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15 June 2022 - NW1945

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total number of Cuban (i) teachers, (ii) engineers, (iii) nurses and (iv) doctors are currently employed in the Republic and (b) is the total cost of their employment?

Reply:

According to the information extracted from PERSAL as at 30 April 2022, the total number of Cubans teachers, engineers, nurses and doctors currently employed in the Republic and the total cost of their employment are as follows:

Category

a) Total number of employees

b) Total costs

(i) Teachers

None

Not applicable

(ii) Engineers

65

R50 394 855

(iii) Nurses

None

Not applicable

(iv) Doctors

229

R257 917 774

End

15 June 2022 - NW2230

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

In light of the fact that 6 457 employees of the Public Service were still receiving outdated housing allowance as at 31 March 2022, what are the reasons that (a) this is still happening and (b) it has not yet been reviewed and/or corrected?

Reply:

a) Employees who are receiving the old housing allowance are those who have not submitted the required housing allowance documents to their respective Human Resource Sections within their respective departments. The required documents include a completed and signed application form for homeowners, proof of home ownership as well as proof that the employee occupies the property concerned. Upon submission of the necessary documents, the affected employees shall receive the current amount of R1 500.07 per month.

b) The only way for the affected employees to move from the outdated housing allowance, is to comply with the information as stipulated in (a) above. In 2015 and 2016 respectively, the DPSA issued Circulars (17/3/P) to all government departments detailing the manner in which the implementation of migration to the new housing allowance should occur.

In addition to previously issued Circulars, the Director-General will again communicate with Directors-General and Heads of Departments of the affected departments and provincial administrations regarding the importance of migrating employees to the new housing allowance system. The Circular will be issued in June 2022.

Over and above issuing Circulars, Government Employees Housing Scheme conducts information Sessions with Human Resource Practitioners in government departments to engage on issues of compliance with the prescripts of housing allowance for the benefit of government employees.

End

15 June 2022 - NW1742

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

Whether the Framework for Professionalising the Public Service that was developed by the National School of Government takes into consideration the fact that there are senior officials within the Public Service without the requisite qualifications; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how does the Framework intend to ensure that senior positions within the Public Service are filled by qualified and competent persons?

Reply:

The National Framework Towards Professionalisation of the Public Sector has not as yes been approved by the Cabinet. The National Framework Towards Professionalisation of the Public Sector take cognisance of the fact that there are senior officials who do not have the requisite qualifications and the National Framework makes the following proposals to address this:

1. The National School of Government will collaborate with Professional Bodies and Higher Education Institutions to professionalise the Public Service. The NSG has already put systems in place to ensure the realisation of this proposal in the following manner:

a) For existing public servants –

(i) The NSG is working with the Quality Council for Trades and Occupations for accreditation and registration of qualifications on the Occupational Qualification Sub-Framework from NQF Level 5-8, with the aim of professionalising the public sector (National, Provincial, Local government and Public Enterprises). These will form part of the compulsory suit of qualifications that the NSG will roll out in the public sector. This will replace the non-credit bearing senior management programmes that the NSG is currently offering. It will also assist the NSG to apply the Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) Policy to recognise the knowledge and experience acquired by public servants who enrolled and completed these programmes previously through formal, informal and non- formal learning.

(ii) Secondly, the NSG is at its final stage of granting a bid/tender to one of the Higher Education Institutions (HEI) to collaborate in the accreditation and registration of a Postgraduate Diploma in Public Affairs & African Governance at NQF Level 8. Public servants will be recruited to study this qualification through that institution and some modules will be offered by the NSG. For this qualification, the Institution’s RPL Policy will be used to recognise the prior learning of the public servants.

(iii) Thirdly, the NSG finalised the design of an executive management qualification that will be registered at NQF Level 8 with the Council on Higher Education. The NSG is working with the Department of Higher Education & Training to declared it as a College to offer Higher Education Qualifications without changing its current structure like other existing government colleges for e.g., “Western Cape Government College of Emergency Care” who have already registered qualifications on the NQF. This qualification is meant to professionalise the executive management who do not have qualifications in the public sector. It has also been designed using some of the content of the existing NSG suites of non-credit bearing executive programmes. This will assist the NSG to apply its RPL Policy to recognise the knowledge and experience acquired by the public servants who enrolled and completed these programmes previously through formal, informal and non- formal learning.

(iv) Once the qualifications have been registered on the NQF, the NSG will also implement its RPL Policy to recognise the experience and knowledge acquired by the public servants through formal, informal non formal learning in the following manner:

  • The RPL to grant access to study for a qualification to public servants who do not meet the admission requirements;
  • The RPL for credits by exempting public servants to study certain modules of the qualification to recognise the knowledge and experience acquired through studying certain courses with the NSG that are related to the qualifications that are registered on the NQF;
  • The RPL for access to the External Integrated Summative Assessment (EISA): Public servants will be given access to write external integrated summative assessment (final examination) if they demonstrate the ability that they have met the outcomes required for the qualification.

b) The other initiative for professionalising the public service is the collaboration with statutory and non-statutory professional bodies recognised by SAQA. Various Departments including the NSG will collaborate with professional bodies in their area of work, e.g., for professional registration of public servants with professional bodies. This means that public servants who do not meet the criteria for registration or to be awarded professional designations will be required to go through the professional bodies’ processes to meet the criteria, through RPL or studying certain programmes designed by the professional bodies in collaboration with the NSG or Higher Education Institutions. Professional bodies will also play a critical role for designing programmes in collaboration with the NSG for continuing professional development of the public servants.

c) The above initiatives will assist in the professionalisation of senior government officials to ensure that positions are filled by qualified and competent officials.

End

15 June 2022 - NW667

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the reasons that members of the Cabinet have not yet undergone lifestyle audits despite the fact that this was promised by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, in his State of the Nation Address in 2019?

Reply:

1) The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have a mandate to perform lifestyle audits for members of Cabinet. This is the mandate of the Presidency. In March 2022, the Presidency responded to this question in Parliamentary Question 702.

2. The response was as follows: “The introduction of lifestyle audits for Members of the Executive has taken far longer than originally anticipated. While we have begun with lifestyle audits for senior public servants, it is important that we extend this practice to Members of the Executive.

Much work has been done on the approach and methodology to lifestyle audits of Members of the Executive. However, the finalisation of this work is being held in abeyance pending the submission of the final report of the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture. This is so that any additional measures required to strengthen Executive accountability and conduct can be considered holistically.”

End

15 June 2022 - NW1927

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total number of senior managers within the Public Service have enrolled for and successfully completed the Ethics in the Public Service online course offered by the National School of Government and (b) is the breakdown of the specified figure in each (i) national and (ii) provincial government department?

Reply:

a) Since the inception of the course in 2016, of just over 9 800 members of the senior management services, 1,963 senior managers enrolled and successfully completed the course.

b) The following tables reflect the breakdown of this figure:

Period

National

Provincial

TOTAL

1 Apr 2016 to 31 March 2017

12

38

50

1 Apr 2017 to 31 March 2018

96

66

162

1 Apr 2018 to 31 March 2019

31

422

453

1 Apr 2019 to 31 March 2020

83

37

120

1 Apr 2020 to 31 March 2021

380

201

581

1 Apr 2021 to 31 March 2022*

300

297

597

TOTAL

902

1,061

1,963

* Statistics for the 2021/2022 financial year has not yet been audited

National Departments

TOTAL 902

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

4

Civilian Secretariat for Police

3

Communications

2

Cooperative Governance

1

Correctional Services

11

Defence

1

Economic Development

4

Energy

1

Environmental Affairs

3

GCIS

49

Health

9

Higher Education

7

Home Affairs

74

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

2

International Relations and Cooperation

4

Justice and Constitutional Development

31

Labour

81

Military Veterans

1

National School of Government

19

National Treasury

131

Office of the Chief Justice

16

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

3

The Presidency

10

Public Enterprises

3

Public Service and Administration

15

Public Works

14

Rural Development and Land Reform

15

Science and Technology

11

Small Business Development

1

Social Development

44

South African Police Service

7

South African Revenue Services

1

Statistics South Africa

128

Telecommunications and Postal Services

2

Tourism

2

Trade and Industry

5

Traditional Affairs

1

Transport

3

Water and Sanitation

82

Women

2

Not Specified

99

Provincial Government

TOTAL 1,061

Eastern Cape

81

Free State

32

Gauteng

475

KZN

94

Limpopo

89

Mpumalanga

37

North-West

79

Northern Cape

26

Western Cape

75

Not Specified

72

Gender

National

Provincial

Male

440

548

Female

461

513

Not Specified

1

0

TOTAL

902

1,061

Salary Level

National

Provincial

13

686

787

14

176

201

15

29

53

16

11

20

TOTAL

902

1,061

Race

National

Provincial

African

602

790

Coloured

49

76

Indian/Asian

82

80

White

163

110

Not Specified

6

5

TOTAL

902

1,061

  1. The below figures show a reasonable increase in the participation of officials below senior management level on the course:

Non-SMS members

Period

National

Provincial

TOTAL

1 Apr 2016 to 31 March 2017

298

561

859

1 Apr 2017 to 31 March 2018

400

541

941

1 Apr 2018 to 31 March 2019

947

3,535

4482

1 Apr 2019 to 31 March 2020

721

1,189

1,910

1 Apr 2020 to 31 March 2021

7,569

4,196

1,1765

1 Apr 2021 to 31 March 2022*

10,670

16,484

27,154

TOTAL

20,605

26,506

47,111

* Statistics for the 2021/2022 financial year has not yet been audited

National Departments (non-SMS members)

TOTAL 20,605

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

459

Arts and Culture

33

Basic Education

62

Civilian Secretariat for Police

11

GCIS

434

Cooperative Governance

29

Correctional Services

1,433

Defence

81

Economic Development

9

Energy

4

Environmental Affairs

39

Health

506

Higher Education and Training

265

Home Affairs

888

Human Settlements

26

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

59

International Relations and Cooperation

95

Justice and Constitutional Development

3,067

Labour

6,075

Military Veterans

23

Mineral Resources

29

National School of Government

99

National Treasury

566

Office of Chief Justice

579

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

27

Presidency

62

Public Enterprise

11

Public Service and Administration

132

Public Works

144

Rural Development and Land Reform

301

Science and Technology

55

Small Business Development

15

Social Development

686

South African Police Service

275

South African Revenue Service

53

Sport and Recreation South Africa

13

State Security

17

Statistics South Africa

1,775

Telecommunications and Postal Services

9

Tourism

37

Trade and Industry

96

Traditional Affairs

6

Transport

29

Water and Sanitation

80

Women

18

Not specified

1,893

Provincial Government (non-SMS members)

TOTAL 26,506

Eastern Cape

1,533

Free State

946

Gauteng

6,264

KZN

2,548

Limpopo

1,026

Mpumalanga

625

North-West

11,828

Northern Cape

491

Western Cape

1,231

Not Specified

14

End

15 June 2022 - NW1743

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) Whether, in view of the fact that the National Development Plan places emphasis on the need to stabilise the political-administrative interface within the Public Service, and among the measures it is proposing in this regard being the review of delegations on the part of Executive Authorities, his department intends to amend the Public Service Act, 1994, [Proclamation No 103 of 1994], in order to provide Heads of Department (HODs) with powers in respect of organisational and human resource matters; if not, why not; if so, (2) Whether the amendment will include allowing Executive Authorities to recommend an HOD for appointment by the President; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the delegations for human resource practices were reviewed. The amendments to the Public Service Act, 1994 consider the proposals made pertaining to same and an Amendment Bill is being proposed to vest all administrative powers directly with heads of department while retaining strategic powers with executive authorities.

