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05 May 2017 - NW735

Profile picture: Vos, Mr J

Vos, Mr J to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to his reply to question 266 on 6 March 2017, (a) how many Labour Court cases was each national department involved in (i) in the (aa) 2014-15 and (bb) 2015-16 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2016, (b) how many of the specified cases (i) were concluded and (ii) are still pending in each case and (c) what is the total amount spent on legal proceedings in each case?

Reply:

According to information at the disposal of DPSA based on the quarterly reports received from national departments (a) there were 53 Labour cases for the national departments in 2016/17 financial year (i) (aa) there were 20 cases for 2014/15 financial year and (bb) there were 46 cases for 2015/16 financial year (ii) Since 1 April 2016 (b) (i) there are 8 cases concluded and (ii) 45 cases which are still pending. The legal cost are paid for by the affected national departments who take responsibility for the costs of their individual cases. Attached for ease of reference is the table of involved national departments for 2014/15, 2015/16 and financial years.

End

05 May 2017 - NW732

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether there is any position of director-general in any national department that is currently vacant; if so, (a) how long has each specified position been vacant and (b) what is the reason for each vacancy; (2) Have the vacancies been advertised; if so, (a) were interviews done and (b) on what date will the vacancies be filled; (3) (a) What is the total number of persons who are currently employed in positions of director-general in an acting capacity, (b) for what period have they been acting in each position and (c) has any of the specified persons applied for the positions; (4) Which contracts of directors-general will expire in the (a) 2017-18, (b) 2018-19 and (c) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

(1) Yes, there are 10 vacant Directors-General positions in National Departments

(a) Department of Arts and Culture: 2 years, 2 months

Department of Communications: 2 years, 10 months

Department of Cooperative Governance: 10 months

Department of International Relations and Cooperation: 9 months

Department of Military Veterans: 2 years

Department of Mineral Resources: 1 year, 1 month

Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation: 1 years, 6 months

Department of Transport: 10 months

Economic Development Department: I year, 11 months

Government Communication and Information System: 1 year, 7 months

(b) Details with regards to the reasons for each vacancy can be obtained from the respective departments.

 

(2) Advertising, interviewing and filling of posts within departments remain the responsibility of each Executive Authority, therefore information in this regard can be obtained from the relevant departments.

 

(3) (a) There are 13 persons appointed in acting capacity as Directors - General.

(b) Department of Arts and Culture: 1 year, 3 months

Department of Communications: 1 year, 11 months

Department of Cooperative Governance: 1 month

Department of International Relations and Cooperation: 9 months

Department of Military Veterans: 5 months

Department of Mineral Resources: 1 year, 1 month

Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation: 2 years, 5 months

Department of Police: 1 year and 5 months

Department of Rural Development and Land Reform: 4 months, there is an incumbent appointed in acting capacity since the Director- General is currently on suspension.

Department of Transport: 6 months

Economic Development Department: 11 months

Government Communication and Information System: 2 year, 5 months

(c) Relevant details with regards to any of the specified persons having applied for the position of director-general in which they are acting can be obtained from the respective departments.

 

(4) Contracts of directors-general expiring in the following financial years:

(a) 2017-18 Financial year

Department of Women: 14 November 2017

Department of Police: 11 June 2017

Department of Public Works: 14 January 2018

Department of Science and Technology: 31 March 2018

Office of the Chief Justice: 31 March 2018

(b) 2018-19 Financial year

Department of Small Business Development: 30 September 2018

Department of Traditional Affairs: 31 August 2018

National Treasury: 15 May 2018

(c) 2019-20 Financial year

Department of Defence: 14 December 2019

Department of Labour: 30 November 2019

National School of Government: 31 December 2019

Department of Home Affairs: 31 March 2020

End

05 May 2017 - NW731

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) percentage and (b) actual amount of each budget of each (i) national department and (ii) provincial department will be spent on the salaries of government officials in the 2017-18 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(b) (i) (ii) Based on information received from National Treasury, the total budgets and amounts budgeted for Compensation of Employees (CoE) in National and provincial departments for the 2017/18 financial year, with CoE Expressed as a percentage of the total budget, are contained in the attached Appendices 1 and 2 respectively.

End

28 March 2017 - NW396

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to Statistics South Africa’s Quarter 4 Labour Force Survey 2016 statistics, (a) in which job categories of the Limpopo Community Service Sector did the (i) 18 000 decline in jobs for the fourth quarter of 2016 and (ii) year-on-year 31 000 decline in jobs for the 2015 and 2016 occur and (b) what are the reasons for the specified job losses in each case?

Reply:

The Labour Force Survey indicates the job fluctuations in the Community and Social Services sector for the whole of Limpopo’s labour market.

In so far as my portfolio is concerned, I can only respond on the trends during the quarter ending 31 December 2016 in respect of occupations in the Public Service departments of the Limpopo Provincial Administration in so far as they can be judged to fall within the Community and Social Services sector.

According to the information at my disposal, the jobs (posts) in the said occupations that can be linked to the Community and Social Services sector have reduced by 131 posts during the quarter ending 31 December 2016 of which 130 are from Auxiliary and Related Workers. The table below contains further detail in this regard per the relevant occupational categories:

Related occupations

Filled posts

Oct 2016

Vacant posts

Oct 2016

Filled posts

Dec 2016

Vacant posts

Dec 2016

Variance in Posts between Dec to Oct 2016

AUXILIARY AND RELATED WORKERS

838

142

704

146

-130

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT WORKERS

365

6

364

7

0

INSTITUTION BASED PERSONAL CARE WORKERS

1

0

1

0

0

PSYCHOLOGISTS AND VOCATIONAL COUNSELLORS

131

161

130

162

0

SOCIAL WORK AND RELATED PROFESSIONALS

1 768

70

1 765

73

0

SUPPLEMENTARY DIAGNOSTIC RADIOGRAPHERS

55

31

54

31

-1

YOUTH WORKERS

17

0

17

0

0

TOTAL

3 175

410

3 035

419

-131

REPLY TO QUESTION (b)

The reason for a reduction in job levels in these occupational categories may in general be ascribed to -

(i) steps taken by departments to be more efficient in their operational processes and the delivery of services as well as the management of their organisational structures; and

(ii) the reduced compensation budgets which were introduced with effect from 1 April 2016, in respect of the Public Service as a whole.

END

28 March 2017 - NW463

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Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

Whether his department procured any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what (i) services were procured, (ii) was the total cost, (iii) is the detailed breakdown of such costs, (iv) was the total amount paid, (v) was the purpose of the payments and (vi) is the detailed breakdown of such payments in each case?

Reply:

The Department did not procure any services from and/or made any payments to (a) Mr Mzwanele Manyi, (b) the Progressive Professionals Forum, (c) the Decolonisation Fund and/or (d) the Black Business Council;

The department did not procure any services nor made any payments to the above-mentioned suppliers since their services were not required by the department during the period.

End

09 March 2017 - NW265

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) With regard to the total cost of pending cases involving employees in (a) national and (b) provincial departments, what are the amounts budgeted for such expenditure in each department in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15, (iii) 2015-16 and (iv) 2016-17 financial years; (2) did any of the specified departments spend more than the allocated budgets during the specified periods on any case; if so, what (a) are the relevant details in each case, (b) amounts were overspent and (c) was the reason in each case?

Reply:

Budgets for pending cases, involving employees, is the responsibility of individual national and provincial Accounting Officers. The Ministry for Public Service and Administration thus does not have detailed information on such budgets.

END

09 March 2017 - NW367

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Stander, Ms T to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and (ii) his deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2014-15 and (bbb) 2015-16 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(i) Late Minister Chabane.

  1. Make: Volkswagen
  2. Model: Touareg 3.0
  3. Price: R 755 720.82
  4. Purchased date: 25 July 2014

aa) None

aaa) 2014-15 Financial Year

bbb) None

bb) None

NB: Subsequently written off due to accident.

(i) Minister Ramatlhodi.

a) Make: Ford

b) Model: Everest 3.2D LTD 4X4 6At

c) Price: 714 500.40

d) Purchased date: 18 April 2016

aa) None

aaa) None

bbb) None

bb) 2016-17 Financial Year

(ii) Deputy Minister Dlodlo.

  1. Make: Audi
  2. Model: Audi A8 3.0 TDI QuatrroTip-tronic
  3. Price: 750 000.00
  4. Purchased order date: 02 June 2016

aa) None

aaa) None

bbb) None

bb) 2016-17 Financial Year

(ii) Deputy Minister Dlodlo.

  1. Make: Audi
  2. Model: Audi A7 Sportback3.0 TDI Tip-tronic
  3. Price: 735 700.00
  4. Purchased order date: 20 June 2016

aa) None

aaa) None

bbb) None

bb) 2016-17 Financial Year

END

07 March 2017 - NW264

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

(1) How many (a) employees are currently on suspension pending disciplinary action in each (i) national and (ii) provincial department and (b) of the specified employees have been on suspension for (i) more than six months but less than one year, (ii) more than one year but less than two years and (iii) two years or more; (2) what amount has been paid to the specified employees pending disciplinary action in each (a) national and (b) provincial department since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

1.  Based on the third quarter of 2016/17 financial year statistical reports received from provinces and national departments, there are:

2.  (a) (i) 45 employees who are on precautionary suspension in national departments; and

(ii) 24 employees who are on precautionary suspension in provincial departments.

(b) In the provinces, of the 24 employees on precautionary suspension in 2(a)(ii), 23 employees were suspended for the period requested, as follows:

(i) Fourteen (14) precautionary suspensions that are more than six month but less than one year;

(ii) Four (4) precautionary suspensions are more than one year but less than two years; and

(iii) Five (5) precautionary suspensions for two years and more.

3.  Based on the reports received from provinces and national departments, the total cost of precautionary suspensions since 1 April 2016 is:

(a) R24 001 864.08 in national departments; and

(b) R112 465 834.37 in provincial departments.

END

06 March 2017 - NW266

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

How (a) many Labour Court cases of each (i) national and (ii) provincial department are pending as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) How long have the specified cases been pending?

Reply:

(a) According to the third quarter of 2016/17 financial year statistical reports received from national and provincial departments the total number of court cases in:

(i) national departments is 53, where 8 cases have been finalised and 45 cases are still pending, and

(ii) in provinces is 125, where 6 cases are finalised and 119 cases still pending.

