Questions and Replies

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25 November 2022 - NW2606

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of requests have been received by the Director-General of her department under section 11(6)(d) of the Communal Property Associations Act, Act 28 of 1996, to (a) require the members of an association to conduct an election for a new management committee where the integrity, impartiality of effectiveness of the incumbent committee or a member of that committee was placed in question, (b) undertake an enquiry into the activities of an association and (c) obtain annual financial records from an association since 1 January 2012?

Reply:

(a)(b),(c) None. Section 11(6)(d) of the Communal Property Associations Act, 1996 (No. 28 of 1996) does not make provision for members of an association to request the Director General of the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development to conduct an election for a new management committee, undertake an enquiry into the activities of an association and obtain annual financial records from an association.

Section 11(6)(d) of the Communal Property Associations Act, 1996 (Act No. 28 of 1996) makes provision for Director General of the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development to conduct an election for a new management committee, undertake an enquiry into the activities of an association and obtain annual financial records from an association.

25 November 2022 - NW2538

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) recent initiatives has she taken to abolish the practice of Ukuthwala, which remains prevalent in some parts of the Republic and (b) measures have been put in place to ensure that parents and/or guardians who subject young girls to the specified practice are held accountable?

Reply:

a) The practice of ukuthwala is not legalized in the country, and the Department of Social Development together with all of government supports this stance. Therefore, the Department is against the practice of ukuthwala and advocates against its practice. On this backdrop, it is important to note that the continuity of this practice has been masked as a customary practice. This is notwithstanding the fact that it is being denounced by the custodians of customary practices. Ukuthwala occurs without the consent of its victims. It violates the victims’ right to dignity. This practice is associated with the kidnapping, assault and rape of young girls by older men who force them into customary marriages. It is a cross-cutting issue and fighting it requires collaboration with other departments such as, for instance, Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and South African Police Service (SAPS). This practice has been reported mainly in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape provinces.

The Department of Social Development in partnership with other government departments is on a standing 365 days campaign on the protection and prevention of violence against women and children. Among the messages that we communicate through this permanent campaign is to advocate against the practice of ukuthwala. In particular in the Eastern Cape province we are embarking on a number of initiatives in this regard, including conducting educational programmes at schools and communities to empower children and parents about the infringement of children’s rights through ukuthwala. Where cases of statutory rape and forced marriages are identified, these cases are reported to SAPS and victims are provided with therapeutic services. In KwaZulu Natal, the district municipalities that are mostly affected by the scourge of ukuthwala are Uthukela and Harry Gwala. Led by Social Development, the relevant prevention and intervention programmes were implemented in an integrated approach together with all the stakeholders including the Department of Health, Amakhosi and the National Prosecuting Authority. A stakeholder’s forum has been established whereby Amakhosi in the affected areas are leading the awareness campaign against ukuthwala and other social ills. These ongoing initiatives have resulted in reduced cases of ukuthwala. Now there are improved levels of assertiveness by families and young girls against ukuthwala, ant these cases are being reported to SAPS. The social workers that we placed in police stations through lifeline as well as in Thuthuzela centres are providing psychosocial support and therapeutic services to the affected community members.

Further, from May 29 to 5 June 2022 the Department was part of the government-wide annual Child Protection Week Campaign. This year’s campaign had a particularly strong focus on teenage pregnancy. It is important to point out that some of the young girls who are victims of ukuthwala get pregnant and miss out on their rights to education, dignity and health. Furthermore, the Department worked with the provincial offices on child rights (ORCs) during this year’s commemoration of the Day of the African Child under the theme: “Advocating against harmful cultural practice” with the focus on protecting girls against ukuthwala as well as boys against attending unregistered initiation schools. The outcome of the two campaigns led to increased awareness on the violation and protection of the rights of children.

Even though the incidents of ukuthwala have only been reported in KZN and EC, the Department plans to extend its campaign to other provinces as a preventative measure. It is believed that awareness campaigns may limit the spread of ukuthwala as these target changing mindsets about the practice. The next campaign is targeted in Mpumalanga during the current financial year.

b) The perpetrators of ukuthwala (including the instigator and parents if they collaborate with the instigator) are administered in terms of the applicable legislative framework relevant to the specific matter that is associated with ukuthwala such as rape (including statutory rape if the victim is a child), contravening the Marriage Act, kidnapping, trafficking of persons, defeating the ends of justice, etc. Criminal charges should send a strong message to discourage the practice of ukuthwala.

Furthermore, the victims of ukuthwala are offered psycho-social support services by qualified professionals and they can reach out to the Department via our toll-free number 0800 428 428. This is supported by a USSD, “please call me” facility: *120*7867#. A Skype Line ‘Helpme GBV’ for members of the Deaf community also exists. (Add ‘Helpme GBV’ to your Skype contacts). An SMS-based Line 31531 for persons with disabilities (SMS ‘help’ to 31531) also exists. Victims of ukuthwala are further referred to applicable health and justice services.

 

 

24 November 2022 - NW4059

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)With regard to the responsibilities of his department in relation to the Alteration of Sex Description and Sex Status Act, Act 49 of 2003, what total number of applications has his department (a) received in terms of section 2(1) since the specified Act was promulgated, (b) granted in terms of section 3 of the specified Act and (c) rejected in terms of section 2(3) of the Act; (2) what total number of rejections had reasons communicated to the applicants as it is required in terms of section 2(3) of the Act?

Reply:

(1) (a) A total number of 476 applications were received.

(b) A total number of 7 orders were granted for alteration of sex description.

(c) No rejections were made in terms of section 2(3) of the Act.

(2) None.

END

24 November 2022 - NW4061

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, with regard to the responsibilities of his department in relation to the Alteration of Sex Description and Sex Status Act, Act 49 of 2003, he will furnish Ms N K Sharif with all internal research that his department has conducted in terms of its responsibilities in relation to the specified Act; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what total number of appeals has he received, challenging the decision of his department to reject an alteration of sex description application, since the inception of the Act; (3) whether he will furnish Ms N K Sharif with a statistical breakdown of his ruling on such appeals; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether any members of the Trans Activist Coalition have been included in the drafting processes of the amended Identifications Act, Act 68 of 1997, which will be presented to Cabinet in 2023?

Reply:

1. No internal research has been conducted as the department’s responsibility and mandate as guided by Alteration of Sex Description and Sex Status Act, Act 49 of 2003, is to process applications in this respect.

2. None received.

3. Not applicable as no appeals have been received.

4. No member of the group, identified, has formed part of the drafting team. The Bill will be gazetted for public consultation wherein comments and inputs are expected, inter alia, from the community identified.

END

24 November 2022 - NW3736

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

By what date will Eskom be paying workers the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration award of 29 September? NWAQ46F21E

Reply:

According to Information Received from Eskom:

Payment will be processed with the December 2022 payroll and the payment date is 21 December 2022.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW4086

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

On what date will adequate water supply be provided for the community of Boitekong in Ward 19 in Rustenburg, North West province, which is currently without water and has been requesting the municipality to make provisions since 2016?

Reply:

Due to the current high-water demand exacerbated by the ongoing power outages, the Rustenburg Local Municipality (LM) is implementing water demand management in the greater Boitekong areas including the new stands (Extention 13). According to the Rustenburg LM, the water restrictions schedules have been communicated with relevant Ward Councillors and the affected residents.

In the medium to long term, funds have been made available through the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) administered by Department of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) for the upgrade of Bospoort Water Treatment Works from the 12ML/d to 24ML/d. I have been advised that the outstanding mechanical and electrical works are envisaged to be completed by the end of June 2023. This will ensure adequate water provision to the Boitekong area.

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24 November 2022 - NW4209

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Given that on 1 November 2022 the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs was informed that staff in the Home Affairs legislative drafting unit do not have the necessary legislative drafting expertise, what (a) total number of staff are in the legislative drafting unit, (b) is the total salary and benefits of the staff in the specified unit, (c) are the reasons that staff were hired to the positions without the relevant experience, (d) work are the staff currently busy with given that they do not have legislative drafting expertise, (e) are the reasons that legislative drafting training was not undertaken for the staff, (f) period has the position of Director: Legal Drafting been vacant and (g) are the reasons that an independent legislative drafter was appointed and the skill was not brought in-house?

Reply:

(a) Six (6)

(b) R4 555 841 per annum.

(c) The Senior Legal Administration Officers have the requisite qualifications, as well as experience, to be appointed within the Unit. There is however a distinction between these competencies and that of a Specialist Legislative Drafter, who, has advanced knowledge and expertise required for the formulation of Draft Bill into a legislative framework for submission to Cabinet and Parliament, and ultimately, tabling as an Act.

