provide the details in this regard. The full response will be furnished to the Honourable Member as soon as it has been received from the Provinces.

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3991

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Who are the current members of the National Health Committee (NHC), (b)(i) on what dates were the specified members appointed and (ii) what were the criteria for appointment and (c) where are vacancies for the National Health Research Committee advertised; (2) whether the appointment of members of the committee is at his sole discretion; if not, (a) who does he consult with in this regard; if so, on what legislative provisions does he rely in doing so; (3) (a) what are the requisite qualifications of the members of the NHC, (b) how often does the committee meet and (c) what is the remuneration of each member of the committee? NW4961E

Reply:

(1) Firstly it is important to correct the question from the Honourable Member, that there is no structure called the National Health Committee in the National Department of Health. The acronym NHC stands for the National Health Council.

It is also our understanding that based on the content of the question, the Honourable Member could be referring to the National Health Research Committee (NHRC), and therefore our response will deal with this particular structure.

(a) The current NHRC members are listed below with their institutions:

  1. Prof Mahmood Ally (University of Pretoria)
  2. Prof Nicolaas Gey van Pittius (Stellenbosch University)
  3. Ms Glaudina Loots (Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation)
  4. Prof Joyce Tsoka-Gwegweni (University of Free State)
  5. Prof Heidi Abrahamse (University of Johannesburg)
  6. Dr Mapitso Molefe (Council for Scientific and Industrial Research)
  7. Dr Anthony Hawkridge (Western Cape HRC)
  8. Prof Christo Heunis (University of Free State)
  9. Prof Angela Mathee (South African Medical Research Council)
  10. Prof Mushi Matjila (University of Cape Town)
  11. Prof Taryn Young (Stellenbosch University)
  12. Prof Moses Mbewe (University of Mpumalanga)
  13. Prof Panjasaram Naidoo (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

     14. Ms Thulile Zondi (National Department of Health)

Prof Mahmood Ally currently chairs the NHRC as per the regulations relating to the National Health Research Committee.

(b) (i) The members were appointed on 24th April 2020, by the former Minister of Health, Dr Zwelini Mkhize for a term of three (3) years. The end of term for the current members is on 24th April 2023.

(ii) The Members of the Committee, appointed by the Minister in terms Section 69 (2) and Regulations Relating to the Establishment of the National Health Research Committee, 2010, are constituted as follows:

• A person with extensive experience and knowledge in health research;

• A representative of the community;

• A representative of the National Department of Health;

• A person appointed on account of his / her knowledge in law; and

• A representative of the Department of Science and Technology.

(c) The Director-General (DG) approves the publication of an advertisement for appointment of new Members to the National Health Research Committee (NHRC) according to Government Communication and Information System (GCIS) government regulations and policy. A notice relating to nominations of members of the committee is published in the government gazette and at least one national newspaper. The applicants use a nomination form and submit a recent Curriculum Vitae.

(2) The Minister appoints NHRC members after as required by National Health Council (NHA) section 69(1) of the National Health Act, 2003 .

(3) (a) Public health qualifications, as well as extensive experience and knowledge in health research is required. In addition, least one person in the NHRC is required to have knowledge of law, and also representation from NDoH and Department of Science and Technology

(b) The committee is required to meet four times per annum.

(c) The committee members remuneration levels are determined by National Treasury Regulation which are revised annually. The NHRC falls under category A, sub-category A2 of the 2019 remuneration levels which stipulates that the chairperson receives R4646 per day (R581 per hour); the vice chairperson receives R3778 per day (R472 per hour) and other members receive R3669 per day (R459 per hour).

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3871

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What steps will his department take to implement consequence management measures for officials found to have contributed to his department’s underspending of R1,3 billion in the 2021-22 financial year?

Reply:

a) The Department did not implement consequence management measures on officials for the underspending of R771 334 000 during 2021/2022 financial year. The underspending was due to moratorium placed by National Treasury which resulted in delays on procurement of services including cleaning services, security systems, other tools of trade amongst others.