(b) The duration of the pending court cases is determined by the processes as each case unfolds in court. The longest pending case was lodged 4 years ago in February 2013 whilst the shortest pending case was lodged in December 2016.

REPLY ORIGINATOR

Name: Koos Shabangu

Designation: Deputy Director

Contacts: 012-336 1274

E-Mail: koos@dpsa.gov.za

Recommended / Not recommended

__________________

Director General:

Date: _____________

Recommended / Not Recommended

_____________________

Ms Ayanda Dlodlo, MP

Deputy Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:______________

Approved/ Not approved

________________________

Adv. Ngoako Ramatlhodi, MP

Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:________

27 February 2017 - NW70

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

(a) What amount has been spent by Government on the Open Government Partnership since its inception to date and (b) in what ways did the public service benefit from the specified partnership?

Reply:

A: South Africa joined the Open Government Partnership (OGP) in September 2011. Since then, the Ministry of Public Service and Administration has spent R25, 546, 000. 00.

B: The Open Government Partnership- South Africa (OGP-SA) is geared towards supporting the advancement a developmental state that would result in greater efficiency, higher productivity and promote the goal of a better life for all. More importantly this program is centered on advancing the governance agenda that would respond to citizen’s needs.

The OGP-SA programme aims to bring government directly to the people and enhancing the relationship between government and citizen. The programme does this by:

  1. Developing systems and enhancing mechanisms for public participation;
  2. Providing support for the packaging and dissemination of government departments’ information to citizens;
  3. Providing avenues and innovate methods for citizen feedback on government processes;
  4. Developing strategies and strengthening government partnerships with civil society
  5. Championing and advocating for open government principles across the three spheres of government and organs of state.

Beyond promoting and enhancing government – civil society collaboration on policy formulation through co-creation on commitments in the OGP National Action Plans, the MPSA has played an advocacy role in the promotion of the values of Open Government within and outside government.

Through advocacy, the OGPSA has managed to lobby government to mainstream the openness in its programmes. Results of this lobbying and engagement include the creation of:

  1. Municipal Money”, an open local government budget data portal which provides citizens and other stakeholders with access to comparable, verified information on the financial performance of each municipality. Municipal Money aims to promote transparency and citizen engagement through the visualisation and ‘demystification’ of information about municipal spending.
  2. Through the Open Government Partnership, the South African government, along with a team from the private sector and civil society, launched a national open data portal project. The objective of the portal is to create a platform to enhance citizen access to government open data as well as showcase software applications that were built using South African government open data.
  3. The inclusion of a chapter (Chapter 10) on A Digital Society in the National Integrated ICT Policy White Paper issued on 28 September 2016.

Furthermore, national departments are implementing commitments under the OGP country action plan namely:

  1. Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation: Strengthening Citizen- Based Monitoring. In partnership with civil organization, this commitment specifically focuses on enhancing active citizen participation in monitoring the delivery of services at government frontline points.
  2. National Treasury: Open Budgeting. This commitment involves citizens in the budget process from planning, implementation, monitoring and evaluation, enabling them to have a firmer grasp on how national resources are generated, distributed and reported upon. This aligns with the OGP values of access to information and public accountability.
  3. Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs: Back to Basics Programme. The objectives of this commitment are to ensure that citizens have basic sets of tools by which they can hold their municipalities to account and measure whether they are living up to their commitments. This initiative resonates with the OGP’s emphasis on greater accountability and transparency.
  4. Department of Environmental Affairs: Development an integrated and publicly accessible portal for environmental management information. To enable better engagement and informed decision making by citizens on environmental sensitive areas, this commitment seeks to integrate spatial data on biodiversity, ecosystems, water, agriculture, protected areas, conservation areas, air quality priority areas, etc. As part of access to information entrenched in the OGP values, this commitment will allow easy and unrestricted access to spatial environmental data and support the citizens constitutional right to information.

5. Department of Public Service and Administration: Implement South Africa’s action plan on the G20 High Level Principles on Beneficial Ownership Transparency to improve the transparency of legal persons and arrangements in order to protect the integrity and transparency of the global financial system. This commitment aims at preventing misuse of and ensure transparency of legal persons and arrangements. It relates with the OGP’s principles transparency and access to information.

South Africa’s participation in the OGP has benefited the public service through the promotion of constitutional values such as public participation and the emphasis on ethical conduct and responsiveness to citizens. The increased engagement with communities and co-creation of national commitments as well as other citizen’s activities on the OGP has positively enhanced public participation in government programmes.

The OGP is also piloting the implementation of Agenda 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (Goal 16) through a partnership with the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and Statistics South Africa. Such partnerships ensures that the Open Government agenda is infused into both national and international programmes of government.

END

23 February 2017 - NW181

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

With reference to the Presidential Golf Challenge held on 10 February 2017, what are the reasons for the invitation to the Executive Mayor of Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality, Mr Athol Trollip (details furnished), being withdrawn two days before the specified event?

Reply:

The Presidential Golf Challenge (PGC) is hosted by the Ministry of Public Service and Administration every year after the State of the Nation Address to raise funds for a charitable course of a sitting President.

As the event is sponsored by private companies, the majority of participants at the PGC are business executives. Therefore, the number of guests who could be accommodated for the event is limited and this year, only six Cabinet Ministers and sitting Members of Parliament who belong to the Parliamentary Golf Club were invited.

Mr A. Trollip is no longer a sitting Member of Parliament even though he belongs to the Parliamentary Golf Club.

17 February 2017 - NW69

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the THE MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION:

(1) What are the full details of the guidelines determining the purchase of vehicles for (a) Ministers and (b) Deputy Ministers; (2) what are the full details of the vehicle(s) purchased for use by the Deputy Minister of his department since 1 April 2016 to date, including any (a) optional extras, (b) maintenance and warranties included, (c) suppliers chosen and (d) any other further relevant details; (3) was the purchase of the specified vehicle(s) done as per the normal supply chain management processes for transactions of its value; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) how does the total amount budgeted for the purchase of the specified vehicle(s) compare with the threshold set by the Ministerial Handbook; (5) was approval granted for any deviation from the threshold amounts, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Ministerial Handbook governs the acquisition as well as the replacement of official vehicles as procured for both the Minister and the Deputy Minister.

In terms of Chapter 5, paragraph 1.2.1 of the Ministerial Handbook, Members at a National level may be provided with one vehicle for the use in Cape Town and one vehicle for the use in Pretoria.

Paragraph 1.2.3 of the Ministerial Handbook stipulates that Departments may purchase official vehicle/s directly from manufacturers and/or their dealerships only when the currently provided officials vehicle for that office has reached 120 000km’s or 5 years, whichever comes first.

Paragraph 1.2.4 of the Ministerial Handbook stipulates that the total purchase price of the vehicle chosen by the Member may not exceed in respect of a:

  • Minister/Premier: 70% of the inclusive annual remuneration package of a Minister as may be amended from time to time on recommendation of the Commission for the Remuneration of Political Members (Grade F, Notch 3),
  • Deputy Ministers/MEC: 70% of the inclusive annual remuneration package of a Deputy Minister as may be amended from time to time on recommendation of the Commission for the Remuneration of Political Members (Grade E1, Notch 3).

2. The following two vehicles were procured for the Deputy Minister:

Audi A8 3.0 TDI Quattro Tip-tronic (R750 000.00)

  1. No optional extras were added.
  2. Standard Audi 5 year/100 000km maintenance plan included in the purchase price.
  3. Audi Centre Fourways.
  4. The vehicle was pre-owned.

Audi A7 Sportback 3.0 TDI Tip-Tronic (R735 000.00)

  1. No optional extras were added.
  2. Standard Audi 5 year/100 000km maintenance plan included in the purchase price.
  3. Audi Centre Fourways.
  4. The vehicle was pre-owned.

3. The procurement of the vehicles was done in terms of normal Supply Chain Management processes. The vehicles were available on the transversal contract RT 57 through National Treasury for the Supply and delivery of motor vehicles, light and heavy commercial vehicles, busses and motor cycles to the State for the State at a cost in excess of 32% more than the quoted price from Audi Centre – Fourways. Annexure: B, paragraph 3 of the approved Departmental Supply Chain Management Policy caters for exemption of the three quotation and deviation rule for the sourcing of vehicles for Executive Authorities when the vehicle is not available on the transversal contract RT 57. Deviation approval was sought from Annexure: B, paragraph 3 of the approved Departmental Supply Chain Management Policy as the vehicles were available on RT 57 but at a premium price. The deviation approval was in light of “Value for Money” which is one of the key principles to consider during Demand Management within the Supply Chain Management arena.

4. The budgeted amount for the vehicles is in line with the threshold stipulated in the Ministerial Handbook.

5. No approval was granted for any deviation from the threshold amounts as set by the Ministerial Handbook as the vehicles procured for the Deputy Minister were far less than the 70% threshold amount per vehicle of the Deputy Minister’s inclusive annual remuneration package.

02 December 2016 - NW2306

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether any (a) internal and/or (b) external forensic reports pertaining to (i) his department and/or (ii) each entity reporting to him were completed from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what is the (aa) name, (bb) subject matter and (cc) date of conclusion of each of the specified forensic reports?

Reply:

DPSA

  1. No Internal forensic reports pertaining to the Department of Public Service and Administration were completed from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available.

Why not? there were never any cases that came to our knowledge that required a forensic investigation.

  1. No External forensic reports pertaining to the Department of Public Service and Administration were completed from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available

Why not? there were never any cases that came to our knowledge that required a forensic investigation

(aa) N/A

  1. N/A
  2. N/A

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent Constitutional body, and its budget is appropriated via the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

(a) & (b)(i) Not applicable

(a) & (b)(ii) No internal or external forensic report has been commissioned by the PSC from 1 January 2009 to date.

(aa) Not applicable, please see (a) and (b) above.

(bb) Not applicable, please see (a) and (b) above.

(cc) Not applicable, please see (a) and (b) above.

The Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI) has not had any (a) Internal and /or (b) external forensic reports completed from 1 January 2009 to date; because the organisation has not had any reported and /or investigated forensic cases.

THE NATIONAL SCHOOL OF GOVERNMENT

(a) None

(b) Yes

(i) National School of Government

(aa) KPMG

 

(bb) Fraudulant Transactions – misappropriation of funds

(cc) 15 June 2011

Government Employees Medical Scheme

(a)(i): Not applicable to GEMS

(a)(ii) No completed internal forensic investigation report is available. Why Not: An investigation into the leaking of information to the press is still underway.