(d) Currently, the Unit is developing the draft Bills relating to;

  1. Electoral Amendment Bill;
  2. Marriage Bill;
  3. National Identification and Registration Bill;
  4. One Stop Border Post Bill;
  5. Public Holidays Bill. This Bill is initiated as a result of request to determine whether or not certain public holidays should be declared as non-trading days;
  6. Security Printer’s Bill;
  7. Section 34 of the Immigration Act, 2002.

(e) Legal officials within the Legal Services Drafting Unit possess the requisite drafting skills and experience, and have been instrumental with the development of the Draft (foundation) Bill’s as detailed in (d) above. However, the process does not end within the Department and as an outcome of consultations across government Clusters and concerned entities, an integrated legislative formulation of the Draft Bill becomes possible, but prior to it being advanced to Cabinet and then Parliament for approval, it must conform to a specific framework and drafting language, and this is where the skills of a Specialist Legislative Drafter is required.

(f) The erstwhile Director: Drafting left the employment of the Department in November 2021. The Department proceeded to advertise the vacant position and is in the process of finalising the appointment of the Director: Drafting.

(g) Refer to the reasons alluded to in (e) supra above.

END

24 November 2022 - NW4208

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

In light of the fact that the SA High Commission Canada charges CAN$127 for a passport and CAN$253 for a maxi passport and the SA High Commission New Zealand charges NZ$135 for a passport and NZ$270 for a maxi passport, what are the reasons that (a) the prices are far higher than the R1 200 for a passport and R2 400 for a maxi passport advertised on 1 November 2022, (b) non-first-time United Kingdom (UK) applicants pay the equivalent of R1 200 for a passport and R2 400 for a maxi passport when they are forced to pay an additional GBP35 to apply through Visa Facilitation Services Global and (c) non-first-time UK applicants do not have the option to apply directly at the SA High Commission?

Reply:

a)  New passport and travel document tariffs were gazetted in the Government Gazette No. 47256 dated 9 September 2022. In accordance with this Gazette, the tariff for a normal 32-page adult and child passport applied for at a South African mission is R1 200.00 while the tariff for a maxi passport applied for at a South African mission is R2 400.00. These new tariffs became effective 1 November 2022.

The missions were informed of the new tariffs for passports and travel documents under cover Revenue Circular No. 6 of 2022, dated 31 October 2022. In this regard, the missions were informed of the ‘spot rate’ to be used in instances where the tariff needs to be converted into a foreign currency. Using these ‘spot rates’ for Canada, New Zealand and the United Kingdom, the indicative prices for normal 32-page passports and maxi passports should be as per the table below:

Country

Spot rate

32 page passport

Maxi passport

Canada

0.0753383665

CAD91.00

CAD181.00

New Zealand

0.095299378

NZD115.00

NZD230.00

United Kingdom

0.047938754

GBP58.00

GBP116.00

Spot rates are used to ensure consistency in the applicable exchange rate. The Department therefore does not vary tariffs payable at the missions on a daily basis as the exchange rates fluctuate. The prices at the missions are rounded up to eliminate the need for change.

The mission in Canada applied the wrong spot rate and did not immediately update its webpage with the correct amounts for Canadian dollars. This oversight has been rectified and the current rates for passports as per the website is the following:

Adult / child passports (32 pages): CAD91:00 (http:///www.southafrica-canada.ca/regular-south-african-passports-c55-processing-fee/ )

Maxi passport (48 pages): CAD181 (http://www.southafrica-canada.ca/maxi-passports/ )

The mission in New Zealand also applied the wrong spot rate. This mission was requested to update its webpage with the correct amounts, in New Zealand dollars, for South African passports applied for at the mission.

b) The introduction of a passport pilot project in the UK through VFS was as a result of high volumes of applications and over six to nine months turnaround times with limited staffing in the Mission in London. The pilot turnaround time is one month and the service fee charged is to cover the overhead costs of VFS.

(c) The applicants may still apply at the Mission should they opt to do so and avoid paying the VFS service fee.

END

24 November 2022 - NW3620

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What is the total monetary value of (a) all government guarantees issued to the SA Airways (SAA) and which remain with SAA as at 30 September 2022 and (b) government guarantees utilised by SAA as at 30 September 2022; (2) what are the relevant details of the dates that all government guarantees were issued to SAA; (3) what are the (a) reasons that all government guarantees have not been withdrawn from SAA if any government guarantees remain in the hands of SAA as at 30 September 2022 and (b) relevant details of the dates by which all government guarantees will be withdrawn from SAA; (4) what are the relevant details of government guarantees utilised by the SAA including the details of the (a) persons and/or entities that have been given and/or issued with government guarantees as security by SAA, (b) services and/or supplies provided to SAA by persons and/or entities to whom government guarantees have been given and/or issued as security by SAA, (c) value of government guarantees given and/or issued by SAA to each person and/or entity and (d) period of and repayment date of government guarantees given and/or issued by SAA?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

1. (a) The total monetary value of guarantees issued to SAA was R19.1 billion. As at 30 September 2022, R1.2 billion remain with SAA.

(b) A total of R377 million of government guarantees remain in use.

2. The guarantees were issued as follows:

Financial year

Purpose

R Billion

2006/07

Support to restore going concern

1,300

2009/10

Support to restore going concern

1,600

2012/13

Support to restore going concern

5,006

2014/15

Support to restore going concern

6.488

2016/17

Support to restore going concern

4,720

Total

 

19 114

 

3. (a) All the guarantees have not been withdrawn from SAA as the airline is in the process of replacing the guarantees currently pledged as security for contingent liabilities with its own cash.

(b) All guarantees will be withdrawn as soon as SAA has been able to find alternatives for replacing the guarantees pledged as security

4. SAA intends to settle the outstanding guaranteed obligation by end of March 2023.

 

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane PJ. Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW4014

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What (a) total number of (i) civil claims have been filed against the Compensation Fund since the start of the 2020-21 financial year and (ii) cases are currently not finalised and (b) is the total quantum of such cases; (2) what total amount did the Compensation Fund spend on legal costs to oppose the specified claims (a) in the (i) 2020-21 and (ii) 2021-22 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2022?

Reply:

1. (a) Cases

(i) The total number of civil claims cases received for the financial year 2020/2021 is 156

(ii) Total number of cases still not finalised is 124 for financial year 2020/2021

(b) The total contingency liability amount is R142 231 682,93.

2. (i) The total amount spent on legal costs for the financial year 2020/2021 is R11 562 528,55 which comprised R1 382 588,05 for legal costs relating to that cases specific to that financial year and the balance comprising shared split costs and prior years’ late claims by the Office of the State Attorney.

(ii) The total amount spent on legal costs for the financial year 2021/2022 is R10 528 779,18 which comprised R1 415 653,76 for legal costs relating to that cases specific to that financial year and the balance comprising shared split costs and prior years’ late claims by the Office of the State Attorney.

(b) The total amount spent on legal costs since April 2022 is R257 158,73.

24 November 2022 - NW3955

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What are the details, including addresses, of the Home Affairs offices situated in the municipal area of the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality; (2) whether the offices are fully staffed; if not, what (a) is the plan to staff the offices and (b) are the time frames of filling the vacant posts; (3) whether the internet works optimally at the offices; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is done when there is load shedding and (b) are his department’s plans to ensure that services are not interrupted by load shedding; (4) whether the phone lines are functional at the offices; if not, what are the time frames regarding the date it is envisaged that the phone lines will be fixed; (5) whether he has found that there are any other specified services that are not rendered and/or delivered at the offices; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) plans are in place to ensure that the services will be delivered and (b) is the frequency of service of the mobile office to towns that are not serviced by offices?

Reply:

1. The Department of Home Affairs has two offices in the municipal area and they are Aliwal North, Local Office Medium situated at number 18 Hunt Street Aliwal North 9750 and Burgersdorp Local Office Small, No.31 Van Der Walt Street, Burgersdorp 9744,

2. Offices are not fully staffed and there is a capacitation programme currently underway to fund vacancies but all posts for office managers have been allocated funds. The Aliwal North office has appointed one Civic Service Supervisor who assumed duties as from the 1st September 2022. There is one vacant funded post of Civic Service Supervisor for Burgersdorp which emanated from the current recruitment process and will be filled soon.