Table below indicate the underspending per economic classification

Economic Classifications

Appropriated budget 2021/2022
R'000

Expenditure 2021/2022
R'000

Funds Available
R'000

Percentage Underspending

Compensation of Employees

892 621

848 239

44 382

5%

Goods and Services

9 548 526

9 118 156

430 370

5%

Transfers

54 493 502

54 491 901

1 601

0%

Capital

965 761

670 780

294 981

31%

Losses

8 355

8 355

-

0%

TOTAL

65 908 765

65 137 431

771 334

1%

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3937

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of public health facilities do not have a (a) psychiatrist, (b) psychologist and (c) child therapist in their facilities; (2) what number of mental health nurses are there for every 1 000 patients in the Republic; (3) what number of (a) psychiatrists, (b) psychologists, (c) social workers and (d) occupational therapists are there in the Republic for every 1 000 persons? NW4902E

Reply:

1. According to the service package, Primary Health Care facilities are not required to have (a) psychiatrist, (b) psychologist and (c) child therapist in their facilities;

2. There is a total of 1,244 mental health nurses for every 1,000 patients in the Republic’s population;

3. The table below indicates the total number of a speciality per 1000 in the Republic’s population

 

Occupation Field

Ratio Per 1000 people/persons

Catchment/total population

(a) Psychologist

0.013

61402358

(b) Occupational Therapist

0.017

61402358

(c ) Social Worker

0.570

61402358

(d) Psychiatrists

0.001

61402358

 

 

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3868

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he intends to intervene in line with section 100 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, in the administration of provincial departments of health, which have already accrued up to 90% of the next financial year’s budgets, to ensure that they are able to provide health services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department does not intend to intervene in line with section 100 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, as no provincial department of health has accrued up to 90% of their next financial year’s budget.

Below are the details of the provincial appropriated budget for 2022/2023 financial year against the accruals

Province and National

Appropriated budget 2022/2023
R'000

Accruals for 2021/2022

R’000

Percentage of Accruals to 2022/2023 Appropriation.

Eartern Cape

27 362 251

4 659 984

17%

Free State

12 711 441

619 971

5%

Gauteng

59 426 398

6 322 118

11%

Kwazulu Natal

49 609 770

1 485 045

3%

Limpopo

22 725 589

287 965

1%

Mpumalanga

16 824 794

449 601

3%

Northern Cape

5 893 603

397 234

7%

North West

15 186 040

1 322 914

9%

Western Cape

29 094 331

428 911

1%

TOTAL FOR PROVINCES

238 834 217

15 973 743

7%

 

 

 

 

National

65 000 031

113 459

0,2%

END.

14 November 2022 - NW3427

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has been informed that residents of Wards 10 and 5 in Mkhondo in Mpumalanga have been drinking muddy water for the past couple of weeks; if not, why not; if so, what immediate plans of intervention have been taken to provide communities with clean water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation engaged with Mkhondo Local Municipality on 10 and 19 October 2022 respectively. The Municipality reported that there has never been a point where there has been muddy water supplied to the community except when the team is busy with pipe repairs and only for a few hours not days or weeks. The Municipality has never received any complaints regarding muddy water in both Wards mentioned above.

Eskom’s load shedding affects the water supply and the low-level water in the reservoirs causes sediments to flow from the reservoirs into the pipeline, and this affects the quality supplied to the community. When the water treatment plants are not operating, water storage reservoirs drop significantly to an extent that remaining water at the water storage reservoirs remain with sediments that are flushed out when water supply is restored.

On occasions when the municipality experiences muddy water, their water quality team collects water samples for analysis to confirm compliance with the drinking water quality standard.

The DWS has been engaging with the municipality on the 2022 Blue Drop Risk Assessment Report published in April 2022. The DWS has requested the municipality to improve on the following:

  • The WTW Microbiological report
  • Develop water storage reservoirs cleaning programme to all water supply systems within the municipality to prevent sediments in tap water.
  • Flush water following major pipe burst to prevent supply of muddy water.

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14 November 2022 - NW3773

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has engaged with Eskom to exclude water treatment works from load shedding in the various municipalities, as it has a negative impact on service delivery; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Engagement is ongoing with the respective Water Service Authorities regarding the need to provide alternative energy supply mechanisms that can minimize the impact of loadshedding, to ensure the citizens constitutional right of access to clean drinking water.