2. The procedural matters relating to the appointment of heads of department is contained in the Public Service Regulations, 2016. The relevant executive authority currently chairs the selection committee in respect of the particular head of department and the recommendation of the candidate, in respect of a national head of department, is submitted to the Cabinet before appointment by the President. The President may delegate the authority to appoint the national head of department to the Deputy President or a Minister in terms of section 42A(3).

End

14 June 2022 - NW1440

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) With reference to her reply to oral question 164 on 22 March 2022, what number of (a) national departments and (b) provincial departments have not (i) started to conduct lifestyle audits and (ii) conducted lifestyle audits; (2) out of the six provinces that either indicated that they had completed lifestyle audits or that they were in the process of conducting lifestyle audits, what number of the provinces (a) have actually completed the lifestyle audits and (b) are still in the process of conducting the lifestyle audits; (3) by what date is it envisaged that all national and provincial departments will complete conducting the lifestyle audits?

Reply:

BACKGROUND

With the adoption of the Guide on implementing lifestyle audits in the Public Service, lifestyle audits for the Public Service became compulsory from 1 April 2021. When implementing the Guide, national and provincial departments follow a three step approach, starting with lifestyle reviews. When red flags (unexplained wealth, conflicts of interest, etc) are identified during this step, the department will move to the next step, which is lifestyle investigations. This step may lead to disciplinary action if an irregularity or wrong-doing was detected (and if action is required in terms of law and prescripts). When an investigation prove to be challenging, a department will move to the last step, namely a lifestyle audit. This step involves the utilisation of specialist auditors that will employ specialist tools to trace unexplained wealth (for example). Given the three step approach, the lifestyle audit process can end with a lifestyle review (when no red flags are identified). If investigations are conducted, the timeframe for completion will depend on the complexity of the case. There is therefore no due date for completion of lifestyle audits. However, lifestyle reviews are to be completed at the end of each financial year for SMS members, and every second year for other categories.

RESPONSE

(1) (a) The national departments and provincial departments that have not started to conduct lifestyle audits:

(i) Not started to conduct lifestyle audits:

National departments:

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, Correctional Services, Employment and Labour, Government Communication and Information Systems, Higher Education and Training, Independent Police Investigative Directorate, Justice and Constitutional Development, Military Veterans, The Presidency, Rural Development and Land Reform, Science and Innovation, Sport, Arts and Culture, Statistics South Africa, Tourism, Traditional Affairs, Transport, Water and Sanitation, Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities.

 

Provincial departments:

Eastern Cape: Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Education, Health, Human Settlement, Provincial Treasury, Roads and Public Works, Rural Development and Agrarian Reform, Safety and Liaison, Social Development, Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture, Transport.

Free State: Agriculture, Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs, Education, Health, Human Settlements, Office of the Premier, Police, Roads and Transport, Provincial Treasury, Public Works and Infrastructure, Social Development, Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation.

Gauteng: Agriculture and Rural Development, Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Community Safety, Economic Development, Education, E-Government, Health, Infrastructure Development, Office of the Premier, Provincial Treasury, Roads and Transport, Social Development.

Limpopo: Agriculture and Rural Development, Cooperative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs, Economic Development, Environment and Tourism, Education, Health, Office of the Premier, Provincial Treasury, Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure, Social Development, Sport, Arts and Recreation, Transport and Community Safety.

Mpumalanga: Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs, Community Safety, Security and Liaison, Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Culture, Sport and Recreation, Economic Development and Tourism, Education, Human Settlement, Provincial Treasury, Public Works, Roads and Transport, Social Development.

North West: Community Safety and Transport Management, Culture, Arts and Traditional Affairs, Education and Sports Development, Finance, Economy and Enterprise Development, Local Government and Human Settlements, Office of the Premier, Public Works and Roads, Rural, Environment and Agriculture Development, Social Development, Tourism.

Northern Cape: Education, Environmental Affairs and Nature Conservation, Economic Development and Tourism, Health, Office of the Premier, Provincial Treasury, Roads and Public Works, Social Development, Sport, Arts and Culture, Transport, Safety and Liaison.

Western Cape: Agriculture, Community Safety, Education, Human Settlements, Local Government, Social Development, Transport and Public Works.

(ii) Conducted lifestyle audits:

National departments:

Basic Education, Civilian Secretariat for Police Service, Communications and Digital Technologies, Cooperative Governance, Health, Government Technical Advisory Centre, Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries, Human Settlements, Home Affairs, International Relations and Cooperation, National Prosecuting Authority, National Treasury, National School of Government, Office of the Chief Justice, Office of the Public Service Commission, Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation, Public Enterprises, Public Service and Administration, Public Works and Infrastructure, Small Business Development, Social Development, South African Police Service, Trade, Industry and Competition.

Provincial departments:

Eastern Cape: Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Office of the Premier.

Gauteng: Human Settlements, Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

Mpumalanga: Office of the Premier

North West: Health

Northern Cape: Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (SMS completed, rest in progress), Cooperative Governance (in progress), Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs.

Western Cape: Cultural Affairs and Sport, Economic Development and Tourism, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning, Health, Provincial Treasury.

(2) Of the six provinces (above) that completed lifestyle audits or indicated that they were in the process of conducting lifestyle audits:

(a) Provinces that completed lifestyle audits:

Eastern Cape: Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, Office of the Premier.

Gauteng: Human Settlements, Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

Mpumalanga: Office of the Premier

North West: Health

Northern Cape: Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs.

Western Cape: Cultural Affairs and Sport, Economic Development and Tourism, Environmental Affairs and Development Planning, Health and Provincial Treasury. The Western Cape Province indicated that they have proceeded to lifestyle investigations to address identified conflicts of interest.

(b) Provinces that are still in the process of conducting lifestyle audits:

Northern Cape: Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (SMS completed, rest in progress) and Cooperative Governance (in progress).

(3) Departments who detected no red flags during the lifestyle review process is regarded to have finalised their lifestyle audit process. All departments are expected to complete lifestyle reviews for SMS members at the end of each financial year, and that for the other categories at the end of the second year cycle when they are performing lifestyle audits on those employees. When investigations and audits are taking place (thus, lifestyle investigations and lifestyle audits), no time frame was set, as the process will be guided by the complexity of the case. However, the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit will monitor completion of investigations and audits.

End

14 June 2022 - NW1842

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department intends to require that public servants spend a minimum number of years in a position before they can be considered for and/or qualify for a promotion (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What number of (a) directors-general and (b) heads of departments are currently acting without having the requisite experience of over six years in a senior management position within the Public Service?

Reply:

(1) Recruitment and Selection in the Public Service under the Public Service Act, 1994, is based on an open employment system where persons apply and compete for positions. Persons already employed in the Public Service need to also apply for higher posts in the event that they wish to progress in the service and compete for such posts, promotion is not automatic. When a post is created it is subjected to a job evaluation process where the inherent requirements of the job is determiner, this includes educations qualifications, technical experience and managerial/supervisory experience (where such is required) and any other requirement which could be professional registration etc. The Job evaluation determines the salary grading for a post.

(2) Section 32(2) of the Public Service Act, 1994 makes provision for an appointment to act which is the prerogative of the relevant Executive Authority. Regulation 63(2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that, an employee directed to act in another post in terms of section 32(2) should have the necessary competency for the post to which he or she is appointed to act. Competency means the combination of knowledge, skills, behaviour and aptitude that a person can apply in the work environment, which indicates a person’s ability to meet the requirements of a specific post. Therefore the requirement to act is based on the competency of a person appointed not whether she or he meets the inherent requirements in terms of years of experience. An acting person is not the incumbent of the post, she or he is appointed in the short term for purposes of business continuity for that work environment. For that reason there is no monitoring for purposes of acting and meeting experience requirements and it is not a prescriptive requirement to meet the inherent requirements of the job as determined through the job evaluation process.

End

14 June 2022 - NW1841

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What measures has his department put in place in order to strengthen meritocracy in the Public Service?

Reply:

The Public Service Act, 1994 and Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that persons who are appointed in the Public Service must be fit and proper and further indicates that any person who is appointed must meet the inherent requirement of the job. Section 11 of the Public Service Act, 1994, states that in the public service- “(a) all persons who applied and qualify for the appointment concerned shall be considered; and (b) the evaluation of persons shall be based on training, skills, competence, knowledge and the need to redress, in accordance with the Employment Equity Act, 1998 (Act 55 of 1998), the imbalances of the past to achieve a public service broadly representative of the South African people, including representation according to race, gender and disability.”

Legislation applies to all appointments in the Public Service which must be open, transparent and fair to all of those who apply. The intention is to seek the best person based on the requirements of the post and within the parameters of the regulatory framework.

End

25 May 2022 - NW1744

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

What measures did his department put in place to ensure that there is transparency in the entire recruitment and appointment process for heads of departments?

Reply:

The prescripts and accompanying norms and standards issued by the MPSA remain the mechanisms established to ensure that recruitment and selection is fair, transparent and are in line with Section 195 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

Section 12 of the Public Service Act, 1994 provides for the appointment of Head of Department which gives the President such power at National Government and the Premier such power within the relevant province.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) issued the Executive Protocol: Principles and Procedures for the Employment of Heads of Department (HoDs) and Deputy Directors-General (DDGs) Nationally. This was to support the President and Ministers with regard to HoD posts (recruitment, selection, appointment and other career incidents) at National Government.

The Department of Public Service and Administration provides support to the MPSA regarding the processing of Cabinet Memoranda on appointments of Heads of Department to Cabinet. The process of quality checking aims to ensure that the relevant prescripts (Public Service Act, 1994, Public Service Regulations, 2016 and relevant Directives, Determinations, Guides as issued) were followed. In the event that prescripts were not followed, such Cabinet Memoranda are referred back to the relevant delegated Minister with regard to the filling of a Head of Department post and do not serve before Cabinet until issues of concern are resolved.

If the issue of noncompliance impacting the fairness and transparency of the process, are not addressed, the relevant Executive Authority would be advised to re-advise the post and ensure compliance with relevant prescripts and prescribed policies.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration has also issued a capacitation guide to all Premiers regarding the recruitment of Heads of Department and the required processes to follow. The Premier of the relevant province is the relevant Executive Authority for purposes of such appointments.

End

18 May 2022 - NW824

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What measures and/or interventions has her department put in place to ensure that the Public Service recruits only ethical public servants with the highest degree of integrity?

Reply:

All individuals who wish to apply for a post in the Public Service, are required to complete the Z83 application for employment form. The form is designed to assist department to only recruit only ethical public servants with the highest degree of integrity as they are required to declare matters related to all pending disciplinary and criminal cases as well as matters related to doing business with the State amongst others.

The declaration of all pending disciplinary cases, discourages public servants from moving around within the Public Service without accounting for their actions. Any misrepresentation on the Z83 form is considered a misconduct which may result in the termination of an employee’s service. Lastly, as part of the recruitment process, all departments are required to conduct pre-employment screening activities to verify the information supplied by applicants including on their qualifications, citizenship and criminal records amongst others.

End

18 May 2022 - NW956

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What informs the proposed extension of the tenure of heads of department from 5 to 10 years?

Reply:

The tenure of HoDs is still a matter being consulted as part of the Professionalization Framework for the Public Service and no final decision has been reached. The proposed extension is from 5 to 7 years and not 10 years. The following are some of the reasons that have been put forward for the consideration to increase the tenure of HODs:

  1. The National Development Plan; the 10 and 20 Year Review of Government; the Human Science Research Council, the Department of Public Service and Administration; and the National School of Government have highlighted that the short tenure of HODs has had a negative impact on the stability of government and its ability to provide services. Departments with long serving senior managers appear stable and effective;
  2. The management of the political-administrative interface can be improved through stability and longevity at the level of HoDs; and
  3. The 7 year tenure would allow for an integrated and properly processed handover system to the new administration following the 5 year term of office of governments.