3. The State Information Technology Agency (SITA) is making an investment to improve internet connectivity at DHA offices and both offices have generators that are used during load-shedding to ensure that services are not interrupted.

4. There are temporary telephone lines for Aliwal North Local Office Medium with the following numbers: 051 633 3317, 051 633 2118, 051 633 2883,051 633 2281 and they are functional. Permanent lines will be installed once Telkom is done with the migration to fibre-lines.

5. Inspectorate Services are not done at the Burgersdorp Local Office Small, due to the size of the office. At the Aliwal North Local Office Medium, recruitment for Immigration officials has started in phases. (a) The Immigration Officials of the Sterkspruit Local Office Medium, have an Itinerary that covers Senqu Local Municipality, and Walter Sisulu Local Municipality. (b)A monthly itinerary for the mobile units is drawn to service towns with no DHA footprint.

END

24 November 2022 - NW3188

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

On what date did he last attend a meeting outside the structures of the Government to determine the deployment of personnel in public sector positions;

Reply:

  1. I have not attended a meeting outside of the Government to determine the deployment of personnel in public sector positions.
  1. Appointments in the Public Service are regulated by the Public Service Regulations (PSR) 2016, (57). In terms of regulation (65) of the PSR, vacancies in the public service must be advertised extensively, to reach an entire pool of potential applicants.

Regulation (67) of the PSR regulates the selection of a suitable candidate/s to an advertised post. Formal selection processes entail the shortlisting of candidates, where after formal interviews are undertaken to identify a suitable candidate to appoint. Regulation (67)(7) also makes provisions to headhunt a suitable candidate if the selection panel is unable to recommend a suitable candidate.

END

24 November 2022 - NW4217

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Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he will furnish the Leader of the Opposition with a list of all South Africans who are in possession of a diplomatic passport; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is herewith informed that Diplomatic passports are issued according to the South African Diplomatic Passport Policy and that the Department of Home Affairs is not the custodian of this policy, and similarly not responsible for the application(s) as well as the issuance of this category of passports whatsoever. Hence it is requested that any information relating to Diplomatic Passports should be addressed to the Department of International Relations and Co-operation (DIRCO).

END

24 November 2022 - NW3790

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he will furnish Mr E M Buthelezi with an update on the (a) steps that his department has taken to ensure that (i) ports and (ii) railroads remain operational during the strike at Transnet and (b) closed Northern Corridor between Durban and Tongaat; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

(a)(i) Ports

At the onset of the strike, Command Centers were invoked at all operating divisions of Transnet SOC Ltd to ensure that company assets were secured; non-striking employees were protected; and contingency plans were implemented to reduce operational disruptions. While the marine operations of Transnet National Ports Authority were not affected by the strike due to their essential service designation, the Transnet Port Terminal operations were impacted as they do not form part of essential services at the ports. Other measures introduced included the following:

  • Employees who were not striking were used as a contingency.
  • The Bulk and Breakbulk Terminals were not severely affected. Customer resources were utilised to continue operating in these sectors, together with some employees who were not on strike.
  • The Auto Terminals were operating by utilising the existing third-party contracts.

A recovery plan has been implemented and is on track.

(ii)(b) Railroads

The North Corridor does not have a rail line between Durban and Tongaat.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW2883

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

In light of the extension requested by Chief Justice R M M Zondo in completion of the report of The Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State better known as the Zondo Commission, what financial allowances and claims has the Chief Justice made during the extended period as Chair of the Zondo Commission?

Reply:

The Chief Justice R M M Zondo has not made any claims or been paid any allowances during the extended period of the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture.

24 November 2022 - NW3878

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to Medupi’s ash dump outside Lephalale, he will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with reasons for the dumping of ash at the current location, when the preparations for an ash dump was made right next to the new power station; if not, why not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether the dump site next to the new power station is also in operation; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the reasons that the location at the old dump site is also in use and (b) apart from the two dump sites, are there any alternative sites for dumping the ash; (3) Whether he relies on any provisions of waste management legislation for the location of the current ash dump that is creating the pollution; if not, (a) which legislative provisions does he rely on and (b) was an environmental impact study done on this site; if so, what are the reasons that no preparations were made at the specified site to stop the pollution from spreading into the surrounding area and town; (4) Whether the World Bank set any prerequisites and/or conditions for the loan to build the new power station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified prerequisites and/or conditions being (a) met and (b) contravened?

Reply:

According to Information Received from Eskom:

1. The current location of Medupi Power Station’s North Ash Disposal Facility (ADF) is located at Farm Eenzaamheid 687 LQ which is adjacent to the power station (on the western side). The location was assessed as part of the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) studies undertaken in 2005 (DFFE Ref. No. 12/12/20/695) as well as

during additional EIA studies. Medupi Power Station (PS) only has one operational ash disposal facility.

(2)(a) Medupi’s ADF, on the western side of the power station, is in operation. It should be noted that construction and operation of the Medupi PS ADF is done in phases. Currently, Medupi is operating part of the zero for four-year ADF while they are busy with the construction of the remaining phases.

At Medupi PS there is only one ADF and ash arising from the power station is not disposed of at the old dump site as referred. It is assumed that the old dump site referred to is the Matimba PS ADF which is not linked to the operation of Medupi PS, but instead services Matimba PS.

(b) For future ashing requirements, alternative sites will be assessed following an EIA study. Various options are being considered for the future disposal of waste such as ash off-takers, but these are still being developed.

(3)(a) The current ash disposal for Medupi PS triggers waste management activities listed under Government Notice No. 921 dated 2013 as amended. In addition, other applicable legislation includes section 21 of the National Water Act, 1998 as amended. It should be noted that one needs to undertake the EIA studies set out in the Environmental Impact Assessment Regulations under section 24 of the National Environmental Act, 1998 as amended, when applying for a waste management license and/or water use license.

The EIA studies were undertaken, and dust management controls were considered as part of the preparations.

Below please find an update reflecting the current status of Medupi Power Station:

(b) Waste Management Licence No. (12/9/11/L21/0323092918/5/R) and National Dust Control Regulations No. 36974 GOVERNMENT GAZETTE, 1 November 2013 are the main legislations that govern fugitive dust management at the Ash Disposal Facility (ADF). Environmental impact studies were conducted during the EIA phase of the project and a waste management licence is available for the ADF.

Medupi PS has installed and commissioned an Ash Dump Irrigation (ADI) system with sprinklers to suppress the fugitive dust at the ADF. Effluent water from the station’s pollution control dams is used for dust suppression. Water tankers are also used to suppress dust at active areas, including access roads to the ADF.

Medupi PS has established a monitoring network for fugitive dust management to measure the dust fallout in line with the National Dust Control Regulation. Medupi PS fugitive dust fallout is measured against the non-residential limit of 600 < D > 1,200 Dust fall rate (D) (mg/m2/day), 30-day average based on the station’s location.

Long-term plans are under development in terms of rehabilitation of the ADF as the ashing disposal is completed per phase. These will also need to follow environmental approval processes before execution. Currently, the rehabilitation designs for the first phase are completed.

(4) On 16 April 2010, Eskom and the World Bank (WB) concluded a loan facility, with a total WB financing of US$3.75 billion. In the loan agreement, Eskom made a commitment to develop, adopt and thereafter implement a programme to install Flue Gas Desulphurisation (FGD) technology in each of the six power generation units at the Medupi power plant.

Due to delays at Medupi, the World Bank approved Eskom’s request to amend the deadline for the Medupi FGD to 30 June 2027. Eskom is thus currently not in breach of the loan agreements; however, it is unlikely that Eskom will be able to install FGD at all Medupi units by the 2027 deadline. Eskom submits bi-annual progress reports on the Medupi FGD to the World Bank.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW3582

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Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he will furnish Mr E M Buthelezi with an update on the (a) Rheinmetall Denel Munition (RDM) and (b) projects that (i) are in progress and/or (ii) have been rolled out by the RDM; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

According to the information from Denel

(a) Rheinmetall Denel Munition RF Pty. Ltd (RDM) is a joint venture between the German Rheinmetall Waffe Munition GmbH (51%) and the South African State-Owned Company, Denel. The JV was completed in 2008. RDM is producing and selling ammunition of various calibres. RDM employs a total of 2,500 people across its four sites (2 in Western Cape, 1 in Gauteng and 1 in North West) and conducts business with more than 1,500 suppliers in South Africa. Over 90% of RDM’s turnover is generated from international clients, especially in the Middle East / Northern Africa (MENA), Asian and Europe. RDM’s dependency on international clients underlines its dependency of the timely approval of contracting and export permits from the South African National Conventional Arms Control Committee (NCACC).

