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13 October 2022 - NW2543

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Noting that most correctional centres are without functional electrical fences and flood lights, what measures have been taken by his department to fully insource the protection services of its correctional centres, without delegating responsibility to the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI)?

Reply:

All Protection services at correctional centres under the management of the Department of Correctional Services (DCS) are insourced not outsourced. The Department has further diversified the Infrastructure Procurement Strategy by appointing additional Implementing Agents to fast-track infrastructure projects, inclusive of maintaining fences and Integrated Security Systems (ISS) in order to be less reliant on DPWI.

During the 2021/2022 financial year the Department implemented contracts to maintain Integrated Security Systems (ISS) at prioritised correctional centres. These contracts included the maintenance of existing security fences which are equipped with detection systems.

In addition, under 2022/23 financial year, the Department has finalised the planning and design for the implementation of 36 month maintenance contracts on ISS. The tender was advertised during June 2022, and will be implemented by the Independent Development Trust (IDT). The proposed contracts will include the maintenance of security fences, access control systems, detection systems, monitoring systems and lighting systems. A 09 Kilometre perimeter fencing project at Mthatha Management Area, inclusive of a patrol road, is currently under construction, which is implemented by the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA).

Furthermore, on a frequent basis the Department conducts maintenance of fences under the auspices of the day-to-day maintenance allocation and in terms of the Capital allocation.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3306

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)By what date will the SA Social Security Agency (Sassa) home visit ban, which was instituted at the start of the COVID-19 lockdown, be lifted; (2) whether Sassa has done an assessment of their offices countrywide to assess personnel needs; if not, why not; if so, what total number of vacancies does Sassa have in each office in each province; (3) what are Sassa’s plans to capacitate its offices in order to address the (a) endless queues and (b) staff shortages?

Reply:

1. SASSA has returned to providing full services, within its capacity, since the lifting of the State of Disaster. There is no “ban” in place with regards to home visits.

2. As from 2021/2022; SASSA has done the assessment in terms of critical posts required to ensure that its operation and service delivery are not compromised; It must also be recorded that SASSA is undergoing transformation process whereby its businesses are reviewed for organizational effectiveness, responding to 4th Industrial technology requirements and to be in line with the current Strategic Plan 2020/2021 to 2024/2025. As a result of the above mentioned project, SASSA has established the Critical Post Committee which is responsible to ensure that critical posts are identified and funded. The identified critical posts would be presented to the Executive Committee for consideration and approval at the beginning of each financial year. In 2021/2022 there were 251 critical posts filled 2022/2023 financial there are 118 critical posts approved for filing, and in case the post becomes vacant within a financial year it would be replaced if it meets the description/criteria of being critical.

In view of the above mentioned processes, SASSA is able to manage the risks of ensuring that on one hand, service delivery is not compromised, and on the other hand, the filling of posts is based on needs until the Business Process Re-Engineering and organizational structure are in place with minimal or no labour challenges/disputes. Lastly, SASSA has the total of 7 642 filled posts as at 31August 2022.

3. (a) At present SASSA is experiencing slightly higher than normal applications in some of their offices, which may be as a result of the lower uptake during the COVID pandemic. Load shedding, which affects both network connectivity and other system availability also negatively impacts on the speed at which a client can be assisted.

As mentioned, front line staff are considered as critical posts and are prioritised for filling, however this is subject to available resources.

SASSA has also implemented an online application portal which aims to relieve some of the pressure on the queues in local offices.

(b) With regard to shortages of capacity, please note that critical posts are filled, and SASSA has not implemented a moratorium in filling posts. In the event an official vacates a posts; replacement is sourced with immediate effect, subject to recruitment processes. However, as with all other government departments, and the overall attempts by government to manage the public sector wage bill, the compensation of employees budget of SASSA are also subject to these reviews and has been cut significantly over the past few years. As mentioned, SASSA has prioritised front line staff over other posts in an attempt to continue to provide optimal services.

13 October 2022 - NW2865

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the (a) full details of the progress with regard to the R255 million Free State asbestos corruption case and (b) reasons that it has taken so long to arrest the former Head of the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements, Ms. Ann Diedricks?

Reply:

a) The Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicated that 13 accused have been charged by the State and are going to appear in the Bloemfontein High Court on the 23rd of September 2022. Amongst the individuals charged are the following: former HOD of the Department and three current employees namely the Chief Financial Officer, Chief Director responsible for Project Management and the Director responsible for Supply Chain Management.

b) The Gauteng Provincial Department of Human Settlements did not open a criminal case against the former Acting Head of the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements. The appropriate organ of state to respond to this Question is the Free State Directorate of Priority Crimes Investigation (DPCI) which is investigating the matter.

 

13 October 2022 - NW2763

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

(a) What total amount has his department spent on external consultants in the period 1 May 2019 to 31 May 2022?

Reply:

a) The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development spent R537 million on external consultants between 01 May 2019 and 31 May 2022, as depicted on the table below:

DEPARTMENTAL SPENDING ON CONSULTANTS FOR THE PERIOD 01 MAY 2019 31 MAY 2022

Description

Periods

Total

 

01 May 2019 - 31 March 2020

2020/2021 Financial Year

2021/2022 Financial Year

01 April 2022 - 30 May 2022

 

Department

R29 241 527.43

R30 552 650.95

R46 646 953.27

R4 968 853.16

R111 409 984.81

State Capture Commission

R222 144 229.73

R100 013 032.00

R103 414 189.44

R142 294.00

R425 713 745.17

Total

R251 385 757.16

R130 565 682.95

R150 061 142.71

R5 111 147.16

R537 123 729.98

13 October 2022 - NW2485

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Water and Sanitation

Whether he has been advised that (a) residents in Mkhuhlu, Ndubane, Mashonamini, Johnella, Madras and Buyelani in Bushbuckridge are reportedly dying of thirst due to the lack of a water supply and of the danger the situation is posing to the residents of the villages, (b) in 2018, as many as 5 000 standpipes and water meters were installed in the 40 villages in Bushbuckridge, but that the treated water does not reach the reservoir as farmers, residents and residents who recently got land from chiefs unlawfully tap into the bulk water pipe of 62 km, (c) half of the potable water is captured and (d) the municipality says they cannot stop the damage to state infrastructure and theft of water treated at a high cost; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the details of the steps he has taken in this regard; (2) whether the residents’ request for a borehole is receiving his attention; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) time frames that his department has set to act and positively address the request and (b) further relevant details in this regard. (3) whether he has found that the Bushbuckridge Local Municipality is failing to provide water to the villages; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a-c)The department has been advised that there are villages that do not have twenty-four hour access to water due to leakages caused by unauthorised and illegal connections, which also impacts the water pressure and adequate supply to villages. The municipality has a rationing programme in place to ensure that all residents have access to water. Bushbuckridge Local Municipality has been advised to implement the water conservation and water demand management and COGTA is part of the Task Team to ensure that it is implemented in order to ensure water availability to communities.

(d) The municipality has a duty to enforce its by-laws by ensuring that farmers and residents that have illegally connected into the water infrastructure are held liable through penalties to curb and regulate water consumption.

2. The Bushbuckridge Local Municipality has reported that there are two boreholes supplying villages in the Bushbuckridge area, furthermore, one is functional and the other one in the Buyelani Village, had to be decommissioned due to frequent vandalism. This village receives water through bulk water supply, although it is also impacted by the illegal connections. Once the Hoxani Bulk water scheme is finalised, water supply will improve in the long term.

3. As indicated above, the municipality is not able to meet the demand for water supply due to unauthorised connections and water losses. However, there is an ongoing project to replace the asbestos pipeline which is planned for completion in the 2024/25 financial year. The replacement of the asbestos pipeline with a steel pipeline will significantly reduce water losses and improve water supply to the area.

The municipality is also implementing a project to install an additional clear water pump at the Hoxane WTW which will increase the volumes pumped by the plant from 22 Ml/day to 31 Ml/day to the Ndonga reservoir that supplies the villages in Bushbuckridge. The Hoxani Bulk Water Supply Scheme project, which is due to commence at the beginning of 2023/24, will also improve water supply to the villages in Bushbuckridge when is completed. The completion of the Hoxani Bulk water scheme will increase the water supply to full capacity of 36 Ml/day.

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13 October 2022 - NW3290

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has been informed that the Health Professions Council of South Africa has refused to refund examination fees that it has charged repeat candidates (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what measures have been taken to rectify the issue?

Reply:

The Department has been informed that the Health Professions Council of South Africa is currently processing refunds for candidates that paid and were scheduled to take both components of the medical professions board examination (Theory and OSCE) but ended up taking only OSCE component.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW2901

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of shelters (i) are registered with her department and (ii) does her department support and (b) amount in terms of financial support does each shelter receive?

Reply:

a) The department of social development has a total number of 147 shelters

(i) There are 147 shelters, which are registered with the department of Social Development.

(ii) While 125 are run by non-governmental partners and are financially supported by the government.

b) These shelters received financial resources amounting to about R 700 million from government. Below is a table containing a breakdown of the shelters and the amounts distributed by provincial departments of social development between 2019-2023 financial year.

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF SHELTERS

BUDGET ALLOCATION

Financial Year

 

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

Eastern Cape

13

37 686 000.00

38 188 000.00

30 867 000.00

31 732 000.00

Free State

07

5 194 000.00

5 439 000.00

4 277 014. 09

4 214 044 .00

Gauteng

25

30 734 000.00

32 511 000.00

35 309 000.00

34 894 000.00

KZN

23

23 819 627.32

24 837 489.70

26 791 682.20

29 750 230.94

Limpopo

1 Funded

317 500.00

317 500.00

317 500.00

317 500.00

 

01 Government Run

   

4 108 000.00

12 541 000.00

Mpumalanga

22

21 598 000.00

18 098 000.00

24 251 000.00

25 218 956.00

North West

22

14 360 200.00

14 000 000.00

15 984 800.00

15 954 800.00

Northern Cape

07

5 894 078.82

6 191 880.00

7 631 292.77

8 107 000.00

Western Cape

26

26 462 976.00

37 706 606.00

33 572 256.00

32 569 409.00

Total

147

166 066 382.14

177 289 475.70

183 109 545.06

195 298 939.94

13 October 2022 - NW3036

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of departmental officials are (a) serving sentences for smuggling contraband into prison cells, (b) facing criminal charges and (c) facing internal departmental probes on smuggling contraband, but without formal criminal charges arising from a criminal case?

Reply:

a) There are three (03) officials serving sentences for smuggling contraband into prison cells as follows:

  • 02: Limpopo, Mpumalanga & North West (LMN) Region
  • 01: Eastern Cape Region (EC)

b) A total of 19 officials are facing criminal charges in the following regions.

  • 11 cases from KwaZulu-Natal Region
  • 03 cases from EC Region
  • 02 cases from LMN Region
  • 03 cases from Gauteng Region

c) The total number of officials facing internal departmental probes on smuggling contraband without formal criminal charges for the past two financial years including the current financial year as follows:

Financial Year

Total Number

2020/2021

34

2021/2022

104

2022/2023 (April-August 2022)

56

END

13 October 2022 - NW3089

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Department of Health in KwaZulu-Natal has taken up the offer made by the private health care groups to train more than 200 nurses to counter a threatening shortage of skills; if not, why not; if so, who are the private health care groups that have offered to train nurses in the specified province; (2) whether any of the other provincial health departments have collaborated with private health care groups in order to assist with the training of nurses; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) in which provinces has the partnership transpired and (b) what total number of nurses have been taken through the training courses?

Reply:

  1. The KZN Department of Health is not aware of any offer made to the Province by the Private Health Care Groups to train more than 200 nurses to counter a threatening shortage of skills. Instead the Province have granted permission and support letters to Private colleges to place their students in public health establishment for them to achieve the clinical training component which cannot be provided by the private nursing schools.
  2. None of the other provincial departments of health offer nurse training in collaboration with the private health care groups.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3357

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the ambulance-to-population ratio in George in the Western Cape and (b) plans have been put in place to provide more ambulances to George and other areas in the Southern Cape area?

Reply:

a) In the Western Cape resources are deployed based on District and Sub-District level rather than Local Municipalities. In this case they deploy resources to the Garden Route District. The population for the Garden Route District is 622 000. This equates to 0.3 ambulances per 10 000 population. The ambulance allocation per sub-district is as follows:

George 3

Knysna 2

Plettenberg Bay 2

Uniondale 1

Dysselsdorp 2

Oudtshoorn 2

Calitzdorp 1

Ladismith 1

Heidelberg 1

Riversdale 2

Mosselbay 2

b) The reality is that without a significant increase in the budget for compensation of employees the Western Cape province is unable to increase the number of ambulances. The Province is however, deploying several other initiatives to augment service delivery. These include:

  • Community-orientated Emergency Care underpinned by the Emergency First Aid Programme
  • Augmentation of provincial services with contracted private ambulance service

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3210

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in view of the important role that advanced nurse practitioners (ANPs) play in national and international health care (details furnished), what are the reasons that (a) the Government is not making more of a concerted effort to train more ANPs in an attempt to address the Republic’s health care system which continues to struggle with a shortage of doctors and (b) more posts that fully utilise the capacity of qualified APNs in the Republic are not prioritised in the Republic’s healthcare system?

