Questions and Replies

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16 September 2021 - NW2037

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person Mr D C Mamphiswana is currently employed in any capacity in a national and/or provincial government department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified person employed, (b) what is the current position the person holds and (c) what is the annual salary package?

Reply:

a) According to PERSAL Dr DC Mamphiswana is currently not employed in the Public Service.

b) Dr DC Mamphiswana was the previous Director-General at the Public Service Commission and was appointed on 01/06/2016. He was dismissed for misconduct in January 2021.

c) Not applicable as the person is no longer employed in the Public Service.

End

16 September 2021 - NW2006

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the Department of Public Service and Administration circular HRD03/01 signed by the Director-General, Ms Yoliswa Mkhasi, and dated 15 April 2021, requesting all Heads of Department and Directors-General to urgently update the qualifications of Senior Management Service (SMS) employees in the Public Service on the Personal and Salary System (PERSAL), (a) what are the reasons the updating of this information on the PERSAL system has become urgent, (b) how often are the human resource units of the various national and provincial government departments expected to update this information on the PERSAL system, (c) who is responsible for monitoring the updating of this information on the PERSAL system by the human resource units of the various government departments and (d) what steps will her department take against the human resources units of the various national and government departments which fail to update this information on the PERSAL system by the dates stipulated in the circular?

Reply:

It was noted that some departments are not capturing or updating the NQF qualifications and personal information as often as expected. This practice leads to unreliable data regarding officials. The capturing is done on the PERSAL system and hence departments are required to urgently update the information on the PERSAL system. (b) Currently there is no prescribed timeline for the updating of information on the PERSAL system. Departments are, however expected to update information on PERSAL system when employees are promoted or transferred to another department and/or at any time when personal information changes. (c) Heads of various departments are responsible, hence the Circular is directed to Heads of Departments. (d) The matter will be escalated to Executive Authorities where there is non-compliance with the Circular. The MPSA also has the option of reporting the non-compliance with the Circular to the President if no-noticeable change is reported after escalation to Executive Authorities

End

15 September 2021 - NW1861

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether her department has developed a policy on the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date was the policy developed and (b) how often is it monitored and reviewed, (2) Whether her department monitors the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, how often does her department monitor the payment of overtime in the Public Service?

Reply:

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

2. Overtime payments are a function located in departments through the PERSAL system. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) does not have access to, and control over the payment function taking place in departments. However, the DPSA from time to time does extract data on overtime from PERSAL and analyse the overtime expenditure in the Public Service. This analysis is used to engage with departments to ensure compliance with Public Service Regulations, 2016 including on the proper alignment of departmental structures to service delivery requirements. Since 2020, the DPSA has held regular meetings with departments that have been found to be non-compliant with applicable regulations and technical support has been provided to improve compliance.

End

15 September 2021 - NW1860

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total amount did each (a) national and (b) provincial government department spend on paying overtime to Public Service employees in the (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 financial years; (2) Whether her department has developed norms and standards for the payment of overtime in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date were the norms and standards developed and (b) how often are the norms and standards (i) monitored and (ii) reviewed?

Reply:

  1. 1. The total overtime expenditure by provincial and national departments for the 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial years are set out in the table below. In instances where no values are displayed, it is due to either the department splitting or merging with another/other department(s) or overtime payments not having been captured on the PERSAL system:

Department Name

2019-20

2020-21

 

Amount

(R)

Amount

(R)

Eastern Cape Provincial Administration

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,207,384.23

131,393.44

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

511,581.59

249,209.73

 

Education

18,113,853.20

13,965,584.32

 

Health

829,123,891.33

922,173,581.39

 

Human Settlements

183,421.78

130,867.37

 

Office of the Premier

959,684.20

155,510.05

 

Provincial Treasury

65,511.58

5,302.19

 

Roads and Public Works

1,876,901.37

537,655.44

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

4,583,294.67

3,966,340.06

 

Safety and Liaison

956,381.49

191,975.32

 

Social Development

3,258,168.59

1,348,584.50

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

971,988.92

29,116.44

 

Transport

39,490,326.66

44,816,427.05

Free State Provincial Administration

Agriculture

1,406,881.16

1,517,070.60

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

27,482.18

326,724.86

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3,686,637.87

1,145,811.34

 

Education

6,663,922.23

6,077,107.86

 

Health

412,804,512.48

448,065,887.45

 

Human Settlements

919,669.23

282,820.62

 

Office of the Premier

5,841.27

28,560.38

 

Police, Roads and Transport

26,522,898.56

26,223,630.44

 

Provincial Treasury

193,997.36

129,203.80

 

Public Works

1,261,530.82

1,371,970.70

 

Social Development

9,747,433.92

6,324,314.36

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

1,029,939.76

116,687.64

Gauteng Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

3,992,205.46

836,076.84

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

280,270.04

954,484.62

 

Community Safety

26,033,682.97

77,501,930.44

 

E-Government

4,989,355.16

6,067,932.15

 

Economic Development

14,159.93

40,695.39

 

Education

21,995,472.75

24,786,642.54

 

Health

2,435,543,294.00

2,763,210,382.50

 

Human Settlements

129,667.01

58,370.18

 

Infrastructure Development

28,723,049.87

29,295,939.15

 

Office of the Premier

713,338.14

2,973,302.02

 

Provincial Treasury

441,709.44

256,062.17

 

Roads and Transport

2,286,377.10

8,877,497.13

 

Social Development

1,435,832.52

1,268,506.95

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

6,240,455.90

706,086.43

KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

7,863,906.28

8,384,542.17

 

Arts and Culture

221,106.35

11,173.32

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,130,739.09

563,901.35

 

Community Safety and Liaison

260,549.36

 
 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

1,150,064.72

648,309.55

 

Education

45,741,563.54

42,181,719.06

 

Finance

1,374,313.87

615,340.64

 

Health

1,443,466,029.40

1,651,250,447.20

 

Human Settlements

1,753,104.14

487,113.17

 

Office of the Premier

1,133,266.41

1,083,368.74

 

Public Works

1,273,475.07

671,446.33

 

Social Development

4,797,599.77

6,104,190.08

 

Sport and Recreation

3,602,378.24

1,135,364.42

 

Transport

120,146,901.38

114,084,581.30

Limpopo Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

10,515,966.75

2,981,688.70

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

4,358,545.18

1,093,578.77

 

Community Safety

88,452.17

 
 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

21,306,916.98

17,419,216.45

 

Education

21,490,655.33

12,084,855.07

 

Health

912,828,046.45

834,820,747.92

 

Office of the Premier

2,626,255.86

207,299.01

 

Provincial Treasury

61,181.02

83,157.58

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

5,185,352.43

1,313,613.05

 

Social Development

644,331.84

171,781.02

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

381,760.10

19,709.53

 

Transport and Community Safety

134,489,211.93

118,715,430.12

Mpumalanga Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

2,512,911.27

1,108,970.79

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

535,146.73

448,455.16

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

21,406,246.29

27,837,333.02

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

3,558,405.69

1,892,291.27

 

Economic Development and Tourism

786,429.45

8,047.20

 

Education

9,496,317.00

10,047,619.84

 

Health

425,888,487.00

495,675,959.89

 

Human Settlements

2,742,950.17

1,418,061.16

 

Office of the Premier

689,522.46

502,770.65

 

Provincial Treasury

867,846.68

62,664.65

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

25,012,772.13

28,574,276.03

 

Social Development

1,779,451.45

13,441,056.28

North West Provincial Administration

Agriculture and Rural Development

2,926,869.15

3,070,211.19

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

280,463.39

496,449.11

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

48,715,985.02

40,785,276.66

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1,154,554.32

1,826,152.58

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

815,951.62

509,190.39

 

Education

12,774,961.63

7,752,329.84

 

Health

493,620,723.57

648,705,462.33

 

Human Settlements

 

29,555.38

 

Office of the Premier

916,062.45

1,049,945.94

 

Provincial Treasury

3,060,051.70

1,629,648.73

 

Public Works and Roads

14,270,996.60

5,642,349.40

 

Social Development

1,116,656.03

1,731,924.82

Northern Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1,419,518.86

751,237.42

 

Education

4,511,565.10

3,364,596.93

 

Environment and Nature Conservation

461,153.72

170,158.66

 

Health

189,446,067.37

223,175,196.17

 

Office of the Premier

891,074.34

549,628.18

 

Provincial Treasury

64,866.20

 
 

Roads and Public Works

1,556,828.92

419,632.24

 

Social Development

193,823.21

193,274.31

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

1,630,716.95

3,176,554.74

Western Cape Provincial Administration

Agriculture

3,802,633.61

2,770,686.47

 

Community Safety

1,857,729.80

1,460,201.91

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1,686,526.30

135,725.04

 

Economic Development and Tourism

131,377.14

174,957.97

 

Education

11,463,379.32

5,749,486.77

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

326,097.58

63,502.19

 

Health

1,157,736,241.00

1,243,312,634.20

 

Human Settlements

5,295,675.96

1,742,808.98

 

Local Government

943,099.21

851,712.07

 

Provincial Treasury

669,139.26

389,753.04

 

Social Development

8,378,531.97

9,032,576.23

 

Department of the Premier

3,517,839.63

1,247,110.44

 

Transport and Public Works

12,378,007.36

9,447,650.95

 

National Departments

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

17,779,803.32

 
 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

80,389,519.07

40,098,966.40

 

Basic Education

7,897,621.06

5,681,828.67

 

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

794,037.21

400,803.16

 

Communications

541,647.64

 
 

Communications and Digital Technologies

639,577.01

138,099.45

 

Cooperative Governance

4,412,709.39

4,270,256.25

 

Correctional Services

193,914,775.91

211,578,343.23

 

Economic Development

280,232.85

 
 

Employment and Labour

55,125,049.13

53,047,865.35

 

Energy

612,460.36

 
 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

10,565,727.39

12,219,404.08

 

Government Communication and Information System

2,950,394.84

702,593.22

 

Health

20,001,395.84

25,895,317.01

 

Higher Education and Training

16,976,257.16

9,595,677.26

 

Home Affairs

85,684,534.47

50,468,033.79

 

Human Settlements

2,257,343.29

1,731,822.84

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

1,816,320.14

1,339,076.49

 

International Relations and Cooperation

11,755,886.85

8,905,729.97

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

18,089,042.44

9,119,949.42

 

Military Veterans

1,804,463.19

917,236.95

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4,878,887.82

2,823,676.98

 

National School of Government

225,216.84

14,284.23

 

National Treasury

16,347,923.84

3,179,421.72

 

Office of the Chief Justice

2,194,424.04

856,071.81

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

380,286.14

118,374.03

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

1,099,056.25

408,591.27

 