(b) RDM operates in a sensitive defence/military environment. Customers insist on tight non-disclosure requirements as part of contractual obligations. All other mandatory regulatory disclosures related to contracting for export and import of controlled items are made to the NCACC.

(i) Since the inception of the Joint Venture in 2008, the company invested R1.5 billion in the development of new technologies, R1.0 billion in infrastructure and facilities as well as more over R500 million in social responsibility, skills development, and supplier development.

(ii) RDM’s goal is to be carbon neutral by 2035. In this regard, RDM is in the process of constructing the first solar PV farm at the Somerset West site and the same model will be replicated across all RDM sites in South Africa.

RDM has started to endeavour in technology developments in the field of alternative green energy solutions, specifically solar and green hydrogen. On green hydrogen, RDM has developed several applications and wants to position itself as a partner for hydrogen supply globally. RDM is also developing solutions for fixed and mobile hydrogen power, and storage solutions for industrial use. RDM unveiled its green hydrogen plans at the 2022 Africa Aerospace and Defence exhibition.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date

24 November 2022 - NW4067

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What was the total amount of (a) legal fees that was spent on defending legal actions against his department, (b) cost orders that were made against his department and (c) contingent liabilities against his department in the 2021-22 financial year in each case?

Reply:

a) Hereunder please find a list of argued matters in court and the amount spent on legal costs.

NB: Please note that where amounts are not stated it is because the Department is awaiting invoices of payments from the Department of Justice (State Attorney). The Department of Justice is responsible for payments on behalf of Client-Departments and the Departments in turn, reimburse the offices of the State Attorney.

YEAR 2021 LOST MATTERS

 

NAMES

CATEGORY

REASON FOR THE APPLICATION

TOTAL AMOUNT

1

Dembello Markos

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

R209 052.95

2

Mbrik Barsodo Shafe

Immigration

Release from detention

R16 618.77

3

Alert Ndlovu

Immigration

Release from detention

R34 848.00

4

Chand Uzzal Mondol

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

R27 200.00

5

Dwatat Ashenut

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

R1 615.98

6

Deroke Ashuro Abacho

Immigration

Release from detention

R76 525.72

7

Khaled Abdelmoniem Foud

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

Awaiting invoice from Justice

8

Hassim Allamin

Immigration

Release from detention

Awaiting invoice from Justice

9

Faruk Omar

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

R173 119.97

10

S Ntukwana

Labour relations Act

Re-instatement

R53 100.00

11

Herbert Mfabi & & Musana Luzake

Immigration/ urgent

Release from detention

R27 200.00

12

Kamal Adissa Agbe Akinotcho

Immigration Act/urgent

Release from detention

R2 519.72

13

Manedo Ayano

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

Awaiting invoice from Justice

14

Lamboroko Berekete

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

Awaiting invoice from Justice

15

Ababa Joseph

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

Awaiting invoice from Justice

16

fayez Mohammed

Immigration Act/Urgent

Release from detention

R27 744.00

17

Kotiso Tsagae

Immigration Act/urgent

Release from detention

R35 700.00

18

Amin Abukar and 5 others

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

R70 000.00

19

Fayeza Nuraden

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

R47 775.00

20

Douglas chidi Obere ofenedu

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

Awaiting invoice from Justice

21

Rashid Adam

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

R10 500.00

22

Centre For Child Law // Minister of Home Affairs and others

Births and Deaths Registration Act 51 of 1992

constitutionality of section 10— section is unconstitutional

R122 560.00

23

mezene Tedessa Someno

Immigration Act/urgent

Interdict deportation and release to apply for asylum

R89 182.50

24

Mohlakore Matsaba

Immigration Act/Citizenship, urgent

Interdict deportation

R33 480.00

25

Dutimo Bakala

Immigration Act/ urgent

Interdict deportation

R82 100.49

26

Tugugn Tedesse Achamo

Immigration Act/ urgent

Interdict deportation

R25 561.45

27

Birhu Kibamo &Tesfaye John

Immigration Act/ Urgent

Interdict deportation

R19 200.00

28

Detamo Wondmagan

Immigration Act/urgent

Urgent application

R106 261.55

29

Hussen Mohammed

Immigration Act/ urgent

Urgent application

R102 395.07

30

Getachew Tirore Watango

Immigration Act/ urgent

Urgent application

Awaiting invoice from Justice

31

Abeni Girma Teloro

Immigration Act/ urgent

Urgent application

Awaiting invoice from Justice

32

Kanora Gabese Gabore

Immigration Act/ urgent

Urgent application

R341 250.00

33

Fhatuwani Sibanda

Citizenship Act/ Immigration Act

Urgent application

R123 395.00

34

kabula Ilunga

Immigration Act/ urgent

Urgent application

R19 550.00

35

Maria Belvedere Florencia

Labour relations Act

Labour Matter

R87 200.00

36

Ramadhani Rajabu

Immigration Act/urgent

Urgent application

R40 341.19

37

Kamorudeen Tunde Isiaq

Immigration Act/urgent

Urgent application

R34 200.00

38

Salamu Muramo Rejabo

Immigration Act/urgent

Urgent application

R11 400.00

39

Dutimo Bakala

Immigration Act/ urgent

Interdict deportation

R82 100.49

40

Echozona Lawrence Nnalue

Immigration Act /Urgent

Interdict deportation

R23 015.00

41

Bebeyi Sheye Niyi

Immigration Act /Urgent

Release from detention

R18 050.00

42

Daniel Amelate

Immigration Act/urgent

interdict deportations

R116 700.00

43

Desta Abore

Immigration

Release from detention

R97 490.00

44

Noyonkuru Elie

Immigration Act/urgent

Release from detention

R12 810.00

45

Irutabantu Destiny

Immigration Act/urgent

Release from detention

R12 870.00

 

TOTAL

   

R2 259 328.85

YEAR 2022 LOST MATTERS

1

Genamo Solomon

Immigration Act/Urgent

Release from detention

Awaiting invoice from Justice

2

Claire Breukel and Elisa Sofia Sain Serrano// minister of home affairs and others

Immigration Act/urgent

interdict/ POE

R373 235.00

3

Denise Charlotte Hausermann Gordon-Kind

Immigration Act /prohibition sec 29(2)

prohibition sec 29(2) review

R53 586.89

4

Ziaul Hoque&4 others vs Minister of home affairs and one other

Immigration Act

Setting aside decision on PR applications

R25 200.00

5

Hossan Mohammad Delawar

Immigration Act/refugee Act

Interdict against deportation

Awaiting invoice from Justice

6

Ursula Jenny Dinah Jantjies and Vili Krasimmirov Georgiev

Amendments

Ordering department to amend the details of applicant on Birth register

R53 000.00

 

TOTAL

   

R532 021.89

(b) The Department has incurred R27 071 037.81 in cost orders for the financial year 2021/2022. This composes of settled matters, mandamus applications, costs ordered by the courts, etc.

The Department has incurred R10 951 153.39 in cost orders from 1 April 2022 to date.

(c) The total amount of contingent liabilities for financial year 2021/2022 is R 2 107 068 000.00

END

 

24 November 2022 - NW3891

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in view of his statement at the Financial Times Africa Summit in October 2022 that electricity is a public good, as justification for the reason that the State should remain in control of providing electricity through Eskom, his department has considered forming strategic partnerships with other governmental departments and/or private entities, given Eskom’s growing financial predicament and the increased escalation of load shedding stages; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Electricity plays a key role in the economic development of the country. Electricity affects both the rich and the poor communities. Eskom played a critical role and will continue to provide a public good in the form of electricity. It must be emphasized that, the entity provided the good during the time that private sector could not take the risk of providing the public good. The electricity industry has matured hence the private sector is willing to enter the market and provide competition which will bring about efficiencies and improve service provision. The increase in competition in the energy industry necessitated the restructuring of Eskom to enable the entity to efficiently operate in the energy industry. The incorporation of the Transmission Subsidiary will play a key role in the transmission of electricity. Partnerships between the public, and private sectors is needed for provision of electricity. The Department is engaging with Department of Mineral Resources and Energy (DMRE) and National Treasury through the Intergovernmental Steering Committee that provide oversight to Eskom restructuring.

The development finance institutions are critical for financing electrical infrastructure in the country. The private sector has invested heavily on the Eskom transmission network. The embedded generators are allowed to sell the excess electricity to Eskom. The private sector has played an important role in the provision of electricity through the Renewable Energy Independent Power Producer Power Programme bid windows. Eskom is procuring additional capacity from Independent Power Producers (IPPs) to improve maintenance to improve Energy Availability Factor (EAF) to reduce loadshedding in the country.