Reply:

a) Training of specialist nurses, as referred to as ANPs in the question here above, has always been a priority for the national and provincial departments of health.  Accordingly 11 118 Clinical ANPs have been trained between 2017 and 2021. In addition all public colleges have prioritised ANP as part of new programmes which commenced in January 2020. Accordingly with finalisation of accreditation processes  by the Council of Higher Education ( CHE) it is anticipated that public nursing colleges will continue to produce ANPs.

In terms of the statement “attempt to address the Republic’s health care system which continues to struggle with a shortage of doctors” it is to be noted that doctors and nurses, including specialist nurses, have different scopes of practice and can thus not replace each other.

(b) All posts for health professionals including those that utilize the capacity of qualified APNs in the Republic’s healthcare system are prioritised to ensure that the required health skills mix is provided in all the levels of care.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW2545

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What specific measures does he have in place to address the issue of rising fuel prices in the Republic?

Reply:

Government was able to cushion the consumers at the height of these increases by selling strategic crude reserves as well as foregoing some revenue. In addition a 10 cent demand side management levy was removed for inland provinces.

13 October 2022 - NW3108

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of assessment doctors who have been contracted by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) have been assigned to service the areas of (i) George, (ii) Riversdale, (iii) Knysna, (iv) Mossel Bay and (v) Plettenberg Bay as at 1 June 2022 and (b) is the number of (i) new and (ii) existing Sassa beneficiaries who are currently on the waiting list to see a Sassa-contracted assessment doctor in the specified areas?

Reply:

a) As of 1 June 2022, the WC Region had a total of 7 provincially Contracted assessors, who may be shifted across areas of need should they agree. The table below reflects the current distribution of contracted doctors servicing the areas of George, Rieversdale, Knysna, Mossel Bay and Plettenberg Bay:

Service Area

No. of Servicing Dr/s

i) George

1

ii) Riversdale

1

iii) Knysna

1

iv) Mossel Bay

1

v) Plettenberg Bay

1

 

(b) If a client is reapplying for a lapsed disability grant (usually a temporary grant which has lapsed), the application is treated as new. Unfortunately SASSA’s information system does not segregate booked clients as new applicants or active beneficiaries.

As of 20 September 2022 the number of clients awaiting an assessment, in the listed areas, is indicated in the table below:

Service Area

Clients Awaiting Assessment

i) George

985

ii) Riversdale

None

iii)Knysna

None

iv) Mossel Bay

747

v) Plettenberg Bay

None

Total

1 732

13 October 2022 - NW2914

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms SA

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) With reference to the State of the Cities Report released earlier this year by the South African Cities Network, which indicates that 1 in 5 people in Johannesburg and Cape Town live in Informal settlements, and in my view of the fact that Cabinet has approved just over 14 000 hectares made up of 167 portions of land held by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure for release for human settlements development and the portions of land will be held by the Housing Development Agency, while the programme is aimed at providing the poor and marginalised access to land in urban areas. (a) What criteria will be used to allocate land, (b) on what date is it envisaged within this current financial year that the reported 7000 hectors of land will be released and (c) what plans does the Government have in place to ensure delivery of services to those who settle on the land?

Reply:

(1)(a) The identified and targeted land parcels are required for the implementation of various key human settlements programmes which include upgrading of informal settlements, rural housing programme, social housing, integrated residential development programme, title restoration programme (tenure upgrading) and the finance-linked individual subsidy programme. The respective programmes, therefore provide for criteria for allocation of completed units with preference being given to local qualifying beneficiaries residing within the specific localities where the projects are located.

The generic qualification criteria for housing subsidy and therefore land allocation are the following:

  1. A lawful resident of South Africa or in possession of permanent residence status.
  2. Legally competent to contract.
  3. Not yet benefited from government housing assistance.
  4. Married or cohabiting.
  5. Single with financial dependents, must reside permanently with the applicant.
  6. Single persons without financial dependents – apply for purchase of a vacant serviced site or rental accommodation.
  7. Monthly household income (proof of income required), R0 – R3500 for a full housing subsidy, R3501 – R 22 000 for a partial subsidy known as Finance Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (FLISP).

(1)(b) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has already released 2491 hectares of land located in all nine provinces and seventeen municipalities for human settlements development purposes.

DPWI targets to conclude the release of over 7000 hectares of land for human settlements by the end of the current financial year. Additional land parcels have also in the meantime been identified by various municipalities for human settlements development including emergency housing

(1)(c) The Housing Development Agency works with the respective municipalities and the provinces to ensure joint development planning of the released land parcels. This includes coordination and monitoring of infrastructure planning and budgeting for the required services to support human settlements projects.

13 October 2022 - NW2916

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

In view of the success of the social housing programme relies on, amongst other things, the creation of more sustainable social housing institutions and the development of mechanism for better social housing management, what (a) has her department done to (i) develop and capacitate social housing institutions and (ii) develop a mechanism for social housing management and (b) mechanism in place for the monitoring and evaluation of the social housing programme

Reply:

(a) (i) & (ii) Capitation and mechanisms are largely driven through Institutional Investment Grant (IIG) support which include training, incubation, and project packaging support summarised as follows:

Social Housing Training rolled out, nineteen (19) training sessions were conducted reaching over a thousand participants countrywide. Topics included Introduction to Social Housing, Planning and Project Packaging a Social Housing Project, Governance Training, Property Management and Social Housing Institution Accreditation Process training. To increase accessibility, reach and raise awareness the training has been converted to a series of short 5-10 minute videos available on the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) website.

Incubation Programme – in the 2021/22 financial, year, nine (9) Social Housing Institutions (SHI) received support under this multi-year programme. Two of these we successful in registering potential Social Housing Projects in the pipeline and received further grand funding to carry out project feasibility studies on these projects. One of these SHIs has since began with construction of the project and has been provided with legal support around contracting.

Pre-Accreditation Grant support – five (5) emerging companies are supported for Accreditation.

(b) Through compliance monitoring on the performance of institutions areas of poor performance and areas of improvement are identified. Tenancy audits and building condition audits undertaken by SHRA have led to the development and implementation of remedial action plans.

Failure to adhere to the remedial actions identified would then result in enforcing powers of intervention (section 12 of the Social Housing Act 16 of 2008) permits the SHRA to undertake forensic investigations and in instances where maladministration is identified seek for a high-court application to place the institution under administration.

The Social Housing Act 16 of 2008 specifies that the delivery of sustainable Social Housing requires participation of National Government, Provincial Government, Local Authorities, and the Regulator.

As a schedule 3A public entity, the SHRA under the Human Settlements portfolio is required to comply with the legislative prescripts such as the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 and the Department of Public Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) revised framework for Strategic and Annual Performance Plans. The National Department of Human Settlements is in the process of a mid-term review of its programmes.

13 October 2022 - NW3229

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total number of applications for the Social Relief of Distress Grant of R350 (i) are still pending and (ii) have been rejected in the past six months, due to alternative sources of income of the applicants and (b) are the reasons that the CashSend payment option is still not being utilised?

Reply:

(a)(i) The table below provides an indication of the number of clients who have applied for the provision and the number of clients who are on a pending status, per month from April to August 2022.

Period

Total Applications

Pending Status

April

8 148 777

-

May

10 602 246

-

June

11 369 799

-

July

11 823 675

455 836

August

12 179 270

97 766

All clients for the months of July and August who are still on a pending status are new clients who applied late in the respective month. The processing of their applications takes a bit longer as it includes additional first-time validations, such as the verification with Home Affairs for identification purposes etc.

(a)(ii) There are various reasons why clients are declined when applying for the grant, however, all of these reasons can be attributed to indicators that the clients may have a source of income.

These include being employed within government (checks against the Persal, Persol and GEPF databases), support received through NSFAS, accommodation within a government facility (such as a prison) and other indicators of employment such as employer’s contributions to UIF on behalf of the employee and or payment of taxes to SARS. In addition, the bank accounts of applicants are also checked to confirm whether or not there were funds above the threshold flowing into the account during the month.

The table below indicates the total amount of people who were declined on a monthly basis since April to August 2022:

Period

Total Declined

April

3 303 085

May

4 793 365

June

4 390 526

July

5 645 976

August

4 648 389

The table below shows the number of declines that relate specifically to the bank account checks that indicates whether or not the applicant has had a flow of funds above the threshold into their bank account relative to the month of assessment.

Period

Total Declined

Declined due to bank account checks

April

3 303 085

2 700 752

May

4 793 365

4 030 211

June

4 390 526

3 496 046

July

5 645 976

4 902 655

August

4 648 389

4 358 023

(b) The cash send option is still used and is an active payment method for client payment.

The same process, as with bank account verification (where bank account details are verified and linked directly to the applicant) is also followed for cellphone numbers.

Thus, cellphone numbers provided by clients for the payment of the provision are also subjected to identity and cell number verification processes.

This entails that SASSA needs to ensure that the client (identity number) and the cellphone number can be directly linked to each other. This will typically also be true when a client followed a RICA process for his/her cellphone.

This process has been concluded and all cash send payments where SASSA was able to directly link the cellphone number to the client was concluded.

The table below indicates the figures of cash payments made for the month April 22 to July 22.

Period

Clients who requested Cash Send

Successfully Verified (Linked client to Cell Number)

Client could not be linked to Cellphone Number

Clients Paid

% Paid

April

240,507

70,316

170,191

70,316

100%

May

380,548

101,967

278,581

101,967

100%

June

385,062

104,109

280,953

104,109

100%

July

401,405

100,165

301,182

100,165

100%

Where clients applied for cash send and whose cell phone number failed verification, they will have to provide SASSA with a bank account where SASSA is able to pay their money into as these clients typically have not followed the RICA process and it would be a risk to Government to pay these clients without definitive linkage between the client, their ID number and cellphone number.

13 October 2022 - NW3356

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

Which of the recommendations that were made to his department by the AuditorGeneral in the 202122 financial year were (a)(i) implemented and (ii) how were they implemented in each case and (b)(i) not implemented and (ii) what are the reasons that they were not implemented?

Reply:

The Auditor-General ‘s (AGSA) audit on National Department of Health (the department) for 2021-22 was concluded on 27 September 2022 which is when the final version of the audit reports were issued to the department. The timing of the parliamentary question preceded the issuing of the final version of the audit report to the department by AGSA. Furthermore, the department has just tabled its Annual Report 2021/22 that includes the 2021/22 AGSA’s Audit Report with recommendations. The departments Annual Report 2021/22 is also scheduled to be presented at the Portfolio Committee meeting scheduled for Friday, 14 October 2022.

The department is currently coordinating the process of ensuring that all the AGSA’s audit findings and recommendations are supported by proper management action plans to address the findings.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3346

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the dysfunctional sewerage plant that was pouring raw and contaminated sewerage into the Elands River, upon which thousands of persons rely for water for irrigation and daily use and which is spreading water borne diseases like Cholera, Dysentery and Hepatitis and many other diseases in the process, what interactions are being held with other departments, in particular the Department of Water and Sanitation, to assess and mitigate health disasters; (2) whether water sources are checked and tested to assess the (a) possible increase in COVID-19 and (b) the spread of other diseases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what measures are in place at a provincial level to regularly assess the water quality and other potential disease risks in vulnerable communities; (4) what number of patients in each district in Limpopo have been treated for possible water borne diseases in the past 12 months?

Reply:

1. Interactions are being held with other departments. Municipal Health Services Departments, led by Environmental Health Practitioners, with other sector Departments such as Department of Water and Sanitation in those areas of jurisdiction jointly assess potential health hazards and risks.

The Department of Health has developed the National Environmental Health Norms and Standards that further guides Municipalities on roles they should play to ensure that communities are not exposed to unsafe water including development of Municipal Water Quality Monitoring Plans against which routine water sampling is conducted. The National Department of Health further encourages and support Municipalities in conducting health Education to the communities affected including providing all other Municipal Health Services.

2. (a) Yes, wastewater is tested. Domestic water sources are not tested because SARS-CoV-2 is not spread by water.

The National Institute for Communicable Diseases (NICD), Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Durban University of Technology started testing wastewater for SARS-COV-2 in mid-2020, in collaboration with the Department of Health and Municipalities.

As a result, interested laboratories formed the South African Collaborative COVID-19 Environmental Surveillance System Network (SACCESS). The aim of the SACCESS is to create a network of stakeholders (including laboratories and municipalities) capable of testing wastewater for SARS-CoV-2 by standardised methodology to support tracking of the COVID-19 pandemic across South Africa.

Results of wastewater based testing for communicable diseases in influent sewerage reflect the health status of the population, and proves helpful in monitoring effects of SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. SARS-CoV-2 is not transmitted by wastewater and untreated wastewater influent is not regarded as infectious for SARS-CoV-2. Data from testing of wastewater has been made available in South Africa through the NICD-led South African ‘SACCESS’ network and has contributed to developing COVID-19 response plans.

(b) Municipalities’ environmental health services are required to develop water quality monitoring plans in accordance with the National Environmental Health Norms and Standards for Environmental Health. These plans include, monthly domestic water quality monitoring plans including water borne diseases environmental surveillance, include cholera monitoring amongst others.

3. District and Metropolitan Municipalities’ environmental health services are required to develop water quality monitoring plans in accordance with the National Environmental Health Norms and Standards for Environmental Health. These plans include, the requirements for monthly domestic water quality monitoring supplies in terms of microbiological and chemical quality of water for fitness for human consumption for water services and non-water services authorities.