Supported by the department, Water Boards, in their roles as water service providers to water service authorities, have taken different approaches to manage the impact of ESKOM’s loadshedding on their ability to provide reliable bulk water supply services to users, including:

  • Engaging with the provincial government leadership and ESKOM in an attempt to negotiate and facilitate for exemption on water infrastructure from frequent load-shedding
  • Filing applications with ESKOM for exemption in terms of Eskom Regulation NRS048-9. Some applications for exemption have been successful while some have not been due to technical reasons advanced by ESKOM and some are still waiting for outcomes to the applications.
  • Entities such as Bloem Water, Rand Water, Umngeni Water, Lepelle Water and Magalies Water are operating water infrastructure that is exempt from loadshedding and are mostly able to continue with operations.
  • Where affordable, some of the entities have procured back-up generators to continue with operations even when there is loadshedding

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11 November 2022 - NW3947

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)(a) What are the names of all the mining companies that have been involved in the Kamiesberg Local Municipality area in the past five financial years, (b) what are the names of the shareholders and/or directors of the companies, (c) how long has each company been mining in the Kamiesberg, (d) what does each company mine, (e) where is the mine and (f) what amount was set aside by each mining company for rehabilitation; (2) whether the Government and/or any government officials have any shares in any of the specified mining companies; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the (a) name of the company and (b) shareholding percentage; (3) whether all of the mines have a social labour plan; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a copy of the specified plan?

Reply:

1(a) West Coast Resources.

(b) West Coast Resources (Pty) Ltd is owned 67.2% by Trans Diamante Ltd a subsidiary of Trans Hex group Ltd, 4% is held by Namaqualand Diamond Fund Trust, 8.8% is held by Dininoka Investment Holdings and 20% is held Main Street (State SPV). Historically Disadvantaged South Africans holds 41.61% shares of the 67.2% shares in the Trans Hex group shares.

(c) West Coast Resources has taken over to these rights from DeBeers group since May 2011.

(d) The company is mining for Diamonds

(e) Koingnaas

(f) an amount of R125 386 427. 00 has been set aside

(2)(a) Main Street (State SPV)

(b) 20% shares is held by Main Street (state SPV)

(3) Yes, the mining right in question has a social labour plan in Place.

11 November 2022 - NW3816

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the (a)(i) names and (ii) types of farming operations of the (aa) unsuccessful and (bb) successful land reform farms in the (aaa) Western Cape, (bbb) Eastern Cape and (ccc) Northern Cape and (b) reasons that some are successful, and others are not?

Reply:

(a)(i),(ii),(aa),(aaa) Please refer to the table below.

(aa),(aaa) Unsuccessful farming operations in the Western Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Cape Winelands: Nirwanda

Table Grapes

Central Karoo: Toornitzkuil

Livestock

Cape Metro: Schaap Kraal 1448

Vegetables

Cape Metro: Zouterivier

Vegetables

Cape Metro: TweeKuilen

Potatoes

Cape Metro: Goedehoop

No Production

Cape Winelands: Langboom

Butternut

Cape Winelands: Mesco

Wine Grapes

West Coast: Middelpost 152

Livestock, pastures and Olives

(b) Reasons for unsuccessful land reform operations in Western Cape.

  • Protracted legal issue which lasted for the past eight years that affected Nirwanda. During this period the farming operation had come to a halt. No lease agreement could be entered into which prevented them from qualifying for any financial assistance. This situation exposed the infrastructure on the farm to vandalism;
  • Loss of animals due to drought in 2020, that affected Toornitzkuil farm. Since then they could not secure any financial support and this affected their production;
  • Schaapskraal 1448 had no water rights on the farm which is the mains source for production support/activities;
  • Non-payment of utility services by Schaapskraal 1448, Zouteriview, TweeKuilen resulting in their electricity connection being cut-off which affected their production, i.e., need for electricity to pump water for irrigation;
  • Loss of interest of the lessee to farm that resulted in the farm not being optimally utilised;
  • Lack of market access and information which affected all farmers;
  • Limited extension services especially during production season that affected Goedehoop, Langboom farms;
  • Some of the members of the legal entity passed on and others left the Province;
  • Non-payment of utility services by some lessees resulting in cutting of electricity that is preventing production;
  • No communication between lessee and farm workers/occupiers as 50% shareholder – Mesco farm; and
  • Lack of willingness from lessee to undergo necessary training and requisite mentorship- Middelpos farm.