(b)(i): Not applicable to GEMS

(b)(ii) No. Why Not: Allegations made in relation to one of the Scheme’s procurement processes is still underway.

Note that the Scheme does have a Claims Risk Management function where reported cases of fraud, waste and abuse are subjected to investigation. The actions pursued by the Scheme in response to the forensic investigation outcomes include reporting healthcare providers to regulatory bodies such as the Health Professions Council of South Africa and criminal prosecution.

18 October 2016 - NW634

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Mbete, Ms B to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) How many (i) deputy directors (ii) directors (iii) chief directors (iv) deputy directors-general and (v) directors-general were employed in all national departments in 2009 and (b) how many of the specified managers were employed by the end of 2015?

Reply:

1. The number of permanent employees on salary levels 11 to 15, as well as all permanent and contract appointments on salary levels 16 in all national departments as in March 2009 and January 2016 are displayed in the table below.

Number of employees in the Public Service by Management and Salary level

as in March 2009 and January 2016

 

Salary Level

2009

2016

11

2464

2662

12

5256

5960

13

2599

3572

14

843

1279

15

201

281

16

59

74

Data Source: PERSAL

   

Compiled by the DPSA

Excluding Defence

   
     

10 October 2016 - NW2101

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What amount did (a) his department and (b) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising on the (i) Africa News Network 7 channel, (ii) SA Broadcasting Corporation (aa) television channels and (bb) radio stations, (iii) national commercial radio stations and (iv) community (aa) television and (bb) radio stations (aaa) in the 2015-16 financial year and (bbb) since 1 April 2016?

Reply:

(a) Department of Public Service and Administration

(i) None

(ii) (aa) None

(ii) (bb) None

(iii) None

(iv) None (aa) None (bb) None (aaa) None (bbb) None

(b) (1) National School of Government (NSG) and (2) Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI)

(1) National School of Government (NSG)

(i) None

(ii) (aa) None

(ii) (bb) None

(iii) None

(iv) None (aa) None (bb) None (aaa) None (bbb) None

(2) Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI)

(i) None

(ii) (aa) None

(ii) (bb) None

(iii) None

(iv) None (aa) None (bb) None (aaa) None (bbb) None

10 October 2016 - NW1762

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What are the (a)(i) names and (ii) positions of the members of the Public Service Commission as at 1 September 2016 and (b) last dates of current terms of offices of each member; (2) (a) how many positions were vacant at the Public Service Commission on 1 September 2016 and (b) what steps will be taken to (i) avoid interruptions in the provision of service by the specified entity and (ii) ensure the rapid filling of the specified vacancies in the future?

Reply:

  1. (a)(i)-(ii) and (b)

Name

Position

Date Appointed

End of term

Term of office

Mr BM Mthembu

Deputy Chairperson

20160101

20201231

2nd Term

Ms SS Nkosi

Commissioner: National

20140424

20190423

2nd Term

Ms LV Sizani

Commissioner: National

20111001

20160930

1st Term

Mr DS Mkhwanazi

Commissioner: Mpumalanga

20140501

20190430

2nd Term

Ms MD Sejosingoe

Commissioner: North West

20121210

20171209

1st Term

Mr TG Mashamba

Commissioner: Limpopo

20150824

20200823

1st Term

Mr MH Seloane

Commissioner: Gauteng

20111101

20161031

1st Term

Ms MA Marais-Martin

Commissioner: Northern Cape

20150413

20200412

2nd Term

Dr WH Boshoff

Commissioner: Free State

20140301

20190228

1st Term

Mr S Mafanya

Commissioner: Eastern Cape

20140211

20190210

2nd Term

Dr GG Woods

Commissioner: Western Cape

20120101

20171231

1st Term

Dr MP Sithole

Commissioner: KZN

20150901

20200831

1st Term

2. (a)

Since 1 September 2016, there are two (2) vacancies for Commissioners based at the national office in Pretoria and the President has not yet designated a Commissioner to be a Chairperson of the Commission in terms of Section 5(1) of the Public Service Commission Act, 1997.

(b)

(i) The President has, in terms of Section 4(1) of the PSC Act, 1997, addressed a letter to the Speaker of the National Assembly on 27 May 2016 requesting the National Assembly to initiate a process to fill the vacancies that will occur when the term of office of two Commissioners expire on 14 August 2016 and 31 August 2016 respectively. The Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration as well as Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation has been tasked with the responsibility to find suitable candidates to fill the vacancies.

(ii) Given the current prevailing legislative framework which requires the National Assembly to fill the vacancies, it is difficult for the PSC or Ministry to expedite the process as the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration as well as Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation is tasked with the responsibility to finalise the process. Therefore, the onus rests with the Portfolio Committee to ensure rapid filling of the vacancies as the matter is before the Committee.

03 October 2016 - NW1653

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) is the job description of his department’s ethics officer and (b) are the critical performance indicators for the specified position?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have a dedicated official performing the functions of an Ethics Officer. However it has assigned an official in the Office of the Director-General to perform key ethics officer functions in addition to her other duties. In this regard her role entails the following:

  1. Liaison with all members of the SMS regarding the submission of Financial Disclosures.
  2. Initial scrutiny of all submitted disclosures to assess if they are complete.
  3. Follow-up with relevant managers whose disclosures might be incomplete.
  4. Forwarding of all completed disclosures to the Executive Authority for onward processing to the Public Service Commission.
  5. Brief report to the Director-General on the disclosure process and the results thereof.

(b) The critical performance indicators are:

  1. Timely and complete disclosure of financial interests by SMS members; and
  2. Timely advice to the Accounting Officer regarding non-compliant officials for purposes of follow-up and where necessary, disciplinary action.

03 October 2016 - NW1753

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Mulder, Dr PW to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department has met the requirements of the Use of Official Languages Act, Act No 12 of 2012, according to which his department (a) has established an official language policy for the department and (b) instituted a language unit; if not, (i) why not and (ii) what steps he will take to ensure that the provisions of the Act are met; if so, what are the relevant particulars?

Reply:

(a) The DPSA has developed an Official Language Policy which has been submitted to the Government Printing Works for publication in the Government Gazette for public comment. The Notice was published in Government Gazette of 23 September 2016 (No. 40293 23-9 Notice No. 1081) which is available on the GPW website: www.qpwonline.co.za All interested persons and organisations who would like to submit written comments are provided with 30 days to do so from the day of publication in the Government Gazette. The Policy is available on the DPSA website: www.dosa.qov.za

(b) The process of having an operational Language Unit is under consideration at the moment and will be concluded once the Official Language Policy has been finalised.

03 October 2016 - NW1740

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the Minister of Finance’s Budget Speech on 24 February 2016, in which the Minister announced the Government’s intention to cut R25 billion over three years from the Governments’ wage bill, (a) how does the total wage bill for the first four months of the 2016-17 financial year compare to that of the first four months of the 2015-16 financial year, (b) what has been the total wage bill of government in the (i) 2014-15 and (ii) 2015-16 financial years, (c) what savings in the wage bill have been achieved due to austerity measures over the first four months of the 2016-17 financial year, (d) is the Government still on track in achieving its target of R25 billion in wage bill savings over the next two financial years and (e) what percentage of the total government expenditure was allocated to wages in the (i) 1996-97, (ii) 2006-07 and (iii) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

With reference to the Minister of Finance's Budget Speech on 24 February 2016, in which the Minister announced Government's intention to cut R25 billion over three years from the Public Service (national and provincial government) wage bill,

(a) According to information received from National Treasury, the first four months of the 2016-17 financial year compared to that of the first four months of the 2015-16 financial year, is as reflected in the Table below;

R'000

 

April

 

May

 

June

 

July

 

Total

2015/16

32

125

538

32

547

131

37

501

783

34

217

531

136

391

983

2016/17

37

255

422

37

898

664

38

512

932

38

314

848

151

981

865

(b) The Public Service wage bill in the following financial years:

    (i) 2014-15

Amounts to total consolidated expenditure' of R396 888.1 million.

   (ii) 2015-16

Amounts to total consolidated expenditure2 of R430 547.8 million (revised Estimate).

(c) What savings in the wage bill have been achieved due to austerity measures over the first four months of the 2016-17 financial year?

While earnings of public servants have increased during the first four months of 2016/17 financial year, departments have managed to contain headcount growth over the same period. Headcount has reduced by 0.6 per cent across the board for national and provincial spheres of government. In financial terms, this amounts to R2.8 billion in projected savings for the whole financial year

(d) Is the Government still on track in achieving its target of R25 billion in Public

Service wage bill savings over the next two financial years?

Government is committed to spending within set compensation budget ceilings and will continue to enforce them over the next two financial years. Indications are that set targets will be achieved as planned.

(e) What percentage of the total government expenditure was allocated to Public Service wages in the following financial years -

   (i) 1996-97

The percentage of the total government expenditure allocated to wages is 40.8%3

   (ii) 2006-07

The percentage of the total government expenditure allocated to wages is 31.3%4

   (iii) 2016-17

The percentage of the total government expenditure allocated to wages is 33.6%.5

03 October 2016 - NW2066

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether each Head of Department (HOD) of his department signed a performance agreement since their appointment; if not, (a) what is the total number of HODs who have not signed performance agreements, (b) what is the reason in each case, (c) what action has he taken to rectify the situation and (d) what consequences will the specified HOD face for failing to sign the performance agreements; if so, (i) when was the last performance assessment of each HOD conducted and (ii) what were the results in each case; (2) whether any of the HODs who failed to sign a performance agreement received a performance bonus since their appointment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) at what rate and (b) what criteria were used to determine the specified rate; (3) whether any of the HODs who signed a performance agreement received a performance bonus since their appointment; if so, (a) at what rate and (b) what criteria were used to determine the rate?

Reply:

(1) Yes.

    a) None.

    b) Falls Away.

    c) Not applicable.

    d) Falls away, (i) and (ii) please refer to the table herewith below;

Name

 

(ii)

Department of Public Service and Administration

2014/2015

Fully effective

Office of the Public Service Commission

None, the HOD was appointed on 1 June 2016

Falls away

National School of Government

2014/2015

Eligible for pay progression

Centre for Public Service Innovation

2015/2016

Outstanding performance rating

(2) None.