Sampling is focused on water supplies that are likely to pose risk to human health.

In the event of non-compliance with water quality standards, sampling frequency is increased (for example to 4 (four) samples per month).

Monitoring of water sources is accompanied by the necessary community education.

(4) The following information is supplied by the Limpopo Department of health. The most recent period for which data is available is August 2021 – July 2022.

Below is a table that indicates the number of cases of water-borne diseases that were treated:

Table: Diarrheal cases by district for last 12 months from Aug 2021 to Jul 2022 District

District

Waterborne disease

Number of case treated

Capricorn

Cholera

0

 

shigellosis

1

 

Typhoid

2

Mopani

Cholera

0

 

shigellosis

0

 

Typhoid

0

Sekhukhune

Cholera

0

 

shigellosis

0

 

Typhoid

0

Vhembe

Cholera

0

 

shigellosis

0

 

Typhoid

2

Waterberg

Cholera

0

 

shigellosis

0

 

Typhoid

0

Total

 

5

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3359

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of (a) applications for the R350 Social Relief of Distress grant were declined because of the Grant qualification threshold and (b) appeals were successfully processed in the past year?

Reply:

(a) The table below shows the number of declines that relate specifically to the bank account checks that indicates whether or not the applicant has had a flow of funds above the threshold into their bank account relative to the month of assessment.

Period

(2022)

Total Declined

Declined due to bank account checks

April

3 303 085

2 700 752

May

4 793 365

4 030 211

June

4 390 526

3 496 046

July

5 645 976

4 902 655

August

4 648 389

4 358 023

(b) The following table provides the number of reconsiderations successfully processed (approved) in the previous year (2021/22).

Month

Approved Reconsiderations

August-2021

676 236

September-2021

496 445

October-2021

400 689

November-2021

294 649

December-2021

211 494

January-2022

258 309

February-2022

271 176

March-2022

215 092

13 October 2022 - NW3270

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) ratio for physio and/or biological to psychiatric and/or psychological healthcare services in public health facilities nationally and (b) breakdown of the ratio in each province; (2) what is the ratio for physio and/or biological to psychiatric and/or psychological healthcare workers in the Republic?

Reply:

The National Department requests the Honourable Member to rephrase the question in a clear manner for the Department to assist in responding. The question is not clear and it is difficult to provide a response.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3149

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) total number of persons have unduly benefited from receiving social grants through fraud and/or corruption in the past 10 years and (b) is the breakdown of the number in each year; (2) what (a) amount was stolen by the individuals who unduly benefited from social grants in the past 10 years and (b) is the breakdown of the amount in each year?

Reply:

(1) a) For the period referred to in the parliamentary question from 2012/2013 to 2021/2022 financial year, 1174 persons were suspected to have unduly benefited from the social grant system leading to cases referred to law enforcement.

b)The breakdown of the number of persons who unduly benefited

No

Year

Beneficiaries

Offic

ials

Money Lenders

Other

1

2021/22

-

50

-

-

2

2020/21

17

20

-

-

3

2019/20

 83

16

3

 

4

2018/19

 73

 52

 

1 CPS Official

6 Public Works Officials

5 Former SASSA Officials

5

2017/18

 38

195 

53

7 private person

1 CPS

6

2016/17

 1

 22

-

3 Private Persons

7

2015/16

 9

 337

 

5 Doctors

5 Private persons

3 Former SASSA Officials

8

2014/15

 -

 3

64

16 Private Persons

2 CPS Officials

9

2013/14

 -

 56

-

 

10

2012/13

 -

10 

-

03 Former SASSA Official

15 Agents/Tout

 

Subtotal

221

761

120

72 Private persons

 

TOTAL

1174

2 a) The total potential loss is projected at R536 683 179.12. Some of the cases are not yet finalised to come to full determination of the actual loss.

b) The breakdown of potential loss in each year

No

Year

Potential Loss

Budget Amount

Loss as a %

1

2021/2022

R 23 141 386.15

R 221,716,422,608.00

0.010%

2

2020/2021

R 8 554 573.60

R 195,516,422,608.00

0.004%

3

2019/2020

R 6 861 156.50

R 175,155,593,000.00

0.004%

4

2018/2019

R 215 402 889.89

R 162,960,723,000.00

0.132%

5

2017/2018

R 6 886 687.94

R 151,580,232,000.00

0.005%

6

2016/2017

R 75 085 055.62

R 140,498,691,000.00

0.053%

7

2015/2016

R 14 712 807.44

R 129,818,278,000.00

0.011%

8

2014/2015

R 59 203 282.32

R 120,952,101,000.00

0.049%

9

2013/2014

R 109 949 555.00

R 113,006,841,000.00

0.097%

10

2012/2013

R 16 885 784.66

R 104,887,916,000.00

0.002%

Total

R 536 683 179.12

R 1,516,093,220,216.00

0.034%

 

13 October 2022 - NW3205

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How does his department intend to bridge the knowledge skills gap that is due to the fact that some of the drugs that are used in government hospitals for the management of haematology and oncology are between 20 and 30 years old and that, due to the use of the outdated drugs, specialist doctors who are training in government hospitals are not exposed to modern medicine practices, resulting in the doctors turning to the private sector in order to be exposed to training with access to adequate therapeutic options; (2) with approximately 70% of the Republic using the public health care system, what budget is available to ensure that modern treatment options are updated to the benefit of the people of the Republic?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health (NDoH) is committed to improving the health status of all South Africans. The ministerially appointed National Essential Medicines List Committee (NEMLC) consider medications for inclusion on the Essential Medicine List (EML) based on priority conditions within the country, taking into consideration the clinical need, evidence of efficacy, quality, safety, affordability and implications for practice.

The review of medicines for inclusion on the EML and use in the public sector is a dynamic process, with disorders/medicines being reviewed continuously based on factors including the changing clinical need, emerging clinical evidence, availability of new medicines, price of medicines. This has been demonstrated with the approval of newer agents on the EML such trastrastuzumab and bortezomib in the management of breast cancer and are both available in the public sector.

Although a number of the agents used in the field of haematology and oncology are 20 to 30 years old, these agents are established effective therapies considered standard of care for particular indications in these fields.

Cost-effectiveness, affordability and security of supply of these newer agents is often the reason why they are not considered for use in both the private and public sectors.

The private sector is also often limited by the price of these newer agents, and may only be able to use them in situations where medical schemes cover portions of the costs, with large co-payments are made by individuals out of pocket. The availability of generic and biosimilar agents will promote competition driving down the prices of these newer agents for consideration for widespread public health use.

Both undergraduate and postgraduate trained clinicians in the fields of medical oncology and clinical haematology are exposed to modern therapeutic options. Additionally, exposure to use of these agents is often gained through work in clinical trials and access programmes.

2. Treatment options that are currently provided in the South African public sector are based on available evidence as described above.

The current budget for medicines is approximately R 20 billion, with an additional budget allocation per province for more modern therapeutic options in the National Tertiary Services Grant.

MEDICINE BUDGET

R Thousands

Main Budget 2022/23

Provinces

 

Eastern Cape

2,067,531

Free State

1,020,160

Gauteng

5,117,929

Kwazulu-Natal

4,535,574

Limpopo

1,499,518

Mpumalanga

1,793,290

Northern Cape

415,010

North West

1,215,842

Western Cape

1,876,983

Total

19,541,837

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3160

Profile picture: Horn, Mr W

Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the functionality of the (a) court recording technology and (b) closed-circuit television systems were fully functional in respect of each sexual offences court in the Republic on 1 June 2022; if not, what steps are being taken to restore the court recording technology and closed-circuit television to its full functionality; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) which sexual offences courts in the Republic are not benefitting from the services of a full-time specialist interpreter who has received training on child development and working with persons with a mental disability and (b) what plans are in place in order to ensure that each of the courts benefits from the services of a full-time specialist interpreter?

Reply:

1. I wish to acknowledge the challenges that the Department has in ensuring that the Court Recording Technology (CRT) and Sexual Offences Courts’ Systems (SOS), are fully maintained and functional. The Director-General and his Team are working very hard to restore functionality, ensure that relevant technology is available in courts, and ensure that courts are functional. Meetings with relevant Departmental officials, in the National and Provincial Offices, and the current service provider (Datacentrix), are held on a weekly basis to strategically discuss challenges and progress on the project.

a) As at 1 June 2022, there were 1 566 functional CRT machines (77%) and 548 non-functional machines (23%). As of 10 September 2022, 1 794 machines were fully functional (88%) as compared to 230 (12%) that are non-functioning.

b) The number of SOS, that were functioning on 1 June 2022, were 270 (67,8%), and 128 (32,2%), were non-functioning. As of 10 September 2022, 319 (80,2%) SOS were fully functioning, and 79 (19,8%) were not functioning.

Between July 2022 and August 2022, 50 SOS court rooms were upgraded from old to new technology (SOS), and in those courts, the systems are stable. 110 SOS court rooms have been identified for the next phase of the upgrade. The Project is anticipated to be completed by 31 December 2022, where-after all problematic SOS court rooms will be fixed.

The Alternative SOS Solution, that has been considered and is being used by some Provincial Offices, is an attempt to temporarily substitute the normal SOS in the Courtrooms by utilizing the below IT equipment:

  • Video-Conferencing Capable Laptops – These devices are meant to connect the Intermediary room and the court room together utilizing two (2) laptops that have built-in camera, microphone and a wireless adapter to ensure that child victims can be both seen and heard during testimony by court participants, and most importantly recorded during the session.
  • The other supporting equipment used are lapel microphones (clip-on microphone) for the child victim and headphones with a mouthpiece for the intermediary officer – these ensure sound is carried from both the intermediary officer and child victim into the court.
  • The other supporting equipment used in the solution, is the conferencing speakerphones (conference microphone) – This is used to pass/communicate testimonies into the working CRT or alternatively used to record sound from the intermediary and other present court participants into an actively recording laptop via the built-in voice recorder app.
  • The platform that is being used to connect the two rooms together is, MS Teams (other Video-conferencing platforms can be used but since this solution is being paid for in-house, that is why Kwa-Zulu Natal chose to use it).
  • In closing, other video-conferencing solutions are currently being explored and tested and the above is subject to change, if other cheaper/ cost effective means are found to be stable and efficient.

2. I wish to inform you that the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act, 2021 (Act No. 13 of 2021), does not specifically provide for the appointment of specialist interpreters. However, I wish to inform you as follows:

a) There are no posts created for Special Court Interpreter for the Sexual Offences Courts. Currently, the placement of interpreters in Sexual Offences Courts and matters involving children, people with disabilities and other vulnerable witnesses are mainly based on experience, character and demeanor of the Interpreter.

b) The Department, working closely with the Judiciary and Prosecutors, will design a programme that will be offered to Sexual Offences Courts’ Interpreters. This programme will focus on issues such as child development, needs of people with disabilities and complexities relating to sexual offences.

13 October 2022 - NW3154

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of (a) bursaries and (b) scholarships have been awarded for the Nelson Mandela Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme in each of the past five financial years; (2) what is the (a) total number of students in the specified programme for 2022 and (b) breakdown of the specified members in each province; (3) what is the (a) total cost of the programme, (b) breakdown of the cost in each province, (c) total amount to be transferred and (d) breakdown of the amount in each province?

Reply:

1. The following is the status of awarding of bursaries and scholarships for the (8) Provincial Departments of Health participating in the Nelson Mandela Fidela Castro Medical Collaboration Programme.

  • 2017/2018 no bursaries and scholarships were awarded
  • 2018/2019 no bursaries and scholarships were awarded
  • 2019/2020 only Northwest awarded four (4) bursaries
  • 2020/2021 no bursaries and scholarships were awarded
  • 2021/2022 no bursaries and scholarships were awarded

2. (a)-(b) There is a total number of 702 students in the specified programme for 2022 also broken down in tables below:

Table 1 below indicates that a total of 103 students were integrated into the Universities in South Africa in July 2022.

Table1: Students integrated in 2022 into South African Universities

Province

UCT

UL

UP

SMU

WITS

WSU

Total

EC

1

0

0

0

2

5

8

FS

0

1

1

0

0

0

2

GP

5

0

4

1

6

1

17

KZN

3

3

1

2

1

3

13

LP

3

14

2

1

2

2

24

MP

4

2

6

2

5

5

24

NC

1

0

1

0

0

0

3

NW

3

3

1

2

1

3

13

SA

8

20

23

16

17

19

103

Table 2 below indicates that a total of 466 students were integrated into the Universities in South Africa in July 2021 and are currently completing their programme.

Table 2: Students integrated in 2021 and in Universities 2022

Province

SMU

SU

UCT

UFS

UKZN

UL

UP

Wits

WSU

Total

EC

2

 

1

3

3

1

2

8

5

25

FS

1

 

 0

 0

1

2

GP

12

5

5

12

20

1

10

52

6

123

KZN

3

3

2

2

7

3

4

13

7

44

LP

12

5

4

4

17

11

9

37

15

114

MP

7

4

3

11

6

3

10

22

6

72

NW

8

1

4

3

6

3

8

14

10

57

NC

5

2

2

7

1

3

5

4

 

29

SA

50

20

21

42

60

25

48

151

49

466

Table 3 below indicates that 94 students are repeating some modules in 2022 in South African Universities.