End

17 May 2022 - NW886

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service has sexual harassment policy in place. As part of the implementation of the policy awareness programmes on management of sexual harassment in the workplace including procedures and processes to be followed in reporting related cases are held. The department also provides psychosocial support through Employee Health and Wellness unit to victims and those affected.

(a) The total number of incidents (i) sexual harassment = 0 and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years = 0 and (bb) since 1 April 2021 =0, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded =0, (ii) were withdrawn =0 and (iii) remain open or pending based on incidents =0 and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty =0.

END

17 May 2022 - NW646

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to her reply to question 2699 on 16 December 2021, what (a) number of public servants have been subjected to lifestyle audits as at 1 January 2022 and (b) were the outcomes of the specified lifestyle audits; (2) whether she will furnish Dr M M Gondwe with a breakdown of the specified number of lifestyle audits that were conducted in each (a) national and (b) provincial government department; if not, why not, if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. The lifestyle audits are conducted in three phases namely lifestyle review, lifestyle investigation and lifestyle audit (a) A total number of 21574 public servants have been subjected to lifestyle review, which is the first phase of lifestyle audit, as at January 2022; (b) There were 746 public servants who are undergoing investigation for non-disclosure of assets, vehicles and companies as well as conflicts of interest.

2. The breakdown of the number of lifestyle audits conducted is as follow: (a) National departments’ lifestyle reviews conducted amounts to 12557; and (b) Provincial government departments’ lifestyle reviews conducted amounts to 9017, as at January 2022.

End

17 May 2022 - NW673

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the total cost of the salary increases for members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) to the fiscus for the (a) 2021-22 and (b) 2022-23 financial years as announced in Circular 13 of 2022; (2) Whether she will furnish Dr L A Schreiber with a table showing a breakdown of the cost to the fiscus of the salary increases for SMS levels 13, 14, 15 and 16 for the specified financial years; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) Whether she has found the salary increases for highly paid SMS members in the Public Service to be just, equitable and an efficient use of public money in the current economic climate, wherein millions of private sector workers lost their jobs during the lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 and with 46% of South Africans currently employed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The total cost of the salary increases for members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) for the 2021/22 financial year is R373 165 844. It must be noted that no decision on salary increases for members of the SMS for the 2022/23 financial year has yet been taken.

2. A breakdown of the cost of the salary increases for SMS levels 13, 14, 15 and 16 for the 2021/22 financial year is indicated in the table below:

SMS salary level

Cost (R)

13

243 526 088

14

85 976 406

15

25 203 259

16

18 460 091

Total

373 165 844

3. Yes, the salary increases for members of the SMS in the Public Service are regarded as just, equitable and an efficient use of public money in the current economic climate. The salary adjustments granted to members of the SMS is equitable, considering the fact that it is similar to what was granted to employees below the SMS. If the salaries of members of the SMS are not adjusted, it will result in a situation where employees below SMS will earn more that senior managers. The gap between the maximum salary notch of a Deputy Director on salary level 12 and a Director on the minimum of salary level 13 is already narrow. In some occupation specific dispensations, staff below SMS level already earn more than senior managers. This situation creates a disincentive for competent employees to aspire to become senior managers.

It should be noted that the 2019 Incentive Policy Framework provides for payment of annual pay (notch) progression for eligible members of the SMS. The cost-of-living adjustment for 2021/22 was granted in lieu of pay progression.

Furthermore, the remuneration of the members of the SMS are impacted by the changes in the consumer price index (CPI) that reflect changes in the cost-of-living and which has a direct impact on the “buying power” of their remuneration. As a result, the adjustments are necessary to protect the “buying power” of the salaries of members of the SMS

End

17 May 2022 - NW1438

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

With reference to the Public Service Recruitment Scheme that is aimed at strengthening the talent pipeline within the Public Service, especially for scarce and critical positions, (a) how often does her department monitor the rollout of internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes within the Public Service and (b) how does her department ensure that graduates with scarce and/or critical qualifications are recruited into internship, learnership and/or apprenticeship programmes?

Reply:

Minister for Public Service and Administration issued the Graduate Recruitment Scheme Framework for implementation across the Public Service.

One of the objectives of the Framework is to attract graduates to address skills shortages in scarce occupational areas of the service in line with the departmental Human Resource Plan. Therefore, the intention is to appoint these graduates on permanent basis, subject to successful completion of the programme.

a) The DPSA monitors implementation and compliance of the Graduate Recruitment Scheme Framework on annual basis. Government departments are required to submit reports on the implementation of the framework to the Director-General, as part of the Annual HRD Implementation Plans and Monitoring and Evaluation on 31 March of each year.

b) The DPSA encourage departments to dedicate 10% of the department`s vacant posts to recruit and retain graduates with potential, beyond the graduate development phase, into entry level positions. Recruitment should be in line with the department`s career Planning and Progression Strategy.

Each department is expected to regularly monitor its own needs for scarce occupations as well as the vacancy rate in those occupations then recruit accordingly.

End

17 May 2022 - NW1102

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total number of public servants are currently earning a salary at levels (i) 15 and (ii) 16 within the Public Service and (b) is the breakdown of the specified number for each (i) national and (ii) provincial department, including a brief (aa) job title and (bb) description?

Reply:

The (a) total number of public servants earning a salary at (i) level 15 was 467 and (ii) level 16 was 122, as on 28 February 2022. This excludes Defence and State Security Agency. The (b) breakdown per (i) national and (ii) provincial department including the (aa) job title is provided in the table below as it has been captured on PERSAL by departments.

(bb) Public Service Regulations, 2016 (Part I, regulation 39) stipulates that “for each post or group of posts, an executive authority shall establish a job description and job title that indicate, with appropriate emphasis on service delivery –

(a) The main objectives, activities and functions of the post or posts in question; and

(b) The inherent requirements of the job”.

The function to develop job descriptions and job titles for posts, is therefore decentralised to each national and provincial department. The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have access to information on job descriptions.

Number of Public Servants on salary levels 15 and 16

as on 28 February 2022

National/Provincial department and Job title

Salary level

 

15

16

Total

467

122

Eastern Cape

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DDG-DEVELOPMENTAL LOCAL GOVT

1

 

   

DDG-TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

CHIEF DIRECTOR:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG:IOM*

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL_*

 

1

 

Health

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CLINICAL HEALTH L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT L15

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL (HOD) L16

 

1

 

Human Settlements

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Office of the Premier

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: PROVINCE OF THE EASTERN CAPE

 

1

 

Provincial Treasury

DDG:CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:MUNICIPAL FINANCIAL GOVERN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:SUST FISCAL RESOURCE MNGMT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Roads and Public works

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

3

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Safety and Liaison

DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL_OPERATIONS

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

2

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Transport

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

Free State

Agriculture

DDG

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: AGRIC AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

ADMINISTRATOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL LOCAL GOVERNMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL`

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Education

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

   

FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER CHIEF

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD HEALTH

 

1

 

Human Settlements

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: FREE STATE PROVINCIAL ADMIN

 

1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE ADMINISTRATION & COORDINATION

 

1

 

Police, Roads and Transport

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:ROADS & TRANSPORT

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Public Works

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

Gauteng

Agriculture and Rural Development

DDG: SUSTAINABLE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: TRANSVERSAL SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DIRECTOR:LEGAL SERVICES

1

 

 

Community Safety

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

E-Government

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Economic Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CURRICULUM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: EDUCATION SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: GCRA

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: STRATEGIC PLANNING MANAG

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER(HEALTH

5

 

   

SENIOR MANAGER (ADMINISTRATION)

1

 

 

Human Settlements

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

3

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Infrastructure Development

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

4

 

   

HEAD OF OFFICE

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF DIRECTOR

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: GAUTENG PLANNING COMMISSION

 

1

   

SPECIAL ADVISER I

1

1

 

Provincial Treasury

CEO/PROJECT DIRECTOR

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR

2

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: PROJECT DEVELOPMENT

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: PROJECT FINANCE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

   

PROJECT ACCOUNTANT

1

 

   

PROJECT MANAGER

1

 

 

Roads and Transport

CHIEF: DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: G-FLEET TRADING ENTITY

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: ROADS & TRANSPORT

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Sports, Arts, Culture and Recreation

CHIEF DIRECTOR

 

1

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

KwaZulu-Natal

Agriculture and Rural Development

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD:AGRICULTURE

 

1

 

Arts and Culture

HEAD: ARTS & CULTURE

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:DEVELOPMENT AND PLANNING

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

HEAD:COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE & TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

 

1

 

Community Safety and Liaison

HEAD: COMMUNITY SAFETY AND LIAISON

 

1

 

Economic Development, Tourism and Environmental Affairs

DDG: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: INDUSTRY DEVELOPMENT & BUSINESS REG

1

 

   

DDG: INTEGRATED ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD: ECO DEV TOURISM & ENVIRO AFFAIRS

 

1

 

Education

CHIEF FINANCIAL ADMINISTRATION OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: CURRICULUM MANAGEMENT AND DELIVERY

1

 

   

DDG: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Finance

CHIEF DIRECTOR: MUNICIPAL FINANCE

1

 

   

DDG:FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT(PROVINCIAL ACCOUNTANT GEN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: FISCAL

1

 

 

Health

CHIEF DIRECTOR:IDMTS

 

1

   

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: HEALTH

 

1

 

Human Settlements

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER:OFFICE OF CFO

1

 

   

HEAD: HUMAN SETTLEMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

2

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Public Works

CHIEF DIRECTOR:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

HEAD:PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

   

HEAD:SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

 

1

 

Sport and Recreation

HEAD: SPORT AND RECREATION

1

 

 

Transport

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL: TIRS

1

 

   

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL: TRANSPORTATION SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY-DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD : TRANSPORT

 

1

Limpopo

Agriculture and Rural Development

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG:COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

CHIEF DIRECTOR: COMMERCIAL OPERATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ENVIRONMENT AND TOURISM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: INTER ECONOM DEVELOP SERV

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL CURRICULUM DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINACIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:HEALTH SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR:INFRASTRUCTURE PLANNING

1

 

   

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

D-G: PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATION: NORTHERN PROVINCE

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: PLANNING COORDINATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOP SUPPO

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ASSETS LIABIL & SCM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERV

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SUST RESOURCE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

FINANCIAL SPECIALIST TO OFFICE OF THE HOD

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

 

1

 

Public Works, Roads and Infrastructure

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Social Development

HEAD OF THE DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Sports, Arts and Culture

HOD

1

 

Mpumalanga

Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

 

Education

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT: EDUCATION ÝH/O¨

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG:CLINICAL HEALTH SERVICES

1

 

 

Human Settlements

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY

1

 

 

Office of the Premier

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

   

EXECUTIVE MANAGER: CORPORATE STRATEGY

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

HOD:PUBLIC WORKS ROADS AND TRANSPORT

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

National

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

CHIEF DIRECTOR: MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: NATIONAL RURAL YOUTH SERVICE CORPS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: POLICY RESEARCH

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF LAND CLAIMS COMMISSIONER

1

 

   

CHIEF OF STAFF

1

 

   

CHIEF REGISTRAR OF DEEDS

1

 

   

DDG: FOOD SECURITY & AGRARIAN REFORM

1

 

   

DDG: LAND REDISTRIBUTION AND TENURE REFORM

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SUPPORT SERVICE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

   

DIRECTOR: PROJECT MANAGEMENT SUPPORT

1

 

   

NATIONAL PROJECT COORDINATOR (CASP)

1

 

   

SPECIAL MASTER

 

1

 

Basic Education

CD: STRATEGIC PLANNING RESEARCH & CO-ORDINATION

1

 

   