Police

1,058,957,936.40

703,439,233.53

 

Public Enterprises

633,577.65

54,097.31

 

Public Service and Administration

1,182,159.50

941,606.03

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

41,830,007.47

22,785,119.14

 

Science and Innovation

634,812.48

176,458.79

 

Small Business Development

258,870.39

80,442.36

 

Social Development

3,978,318.46

5,318,308.53

 

Sport and Recreation South Africa

740,229.15

 
 

Sport, Arts and Culture

2,211,959.45

1,123,723.21

 

Statistics South Africa

1,750,411.32

1,208,001.54

 

The Presidency

11,214,516.50

4,723,079.39

 

Tourism

711,130.74

1,497,175.97

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

1,058,217.03

282,276.81

 

Traditional Affairs

550,756.28

23,888.86

 

Transport

3,285,644.20

2,572,738.80

 

Water and Sanitation

33,960,826.74

31,247,215.11

 

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

190,896.72

44,683.56

Data Source: PERSAL

Compile by the DPSA

Excludes Defence and the State Security Agency

1. Overtime work is informed by the service delivery requirements of a department. Hence, Regulation 49 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that a department must have an approved overtime policy in place. The said departmental overtime policy must be in keeping with the overarching policy requirements set out in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, applicable collective agreements and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended.

a) The overarching policy requirements were established with the introduction of the Public Service Regulatory Framework in 1999 and the conclusion of Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999.

b) The said policy requirements are reviewed as and when required, for example, with the introduction of the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997, as amended, in the Public Service in July 2000 and with the promulgation of the 2016 Public Service Regulations. The applicable Regulation is currently being reviewed.

End

01 September 2021 - NW1686

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the commissioners in the Public Service Commission signed performance agreements; if not, (a) what are the reasons that they do not sign and conclude performance agreements and (b) how is their performance assessed and/or measured; if so, (i) how often are the performance agreements signed and concluded and (ii) with whom do they sign and conclude the performance agreements?

Reply:

The Commissioners in the Public Service Commission (PSC) have not signed any performance agreements.

a) The legislation regulating the employment of Commissioners, i.e. the Public Service Commission Act, 1997 and the Conditions of Appointment (including remuneration and other conditions of service) applicable to members of the Public Service Commission determined by the President, in terms of section 6 (1) of the Public Service Commission Act, do not provide for Commissioners to sign Performance Agreements. The implication of this is that Commissioners are not eligible for annual notch increases and remain on the same notch for the duration of the 5 year term.

The performance of Commissioners was raised by Members of Parliament in dealing with the Public Service Commission Amendment Act, 2019, and the Act makes provision for the renewal of term of a commissioner, based on the commissioner having maintained a satisfactory level of performance in relation to his or her duties. Parliament, being the employer of Commissioners, has to finalise a process in this regard. The PSC is also addressing the matter in the PSC Bill that is being processed.

b) Therefore, no assessment of individual performance is conducted. As the Public Service Commission operates as a single entity, it submits an annual report on its activities to the National Assembly and legislatures as required in section 196 (4)(e) of the Constitution, 1996.

  1. Not applicable
  2. Not applicable

End

27 August 2021 - NW1416

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With respect to the establishment of the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit, (a) on what date was the specified unit officially established, (b) what is the current staff complement of the unit and (c) what has been the successes of the unit since its establishment; (2) Will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with a list detailing the job title of each member of the unit; if not, why not; if so, on what

Reply:

1. (a) In March 2019, the President issued a proclamation on the establishment of the Unit, to be effective from 1 April 2019. The Unit was therefore formally established on 1 April 2019.

(b) Currently the unit consists of nine employees: 1 Chief Director, 1 Director, 4 Deputy Directors and 3 Assistant Directors. Two vacant Director posts are in the process of being filled.

(c) The successes of the unit:

  • Technical Assistance and support: Since 2019, various awareness sessions were conducted to assist departments to implement Public Service Regulations, 2016 addressing ethics; integrity and discipline management. This includes issues of financial interests, gifts, other remunerative work and employees conducting business with the State. Departments were also assisted with establishing Ethics Committees. Ethics Officer Forums were established and used to guide Ethics Officers on the management of ethics in their departments, focussing on identified challenges and new developments.

The Unit assisted departments in rolling out the Guide to implement lifestyle audits in the Public Service. This included conducting training of 41 Ethics Officers (on 3 – 4 May 2021) regarding the verification of assets. This training was run in partnership with the UNODC and the World Bank.

Supported by Co-Water Sogema, an implementing agent for the Government of Canada (under the Strengthening of Ethics and Integrity Project) the Unit is finalising online courses to enable Ethics Officers and departmental investigators to conduct lifestyle reviews and lifestyle investigations as part of the lifestyle audit process. Awareness sessions on the Guide to implement lifestyle audits in the Public Service were presented to all provinces and selected national departments.

The Unit developed and adopted a Guide on managing discipline in the Public Service, to assist departments in managing disciplinary cases and to address precautionary suspensions.

The Unit adopted a project in Q 3 of 2020/2021 to assist those departments with long outstanding precautionary suspensions to address their backlogs and as a result, the costs for precautionary suspensions. Due to the project, by end of March 2021, provinces finalised 78% of their precautionary backlogs (Q1: 1% - Q 2: 8%, Q 3: 18% and Q4: 78%). The cost for precautionary suspensions was reduced, with the cost for National Departments stabilising around R 20 million per quarter and the cost for provinces decreasing from the first quarter to the last quarter with almost R 25 million (Q1:R 87 million compared to Q4: R62 million). The Unit specifically focussed on two provinces with the highest costs pertaining to precautionary suspensions: Free State and Kwa-Zulu Natal. The Free State managed to reduce their cost from R 12 million in Q 3 to R 6 million in Q 4. KZN reduced its cost from a high of R 92 million in Q 3 to R 21 Million in Q 4. NB: The amounts are based on information captured on PERSAL and verified by departments.

  • Monitoring and evaluation: The Unit drew information from 2017 and drafted monitoring and evaluation reports where trends on the following are monitored and used to identify needs and emerging risks:
    • Report on employees conducting business with the State (March 2021), which indicated a decline in employees conducting business with the State. In June 2020, approximately 1500 employees were identified to be possibly involved in conducting business with the State. This declined to 490 employees in Jan 2021, and at the end of June 2021 it declined to 96 employees.
    • Report on employees performing other remunerative work (Feb 2021). The report found that departments are successfully implementing regulation 24 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 (dealing with approval for performance of other remunerative work). Where challenges are identified, the Unit intervenes with training and assistance.
    • Report on submission of Financial Disclosures (March 2021). The report found that 98% of SMS members submitted their financial disclosures for 2020/2021. 60% of MMS members submitted their financial disclosures. Most of these members submitted for the first time, as they were identified as a new category. The Unit intervened to address challenges through training, awareness sessions and technical support provided to departments.
    • The Unit established a database on Public Service employees appointed as board members to State Owned Entities. The database is used to monitor if those employees were appointed in an official (as allowed in terms of Regulation 13(c) and to cross reference with existing databases to ensure they do not perform other remunerative work or conducting business with the State).
  • Cooperation: The DPSA entered into agreements with the Financial Intelligence Centre, National Prosecuting Authority, South African Police Service and Auditor-General South Africa to assist the Unit with monitoring the implementation of regulations and to share data. The Unit works within the Anti-Corruption Tasks Team to provide support to investigations involving fraud of Personal Protective Equipment, Unemployment Insurance Fund and Social Relief of Distress fraud by identifying Public Service employees and following up on the institution of disciplinary action against employees.

2. A list of the members of the Unit was provided to Dr Gondwe.

27 August 2021 - NW1290

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to his reply to question 219 on 10 March 2021, what steps has and/or will his department take to investigate and address the delays in finalising disciplinary cases of Public Service employees who are sitting at home whilst earning a full salary; (2) what (a) total amount has been spent by each (i) national and (ii) provincial departments on (aa) legal and (bb) compensation fees incurred as a result of disciplinary cases involving Public Service employees and (b) is the breakdown of the specified figure for each department; (3) What steps has and/or will his department take against executive authorities who fail to ensure that disciplinary cases within their departments are finalised within the stipulated 90-day period?

Reply:

1. In the third quarter of the previous financial year, the Department of Public Service and Administration launched a project to address the delays in finalising disciplinary cases where the Minister for the Public Service and Administration addressed executive authorities (Ministers and Premiers) whose departments were identified to have long outstanding precautionary suspensions. This was followed by one-on-one sessions between these identified provinces and departments and the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU) to assess the reasons for delays, to provide technical assistance to finalise cases and where a newly developed electronic register was provided to departments to user to record their cases and to provide monthly progress updates to the DPSA. The MPSA furthermore addressed the issue in the Forum of South African Director-Generals (FOSAD) which took place in May 2021. The Director-General: DPSA embarked on provincial visits where top management were engaged, amongst others, on discipline management.

To assist departments with discipline management and to address identified challenges, the PAEIDTAU developed a Guide on managing discipline in the public service. The Guide is available on the DPSA website and training on the guide will commence this year.

In 2020, the DPSA trained 204 presiding officers to preside over disciplinary hearings.

As an interim measure, the MPSA launched (on 16 April 2021) a Discipline Management Complaints Hotline to enable public servants to report incidents of bullying and victimizations by their supervisors, pending finalisation of their disciplinary cases.

2. Tag A, herewith attached, addresses question 2, and reflects the information provided by national and provincial departments who responded to the request of the DPSA to provide the necessary information.

3. As indicated in the response of question 1, the MPSA addressed the issue with executive authorities in one-on-one meetings. The MPSA will continue to issue non-compliance letters to non-compliant executive authorities as mandated in terms of section 16 A of the Public Service Act and will also report those executive authorities to Cabinet and the Presidential Co-ordinating Council.

End

27 August 2021 - NW1674

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the (a) full relevant details of the various agreements signed by him and his predecessors over the past 10 financial years on behalf of the Government with the Republic of Cuba, (b) reasons and (c) total amounts paid to any Cuban entity in the past 10 financial years by (i) his department and (ii) any entity reporting to him?

Reply:

a) The Department of Public Service and Administration has not concluded any agreements with the Republic of Cuba over the past 10 financial years.

b) Not applicable

c) (i) & (ii) Not applicable

End

27 August 2021 - NW1546

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the reasons that vacant Head of Department posts in the North West are filled with persons employed on temporary contracts?

Reply:

The appointments of Heads of Department is governed by the Public Service Act which states that such appointments shall not exceed a period of five years. The contracts of two serving heads of department (COGTA and Human Settlements) were extended by the Premier on a short term basis at the end of their initial 5 year contract periods. The recruitment process of replacement full time incumbents is currently underway.