Table 3: Students repeating in 2022

Province

UCT

UL

UP

SMU

WITS

WSU

SU

UFS

UKZN

Total

EC

0

1

0

0

5

4

0

2

1

13

FS

0

0

1

2

1

1

1

3

0

9

GP

0

0

0

2

8

2

0

0

0

12

KZN

1

1

3

2

2

3

2

1

5

20

LP

0

1

2

2

6

0

0

2

0

13

MP

0

0

2

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

NC

1

0

3

0

0

0

1

1

0

6

NW

1

3

1

5

3

0

2

3

1

19

SA

3

6

12

13

25

10

6

12

7

94

Table 4 below indicates that 37 students are currently in Universities in Cuba Universities.

Number of students in Cuba in 2022

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

0

Free State

0

Gauteng

8

KwaZulu-Natal

8

Limpopo

5

Mpumalanga

5

Northern Cape

2

North West

9

Total

37

3. (a) Total cost of the Programme

Costs for Cuba

This is a Scholarship Programme which is jointly funded by both Governments. The fixed cost per student per year, depending on the Rand/Dollar Exchange Rate at the time of transfer, is reflected below:

  • Preparatory (one year) : $2000.00 per students
  • 1st – 5th Year (per student) : $5000.00
  • Stipend (per student per year) : $2400.00
  • Additional costs include two return flight tickets during six years and additional flight ticket in case of death of immediate family member. The tickets cannot be costed as it also depends on the Rand/Dollar Exchange at the time.

The Expanded Training Programme (ETP) which is wholly funded by the South African Government is reflected in the table below:

Table: 5

Level

Tuition Fees

Meals and Accommodation

Ave. cost Med. Ins.

Stipend

TOTAL

Preparatory

$6000.00

$6022

$450

$2400.00

$14, 872.00

1st – 2nd Year

$12, 500

$6022

$500

$2400.00

$21, 422.00

3rd – 4th Year

$11, 500

$6022

$500

$2400.00

$20, 422.00

5th Year

$13, 500

$6022

$600

$2400.00

$22, 522.00

Costs for integration in the local Universities

Tuition fees charged by South African universities during the integration since inception until 2018 varied from one university to another. After the agreement was signed with local universities, the cost of integration per student has been standardised since July 2018 and adjusted according to annual Consumer Price Index. Students have to be in the clinical training platform for 18 months. This translates to three (3) semesters. Additional costs include transportation of the final year students to local universities which depends on the mode of transport and distance to the university.

  • July 2018 – June 2019 : R231 325.00 (R115 662.50 per semester).
  • July 2019 – June 2020 : R241 734.63 (R120 867.31 per semester).
  • July 2020 – June 2021 : R252 612.68 (R126 306.34 per semester).
  • July 2021 – June 2022 : R260 696.28 (R130 348.14 per semester).
  • July 2022 – June 2023 : R277 641.54 (R138 820.77 per semester).

(b)(c)(d) The information below indicates total cost by provincial breakdown, by number of students and amount to be transferred by each province to South African University for the specified period.

Eastern Cape Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

25

R3 450 967.01

 

8

R 2 208 618.88

R 5 659 585.89

Free State Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

1

R138 038,68

 

2

R552 154,72

R690 193,40

Gauteng Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

120

R 16 564 641,60

 

17

R 4 693 315,12

R 21 257 956,72

KwaZulu Natal Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

43

R5 935 663,24

 

13

R3 589 005,68

R9 524 668,92

Limpopo Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

112

R 15 460 332,16

 

24

R 6 625 856,64

R 22 086 188,80

Mpumalanga Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

68

R 9 386 630,24

 

24

R 6 625 856,64

R 16 012 486,88

Northern Cape Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

30

R4 141 160,40

 

3

828 232,08

R4 969 392,48

Northwest Department of Health

FOURTH COHORT - Third Semester- July to December 2022

 

FIFTH COHORT - First & Second Semester - July 2022 to Jun 2023

Total No of Students

Total Cost

 

Total No of Students

Total Cost

Grand Total to be transferred

57

R7 868 204,76

 

13

R3 589 005,68

R11 457 210,44

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3234

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Following his visit to Kalafong Hospital after the reported xenophobic attacks against patients assumed to be foreign nationals and patients who did not carry identification documents, (a) what is the outcome of his visit to the specified hospital and (b) how did hospital management take accountability for the flouting of security requirements and expectations?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Health conducted site visit to the hospital on Thursday, 01 September 2022, and interacted with facility management to assess the impact of protests on health service deliver, local SAPS authorities to understand their role in enforcing the court interdict and leaders of the Operation Dudula to understand their concerns.

a) During this meeting an agreement was reached that the protests should end with immediate effect, and all concerns should be raised through proper channels, instead of protests action that will affect service delivery. The protest was called-off.

b) After Kalafong hospital management was alerted of the disruption of free access to the hospital, hospital security and SAPS members were deployed to ensure free access to the hospital.

2. Secondly, the hospital management applied for an urgent court interdict against the protesting organization. A Court interdict preventing disruption to free access to the hospital was subsequently granted.

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3055

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) form of support will her Department provide to i) non-governmental organizations and ii) civil society organizations for the acceleration of sustainable and integrated human settlements and (b) what opportunities does her Department provide to the sector to participate in the acceleration of human settlements?

Reply:

(a) (i) The current housing and human settlements policy framework makes provision for various roles that Non-governmental Organizations (NGOs), as well as Civil Society Organizations (CSOs), can and do play within the human settlements value chain. This is evident in the role played by the sector in the implementation of the People’s Housing Process (PHP) programme. In various Provinces and Municipalities, NGOs and/or CBOs are participants in the housing delivery process either as support and/or as community resource organisations. The current grant framework for the Informal Settlements Upgrading Grant now also allows for NGOs and CBOs to form part of the implementing teams when an informal settlement is upgraded.

(ii) The NGOs and CBOs provide the necessary support to communities, provinces, and municipalities in various programmes, and this includes social facilitation. The policies allow for the conclusion of social compacts and partnership agreements to be concluded signed with the CSOs and NGOs, to allow for the sector to be part of the delivery of human settlements. Our various policy and legislative reviews also ensure that the sector is consulted and assists in the development and review of human settlements legislation and policies.

(b) The Department has constantly held consultations and engagements with the sector to ensure that they continue supporting Provinces and Municipalities in the implementation of human settlements programmes.

Based on various Memoranda of Understanding (MoU), Social Compacts and Partnership Agreements signed with the Sector in past years, a number of CSOs and NGOs continue to support provinces, municipalities and communities in the delivery of sustainable integrated human settlements.

Among the opportunities created by the Department for sector participation in the housing and human settlements delivery chain, and include:

  • The sector has worked with the Department, Provinces and Municipalities to build the capacity and empowerment of communities, promote active citizenry, and provided support to these communities in Provinces/Municipalities that implement the PHP programme.
  • Some of the CBO and NGO sector partners are involved in the enumeration and profiling of beneficiaries within settlements and the feedback assists Provinces in planning for the upgrading of informal settlements.
  • The sector partners are also involved in re-blocking which entails that prior to a settlement being upgraded with infrastructure and services, the settlement is reordered in terms of an approved or draft layout plan. This also allows households to access emergency health services as well as collection and provision of interim municipal services.
  • During the period of the recent COVID-19 pandemic, NGOs and CSOs supported the Department, Provinces, and Municipalities in the identification of informal settlements without water and sanitation and ensured that such settlements are provided with these basic services. The sector partners also supported provinces and municipalities in the distribution of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in informal settlements.

One of the outcomes of the 2022 Human Settlements Indaba, is that the Department will intensify and resuscitate quarterly engagement sessions with the sector to monitor and oversight various agreements and commitments made with regard to the sector involvement in the housing and human settlements delivery chain.

 

13 October 2022 - NW3090

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to shooting incidents taking place within public health care facilities, (a) what is the procedure of taking a prisoner to a hospital for health care, (b) what are the responsibilities of the health care facilities assigned to the SA Police Service members while at the facility, (c) to whom do they report if they have to suddenly leave and (d) what are the strategic guidelines of the whole process from the prisoner leaving prison to the time he/she is returned after receiving health care; (2) what (a) total number of violent incidents have been recorded at each public health care facility in the past five years and (b) are the relevant details of each violent incident; (3) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a list of facilities where the violent incidents have occurred; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)        The following table reflects the details in this regard.

North West

(1)

(a) what is the procedure of taking a prisoner to a hospital for health care,

(b) what are the responsibilities of the health care facilities assigned to the SA Police Service members while at the facility

(c) to whom do they report if they have to suddenly leave

(d) what are the strategic guidelines of the whole process from the prisoner leaving prison to the time he/she is returned after receiving health care;

The prisoner warden / guard accompanies the patients in health facilities and stay with them through out until they leave the health facility.

  • SAPS / Correctional Services takes care of prisoners as outpatients and inpatients.
  • During consultation, they are being prioritized, as they do not follow the queue. When admitted they are under-guard by SAPS/Correctional Services
  • The Correctional Service department make prior arrangements with the hospital for the retrieval of files and immediate medical treatment at Casualty and out patients departments.

 

Operational Manager, doctor, nurses and security

Procedure lies with the department of Correctional Services. However, the responsible nurse from Correctional Services Facility will arrange a booking at the hospital in advance. The hospital will retrieve the prisoner’s file 2 days before the actual date of appointment.

 

Once in the facility, the prisoner will be processed while balancing the rights of the other patients and that of the prisoner. The prisoner remains under guard right through every step of care until the last working station which is pharmacy and exit the facility.

 

(2)        The response is as follows:

 

(2)

Facility

what (a) total number of violent incidents have been recorded at each public health care facility in the past five years

and (b) are the relevant details of each violent incident;

Klerksdorp / Tshepong Hospital

6

  • 03/02/2022 at 02:45, a mentally disturbed patient fought with the nurse and security officer at Casualty.
  • 06/03/2022 at 02:20, a patient fought with the security at casualty and broke the window.
  • 22/03/2022 at 11:40, a gang brought their friend with a gunshot wound, when the Doctors referred their friend to Tshepong they threw tantrums.
  • 19/06/2022 at 01:00, two armed men gained access to the doctor’s quarters and robbed doctors.
  • 15/08/2022 at 20:00, a gangster was shot and brought to Tshepong Hospital, other gang members followed him to the hospital to try and finish what they started. SAP had to be called for assistance.

13/08/2022, there was an attempt to abduct a female Doctor at the doctor’s quarters, guards fired four shots and the intruders ran away.

 

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

None

 

Mafikeng Provincial Hospital

5

House breaking with force entry

Robbery at gun point

Employees fight using a child

Theft using force

Gang fights

 

Potchefstroom Hospital

4

A psychiatric patient stabbed a nurse

One patient was followed by others to finish him

Another psychiatric patient attacked the security guard and a nurse

A family who wanted to enter the hospital by force and slapped the security guard.

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

2022 – Two (02)

2021-2018 - None

2022 (01) – Intoxicated patient physically assaulted nursing staff in Casualty.

2022(02) – Staff member physically assaulted in Radiology Department due to person grievances not pertaining to work. 

Witrand Hospital

0

None

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

0

None

Klerksdorp / Tshepong Hospital

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

Mafikeng Provincial Hospital

Potchefstroom Hospital

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

Witrand Hospital

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

The hospitals have electricity backup (Generator) which only covers clinical/patient areas, Load shedding affects areas that are not on backup as follows:

  • Safety issues (break-ins, opportunistic theft, attacks, etc.)
  • Communication breakdowns (non-availability of systems such PERSAL, BAS, Walker, emails, internet, etc), delay in capturing of invoices.
  • Damage to equipment’s
  • High costs incurred on fuel
  • Water interruption due to the water pumps filling water slowly in the reservoirs 

 

 

         

 

 

Northern Cape:

(1)

(a) what is the procedure of taking a prisoner to a hospital for health care,

(b) what are the responsibilities of the health care facilities assigned to the SA Police Service members while at the facility

(c) to whom do they report if they have to suddenly leave

(d) what are the strategic guidelines of the whole process from the prisoner leaving prison to the time he/she is returned after receiving health care;

The prisoner warden / guard accompanies the patients in health facilities and stay with them through out until they leave the health facility.

  • SAPS / Correctional Services takes care of prisoners as outpatients and inpatients.
  • During consultation, they are being prioritized, as they do not follow the queue. When admitted they are under-guard by SAPS/Correctional Services
  • The Correctional Service department make prior arrangements with the hospital for the retrieval of files and immediate medical treatment at Casualty and out patients departments.

 

Operational Manager, doctor, nurses and security

Procedure lies with the department of Correctional Services. However, the responsible nurse from Correctional Services Facility will arrange a booking at the hospital in advance. The hospital will retrieve the prisoner’s file 2 days before the actual date of appointment.

 

Once in the facility, the prisoner will be processed while balancing the rights of the other patients and that of the prisoner. The prisoner remains under guard right through every step of care until the last working station which is pharmacy and exit the facility.

 

(2)       

 

(2)

Facility

what (a) total number of violent incidents have been recorded at each public health care facility in the past five years

and (b) are the relevant details of each violent incident;

Windsorton Clinic

1 – 2018

  • Nurse assaulted by psychiatric patient (outpatient) – waiting too long to receive medication.