CFO

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING AND DELIVERY OVERSIGHT UNIT

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING INFORMATION & ASSESSMENTS

1

 

   

DDG: SOCIAL MOBILISATION & SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: BASIC EDUCATION

 

1

   

PROJECT MANAGER

 

1

 

Communications and Digital Technologies

DDG: GOVERNANCE & ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: ICT INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG:ICT INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS & TRADE

1

 

   

DDG:INFORMATION SOCIETY DEVELOPMENT & RESEARCH

1

 

   

DDG:SOE OVERSIGHT&ICT ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

HEAD:PRESIDENTIAL COMMISSION (4IR)

1

 

 

Cooperative Governance

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

1

   

CHIEF TECHNOLOGY OFFICER

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL :NATIONAL DISASTER MAN CEN

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICE

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: COOPERATIVE GOVERNANCE

 

1

 

Correctional Services

CDC COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS

1

 

   

CDC STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

CDC: REGIONAL COMMISSIONER

6

 

   

CDC:FINANCE(CFO)

1

 

   

CDC:INCARCERATION & CORRECTIONS

1

 

   

CDC:REMAND DETENTION

1

 

 

Employment and Labour

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: IES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:PUBLIC EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: LABOUR

 

1

 

Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

CHIEF DIRECTOR L14

3

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER L15

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL L15

7

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL (DEFF) L16

 

1

   

SPECIALIST ADVISOR L15

1

 

 

Government Communication and Information System

CHIEF DIRECTOR: CONTENT AND WRITING

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: ENTITY OVERSIGHT

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: PROVINCIAL AND LOCAL LIAISON

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATIONS

 

1

 

Health

CD: CCOD & OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: HEALTH REGULATION & COMPLIANCE

1

 

   

DDG: PRIMARY HEALTH CARE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: NHI

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: HEALTH

 

1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

TECHNICAL SPECIALIST: HEALTH ECONOMIST

1

 

 

Higher Education and Training

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER NATIONAL SKILLS FUND

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: COMMUNITY EDUCATION AND TRAINING

1

 

   

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING POLICY AND STRATEGY

1

 

   

DDG: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: TECHNICAL & VOCATIONAL EDUCATION & TRAINING

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Home Affairs

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

 

1

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

1

   

COMMISSIONER

 

1

   

DDG: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT AND DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: INSTITUTIONAL PLANNING AND SUPPORT

1

 

   

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY COMMISSIONER: OPERATIONS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CIVIC SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: IMMIGRATION SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: INFORMATION SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:COUNTER CORRUPTION AND SEC

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: HOME AFFAIRS

 

1

   

PROJECT OFFICER BORDER MANAGEMENT AGENCY

1

 

 

Human Settlements

DDG: CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

 

1

   

DDG: CHIEF OPERATIONS OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: HEAD OF MINISTRY

1

 

   

DDG: HS STRATEGY AND PLANNING

 

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

 

1

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

1

 

 

International Relations and Cooperation

CHIEF OF STATE PROTOCOL

1

 

   

CHIEF STATE LAW ADVISOR

1

 

   

DDG:PUBLIC DIPLOMACY

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

4

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:FOREIGN SERVICE

3

 

   

DIRECTOR

1

 

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF MASTER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL/MANAGING DIRECTOR

8

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROSECUTIONS

1

 

   

DEPUTY NATIONAL DIRECTOR PUBLIC PROSECUTION

 

4

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

4

   

DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROSECUTIONS

6

 

   

DIRECTOR/SENIOR MANAGER

1

 

   

NATIONAL DIRECTOR OF PUBLIC PROSECUTIONS

 

1

   

SENIOR SPECIAL ADVISER

1

 

   

SPECIAL DIRECTOR

5

 

 

Military Veterans

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: EMPOWERMENT & STAKEHOLDER

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

 

1

 

Mineral Resources and Energy

CHIEF DIRECTOR: ECONOMIC GROWTH & GLOBAL RELATIONS

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

CHIEF INSPECTOR OF MINES (DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL)

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: MINERAL&PETROLEUM REGULAT

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: NUCLEAR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: PROGRAMMES AND PROJECTS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:MINING MINERALS&ENERGY PD

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: MINERAL RESOURCES AND ENERGY

 

1

 

National School of Government

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

 

1

   

PRINCIPAL:NSG

 

1

 

National Treasury

CHIEF DIRECTOR: FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: LEGAL TAX DESIGN

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: LEGISLATION

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: REGULATORY IMPACT ASSESSMENT

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: TAX SPECIALIST

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: TECHNICAL SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: TRANSACTION ADVISORY SERVICES &PPP

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:LEGAL SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG PUBLIC EXPENDITURE AND POLICY ANALYSIS

1

 

   

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG: ECONOMIC POLICY

1

 

   

DDG: EMPLOYMENT FACILITATION

1

 

   

DDG: INTERGOVERNMETAL RELATIONS

1

 

   

DDG: TAX AND FINANCIAL SECTOR POLICY

1

 

   

DDG:INTERNATIONAL & REGIONAL ECONOMIC POLICY

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: PUBLIC FINANCE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: NATIONAL TREASURY

 

1

   

PROJECT DIRECTOR JF

1

 

 

Office of the Chief Justice

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL/MANAGING DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERVI

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:COURT ADMINISTRATION SERVI

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

   

DIRECTOR: CHIEF/GENERAL MANAGER

1

 

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:INTEGRITY & ANTI-CORRUPTIO

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:LEADERSHIP MANAGEMENT PRAC

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:MONITORING & EVALUATION

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERV COMMIS

 

1

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

CHIEF DIRECTOR: EDUCATION & SKILLS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: FRONTLINE MONITORING & SUPPORT

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: HEALTH

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: SOCIAL COHESION PROTECTION & GEND

1

 

   

DDG: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DDG: EVALUATION EVIDENCE AND KNOWLEDGE SYSTEMS

1

 

   

DDG: NATIONAL PLANNING COORDINATION

1

 

   

DDG: SECTOR MONITORING

1

 

   

DEPUTY SECRETARY OF PLANNING

 

1

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Police

COMMISIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE NATIONAL

 

1

   

COMMISSIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE PROVINCIAL=(P)

4

 

   

COMMISSIONER: S A POLICE SERVICE REGIONAL=(P)

14

 

   

COMMISSIONER:S A POLICE SERVICE:DEPUTY NAT=(P)

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=

1

 

   

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

1

 

   

PROVINCIAL COMMISSIONER

2

 

   

SPECIAL ADVISEUR III

1

 

 

Public Enterprises

CHIEF SPECIALIST:FINANCIAL ASSES & INVEST SUPPORT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

 

Public Service and Administration

ADMINISTRATOR: INTERVENTION NW OFFICE PREMIER

 

1

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR: HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: ADMINISTRATION

1

 

   

DDG: E-GOVERNMENT SERVICES & INFORMATION MNG

1

 

   

DDG: GOVERNMENT SERVICES ACCESS & IMPROVEMENT

1

 

   

DDG: HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT & DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL DPSA

 

1

 

Public Works and Infrastructure

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT PLANNING

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:EPWP

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:PROFESSIONAL SERVICES DPW

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL:PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

   

DIVISIONAL HEAD:REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

DIVISIONAL HEAD:REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT SERVICES

1

 

   

HEAD OF INFRASTRUCTURE SOUTH AFRICA

 

1

   

HEAD OF PMTE

 

1

   

HEAD:GOVERNANCE RISK AND COMPLIANCE

 

1

   

PMTE:DIVISIONAL HEAD:CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT:EXECUTIVE

1

 

 

Science and Innovation

DDG CORPORATE SERVICE

1

 

   

DDG: SOCIO-ECONOMIC INNOVATION PARTNERSHIPS

1

 

   

DDG:INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION & RESOUR

1

 

   

DDG:TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: IP&S

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Small Business Development

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Social Development

DDG: COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: COMPREHENSIVE SOCIAL SECURITY

1

 

   

DDG:CORPORATE SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

4

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL ARTS AND CULTURE

 

1

 

Statistics South Africa

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PRICE STATISTICS

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:PROGRAMME OFFICE

1

 

   

DDG:STATISTICAL OPERATIONS & PROVINCIAL COORDINATI

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: ECONOMIC STATISTICS

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: METHODOLOGY STD & RESEARC

1

 

   

STATISTICIAN-GENERAL

 

1

 

The Presidency

CHIEF POLICY ANALYST

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL PRESIDENCY

 

1

 

Tourism

DDG: DESTINATION DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DDG: TOURISM RESEARCH POLICY & INT RELATIONS

1

 

   

DDG: TOURISM SECTOR SUPPORT SERVICES

1

 

   

DEP DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF TOURISM

 

1

   

SENIOR SPECIALIST - STRATEGIC PROJECTS SL15

1

 

 

Trade, Industry and Competition

CD: INVESTMENT PROMOTION & FACILITATION

1

 

   

CHIEF DIRECTOR:CONSUMER AND CORPORATE REGULATION

1

 

   

CHIEF ECONOMIST

1

 

   

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

COMMISSIONER

 

1

   

DDG: CORPORATE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

1

 

   

DDG: TRADE & INVESTMENT SOUTH AFRICA

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CCRD

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ITED

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: TEO

1

 

   

GROUP CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER

1

 

   

SA AMBASSADOR TO WTO

1

 

   

SNR SPECIALIST: STRATEGIC INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

 

Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: ISC

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: RPL

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

 

Transport

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DDG: INTEGRATED TRANSPORT PLANNING

1

 

   

DDG: MARITIME TRANSPORT

1

 

   

DDG: PUBLIC TRANSPORT

1

 

   

DDG: ROAD TRANSPORT

 

1

   

DDG:CIVIL AVIATION

1

 

   

DDG:RAIL TRANSPORT

1

 

 

Water and Sanitation

DDG: NATIONAL WATER RESOURCE INFRASTRUCTURE

1

 

   

DDG: PLANNING & INFORMATION

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

2

1

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL:INTERNATIONAL WATER COOP

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL WATER AND SANITATION

 

1

 

Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL:STEE

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: RPD

1

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL

 

1

North West

Agriculture and Rural Development

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Community Safety and Transport Management

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY=**OLD

1

 

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT GENERAL

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

D-G: PROVINCIAL ADMINISTRATION: NORTH WEST

 

1

   

DDG:ADMINISTRATION

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DDG: FINANCIAL GOVERNANCE

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT/ SUPERINTENDANT GENERAL

 

1

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

Northern Cape

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Economic Development and Tourism

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

HEAD OF DEPARTMENT

1

 

 

Education

DDG-CURRICULUM EXAMINATIONS&ASSESSMENT

1

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Office of the Premier

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL

1

 

 

Social Development

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

1

 

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL (HOD)

1

 

Western Cape

Agriculture

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: AGRICULTURE

 

1

 

Community Safety

HEAD: COMMUNITY SAFETY

1

 

   

PROVINCIAL POLICE OMBUDSMAN

1

 

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

HEAD: CULTURAL AFFAIRS AND SPORT

1

 

 

Economic Development and Tourism

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD: ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND TOURISM

 

1

 

Education

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Health

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER SR15

2

 

   

DIRECTOR GENERAL: DEPUTY

2

 

   

SUPERINTENDENT-GENERAL

 

1

 

Local Government

HEAD: LOCAL GOVERNMENT

1

 

 

Provincial Treasury

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

HEAD OFFICIAL: PROVINCIAL TREASURY

 

1

 

Social Development

HEAD: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 

 

The Premier

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

2

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL: CORPORATE ASSURANCE

1

 

   

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

 

1

   

HEAD: CORPORATE SERVICES CENTRE

 

1

 

Transport and Public Works

CHIEF DIRECTOR

1

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR GENERAL

4

 

   

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCE

1

 

   

HEAD:TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS

 

1

Data source: PERSAL

Compiled by the DPSA

Excluding Defence and State Security Agency

09 May 2022 - NW477

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)As at January 2022, what number of senior managers in the Public Service do not have the qualifications required for the positions that they currently occupy; (2) what number of government departments have been able to update the qualifications of their staff members on the PERSAL system; (3) whether there will be repercussions for government departments and/or senior managers who have failed to ensure that their qualifications are updated on the PERSAL system; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The reply to Parliamentary Question 152 on 7 April 2021, highlighted that the information available from PERSAL, indicated that over 35% of senior managers (SMS) did not have the requisite qualifications for the positions that they occupied. By 31 January 2022, the figure reduced by almost 10% to 25.9%. As it stands, a total of 2412 out of 9309 senior managers do not have their qualifications reflected on PERSAL.