 

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW3747

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Considering that organised labour declared a dispute with Transnet over wage negotiations, what measures of intervention has he taken to resolve the situation and assist Transnet and the workers to find each other?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

The governance process for wage negotiations at Transnet provides for an internal process led by the Board of Directors. As such, the Minister of Public Enterprises’ role is that of guidance and mediation.

The mandate for the quantum of the increase is given by the Transnet Board of Directors based on recommendations from the Group Executive and Remuneration, Social and Ethics Committees before wage negotiations commence. The Chief of People Management and Learning is then empowered to negotiate with the recognised unions SATAWU and UNTU within the confines of the mandate given.

When industrial action commenced, Minister Gordhan convened daily meetings with the Transnet Board, Group Executive Committee as well as the private sector, which was represented by various industry associations. The purpose of the meetings was to update industry on operations at Transnet.

Honourable Ministers Thoko Didiza, Thulas Nxesi and Pravin Gordhan met with the leadership of SATAWU and UNTU on 12 October 2022. The Ministers used the meeting to engage with union leaders on the demands tabled by their members and to urge that all parties find a solution to the deadlock.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

 

24 November 2022 - NW4141

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he will furnish Mr A C Roos with a list of the court cases in the 2022-23 financial year, in which his department has been instructed to amend regulations and/or legislation, that have not been done; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will furnish Mr A C Roos with a list of the (a) deadlines given by the court to effect the order for each case and (b) actions taken to satisfy the requirements of the court order in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. During 2022-2023 financial year the Department was instructed to amend certain sections of the Immigration Act, 13 of 2022 on the matter of Tereza Rayment & 5 others v The Minister of Home Affairs: court case No. 3919/20, as summarised hereunder:

The Applicants sought to declare the Immigration Act, 13 of 2002, unconstitutional based on Sections 10(6), 11(6), 18(2) and 43, and Regulation 17 thereof. The Western Cape High Court held that Sections 10(6), 11(1)(b) and 18(2), read with Regulation 9(5) and 9(9) are inconsistent with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. That declaration of invalidity was suspended for 24 months from the date of the order, to enable Parliament to remedy the inconsistency.

The Western Cape High Court ordered that the Department must consider granting the Applicants authorization to remain in the RSA in terms of Section 32(1), pending the outcome of such applications. Costs were ordered to be paid by the Department, including the costs of two Counsel.

Both the Applicants and the Department were not satisfied with the order and therefore appealed, and cross appealed respectively, resulting in the stay of the court order and thus it cannot be implemented.

2. The above-mentioned court application is the only court case during the 2022-23 financial year wherein the Western Cape High Court instructed the Department to amend its regulations and/or legislation. As mentioned above, the court order has been stayed due to the pending appeal processes.

END

 

24 November 2022 - NW3594

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) Who appointed a certain person as the company secretary of Alexkor, (b) was the specified position advertised, (c) who else was interviewed, (d) what total number of persons applied for the job or was the person appointed through the influence of the cadre deployment machinations of the ANC’s deployment committee and (e) is the specified person an employee of Alexkor?

Reply:

According to information received from Alexkor:

a) The former CEO appointed Messina Inc Attorneys to render company secretarial services on a month to month basis with effect from 1 October 2020. The certain Person is a Director and a representative of Messina Inc Attorneys and is responsible for rendering the company secretarial services.

b) There was no position advertised.

c) There were no interviews.

d) There was no job advertised and the certain person is a representative of Messina Inc Attorneys being the entity appointed as Company Secretary. I am informed that the certain person carries out his duties diligently. The certain person is not deployed through cadre deployment machinations of the ANCs deployment committee or any political party’s cadre deployment.

e) The certain person is not an employee of Alexkor.

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW3875

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Considering that before December 2021 three companies, namely Actom, Steinmuller Africa and Babcock Ntuthuko Engineering, were all contracted to perform specialist engineering services at different Eskom power stations, how does Eskom now justify eliminating a key original equipment manufacturer, Babcock Ntuthuko Engineering, from a tender process when the specified company was servicing the power stations and performing well; (2) given the skills shortage and/or loss on the Eskom side, how does Eskom justify losing years of experience and expertise from a key original equipment manufacturer that has maintained the units, both from a construction and engineering aspect; (3) what is the reason that Eskom did not accept the tender from Babcock Ntuthuko Engineering, specifically in light of the critical urgency to ensure proper and skilled maintenance on the power plants?

Reply:

According to information received from Eskom:

  1. The process to procure the boiler maintenance services went through the competitive open tender process and the successful bidders’ contracts started in January 2022. Babcock Ntuthuko was disqualified technically. The two service providers awarded the contract have proven that they have the capacity and capability to render the required scope of work.
  2. The procurement of goods by Eskom is done and should always be done in a manner that is equitable, fair, transparent, cost-effective and competitive. It was not a requirement to award the tender to Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs), however, Actom and Steinmuller are in fact the OEMs on certain power stations. However, that did not influence the tender evaluation outcome or award.
  3. Babcock Ntuthuko’s tender was not accepted due to its failure to meet one of the mandatory technical requirements. The supplier failed to submit the mandatory technical requirements. The supplier failed to submit the mandatory certification of ISO 3834 which was required and mandatory for technical evaluation.

It should be further noted that Eskom is committed to utilising experienced skills when it comes to working on the units, but where bidders in a procurement process do not meet the mandatory requirements, Eskom cannot accept those bids.

 

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW3892

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Considering the breakdown of a generating unit each at (a) Duvha, (b) Kriel and (c) Medupi Power Stations, and noting that delayed returns of a generating unit each at (d) Camden, (e) Kusile, (f) Komati and (g) Kendal Power Stations have worsened the current generation capacity shortages, (i) what maintenance plans does Eskom have in place for generating units and (ii) have the specified plans regularly been updated, in view of the frequent breakdowns of generating units?

Reply:

According to Information Received from Eskom:

(i) and (ii)

Generation has a capacity plan. This capacity plan identifies all “off-load” maintenance scheduled for each unit in the fleet. This plan is very detailed for the first year, but also identifies the maintenance space required for the following year. The plan is linked to required budgets as well as the required space on the system to allow the unit to be shut down for the maintenance. Planned maintenance requires a 24-month planning period to ensure that spares and services are available for the outages.

This capacity plan gets revised regularly and updated according to the evolving environment. The challenge with executing this plan is determined by the availability of the timely release of funding, the available space on the system to allow maintenance to occur, as well as the “readiness” of the unit to execute the planned maintenance.

Securing the required funding for planned maintenance has been a challenge for FY2022, FY2023 and FY2024. This results in the late release of funding to sites hence their ability to plan outages is compromised. The uncertainty of funding also affects the amount of maintenance that can be planned. For example, lack of funds requires the prioritisation of safety maintenance while reliability maintenance has to be reduced, which is not ideal.

The compromised planning also impacts the sites’ ability to carry out maintenance in the required time and according to the required schedules, this leads to slips on return dates.

The unpredictability of the current fleet means that unplanned failures take up space on the already constrained system. This then results in the deferment of planned outages. In essence, the current unpredictability of plants compromises the current capacity plan from materialising as intended.

 

 

 

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW2455

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Police to question 2141 on 17 June 2022 regarding the investigations and prosecutions arising out of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, wherein he states that 100 cases were referred to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), what is position to the other 200 cases of apartheid-era atrocities, where no amnesty was applied for and/or granted, that were recommended by the TRC for investigation and/or prosecution; (2) What criteria was determined by the National Prosecuting Authority for selecting and/or prioritising, the 100 out of the 300 for the DPCI for investigation?

Reply:

1. According to the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) statistics, prior to September 2021, a total of 59 Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) cases were under investigation by the Directorate Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI). The Priority Crimes Litigation Unit (PCLU) oversaw the investigations at a national level until they were migrated to the respective provinces in April 2019. After a careful analysis, a further 55 cases were thereafter identified for re-opening.. These cases pertained to the deaths in detention where detainees, detained mainly under security legislation, died under circumstances which necessitated further investigation. These matters were identified on the available information at that stage. The process to review the TRC Recommendations is ongoing and relevant is extracted from the multiple volumes of the Final TRC Report.

Since September 2021 to July 2022, a total of 64 new matters have been referred to the DPCI for investigation.