RMSH A&E

5 – 2018

6 – 2019

5 – 2020

3 - 2021

 

  • Patient assaulted nurse (shocked death of family member and way nurse relayed message)
  • Drunk patient
  • Psychiatric patient attack security trying to steal food.
  • Triage waiting period (violence patient)
  • Mental patient damaged drs vehicle (stone thrown windscreen).
  • Patient threatened guards with knife.
  • Dr threatened by family (child died) to shoot him.
  • Aggressive patients A&E (swearing staff)
  • Patient arrested for rape treated at hospital threatened staff verbally.
  • 72-hour observation attacked guard (clothes ripped).
  • Two Fleet employees assaulted one another.
  • Patient threatened staff (gun in car not confirmed) – casualty.
  • Professional Hitmen shot patient recovering in ward (gang related).
  • Gun threat, Mental patient (arrested with unlicensed firearm).
  • Buck horn taken off patient entering casualty to receive treatment.
  • 4 x gun-shot wound victims treated (gang-related). Staff threatened not to work unless security increased.
  • 72-hour ward – one patient attacked another using food-tray.
  • Khoocs – foreigner verbal threat to shoot.  Racial tension patients waiting.
  • Knife found in sleeve of patient being treated (who came in unconscious in ambulance).

Springbok (Dr Van Niekerk) Hospital

1 – 2018

1 - 2021

  • Psychiatric patient attacked guard who caught him stealing food out of kitchen.
  • Patient under alcohol influence assaulted staff.

Prof ZK Matthews Hospital, Barkly

1 – 2018

1 – 2019

  • Mental patient broke doors.
  • Staff striking at facility – burn tyres and blocked entrance.

Hopetown Clinic

1 – 2018

  • Nurse assaulted patient coming for treatment (long waiting time for assistance)

Kuruman Hospital

1 – 2018

3 - 2020

  • Union disruptions
  • Kidnapping patient – saps caught (CAS215/09/2020)
  • Guard stabbed with knife by patient trying to enter.
  • Guard assaulted and attacked with knife stopping gangs entering.

MaDoyl Clinic

1- 2018

 

 

 

1 – 2020

  • NGOs contracting Health Care Workers (HCW) – threaten to close clinics (absorption into Health)
  • Alleged knife threat by staff (to close clinic) – victimization concerns COVID.

EMS Control Room, Kimberley

1 – 2018

  • Assault (domestic dispute at work)

Colesburg Nursing home

1 – 20108

1 – 2019

  • Attach nurse in flat (domestic).
  • Drunk visitors refused entry – vulgar language security.

Bill Pichard Hospital, Prieska

2 – 2019

  • Rape victim threatened rapist family at hospital.
  • Gang violence following victim to hospital.

Harmony Home

2 – 2019

  • Assault patient by guard (patient stole guard’s money – mental patient).
  • Mental patient attacked guard and ripped uniform.

Ritchie Clinic

1 – 2019

  • Social worker / nutritionist threatened after removal malnutrition children from mother

De Aar Hospital

1 – 2019

 

 

 

 

1 – 2020

  • Foreign nationals entered with knives – threat to nurses (x-ray equipment not working). Gang-related violence.
  • Assault by mental patient.

Ipeleng Clinic

1 – 2019

  • EPWP workers strike – burn tyres and blocked entrance to facility.

Hopetown Clinic

1 – 2019

  • Mental patient fight with staff (waiting for medication issue).

Pampierstad Nursing home

1 – 2019

  • 3 males jumped fence and attacked staff residing to steal.

City Clinic

1 – 2019

  • Municipal strike action – threats.

Loeriesfontein Clinic

1 – 2019

  • Nurse assaulted by boyfriend at clinic.

WESH (Mental B3)

2 -2019

  • Mental patient alleged assaulted security guard (stole money).
  • Patient attacked guard with hair clipper.

Victoria West Hospital

1 – 2020

1 – 2021

  • Gang violence hospital (threat at hospital when gang arrived whilst person was receiving treatment).
  • Malicious damage of front door – psychiatric patient.

Oliphantshoek CHC

1 – 2020

  • Assault and public violence (drunk visitors)

New Mental Health Hospital

3 – 2020

1 - 2021

  • Patient assaulted guard with metal coffee mug.
  • Patient assaulted guard (needed medical attention and clothes ripped).
  • Attempted escape of mental patient who tried to flee whilst being transported in ambulance to RMSH (overpowering staff).
  • Guard assaulted by 4 unknown suspects fled theft power-station copper.

Connie Vorster Hospital, Hartswater

1 – 2020

  • Mental patient (broke window)
  • COVID protest

LAdams Clinic

1 – 2020

  • Patients threaten staff.

Beaconsfield Clinic

1 – 2021

  • OPD Patient threaten staff.

EMS Kuruman

1 – 2021

  • Guard overpowered by 5 unknown suspects (hostage situation) theft.  CAS 799/03/2021

Galeshewe Day Hospital

1 – 2021

1 - 2022

  • Guard attacked with sharp object (eye injury).
  • Assault – maternity patient slapped nurse.

Dr Winston Torres Clinic

1 – 2021

  • Patient slapped guard refusing entry (skipped queue).

Jan Kempdorp Hospital

1 – 2021

  • Emotional trauma patient damaged property – broke door after death of family.

Carnarvon CHC

1 – 2022

  • Assault – 4 drunk people tried to enter facility and assaulted security.

Pampierstad CHC

1 – 2022

  • Mental patient threaten staff (OPD).

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital, Upington

1 – 2022

  • Aggressive visitor with patient under influence of alcohol removed by SAPS.

Valspan Clinic

1 – 2022

  • OPD mental patient threaten staff.

 

Free State

(1)

(a) what is the procedure of taking a prisoner to a hospital for health care,

(b) what are the responsibilities of the health care facilities assigned to the SA Police Service members while at the facility

(c) to whom do they report if they have to suddenly leave

(d) what are the strategic guidelines of the whole process from the prisoner leaving prison to the time he/she is returned after receiving health care;

The prisoner warden / guard accompanies the patients in health facilities and stay with them through out until they leave the health facility.

  • SAPS or Correctional Services takes full responsibility for the prisoners admitted and for outpatients at health facilities.
  • Prisoners are prioritized at health facilities and don’t follow the queue. Prisoners when they

 are admitted are under SAPS and   Correctional Services watch.

  • The Correctional Service department make arrangements with the facilities and responsible for opening for files and collection of medical treatment.

Doctor, Operational Manager, nurses and Security Officers on duty.

Procedure lies with the department of Correctional Services. However, the responsible nurse from Correctional Services Facility will arrange a booking at the hospital in advance. The hospital will retrieve the prisoner’s file 2 days before the actual date of appointment.

 

Once in the facility, the prisoner will be processed while balancing the rights of the other patients and that of the prisoner. The prisoner remains under guard right through every step of care until the last working station which is pharmacy and exit the facility.

 

(2)       

(2)

Facility

what (a) total number of violent incidents have been recorded at each public health care facility in the past five years

and (b) are the relevant details of each violent incident;

Universitas Academic Hospital

4

Porter fought with the messenger.

The cleaner fought with the messenger.

ATM bombed and Security Officers were pointed with firearms.

Break in and 31 computers stolen

Pelonomi Tertiary Hospital

3

Security Supervisor assaulted by community member.

Female Security Officer assaulted by psychiatric patient 

Male Security Officer assaulted by psychiatric patient.

National District Hospital

2

Psychiatric patients fought with Security Officers and nurses in two different incidences.

Bongani District Hospital

0

 None

Boitumelo District Hospital

1

Security Officer fought with the patient where Security Officer broke his leg.

Botshabelo District Hospital

0

None

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

0

None

Fezi Ngubentombi District Hospital

1

Intoxicated patient assaulted Security Officer and the nurse.

Sinorita Nhlabathi District Hospital

0

None

Free State Psychiatric Complex

Several

Patients fighting each other

Parys District Hospital

0

None

Tokollo District Hospital

0

None

Mafube District Hospital

0

None

Winburg District Hospital

1

Two nurses fought each other

Katleho District Hospital

0

Messenger fought with cleaner

Thusanong District Hospital

0

None

Mohua District Hospital

0

None

Nala District Hospital

0

None

Elizabeth Ross District Hospital

1

Patient fought with nurses and Security Officers

Phekolong Nketoane District Hospital

1

Gangsters fought with Security Officers at the gate because they wanted to force to see the patient.

Mofumahadi Manapo Mopeli Regional Hospital

1

Visitors fought with nurses and Security Officers claiming they are from far and wanted to see their patient.

Diamant District Hospital

0

None

Stoffel Coetzee District Hospital

0

None

Embekweni District Hospital

0

None

Dihlabeng District Hospital

0

None

Thebe Phumelela District Hospital

0

None

Winburg District Hospital

0

None

       

 

Eastern Cape  

 

(1)

(a) The inmate is accompanied and guarded by the warden/ guard team into the health facility, through the entire visit to the facility.

 The hospital have a fast line leeway for inmates visiting the hospital, especially when hospital booking system have been followed to the various clinics of the hospital

(b) The inmates consult on a booked appointment schedule; they receive priority consultation to avoid subjecting them in long queue in health facilities. This is in line with hospital standard operating procedures.

(c) If there is any unexpected eventuality in a form of   incident, it is reported, firstly to the hospital CEO, Head of clinical Governance to the doctors, nursing service manager staff and the security officers.

(d) The Correctional Services officials bear responsible for safeguarding procedure of the inmates upon egress point of the health facility up until the exit point and safe return to the correctional facility. In accordance to the Correctional Services Act.

(2)       

(2)

Facility

what (a) total number of violent incidents have been recorded at each public health care facility in the past five years

and (b) are the relevant details of each violent incident;

Fort England Psychiatric Hospital

(Sarah Baartman District)

 

 

1

10/06/2019 - One in-Patient stabbed another in-patient with a sharpened thick piece of wood on the forehead and left eye

Bisho Hospital

(Buffalo City Metro)

 

1

19/01/2019- Assault of a security officer by a patient

Nomangesi Jayiya Clinic (Nelson Mandela Bay Health District)

 

1

13/01/2022- Security guards were attacked/ assaulted by 4 thugs.

Nelson Mandela Metro Health District

 

 

38

EMS personnel have been victims of crime in the Gqeberha Northern areas. there has been no fatalities;

  • 2019- 26 attacks
  • 2020- 6 attacks     
  • 2021- 5 attacks
  • 2022- 1 attack

Information from other remaining provinces is still being collated and will be furnished as soon as it is received.

 

 

END.

13 October 2022 - NW3101

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the status quo of the Dr Pixley Ka Isaka Seme Memorial Hospital in KwaZulu-Natal currently; (2) (a) what was the cost of the specified project and (b) in what time frame was the project to be finalised; (3) (a) what total number of months has the contract gone over its time frame and (b) were any penalties imposed; (4) what is the reason that the hospital has not opened at this stage; (5) does the hospital have the (a) budget and staff structure and (b)(i) operational needs and (ii) budget to open its doors?

Reply:

1. The hospital was completed on 9 March 2022 and is currently operational.

2. (a) The table below reflects the details in this regard:

Contract Name

Cost

Contract 1 : Earthworks

1 244 730,50

Contract 2 Pilling

24 451 211,82

Contract 3 Superstructure

3 172 362 000,79

Contract 3 VAT

475 854 300,12

Total

3 673 912 243,23

(b) The original completion date was the 05 October 2018.

(3) (a) 41 Months

(b) Yes there were penalties imposed.

(4) The hospital is operational since August 2021. The practical completion has been following a phased approach until the overall practical completion was reached on 9 March 2022.

(5) (a) Yes

(b) Yes, Operational needs and budget have been catered for

END.

13 October 2022 - NW2844

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total (a) number of employees of her department have been fingered as perpetrators of scams and other illegal activity, (b) the number of cases and or complaints have been brought against her department and its employees in this regard and (c) amount did it cost her department in the past five financial years?

Reply:

a) Two officials were fingered in allegations of illegal activities.

b) Two cases were referred to the Department and one criminal case was opened with the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the matter is currently in court and the other matter is still under investigation within the department; and

c) The Department lost an amount of R320,0000.00, during 2018/2019 financial period through two fraudulent payments and the other matter was reported in 2022/2023 financial period. The matter is still under investigation and the determination of financial implications will be concluded once the investigation has been completed.

13 October 2022 - NW3239

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to her reply to question 2319 on 16 August 2022, (a) on what date is her department planning on submitting the joint bid to the National Treasury and (b) how far is the process on the development of the Draft Sector Strategy?

Reply:

(a) on what date is her department planning on submitting the joint bid to the National Treasury.

  • The joint bid was tabled to National Treasury on the 28th of July 2022.
  • The department is expecting a response from the National Treasury anytime in the month of November 2022.

The aim of the joint bid is to:

  • Source funding to leverage and expand on employment of social service professionals to address social ills which are adversely impacting the country and society.
  • Source funding to employ social service professionals from the current pool of unemployed social service graduates.

Various government departments participated in the joint bid process, and these are:

  • 9 Social Development Provincial Departments.
  • South African State Security Agency.
  • Department of Basic Education.
  • Department of Correctional Services.
  • Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.
  • South African Police Service.
  • Department of Health.

(b) how far is the process on the development of the Draft Sector Strategy?