2. 50 departments updated the qualifications of their senior managers on the PERSAL system between 31 October 2021 and 31 January 2022.

3. The DPSA is monitoring the updating of PERSAL data and continues to remind Accounting Officers of the importance of maintaining this information. The current exercise has indicated that there might be SMS members who possess proper qualifications but such are not reflected on the PERSAL system. It is however clear that departments are gradually responding to
Circular HRD0301 to update PERSAL data, therefore further punitive measures might not be needed. It is important to reiterate the fact that the matter of the senior manager’s or other employees’ qualifications be understood within the broader context of the professionalization of the public service efforts that are underway.

End

04 May 2022 - NW476

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With regard to the findings of the Canadian-funded research conducted by an independent research expert into the reasons that government departments are battling to finalise disciplinary cases, (a) what strategy has her department adopted in response to the findings of the specified research and in an effort to deal conclusively with the finalisation of outstanding disciplinary cases within the Public Service and (b) how will the strategy be rolled out and/or implemented across (i) national and (ii) provincial government departments?

Reply:

a) The department adopted a strategy to address discipline management in departments, which in the short term focusses on strengthening basic discipline management processes/systems and addresses knowledge gaps; and in the long term addresses the decentralised nature of discipline management.

The short term interventions are the following:

i) Strengthening basic discipline management processes/systems:

  • Assisting of departments with long overdue cases to update their records on discipline management, to interrogate the reasons for case backlogs and to provide monthly feedback to the Public Administration Ethics Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU) on progress made and steps taken. An electronic tool was developed to be used by those departments with long overdue backlogs. The PAIEDTAU monitors progress and plans technical assistance based on the submitted progress reports.
  • Addressing the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) inefficiencies through consolidating and reducing the number of categories for transgressions to improve the capturing of data, the standard of reporting, and to enable PAEIDTAU to download electronic reports that can identify trends. This project will make it easier for data capturers to capture relevant data in a sensible way.
  • Addressing non-compliance – Non-compliance letters are addressed to those departments not providing reports to the DPSA and failing to keep within the specified timeframes. Feedback reports are monitored on a monthly basis. Non-compliance is furthermore highlighted in quarterly reports and submitted to the Forum of South African Directors-General (FOSAD).

ii) Addressing knowledge gaps:

  • Providing guidance to labour relations officials on discipline management, by:

Adopting a Guide on Discipline Management – A new Guide on managing discipline in the public service was adopted on 1 April 2021. This consolidated all relevant discipline management frameworks into one guide.

Adopting a Directive on Discipline Management – This is currently being finalised and will enforce the implementation of the Guide. This will direct the use of PERSAL in recording disciplinary cases, with a designated official(s) in departments to be made responsible for recording and to include this in the job descriptions.

    • Developing of a training course for discipline management (based on the Guide) – A pilot was conducted in December 2021 and the course will be rolled out in the 2022/2023 financial year.
    • Using of an online platform to provide labour relations officials with easy access to discipline management courses and material. The DPSA is in the process of procuring such a platform.
    • Maintaining a record of those employees who were trained on discipline management to be consulted when departments request assistance with initiators and chairpersons.
    • Providing continuous technical assistance to departments based on identified needs, as identified in quarterly reports.

The long term interventions are the following:

Reviewing of the disciplinary code Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council, Resolution 1 of 2003 to address identified shortcomings contributing to case backlogs, including tabling it for negotiations in the last quarter of the coming financial year (2022-2023).

Amendments to required legislation to centralise the function of discipline management under the DPSA, with sufficient capacity allocated to the PAEIDTAU to be able to manage this function.

b) The strategy will be rolled out as follows:

The PAEIDTAU will provide technical assistance to prioritised departments and provinces (those with the most case backlogs). Scheduled visits will be made to these departments and provinces, and interventions will be planned in collaboration with the Offices of the Premiers. Support will also be provided in terms of sourcing chairpersons and initiators to ensure cases are finalised. Training will be provided to Labour Relations officers, who will then be expected to conduct discipline management training in their respective departments (using the “Train-the-trainer” approach).

To capacitate Labour Relations Officials, the non-functioning National Labour Relations Forum will be activated to create a platform for sharing good practise and to create awareness on legislation, regulations and guides.

25 April 2022 - NW970

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What number of due diligence checks that were undertaken on behalf of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) for recruitment purposes in the past 12 months have (a) been returned to the DPWI due to insufficient information, (b) not complied with the requirements of her department in terms of (i) structure, (ii) format and (iii) information and (c) been processed and finalised?

Reply:

Section 3(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994 gives powers to Executive Authorities for purposes of recruitment. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) however supports the Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) in the processing of Cabinet Memoranda for purposes of appointments of Directors-General and Deputy-Directors-General at National government. Insight is therefore only limited to the processing of such Cabinet Memoranda.

(a) & (b)(i)(ii)(ii) According to available records, the DPWI submitted six (6) Cabinet Memoranda, five (5) of which were referred back for additional information and to seek clarity pertaining to the adherence to the recruitment regulatory and legislative framework.

(c) Three (3) Cabinet Memoranda were tabled following clarity being sought from the DPSA. A total of three (3) Cabinet Memoranda are still receiving attention by the DPWI in order to clarify matters raised after, the DPSA provided guidance on how to properly apply the regulatory framework.

25 April 2022 - NW1109

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the progress of each investigation and/or disciplinary hearing for public servants who fraudulently applied for the R350 Social Relief of Distress grant; (2) Whether any of the public servants who are currently being investigated and/or facing a disciplinary hearing have offered to pay back the money that they have received; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What will be the consequences for those public servants who are found to have unlawfully applied for and/or received the R350 grant?

Reply:

1. The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) received files of 154 public servants who are alleged to have fraudulently applied for the R350 grant from the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) on 11 March 2022. The DPSA has requested SASSA to assist with the drafting of charges before engaging the affected departments. The Fusion Centre met on the 25th March 2022, where the DPSA put the matter on the agenda for discussion. The meeting resolved that the DPSA should continue with the distribution of these files to the affected departments without the draft charges. Once the files are distributed, the DPSA will continue monitoring progress in the disciplinary proceedings as discipline management is a decentralised function.

2. The DPSA has not received any information regarding public servants who are currently being investigated and/or facing a disciplinary hearing. The DPSA believes that all public funds that accrue wrongly to anyone should be recovered.

3. The DPSA views these as serious allegations and anticipates that the affected departments will be calling for the maximum allowable sanction allowable in the disciplinary code. However, the DPSA cannot pre-empt the outcome of disciplinary hearings as each case is dealt on its merit.

25 April 2022 - NW955

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What measures and/or interventions has her department put in place to ensure that appointments within the Public Service are based purely on merit and competency; (2) Whether the specified measures and/or interventions apply to the appointments of senior managers within the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) & (2) The Public Service Act, 1994 and Public Service Regulations, 2016 requires that persons who are appointed in the Public Service must be fit and proper and further indicates that any person who is appointed must meet the inherent requirement of the job. In the making of any appointment in terms of section 9 of the Public Service Act, 1994, in the public service- (a) all persons who applied and qualify for the appointment concerned shall be considered; and (b) the evaluation of persons shall be based on training, skills, competence, knowledge and the need to redress, in accordance with the Employment Equity Act, 1998 (Act 55 of 1998), the imbalances of the past to achieve a public service broadly representative of the South African people, including representation according to race, gender and disability.

These legislative prescripts apply to all appointments in the Public Service which must be open, transparent and fair to all of those who apply. The intention is to seek the best person for the post within the context of the regulatory framework.

31 March 2022 - NW415

Profile picture: Herron, Mr BN

Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether she has received the Premier of the Western Cape’s motivation for the appointment of Mr B S Madikizela at Level IV (details furnished), despite Mr Madikizela having admitted to claiming a degree he does not have; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has found that Mr Madikizela is recognised as a competent expert at (a) national and (b) international level; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how is Mr Madikizela recognised as a competent expert at (i) national and (ii) international level; (3) whether she has found that Mr Madikizela has very high level skills and/or scarce skills; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in what respects are Mr Madikizela’s skills high level and/or scarce; (4) whether skill level includes consideration of educational and/or professional qualifications; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how does Mr Madikizela qualify for Level IV remuneration; (5) (a) what does Mr Madikizela’s curriculum vitae disclose as his highest educational qualification and (b) on what date was it obtained?

Reply:

  1. Yes. The Minister for the Public Service and Administration received a request for approval of compensation level IV on the appointment of Mr. Madikizela as Special Adviser for the Premier of the Western Cape. This is in compliance with paragraph 11 of the Dispensation for the Appointment and Remuneration of Special Advisers (“the Dispensation”) which provide that “Executive Authorities must submit proposals/recommendations for the appointment of individual Special Advisers to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration for approval of the individual’s compensation level before the appointment/upgrade is effected”. Upon assessment of the request from the Premier, the MPSA approved compensation level III for Mr. Madikizela as Special Adviser to the Premier of the Western Cape.

For purposes of determining which compensation level should apply, paragraph 24 of the Dispensation requires, among others, that the Executive Authority considers the particular individual’s level of expertise and the stature in the particular field before submitting a request to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration. For this purpose, paragraph 25 of the Dispensation provides the following guidelines:

Compensation level I:

  • i. The individual must enjoy noticeable national recognition as a competent expert.
  • ii. The complexity of advice to be rendered is comparable to that given by a Director (Senior Management Service Grade A) in the Public Service.

Compensation Level II:

    1. The individual must enjoy recognition as a competent expert at national level.
    2. The complexity of advice to be rendered is comparable to that given by a Chief Director (Senior Management Service Grade B) in the Public Service.

Compensation level III:

    1. The individual enjoys recognition as a competent expert at national and to some degree international level.
    2. The complexity of the advice to be given is comparable to that given by a Deputy Director-General (Senior Management Service Grade C) in the Public Service.

Compensation level IV:

    1. The individual enjoys recognition as a competent expert at national and international level.
    2. To appoint and retain persons with very high level skills and/or scarce skills.
    3. The complexity of advice to be rendered is comparable to that given by a Director-General (Senior Management Service Grade D) in the Public Service.

2. Based on the above, an assessment of Mr Madikizela’s CV indicated that he enjoys a sufficient degree of recognition as a competent expert at national and international level to justify the awarding of compensation level III.

3. The Dispensation does not specify the level of skills that a Special Adviser should possess except in instances where compensation level IV is to be awarded. As indicated in paragraph 1 above, the Dispensation rather focuses on the degree of recognition as a competent expert that the individual enjoys as well as the complexity of the advice that he/she would render. It should also be noted that skills does not only relate to formal educational qualifications. It also includes skills and competencies gained through other means such as work experience. Based on his CV, Mr Madikizela is highly experienced at political and executive levels.

44. The Dispensation does not specify that a Special Adviser must possess any specific educational or professional qualifications for the awarding of any of the compensation levels.