2. The criteria currently used is to first establish if the charge/s against person/s have not prescribed. Once it has been ascertained that the matter was referred by the TRC, and the charges have not prescribed, then the matter is referred for re-opening to DPCI for the allocation of an investigator. After an investigator is appointed, the matter is referred to the office of the relevant Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) where a dedicated TRC prosecutor is assigned the matter for prosecution guided investigation to take place.

END

24 November 2022 - NW4128

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the dismissal of a certain employee (name furnished) who has since passed on, which was later found to be substantively and procedurally unfair by an arbitrator, what (a) has been the progress with regard to the arbitrator’s award of R232 916,67 to the specified employee’s family and (b) measures has his department actioned to ensure that their disciplinary and consequence management processes are fair to their employees?

Reply:

a) The Department does not have any outstanding arbitration award to the amount of R 232 916.67 that is due to Mr Moodley’s family.

The Department received an arbitration award dated 27 July 2010, in respect of Manickum Moodley which ordered that: -

  1. Mr Moodley be paid a sum of R232 916.67 in outstanding salary for the period May 2009 to May 2010;
  2. The first payment to the amount of R154 028.60 was paid to Mr Moodley on 31 March 2011;
  3. The second payment to the amount of R288 061.50 was paid to Mr Moodley on 14 April 2011;
  4. Mr Moodley was paid a total amount of R442 090.10 which was outstanding salary payments.

b) The Department applies the Disciplinary Code and Procedures for the Public Service which is premised on the principles of prompt, fair and consistent, amongst others.

 

END

24 November 2022 - NW3546

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) On what date was Messina Attorneys appointed as a service provider for Alexkor and (b) what was the duration of the contract; (2) whether Messina Attorneys’ contract was renewed and/or extended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) whether it was done in terms of the (a) Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and (b) National Treasury regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to information received from Alexkor:

1. The interim CEO is reviewing all contracts approved by his predecessor, including the appointment of Messina Inc Attorneys. Until such time as all contracts have been reviewed and/or new procurement processes have been initiated, existing contracts have not been terminated provided that the service rendered meets requirements. The reality is that Messina Inc Attorneys represent Alexkor in all pending legal cases and handing over to a new legal service provider would be financially imprudent. Messina Inc Attorneys were appointed after participating in a tender for legal services in 2014. This tender was cancelled. The same tender was readvertised in 2015 and the procurement process was finalized in 2016. A Service Level Agreement was signed with a duration of 3 years terminating on 31 March 2020.

2. The former CEO of Alexkor extended the contract in 2020 for a period of one (1) year, terminating on 1 April 2021 and continued to use the services of Messina Inc Attorneys after this date and on the same terms and conditions as contained in the main service level agreement. This is still the case pending the review of all contracts.

3. The initial appointment of Messina Inc Attorneys was compliant with the Public Finance Management Act and Treasury Regulations.

Remarks: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane Pravin Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister

Date: Date:

24 November 2022 - NW3840

Profile picture: Essack, Mr F

Essack, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in light of the fact that the unprotected strike by workers at Transnet has severely impacted the mining and agricultural export industries, with estimates indicating that the loss may run into billions of rand, the Government will consider substantially increasing by up to 50% third party access to the Transnet rail network operations to protect the economy from future disruptions caused by illegal labour action; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

Normal weekly average volumes for Agriculture and Mining are 12 611 tons and 2 622 737 tons respectively. Over the strike period, the weekly average volumes for Agriculture stood at 10 033 tons, and 1 901 034 tons for Mining.

Third party access by itself is incapable of remedying industry or sector level employee strikes or protests. South African Labour Relations are governed by the Labour Relations Act, Basic Conditions of Employment Act and other related laws, policies and agreements concluded in formal bargaining structures.

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Jacky Molisane P J Gordhan, MP

Acting Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

23 November 2022 - NW4007

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What steps has she taken to preserve the dignity of young girls of school-going age who are menstruating and provide them with free sanitary towels?

Reply:

During the 2022/23 financial year, there is a budgetary allocation R225 million in equitable share allocation was given to provinces in order to supply sanitary pads to learners. In the event that a Provinces do not deliver on the mandate, it will not be due to the absence of the budget but due to provincial internal processes.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

23 November 2022 - NW3675

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Which mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that the online application system for school placements places learners in schools that are preferred by parents and not simply based on distance of the school from the place of residence of the family and/or learner?

Reply:

The online system prioritises place of residence, primary feeder school and place of work and not parental choice for placement of learners. Parental choice is considered after all qualifying learners have been placed. 

23 November 2022 - NW4013

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What measures did she and/or her Office put in place at grassroots level with the different stakeholders including Basic Education, Social Development and the SA Police Service to monitor the protection woman enjoy against the risks of being raped, murdered and becoming victims of genderbased violence?

Reply:

The Department is facilitating establishment of Gender Based Violence and Femicide Rapid Response Teams (GBVF RRTs) at Local and District Municipality levels. The purpose of these Multi Stakeholder GBVF structures is to coordinate supportive response to GBVF victims and GBVF Prevention initiatives in the Municipalities. The GBVF RRTs are made up of government departments (i.e. Department of Basic Education, Social Development, South African Police Services and other government departments that are key in the fight against the scourge of GBVF). The Civil Society Organisations and other government entities, like the Thuthuzela Care Centres and Victim Empowerment Centres are also represented in these Local Multi Stakeholder GBVF Structures.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

23 November 2022 - NW4009

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What monitoring steps has her Office taken to ensure that government departments reach the 3% target of employing person with disabilities in the Public Service?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

23 November 2022 - NW4221

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to the reply to question 3782 on 2 November 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with the names of all the like-minded civil society organisations and interest groups that are part and have formed the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group since its establishment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details (2) (a) how were the groups brought together and (b) were they brought together by her department; (3) whether there is a possibility that civil society organisations representing family values can form a working group with her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will she and her department support such organisations and consider their counsel?

Reply:

(1) The list of the like-minded civil society and interest groups that are part of the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group is enclosed.

(2) (a) Although the intention of the working group is to address all social inclusion matters, when it was established, it sought to address in the meantime the burning issue of socio-educational inclusion of diverse sexual orientation, gender identitiy, expression and sex characteristics.  Due to limited capacity internally at the Department of Basic Education (DBE), it was important to reach out to civil society organisations that work daily at the coalface of similar issues at school and community level, to ensure an efficient, effective, relevant and appropriate education sector response. Establishing a working group is recommended to maintain stakeholder relations.

(b) Yes

(3) The DBE has previously attempted to incorporate civil society organisations representing family values in the working group. However, this approach to group composition proved to be a challenge due to extreme differences in opinion. As such, the DBE has opted to openly engage with civil society organisations representing family values separately, as their voice is valuable and essential in addressing discrimination and oppression of children from a family values perspective.  These engagements have already begun.

23 November 2022 - NW4352

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What number of (a) learners make use of learner transport, (b) established transport routes are used by learner transports and (c) learner transport programmes are subsidised by her department (i) nationally and (ii) in each province in each case; (2) whether there are public-private partnerships to fund learner transport programmes and/or routes (a) nationally and (b) in each province; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what do the specified partnerships entail?

Reply:

1. Learner Transport Programme is a shared responsibility between the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Transport. The provisioning of learner transport programme is a provincial competency and the National Departments of Basic Education and Transport monitor the provisioning of learner transport programme in provinces.

Province

 (a) Number of Learners

(b) Learner Transport Routes

 (c ) subsidized by her department

 

       

 

EC

125071

1608

Learner Transport programme is funded through the equitable share allocations to provinces and not subsidized by DBE

 

FS

9524

397

 

 

GP

190857

677

 

 

KZN

73933

672

 

 

LP

57636

399

 

 

MP

69725

524

 

 

NC

25878

408

 

 

NW

64450

671

 

 

WC

64843

566

 

 

TOTAL

681917

5922

 

 

2. There are no Public Private Partnerships as the Learner Transport programme is funded through the equitable share allocations to provinces.

23 November 2022 - NW4012

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether she intends to implement any measures to advocate for funding of nongovernmental organisations working in the disability sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) engagements and (b) outcomes thereof?

Reply:

Yes, the department intends to advocate continually for funding of non-governmental organisations working in the disability sector.The Disability organisations are an important stakeholder and the department collaborates with the sector. Government departments through different initiatives do fund sector specific programs.