End

27 August 2021 - NW1372

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What is the total Rand value of monies recovered by his department from officials doing business with the State and (b) which departments has he found to be implicated in the specified matter?

Reply:

a) No monies were recovered by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA), as no individual within this department were found guilty of conducting business with the State. The DPSA established a Memorandum of Understanding with the South African Police Service (SAPS), National Prosecuting Authority and Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to assist departments with investigating those cases where public service employees were identified by the DPSA to be possibly conducting business with the State. The SAPS investigations into the criminal cases referred by departments are not finalised yet, and as such no monies could be recouped.

b) By April 2021, the DPSA identified the following departments as possibly having employees conducting business with the State, and they were requested to investigate the allegations, to proceed with disciplinary action and to open criminal cases against employees found to be guilty:

National/Provincial department

Provincial

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural

Development

 

Correctional Services

 

Higher Education and Training

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

 

Science and Innovation

 

Social Development

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

Eastern Cape

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

Office of the Premier

 

Provincial Treasury

Free State

Social Development

Gauteng

Education

 

Health

KwaZulu-Natal

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

 

Education

 

Health

 

Transport

Mpumalanga

Culture, Sport and Recreation

 

Health

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

North West

Education

 

Health

Northern Cape

Agriculture, Environmental Affairs, Rural

 

Development and Land Reform

 

Economic Development and Tourism

 

Education

 

Health

 

Roads and Public Works

Western Cape

Health

End

01 July 2021 - NW1745

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) were the reasons given by the Northern Cape regarding the request for condonation on submission on Performance Agreement Compliance and (b) measures has his department put in place with regard to provinces missing deadlines?

Reply:

a) The Northern Cape Provincial Government complied with the due date of 31 October 2020 on the signing of PAs for the 2020/2021 performance cycle as set by DPSA Circular 32 02 2020. There was therefore, no reasons required.

b) The performance management and development system (PMDS) prescribe the specific measures for dealing with non-compliance on the signing of PAs including:

  • Empowering Executive Authorities and Heads of Department to take appropriate disciplinary action against employees who fail to comply with the PMDS; and
  • Disqualifying any employee who fails to comply from participating in any performance incentive, i.e. pay progression and performance bonuses;

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) monitors compliance to these policy prescripts and issues compliance notices. Advocacy meetings are also held with FOSAD and Provincial Executive Councils led by Premiers to highlight areas of concern. If a Department is highlighted to have consistently failed to comply, the Minister also has the option to escalate the matter to the President.

End

01 July 2021 - NW1073

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the filling of vacant posts for the position of Director-General and/or Head of Department in the Public Service, what (a) is the total number of (i) national and (ii) provincial departments which were required to advertise for the specified posts more than once during the (aa) 2018-19, (bb) 2019-20 and (cc) 2020-21 financial years, (b) are the reasons that the specified departments were required to advertise for the posts more than once and (c) total amount was spent on re-advertising the posts for each of the implicated departments?

Reply:

(a) Based on information available to the DPSA (a)(i) Three Director General or Head of Component posts were re-advertised as follows:

(aa) CEO: Government Printing Works was re-advertised in June 2018.

(bb) Director-General: Department of Home Affairs was re-advertised in November 2019.

(cc) Director-General: Cooperative Governance was re-advertised was advertised in February 2020.

(a)(ii) Based on information available to the DPSA, state the number of HOD posts (i.e. three (3) Provincial HoD posts were re-advertised:

(aa)

(bb)

(cc)

(b) The reasons provided to the DPSA by the advertising Departments included that advertising requirements were not being met, including attaining the delegation of authority to fill the post from the President and allowing for a fair or adequate time to reply to an advert. It should be noted that in terms of section 3(7)(a) and (b) of the Public Service Act, 1994 the relevant executive authority of department has power and duties to manage the recruitment and appointment in his or her department which includes filling of a posts. The mandate of the DPSA as far as advertising is concerned, is limited to the publication of the vacancies and facilitation of the cabinet memorandum specifically for the Director-General and Deputy Director General posts.

(b) The DPSA issues the PSVC publication at no cost to the departments, any other costs related to the re-advertisement of such post in the media is managed by the relevant department.

End

01 July 2021 - NW1483

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department has concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) total number of Cuban nationals (i) have been employed in each of the specified financial years and/or (ii) are due to be employed in the 2021-23 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework period, (b) are the details of the work that each of the specified Cuban nationals was and/or will be employed to perform, (c) are the details of the specific skills sets that each of the specified Cuban nationals possessed and/or will possess that South African nationals did or will not possess and (d) are the details of the total cost of employing each of the specified Cuban nationals in each case; (2) whether his department took any steps to ensure that the specific skills set of the specified Cuban nationals were and/or will not be available in the Republic amongst South African citizens; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) steps taken and (b) outcomes of the steps taken in this regard?

Reply:

1. The Department of Public Service and Administration has not concluded any work exchange and/or employment agreements with any entity of the Republic of Cuba from the 2010-11 financial year up to the 2020-21 financial year. There was no need identified in this regard.

2. Not applicable.

End

18 June 2021 - NW1286

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) is an employee of any government (a) department, (b) agency and/or (c) state-owned entity in any capacity whatsoever in the national and/or provincial sphere of government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(a)(b) & (c) No, the said person is not an employee in the Department of Public Service and Administration; any departmental agency nor a state-owned entity reporting to the Ministry of Public Service and Administration (MPSA) portfolio. Consequently, there are no further relevant details that can be provided.

According to records on the Public Service payroll system (PERSAL) is currently NOT an employee of any national or provincial department or government component. The person was last employed in the South African Police Service between November 2005 and November 2020.

End

28 May 2021 - NW1115

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What happens if an applicant refuses to indicate their race in section B of the Z83 application for employment form; (2) Whether his department classifies the race of an applicant who refuses to indicate their race; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what basis does his department classify a person as (i) Black, (ii) White, (c) Coloured, (iv) Indian and/or (v) Other; (3) What physical characteristics does his department take into account when classifying an applicant as Black, White, Coloured, Indian and/or Other?

Reply:

1. The Z83 application form is a prescribed form. An applicant is required to fill in all sections of this form completely, accurately and legibly. In addition, the declaration at the end of the form requires the applicant to confirm that all the information provided (including any attachments) is complete and correct to the best of his/her knowledge. Therefore it is incumbent on an applicant to complete the form in full. In the event that this information or any other information is not indicated, the application will not be compliant and may result in disqualification.

2. There is no requirement for any department to attempt to classify applicants into racial groups. The information provided on the Z83 form by the applicant is relied upon as correct and true based on the declaration as mentioned above.

3. As neither the DPSA nor any other department is required to determine the categorisation of the race of an applicant, there are no physical characteristics taken into account.

28 May 2021 - NW1114

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he amended the Z83 application for employment form, as published in notice 627 of 2020 in the Government Gazette of 6 November 2020, to include a new racial category called Other to be listed alongside the existing categories of African, White, Coloured and Indian; if so, (2) what is the legal definition (a) of the category called Other which does not exist in the Employment Equity Act, Act 55 of 1998, and (b) used by his department for the categories of (i) African, (ii) White, (iii) Coloured and (iv) Indian; (3) Whether a person classified as other qualifies as a member of a designated group for the purposes of the Employment Equity Act, Act 58 of 1998, and broad-based black economic empowerment?

Reply:

(1) The Z83 application for employment form was amended extensive public consultations to address, among others, the issue of employees trying to escape disciplinary procedures and accountability by resigning when charges are proffered against them. The revisions empower the Public Service to give effect to section 16B (4) and (5) of the Public Service Act, 1994 which allows for employees to be disciplined for misconduct allegedly committed in their former department, when they are appointed in a new department. In addition other amendments included the race categorisation for ‘other’’.

(2) There is no legal definition accorded to the category of “other”. Under note 3 attached to the information of race as reflected in the Z83 form, it is indicated that the information is to enable the department to comply with the employment Equity Act, 1998. The information provided in respect of the race of applicants is therefore utilised to implement any affirmative action measures that a department may have.

In terms of the Employment Equity Act, “designated groups” is defined to include South Africa citizens who are black people, women and people with disabilities. In the same Act, “black people” is defined to mean Africans, Coloured and Indians. In addition it is also recognised that there are applicants, such as foreign nationals, who do not fall within these definitions provided for in the Employment Equity Act and therefore the category of “other” was introduced.

(3) The Z83 form is for purposes of employment in the public service and does not address broad-based black economic empowerment prescripts. The intention of the Z83 form is to allow the ease of categorisation of persons for employment taking into account the Employment Equity Act. Therefore an applicant who reflects himself or herself within the category of “other” indicates that the applicants does not fall within the other categorisations as contemplated in the Employment Equity Act.

20 May 2021 - NW827

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in light of the rising budget deficit of the Republic which has been made worse by the economic impact of COVID-19, necessitating a need for the rationalisation of Government expenditure through, among other considerations, a rationalisation of the public service headcount, his department has introduced a rationalisation process of the staff complement in the public service; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) by what date is the rationalisation envisaged to be completed?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration has not introduced rationalisation of the Public Service headcount. Headcount increases have not been the main driver of the wage bill. Rationalisation of the Public Service headcount may adversely affect service delivery to citizens in critical sectors such health, education and policing amongst others. The 2021 Budget Review, has indicated that the government wage bill must be managed within the Fiscal Framework which assumes that compensation budget ceilings will be maintained.

Not applicable in terms of the response in (a).

End

20 May 2021 - NW825

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress grant (SRD), his department took any disciplinary and/or legal steps against the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether any steps have been taken to recover the monies from the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether any measures have been put in place to ensure that no government employee will be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No employees of the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has been implicated, therefore the Department did not take any disciplinary and/or legal steps. Discipline management is a decentralised function and therefore the responsibility of each department to enforce the disciplinary code and take the necessary legal steps to recover public funds. The DPSA is only mandated to take action against its own employees when found guilty of wrongdoing through a disciplinary process.

2. The DPSA did not recover monies from the implicated public service employees. Before monies can be recovered from employees, an investigation must be finalised with sufficient evidence of criminality collected and recommending for monies to be recovered. The recovery of monies will then be effected through a court order. The mandate to investigate fraud, corruption and crime belongs solely to the South African Police Service, or under special circumstances to the Special Investigative Unit (SIU). The DPSA, including the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU), does not have a mandate to investigate crime or to recover monies from employees.