(a)(i),(ii),(aa),(bb),(aaa) Please refer to the table below.

(bb),(aaa) Successful farming operations in the Western Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Cape Metro: Leliebloem

Grain and Livestock

Cape Metro: Klein Morgenwacht

Vineyards (wine grapes), Livestock and Grain

Cape Metro: Schaap Kraal 1449

Vegetables

Cape Winelands: Loufontein

Deciduous Fruit (Apples and Pears)

Cape Winelands: Mooikelder

Nursery

Cape Winelands: Siyazama Klipboerdery

Table Grapes

Overberg: Kleine Ezeljagt

Fruit/ Grain/ Livestock

Overberg: Amanzi PLAS Project

Deciduous Fruit (Apples and Pears)

Overberg: Belleview Villiersdorp PLAS Project

Deciduous Fruit (Apples and Pears)

Overberg: Protea PLAS Project

Deciduous Fruit (Apples and Plums)

Overberg: Riverside PLAS Project

Livestock and Grains (feeding purposes and Flowers

Overberg: Romans Flora PLAS Project

Livestock

Ceral Karoo: Vaalkuil

Lucerne and livestock

West Coast: Klipdrift

Livestock, pastures

West Coast: Rietkloof 1

Citrus and table grapes

West Coast: Rietkloof 2

Citrus and table grapes

West Coast: Caledonia

Livestock, pastures

West Coast: Middelpos 946

Livestock and grain

West Coast: Middelpos 611

Cash crops, vines and olives

West Coast: Bitterfontein

Livestock

West Coast: Olifantsrivier Nedersetting

Cash crops

Eden: Langfontein

Deciduous Fruit (Apples and Pears)

(b) Reasons for successful land reform operations in Western Cape.

  • Successful Farmers are following suggested production practices; growing different crop varieties to diversify enterprises and making use of crop rotation; obtaining crop insurance in order to stabilize farm income during times of loss; maintaining equipment and ensuring that farm facilities are in good working conditions; and
  • Those that are successful have mastered how the primary agriculture sector operates; registered for VAT and are able to claim for their rebate for VAT paid for agricultural inputs and machinery; and are able to obtain production loans without the help of government.

(a)(i),(ii),(aa),(bbb) Please refer to the table below.

(aa)(bbb) Unsuccessful farming operations in Eastern Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Sarah Baartman: Pampoenlands River

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Adendorp farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Zabalaza Primary Co-Op

Vegetable

Sarah Baartman: Edenvale

Vegetable

Sarah Baartman: Zamani Piggery

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Adendorp_7

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Houtgerus

Fruit

Chris Hani: Sarnia

Livestock

Chris Hani: Rynlands/ Retreat Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Brookfields

Grain

Chris Hani: Cloverfields

Livestock

Chris Hani: Hughenden

Livestock

Chris Hani: Annex/Kleinvley Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Perledine and Surprise

Grain

Chris Hani: Steenbok Trust

Grain

Chris Hani: Kuyasa

Livestock

Ballards Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Modderfontein

Livestock

Chris Hani: Vorentoe Farm

Grain

Joe Gqabi: Farm 159

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Roodenek

Livestock

(aa) Reasons for unsuccessful land reform operations in Eastern Cape.

  • Some farms are too small to can be a viable economic unit;
  • Some have not been fully funded; and
  • There are beneficiary conflicts and insufficient participation by the beneficiaries.