The Department of Women , Youth and Persons with disabilities in its work to advocate and mainstream for disability inclusion continually works and assists departments to establish and strengthen sector specific Disability Forums in line with department’s stakeholder management strategy. The Organisations of and for persons with disability are an important stakeholder for each and every department in planning and implementation of programs of and for persons with Disabilities.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

23 November 2022 - NW3872

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Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

With reference to the Auditor-General’s 2021-22 report on his department, (a) what steps are being taken to design and implement a National Action Plan to address the growing scourge of water losses in various parts of the Republic and (b) by what date will the specified plan be ready for implementation?

Reply:

a)  The Department acknowledges the deterioration of water and sanitation services at municipal level. The decline includes a growing trend on water losses and water use inefficiencies. In response to the decline, and along with the requirement by AGSA to develop an action plan, the Department is putting in place a Water Services Improvement Programme (WSIP) to strengthen its support and intervention at municipal level based on actual data or most available data. The aim of the programme is for the Department to ensure that support and intervention at municipal level is proactive, consistent, and systematic as opposed to current ad-hoc approach. In line with the WSIP, the Department has further established the Water Partnership Office (WPO) within the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA). The WPO has developed five standardized National Programmes for private sector participation in municipal water and sanitation services, to make it easier, quicker, and cheaper for municipalities to enter into partnerships, without having to ‘reinvent the wheel’ for each partnership. One of the five National Programmes within the WPO is Non- Revenue Water (NRW) programme aimed at implementing the Water Conservation and Water Demand Management and cost recovery programme focusing on reducing losses, reducing over consumption, and improving cost recovery

b) A part of the programme is being implemented; the intention is to roll it out Nationally in the next Financial Year (2023/24 FY)

---00O00---

23 November 2022 - NW4142

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister in the Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What steps will she take to ensure that the target of 3% set by the Minister of Employment and Labour in the past 15 years for the employment of persons with disabilities within the civil service is reached forthwith as persons with disabilities make up almost 7% of our population in the Republic?

Reply:

The monitoring mandate of the Department is a function concerned with tracking and reporting on progress and regress on targets as well as providing technical support on the development of National and Provincial Strategic Plans and Annual Performance Plans. These are key enablers to systemic changes to mainstream disability considerations.

There are currently engagements between the Department of Public Service and Administration, Department of Employment and Labour as well as the Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities regarding the employment equity targeting.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

23 November 2022 - NW4306

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, the guidelines for Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression and Sex Characteristics that her department is consulting on, would enable an inclusive and safe learning environment for all learners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the practical considerations for implementation to ensure that the culture and rights of all learners are protected and respected; (3) whether she has any concerns about the specified guidelines and/or their implementation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes

(2) Due consideration has been given to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa as the supreme law of the State, which prohibits violation of rights of all citizens.

(3) Human rights compliant education practice is an ongoing discourse; and the concern is that educators may not all be technically ready to implement the guidelines once published.  Therefore, the Department of Basic Education is working with the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC), South African Council for Education (SACE), Equal Education Law Centre (EELC), and the Commission on Gender Equality to ensure proper sensitisation of educators and school communities to circumvent this concern.

23 November 2022 - NW4005

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Considering that the report of the Auditor-General of South Africa on her Office highlighted the severe challenge of underspending which was flagged across all the programmes in the portfolio of her Office, which indicates a clear lack of strategic planning, how will she capacitate the human resource division in her Office to strengthen overall work performance?

Reply:

The Auditor-General of South Africa found that the underspending on Goods and Services in departmental Programmes was due to COVID-19 implications and not a lack of strategic planning or under-capacitated human resources. Given the suspension of all COVID-19 restrictions, the Department shall take all necessary measures to ensure that allocated funds are appropriately spent.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

23 November 2022 - NW4010

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) is the current status of the task team set up by her Office to explore options to manufacture sanitary products in-house to ensure that schoolgirls have access to free sanitary products as part of the Sanitary Dignity Programme of her Office and (b) are the relevant details of any findings and/or recommendations the specified task team has made in this regard to date?

Reply:

  • A National Task Team has been established and the following three departments are working in collaboration; Department of Women, Youth & Persons with Disabilities (DWYPD), Department of Small Business & Development (DSBD) and National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) for the sanitary dignity economic value chain program.
  • The project seeks to explore entry points and opportunities for increased participation of Women, youth, & Persons with Disabilities (WYPD) in the Sanitary Dignity Program (SDP) value chains.
  • The SDP Economic Value Chain is implemented in five sectors namely; Manufacturing, Procurement, Production, Distribution and Disposal.
  • The Final report (Business Case) has now been produced.
  • The next step is through DSBD is to ensure that the Business Case is to be costed with (NT) based on recommendations in the Business Case and to be ready for implementation in the 2022/23 Financial Year.

________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

23 November 2022 - NW4220

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, what (a) will be the process for the roll-out of the guidelines, (b) steps (i) will be taken and (ii) have been taken to prepare for the roll-out of the guidelines and (c) public participation process would be implemented for the guidelines with specific reference to the (i) timelines, (ii) publication and (iii) person to whom comments will be sent?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) will be collaborating with the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC), South African Council for Educators (SACE), South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC), School Governing Body (SGB) Associations, South African Principals' Association (SAPA), Education Faculties of Universities and Civil Society Organisations on a dissemination and sensitisation programme for schools.

(b)(i) As the document was endorsed by Council of Education Ministers (CEM), it will need to be re-tabled at CEM for final approval and publication, followed by a dissemination and sensitisation programme for schools.

(ii) The DBE has commenced consultations and engagements with relevant education stakeholders nationally.

(c) The DBE is currently in the process of consultations and engagements with relevant education stakeholders, working through Provincial Educations Departments (PEDs) and Education District Offices.

(i) The DBE is ambitiously aiming to conclude the consideration and incorporation of submitted comments by March 2023.

(ii) Due to delays already experienced in carrying out the consultations that are underway, the process may take a further three (3) months to June 2023 before publication.

(iii) Comments may be sent to SOGIESC@dbe.gov.za by 31 December 2022

23 November 2022 - NW4096

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What provisions have been made to curb the rising levels of violence at schools without overly securitising schools?

Reply:

1. National School Safety Framework

The Department has trained schools on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF) which is a guiding framework in addressing all forms of violent incidences in schools including gangsterism. The NSSF empowers schools to identify and manage all safety threats in schools, establish school safety committees comprising of stakeholders such as teachers, police officers, school governing body members and learner representative council members. Furthermore, The NSSF also empowers schools to develop incident reporting mechanisms, establish collaborations with external stakeholders such as the South African Police Service (SAPS), the Department of Social Development and civil society organisations, as well as develop school safety plans and policies to respond to safety challenges.

2. Protocol to Deal with Incidences of Corporal Punishment in schools

The Department developed and published a Protocol to Deal with Incidences of Corporal Punishment in schools to highlight the abolishment of corporal punishment in schools and to provide Provinces, Districts and schools guidance on how to deal with issues of corporal punishment. The protocol foregrounds the following areas:

  • The steps to be taken by provincial, district, circuit and school Senior Management Team (SMT) in reporting the incidents of corporal punishment in schools;
  • The complaints procedures are outlined and the measures to be taken at every level of the system are explicit and include the labour relations processes in response to perpetrators of corporal punishment as well as sexual abuse and harassment;
  • In line with the NSSF the Protocol further supports schools in ensuring safe and supportive learning environments that use protective behaviour, positive discipline, restorative justice and positive behaviour intervention support systems.

3. Protocol on the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools

The Department developed and published a Protocol on the Management and Reporting of Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Schools, which highlights the illegality of sexual harassment and abuse committed against children in schools, and to provide Provinces, Districts and schools guidance on how to deal with issues of sexual harassment and abuse in schools. The Protocol foregrounds the following:

  • The various key legislation that protect children against sexual harassment and abuse which include the Employment of Educators act, 76 of 1998, the South African Council for Educators Act 31 of 2000, the Children’s Act of 2005 and Criminal law (sexual offences and related matters) amendment act, 2007 act 32 of 2007;
  • The steps to be taken by provincial, district, circuit and school SMT  in reporting the incidents of sexual abuse and harassment in schools;
  • The key stakeholders that schools are required to work with in dealing with cases of sexual harassment and abuse in schools.

4. Partnership Protocol between the Department of Basic Education and the South African Police Service (SAPS)

The Department also has an established Protocol with SAPS to address crime and violence in schools The Protocol has enabled all schools to be linked to their local police stations, SAPS conduct searches and seizures in schools and conduct crime awareness campaigns in schools. Regularly, schools work with SAPS and local community police forums and social workers to address gangsterism issues. Constantly, searches and seizures of illegal drugs and weapons are done in schools and anti-gangsterism campaigns in collaboration with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development are conducted in schools.   