5. According to the CV submitted by the Premier, Mr Madikizela is in possession of Matric (Standard 10/Grade 12), obtained in 1996.

End

31 March 2022 - NW858

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

Item Description

(i) Minister

(ii) Deputy Minister

(iii) DPSA

 

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

 

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

R’000

Catering

469

382

123

46

10

6

2 706

431

615

Entertainment

2

0

0

0

0

0

2

0

0

Accommodation

1 692

1 148

536

666

234

228

10 325

4 125

2 548

End

30 March 2022 - NW825

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What will be the consequences for public servants who do not pass lifestyle audits and (b) on what date does she envisage that all the specified lifestyle audits will be completed?

Reply:

a) Lifestyle audits will be considered “not passed” if criminal conduct was identified during a lifestyle review, which was referred for a lifestyle investigation that progressed into a criminal investigation conducted by the Police, and eventually resulted in a prosecution. The consequence will be a criminal record, as pronounced by court. Disciplinary steps will also be taken against such an employee. Regulation 61 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016, guides the re-employment of former employees dismissed for misconduct.

b) The completion cycle of lifestyle audits is linked to the financial interest declaration cycle and as such must be completed at the end of each financial year for Senior Management Service (MS) Members and at the end of every second financial year for non-SMS Members.

End

30 March 2022 - NW167

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether she and/or her department ever received correspondence from a certain political organisation (details furnished), via email, WhatsApp, hardcopy and/or in any other format of which the original file is dated June 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date was the specified correspondence received, (b) who was the sender of the correspondence and (c) what steps were taken by her department in this regard?

Reply:

No.

a) No

b) Not applicable

c) Not applicable

End

30 March 2022 - NW195

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her for more than (aa) 30 days, (bb) 60 days, (cc) 90 days and (dd) 120 days, (b) what is the total amount outstanding in each case and (c) by what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

Reply:

PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION: (PSC)

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent Constitutional body, accountable to the National Assembly. It is therefore not an entity or body reporting to the Minister of Public Service and Administration (MPSA). Its budget is appropriated via the MPSA.

The supplier invoices unpaid is as follows:

DESCRIPTION

CURRENT

(a)

30 DAYS

(aa)

60 DAYS

(bb)

90 DAYS

(cc)

120 DAYS

(dd)

TOTAL

(b)

Number of unpaid invoices

109

-

-

-

-

109

Amount outstanding

R 4,586,928.59

-

-

-

-

R 4,586,928.59

Date envisaged that amount will be settled

2022/03/15

 

-

-

-

-

REPLY:

CENTER FOR PUBLIC SERVICE INNOVATION (CPSI)

(a) (i) The CPSI does not have any supplier invoices that remain unpaid for more than

(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(dd) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

REPLY:

NATIONAL SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT (NSG)

The following is the response of the National School of Government, a government department under the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

(a) What number of supplier invoices currently remain unpaid by (ii) each entity reporting to the Minister of Public Service and Administration for more than:

(aa) 30 days - None

(bb) 60 days - None

(cc) 90 days - None

(dd) 120 days – None

(b) What is the total amount outstanding in each case:

None

(c) By what date is it envisaged that the outstanding amounts will be settled?

Not Applicable

REPLY:

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION (DPSA)

The Department of Public Service and Administration is not in possession of any unpaid invoices for which there are contractual obligations.

Kindly note that the information provided pertains to the DPSA only and not for other entities reporting to the MPSA.

End

30 March 2022 - NW275

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(a) What is the current total number of vacancies in the public sector and (b) by what date does she intend to have all the vacancies filled?

Reply:

(a) As per data taken from PERSAL, the total number of vacancies in the Public Service stood at 164 661 as at end of quarter 3 of the 2021/2022 financial year (31 December 2021)

(b) In terms of Section 3(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994, the recruitment and filling of vacant posts within a department is the responsibility of the relevant Executive Authority.

The MPSA and DPSA continue to support departments through policy and setting of Norms and standards in order to efficiently fill vacancies within the parameters of the legislative framework. Regular status reports are also shared with Heads of Department through FOSAD and Cabinet Committees.

End

30 March 2022 - NW668

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What has she found to be the key difference that enabled the Western Cape Government to implement lifestyle audits on all members of the provincial Cabinet within months of announcing the audits during the 2019 State of the Province Address, while the national government is still failing to implement lifestyle audits over three years after it announced the same for the national Cabinet; (2) whether she has taken any steps to approach the Western Cape Provincial Government so that it can teach the national government how to implement lifestyle audits for members of the national Cabinet; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The key difference between the Western Cape and Public Service is that the Western Cape appointed a service provider to conduct lifestyle audits and the DPSA opted to prepare policies and to develop its own system so that lifestyle audits can sustainably be conducted as part of an integrated departmental ethics management process.

In order for the Public Service to be able to conduct lifestyle audits, it had to prepare the legislative environment and adopt the required policies and systems that would make lifestyle audits effective. This included the following:

  • The setting of clear behavioural standards outlined in a Code of Conduct.
  • The adoption of conflict of interest laws for public service employees.
  • The adoption of ethics infrastructure at departmental level to support ethics management.
  • The adoption of whistle blowing reporting structures and policies and assurance that those who report corruption and unethical conduct will be protected under the law.
  • The compulsory disclosure of financial status for public service employees.

The above elements were provided for in the Public Service Regulations that were amended in 2016 and is regarded as essential for an effective lifestyle audit regime.

After amendment of the Public Service Regulations, 2016, the necessary systems and processes had to be developed and implemented, with some requiring the adoption of directives, determinations and guides.

The proclamation of the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU) by the President in 2019 provided the necessary structure to coordinate, monitor and support the implementation of lifestyle audits on national and provincial level. With structures, systems and policies in place, the next step was to prioritise the training of role players. This required the development of training material. With that completed, the actual training of Ethics Officers started in 2021, with the assistance of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, the World Bank and the Canadian Government funded Strengthening of Ethics and Integrity Project (SEIP). Training will continue for Ethics Officers and departmental investigators.

All of the above activities required time, and as such the Public Service became ready to implement lifestyle audits from April 2021, when the Guide on implementing lifestyle audits in the public service was adopted and implementation of lifestyle audits became compulsory.

As the system and processes are integrated in the management of ethics, lifestyle audits will become a normal part of the work of departments.

2. No, for reasons discussed under par (1) above.

End

09 March 2022 - NW216

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What systems has she put in place to measure the performance of the Commissioners of the Public Service Commission; (2) whether she has found that the (a) systems work and (b) Commissioners are doing what they are expected to do; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

1) Section 196 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, (the Constitution), regulates the Public Service Commission (PSC). Key provisions relevant to the question at hand provide as follows:

(a) Section 196(1) of the Constitution provides that there is a single PSC for the Republic.

(b) Section 196 (4)(e) of the Constitution provides that the PSC must report on its activities and the performance of its functions, including any finding it may make and directions and advice it may give, and provide an evaluation of the extent to which the values and principles set out in Section 195 are complied with.

(c) Section 196 (5) of the Constitution provides that the PSC is accountable to the National Assembly.

(d) Section 196 (6) of the Constitution provides that the PSC must, in terms of subsection (4)(e), report at least once a year to the National Assembly, and in respect of its activities in a province, to the legislature of that province.

(e) Section 196 (7) of the Constitution provides that PSC has the following 14 commissioners appointed by the President:

(i) five commissioners approved by the National Assembly; and

(ii) one commissioner for each province nominated by the Premier of the province

Commissioners are envisaged to form part of a single PSC, and required to follow the same polices and decision making processes of the PSC. Given the above, the PSC reports annually to the National Assembly on its activities in terms of section 196 (4)(e) of the Constitution, 1996, as a single entity.

Commissioners are appointed in terms of section 196 (7) of the Constitution and not in terms of the Public Service Act and therefore not accountable to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration. The PSC’s budget is appropriated through the Minister. The National Assembly is regarded as the employer and responsible for the performance of the PSC.

It is also worth mentioning that during discussions on the legislative process around the Public Service Commission Amendment Act, 2019, the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration/ Performance Monitoring & Evaluation agreed that Parliament should set the criteria for renewal and the assessment of the performance of Commissioners and that it is not a function of the PSC. The PSC did provide input on this to the Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee in November 2021.

2)Please refer to response above.

End

08 March 2022 - NW532

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Myburgh, Mr NG to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) year of manufacture, (d) price and (e) purchase date of each vehicle purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration has not purchased new vehicles since 29 May 2019 for either the Minister or Deputy Minister of the Department for Public Service and Administration. Details of the existing vehicles purchased by the Department for use by the Minister and Deputy Minister for Public Service and Administration are as follows:

i) Minister for the Public Service and Administration:

Seat of Office: Pretoria

(a) Make: Audi.

(b) Model: A8 3.0 TDI Quattro Tiptronic.

(c) Year of Manufacture: 2015.

(d)Price: R750 000.00

(e) Purchase Date: 2 June 2016.

Seat of Office: Cape Town

(a) Make: Mercedes Benz.

(b) Model: GLC 250D.

(c) Year of Manufacture: 2018.

(d) Price: R799 664.11

(e) Purchase Date: 19 January 2018.

ii) Deputy Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Seat of Office: Pretoria

(f) Make: Audi.

g) Model: A7 Sportback 3.0 TDI Quattro.

h) Year of Manufacture: 2015.

i) Price: R735 700.00

j) Purchase Date: 20 June 2016.

Seat of Office: Cape Town

f) Make: Ford

g) Model: Everest 3.2 TDCI.

h) Year of Manufacture: 2016.

i) Price: R714 500.40

j) Purchase Date: 18 April 2016.

End

08 March 2022 - NW257

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What total number of (a) persons are currently employed in the Public Service and (b) the specified persons will reach a retirement age in 2025?

Reply:

a) The number of persons currently employed in the Public Service as at 14 February 2022 is 1 230 835.

b) The total number of persons that will reach the retirement age of 65 in 2025 is 131 176.

Source: PERSAL

End

25 February 2022 - NW82

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) total number of (i) directors-general and/or (ii) heads of departments who are currently appointed in the Public Service and (b) breakdown in each (aa) national and (bb) provincial department?

Reply:

(a) (i) Directors-General: 35 (Nationally) Directors-General: 7 (Provincially)

(ii) (aa) (bb) List is appended at Annexure A, derived from PERSAL ending January 2022.

End

11 January 2022 - NW2421

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) total number of Public Service employees are currently facing disciplinary hearings in government departments other than in those that they are currently employed in and (b) is the breakdown of the number in terms of each (i) national and (ii) provincial department?

Reply:

(a). The DPSA does not keep the information as discipline management is a decentralised function of departments. The purpose of sec 16B(4)(b) of the Public Service Act 103 0f 1994 was to ensure that employees who try to escape discipline by moving from one department to another, are held accountable for their action(s). Section 16B(4)(a), provides that the disciplinary hearing of an employee may be transferred to the department where he or she is to be employed. 16B (4)(b) provides that a department can request the department of a former employee to institute or continue with a disciplinary case. As such, it is not possible for one department to discipline an employee from another department, without being instructed to do so. The DPSA is contemplating issuing a Directive to give clarity on the above.

(b). (i) and (ii) A Circular was prepared to source this information from departments and it will be shared with Parliament once it has been received.

End

Dr M M Gondwe (DA) to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration (Question 2421)

05 January 2022 - NW2586

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) has been the compliance rate by government departments regarding the submission and implementation of the service delivery implementation plans (SDIPs) in the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii) 2020-21 financial years and (b) role does her department play to ensure that (i) the submitted SDIPs are implemented and (ii) better alignment and coordination in the delivery of services by individual government departments is achieved?