(3) None.

03 October 2016 - NW2031

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What formal qualifications does each of his department’s (a)(i) Chief Financial Officers and/or (ii) acting Chief Financial Officers and (b)(i) Directors-General and/or (ii) acting Directors-General possess?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Chief Financial Officer of the Department of Public Service and

Administration possesses the following formal qualifications;

  1. Matric Certificate
  2. Bachelor of Arts in Education
  3. Master of Education
  4. Master of Management Public and Development Management

(ii) The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have acting Chief Financial Officer

(b) (i) The Director-General of the Department of Public Service and Administration

possesses the following formal qualifications;

  1. Matric Certificate
  2. Bachelor of Commerce
  3. Certificate Programme in Finance and Accounting (CPFA)
  4. Programme and Project Management in Public and Management

(ii) The Department of Public Service and Administration does not have acting Director-General

23 September 2016 - NW1734

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the undertaking made by his department during a parliamentary portfolio committee meeting in September 2014, that it would review the disclosure requirements for senior members of the public service with the aim to also include debts owed by public servants in the list of items to be disclosed annually, what progress has been made in revising such requirements?

Reply:

The Public Service Regulations, 2001 were reviewed after consultation with relevant stakeholders. The review included Chapter 3 (the Financial Disclosure Framework) of the 2001 Regulations. The Public Service Regulations, 2016 were issued after this review process and came into effect on the 1st of August 2016. Regulation 19 stipulates details of interests to be disclosed by designated employees. These details include the disclosure of “loan accounts”, among other things to be disclosed by designated employees. Members of senior management service are designated employees.

23 September 2016 - NW1652

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What are the (a) names, (b) descriptions of the positions and (c) circumstances of the Directors-General in the Public Service that did not submit their financial disclosure forms for the 2014-15 financial year as at (i) 31 March 2015 and (ii) 31 March 2016; (2) whether all senior management staff members of his department and the National School of Government submitted their financial disclosure forms by the due date for the 2014-15 financial year; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will the specified financial disclosure forms be submitted; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what steps have been taken to avoid a repetition of the failure to submit disclosure forms by (a) Directors-General in the Public Service and (b) senior management staff members in his department and the National School of Government on time in the 2015-16 financial year deadline?

Reply:

(1) Chapter 3 C.1 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001 (which was applicable during the period in question) provides that every designated employee (SMS member) shall, not later than 30 April each year, disclose to the relevant Executive Authority particulars of all her/his registrable interests in respect of the period 1 April of the previous year to 31 March of the year in question. Copies of the forms on which the designated employees disclosed their financial interests are to be submitted to the Public Service Commission (PSC) by not later than 31 May each year. In view thereof, the financial disclosure forms for the period 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015 were supposed to reach the PSC by 31 May 2015. There were, however, financial disclosure forms, including those of some of the Directors-General, that were not submitted to the relevant Executive Authorities and the PSC by the respective stipulated due dates. The Directors-General (including those who were acting) and Executive Authorities who did not comply with the requirements to submit the financial as provided for in the Public Service Regulations are reflected in the Table below.

The level of compliance with the requirement to submit the financial disclosure forms by the due dates of 30 April 2015 (Director-General) and 31 May 2015 (Executive Authorities)

NAME OF DEPARTMENT

NAME OF DG

DATE CREATED! COMPLETED BY DG

DATE

SUBMITTED BY
EA TO PSC

Arts and Culture

Mr V. Jack (Acting)

The official never

submitted

-

Correctional Services

Mr Z.I Modise

22 April 2015

28 April 2016

Defence

Dr S.M. Gulube

The official never

submitted

-

Economic Development

Mr K. Naidoo

f(Acting)

21 April 2015

-

Environmental Affairs

Ms N.N. Ngcaba

16 April 2015

23 June 2015

Higher Education and Training

Mr G.F. Qonde

28 April 2015

17 December 2015

Human Settlements

Mr M. Tshangana

The official never

submitted

-

IPID

Mr R.J. McBride

The official was on

suspension during the submission period and never submitted.

-

Military Veterans

Mr T. Motumi

1 June 2015

-

National School of Government

Mr B.I. Maja

(Acting)

29 April 2015

-

National Treasury

Mr L. Fuzile

29 April 2015

-

Public Service & Administration

Mr M. Diphofa

30 April 2015

12 August 2015

Small Business Development

Ms P. Ncapayi

21 April 2015

16 February 2016

Sport & Recreation

Mr M.E. Moemi

16 October2015

(Submitted internally)

-

State Security Agency

Amb S. Kudjoe

The official never

submitted

-

Trade & Industry

Mr L.V. October

20 April 2015

16 February 2016

Women

Ms J. Schreiner

The official captured

the required
information on the e-Disclosure system but was not submitted.

-

For the 2015/2016 financial year the financial disclosure forms of only two Directors-General were outstanding as at the due date of 31 May 2016. These are the Director-General of State Security Agency (Ambassador S Kudjoe) and the Secretary General of the Office of the Chief Justice (Mr M Sejosengwe). The form of Mr Sejosengwe was, however, submitted on time internally (i.e. 15 April 2016) through the eDisclosure system. This form was only released by the Executive Authority to the PSC on 29 June 2016. Ambassador Kudjoe's form is still outstanding.

(2) For 2014/2015 financial year Public Service and Administration and National School of Government did not submit their financial disclosure forms to the PSC by the due date of 31 May 2015. As at the end of the 2014/2015 financial year (31 March 2016), the DPSA had submitted 97% of the forms and the National School of Government had not submitted a single form by then.

(3) The PSC is continuously making efforts to try and get Departments to improve the submission rate to 100% by the due date of 31 May each year. The following steps are taken on an annual basis in the quest to improve the submission rate by the due date:

  • The PSC sends out letters to the EAs reminding them to facilitate the submission of financial disclosure forms of SMS members within their respective departments. The DPSA issues notices on the salary advices of senior managers, reminding them of their duty to declare financial interests.
  • The Executive Authorities are advised on a continuous basis to take disciplinary steps against officials who, without valid reasons, fail to comply with the Financial Disclosure Framework, as stipulated in Regulation H of Chapter 3 of the Public Service Regulations.

19 September 2016 - NW1654

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether (a) his department and/or (b) the Public Service Commission have studied the practices of other international governments in fighting corruption in the public service; if not, why not; if so, (i) which international governments’ practices have been studied and (ii) what is his position regarding the specified practices in each case; (2) whether any of the specified governments expect senior management staff members in the Public Service to declare the business interest of close family members; if so, why is this declaration excluded from the information that senior management staff members in South Africa have to disclose annually; (3) whether any plans have been put in place to improve the effectiveness of the annual submission of financial disclosures of the Public Service senior management staff members in government’s endeavours to purge corruption from the public service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) In April 2016, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) undertook a study visit to Canada. The purpose of the visit was to benchmark against existing institutional mechanisms in Canada, to gather information that will assist in establishing the Public Administration

Ethics, Integrity and Disciplinary Technical Assistance Unit (EIDTAU), focusing on specific lessons and experiences with regards to structures, regulations, procedures, tools and systems. The DPSA interacted with a number of institutions operating at three levels of government. One of the institutions that the DPSA engaged with is the Treasury Board Secretariat (TBS), which is similar to the DPSA with regards to mandate.

 (i) TBS is responsible for accountability and ethics, HR and administrative management. financial, comptrollership, approving regulations and translating the policies and programmes approved by Cabinet into reality and by providing departments with the resources and the administrative support they need to do their work. TBS implements a number of instruments for promoting ethics in the Public Service at Federal level such as:

  • Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA) which protects public servants who disclose acts of wrongdoing. This piece of legislation enables departments to implement an internal mechanism for reporting allegations of unethical conduct or corruption. However, the Act does not prevent employees from reporting to the Office of the Public Sector Integrity Commissioner of Canada, which is an agency of Parliament similar to the Public Protector of South Africa.
  • Values and Ethics Code for the Public Sector- general code of conduct for all Federal public service employees. The Code constitutes part of the terms and conditions of employment for all Federal employees. Failure to adhere can lead to disciplinary action up to and including termination of employment; and
  • Policy on conflict of Interest and Post-Employment. This Policy prescribes restrictions that public servants in designated positions should adhere to in order to avoid actual, potential or perceived conflict of interest, when they leave the public service.

In June 2013, the DPSA also undertook a study visit to the United Republic of Tanzania. The purpose of the study visit was to achieve the following outcomes:

  • Clear conceptualization of the institutional model that can best address corruption challenges in the public administration of South Africa;
  • Delineation of the mandate and functions of such a model;
  • In-depth understanding of the resource allocation implications and
  • The design of an organizational structure that matches the functions and mandate.

The DPSA delegation interacted with the Prevention and Combating of Corruption Bureau (PCCB) and the Ethics Secretariat. The PCCB is a constitutional body that investigates and prosecute acts of corruption in both public and private sector. It is an independent anti-corruption agency as contemplated in Articles 6 and 36 of the United Nations Convention against Corruption (UNCAC). The Ethics Secretariat receives and verifies declarations of assets and liabilities which are required to be made by public leaders under the Constitution of the United Republic of Tanzania. Moreover, this constitutional body is empowered to initiate and conduct any investigation in respect of breach of ethics prescribed under the Public Leadership Code of Ethics Act. No. 13 of 1995.

(ii) The following is my position regarding each of the initiatives implemented by TBS of Canada and the Government of the United Republic of Tanzania.

Initiative

My position

Public Servants Disclosure Protection Act (PSDPA) (Canada)

The internal reporting mechanism implemented by departments is an excellent practice. This is an idea that we are exploring as we proceed with the establishment of the EIDTAU.

Values and Ethics Code for the Public

Sector (Canada)

This Code is similar to our Code of Conduct

for Public Servants, which we have
implemented since 1997. We have recently

refined the Code as part of the new
amendments we made in the Public Service Regulations, 2016.

Policy on conflict of Interest and Post-

Employment (Canada)

We studied this practice since 2007. While this practice is desirable, we believe that the enforcement will pose more challenges.

Prevention and Combating of Corruption

Bureau (PCCB) (Tanzania

In establishing the EIDTAU, we are

cognizant that South Africa has adopted a multi-agency system to fighting corruption,

which is viewed by the National
Development Plan as the appropriate model for the country. Although the work of PCCB is commendable, we believe its approach is similar to the DPCI.