3. The DPSA established that all cases regarding government employees receiving Social Relief of Distress grants (SRD) were referred to the Fusion Centre, with a process embarked upon to analyse the data and to refer established cases to investigators. The Fusion Centre is an Anti-Corruption Task Team initiative, where resources of law enforcement agencies are pooled and coordinated to investigate and prosecute priority corruption cases. The DPSA has a Memorandum of Understanding with the Financial Intelligence Centre (who are involved in the Fusion Centre) in terms of which the DPSA will assist any investigations by identifying Public Service employees in corruption cases. In this regard, the DPSA will assist with the identification of Public Service employees from the SRD Grant cases, and after investigations established criminal conduct involving public service employees, the PAEIDTAU will monitor if national and provincial departments are taking disciplinary steps against the identified employees. The Department of Social Development will have to implement measures on their systems to prevent government employees to be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grants, as those systems are not managed or maintained by the DPSA.

End

11 May 2021 - NW698

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD Grant), his department has been able to conclusively establish the number of government employees who have fraudulently applied for the SRD Grant; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the total number of government employees who actually received the SRD Grant and (b) is the total amount that the implicated government employees received from the SRD Grant?

Reply:

Cognisance of the Auditor-General’s findings is taken. It must however, be noted, that the mandatory investigative processes need to be undertaken by the relevant authorities, such as the South African Police Service (SAPS) and in some cases, the Special Investigating Unit (SIU). Once these investigations have been completed, the necessary information will be obtained by the DPSA, and will be communicated to the relevant department/s. The DPSA, through the Technical Assistance Unit will ensure that it keeps abreast of the developments so as to offer support to departments and monitor the management of disciplinary actions instituted against those public servants who are found guilty.

End

11 May 2021 - NW308

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the total number of (a) national and (b) provincial government employees who are currently working from home during the Adjusted Level 3 Lockdown to curb the spread of the COVID-19 virus; (2) whether the Government has conducted an assessment of the number of national and provincial government employees who are currently working from home that have access to sufficient internet/data to execute their duties; (3) what number, out of the total number of national and provincial government employees currently working from home, do not have access to the required internet/data connections to fully execute their duties?

Reply:

  1. The required information is not centralised and readily available as each department keeps its own register and records. Individuals Departments must be approached for detailed information such as access to internet/data.

End

21 April 2021 - NW490

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What number of (i) directors-general and (ii) heads of departments (HODs) in the public service are (aa) permanently employed, (bb) in acting positions, (b) for what period have they been acting in such positions and (c) will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with a breakdown of this number in each government department?

Reply:

a) (i) (aa) Directors-General - 37 Nationally appointed; 8 Provincially appointed (Schedule 1 of the Public Service Act, 1994) - (Directors-General are appointed on contract for a term not exceeding five years)

(bb) Acting Directors-General - National 8 Directors-General are acting; Provincially 1 Director-General is acting.

(ii) (aa) Heads of Department: 87 appointed – (Schedule 2 of the Public Service Act, 1994) – (Heads of Department are appointed on contract for a term not exceeding five years)

(bb) Acting Heads of Department – 25.

(b&c) Officials are appointed to act from the date the post has become vacant – Period of Acting Directors-General Nationally by Department (data: as at 31 December 2020):

National Departments

Post vacant date

Duration vacant (months)

Department of Social Development

2017-05-31

43

Department of Water and Sanitation

2017-11-30

37

Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2020-10-31

2

Department of Military Veterans

2018-06-15

31

Small Business Development

2018-09-30

27

The Presidency

2020-08-31

4

Communication and Digital Technologies

2020-06-30

6

State Security Agency

2018-04-30

33

     

Provincial Department

Post vacant date

Duration vacant (months)

North West Office of the Premier

2019-04-30

20

(b&c) Officials are appointed to act from the date the post has become vacant – Period of Acting Nationally by Department: (data: as at 31 December 2020):

Province

Provincial Department

Post vacant date

Duration vacant (months)

KZN

Provincial Treasury

2020-06-30

6

 

Transport

2020-04-30

8

 

Northern Cape

Provincial Treasury

2014-10-31

74

 

Education

2020-08-31

4

 

Roads and Public Works

2020-07-31

7

 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

2019-10-31

14

 

Environment and Nature Conservation

2020-02-01

11

 

Economic Development and Tourism

2014-10-31

74

 

Health

2020-02-28

10

 

Eastern Cape

Health

2020-09-30

3

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

2018-09-30

27

 

Mpumalanga

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

2018-05-31

31

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

2019-10-31

14

 

Economic Development and Tourism

2014-10-31

74

 

Education

2019-08-31

16

 

Health

2013-06-01

90

 

Cooperative Governance

2020-02-29

10

 

Gauteng

Community Safety

2020-02-29

10

 

Health

2020-10-01

3

 

Economic Development

2020-11-30

1

 

Limpopo

Education

2020-01-31

11

 

Social Development

2020-05-01

8

 

North West

Agriculture and Rural Development

2020-10-01

3

 

Health

2020-01-13

12

 

Social Development

2018-11-30

26

       
       

20 April 2021 - NW536

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, in view of the announcement by the National School of Government that the government of the People’s Republic of China will be providing training to South African public servants, including to expose South African managers to China’s governance models, the Government is paying to obtain this training from the Chinese government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a detailed breakdown of the curriculum and topics that will be covered during the training; (3) given that the People’s Republic of China is a one-party state instead of a multiparty liberal democracy like the Republic, what are the reasons that he has found it to be appropriate for public servants in our democracy to be trained on governance matters by functionaries of the Chinese state?

Reply:

(1) The Government of South Africa is not paying to receive this training from China. The programmes are sponsored by the Government of China and exist within the context of the MoUs entered into between the NSG and the China National Academy of Governance and the University of China Academy of Social Sciences.

(2) For details of the curriculum please see the following annexures:

Annexure 1: Building Governance Capacity for South Africa

Annexure 2: Economic Governance

Annexure 3: Poverty Alleviation and Rural Development

 

The upcoming programme on Governance and Emergency Management will cover topics such as (1) Modernization of Chinese Government Structure and Governance Ability, (2) Chinese Government Performance Management, (3) China's Public Policy Making, (4) Response to Emergencies, (5) Emergency management in China, (6) Practice and exploration of the construction of national emergency management system

These programmes are targeted at Senior Managers in the public service and have also attracted Deputy Ministers, Councillors and Executive Mayors.

(3) The NSG has prioritised the use of strategic partnerships with leading institutions from around the world in pursuit of knowledge exchanges. These partnerships include institutions in Europe, Asia and the Americas. These partnerships are with the Ecole Nationale d’Administration (France), University College London (United Kingdom), Thunderbird School of Global Management – Arizona University (USA), China National Academy of Governance and the University of China Academy of Social Sciences.

The NSG also enjoys exchanges with countries such as Germany, Chile and India where we facilitate learning opportunities for South Africa’s public servants. The pursuit of these strategic partnerships is in line with South Africa’s White Paper on Foreign Policy. We pursue our relations with countries that have diplomatic relations with South Africa, China being one of them. Regardless of its Political System, China boasts a public service that is based on a strong system of meritocracy and has its own unique governance system which other countries can learn from in crafting or improving their own in pursuit of their own national objectives and interests. Over the past decades, China has excelled in development planning, testing and mass rollout of integrated development initiatives. China has been very successful in translating strategic plans into operational plans and implementing them. We would like South Africa’s public servants and leaders to be exposed to the education and learning programmes that have underpinned the successes of development-oriented states such as China.

We also facilitate learning opportunities with institutions in Germany, France, Chile and India, because like China, they have mastered State craft.

End

20 April 2021 - NW172

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total (a) number of provincial departments have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year; (2) What total (a) number of departments within the national Government have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year?

Reply:

  1. For the purpose of responding to this parliamentary question, departments that received a disclaimer or adverse finding from the Auditor-General for the 2019/2020 financial year are regarded as having underperformed. (a) The North West Department of Human Settlements is the only provincial department that received a disclaimer or adverse finding from the Auditor-General for the 2019/2020 financial year. (b) According to information available on PERSAL no performance bonuses were paid by the department for the 2019/2020 financial year.
  2. (a) None of the national departments received a disclaimer or adverse finding for the 2019/2020 financial year. (b) According to information available on PERSAL no performance bonuses were paid by departments that are regarded as underperforming.

End

15 April 2021 - NW535

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in light of the dismissal of a certain person (name and details furnished), for illegally appointing his mistress to the position of Chief Director: Professional Ethics, he intends to institute a review of the fitness to hold office of all people appointed by the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As it stands all appointments made by this person were performed in line with the law and delegations and therefore they are all valid until declared invalid by a court of law. In addition, each appointment made creates a contract of employment and rights for employees in terms of the Labour Relations Act of 1995 and other labour legislation. The individual employees’ rights cannot be diminished by just one incident that has no bearing on their employment.

The dismissal of the person is regarded as a deterrent to all employees to act within the prescribed legislative framework and the organisation cannot conduct a witch-hunt where no allegation or evidence of wrong-doing exist. Such an approach will have a destabilising effect on the organisation. In this regard, it should be kept in mind that the recruitment and selection process is not undertaken by a single person, but by a Selection Committee comprising of at least three members and is guided by the Public Service Regulations, 2016, as amended, and the Departmental Policy on Recruitment and Selection. When the allegations came to the attention of the Executive Authority, the former employee was removed from all recruitment and selection processes within the organisation.

Since the dismissal of the former employee, the organisation has been at pains to institute additional controls in the human resources management environment to overcome the challenges identified in the recruitment and selection process, this includes but is not limited to a comprehensive legislative and policy framework checklist that accompanies each recruitment and selection process, as well as the review of human resources management policies.

Whistle-blowing Guidelines are in place to encourage and enable employees to raise serious concerns about fraud and corruption within the organisation or with the independent Audit Committee. All complaints are handled professionally and in line with the prevailing prescripts.

12 April 2021 - NW915

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What total number of (i) Directors-General and (ii) provincial Heads of Department have signed their performance contracts and (b) how does he intend to hold the specified officials to account should they fail to meet the agreed upon performance standards?

Reply:

a) All the DGs and HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements for the 2020/2021 performance cycle have submitted.

(i) Out of the 54 national departments and Offices of the Premier, 39 DGs were required to and signed performance agreements. The remainder of the DGs comprises of 13 acting DGs and two (2) newly appointed. These officials only have to sign performance contracts three months after assumption of duties.

(ii) The 68 HoDs who were required to sign performance agreements have submitted it. At the provincial level, 24 were acting HoDs, three (3) newly appointed, one (1) on special leave and one (1) on precautionary suspension.

b) In terms of section 7(b) of the Public Service Act 103 of 1994, each individual Executing Authority has all the necessary powers to manage performance in their respective departments.