16 December 2021 - NW2699

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has the capacity to conduct and/or roll out lifestyle audits in the various government departments; if not, on what dates are the lifestyle audits likely to be conducted and/or rolled out in the various government departments; if so, on what dates have the lifestyle audits been conducted and/or rolled out by her department in the various government departments;

Reply:

    1. The conducting and/or roll out of lifestyle audits are, in terms of regulation 22 of the Public Service Regulations, 2016, the responsibility of departments. Within departments, ethics officers and investigators are required to perform the required stages of lifestyle audits (lifestyle review and lifestyle investigation). In terms of the Public Service Regulations, 2016, departments have to designate Ethics Officers to manage ethics, and in terms of the Minimum Anti-Corruption Requirements, departments have to investigators and a dedicated anti-corruption capacity. This is not a new requirement, so departments do have an established ethics management and anti-corruption capacity.

The Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU), in terms of Section 15 of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014, has the function to monitor the implementation of lifestyle audits. This Unit does not have an investigative mandate, so it will not conduct lifestyle audits.

Lifestyle audits became compulsory from 1 April 2021. To assist departments, the PDSA adopted a Guide on implementing lifestyle audits and started with awareness raising and the training of ethics officers.

Lifestyle audits could commence after Senior Management Members disclosed their financial interests in April (every year) on the eDisclosure system, and when the other designated categories did the same in June and July (of every year). The lifestyle audit process is dependent on the disclosure of financial interests on the eDisclosure system.

    1. The PAEIDTAU is not aware whether any Public Service employees have been subjected to lifestyle audits. Departments have until the end of March 2022 to conduct lifestyle audits for the current financial year.

End

The number of employees subjected to lifestyle audits and the outcomes of the process will only be known at the end of January 2022. In a Circular dated 25 October 2021 addressed to all departments and government components, departments were requested to provide feedback on their progress regarding the implementation of the Guide to the PAEIDTAU, by the end of January 2022.

14 December 2021 - NW2681

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) To which position in Government has a certain person (name furnished) been employed and (b) what processes were followed in the employment of the specified person to the new position? NW3181E

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is not the employer of the individual. It is widely known that the individual was employed by the Presidency therefore the matter should be referred to the Presidency accordingly.

End

14 December 2021 - NW2502

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 152 on 7 April 2021 which revealed that over 35% of senior Public Service employees do not have the requisite qualifications for the positions they currently occupy, her department has conducted any investigation into how the specified employees were recruited and employed in the absence of the requisite qualifications; if not, why not; if so,

Reply:

  1. Subsequent to the reply to question 152 on 7 April 2021, a Circular HRD031 was sent to all Heads of Departments requesting them to verify the qualifications of their Senior Management Service (SMS) members and to update information on the PERSAL system. Verification of this information is done by departments.

As a results of information relayed in the Circular, the number of SMS members who do not have the requisite qualifications for the position they currently occupy, went down from 35% to 27.29 % by July 2021, and further to 26% by 31 October 2021. This is because, as stated before, there might be SMS members who do possess proper qualifications but such are not reflected on the PERSAL system.

  1. (a) & (b) Information received from departments pointed to the fact that Departments are not regularly information on PERSAL resulting in incomplete information. It was also revealed that some of the SMS members who were identified as not meeting minimum requirements became senior managers before the 2016 Public Service Regulations, as such they were complaint at the time of their joining the SMS.

The Circular to Heads of Departments to update PERSAL data has resulted in a steady improvement in capturing qualifications on the PERSAL system. At the moment there is no need identified to conduct any investigation into how the specified employees were recruited and employed at this stage.

The DPSA will continue to monitor the capturing of data on qualifications and such analysis will therefore inform a decision if any further investigations are warranted.

End

08 December 2021 - NW2503

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether any disciplinary and/or legal steps have been taken against the 241 Public Service employees who, according to the Department of Social Development, received the Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grant in May 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What steps has her department put in place to deter Public Service employees from applying for the SRD grant following its recent reintroduction by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa

Reply:

1. No disciplinary and/or legal steps have been taken against the 241 Public Service employees who received Social Relief of Distress (SRD) grants in May 2020.

The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) is working with the departments of identified Public Service employees to ensure legal steps are taken where required. The Department of Public Service Administration (DPSA) is working closely with SASSA to ensure that disciplinary steps are taken against Public Service employees who received SRD grants in an unlawful way.

In terms of this arrangement, investigations are conducted by SASSA (supported by the Fusion Centre), as the DPSA has no investigative mandate. Furthermore, However, the DPSA plays a coordinating role and provides technical assistance to departments as far as that is concerned.

Up to date, the DPSA verified a list of 241 employees identified to have received SRD grants unlawfully. During the screening process, the DPSA found that only 198 employees on the list of 241 employees were in fact Public Service employees.

The investigating team therefore is currently focussing on the remaining 198 cases, and works with the South African Police Service to obtain statements and to collect evidence. This collated information is packaged in files which were opened for each accused. These files will be used during the criminal and disciplinary process so as to synchronize the two processes. The charges levelled against the employees will be fraud and misrepresentation. The investigation process is not yet finalised, but is continuing.

On 16 November 2021, the DPSA and investigation team from SASSA met to assess progress. The meeting resolved that the allegations against the public service employees are of a serious nature and therefore:

a) Disciplinary hearings should be held;

b) SASSA and DPSA agreed on the information/evidence to be included in the files to be opened for each employee;

c) For employees employed in provinces, the offices of the Premier will coordinate and monitor cases;

d) SASSA will provide witnesses;

e) Departments will have 90 days to finalise their cases from the dates of receiving files;

f) DPSA and SASSA will monitor the adherence to the timelines; and

g) SASSA will finalise the packaging of files.

 

Once investigations are finalised, the DPSA and investigators will reconvene with the identified departments, where guidance will be provided to labour relations officers to take the disciplinary cases forward in a coordinated way. The DPSA will source additional resources to assist those provinces with the most cases.

(2) SASSA is responsible for managing the payment of SRD grants and utilises its own electronic system to do that. The DPSA and SASSA linked the SASSA system to access information on the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) so that current payments to applicants are only made after it was confirmed that the applicants are not appointed as Public Service employees.

End

08 December 2021 - NW2588

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether her department has conducted an investigation into the reasons that some government departments are battling to finalise and/or conclude disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons that some government departments are battling to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame and (b) steps has her department taken in order to capacitate government departments that are failing to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frames?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has conducted an investigation into the reasons why some government departments are battling to finalise and/or conclude disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame.

During Quarter (Q) 3 of the previous financial year (October to December 2020), the Public Administration Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (PAEIDTAU), assisted by the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project that are funded by the Canadian Government, contracted an independent expert to conduct research into the reasons for case backlogs and long overdue precautionary suspensions.

a) The following reasons were identified why some government departments are battling to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frame:

  • Interference were reported, where it was alleged that suspensions were sometimes used as a tool to neutralize opposition, or employees from different camps or interest groups.
  • Heads of Departments and labour relations officials are scared to address interferences due to a fear for retaliation.
  • Unavailability of chairpersons in provinces.
  • Use of legal services to assist with discipline management cases without involving the labour relations official.
  • Appeals instituted on the side of the employer with the aim to keep an official out of the work place, usually when this person reported wrongdoing or corruption.
  • Shortage of labour relations employees.
  • Unavailability of tools of the trade, especially where educators are involved.
  • Complexity of cases due to sector specific challenges, such as in Education and Health.

b) To capacitate government departments that are failing to finalise their disciplinary cases within the stipulated time frames, the DPSA launched a project where the Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) held one-on-one meetings with Executive Authorities of departments identified to have long overdue disciplinary cases and precautionary suspensions to ascertain the reasons for backlogs and to pledge support. This was immediately followed by a workshop conducted by the PAEIDTAU to the identified departments to address their backlogs. The PAEIDTAU developed, with the assistance of the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project, an electronic tool that was utilised by the affected departments to register their backlog cases on, and to provide monthly feedback. In January 2021, the Director-General (DG) DPSA embarked on provincial meetings, where the issue of discipline management is addressed and compliance statistics are shared with departments. The MPSA also addressed a special FOSAD meeting in May 2021 to raise this issue with director-generals.

To assist departments with managing discipline and to address the findings of the PAEIDTAU research, a new Guide on managing discipline in the public service was adopted and approved by the MPSA. From 1 April 2021, the implementation of this Guide is compulsory. This guide specifically addresses the issues of appeals and precautionary suspensions. During 2020, the DPSA also facilitated the training of 204 (out of 246) public service employees on a PSETA accredited course for presiding officers (chairpersons and initiators) to address the issue of capacity. With the assistance of the Strengthening Ethics and Integrity Project, the PAEIDTAU is currently developing training material for labour relations officials and managers, to improve implementation of the newly adopted guide.

The above outlined interventions undertaken by the MPSA, PAEIDTAU and DG yielded significant success. A decrease in suspensions and in the costs of precautionary suspensions, as well as an improvement in the capturing of cases on the Personnel Salary System (PERSAL) were noted at the end of March 2021. By the end of March 2021, provinces finalised 78% of their backlogs (up from only 1% in Q1, 8% in Q 2, and 18% in Q 3). The cost of precautionary suspensions for National Departments stabilised around R 20 million per quarter and the cost for precautionary suspensions in provinces decreased to a new low level - almost R 25 million less than what the year started with (Q1: R 87 million compared to Q4: R62 million). The two provinces that had the most precautionary suspensions also managed to reduced their backlogs. The Free State reduced their cost from R 12 million in Q 3 to R 6 million in Q 4. Kwa-Zulu Natal managed to reduce their cost from a high of R 92 million in Q 3 to R 21 Million in Q 4. The amounts reflected here are based on all disciplinary cases captured on PERSAL.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2324

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the (a) breakdown of the total number of Public Service employees currently reported to be working from home for each (i) national and (ii) provincial government department and (b) total number of (i) national and (ii) provincial departments which have implemented a hybrid system or model for work; (2) What are the relevant details of how government departments are implementing the hybrid system or model of work?

Reply:

1. The required information is not centralised and readily available as each department keeps its own register and records. Individual Departments must be approached for detailed information.

2. The DPSA issues circulars following Cabinet and National Corona Virus Command Council (NCCC) resolutions as announced by the President on the state of COVID-19 Risk Adjusted Disaster Alert Levels. These circulars are meant to guide Heads of Departments on the decongestion of workplaces by keeping the minimum numbers of employees physically on-site in order to be within safety protocols in line with Department of Health Guidelines and the Occupational Health and Safety Directions from the Department of Employment and Labour. This is achieved through rotational and remote working arrangements. Although employees work off site on certain days, they are still expected to discharge their responsibilities as if they are in the offices.

The percentage of the occupancy rate at the workplace on any particular workday is determined by the alert level at that particular time and the specific operational needs and realities of the relevant organisation.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2420

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

How will his department monitor the strict adherence to Part B of the new Z83 form introduced in 2021 by (a) line managers and (b) human resources departments in the recruitment process?

Reply:

(a)&(b) The Minister of Public Service and Administration is responsible for the setting of norms and standards in terms of Section 3 of the Public Service Act, 1994. The Z83 is an instrument gazetted for such norms and recruiting. It is thus the relevant Executive Authorities responsibility to ensure that norms and standards are upheld. This was applicable to the previous version of the Z83 as well. Human Resource processes are subject to audit processes. DPSA has issued various circulars on the strict application of the Z83 to departments as part of advocacy.