The Ethics Secretariat (Tanzania)

A central system for disclosure of financial interests of all public officials (elected and appointed) is a very unique. However, this model cannot be replicated in South Africa. We already have a decentralised system that separates categories of public officials. In the Public Service, the Public Service Commission verifies all financial disclosures of senior officials.

(2) In terms of the Public Administration Management Act, 2015 (PAMA), all public servants will be required to disclose financial interests of spouses. This requirement will come in to effect once I have issued the Regulations to support the implementation of PAMA.

(3) We have been implementing the electronic disclosure system since 2015 and we have seen a remarkable improvement in terms of compliance rate. Below is an overview electronic disclosures by SMS members as at 30 April 2016.

Institution

No. of SMS

No. submitted

%

National Departments

4988

4532

91%

National Components

684

660

96%

Eastern Cape

580

459

79%

Free State

379

330

87%

Gauteng

811

803

99%

KZN

605

605

100%

Limpopo

484

479

99%

Mpumalanga

262

230

88%

Northern Cape

262

262

100%

North West

250

199

80%

Western Cape

384

384

100%

Total

9689

8943

92%

We have strengthened the requirement to disclose electronically in the PSR, 2016. Employees will disclose manually only under exceptional circumstances, which will have to be authorised by respective heads of departments. The Public Service Commission retains the responsibility to conduct verification of financial disclosures and manage any conflicts of interest for all members of Senior Management Service

19 September 2016 - NW1735

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Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Can he provide (a) details of and (b) reasons for the unplanned spending on public participation programmes by his department as contained in a recent report by the to the Standing Committee on Appropriations by the Treasury?

Reply:

In its adoption of the new approach towards Public Participation Programmes on 24 March 2010, Cabinet resolved that Ministers and Deputy Ministers are required to commit to at least ten (10) public engagements per year. These would include repeats and follow up visits and will be informed by their departmental outcomes and targets. The main focus of the public participation programmes was on rural areas, townships and villages.

Minister Adv. Ngoako Ramatlhodi

01 June 2016.

Engagement with young unemployed graduates in the Eastern Cape Province was held in Mdantsane Sisa Dukashe Stadium. The Minister’s engagement was to assist graduates into candidacy programme as the launch of Youth Month.

09 June 2016

In partnership with the NYDA, SETA’s, Department of labour and Private Sector, the Minister was involved in taking government services to young people in Gauteng Province (Fochville Popo Molefe Stadium). Issues raised by young people included inter alia youth unemployment which leads to drug abuse and addiction, access to higher learning and internet connection.

21 July 2016

Engagement with Learners in Wedela where the Minister donated a mini library at Thabo Merafong Home Based Care Center.

Deputy Minister Ayanda Dlodlo

23 April 2016

The Imbizo was held at Civic Centre Hall, Riversdale, Hessequa Local Municipality

Report back Imbizo on issues raised by youth engagement on 20 June 2015.

The report included the number of 807 unemployed young people who were registered by the Department of Labour and 606 who received Employment Counseling; the increased Home Affairs services per month i.e. twice a month in Albertinia, Stilbaai and Heidelberg, youth entrepreneurial development programme Small Enterprise Development Agency (SEDA) trained 150 young people in areas of marketing, production and human resources management; Southern Cape College TVET College, PetroSA and Transnet provided skill Youth Career Expo in the municipality.

10 July 2016

Oudtshoorn Youth Outreach Programme was held at New Bridgeton Stadium, Oudtshoorn.

Shared information on education and economic development opportunities, encouraged them to talk about issues they are confronted with and what support they need to improve their lives, encouraged youth to make the Public Service their career of choice. This was in partnership with the South Cape TVET College, Department of Home Affairs, SASSA, Department of Health, South African National Defence Force and Local Municipality. These partners provided information on available youth development opportunities.

20 June 2016

Open Government Partnership youth dialogue was held at UNISA, Pretoria.

The purpose of the youth dialogue was to discuss how land reform and expropriation relates to youth unemployment and economic empowerment. Issues covered included necessary skills needed, access to information on land reform, youth involvement in national discourse, establishment of Commission of Enquiry on the land that was taken from black people.

30 June 2016

Open Government Partnership youth dialogue on Land Reform, Youth Unemployment and Economic Empowerment in Nelspruit, Mpumalanga.

The purpose of the youth dialogue was to solicit the opinions of young people on the subject of land and agrarian reform. Furthermore the dialogue strived to establish solutions for the challenges facing the youth of South Africa namely, unemployment and economic disempowerment. Issues that came from the discussions include lack of knowledge and awareness of land reform legislation and initiatives, lack of employment opportunities available, need for funding policy reform and greater monitoring and control of funds within development agencies.

08 September 2016 - NW1556

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What amount did (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him spend on advertising in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) how much has (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(i) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA)

    (a) In the 2015-16 financial year, DPSA spent an amount of R 2 792 971.76 for advertising.

     (b) An amount of R1 666 000.00 has been budgeted for advertising for the financial year 2016-17

(ii) Entities namely: (1) National School of Government and (2) Centre for Public Service Innovation

National School of Government (NSG)

   (a) In the 2015 -16 financial year, The NSG spent R 977, 249 on advertising

   (b) An amount of R1, 121,041 has been budgeted for advertising for the 2016-17 financial year

Centre for Public Service Innovation (CPSI)

  (a) In the 2015/16 financial year, The Centre for Public Service Innovation spent R1.053 million of advertising

  (b) An amount R676 000 has been budgeted for advertising in the 2016-17 financial year.

08 September 2016 - NW534

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to commitments made during his department’s Budget Vote speech on 13 May 2015, what are the relevant details of the (a)(i) business processes mapped, (ii) standard operating procedures developed and (iii) organisational functionality assessments conducted in response to his department’s commitment to its Operations Management Framework and (b) strategy for providing resultant support to poor performing departments that was drafted for consultation with stakeholders in the Public Service in terms of the (i) strategy for providing support, (ii) poor performing departments referred to in the speech and targeted by the strategy and (iii) consultation that has taken place on the strategy his department committed to?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is mandated by the Medium Term Strategic Framework and Outcome 12 to develop an Operations Management Framework (OMF) and to provide institutional support on the implementation thereof to selected national and provincial Government departments on an annual basis.

In pursuance of that mandate, the Chief Directorate: Operations Management of the DPSA developed an Operations Management Framework with supporting toolkits which includes amongst others includes Business Process Management and Standard Operating Procedures.

In the 2015-16 financial year, DPSA focused on the National Department of Labour, the Social Development Sector and the Transport Sector. Business Process Maps and Standard Operating Procedures were developed for these Departments as follows:

Labour:

No.

Branch

Core Service

1

Inspection and Enforcement Service (IES)

  • Conduct Review Inspection on Employment
  • Inspection in terms of Labour Legislation - Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Inspection in terms of the Occupational Health and Safety Act

2

Public Employment Services (PES)

  • Recruitment and Placement Services
  • Walk in Registration of Work Seekers at a Labour Centre
  • Online Registration of Work Seekers via ESSA
  • International Cross Boarder Labour Migration Management

3

Labour Practice and International Relations (LPIR)

  • Registration of Labour organisations
  • Processing of Collective Agreements

4.

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

  • Online application for unemployment/ordinary claim by claimant

5.

Compensation Fund (CF)

  • Assessment: Tariffs Section 85: Reduction and Loading Assessment Rate
  • Assessment: Tariffs Section: Sub Class investigations
  • Raising Assessment (Manual Submission)
  • Registration of Employer
  • Revision of Assessment

Social Development:

  • Registration of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Funding of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Placement of children in need of care and protection in foster care

Transport:

  • Issuing of contracts to service providers for the transportation of eligible learners to and from school
  • Issuing of public transport operating licenses
  • Issuing drivers licenses

The DPSA provided institutional support and/or advice to other departments on the Operations Management value chain. A list of departments is provided hereunder:

No.

Name of the Government Department/ Component/ Institution

1

Gauteng Department of Health

2

National Department of Health

3

Batho Pele Forum

4

Free State — Office of the Premier

5

Mineral Resources

6

Military Veterans

7

Department of Corporative Governance

8

KZN — Arts and Culture

9

National School of Government

10

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

11

Eastern Cape — Safety and Security

12

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

13

KZN —Education

14

Correctional Services Inspector Judge

15

Northern Cape — Office of the Premier

16

Batho Pele Standards Steering Committee

17

Department of Trade and Industry

18

KZN — Office of the Premier

19

Human Settlements

20

Parliamentary Budget Office

21

Agriculture and Rural Development

22

Ministry: Public Service and Administration

23

National Consumer Commission

24

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

25

Agriculture — Mpumalanga

26

Gauteng Office of the Premier

27

Northern Cape Provincial Treasury

(b) (i) (ii) (iii)

(i) The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments was developed by the DPSA to coordinate targeted support to government departments in line with the mandate of the MPSA outlined in section 3 (6) of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended by the Public Service Amendment Act 30 of 2007.

The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments is delivered in phases and the Initiation phase of the strategy looks at three key areas:

  • Cabinet initiated Intervention or Support
  • Pro-active requests from Departments for support and
  • DPSA initiated support (MPAT, SD sites)

The targeted support on year one focused on Pro Active requests from departments for support and the requests received were on Organisational Design support. Received requests on Organisational Design from 43 sectors, 25 were finalised and 11 in progress, attached at Annexure B. The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments has been approved for implementation.

(ii) With regard to poor performing departments, a presentation was made to the North West province on their performance against outcome 12 and it was agreed that the Province will be assisted in the new financial year on their Service Delivery Improvement Plans (SDIPs), and together with National Treasury assist the Province in unblocking the challenge of 30 day payment to suppliers.

(iii) Extensive consultations were held within DPSA and with National and Provincial departments. The draft strategy was finally presented at the Governance and Administration cluster on 01 October 2015 for endorsement and support.

08 September 2016 - NW1404

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether (a) his department and (b) all entities reporting to him are running development programmes for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aa) what are the relevant details, (bb) what amount has been budgeted and (cc) how many jobs will be created through the specified development programmes in the 2016-17 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) No. The Department does not have a mandate to run development programmes.