End

12 April 2021 - NW519

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) Whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. a) No employee of the Department of Public Service and Administration performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to their work in the past five financial years.

b) The functions and performance of all employees are governed by their Job Descriptions, Employment Contracts, Performance Agreements and regular Performance Assessments as per applicable Directives, laws and policies.

b. (i) Zero (0);

(ii) Not applicable.

2. No such requests nor approvals were made by any employee as the Department does not have such a policy.

a) The Department does not have a policy that requires employees to perform work outside of normal working hours additional to their responsibilities as this would be irregular and violates the principles of fair labour practice.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

End

12 April 2021 - NW489

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What number of public servants have taken early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at (i) national and (ii) provincial level and (b) will he furnish Dr M M Gondwe with the breakdown of the relevant number in each government department and (c) what number of these public servants were (i) teachers and (ii) nurses?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at national level was 2 879.

(1) (a) (ii) The number of public servants who took early retirement since the start of the lockdown to curb the spread of the virus in March 2020 at provincial level was 2 005.

(1) (b) The breakdown of the relevant number of early retirements in each government department is depicted in the table below:

 

Number of Public Servants that retired early by department from 27 March 2020

National/Provincial department

Total

Total

4,884

Eastern Cape

Total

322

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

8

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

2

 

Education

215

 

Health

54

 

Office of the Premier

3

 

Provincial Treasury

4

 

Roads and Public works

6

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

20

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

2

 

Transport

8

Free State

Total

135

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

3

 

Education

105

 

Health

10

 

Police, Roads and Transport

7

 

Social Development

10

Gauteng

Total

207

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Economic Development

4

 

Education

87

 

Health

107

 

Human Settlements

6

 

Social Development

2

KwaZulu-Natal

Total

502

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

15

 

Arts and Culture

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Education

368

 

Health

101

 

Office of the Premier

2

 

Public Works

2

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport

8

Limpopo

Total

360

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

5

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

5

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

1

 

Education

283

 

Health

48

 

Office of the Premier

1

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

11

 

Social Development

3

 

Transport and Community Safety

3

Mpumalanga

Total

139

 

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

5

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

1

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

2

 

Education

93

 

Health

28

 

Provincial Treasury

2

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

7

National

Total

2,879

 

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

30

 

Basic Education

4

 

Correctional Services

382

 

Employment and Labour

7

 

Energy

2

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

1

 

Government Communication and Information System

2

 

Health

2

 

Higher Education and Training

110

 

Home Affairs

36

 

Human Settlements

2

 

International Relations and Cooperation

8

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

45

 

Military Veterans

2

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

4

 

National Treasury

9

 

Office of the Chief Justice

9

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

2

 

Police

2,127

 

Public Service and Administration

2

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

44

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

4

 

Statistics South Africa

3

 

Water and Sanitation

41

North West

Total

106

 

Agriculture and Rural Development

1

 

Arts, Culture, Sports and Recreation

3

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

4

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

2

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

1

 

Education

69

 

Health

20

 

Provincial Treasury

1

 

Public Works and Roads

5

Northern Cape

Total

34

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

1

 

Education

26

 

Health

4

 

Roads and Public Works

1

 

Social Development

1

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

1

Western Cape

Total

200

 

Agriculture

1

 

Community Safety

1

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

1

 

Education

119

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

2

 

Health

60

 

Provincial Treasury

7

 

Social Development

6

 

The Premier

3

(1) (c) (i) The number of teachers who took early retirement during this period was 1 274

(1) (c) (ii) The number of nurses who took early retirement during this period was 214

The information indicated above was obtained from PERSAL as on 1 March 2021.

End

12 April 2021 - NW307

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether he has been informed of reports that certain public sector unions are demanding wage increases of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations (details furnished); (2) (a) what are the full details of all the various demands that have so far been tabled by public sector unions in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations and (b) will he furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a list consisting of the (i) name of each labour union and (ii) demands they have tabled; (3) Whether it is the position of his department that a wage increase of 10% is considered a reasonable demand; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) can only respond to formal demands tabled by labour in the Public Service Coordinating Council (PSCBC). At the time of this reply, the unions to the PSCBC had not formally tabled their demands as per Council processes. Therefore the MPSA has not been informed of any wage increase demand of up to 10% during the upcoming round of wage negotiations.

(2)(a) The union parties to the PSCBC tabled their demands in relation to the upcoming round of wage negotiations on first March 2021 and they are attached as annexure to this reply.

(2(b)(i)(ii) The information requested is not available for the reasons indicated above.

(3) The process of engagement between parties in the PSCBC on wage negotiations occurs under the purview of the PSCBC. The employer will negotiate on the basis of fairness, equity, sustainability and affordability.

End

09 April 2021 - NW953

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) is an employee of (a) his department, (b) a departmental agency and/or (c) any state-owned entity reporting to him in any capacity whatsoever; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) No, the said person is not an employee in the Department of Public Service and Administration.

b) N/A

c) N/A

End

09 April 2021 - NW334

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of (i) directors-general and (ii) acting directors-general of government departments received performance bonuses in respect of the 2018-19 financial year and (b) was the total quantum of such bonuses paid out and (c) number of the relevant departments achieved outputs in excess of 80% of their targets as set out in their annual performance plans?

Reply:

In terms of section 7(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994, only the head of national departments and Offices of the Premier may bear the designation of Director-General. The information presented is therefore limited to Directors-General as contained in Schedule 1 of the Public Service Act, 1994.

(a) According to the information from the PERSAL system for the 2018/2019 performance cycle (i) four (4) Directors-General were paid performance bonuses (ii) no acting Directors-General were paid performance bonuses. (b) A total amount of R614 935,11 was paid out to Directors-General for performance bonuses. (c) All of the relevant departments have achieved outputs in excess of 80% of their targets as set out in their annual performance plans (APP). The table below provides the details of the departments who paid performance bonuses.

No

Name of Departments

Performance bonus paid

Achievement of APP targets

Directors-General

 

1

Higher Education and Training

R155,942.16

95%

2

The Presidency

R90,369.00

80%

3

Northern Cape: Office of the Premier

R248,131,95*

99%

4

Western Cape: Office of the Premier

R120,492.00

92%

GRAND TOTAL

R614 935,11

 

*The amount is for two payments of performance bonuses for two performance cycles paid in the 2018/2019 financial year. .

End

09 April 2021 - NW385

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether each national department employs an accounting officer; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what total number of accounting officers are employed in an acting capacity and (b) does each specified officer have the necessary qualifications required for the position; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) In terms of Section 36 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 with respect to Accounting Officers; every department and every constitutional institution must have an accounting officer and the head of a department must be the accounting officer for the department.

(2) In terms of Section 37 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, deals with acting accounting officers and stipulates when an accounting officer is absent or otherwise unable to perform the functions of accounting officer, or during a vacancy, the functions of accounting officer must be performed by the official acting in the place of that accounting officer.

(a) Nationally: There are nine (9) acting Accounting Officers (In the Presidency the acting DG is also the formally appointed accounting officer).

Provincially: There are twenty seven (27) acting Accounting Officers.

(b) In terms of the regulatory framework, Regulation 63 (2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that, “an employee directed to act in another post in terms of section 32 (2) should have the necessary competency for the post to which he or she is appointed to act”. As defined in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, Competency means the combination of knowledge, skills, behaviour and aptitude that a person can apply in the work environment, which indicates a person's ability to meet the requirements of a specific post. For purposes of business continuity meeting qualifications for a post for purposes of acting is not a requirements however, noting the definition, competency to perform the duties are.

End

09 April 2021 - NW935

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with phase one of the vaccine rollout process targeting frontline healthcare workers, his department has devised a vaccine rollout strategy for public service workers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) forms part of the National Vaccine Rollout Committee led by the Department of Health. The Committee acts as a coordination mechanism that oversees the vaccine rollout in both the public and private sectors as government implements the National Vaccine Rollout Strategy, which was presented to Parliament.

In preparation for the Phase Two of the Rollout strategy, the DPSA has developed and presented the Project Plan to the Workplace Vaccination Work Stream of the rollout Committee, which outlines the rollout strategy for essential workers in the public service. This Project Plan is being consulted on with critical stakeholders for finalisation. The relevant details will therefore be made public and shared with Parliament once the plan has been finalised following the consultations.

End

09 April 2021 - NW948

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How often does his department verify the data on the Persal system in an effort to ensure (a) its accuracy and (b) that there are no ghost employees on the system; (2) what are the reasons that some government departments are still making use of manual pay slips as opposed to electronic pay slips despite the fact that electronic pay slips contribute towards the reduction of printing costs and root out ghost employees in the public service; (3) by what date is it envisaged that the Government will phase out the manual submission and formally introduce electronic submission of leave forms for Public Service employees as part of modernising the public service?

Reply:

1. Each department is required to verify the payroll reports on a monthly basis to ensure that every employee receiving payment from the department is eligible for such payment.

a) The capturing, maintenance and verification of data on PERSAL is a decentralised responsibility of each relevant Head of Department. Therefore it is the responsibility of each Head of Department to assign a designated employee as a PERSAL controller to manage data accuracy. PERSAL controllers in every department are accountable for institutionalizing, maintaining and communicating procedures to ensure continuous control over access, security and maintenance of data records within their departments.

b) Treasury Regulations prescribe the verification of payroll reports to ensure that only legitimately employed persons receive payment. According to Treasury Regulation 8.3.4:

For all employees, the person in charge at the respective pay-points must certify on the date of payment that all persons listed on the payroll report are entitled to payment. Employees paid by cheque must sign the payroll report when collecting their cheques.” Regulation 8.3.4 further specifies “These payroll reports must then be returned to the Chief Financial Officer of the department within 10 days and the accounting officer must ensure that all pay-point certificates have been received on a monthly basis.”

2. There is no specific set date for the complete phasing out of manual submission as the relevant technology platform is currently not capable of on-boarding all government departments at the same time. The introduction of electronic payslips is therefore, being rolled out in a phased approach. The migrating of departmental users to an electronic payslip platform requires a close partnership between the PERSAL controllers at National Treasury, department specific HRM employees working on PERSAL, Government Information Technology Officer (GITO) per department, the account management team at SITA as well as their mainframe team. This process impacts the on-boarding process as it depends on the readiness of specific departments to move to an electronic payslip platform at different times depending on the time departments receive the proposal from SITA, process it and verify employees and their respective email addresses to ensure the correct payslip goes to the correct employee. It has also been indicated by some departments that not all employees have access to emails which impacts on their ability to access electronic payslips.

3. The automation of leave is part of the functionality to be provided by the Integrated Financial Management System (IFMS). National Treasury, which is the lead department in the IFMS Programme, is currently in the process of appointing a service provider to design the system to meet the requirements of the Public Service. Once this has been completed and the IFMS implemented, the system will address, amongst others, the automation of leave.