(a)(i),(ii),(bb),(bbb) Please refer to the table below. Successful

(bb),(bbb) Successful farming operations in the Eastern Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Chris Hani: Carnavon

Livestock

Chris Hani: Blaauwe Krans farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Morgenson Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Sa Rynlands/ Retreat Farmrnia

Livestock

Chris Hani: Sanctuary farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Fairfield farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Brookefield

Livestock

Chris Hani: Cloverfields

Livestock

Chris Hani: Alfa Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Avelon & Vischgat

Livestock

Chris Hani: Hughenden Annex/Kleinvley Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Perledine and Surprise

Livestock

Chris Hani: Steenbok Trust

Livestock

Chris Hani: Hofmeyer Farm-Siyaya

Livestock

Chris Hani: Bombani farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Middel Kraal

Livestock

Chris Hani: Tyldendale

Livestock

Chris Hani: Belmont

Livestock

Chris Hani: Haasfontein No.47

Livestock

Chris Hani: Lusthof

Livestock

Chris Hani: Mzini Project

Livestock

Chris Hani: Hofmeyer (Mutton Destiny)

Livestock

Chris Hani: Winchester farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Nicholaasfontein

Livestock

Chris Hani: Klip Kraal

Livestock

Chris Hani: Klipkrantz farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Tolkop

Livestock

Chris Hani: Ougoed

Livestock

Chris Hani: Farm no 946 (Sosebenza Project)

Livestock

Chris Hani: Ardtonisch Farm

Livestock

Chris Hani: Indwe settlement

Livestock

Chris Hani: Maiden Head Farm

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Zeekeogaat Farm

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Reitfontyn Farm

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Kopppiesfontein

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Dwaasvalley farm portion 6

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Driesfontein Farm no.133

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Delta Farm no 164

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Lenam portion 1

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Wepener Farm no.138

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Nooidgedagt no.58

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Ebdeh Farm no.98

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Laalkop Farm portion 8

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Laakfontein no. 138

Grain

Joe Gqabi: Fountain Kloof no 18

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Braamfontein Farm no. 80

Livestock

Joe Gqabi: Kalkfontein no.53

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Lukhambo Agricultural Trading CC

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Amabamba farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Cornucopia Farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Zidle Khaya farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Gorah No. 398

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Gyptjiesgat Farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Landsdowne No. 168

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Yarrow farm

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Sundays River

Livestock

Sarah Baartman: Peynes Kraal No. 365

Citrus

Sarah Baartman: Uitkoms

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Claybrook Farm No. 179,

Crop

Alfred Nzo: Ribblesdale farm No 201

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Makodene farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Zwartmodefontein Farm No 192

Crop

Alfred Nzo: Bon Accord Farm

Dairy

Alfred Nzo: Chilfrome farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Mirage Farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Hentiq Farm

Crop

Alfred Nzo: Oden groups farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Hanover farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Colembert farm

Livestock

Alfred Nzo: Drifontein

Livestock

(bb) Reasons for successful land reform operations in Eastern Cape

  • Successfully supported through the stimulus package.
  • Commitment from the beneficiaries; and
  • Successful partnerships with private stakeholders and businesses

(a)(i),(ii),(aa),(ccc) Please refer to the table below.

Unsuccessful farming operations in the Northern Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Namakwa District: Farm Klein vogel Fontein and Van Wyksvley

Livestock

Namakwa District: Farm Nombies

Livestock

Namakwa District: Farm Brakfontein

Livestock

(aa) Reasons for unsuccessful land reform operations in Northern Cape

These farms are located in the Namakwa District and the area was affected by drought that led to the drought declaration. Farmers had to reduce the number of their livestock, and this affected their cash flows as well as their nett income.

(a)(i),(ii),(bb),(ccc) Please refer to the table below.

(bb),(ccc) Successful farming operations in the Northern Cape

(a)(i) Name

(a) (ii) Type of Farming Operations

Pixley Ka Seeme District: Rooidam

Livestock

John Taolo Gaetsewe District: Auod

Livestock

Pixley Ka Seeme District: Welgevonden

Livestock

(aa) Reasons for successful land reform operations in Northern Cape:

  • The support through Recapitalization and Development improved the production of livestock and the infrastructure of the farms. Farmers also attended various trainings that were organised by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development with SEDA such as financial management and bookkeeping.
  • Permanent and temporary jobs were created during the infrastructure upgrade on the farms. Farmers were also made aware of the establishment of Agri-Parks in their Districts through which they were encouraged to market their livestock once the Agri-Park is fully functional. These farmers are now farming independently without the support of mentorship.