End

02 December 2021 - NW2325

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How are the various government departments (a) measuring and (b) monitoring employee performance with some Public Service employees working from home during the COVID-19 pandemic; (2) (a) whether her department has developed a remote working policy for government departments given that some Public Service employees are working from home; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date was the specified policy developed; (3) Whether the remote working policy has been fully implemented and/or rolled out in all government departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1 (a) All employees are required to sign performance agreements outlining the outputs, indicators and activities that they must deliver on during a particular period. This requirement still applies even during the COVID-19 pandemic.

1 (b) Remote working requires supervisors to agree on work to be completed by employees and regular monitoring to be done in order to ensure that employees are on track in meeting the agreed upon targets. The Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) requires that the performance of employees must be monitored on a continuous basis, with oral feedback on an employee’s performance if the performance is fully effective and meeting the requirements, and in writing if the employee’s performance is unsatisfactory. Conducting mid-year performance reviews and annual performance assessments are compulsory, which is a formal process and in writing.

2. The Remote Working Policy Framework for the Public Service has been developed and is being consulted on with stakeholders including Organised Labour who are parties to the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) and it will be approved once consultations are completed.

3. The Remote Working Policy Framework for the Public Service is at a consultation stage, having been placed on the agenda of the PSCBC meeting of the 6th December 2021 for consultations with organised labour.

End

01 December 2021 - NW2422

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

In light of the fact that the Minister of Home Affairs recently reported to the Portfolio Committee on Home Affairs that one of the officials that were facing disciplinary charges at the Department of Home Affairs is now in the employ of the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture, how will his department assist government departments to ensure that Public Service employees who are facing disciplinary charges do not avoid facing charges against them by seeking and finding employment in another government department?

Reply:

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is assisting departments in the following ways to deal with the disciplining of employees who left one department to join another:

Departments have, in terms of Section 16B (4) of the Public Service Act, 1994, a responsibility to ensure employees guilty of misconduct are disciplined.

Section 16B (4): If an employee of a department (in this subsection referred to as ‘the new department’), is alleged to have committed misconduct in a department by whom he or she was employed previously (in paragraph (b) referred to as ‘the former department’), the head of the new department-

a) may institute or continue disciplinary steps against that employee; and

b) shall institute or continue such steps if so requested-

(i) by the former executive authority if the relevant employee is a head of department; or

(ii) by the head of the former department, in the case of another employee.

The head of the Department of Home Affairs can follow the above prescripts to ensure that the disciplinary process is instituted by the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture.

To further discourage employees with pending disciplinary cases against them from moving around within the Public Service, the DPSA amended the Application for Employment form (Z83) to make it compulsory for prospective employees to disclose all pending disciplinary cases on the form. The use of the amended Z83 form is compulsory from January 2021, and misrepresentation is considered a misconduct which may result in the termination of an employee’s service.

End

05 November 2021 - NW1574

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) With reference to his reply to question 490 on 21 April 2021, what (a) are the reasons that the positions have not been filled permanently and (b) steps has his department taken to ensure that the positions are filled with permanent appointments; (2) whether his department has taken any steps to determine the impact of the vacancies on the performance of the respective departments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he will make a statement in this regard; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

(1)(a) Directors-General and Heads of Department are appointed on fixed term contracts. Positions become vacant when a Head of Department vacates her or his position. Reasons for vacancies are due to the previous National Macro-Organisation of Government and contracts ending. Departments are at different points of the recruitment process to finalise the process of the filling of the post in the respective departments.

(b) It is the responsibility of the relevant Minister of every department in the case of a National Head of Department to advise the President of the vacancy of a National Head of Department in order to manage the process of the filling of the post. The MPSA provides support and guidance to departments on the policy matter pertaining to same and has a guide in place for the filling of such posts. In addition the MPSA has issued various circulars as well as provided reports to the President on the matter.

(2) Departments are consistently provided with support from the MPSA and DPSA on the matter of vacancies. The relevant Executive Authority of a department in terms of Section 3(7) of the Public Service Act, 1994 is responsible for recruitment and appointment and the filling of vacancies in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 and Public Service Regulations, 2016. Vacant HoD posts are occupied in an acting capacity for business continuity of a department, as such an acting HoD is responsible for the deliverables of the department and reporting such through the required structures. Performance is reported through the Annual Performance Plan and Annual Operational Plan by each department through their relevant Executive Authority. MPSA is responsible for the development of norms and standards and will continue to support departments.

End

05 November 2021 - NW2113

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What number of (a) directors-general and/or (b) heads of departments within the public service are currently on (i) suspension and (ii) extended sick leave in each (aa) department and (bb) province?

Reply:

(a)The response will be provide after receiving information from the Presidency and the Premiers.

End

27 October 2021 - NW2036

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) total number of Public Service employees currently on paid suspension, (b) total amount of money spent on paying the salaries of such employees on paid suspension since 1 January 2020 and (c) average length of time it took to finalise disciplinary actions against Public Service employees since 1 January 2020?

Reply:

The response below is based on the information sourced from PERSAL and therefore reflect information captured by both National and Provincials departments as of 31 August 2021. (a) two hundred and twenty-three (223) (b) the total amount is R22 254 974.06 (c) the average length of the time will be Sixty-eight (68.03) days.

End

30 September 2021 - NW2128

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the detailed breakdown of the current average salary for each of the 16 salary bands in the Public Service, (b) total amount will be spent annually in terms of the latest Public Service wage agreement on paying public servant salaries in each of the 16 salary bands, (c) total amount of that amount will be spent annually on employees in each specified salary band in the Public Service and (d) is the breakdown of the total number of employees currently employed in each of the 16 salary bands in the Public Service?

Reply:

a) The detailed breakdown of the current average salary for each of the 16 salary bands in the Public Service:

Salary level

Current average salary per salary level

SL 1

R 103 562

SL 2

R 171 278

SL 3

R 206 957

SL 4

R 247 296

SL 5

R 283 227

SL 6

R 332 985

SL 7

R 411 227

SL 8

R 479 868

SL 9

R 567 956

SL 10

R 710 273

SL 11

R 851 022

SL 12

R 1 222 246

SL 13

R 1 147 609

SL 14

R 1 378 620

SL 15

R 1 661 168

SL 16

R 2 130 602

b) Total amount that will be spent annually in terms of the latest Public Service wage agreement on paying public servant salaries in each of the 16 salary bands:

The latest wage agreement in the Public Service is Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 1 of 2021. The table below reflects the total cost of implementing the Resolution per salary level. It should be noted that no decision has yet been taken regarding possible salary adjustments for members of the Senior Management Service (Salary levels 13 – 16).

Salary level

Total cost of implementing Resolution 1 of 2021

SL 1

R9 552 000

SL 2

R1 235 509 000

SL 3

R1 146 359 000

SL 4

R619 649 000

SL 5

R3 382 164 000

SL 6

R2 457 016 000

SL 7

R5 854 878 000

SL 8

R3 434 624 000

SL 9

R2 261 454 000

SL 10

R1 416 912 000

SL 11

R989 621 000

SL 12

R888 732 000

SL 13

N/A

SL 14

N/A

SL 15

N/A

SL 16

N/A

Total

R23 696 470 000

c) Total amount of that amount that will be spent annually on employees in each specified salary band in the Public Service:

Salary level

Estimated total cost of employment, including the cost of Resolution 1 of 2021, per salary level

SL 1

R 45 851 000

SL 2

R 14 534 682 000

SL 3

R 15 577 597 000

SL 4

R 10 043 465 000

SL 5

R 60 279 792 000

SL 6

R 45 593 919 000

SL 7

R 130 820 285 000

SL 8

R 80 343 958 000

SL 9

R59 391 750 000

SL 10

R 40 307 049 000

SL 11

R 31 208 568 000

SL 12

R 34 486 430 000

SL 13

R 8 843 759 000

SL 14

R 3 343 153 000

SL 15

R 878 758 000

SL 16

R 1 499 944 000

Other (not linked to a specific salary level)

R 12 097 656 000

Total

R 549 296 616 000

d) The breakdown of the total number of employees currently employed in each of the 16 salary bands in the Public Service:

Salary level

Total number of employees per salary level

SL 1

263

SL 2

77 651

SL 3

69 003

SL 4

38 663

SL 5

201 244

SL 6

129 361

SL 7

306 703

SL 8

159 899

SL 9

99 927

SL 10

54 510

SL 11

35 365

SL 12

27 399

SL 13

7 660

SL 14

2 405

SL 15

528

SL 16

712

Other (not linked to a specific salary level)

27 423

Total

1 238 716

The information in the above tables represents the situation as at 31 July 2021 and has been obtained from the National Treasury PERSAL database. The information excludes Defence and the State Security Agency.

End

23 September 2021 - NW2270

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With regard to the Government employees who, contrary to legislation, have done and continue to do business with the State, what (a) measures has the Government undertaken, in the past 24 months, to ascertain the total number of government employees doing business with the State, (b) total number of government employees in the specified period have been identified as doing business with the State and (c) steps has the Government taken against its employees who do business with the State?

Reply:

a) The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) draws reports of employees who are alleged to have conducted business with the State from the National Treasury’s Central Supplier Database (CSD) on a monthly basis and alert their departments to take appropriate steps and provide progress reports to the DPSA on action taken.

b) At the end of March 2019, National Treasury found 1068 employees alleged to have conducted business with the State (270 from national departments and 798 from provincial departments). In April 2020, the number increased to 1539 (this number was 1544, but Department of Trade and Industry confirmed that the 5 cases identified in their departments were in fact employees officially representing that department). A total of 1111 employees, possibly conducting business with the State, were from provincial departments, whilst 428 were from national departments. At the end of June 2021, the total number of employees alleged to have conducted business with the State has drastically decreased to 118, wherein 38 employees were from national departments whilst 80 were from provincial departments. This shows the effectiveness of interventions that the Public Service has introduced to eliminate this action.

c) The DPSA is working closely with the South African Police Service (SAPS) and the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to assist with the investigations and prosecution of cases of employees who are criminally charged with conducting business with the State, in terms of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014. SAPS is currently investigating 17 employees who were alleged to be conducting business with the State and three of these cases have already been referred to the NPA for prosecution. One of these cases was enrolled in court. On a quarterly basis the DPSA also follows up with Departments to verify any disciplinary action taken against such employees alleged to have conducted business with the State.

End

23 September 2021 - NW1409

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 219 on 10 March 2021 which revealed that the national and provincial spheres of government were on course to pay remuneration amounting to R4,5 billion to public service employees who were at various stages of disciplinary processes between 2019 and 2021, there are any steps that the Public Service Commission will take to ensure that pending disciplinary hearings of suspended employees do not exceed three months; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of the Disciplinary Code and Procedure, discipline is a management function, and the PSC does not have the mandate to interfere in the disciplinary process. This position was confirmed by a legal opinion obtained by the PSC from the Office of the Chief State Law Advisor.

However, as part of its monitoring and advisory mandate, the PSC held a meeting with DPSA on 28 May 2021 to deliberate on, amongst others, the issue of disciplinary management and prolonged suspensions. The DPSA indicated that they have procured a service provider to assist them to develop a strategy on how to deal with the backlog of disciplinary cases. In order to contribute to the formulation of the strategy, the PSC and DPSA explored various options, including the following:

  1. The reinstatement of employees whose cases have exceeded the 90 days period where the nature of the misconduct is not of a serious nature;
  2. The reassignment of employees whose cases have exceeded 90 days where the nature of the misconduct is not of a serious nature to other units within Departments or the Public Service;
  3. The establishment of a pool of capacity (i.e. Labour Relations Officers) within the Public Service to deal with backlog cases within the prescribed period; and
  4. The appointment of contract workers/service provides who have the required expertise to deal with some of the cases within the prescribed period.

The PSC is awaiting further engagements with DPSA on the development of the strategy and the PSC continues to urge departments to ensure that disciplinary matters are concluded timeously in the interest of sound labour relations and service delivery.

End