In view of the above, it is not possible to indicate at this stage on which date manual leave forms will be phased out and replaced with an electronic system.

End

09 April 2021 - NW534

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)In light of the recent ruling by the Labour Appeal Court that the 2018 wage agreement, namely Resolution 1 of 2018, was deemed unlawful and in contravention of Regulations 78 and 79 of the Public Service Regulations because the State agreed to wage increases despite not having the requisite written commitment or approval from National Treasury, what are the reasons that his department ignored the letter from the Minister of Finance on 14 February 2018, which explicitly indicated that no additional funding can be made available to fund the wage negotiations outcome and advised his department to instead table an alternative offer that would not exceed the existing funding envelope; (2) whether he will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with (a) a list of the full names of (i) all government officials and (ii) Cabinet Ministers who formed part of the Committee of Ministers and/or who participated at any point in the negotiation of the 2018 wage agreement between the State and trade unions, (b) a full list of names of Cabinet Ministers and officials who formally approved and/or signed off on the 2018 agreement on behalf of the State, (c) a copy of the Cabinet Minutes from the Cabinet meeting that approved the draft wage agreement of 26 January 2018 and (d) a copy of the Cabinet Minutes from the Cabinet meeting that approved the final wage agreement of 8 June 2018?

Reply:

The labour unions involved in this matter have made an application for leave to appeal the Labour Appeal Court judgement. The matter is therefore still before the courts. Under the circumstances, it is advised that at this stage the Minister for the Public Service and Administration is unable to respond to the questions posed.

End

07 April 2021 - NW152

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the total number of senior managers who do not have the required qualifications and credentials for the positions they currently occupy and (b) in which (i) national and (ii) provincial government departments are they employed and (c) what is being done to rectify this situation?

Reply:

a) According to information from PERSAL as at 15th February 2021, there are currently a total of 9477 Senior Managers employed in the Public Service. Out of this total, 3301 members do not have the required qualifications. However it needs to be stated that many Departments do not capture the qualification information on PERSAL and therefore the information in the tables below are skewed. The information also excludes the Department of Defence and State Security Agency.

b) A total of 5447 SMS members are employed in the National departments, 1987 of them do not have the required qualifications. These are from the following departments :

(i) NATIONAL

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

227

Arts and Culture

1

Basic Education

5

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

11

Communication and Digital Technologies

17

Cooperative Governance

34

Correctional Services

67

Education

1

Employment and Labour

79

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

107

Government Communication and Information System

8

Health

56

Higher Education and Training

52

Home Affairs

56

Human Settlement

46

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

9

International Relations and Cooperation

81

Justice and Constitutional Development

189

Military Veterans

4

Mineral Resources and Energy

31

National School of Government

10

National Treasury

64

Office of the Chief Justice

10

Office of the Public Service Commission

15

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

16

Police

228

Public Enterprises

22

Public Service and Administration

32

Public Works and Infrastructure

67

Science and Innovation

44

Small Business Development

15

Social Development

39

Sports, Arts and Culture

22

Statistics South Africa

24

The Presidency

17

Tourism

23

Trade, Industry and Competition

128

Traditional Affairs

7

Transport

25

Water and Sanitation

78

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

20

TOTAL

1987

(ii) Out of a total of 4028 Senior Managers who are currently employed at various provincial government department, 1314 of them do not have the required qualifications as described by the aforementioned Directive and they are from the following departments in the following provinces:

EASTERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

12

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

17

Education

25

Health

47

Human Settlement

14

Office of the Premier

5

Provincial Treasury

1

Roads and Public Works

8

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

15

Safety and Liaison

1

Social Development

15

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

12

Transport

13

TOTAL

185

FREE STATE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture

18

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

12

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

8

Education

14

Health

19

Human Settlement

3

Office of the Premier

7

Police, Roads and Transport

15

Provincial Treasury

6

Public Works

9

Social Development

12

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

4

TOTAL

127

GAUTENG

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

25

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

14

Community Safety

8

E-Government

26

Economic Development

14

Education

42

Health

57

Human Settlement

25

Infrastructure Development

31

Office of the Premier

34

Provincial Treasury

36

Roads and Transport

31

Social Development

22

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

16

TOTAL

381

KWAZULU-NATAL

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

4

Arts and Culture

7

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

17

Community Safety and Liaison

6

Economic Development , Tourism and Environmental Affairs

25

Education

42

Finance

23

Health

28

Human Settlement

8

Office of the Premier

29

Public Works

11

Social Development

16

Sports and Recreation

6

Transport

24

TOTAL

246

LIMPOPO

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

6

Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs

17

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

19

Education

23

Health

46

Office of the Premier

6

Provincial Treasury

3

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

12

Social Development

4

Sports, Arts and Culture

5

Transport and Community Safety

13

TOTAL

154

MPUMALANGA

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

6

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

5

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

5

Culture, Sports and Recreation

3

Economic Development and Tourism

9

Education

15

Health

31

Human Settlement

15

Office of the Premier

7

Provincial Treasury

11

Public Works, Roads and Transport

16

Social Development

8

TOTAL

131

NORTH WEST

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture and Rural Development

0

Arts, Culture, Spots and Recreation

0

Community Safety and Transport Management

7

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

3

Education

0

Health

6

Human Settlement

0

Justice and Constitutional Development

1

Office of the Premier

5

Provincial Treasury

0

Public Works and Roads

2

Social Development

2

TOTAL

27

NORTHERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

1

Cooperative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs

1

Economic Development and Tourism

1

Education

4

Environment and Nature Conservation

0

Health

3

Office of the Premier

3

Provincial Treasury

1

Roads and Public Works

0

Social Development

3

Sport, Arts and Culture

0

Transport, Safety and Liaison

1

TOTAL

18

WESTERN CAPE

Name of Department

Number of SMS Members with qualifications below NQF Level 7/ Not captured

Agriculture

0

Community Safety

0

Cultural Affairs and Sport

0

Economic Development and Tourism

4

Education

4

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

6

Health

9

Human Settlement

2

Local Government

2

Provincial Treasury

3

Social Development

5

The Premier

5

Transport and Public Works

5

TOTAL

45

(c) In order to rectify this situation, a Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum Entry Requirements for SMS was issued to departments with effect from 1 April 2017, as determined in terms of Section 3(2) of the Public Service Act as Amended by MPSA. The Objectives of the Directive are:

  1. To promote continuous professional development of members of the SMS;
  2. To ensure that training on identified skills gap is implemented in departments;
  3. To ensure that compulsory training programmes aimed at addressing the developmental needs of senior managers within the Public Service have been identified;
  4. To promote and encourage SMS members to be trained in a structured manner;
  5. To promote minimum entry requirements for appointment into the SMS through obtaining a compulsory Public Service specific qualification;
  6. To achieve a highly competent SMS cadre; and
  7. To strengthen the recruitment process at SMS level, inter-alia.

It is therefore, compulsory for the identified development needs of SMS members to be reflected in their Performance Agreements as Personal Development Plans. Departments must ensure that such developmental needs are addressed through ensuring that sufficient funding is made available for such interventions.

End

26 March 2021 - NW309

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Since the Republic was placed under Adjusted Level 3 Lockdown on 29 December 2020, what is the total number of Public Service employees who have been or are currently absent from work, but are still receiving their full salaries?

Reply:

The total number of public servants absent since the Adjusted Level 3 Lockdown as from 29 December 2020 amounts to 322 818. The statistics as provided are up to and inclusive of 31 January 2021 (the latest date for which information is available). The figure is made up of employees utilising approved leave as provided for in the Public Service prescripts and as set out in the table underneath. It is important to note that when an employee is counted, it does not mean that the employee was on leave for the full period, e.g. 29 December 2020 to 31 January 2021. This means the person was on leave within the period indicated. Further, the person may have been on leave on more than one occasion in the period. In accordance with the leave provisions in the Public Service it is incumbent on employees to apply for leave and obtain approval prior to taking leave.

LEAVE TAKEN AS FROM 29 DECEMBER 2020 TO 31 JANUARY 2021

Leave Category

Number Of Employees

Adoption

7

Family Responsibility

13 307

Leave Without Pay

929

Maternity

1 513

Occupational Injuries/Diseases

406

Paternity

272

Permanent Incapacity Leave

28

Pre-Natal

632

Shop Steward/Office Bearer

90

Sick-Full Pay

48 576

Special

13 518

Temporary Incapacity Leave

198

Vacation - Full Pay)

243 342

Total

322 818

End

26 March 2021 - NW437

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What total number of (a) employees of the State have been found to be doing business with the State over the past five years and (b) the specified (i) employees were disciplined and (ii) hearings resulted in the dismissal of the employees?

Reply:

a) The number of employees found to be possibly conducting business with the State was 482 at the end of February 2021, with eight (8) employees reported to be conducting business with the State in an official capacity (thus, having been appointed by a competent authority, as allowed in terms of Public Service Regulations, 2016, regulations 13(c)).

 

A

D

 

Departments

Number of Public Servants listed on CSD conducting business with an organ of state as at end of January 2021

1

KwaZulu-Natal

39

2

Gauteng

42

3

North West

13

4

Eastern Cape

71

5

Limpopo

41

6

Mpumalanga

43

7

Free State

25

8

Northern Cape

72

9

Western Cape

18

 

Total Provincial Departments

364

 

Total National Departments

126

 

Grand Total

482 (8 in official capacity)

b) The specified:

(i) Employees disciplined:

Referred for disciplinary hearings

37 cases in the South African Police Service (SAPS);

One (1) case in the Department of Social Development;

Five (5) cases in the Department of Employment and Labour; and

11 cases in the Northern Cape Department of Health.

Outcome of disciplinary hearing

One (1) employee was suspended for three months without pay at the Department of Employment and Labour.

Criminal charges introduced

12 cases were referred for criminal charges in the SAPS.

(ii) hearings resulted in the dismissal of employees: To date there are no employees who were reported to be dismissed from their respective departments due to involvement in the conducting of business with the State.

End

26 March 2021 - NW682

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

The NSG is one of the entities that reports to the Minister for Public Service and Administration and has its own premises that it leases from DPWI (PIC) situated at ZK Matthews, Trevenna Bld, 70 Meintjies street Sunnyside PRETORIA and utilise the following security firms.