(b) Entities namely (1) National School of Government and (2) Centre for Public Service Innovation

(1) National School of Government

The National School of Government does not run development programme for (i) small business and (ii) co-operatives as it does not fall within the mandate of the National School of Government.

(aa)(bb)(cc) Falls away

(2) Centre for Public Service Innovation

The Centre for Public Service Innovation is not running dedicated development programme for (i) small businesses and (ii) co-operatives. However, in terms of its MoA with The Innovation Hub (one of the entities within the National System of Innovation tasked with developing SMMEs), the Centre for Public Service Innovation, annually post a public service challenge to small businesses and co-operatives on their Open IX Exchange.

Small business and co-operatives are invited to submit proposals for developing solutions. The Centre for Public Service Innovation then funds the piloting of the selected solution to a maximum value of: (bb) R250 000, (cc) the number of jobs to be created for 2016/17 has not been quantified yet, since pilot project will only be initiated later in the year.

08 September 2016 - NW635

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Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in accordance with section 3(4)(a) and (b) of the Public Service Act, Act 103 of 2007, his department conducted any study in order to advise the President on the possibility of reducing the size of the national Government and thereby reduce the size of Cabinet; if not, why not; if so, (a) which departments can be abolished and (b) what amount can be saved?

Reply:

In terms of section 91(2) read with section 91(3)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, the President appoints the Deputy President and Ministers and assigs them powers and functions. The appointments are made under a President's Act, see for example President's Act No. 135 signed on 26 May 2014 after the 2014 general elections.

Following the appointment of the national Executive by the President (President’s Act) various administrative and legal steps are taken to give effect to the new Executive portfolios. The Presidency with the support of the Department of Public Service and Administration and the National Treasury, lead the National Macro Organisation of the State (NMOS) in 2014. The NMOS process gives effect to the Presidential proclamations regarding the establishment of new or amended Executive portfolios, the renaming and establishment of new departments, and the transfer of legislation between Ministers in terms of the Constitution.

The NMOS process does consider efficiencies in terms of the size of Ministerial portfolios and locate, as far as possible, more than one department or government component under a Ministry without the need to create a Ministry for every department. Examples of multiple departments within Ministerial Portfolios are:

(a) Communications - Department of Communications and the Government Communication and Information System.

(b) Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs - Department of Cooperative Governance, the Department of Traditional Affairs, and the Municipal Infrastructure Support Agent.

(c) Defence and Military Veterans - Department of Defence and the Department of Military Veterans.

(d) Public Service and Administration - Department of Public Service and Administration, the National School of Government, the Office of the Public Service Commission and the Centre of Public Service Innovation.

(e) Justice and Correctional Services - Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, the Department of Correctional Services and the Office of the Chief Justice.

(f) Minister in the Presidency: Planning Monitoring and Evaluation - Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and Statistics South Africa

Departments are linked to Ministers' portfolios to administer the legislation and policies in that portfolio. The decision to establish national departments is an executive decision by the President. In terms of section 7(5)(a) of the Public Service Act, 1994, the President by proclamation may on the advice of the Minister for the Public Service and Administration amend Schedule 1 so as to establish or abolish any national department, designate such department and the head thereof or amend such designation.

The Department of Public Service and Administration has not conducted a study to advise the President on reducing the size of national government.

24 August 2016 - NW534

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to commitments made during his department’s Budget Vote speech on 13 May 2015, what are the relevant details of the (a)(i) business processes mapped, (ii) standard operating procedures developed and (iii) organisational functionality assessments conducted in response to his department’s commitment to its Operations Management Framework and (b) strategy for providing resultant support to poor performing departments that was drafted for consultation with stakeholders in the Public Service in terms of the (i) strategy for providing support, (ii) poor performing departments referred to in the speech and targeted by the strategy and (iii) consultation that has taken place on the strategy his department committed to?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is mandated by the Medium Term Strategic Framework and Outcome 12 to develop an Operations Management Framework (OMF) and to provide institutional support on the implementation thereof to selected national and provincial Government departments on an annual basis.

In pursuance of that mandate, the Chief Directorate: Operations Management of the DPSA developed an Operations Management Framework with supporting toolkits which includes amongst others includes Business Process Management and Standard Operating Procedures.

In the 2015-16 financial year, DPSA focused on the National Department of Labour, the Social Development Sector and the Transport Sector. Business Process Maps and Standard Operating Procedures were developed for these Departments as follows:

Labour:

No.

Branch

Core Service

1

Inspection and Enforcement Service (IES)

  • Conduct Review Inspection on Employment
  • Inspection in terms of Labour Legislation - Basic Conditions of Employment Act
  • Inspection in terms of the Occupational Health and Safety Act

2

Public Employment Services (PES)

  • Recruitment and Placement Services
  • Walk in Registration of Work Seekers at a Labour Centre
  • Online Registration of Work Seekers via ESSA
  • International Cross Boarder Labour Migration Management

3

Labour Practice and International Relations (LPIR)

  • Registration of Labour organisations
  • Processing of Collective Agreements

4.

Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF)

  • Online application for unemployment/ordinary claim by claimant

5.

Compensation Fund (CF)

  • Assessment: Tariffs Section 85: Reduction and Loading Assessment Rate
  • Assessment: Tariffs Section: Sub Class investigations
  • Raising Assessment (Manual Submission)
  • Registration of Employer
  • Revision of Assessment

Social Development:

  • Registration of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Funding of Non-Profit Organisations
  • Placement of children in need of care and protection in foster care

Transport:

  • Issuing of contracts to service providers for the transportation of eligible learners to and from school
  • Issuing of public transport operating licenses
  • Issuing drivers licenses

The DPSA provided institutional support and/or advice to other departments on the Operations Management value chain. A list of departments is provided hereunder:

No.

Name of the Government Department/ Component/ Institution

1

Gauteng Department of Health

2

National Department of Health

3

Batho Pele Forum

4

Free State — Office of the Premier

5

Mineral Resources

6

Military Veterans

7

Department of Corporative Governance

8

KZN — Arts and Culture

9

National School of Government

10

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

11

Eastern Cape — Safety and Security

12

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

13

KZN —Education

14

Correctional Services Inspector Judge

15

Northern Cape — Office of the Premier

16

Batho Pele Standards Steering Committee

17

Department of Trade and Industry

18

KZN — Office of the Premier

19

Human Settlements

20

Parliamentary Budget Office

21

Agriculture and Rural Development

22

Ministry: Public Service and Administration

23

National Consumer Commission

24

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

25

Agriculture — Mpumalanga

26

Gauteng Office of the Premier

27

Northern Cape Provincial Treasury

(b) (i) (ii) (iii)

(i) The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments was developed by the DPSA to coordinate targeted support to government departments in line with the mandate of the MPSA outlined in section 3 (6) of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended by the Public Service Amendment Act 30 of 2007.

The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments is delivered in phases and the Initiation phase of the strategy looks at three key areas:

  • Cabinet initiated Intervention or Support
  • Pro-active requests from Departments for support and
  • DPSA initiated support (MPAT, SD sites)

The targeted support on year one focused on Pro Active requests from departments for support and the requests received were on Organisational Design support. Received requests on Organisational Design from 43 sectors, 25 were finalised and 11 in progress, attached at Annexure B. The Strategy on the Provision of targeted support to Departments has been approved for implementation.

(ii) With regard to poor performing departments, a presentation was made to the North West province on their performance against outcome 12 and it was agreed that the Province will be assisted in the new financial year on their Service Delivery Improvement Plans (SDIPs), and together with National Treasury assist the Province in unblocking the challenge of 30 day payment to suppliers.

(iii) Extensive consultations were held within DPSA and with National and Provincial departments. The draft strategy was finally presented at the Governance and Administration cluster on 01 October 2015 for endorsement and support.

22 June 2016 - NW1574

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What are the details of the conditions of service attached to appointment as a Commissioner of the Public Service Commission and (b) how is the salary package of a Public Service Commissioner structured; (2) what (a) medical aid, (b) housing assistance and (c) pension benefits are persons who are appointed as Commisioners entitled to; (3) whether any benefits extend beyond the term of service of a Public Service Commissioner; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether any recommendations have been made or measures have been put in place to have extended benefits implemented; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The conditions of service attached to appointment as a Commissioner of the Public Service Commission are determined by the President of the Republic and include provisions of Chapter 10 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (section 196), the Public Service Commission Act, 1997 and the conditions of service applicable to members of senior management service (SMS level) in the public service.

The President, acting in terms of section 6(1) of the Public Service Commission Act, determines the annual salaries and conditions of appointment of Commissioners. The conditions of appointment, (Including remuneration and other conditions of service) of a commissioner of the Public Service Commission are linked with the ‘comparable positions at the SMS level in the public service’.

Despite the linking of the salary dispensation of Commissioners with the SMS, the salary progression measures (notch increases) applicable to the SMS were not extended to Commissioners.

The condition of appointment determined by the President with effect from 1 April 2015, provides for the following inclusive flexible remuneration packages:

Position

Package with effect from 1 April 2015

Commissioner

R1 267 806

Deputy Chairperson

R1 656 618

Chairperson

R1 706 694

(b) The package of a Commissioner of the Public Service Commission is structured as follows (i) basic salary, (ii) State’s contribution to the Government Employee Pension Fund (GEPF) and (iii) a flexible portion.

The basic salary consists of 70% of the inclusive flexible remuneration package. The State’s contribution to the GEPF is calculated on the basic salary, Commissioners may structure their flexible portion into the following items:

   (i) Motor car allowance – to a maximum of 25% of the total package per annum

   (ii) 13th cheque – equal to one-twelfth of the basic salary, to be structuredd as a once-off non-pensionable bonus

   (iii) Medical Assistance – Contribution to a medical aid scheme

   (iv) Housing Allowance – An amount as decided by the member.

   (v) Non-pensionalbe cash allowance – Any remaining amount of the flexible portion.

(2) (a) The medical aid benefit forms part of the inclusive remuneration package.

(b) The housing allowance forms part of the inclusive remuneration package.

(c) The State’s contribution to the GEPF forms part of the inclusive remuneration package.

(3) No benefits extend beyond the term of service of a Public Service Commissioner, since the conditions of appointment (Including remuneration and other conditions of service) applicable to Members of the Public Service Commission, which are determined by the President does not provide for extension of benefits beyond the term of office of a Commissioner.