5. Inter-Departmental Campaign on the prevention of Violence, Bullying, Corporal Punishment, GBBV, Learner Pregnancy, Drugs and Substance Abuse

The Department and its partner Departments: Social Development, Justice and Constitutional Development, Correctional Services, the South African Police Service and the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies have also embarked on an Inter-Departmental Campaign on Violence Prevention. This Campaign raises awareness on issues such as the prevention of bullying, corporal punishment, gender-based violence, teenage pregnancy and drugs and substance abuse in schools. The Campaign has been championed by the Deputy Minister of Basic Education and is supported by other Deputy Ministers from the partner Departments. The Campaign has been targeting districts with high levels of crime and violence known as hot spots. The Campaign includes build up events that take groups of learners through priority content areas related to violence prevention.

Thus far, the Campaign has been rolled out in four provinces: Gauteng (Gauteng West District), Limpopo (Sekhukhune East District), Mpumalanga (Nkangala District) and the North West (Dr Kenneth Kaunda District).  The Campaign also involves Senior Management Teams, School Governing Bodies, learners, parents and ward councillors of the participating schools, in this way the Campaign is a whole school community engagement. The Department intends to continue rolling out the Campaign in other outstanding provinces during this financial year and into subsequent years.

Moreover, districts in collaboration with provincial education departments and civil society organisations also conduct regular awareness raising interventions that advocate for the prevention of violence in schools.  These provincial led programmes include school assembly talks, public debates and dialogues amongst learners.  The DBE monitors these awareness programmes through the District Monitoring of School Safety Programmes annually.

6. Codes of Conduct and Policies

The Department compels all schools to develop and adopt a code of conduct to address ill-discipline of learners. School codes of conduct are aligned with the Constitution of South Africa and child-protection legislation; and are communicated and adopted/ agreed to by all school stakeholders such as SMTs, School Governing Bodies and Learner Representative Councils. School codes of conduct are further supplemented by anti-bullying policies, alcohol and drug abuse policies which contribute towards creating safe and enabling environments in schools.  

23 November 2022 - NW4408

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister’s private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?

Reply:

a) (i) 13.

(ii) None, following the passing of the late Deputy Minister.

b) (i)

(ii)

Chief of Staff

level 14

Administrative Support and Coordination

level 13

Parliamentary and Cabinet Officer

level 13

Community Outreach Officer

level 11

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

level 11

Media Liaison Official

level 10

Speech Writer

level 10

Assistant Appointment and Administrative Secretary

level 9

Registry Clerk

level 7

Secretary/Receptionist

level 7

Driver/Messenger

level 5

Household Aide

level 5

Food Services Aide

level 3

b) (ii) In terms of the Protection of Personal Information Act, individual remuneration packages for each specified person cannot be disclosed. Accordingly, their salary levels are rather indicated.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

23 November 2022 - NW4011

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What are the relevant details of how the (a) R15 million allocated over the 2019-22 MediumTerm Expenditure Framework for the establishment of the National Council on Gender-Based Violence and Femicide was spent and (b) specified council will be funded once the relevant legislation for its establishment has been signed into law?

Reply:

(a) The R15 Million allocated over 2019 – 22 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework is spent on payment of salaries for the NCGBVF Secretariat and their operations of developing strategies, frameworks and plans to be utilized in the coordination and monitoring of the National Strategic Plan on Gender Based Violence and Femicide (NSP on GBVF).

(b) The Council’s main source of funding would be monies appropriated by parliament (National Treasury budget allocation) but other envisaged sources of funds include donations, contributions and monies received from any other source.

 

________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date:

22 November 2022 - NW4339

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

By what date will she verify figures given on the number of claims (a) lodged, (b) settled and (c) outstanding on labour tenants land claims; (2) whether a credible database exists which can verify such numbers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a),(b),(c) The verification process on the applications received was undertaken in 2001 by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) through the appointment of service providers, HSK Simpson and Lima.

(2) Yes. The outcome of the verification process resulted in the database that is being used by DALRRD in processing the labour tenant claims decentralized in all affected provinces.

22 November 2022 - NW4105

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) number of land claims that were instituted for land currently part of the Kruger National Park (KNP) by neighbouring communities of KNP are outstanding and (b) steps are being taken to address the specified claims?

Reply:

a) Five (5).

b) Four (4) claims have been settled in terms of Section 42D (financial compensation in lieu of lost improvements) but pending is the finalisation of implementation of the beneficiation scheme (post-settlement) facilitated by SanParks.

The 4 land claims are Gomondwane Community, Mahashi Community, Mhlanganisweni Community and Ngirivane-Mathebula Community

The 5th land claim was lodged by Phamneni Community has been published in the Government Gazette. The Commission on Restitution of Land Rights is in the process of appointing a service provider to conduct household verification and is targeted for settlement in the 2023/2024 financial year.

 

END

22 November 2022 - NW2605

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of times in each year since 1 January 2012 has the Director-General (DG) in her department undertaken an inspection of a communal property association or provisional association as envisaged in section 11(2) of the Communal Property Associations Act, Act 28 of 1996, in order to monitor compliance with the Act and the constitution of the associations thus inspected; (2) what number of requests have been received by the DG in her department under section 11 of the Act in each year since the 2012-13 financial year from members of a communal property association or provisional association?

Reply:

1. The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) conducts visits to CPAs as part of monitoring and/or inspecting for compliance with the Act on a continuous basis as provided in section 11(2) of the Communal Property Associations Act, 1996 (Act No. 28 of 1996). The results of these inspections are reflected in the CPA annual reports, including those referred to the Land Rights Management Facility:

Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

2022

Number of inspections

0

0

0

0

0

0

25

17

38

139

29

2. None. Section 11 of the Communal Property Associations Act, 1996 (Act No. 28 of 1996) does not make provision for requests from members of a communal property association or provisional association to the Director General. Section 11 of the Act provides for a communal property association or provisional association to furnish prescribed documents and information to the Director-General in order to enable him or her to monitor compliance with the provisions of the relevant constitution and the Act.

22 November 2022 - NW4165

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the status of the land claim on the farm Edenvale in the Graaff-Reinet district that was submitted by a certain person (name and details furnished) in 2008; (2) Whether the land claim has been registered in the name of the specified person; if not, (a) who was the successful claimant, (b) on what criteria were they successful and (c) on what date was the matter finalised?

Reply:

(1) The farm Edenvale, in the Graaf Reinet district, Eastern Cape Province, is not reflected in the database records of the land claims that were submitted before the cut-off date of 31 December 1998 nor in the database records of claims lodged during the 2014/2015/2016 lodgement period. No claim was lodged on this farm.

(2)(a),(b),(c) Falls away.

END

21 November 2022 - NW4129

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

With refrence to his reply to oral question 637 on 27 October 2022, which contains proposed estimates, what (a) was the exact pay-out amount for each claim lodged in the (i) 2020-21 financial years based on the merits of each case.7-, (b) measures has his department put in place to update the training of police officers so as to prevent similar claims in the future and (c) are the consequences that will be faced by the guilty police officers to hold them accountable and/or responsible for their actions?

Reply:

Find here: Reply

21 November 2022 - NW4222

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to the reply to question 3781 on 2 November 2022, what are the (a) requirements and/or (b) directives that came with the funding of the Socio-Educational Inclusion of Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Expression and Sex Characteristics programme; (2) whether her department applied for the specified programme; if not, was it simply offered to them; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department was given a mandate to be involved in such a programme; if not, what (a) is the position in this regard and (b) are the reasons that her department felt it was important to be involved in the programme; if so, by whom?

Reply:

(1) (a) the requirements for the UNESCO funding Socio-Educational Inclusion of Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Expression and Sex Characteristics programme were seeking services of a consultant to help the Department of Basic Education (DBE) draft guidelines for schools.

(b) there were no particular directives that came with the funding.

(2) The programme supports the realisation of Pillar 10 (a Rights-based Socially Cohesive and Inclusive School Environment) in the operational framework of the DBE on Care and Support for Teaching and Learning (CSTL). The intention is to ensure social justice and inclusion of previously marginalised minorities.

(3) The DBE is mandated by the Constitution to carry out this work. It is important for the education sector to be deliberate and intentional in addressing discrimination, prejudice and related intolerances that seem to prevent children from realising their inalienable right to education and undermine the constitutional gains of a democratic South Africa.