(i) Name of the Company

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration of the contract

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise cc (Reg 2003/034074/23)

To provide physical security services to safeguard NSG personnel and property

R 17, 538, 566,28

Five (5) years

(01 November 2018 – 31 October 2023)

Vox Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd (Reg 2011/000797/07)

To provide management and maintenance service for CCTV surveillance, Access Control and Intruder Alarm System

R2,128,829.36

36 months

(01 January 2020-31 December 2023)

REPLY: PSC

The Office of the Public Service Commission (OPSC) has appointed private security firms for four Provincial Offices as set out in the table below:

i) Name of service provider

ii)Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration of each contract

Tyeks Security Services

Alarm Monitoring and Guard Services (day and night) for the Eastern Cape Provincial Office

R614 477.76

01 November 2019 to 31 October 2021

Divergent OPS (Pty) Ltd

Alarm Monitoring for the Mpumalanga Provincial Office

R40 986.00

01 March 2020 to 28 February 2022

National Security and Fire

Alarm Monitoring for the Limpopo Provincial Office

R44 683.35

01 November 2019 to 31 October 2022

Defensor Electronic Security System

Alarm Monitoring for the Free State Provincial Office

R11 098.41

01 October 2020 to 30 September 2021

REPLY: DPSA

a) Yes

Department of Public Service and Administration:

  1. Jackcliffy Trading Cc
  2. Security guarding services during week days, weekends, Public Holidays and nightshift.
  3. R2 589 998.80
  4. Two year contract

b) Thusong Service Centre

  1. Masutha Training & Security Services (Pty) Ltd
  2. Security Guarding Services during week days and on Saturday only.
  3. R4 524 399.72
  4. Three year contract

REPLY: CPSI

a) The CPSI does not make use of private security firms. The organisation has 3 permanently employed Security Officers on the staff establishment.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) NA

(iv) N/A

End

25 March 2021 - NW314

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the current vacancy rate in each government department for funded posts at (a) national and (b) provincial level, (2) whether he has found that the vacancy rate has had a negative impact on service delivery in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures and/or mechanisms has his department put in place in order to address the negative impact of the vacancy rate?

Reply:

(1) (a) At national government, the average vacancy rate is 9%.

(b) At provincial government, the average vacancy rate is 12%.

Disaggregation per department is as per the attached Excel Spreadsheet.

(2) The vacancy rate does impact negatively on service delivery and this is not unique to the Public Service. Posts that remain unfilled do have an impact on the operational efficiency of an organisation. The average vacancy rate in the Public Service is approximately 12% which is above the set 10% target. The Department of Public Service and Administration monitors the vacancy rate and communicates with departments on the urgent need to fill vacant posts.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration has addressed FOSAD on this matter and the Director-General of the Department of Public Service and Administration has presented the compliance report regarding the vacancy rate. Presentations made to FOSAD as well as the GSCID Cluster articulate the impact of vacant posts on service delivery and the non-compliance with legal prescripts, norms and standards on the filling of vacant posts.

The 2020/21 APP highlights Annual Compliance Report as one of the deliverables. This report identifies areas of compliance and non-compliance and most importantly, design technical intervention measures to support struggling departments. A partnership is being sought with the Auditor-General of South Africa to include vacancy management in the areas being audited as part of elevating the matter.

REPLY ORIGINATOR

Name: Mr M Wilson

Designation: Acting Deputy Director-General: Human Resource Management Development

Contacts: 082 903 0552

Recommended / Not recommended

Recommended / Not recommended

_________________

Ms Yoliswa Makhasi

Director-General: Department of Public Service and Administration

Date:

Recommended / Not Recommended

______________________

Ms Sindisiwe Chikunga, MP

Deputy Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:

Approved/ Not approved

____________________

Mr Senzo Mchunu, MP

Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:

25 March 2021 - NW384

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) total number of directors-general (DGs) in the national departments are currently acting in their positions and (b) is the name of each department in which each specified DG is currently employed; (2) whether the DGs who are in acting positions have the correct and/or relevant qualifications; if not, in each case (a) what are their names and (b) in what departments are they currently employed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total number of Directors-General in national departments who are currently acting is ten (10).

(b) National Departments with acting Directors-General:

  1. Department of Social Development
  2. Department of Water and Sanitation
  3. Department of Military Veterans
  4. Small Business Development
  5. The Presidency
  6. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development
  7. Communication and Digital Technologies
  8. State Security Agency
  9. International Relations and Cooperation
  10. Office of the Public Service Commission

(2) In terms of the regulatory framework, Regulation 63 (2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that, “an employee directed to act in another post in terms of section 32 (2) should have the necessary competency for the post to which he or she is appointed to act”. As defined in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, Competency means the combination of knowledge, skills, behaviour and aptitude that a person can apply in the work environment, which indicates a person's ability to meet the requirements of a specific post. For purposes of business continuity meeting qualifications for a post for purposes of acting is not a requirement however, noting the definition, competency to perform the duties are.

(a&b) The names of the acting Directors-General and the Departments in which they are acting:

  1. Department of Social Development: Mr L Mchunu
  2. Department of Water and Sanitation: Mr T Belzar
  3. Department of Military Veterans: Mr DM Mgwebi
  4. Small Business Development: Mr L Mkhumane
  5. The Presidency: Ms L Mxenge
  6. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development
  7. Communication and Digital Technologies: Ms N Jordan-Dyani
  8. State Security Agency: Mr L Jafta
  9. International Relations and Cooperation: Nonceba Losi
  10. Office of the Public Service Commission: Ms IL Mathenjwa

End

25 March 2021 - NW316

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department has put in place measures and/or mechanisms aimed at ensuring that Batho Pele principles are fully entrenched in the public service; if not, why not; if so, what has been the impact of the specified measures and/or mechanisms on the public service and its ability to deliver services to our people?

Reply:

1. Yes, the DPSA has mechanisms to ensure Batho Pele principles are entrenched in the Public Service.

Chapter 10 of the Constitution mandates the MPSA to ensure professionalization of the Public Service with high standards of the professional ethics. To this effect, MPSA launched the Public Service Professionalization Consultation Process led by the National School of Government.

The Public Service Act 1994 empowers the MPSA to ensure transformation, reform, innovation as well as any other matters that improves the efficacy of the Public Service. Policy Frameworks such as The White Paper on Transformation of the Public Service (1995), The White Paper on Transforming the Public Service Delivery (1997) are central to the implementation of the Batho Pele Principles approach in the public service.

2. Amongst others, mechanisms to ensure Batho Pele principles are entrenched in the Public Service are:-

2.1. Public Service Charter (2013) which accelerates the Batho Pele policy as a social contract between the Public Service and organised labour in ensuring quality services to the citizenry.

2.2. National Batho Pele Forums consisting of both national and provincial departments coordinators.

2.3. Implementation of the “Khaedu” programme that is centred on the deployment of Senior Members Service employees to various frontline government department to monitor, ensure compliance and redress of the delivery of services to the people.

2.4. National Batho Pele Excellence Awards is one of the key mechanism that the DPSA host annually to celebrate those employees who has mastered the implementation of the Batho Pele principles.

3. Impact of the specified measures and/or mechanisms on the public service and its ability to deliver services to our people

3.1. The Department host the Integrated Government-Wide Public Service Month in September annually to lead the entire government in assessing the impact of public service delivery in line with the Batho Pele principles.

3.2. The major impact was demonstrated currently during the COVID-19 pandemic, where the public servants who are working in the front line were able to deliver quality public service by living the ethos of Batho Pele principles

END

25 March 2021 - NW315

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the average turnover rate for heads of departments and directors-general in government departments; (2) whether he has found that the turnover rate has had a negative impact on (a) service delivery in the Republic and (b) administration of the affected government departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures and/or mechanisms has his department put in place in order to address the negative impact of the turnover rate?

Reply:

(1) The quarterly (October 2020 to December 2020) turnover rate is 5,7%.

(2)(a) Turnover does have an impact on the delivery of services however there when a Head of Department exits office, an official is appointed in an acting capacity for business continuity.

(b) The departmental impact is that there is a required transition period in which the acting official needs to be briefed on the deliverables of a department to manage the responsibilities whilst in an acting capacity.

Regarding mechanisms, research has been undertaken on the turnover of Heads of Department and includes recommendations on their retention. The recommendations are to be presented to Cabinet once finalised.

End

12 March 2021 - NW63

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total amount has the National School of Government spent on consultants in the period between 1 January and 31 December 2020 and (b) are the relevant details of the (i) name of each specified consultant, (ii) work done by each consultant and (iii) amount paid to each consultant?

Reply:

The National School of Government reporting to the Minister of Department of Public Service and Administration

(a) Spent a total amount of R15,089,360.38 on consultants for the period between 1 January 2020 and 31 December 2020. It should be noted that whilst the details below are reflected as payments to consultants, they do not necessarily represent the outsourcing of services for which the NSG employs people to render. For example, internal audit services are outsourced hence they appear below, inclusive of fees paid to external members of the audit committee.

Further, it should be noted that the NSG operates a Training Management IT

system which requires specialists to manage linked to the term of the contract of the software solution. Also included are the services of a temporary nurse who was contracted to provide screening services for COVID-19. Finally, we also reflect fees paid to independent contractors who are an extension of training arm. Money paid to these independent training contractors are recovered through the training fees charged to learners.

i.e. 2019/20 – 01 January 2020 – 31 March 2020 = R 9 667 710,85

2020/21 – 01 April 2020 – 31 December 2020 = R 5 421 649,53

(b) Relevant details: IT Related – Outsourced services

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

The Training Room online

Management of the Moodle eLearning platform

R1,467,226.18

R290,151.17

R1,177,075.01

Esoftware Solutions

Management of the Training Management System

R736,894.16

R383,523.86

R353,370.30

Bytes System Integration

Outsourced ICT services

R2,021,343.81

R500,656.89

R1,520,686.92

(b) Relevant details: Professional Services

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Lunika Incorporated

Internal auditing services

R587,867.36

R222,701.39

R365,165.97

Nkosi

Audit Committee Member

R39,861.00

R12,978.00

R26,883.00

Peense

Audit Committee Member

R81,576.00

R81,576.00

R0.00

Shikwane

Audit Committee Member

R54,721.00

R54,721.00

R0.00

Van Der Nest

Audit Committee Member

R12,978.00

R12,978.00

R0.00

(b) Relevant details: Research

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Blue Oceans Information Solution

Research and Development Consultants

R338,100.00

R0.00

R338,100.00

De Waal Research

Research and Development Consultants

R18,960.00

R0.00

R18,960.00

Kula Development and Business

Research and Development Consultants

R149,130.00

R0.00

R149,130.00

Lokisa Human Development Solution

Research and Development Consultants

R21,000.00

R0.00

R21,000.00

(b) Relevant details: Nurse – Covid-19 screening

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Revolution Human Capital

Professional nurse – covid-19 screening at the department

R117,142.19

R0.00

R117,142.19

(b) Relevant details: Training related (recovered from training fees)