1. The Draft Sector Strategy was developed in the financial year 2021/2022.

2. The following government departments participated in the drafting of Sector Strategy:

  • 9 Social Development Provincial Departments.
  • South African State Security Agency.
  • Department of Basic Education.
  • Department of Correctional Services.
  • Department of Justice and Constitutional Development.
  • South African Police Service.
  • Department of Health.

3. The Draft Sector Strategy will serve before Cabinet before the end of financial year 2022/2023.

12 October 2022 - NW3319

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1(a). What percentage of the budget of the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport was spent on education related to anti-doping in the 2021-22 financial year, (b) which sporting codes received the most attention, and (c) what type of educational programmes are used to prevent the use of prohibited substances. 2(a). from what age and/or stages in sporting codes do anti-doping start and (b) what is the motivation for such early intervention?

Reply:

1(a). The South African Institute for Drug–Free Sport (SAIDS) in their response indicated that (a) Due to COVID restrictions and the increased use of webinars, only 2% of the budget was spent on education in 2021/22 years. Generally, expenditure on education is in the region of 10% and expenditure has been further supplemented by a Lottery Grant over the past five years.

(b). Rugby received the most attention pertaining to anti-doping education.

(c). The intervention is in the form of webinars, workshops, and outreach at tournaments.

2(a). With the co-operations of schools and national sports federations, SAIDS has delivered anti-doping talks and outreach to as young as Grade 8 level.

(b). Some sports codes have young athletes that participate at an elevated level (provincial/national) at an early age. Sports such as swimming, gymnastics, and track & field receive anti-doping education services at an earlier age.

12 October 2022 - NW3343

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to the Theatre & Dance Policy Consultative Conference that was scheduled to take place on 2 and 3 September 2022, for which a certain person (name furnished) was awarded R993 000, (a) how was the amount awarded, (b) was there a public call for expressions of interest, (c) what are the terms of reference between the specified person and his department and (d) what are the budget line items. (2). what are the reasons that people and/or institutions who made submissions have been excluded from the conference when they have clearly demonstrated knowledge, expertise and an interest for engagement in the policy development process. (3). whether the conference has invited 20 delegates from each province; if not, what number was invited; if so, how (a) were the delegates selected and (b) do their skills and talent base reflect the nine focus areas of the conference?

Reply:

1. The amount awarded is based on the three quotations which were received. They were assessed and an appointment was made.

2. A Request for Quotations (RFQ) for a project within R 1 000 000, 00 Treasury Threshold was used.

3. Terms of References were detailed as indicated herein below:

This is a national policy which requires participation and input from DSAC, Task Team, Provincial Departments and theatre and dance sub sector organizations. The service provider will therefore be required to work closely with all indicated stake holders.

The service provider to use Treasury Remuneration rates (Category C Subcategory C2) to pay 18 Task Team Members attending National conference.

The service provider to submit a project close out report by September 30, 2022.

(d) This budget came from Goods and Services Budget item of the CCID Budget

2.According to the best knowledge of the Department no people and / organizations were deliberately excluded at the expense of the other hence a virtual link was created as an additional platform for everyone to participate in the conference.

1. The conference invited 10 Provincial Delegates per province.

a) These delegates were selected through a process that involved Theatre and Dance Task Team Members and Provincial Departments.

b) The guideline was to select active theatre and dance stakeholders who have insight and vision of how theatre and dance sector should be transformed to address the nine focus areas of the conference.

12 October 2022 - NW2927

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition

With reference to the European Union’s claims that the Republic’s temporary ban on the export of scrap metal is not aligned to the trade deals of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), what further steps has his department and/or the Government taken to (a) illustrate that ban of scrap metal is in line with the position of other states that have banned the sales of scrap metal and (b) ensure that it is not in contravention of WTO agreements in this regard?

Reply:

South Africa’s infrastructure is being stripped at an unprecedented rate with a substantially negative impact on government, citizens and the economy. The objective of the proposed measures (which include prohibition on scrap metal) is likely to lead to a material reduction in the theft of metal from the country's infrastructure. The details setting out the rationale for and proposed modalities of such restriction, were published in the Government Gazette for public comment.

Over the past decade research has pointed to 26 developing and developed countries (the latter including the European Union) who have imposed different forms of restrictions on the export of scrap metal for a variety of reasons, including environmental reasons or to ensure domestic supply. Some countries have imposed export restrictions on scrap metal to curb criminality and the destruction of infrastructure.

Government has consulted with external lawyers regarding the legality of the proposed measures and believe them to be compliant with international trade obligations.

-END-

12 October 2022 - NW3431

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Having heard how the creativity of Solomon Linda was abused by white persons both locally and abroad, what measures have been taken to assist poor, vulnerable and uneducated artists, so that they are not exposed to the same exploitation and slavery by unscrupulous producers and record company executives?

Reply:

We have vigorously supported the initiative by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition in the development of the Copyright Amendment Bill and Performers Protection Bill, which have since been by the National Assembly and has sent them to the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) for concurrence. The main aim of the two bills is to protect the interest of the creative workers.

 

12 October 2022 - NW3494

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). what is the status of (b) structures in each province; (2) what are the details of support programme offered by SA Rugby to the deaf sevens rugby team in view of their participation in the 2023 world cup in Cordoba, Argentina in 2023?

Reply:

South African Rugby provided the following information in response to the question;

There are no deaf rugby clubs in South Africa, all deaf rugby players play for amateur clubs in their area of residence, which is understandably problematic. SADRA’s aim is to implement more programmes in future to enable player numbers to grow and to establish their own clubs.

The South African Deaf Rugby Association (SADRA) has a footprint in the following provinces:

  1. Eastern Cape
  2. Free State
  3. Gauteng
  4. KwaZulu-Natal
  5. Limpopo
  6. Mpumalanga
  7. Northwest
  8. Western Cape.

The relationship with SADRA is governed by a memorandum of agreement entered in 2018. SADRA has their own governance structures and is responsible to source its own money, sponsors, and partners. SADRA is responsible for their own development and building its footprint. SA Rugby assist SADRA on their request. The following is the support provided by SA Rugby to SADRA.

  1. Ensures access to BokSmart training programs and courses for all SADRA members. It was made accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
  2. Ensures SADRA participants have access to SA Rugby/World Rugby Coaching, Referee and Club administration courses.
  3. Supports SADRA events.
  4. SA Rugby provided SADRA with funds in 2022. This support will be repeated in 2023.
  5. SA Rugby has applied for funding to the Department for Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) for a grant in aid (Funding) on behalf of Deaf Rugby.
  6. SA Rugby is assisting SADRA with an application to the Lotto. Due to governance reasons at SADRA prior to the appointment of their new President, this is currently work in process.
  7. SA Rugby is committed to contributing certain items (kit) for the men and female teams for the 2023 World Cup Sevens in Cordoba, Argentina 2023.
  8. The participation of the female team is under consideration and subject to the availability of player resources that is currently being investigated by SADRA.

12 October 2022 - NW3317

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

(1). what (a) number of anti-doping tests were carried out by the SA institute for drug-free sports (SAIDS) during 2022 rugby craven week held at Rondebosch in cape town and (b) were the results. (2). what number of players in each region participated in the 2022 Rugby Craven week (3). whether any players were tested by SAIDS in the qualifying and / or preparation games prior to the rugby craven week; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Institute for Drug – Free Sport (SAIDS) in their response indicated that (a) 995 of the players participating in the 2022 Craven Week were tested in both out-of-competition and in-competition tests (b) No players tested positive for banned substance during the 2022 Rugby Craven week.

(2). The South Africa Rugby Union (SARU) in their response indicated that a total of 2843 players participated in the 2022 Craven Week. Of the total number 2153 players participated in the Boys Youth weeks and 690 participated in the Girls Youth Weeks.

(3). Yes, players were tested, and no one tested positive for a banned substance.

 

12 October 2022 - NW2933

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to the reply to question 1102 on 17 May 2022, on what dates were each of the Chief Directors, currently earning a salary at level 15, appointed at the specified salary level at the (a) national and (b) provincial level; (2) what are the reasons that the Chief Directors in the (a) Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Health and (b) Gauteng Department of Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation are earning a salary at level 16; (3) what are the reasons that heads of department in some provincial departments are earning a salary at level 15 and in other provinces they are earning a salary at level 16; (4) What are the reasons that the project manager in the Department of Education is earning a salary at level 16?

Reply:

1. The dates on which each of the Chief Directors, currently earning a salary at salary level 15, were appointed on this salary level at the (a) national and (b) provincial level are indicated in the table below:

Dates on which each of the Chief Directors earning a salary at salary level 15 were appointed on that level

as on 28 February 2022

Province

Department

Component

Job title

Event date

         

Eastern Cape

Education

 

Chief Director: Financial Management Services

2021-10-01

Free State

Office of the Premier

 

Chief Director

2006-01-01

Gauteng

Human Settlements

 

Chief Director

2013-12-01

 

Office of the Premier

 

Chief Director

2010-08-01

       

2014-04-01

 

Provincial Treasury

Infrastructure Financing Agency

Chief Director

2013-09-01

     

Chief Director: Project Finance

2016-11-01

   

Provincial Treasury

Chief Director

2000-11-01

KwaZulu-Natal

Finance

 

Chief Director: Municipal Finance

2010-12-01

 

Public Works

 

Chief Director: Corporate Services

2003-05-01

Limpopo

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

 

Chief Director: Commercial Operation

2017-06-01

National

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

Chief Director: Monitoring & Evaluation

2009-12-01

     

Chief Director: National Rural Youth Service Corps

2010-12-01

     

Chief Director: Policy Research

2012-04-01

 

Basic Education

 

CD: Strategic Planning Research & Co-Ordination

2011-10-01

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

 

Chief Director L14

2008-04-01

       

2012-01-01

       

2012-04-01

 

Government Communication and Information System

 

Chief Director: Content And Writing

2009-04-01

     

Chief Director: Entity Oversight

2015-07-01

     

Chief Director: Provincial And Local Liaison

2013-03-01

 

Health

 

CD: CCOD & Occupational Health

2014-12-19

     

Chief Director

2010-04-01

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

 

Chief Director: Economic Growth & Global Relations

2014-06-11

 

National Treasury

Government Technical Advisory Centre

Chief Director: Financial Management

2008-12-01

     

Chief Director: Transaction Advisory Services

2007-09-01

   

National Treasury

Chief Director: Legal Tax Design

2014-05-01

     

Chief Director: Legislation

2008-07-01

     

Chief Director: Regulatory Impact Assessment

2005-11-01

     

Chief Director: Tax Specialist

2009-01-26

     

Chief Director: Technical Support Services

2013-09-01

     

Chief Director: Information Technology

2012-02-01

     

Chief Director: Legal Services

2012-04-01

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

 

Chief Director: Education & Skills

2010-08-01

     

Chief Director: Frontline Monitoring & Support

2016-12-01

     

Chief Director: Health

2013-04-01

     

Chief Director: Social Cohesion Protection & Gender

2011-04-01

 

Public Service and Administration

 

Chief Director: Human Resource Development.

2012-12-01

 

Statistics South Africa

 

Chief Director: Price Statistics

2012-05-01

     

Chief Director: Programme Office

2002-05-01

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

 

Cd: Investment Promotion & Facilitation

2015-04-01

     

Chief Director: Consumer And Corporate Regulation

2014-05-01

Western Cape

Transport and Public Works

 

Chief Director

2001-02-01

Data source: PERSAL

2. The reason why the KwaZulu Natal Department of Health is paying the Chief Director: IDMTS on salary level 16 is because an offer of employment was made to him, by the Development Bank of South Africa, on a salary package which fell within salary level 16 in the Public Service. In order to retain his services, a counter-offer was made by the department on the nearest higher salary package compared to the offer received.

The Chief Director in the Gauteng Department of Economic Development, paid on salary level 16, was appointed as the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site and Dinokeng Projects on 1 January 2022. This was done in accordance with the approved organisational and salary structure below:

3. The appointments of heads of departments on salary level 15 and others on salary level 16 is based on the service delivery model of the departments. Furthermore, the size of the departments is also taken into consideration, including client group, geographical distribution and the availability of funds within the Department. As a result, the upgrading of the Head of the Department leads to the upgrading of the lower level posts including the performer level and such leads to an increase in the compensation of employees (CoE), hence the discrepancies of salary levels.

4. This information resides with the Department of Basic Education and will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon it is available.

End

12 October 2022 - NW3535

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture

(1) whether his department intends to facilitate a soccer and/or football indaba of the SA Football Association (SAFA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how far are the preparations. (2)(a) on what date is it envisaged that the football indaba will be held, (b) what is the total budget for the indaba, (c) what are the challenges his department is experiencing with regard to the indaba and (d) what steps has he taken to put pressure on safa to ensure that the soccer indaba takes place; (3) how far are the negotiations with SAFA regarding school sports? NW4350E

Reply:

1. Yes. The Department is working with SAFA to host a Football Indaba. The goal of the National Football Indaba is to objectively assess all facets of the South African football system, identify the challenges, problems, critical failures, and success factors and formulate a turnaround plan and/or approach to reposition and restore South African football as a premier sport in the country. The concept documents and draft programme for the indaba are in place, however, a suitable date is yet to be confirmed.