11 November 2022 - NW4111

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)Noting how contractors appointed by different mines continue to exploit workers, (a) which measures of intervention have been put in place to ensure that workers are not exploited by contractors, (b) by what date will workers be employed directly by the mines and not through contractors and (c) what (i) total number of workers have been employed through contractors in all the mining houses and (ii) is the percentage of workers employed through contractors versus those employed directly by mines; (2) whether he has found that mining contractors pay their workers the minimum wage as set out by the Department of Employment and Labour; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW5123E

Reply:

The matter is not within the mandate of the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as it is an operational matter which should be responded to by the mine owners.

11 November 2022 - NW3225

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department has a central database of all (a) active and (b) inactive tailings dams in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details of the dams?

Reply:

The Department has central database of active and dormant/ inactive slimes in the Republic of South Africa. There are 150 active and 328 dormant slimes dam, respectively. The total number of slimes dams in the databese is 478.

11 November 2022 - NW3374

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether any measures have been put in place for the nationalisation of mines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

There are no measures in place to nationalize mines because it is not a government policy.

11 November 2022 - NW3740

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)Whether any officials in his department have been found fostering an environment for illicit mining to prosper; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what penalties were they given; (2) whether his department will take charge of restoring regions that have been ravaged by illegal miners; if not, who will restore such regions; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

  1. No, no official has been found fostering an environment for illicit mining to prosper.
  2. The Department will continue with rehabilitation of derelict and ownerless mines. It will further continue to promote development in areas ravaged by illegal mining, and mining rights holders to ensure that mines are rehabilitated after closure

11 November 2022 - NW3702

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

(a) How was the budget for the R3 billion bulk water project in Giyani spent and (b) what total number of (i) officials and (ii) politicians have been arrested for corruption relating to the specified project?

Reply:

a)  The budget for the R3 billion bulk water project in Giyani was spent as indicated in the table below.

     

PROJECT NAME 

LTE

SOUTH ZAMBEZI

KHATO CIVILS

TOTAL SPEND

Giyani Intervention

181,534,525.82

171,737,633.33

2,544,327,974.52

2,897,600,133.67

Nandoni

52,195,702.16

22,779,243.65

0

74,974,945.81

Nwamitwa

104,559,644.15

60,678,623.86

0

165,238,268.01

Makoxa

2,446,636.00

0.00

0

2,446,636.00

Total

338,289,872.13

255,195,500.84

2,544,327,974.52

3,140,259,983.49

(i) The Special Investigation Unit (SIU) made a referral to the National Prosecution Authority (NPA) and the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (the HAWKS) on 3 April 2018 for criminal charges against the former Chief Executive Officer of Lepelle Northern Water for contravening the provisions of the Public Finance Act (PFMA). Another referral was made to the NPA for charges against the manager responsible for Planning GIS on 20 September 2018 for collusion, and fraud. The investigation is in progress and no arrests have been made so far.

(ii) No referral was made to the NPA for charges against any politician.

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11 November 2022 - NW3948

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1)(a) What are the names of all the mining companies that mined in the Koingnaas mining area in the Kamiesberg Local Municipality after De Beers stopped mining, (b) who are/were their shareholders/directors and (c) what (i)amount was set aside for rehabilitation by each mining company and (ii) did each mining company contribute towards the municipality and communities; (2) whether he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with the social labour plan of each of the (a) operational and (b) nonoperational mining companies over the past five years, specifically towards infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) West coast resources (Pty) Ltd

(b) West Coast Resources (Pty) Ltd is owned 67.2% by Trans Diamante Ltd a subsidiary of Trans Hex group Ltd, 4% is held by Namaqualand Diamond Fund Trust, 8.8% is held by Dininoka Investment Holdings and 20% is held Main Street (State SPV). Historically Disadvantaged South Africans holds 41.61% shares of the 67.2% shares in the Trans Hex group shares.

(c)(i) R125 386 427. 00

(ii) Yes, through the Local Economic Development programme

(2) Yes, through application for Access to Information.