(4) Falls away, since there are no benefits extended beyond the term of serve of a Commissiner of the Public Service Commission.

07 June 2016 - NW536

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the ministerial speech delivered on the occasion of the debate on the Budget Vote of his department on 13 May 2015, and specifically to the creation of a pool of labour relations specialists and a team of legal experts from the Department of Justice and Correctional Services to deal with the backlog of disciplinary cases following Cabinet’s approval, what are the full details of (a) the pool of labour relations and legal experts formed after Cabinet’s decision, (b) the backlog of disciplinary cases with which they were intended to deal and (c) the progress made to date in addressing the specified backlog?

Reply:

On 09 September 2014 Cabinet approved the establishment of an internal pool of legal experts and labour relations specialists to deal with the backlog cases of precautionary suspensions in the public service. The DPSA has established a pool of panellists to deal with the backlog of precautionary suspension cases in the public service.

(a) The pool comprises 298 expert investigators, departmental representatives and presiding officers to ensure that the value chain is expedited in an optimal manner. Departments and provinces request assistance on their backlog cases from the DPSA.

(b) According the national and provincial statistical report of September 2014 to 31 March 2016 the total number of the backlog of precautionary suspension cases for national departments and provinces referred to DPSA is 687. The total breakdown consist of 291 cases for the provinces and 396 for the national departments.

(c) The progress made since the inception of the project is the resolution of 384 precautionary backlog cases. The total breakdown of the resolved cases consist of 57 for provinces and 327 for national departments. The percentage for the resolved cases is 56%. Members of the pool are allocated cases on a rotational basis so as to achieve an even spread of cases amongst panellists.

07 June 2016 - NW1521

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Bhanga, Mr BM to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department was approached by any political party for any form of funding (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether his department provided any form of funding to any political party (a) in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2016; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) No.

(b) No.

(2) (a) (i)(ii)(iii) No.

(b) No.

07 June 2016 - NW1468

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the full relevant details of the (a) meetings, (b) other activities and (c) achievements of the National Anti-Corruption Forum in the (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16 financial years?

Reply:

(a) No meetings have been held during the (i) 2013/2014, (ii) 2014/2015 and (iii) 2015/2016 financial years.

(b) No activities have been held during the (i) 2013/2014, (ii) 2014/2015 and (iii) 2015/2016 financial years.

(c) No National Anti-Corruption Forum (NACF) achievements have been reported on for the financial years (i) 2013-14, (ii) 2014-15 and (iii) 2015-16.

07 June 2016 - NW1470

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to Commitment 8 contained in the 3rd South African Open Government Partnership Country Action Plan, 2016 to 2018, an inter-departmental committee responsible for developing, implementing and reporting on the country’s implementation and/or action plan has been put in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the development of the country’s implementation and/or action plan has commenced; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes. On 26 October 2015, Cabinet approved the establishment of the inter-departmental committee on beneficial ownership. The committee was set up at the inaugural meeting of the committee held on 27 February 2016. It is constituted by the following institutions and government departments convened by the Department of Public Service and Administration:

 (a) National Treasury (NT);

 (b) Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC);

(c) Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA);

(d) South African Revenue Service (SARS):

(e) South African Police Service (SAPS):

(f) National Prosecuting Authority (NPA);

(g) Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (Doi & CD);

(h) Department of Trade and Industry (DTI);

(i) Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC);

(j) Department of Social Development (DSD);

(k) Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO);

(l) State Security Agency (SSA);

(m) National Intelligence Coordinating Committee (NICOC);

(n) South African Reserve Bank (SARB);

(o) Financial Services Board (FSB);

(p) Johannesburg Stock Exchange (JSE);

(q) Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB);

(r) Law Society of South Africa (LSSA);

(s) National Gambling Board (NGB); and

(t) Independent Regulatory Board of Auditors (IRBA)

(2) Yes. Development of the country’s implementation and/or action plan has commenced, the committee is currently finalising the draft action plan. The draft action plan is derived from the G20 High Level Principles endorsed by Cabinet in October 2015, which sets-out the required actions to be undertaken by the Government of the Republic of South Africa.

07 June 2016 - NW1242

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the report produced by the Public Service Commission, entitled Assessment of the Implementation of Policy Framework on the Appointment of Ministerial Staff in National and Provincial Departments, dated May 2014, what are the details of the action taken to date to address each of the 14 recommendations at the end of the specified report?

Reply:

The details of the action taken to date to address each of the 14 Recommendations are attached herewith below as Annexure A. These details were compiled by the Public Service Commission, after consultation with the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA), which is the custodian of the Ministerial Handbook and all Human Resource Management (HRM) prescripts in the Public Service. Furthermore, the National School of Government (NSG) was also consulted.

These details illustrate that the Department of Public Service and Administration has made significant progress towards implementation of the Recommendations made by the Public Service Commission. The National School of Government has made noticeable preparatory work to roll-out implementation of the executive development programme, and plans are also under way to develop other targeted training programmes.

ANNEXURE A: Progress n implementation of each of the 14 Recommendations made in the Report - Assessment of the Implementation of Policy Framework on the Appointment of Ministerial Staff in National and Provincial Departments

No.

RECOMMENDATION FROM PSC

PROGRESS REPORT

1

The DPSA should develop a focused policy framework that will regulate the employment practices of persons who provide support and serve in EAs' offices

Amended Public Service Regulations and other prescripts regulate the employment practices of persons appointed in the offices of Executive Authorities. It covers the recruitment process, nature of appointment, allowance payable, termination of services and other employment conditions. According to the

2

All SMS levels in Ministries irrespective of the method of recruitment (headhunting or advertising) must be subjected to proper selection processes (i.e. interviews and competency assessment) and for any identified competency gap, a developmental plan must be put in place to address the gap. This plan must be developed in consultation with the person concerned and be managed by the Director-General or Head of Department.

According to the Public Service Regulations, all members of the SMS appointed in offices of EAs are supposed to be subjected to proper recruitment and selections processes and the performance management and development system for SMS. In addition, the Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum Entry Requirements for SMS, which came into effect on 01 April 2015, also applies to all SMS members in the offices of EAs. SMS members should meet the minimum qualification and experience requirements prior to appointment.

The challenge is that there are still many incidences of non-compliance with prescripts, as such, the DPSA has undertaken to conduct targeted support for departments during the 2016/17 financial year.

3.

The Director-General or Head of Department has to provide "primary advisory" support to the EA due to the resources (e.g. research experts, etc.) he/she manages in the department, an administrative reporting line to the Director-General or Head of Department must be enforced for the Chief of Staff.

According to the DPSA, this is the current practice as Chiefs of Staff report to their respective Heads of Department on all administrative matters.

4

Compulsory induction, orientation/training on the functions performed in Ministries, the relationship between the Ministry and the department, the protocols of being a sessional employee and the benefits thereof and how to support the Minister with political responsibilities should be conducted with staff working in the EAs' offices, either at departmental level or coordinated by the National School of Government (NSG) or the DPSA. The current and/or previous competent and experienced Chief of Staff should be part of the training team and assist in this regard.

It is expected that the orientation of staff working in Ministries would be conducted by respective departments. The extent of implementation for such orientation programmes has not been validated.

The generic orientation course for staff in Ministries has not been developed yet. Its development has been prioritised by the NSG. Consultations with relevant stakeholders are expected to commence during the 2016/17 financial year.

5

There should be a dedicated course for Chiefs of Staff and a forum to share experiences and to professionalise this strategic role. There should be a way of career-pathing for experienced Chiefs of Staff.

The course for Chiefs of Staff has not been developed yet. Its development has been prioritised by the NSG. Consultations with relevant stakeholders are expected to commence during the 2016/17 financial year.

6

A Legislation based Compliance Framework for

Ministries should be developed by the DPSA.

Government has adopted the Management Performance Assessment Tool (MPAT) to track and report on compliance to relevant legislation by departments.

7

The DPSA should review the organisational structures of Ministries according to the size and responsibility of the Ministry.

The DPSA has developed a revised generic organisational structure for Offices of EAs and Deputy Ministers as part of the process of amending the Ministerial Handbook.

The concern is that the revised Ministerial Handbook has not been approved by Cabinet, as such, the generic organisational structures are not implemented.

It is therefore important for the Minister for Public Service and Administration to fast-track the approval of the revised Ministerial Handbook.

8

Uniform job profiles and descriptions should be enforced for Chiefs of Staff across the Public Service. Key competencies and minimum qualifications for the position of Chief of Staff must be well-defined. This will help to guide the selection and appointment process and Ministers must be informed of and adhere to this guide. Uniform job profiles should be developed for the rest of the staff in EAs' offices.

The DPSA has developed, as part of the generic organisational structures, clearly defined purpose and functions per post in the offices of EAs.

However, the extent of implementation of the uniform job description remains questionable due to the non-approval of the revised Ministerial Handbook.

With respect to SMS positions in ministerial Office, the DPSA through the Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training days and Minimum entry requirements for SMS has set the minimum qualification and experience requirement for appointment in the office of the EA at an SMS level.

The challenge is that there are still many incidences of non-compliance with prescripts and compliance with the Directive has not been assessed.

9

80% of the positions in Ministries should be permanent and be part of organograms of departments.

The DPSA proposed uniform organisational structures for Ministerial Offices does recommend that a percentage of posts in the Offices of EAs should be permanent. These are all the administrative positions, which turn to be in the majority

Implementation of this will be assessed once the revised Ministerial Handbook has been approved and is being implemented by departments.

10

An orientation and support programme for Cabinet Ministers/Premiers/Members of Executive Council (MECs) and Directors-General/Heads of Department should be developed and it must be compulsory for new EAs and DGs/HoDs to attend at the beginning of every term of government and when a need arises due to reshuffling. There must be a separate session for EAs and DGs first and thereafter a joint session. Also the advisors need to have an orientation programme.

At the start of each term of administration, the Presidency organizes anorientation programme for Executive Authorities (EAs) and the DPSA is invited to make presentations on the Roles and Responsibilities of the EA in relation to the Public Service Act and Regulations, and also presents on the Ministerial Handbook. However, there is no targeted training provided after reshuffling.

     

11

There should be a probation period for staff appointed in Ministries and that period should take into consideration the nature of Ministries and the limited time available to follow the probation period regulations that are cumbersome to release a person who is not performing or fitting in the culture of the Ministry.