2(a). No date has been confirmed as yet, however, on 03 October 2022, the Department met with SAFA and resolved that the Indaba would take place in the 4th quarter of 2022/23, ideally in February 2023. SAFA committed to confirm a date by 14 October 2022.

(c). The budget for Indaba has not been determined. The budget is dependent on the final plans, operations, and logistical arrangements.

(d).The challenge has been in terms of coordinating the diaries of all the key stakeholders considering a range of factors such as the National, Continental and International Football Calendar. It is worth noting that 2022 concludes the full cycle of SAFA Vision 2022 which would form the basis of the review and Indaba Agenda. This was resolved at the last meeting held with SAFA.

(e). There has not been any reason or need identified to pressure SAFA.

3. SAFA is working closely with the Department in terms of the implementation of Schools Football, whereby football is part of the Winter National School Sport Championship. Subsequently, both parties with the Department of Basic Education manage the participation of the two winning schools in the continental championship. Additionally, SAFA and the Department jointly launched the FIFA ‘Football for Schools’ programme, which is to be officially rolled out in the fourth quarter of the current fiscal year. SAFA further provides technical support by offering the training of educators and school-linked volunteers in coaching and refereeing.

12 October 2022 - NW3446

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) By what date will provisions be made for local platforms such as radio, television and museums through which artists will be able to express their craft within their communities and improve tourism and (b) how will his department discourage artists from migrating to Johannesburg in order to build their profile?

Reply:

(a). In as far as the craft sector is concerned the Department is looking to set up a permanent national exhibition, the Beautiful Things Exhibition (BTE), alongside an outlet for transactions, in City of Tshwane to provide craft practitioners from all parts of the country with an opportunity to showcase and derive economic benefit from their products by February of 2023. The last edition of BTE was at the Graskop Gorge in March of 2022, and now the Department intends to set this up as a permanent exhibition to provide a national platform for crafters.

In as far as performing arts are concerned the Department is engaged in consultative discussion with previously marginalized Provinces: (i) Northern Cape – Northern Cape Theatre was refurbished by DSAC and launched on 15 December 2021, (ii) Limpopo - Limpopo Theatre site has been identified, design approved and the Mpumalanga Theatre Feasibility Study Report has been submitted, (iv) Eastern Cape - Mandela Bay Theatre Complex was launched in May 2021 to establish creative spaces (provincial theatres). The intention is to retain talents within local spaces in these Provinces through the provision of theatres for development and promotion of local talents.

(b). The intention is to provide an opportunity for participation to craft producers without them seeing the need to migrate to the cities to build their profile. Furthermore, the Department, working with the Department of Small Business Development and other strategic partners collaborate better to support targeted market access platforms.

12 October 2022 - NW3354

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his replies to questions 1988 0n 15 June 2022 and 1989 0n 15 June 2022 in the context of his constitutional obligations to account and to provide reports concerning matters under his control, what are the reasons that he, as the executive authority, does not directly furnish Mr TW Mhlongo with the information, instead of referring to third party submissions only?

Reply:

In terms of Section 13 (5) (b) (ii) of the National Sport and Recreation Act, the Minister is debarred from involvement in matters of administration in sport. The Section states that “The Minister may not interfere in matters relate to administration of sport and appointment of or termination of the service of the Executive Members of the sport or recreation body.

In addition, the Federations are Non-Governmental Organizations and as such are independent of Government. The matters referred to are administrative and are Human Resources related and as such are dealt with in terms of policies governing employer and employee relationships.

Minister urges the Hon. Member to familiarise himself with the policies and legislation referred to above.

12 October 2022 - NW3384

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that the (a) Mangaung African and Cultural Festival is held in Mangaung every year despite the Department making a loss and (b) same company from Johannesburg is awarded the rights to host and prepare the whole C Square, thereby overlooking local companies?

Reply:

(a). The Mangaung African and Cultural Festival is owned by the Free State Department of Sport, Arts, Culture, and Recreation. The Provincial Department will be in a better place to provide clarity on the rationale for hosting the event in Manguang without considering any other region in the Free State Province.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended with amendments.

QUESTION NO. 3431-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30 SEPTEMBER 2022: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 37 2022

“Mr. B S Madlingozi (EFF) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. Having heard how the creativity of Solomon Linda was abused by white persons both locally and abroad, what measures have been taken to assist poor, vulnerable and uneducated artists, so that they are not exposed to the same exploitation and slavery by unscrupulous producers and record company executives? NW4233E

REPLY

We have vigorously supported the initiative by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition in the development of the Copyright Amendment Bill and Performers Protection Bill, which have since been by the National Assembly and has sent them to the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) for concurrence. The main aim of the two bills is to protect the interest of the creative workers.

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION NO. 3446-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN THE INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 30 SEPTEMBER 2022: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 37 - 2022

Mr K Ceza (EFF) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) By what date will provisions be made for local platforms such as radio, television and museums through which artists will be able to express their craft within their communities and improve tourism and

(b) how will his department discourage artists from migrating to Johannesburg in order to build their profile? NW4251E

REPLY

(a). In as far as the craft sector is concerned the Department is looking to set up a permanent national exhibition, the Beautiful Things Exhibition (BTE), alongside an outlet for transactions, in City of Tshwane to provide craft practitioners from all parts of the country with an opportunity to showcase and derive economic benefit from their products by February of 2023. The last edition of BTE was at the Graskop Gorge in March of 2022, and now the Department intends to set this up as a permanent exhibition to provide a national platform for crafters.

In as far as performing arts are concerned the Department is engaged in consultative discussion with previously marginalized Provinces: (i) Northern Cape – Northern Cape Theatre was refurbished by DSAC and launched on 15 December 2021, (ii) Limpopo - Limpopo Theatre site has been identified, design approved and the Mpumalanga Theatre Feasibility Study Report has been submitted, (iv) Eastern Cape - Mandela Bay Theatre Complex was launched in May 2021 to establish creative spaces (provincial theatres). The intention is to retain talents within local spaces in these Provinces through the provision of theatres for development and promotion of local talents.

(b). The intention is to provide an opportunity for participation to craft producers without them seeing the need to migrate to the cities to build their profile. Furthermore, the Department, working with the Department of Small Business Development and other strategic partners collaborate better to support targeted market access platforms.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended with amendments.

QUESTION NO. 3494-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NUMBER 37 OF 2022 DATED 30 SEPTEMBER 2022

“Mr. D Joseph (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture;

(1). what is the status of (b) structures in each province; (2) what are the details of support programme offered by SA Rugby to the deaf sevens rugby team in view of their participation in the 2023 world cup in Cordoba, Argentina in 2023? NW4307E

REPLY

South African Rugby provided the following information in response to the question;

There are no deaf rugby clubs in South Africa, all deaf rugby players play for amateur clubs in their area of residence, which is understandably problematic. SADRA’s aim is to implement more programmes in future to enable player numbers to grow and to establish their own clubs.

The South African Deaf Rugby Association (SADRA) has a footprint in the following provinces:

  1. Eastern Cape
  2. Free State
  3. Gauteng
  4. KwaZulu-Natal
  5. Limpopo
  6. Mpumalanga
  7. Northwest
  8. Western Cape.

The relationship with SADRA is governed by a memorandum of agreement entered in 2018. SADRA has their own governance structures and is responsible to source its own money, sponsors, and partners. SADRA is responsible for their own development and building its footprint. SA Rugby assist SADRA on their request. The following is the support provided by SA Rugby to SADRA.

  1. Ensures access to BokSmart training programs and courses for all SADRA members. It was made accessible to deaf and hard-of-hearing people.
  2. Ensures SADRA participants have access to SA Rugby/World Rugby Coaching, Referee and Club administration courses.
  3. Supports SADRA events.
  4. SA Rugby provided SADRA with funds in 2022. This support will be repeated in 2023.
  5. SA Rugby has applied for funding to the Department for Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) for a grant in aid (Funding) on behalf of Deaf Rugby.
  6. SA Rugby is assisting SADRA with an application to the Lotto. Due to governance reasons at SADRA prior to the appointment of their new President, this is currently work in process.
  7. SA Rugby is committed to contributing certain items (kit) for the men and female teams for the 2023 World Cup Sevens in Cordoba, Argentina 2023.
  8. The participation of the female team is under consideration and subject to the availability of player resources that is currently being investigated by SADRA.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION NO. 3595-2022

WRITTEN REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NUMBER 37 OF 2022 DATED 30 SEPTEMBER 2022

Mr. T W Mhlongo (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport Arts and Culture:

(1) whether his department intends to facilitate a soccer and/or football indaba of the SA Football Association (SAFA); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how far are the preparations.

(2)(a) on what date is it envisaged that the football indaba will be held, (b) what is the total budget for the indaba, (c) what are the challenges his department is experiencing with regard to the indaba and (d) what steps has he taken to put pressure on safa to ensure that the soccer indaba takes place;

(3) how far are the negotiations with SAFA regarding school sports? NW4350E

REPLY

1. Yes. The Department is working with SAFA to host a Football Indaba. The goal of the National Football Indaba is to objectively assess all facets of the South African football system, identify the challenges, problems, critical failures, and success factors and formulate a turnaround plan and/or approach to reposition and restore South African football as a premier sport in the country. The concept documents and draft programme for the indaba are in place, however, a suitable date is yet to be confirmed.

2(a). No date has been confirmed as yet, however, on 03 October 2022, the Department met with SAFA and resolved that the Indaba would take place in the 4th quarter of 2022/23, ideally in February 2023. SAFA committed to confirm a date by 14 October 2022.

(c). The budget for Indaba has not been determined. The budget is dependent on the final plans, operations, and logistical arrangements.

(d).The challenge has been in terms of coordinating the diaries of all the key stakeholders considering a range of factors such as the National, Continental and International Football Calendar. It is worth noting that 2022 concludes the full cycle of SAFA Vision 2022 which would form the basis of the review and Indaba Agenda. This was resolved at the last meeting held with SAFA.

(e). There has not been any reason or need identified to pressure SAFA.

3. SAFA is working closely with the Department in terms of the implementation of Schools Football, whereby football is part of the Winter National School Sport Championship. Subsequently, both parties with the Department of Basic Education manage the participation of the two winning schools in the continental championship. Additionally, SAFA and the Department jointly launched the FIFA ‘Football for Schools’ programme, which is to be officially rolled out in the fourth quarter of the current fiscal year. SAFA further provides technical support by offering the training of educators and school-linked volunteers in coaching and refereeing.

12 October 2022 - NW3342

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to his department requesting information about the Theatre & Dance Policy Consultative Conference that was scheduled to take place on 2 and 3 September 2022, what amount was a certain person (name furnished) and/or his organisation and/or associates paid for their engagement to drive the policy conference. (2) whether his department issued an open and transparent call for bids regarding the tender; if not, how did his department elect the specified person’s organisation to drive the policy conference; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total project amount awarded is R993 000, 00, and is inclusive of the policy conference amongst other deliverables as outlined in the response to Parliamentary question 3343.

2. The Departmental applied its internal SCM Procurement Process through Request for Quotations (RFQ) which is within an R1 000 000, 00 quotation threshold recommended by SA Treasury.

12 October 2022 - NW3318

Profile picture: Joseph, Mr D

Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). (a). Which sporting code are the biggest challenge for the International Institute for Drug-Free Sport and (b) what is the similar sporting code record in the Republic? (2). whether the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport intends to propose a world ranking list to the International Institute for Drug-Free Sport of countries with sporting codes that are guilty of contravention of anti-doping regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details. (3). whether he has been informed of the ranking of the Republic on any international body for drug-free sport; if so, (a) what is the Republic’s ranking, and (b) on which institute’s list?

Reply:

There is no organization that we know as International Institute for Drug-Free Sport.

12 October 2022 - NW3332

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Government has provided any financial support and /or loans to Zimbabwe in the past five financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) In the past five (5) financial years, the Government of the Republic of South Africa has not provided any financial support and/ or loans to Zimbabwe.

b) However, following an appeal for assistance from the Zimbabwean Government, the South African Government, through the African Renaissance Fund (ARF), provided R50 million worth of humanitarian aid to Zimbabwe following the 2019 Cyclone Idai which destroyed infrastructure and left scores of people homeless and without food. The aid was in the form of 450 000 x 12,5 kg of maize meal procured from South Africa and delivered to Zimbabwe. This project was completed in February 2022.

11 October 2022 - NW3038

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, in respect of the Insolvency Act, Act 24 of 1936, which refers to a threshold of £50 to sequestrate any debtor, his department has any plans to introduce amending legislation to the specified Act to (a) raise the specified threshold and (b) provide for debts such as student loans, home loans and food to be excluded from the harsh reality of the consequences of sequestration?

Reply:

The Insolvency Act, 1936 (Act No. 24 of 1936) (“the Act”) is part of apartheid era legislation which the Department is currently reviewing with the aim of aligning the legislation with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 , and modernising the legislation.

One of the objectives of the draft Bill is to create a legislative framework that is based on the balancing of the conflicting interests of the stakeholders in insolvency proceedings, as opposed to the current legal framework that places emphasis on the best interest of the creditors.

The Department is currently processing a draft Insolvency Bill (the draft Bill”). The issue raised is provided for in section 9(1) of the Act. According to this section a creditor who has a liquidated claim for not less than fifty pounds against a debtor who has committed an act of insolvency, or who is insolvent, may petition the court for the sequestration of the estate of that debtor. Clause 2 of the draft Bill deals with this aspect of the question.