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Various Experts as per attached spreadsheet (attached)

Training of National and Provincial departments and Local Government

R9,387,290.68

R8,107,934.54

R1,279,356.14

(b) Relevant details: Verification Agencies

(i) Name of Consultant

(ii) Work done

(iii) Amount paid

2019/20 January – March 2020

2020/21 April – December 2020

Honeycomb Bee Rating

Verification of B-BBEE status

R51,750.00

0.00

R51,750.00

SA Qualifications Authority

Verification of qualifications

R3,520.00

R490.00

R3,030.00

End

03 March 2021 - NW217

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What total number of (i) employees applied for the Early Retirement Incentive of 2019 in each (aa) national and (bb) provincial government department, (ii) applications were approved and (iii) applications were not processed, (b) who took the decision to not process the applications and (c) was this decision taken in consultation with National Treasury; (2) Whether there are any plans to re-introduce the Early Retirement Incentive in the 2021-22 financial cycle; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether consideration has been given to simplify the process around the Early Retirement Incentive by removing the early retirement provisions for employees aged 55 to 60 across the board and simply incentivising the exit of older less productive employees; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Introduction:

The Centralised Early Retirement initiative in 2019 was considered in response to managing the wage bill as well as a need identified for employees wishing to exit the Public Service before the official retirement age. Eligible employees must have turned 55 but not yet 60 years of age, during the financial years 2019 to 2021. National Treasury was to be approached by departments for the provision of additional funding, in cases where departments could not pay the liability attached to early retirement, on behalf of eligible employees. This meant that an employee taking early retirement would be treated as if he/she would be retiring normally. As National Treasury was providing funding for this initiative, the response to the question is based on the information supplied by National Treasury.

(1)(a)(i) The number of applications, for early retirement, received by National Treasury for processing by December 2020 from both national and provincial departments was 5 289.

(1)(a)(i)(aa) The available information is not disaggregated by departments or specific provinces. From the total number of applications for early retirement, 3 332 applications were from National Departments, and

(1)(a)(i)(bb) 1957 applications were from the Provinces.

(1)(a)(ii) 2 964 applications were recommended for funding and communicated to the respective national departments. Approval for early retirement vests with the relevant Executive Authority. The Technical Committee on Finance (TCF) decided that all applications from provincial departments be referred to the provincial Treasuries to process. The Applications from Provincial Departments were therefore processed and financed through the relevant provincial treasury.

(1)(a)(iii) all eligible applications submitted for central funding were processed and feedback provided to the relevant national departments. Each Provincial Treasury processed applications for the respective province and has such information.

(1)(b) no decision was taken not to process any eligible application made at the national level.

(1)(c) refer to (1)(b) above.

(2) Various measures are considered to better manage personnel expenditure in the Public Service. At this point in time there are no plans to re-introduce a centrally funded Early Retirement Incentive, similar to the incentive that applied in 2019. Early Retirement is regulated and is vested with the relevant Executive Authority. Nothing prohibits departments from encouraging their employees to take early retirement in terms of the current provisions. In August 2020, National Treasury issued Guidelines for Costing and Budgeting for Compensation of Employees for the preparation of estimates of expenditure for the 2021 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF). The Guidelines encouraged departments to implement compensation containment measures, such as Early Retirement without penalisation, among others.

(3) There is no evidence that older employees are necessarily less productive than younger employees or vice versa. Experience, institutional memory and maturity are highly valued by employers. Incentivising exits, is therefore not a mutually exclusive process from considerations such as service delivery continuity, human resource planning, recruitment, utilization, development and retention.

The process of applying for early retirement is the same as applying for normal retirement with the additional consideration of penalties for early retirement. The Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) applies the same formula to both normal and early retirement. Any changes to the process may affect the Government Employees Pension Law and Rules as there is an adjustment factor applicable to early retirement.

End

03 March 2021 - NW218

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total (a) number of qualifying government employees are currently benefitting from the Government Employees Housing Scheme (GEHS) in each (i) province, (ii) department and (iii) salary level and (b) amount is currently being saved in the Individual-Linked Savings Facility for qualifying government employees who do not currently own homes; (2) Whether the department attempted to establish why only a low number of qualifying government employees are benefiting from the GEHS; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) As at 31 January 2021, the number of government employees receiving the housing allowance was 958 705. The breakdown is as follows: 710 173 employees are for home ownership, 240 194 employees are tenants and 8338 are employees still receiving the old housing allowance.

1(a)(i) The table hereunder provides aggregate information, as at 31st January 2021, on employees that are receiving the housing allowance per province and in national departments.

Province and National

Number of employees

Eastern Cape

95 040

Free State

41 006

Gauteng

122 960

KwaZulu Natal

145 358

Limpopo

86 588

Mpumalanga

59 428

North West

45 060

Northern Cape

16 250

Western Cape

49 009

All Provinces (Sub Total)

660 699

National

298 006

Grand Total

958705

1(a)(ii) Information on employees receiving the housing allowance per department (National and provincial departments) is reflected on Annexure A.

1(a)(iii) Information on employees, per salary level 1 to 10 including 11 to 12 for the Occupational Special Dispensation (OSD), is reflected on Annexure B. Employees who are not owning nor renting any accommodation do not receive the housing allowance. Employees who are on middle management (MMS) and senior management service (SMS) levels (11 – 16) respectively and are on Total Cost to Employer salary packages do not receive a separate housing allowance. However, they are able to access other services of the Scheme, such as education and counselling, housing loans and housing stock facilitation, and enrolment.

1(b) As at 31st December 2020, the amount currently saved in the Individual-Linked Savings Facility (ILSF) is R 9.6 billion.

2. The DPSA has established that eligible public service employees are accessing the housing allowance benefit and that this has improved since inception of the GEHS benefits. This is demonstrated by the fact that the qualifying number of employees has almost doubled from 352 103 in July 2015 when the GEHS benefits were implemented to 710 173 employees as at 31 January 2021., A further improvement is on the reduction of the number of employees who were eligible for the historical housing allowance from 44530 in July 2015, to 8 338 employees, as at 31 January 2021.

At an employee/individual level factors, ranging from poor financial health, decisions on appropriate home locations, respective housing stock supply and affordability price ranges affect the ability of employees to obtain finance for housing loans or where to purchase, within their affordability criteria.

The access to and provision of decent housing is a national imperative and the DPSA is acutely aware of its role in acting as a catalyst for disrupting the status quo.

End

22 December 2020 - NW2720

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (a) total cost to company salaries and (b) bonuses of executive employees, including the chief executive officers in all entities reporting to the national Departments of Water and Sanitation and Human Settlements for the past five financial years?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is provided in Annual Reports tabled yearly in Parliament by departments and public entities.

11 December 2020 - NW2605

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What total (a) number of provincial departments have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year; (2) what total (a) number of departments within the national Government have underperformed in the 2019-20 financial year and (b) amount was paid for performance bonuses to the specified underperforming departments in the specified financial year?

Reply:

The Department received the question, reviewed its contents against its mandate and has determined that the most appropriate respondent should be the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs.

10 December 2020 - NW2618

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What qualifications are needed for the post of Deputy Director-General (DDG) within the national Government; (2) whether he has found that all DDGs have the necessary qualifications in each department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details of all DDGs within the national departments, (b) are the current qualifications of each DDG and (c) number of persons are acting as DDGs?

Reply:

(1) The qualifications required for a post of Deputy Director-General (DDG) are regulated in the Directive on compulsory capacity development, mandatory training days and minimum entry requirements for the Senior Management Service which was implemented on 1 April 2015. The qualifications for a Deputy Director-General post is an undergraduate qualification and a post graduate qualification (NQF level 8) as recognized by SAQA.

(2) All Deputy Director-General posts at National departments serve at Cabinet and the Minister for the Public Service and Administration performs an oversight. Should a candidate not meet the requirement, the Cabinet Memorandum does not serve at Cabinet so the appointment is not effected. Departments are often advised through circulars not only on the requirements for post but all regulatory requirements to fill posts including DDG level.

(a) The relevant details of all DDGs in National departments according to PERSAL indicates that there are currently 201 DDG posts in National government of which 135 are filled and 66 are vacant. Prior to 1 April 2015 there was no prescription on the educational requirements. In terms of professionalization, and the expected requirements, mobility is linked to the said qualifications. An individual will not be able to progress to higher levels without the said qualifications. Should a DDG have been appointed prior to 1 April 2015 such a DDG cannot be discriminated against if they currently occupy a DDG post. Should such DDGs apply for another DDG post or a Head of Department post they will not qualify in the event that they have not met the inherent requirements.

(b) The current qualification requirement is an undergraduate qualification and a post graduate qualification (NQF level 8) as recognized by SAQA as well as the inherent requirements of the post. All DDGs appointed with effect from 1 April 2015 must be in possession of those requirements. The information on qualifications for DDGs in posts is based on the data captured by departments may be incomplete or not captured and or updated on PERSAL. Where no information is reflected the department has not captured the qualification, Annexure A.

(c) An employee at a level below a DDG or at the level of a DDG can be appointed to act in a DDG post, therefore there are circumstances where employees are acting laterally. Acting in a post is not captured on PERSAL as the period are generally short. However, when an employee is receiving an acting allowance such acting in a higher post is captured on PERSAL. Based on PERSAL, there are currently six (6) Chief Directors receiving an acting allowance in DDG posts.

END

09 December 2020 - NW2699

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

What is the salary level difference between a level 11 post and a level 13 post?

Reply:

The difference between salary level 11 and 13 is R324 069.

End

08 December 2020 - NW2543

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What security processes has the Government implemented in terms of e-governance systems so that the systems are not compromised?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration is mandated by section 94 of the Public Service Regulations toissue the information security standard for the public service, after consultation with the relevant Ministers.

On the 2nd of June 2017 the DPSA and GITOC Security Committee (SCISS) issued the ICT Security Guidelines for implementation by the national and provincial departments within their respective departments.

The purpose of these ICT Security guidelines is to create an enabling ICT security environment and to address the security risks and weaknesses in e-governance systems.

Section 11 of the DPSA ICT Security Guidelines particularly covers the aspects of access management and acquisition of information systems as they relate to securing e-governance systems.

The ICT Security Guidelines cover a number of areas in relation to securing e-governance systems. Those include:

Section 11.7 – Information Systems Acquisitions, Development & Maintenance

Section 11.6 – Access Management

Section 11.10 – Third Party Management

Section 11.11 – Compliance

Section 11.12 – Intellectual Property Rights

The DPSA ICT Security Guidelines are currently being converted into a Public Service Information Security Standard to strengthen compliance.

End