With the assistance of the Reserve Bank, the value of the 50 pounds was calculated at around R22 500 (and 100 pounds is estimated at R45 000) during the last quarter of 2019 (when the clause was crafted).

With regard to the second part of the question, clause 116 of the draft Bill intends to introduce pre-liquidation composition, which allows a debtor with debts not exceeding R300 000, irrespective of their source, to offer a composition to creditors, before the commencement of liquidation proceedings.

Rule 46A of the Uniform Rules of Court requires that judicial discretion be exercised before the primary residence of a judgement debtor is attached with a view to selling it in execution. Rule 46A is not applicable to a debtor whose estate is in sequestration. The Department will, as the Bill is processed further, review the current status, that is, the absence of judicial oversight with regards to the execution of the residential property of a debtor who is in sequestration the light of the provisions of section 26 of the Constitution, which provides for the right to access adequate housing.

Whilst the draft Bill is being processed there are measures in legislation available to persons who are over indebted. Section 74 of the Magistrates’ Courts Act, 1944 (Act No. 32 of 1944) provides for an administration order procedure, which has been described as a modified form of insolvency proceedings. The National Credit Act, 2005 (Act No. 34 of 2005) has introduced debt review as an alternative to sequestration. The Act makes provision for post liquidation composition, and if the offer of composition has been accepted by creditors the insolvent may apply for rehabilitation, which has the effect of putting an end to sequestration proceedings.

END

11 October 2022 - NW3377

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has found that the proposal of agri-villages as a solution to the problem of evictions is an indication of the failure of the Government to secure tenure rights for farm dwellers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. The Agri-village model is a programme that provides farm dwellers with an opportunity to have security of tenure, access to basic services, and sustainable livelihoods. The programme is not meant to address evictions. The Extension of Security of Tenure Act, 1997 (Act No. 62 of 1997) (ESTA) protects the rights of farm dwellers against unlawful evictions, and the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development working with Legal Aid SA provides legal representation to farm dwellers to defend them against such unlawful evictions.

11 October 2022 - NW3080

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of drug rehabilitation centres in the Republic, (b) number of (i) the specified centres offer services for free and (ii) patients does each centre accommodate?

Reply:

a) In terms of the current database the total number of drug rehabilitation centres in the country is 297. It is very important to indicate that the database of registered drug rehabilitation centres is updated on an ongoing basis. The update is based on the number of registered centres in terms of the Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act, No.70 of 2008.

b) (i)The number of treatment and rehabilitation centres that offer services for free is 169.

(ii)The number of patients each centre accommodate depends on the centre’s bed capacity (see annexure A).

11 October 2022 - NW3473

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Deputy President

In his capacity as the Chairperson of the Human Resources Development Council of South Africa, what has he found to be the (a) successes and (b) challenges in addressing the many issues that the Republic is faced with, in particular poverty and youth unemployment, since he took office?

Reply:

  1. The Ministry of Higher Education has advised us of the following successes in addressing Human Resource Development challenges which South Africa is faced with, relating to poverty and youth unemployment:
  •  

1.1 Regarding University Education

  • Two new Universities have been established in the Northern Cape (Sol Plaatjie University) and Mpumalanga (University of Mpumalanga) to expand access to post school opportunities.
  • Additional two Universities are in the process of being establishment (University of Science in Ekurhuleni and University of Crime Detection in Hammanskraal). Preliminary work on the location including the assessment of the demand and supply-side mapping for each University has been undertaken.
  • Preliminary enrolment data for the 2021 academic year shows 1 047 758 students have been enrolled, 29 percent of enrolments during 2020 were in Science, Engineering and Technology.
  • Eight (8) of the ten (10) accredited Universities to offer TVET related programmes to improve the qualifications of teachers at TVET colleges have since commenced with offering TVET programmes.
  •  

1.2 Regarding Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET)

  • Through the recommendations of the Human Resource Development Council (HRDC), measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans.
  • According to the Department of Higher Education, TVET sector has expanded, and enrolments amongst the youth has been recorded as follows:
  • Student enrolments in TVET colleges have reached 452 277 in 2020 and targeted to increase;
  • Eight (8) of the 13 new TVET college campuses have reached 100% completion (Msinga, Umzimkhulu, Nongoma, Aliwal North, Ngqungqushe, Graaf Reinet, Thabazimbi & Nkandla A). The remaining sites are 68-99% complete;
  • Thirty four (34) Centres of Specialisation have been established at TVET colleges focusing on 13 critical trades required for the economy;
  • 6 779 TVET graduates have been placed with industry and across government departments;
  • Seventeen (17) Entrepreneurial hubs have been established in 17 public TVET Colleges across the country;
  • Three (3) Water and Climate Smart Agriculture Greenhouses have been established in TVET Colleges.

1.3 Regarding Community Education and Training Colleges (CET)

  • According to the Ministry of Higher Education, the Community Education and Training institutional landscape has been reconfigured and rationalised from 3 279 community learning centres to 1791 learning sites (200 Community learning centres and 1691 satellite centres) in the interest of quality, access and available budget.
  • Nine (9) CET colleges have since been established and are functional.
  • All nine (9) Colleges have functional councils appointed in terms of the Continuing Education and Training Act, Act No 16 of 2006. Their term of office will end in October 2025.
  • Programme offering at CET colleges has been improved to include entrepreneurship and Digital programmes. A register of programmes approved by the Director-General is issued on an annual basis.
  • The Department of Higher Education hosted the first ever CET summit in March 2022 to position the CET sector to move into mass skills provision. R200 million has been made available through the National Skills Fund to assist colleges in this regard.

1.4 Interventions by the National Skills Fund (NSF)

  • According to the Ministry of Higher Education, the National Skills Fund has since 2018, disbursed a total of R7.97 billion to a variety of skills development programmes benefiting 407 495 individuals. Targeted areas included the following categories:
    • Agricultural and rural skills development;
    • Information technology;
    • Promotion of small, medium and micro enterprises;
    • Worker education;
    • Capacity development in the PSET sector;
    • Scholarships and bursaries (domestic and international);
    • Research efforts;
    • TVET infrastructure building;
    • Funding NSFAS shortfall;
    • People living with disabilities have also been funded by the NSF.

1.5 Artisan Development and Workplace Based Learning Opportunities

  • One of the major successes of HRDC is the Artisan Development. Through the recommendations of the Council, measures were put in place to reposition TVET as an important skills development sector to incrementally produce the required numbers of artisans. This was made possible by mobilising government to make funding available to improve access.
  • The HRDC established a Technical Task Team on Artisan Development which has assisted in ramping up the artisan development.

2. The following are key challenges in Human Resource Development as identified by the Ministry of Higher Education in addressing critical issues of poverty and youth unemployment:

2.1 One of the major challenges is the poor performance, and declining economy. This has had far reaching implications in opening up workplaces by the industry for workplace based learning opportunities. This has led to a decline in employment, especially among the youth. Government recognises the critical importance of capable human resources as a key driver of economic development. In an endeavour to mitigate the impact of the pandemic and the looming socio-economic ‘crisis’, government adopted an Economic Reconstruction and Recovery Plan with a view to address the challenge of the declining economy and youth unemployment, amongst others.

2.2 The outbreak of the Coronavirus pandemic has worsened an already vulnerable economy, and it’s devastating effect has further deepened the crisis, largely affecting youth, in both relative and absolute terms.

-------------END-------------

11 October 2022 - NW3367

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) steps has he taken recently to resolve the backlog at the Masters Office to allow families of deceased persons to move on with their lives and (b) has he found are the reasons that persons in the Eastern Cape, from as far away as Mt Ayliff, must travel to the Masters Office in Mthatha to have their estates resolved?

Reply:

a) Since the advent of democracy the services of Master had to cover all South African citizens, but that happened only some eight years later with the Constitutional Court’s decision in the Bhe-matter, declaring Reg. 200 of the Black Administration Act unconstitutional and ordering that the Master should now deal with all deceased estates in the country.

The Master’s Office received a huge influx of work since then, but the office is properly capacitated. This is where the Masters’ struggle against backlogs started. Years of being understaffed, ever increasing workload, COVID, system and network challenges, to name but a few, as well as lack of sufficient budget, undermine efforts of the Masters offices to function optimally.

In spite of all of this, the clearing of the backlog is included in indicator 5.9 of the approved Annual Performance Plan 2022/23 for the Master’s Branch, as one of the turnaround strategies to be implemented.

During Quarter 1, the offices determined their backlog and created the baseline lists of matters outstanding. During Quarters 2 and 3, the offices will attend to these matters, by also making use of overtime, in order to reach the Masters indicated target of 100% of the determined backlog cleared by 31 December 2022.

It should however be noted that this target can only be achieved in an enabling and stable work environment and can thus be negatively impacted by the following risk factors:

(i) Stability and availability of the electricity supply to offices (loadshedding is delaying finalisation of matters even during scheduled overtime periods);

(ii) The Department stabilizing and improving the IT systems to enable officials to work seamlessly and without downtime and system errors (e.g. for more than a month now, the Department has been experiencing network and hardware related problems, in which is affecting performance and connectivity to the applications used by the Masters – to date this has not been resolved);

(iii) Stability in the availability of the workforce, mindful of the fact that the wage negotiations have not been finalized and Labour Unions may still call on officials to down tools;

(iv) Finding the critical posts once a scientific determination of appropriate capacity for Masters. Some offices are critically understaffed and do not have the luxury of having time on hand to attend to extra work, whilst also adequately assisting the public, queues and correspondence on a daily basis;

(v) Successful and speedy procurement of new printers as well as multi-functional scanners to ensure better operations.

b) The Eastern Cape has four (4) Master’s Offices, namely Mthatha, Grahamstown, Bisho and Gqeberha.

Furthermore, the Paperless Estates Administration System (PEAS), which computerises the administration process related to deceased estates, has successfully been rolled out and is being used by 290 service points (Magistrate Courts) country wide, of which 27 (including Mt Ayliff) falls within the Mthatha Master’s Office jurisdiction, 11 in Grahamstown’s jurisdiction and 8 in Port Elizabeth’s jurisdiction, (please indicate number of Service Points for Bisho as well).

All Magistrate’s Offices are Service Points of the Master, but the rolling out PEAS to Service Points enables those Service Points to do estate of a higher value, as they are linked with the relevant Masters’ offices, who then are able to oversee the appointment process in those Service Points, and thus ensuring that the whole country receives the same service and are able to access the same quality of services provided directly at Master’s Offices, without the need to travel long distances to the 15 Master’s Offices countrywide. This is to bring services to the people and underscore the drive for access to justice.

The following estates may be reported at Service Points (Magistrate Courts):

- If the value of the assets is, or appears to be, below R125 000, and the deceased did not leave a will, it can be reported at any Magistrate’s Court in the region where the deceased resided prior to death;

- If the value of the assets is, or appears to be, below R250 000, and the deceased did not leave a will, it can be reported at any Magistrate’s Court in the region where the deceased resided prior to death, where the Paperless Estates Administration System (PEAS) has been rolled out.

All other estates need to be reported at the Master though, but it should be noted

that the reported documents can also be posted or couriered to the Master – the

family need not be physically present at a Masters to report an estate.

Future plan involves the online systems which will cause people with requisite knowledge to report estate from their knowledge to report estate from their homes or offices. Reducing footprint of walk-ins in the Masters offices.

END

11 October 2022 - NW3088

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with the President’s Fund having been established as a fund for economic restitution for individuals severely affected by Apartheid, with guidelines set out by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), he has found that there is a large number of South Africans who were excluded from the TRC restitution and who still suffer from the effects of Apartheid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount of the President’s Fund has been used in providing economic restitution to the victims who were excluded?

Reply:

The guidelines set by the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) on page 86 of volume 1 of the TRC of South Africa Report states the following:

a) The TRC Report stated that it adopted a closed-list approach in order not to impose a huge burden on government in that “there would be no value in simply handing the government a list which included a broad category of unidentified persons for consideration as victims deserving of reparations”.

b) The TRC Report further stated that the “Commission had made considerable efforts to reach all parts of the country and to disseminate information on how to make a statement. Those who had chosen not to do so should not, therefore, be included”.

c) The TRC did recognise that “some had elected not to make statements as a matter of political choice”.

d) nThe TRC indicated that “it would have been unrealistic to give the government what would in effect, have been an open-ended list and, on this basis, to expect the state to make a commitment to paying reparations”

The TRC resolved to confine the number of victims eligible for reparations to three (3) areas:

a) Victims who personally made statements to the Commission.

b) Victims named in a statement made by a relative or other interested person for example a colleague, friend or neighbour. These are statements made on behalf of and in the interests of specific persons.

c) Victims identified through the amnesty process.

What is the position in this regard to a large number of South Africans who were excluded from the TRC restitution and who still suffer from the effects of Apartheid?

In terms of current legislation, the President’s Fund effectively makes reparation payments only to victims who made statements to the TRC before 15 December 1997, and who are declared as TRC identified victims of gross human rights violations.

What amount of the President’s Fund has been used in providing economic restitution to the victims who were excluded?

There is no amount from the President’s Fund that has been used to provide reparations to victims who did not make statements to the TRC before 15 December 1997, and who are not declared TRC identified victims of gross human rights violations.