In terms of the Public Service Regulations, all appointments, longer than 12 months, are subject to a probationary period. This requirement includes appointments in Ministries

However, there are instances of non¬compliance — the magnitude of which has not been established. Hence implementation of the revised Ministerial Handbook will also serve as an instrument to address such incidences.

12

The DPSA should continue to give guidance and assistance in the development and implementation of turnaround strategies and restructuring processes.

The DPSA continues to play this role, based on requests received from departments.

It must however be stated that Executive Authorities have the power to decide on their turnaround strategies and organisational structures. All what the DPSA can do is to provide guidance.

13

The DPSA should develop a database of employees with working experience in Ministries who could not be absorbed by departments for purposes of redeployment.

All permanently employed employees are accommodated in the relevant department upon exit of the EA.

There is no provision within the Public Service to absorb employees employed in Ministries linked to the term of office of EAs. Where employees who are linked to the EAs term of office are transferred to or absorbed by the department, this practice will considered to be irregular and should as such be corrected in line with the applicable prescripts.

14

The DPSA should enforce the developed benchmark job descriptions and evaluations for posts in EAs' offices to ensure consistency throughout the Public Service.

In developing the draft generic organisational structures for Ministries, all posts were job evaluated with clearly defined job purpose and functions

Once approved, implementation of these job descriptions, alongside the revised generic organizational structures will ensure consistency.

07 June 2016 - NW1239

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What are the (i) circumstances and (ii) time lines that led to the Public Service Commission (PSC) head office currently being based in temporary office accommodation, (b) what is the term of the lease for the current offices and (c) when is the PSC expected to move into more suitable office accommodation; (2) (a) what was the once-off cost to relocate the PSC to its current temporary office accommodation, including the costs (i)(aa) to move office furniture, (bb) to install computer networks and (cc) to refurbish office space, (ii) of estate agents and (iii) any other relevant expenditure in this regard, (b) what is the total current monthly cost of the rental of the temporary office accommodation, including all levies and costs related to parking bays and (c) how does this expenditure compare to the monthly rental of the PSC’s previous office accommodation; (3) what would the monthly costs have been if the PSC moved to the office accommodation identified by the Department of Public Works?

Reply:

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent Constitutional body, and its budget is appropriated via the Minister of Public Service and Administration.

1(a)(i) The Public Service Commission, forwarded a request to the Department of Public Works (DPW) on 29 October 2010 for the extension of the lease agreement for a period of five (5) years as the building (Commission House in Arcadia, Pretoria) was still suitable and met the requirements of the PSC. The PSC experienced challenges with the renewal process.

Seeing that there were delays with the renewal of the lease as well as the fact that the PSC had reached the optimal occupancy of the building, the PSC requested the DPW to procure alternative office accommodation in July 2012.

In order to allow the DPW to commence with the procurement process of the alternative accommodation, the PSC agreed that the lease agreement be renewed for a further period of eighteen (18) months to ensure that PSC relocates into the new alternative office building on 1 April 2014.

A building was identified as suitable alternative accommodation for the PSC and a lease agreement was signed. However, during tenant installation process there were concerns raised by the PSC e.g. additional costs to be borne by the PSC relating to tenant installation. This resulted in the process being suspended by the DPW. Due to the dispute, the PSC did not take occupation of the building.

The PSC forwarded another request to DPW in June 2015, after receiving notice to vacate Commission House, to commence with the sourcing alternative accommodation.

1(a) (ii) The PSC requested DPW on 1 June 2015 to re-advertise the bid as the PSC was notified of the refurbishment of the building (Commission House) taking into account that the building was supposed to be already vacant then (the PSC was supposed to have vacated the building in 2014).

(b) The term of the lease for the current offices is for a period of 24 months, with an exit clause after 18 months.

(c) The PSC has requested DPW to source permanent accommodation. The process will be completed by no later than January 2017.

2(a) The PSC paid R1.2 million once off costs towards the relocation to temporary accommodation (Absa Towers) for IT network infrastructure.

2(i)(aa) The PSC did not incur costs to move furniture. The Department of Public Works absorbed 50% of the relocation costs and the current landlord paid 50%.

2(i)(bb) The PSC paid R1.2 million for IT network infrastructure costs.

2(i)(cc) The PSC did not incur costs for refurbishing office space. The costs were covered by the tenant installation allowance paid by the landlord.

2(ii) The PSC did not pay estate agents fees.

2(iii) There is no other expenditure that was incurred.

2(b) The total current monthly cost of the rental of the temporary office accommodation is R1 407 312.79 for 8907 square metres.

2(c) The rental for the previous office accommodation was R523 087.00 per month for 6533.75 square metres. The rental for previous accommodation was not market related as ever since the PSC took occupation of the building in 1997, the ownership of the building changed 4 times without the annual rental escalation affected. The current monthly rental expenditure is high compare to the previous monthly expenditure on office accommodation.

(3) The monthly costs would have been lower if the PSC would have moved to the office accommodation identified by the Department of Public Works

The monthly rental for the office accommodation identified by the DPW would have been R 1 361 352.36 for 8907 square metres including parking.

09 May 2016 - NW756

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a)What are the questions that senior managers in the public service need to respond to when declaring their financial interests and (b) (i) how and (ii) by whom is the information stored in the declarations of financial interests shared; (2) has he found that the (a) information revealed by the current questions and (b) way in which the declared information is disclosed to others are effective measures to inform decision-makers of possible risks and to combat corruption at senior management level in the public service; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) is any of the information declared ever checked for completeness and accuracy; if not, why not; if so, (a) by whom and (b) have any steps been taken against staff members who submitted false or incomplete information; (4) what has been the overall compliance rate during the last cycle of submissions in each (a) national and (b) provincial departments?

Reply:

(1) Disclosure of financial interests by members of the senior management is regulated through the Financial Disclosure Framework (which is chapter 3 of the Public Service Regulations, 2001).

(a) Kindly see Tag A which outlines categories of financial disclosures and particulars which members of the senior management service should disclose (Regulations D and E).

(b) (i) The disclosure of financial interests could be done using a manual form (paper-based form) or electronically using the eDisclosure system.

(ii) The disclosure process is as follows:

  • (Disclosure of financial interests is made to the Executive Authority (Regulation C.1). The Executive Authority is the Minister of the National Department or MEC of a provincial department. Premiers are Executive Authorities for their respective departments.
  • The Executive Authority submits the copy of the financial disclosure form to the Public Service Commission (Regulation 0.4).
  • According to Regulation B(a) the Director-General: Office of the Public Service Commission keeps the register of designated employees' Interests.
  • Subject to regulation F.3 of the Financial Disclosure Framework, only the following persons have access to a submitted form or the register:

 (a) The executing authority to whom the form is submitted and the staff designated by the executing authority for purposes of record-keeping of the original form and submission of a copy of the form to the Commission;

(b) commissioners of the Commission;

(c) the Director-General: Office of the Public Service Commission; and

 (d) such other persons designated by an executing authority or the chairperson of the Commission for purposes of the effective implementation of the Financial Disclosure Framework.

2. The measures are found to be effective. The information is verified against Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) data base and Deeds Register to verify completeness of the information and determine if there is potential or actual conflict of interest. The information is further assessed in relation to the functions to be performed by the senior manager.

3. Submitted information is verified against the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) data base and Deeds Register to verify completeness of the information and determine if there is potential or actual conflict of interest. The verification of this information is done by the Public Service Commission which is an independent body. In future the information will also be verified against eNatis data base. If there is potential or actual conflict of interest, the information is discussed with the relevant SMS member and the report is given to the Executive Authority. The Executive Authority has to inform the Public Service Commission of the steps taken to remove conflict of interest.

4. This is the responsibility of Office of the Public Service Commission of which the Report thereof are submitted to Parliament.

TAG A: FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE FORM

ANNEXURE A

FINANCIAL DISCLOSURE FORM

Personal details

Financial Year

 

Surname

 

First Names

 

ID Number

 

Persal Number

 

Current Position

 

Salary Level

 

Specialization/brief job description

 

Postal Address

 

Residential Address

 

Name of Department

 

Telephone Numbers (W)

 

Cell Numbers

 

E-mail address

 
  1. Shares and other financial interests

Number of shares/Extent of financial interests

Nature

Nominal Value

Name of Company/Entity

       
       
       
       
       
  1. Directorships and partnerships

Name of Corporate Entity or Partnership

Company Registration Number

Type of Business (e.g. Construction, Consultancy, etc)

Amount of Remuneration

       
       
       
       
       
  1. Remunerated work outside the public service

Must have been sanctioned by your Executive Authority and approval uploaded to the system or attached to the form.

Name of Employer

Type of Work

Remuneration

     
     
     
     
     
  1. Consultation and retainerships

Name of client

Nature

Type of business activity

Value of any benefits received

       
       
       
       
       
  1. Sponsorships

Source of assistance/ sponsorship

Description of assistance/ sponsorship

Value of assistance/ sponsorship

     
     
     
     
  1. Gifts and hospitality from a source other than a family member

Description

Value

Source

     
     
     
     
     
  1. Immovable property

Description (e.g.flat/ land/ house

Name of the Flats/ Townhouse/Estate

Suburb/Area

(e.g. Arcadia-Pretoria)

ERF number

Unit number

Value

           
           
           
           
           
  1. Vehicles

Description Vehicle (e.g. car/motorbike/boat/aircraft)

Registration number

Year Model

Purchase price

       
       
       
       
       

_____________________________________

SIGNATURE OF DESIGNATED EMPLOYEE

DATE: ________________________

PLACE: ________________________

09 May 2016 - NW759

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether the Public Service use a framework of minimum qualifications for the recruitment of staff to each position in the senior management service in national departments; if not, (a) why not, (b) who has the discretion to decide on acceptable qualifications for a potential incumbent and (c) when will such a framework be available for utilisation; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether all incumbent members of the senior management service in national departments will be required to achieve a minimum level of qualification; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the salaries of directors-general across all national departments are the same or similar; if not, (a) what differences exist in this regard and (b) on what basis are calculations of the specified salaries made; if so, (i) why are all directors-general paid at the same level, regardless of the size of their departments and (ii) what are the salaries of directors-general; (4) whether incentives are paid to employees possessing identified critical or scarce skills; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Public Service has a framework of minimum qualifications in place for the recruitment of staff to each position in the Senior Management Service. The Directive on compulsory capacity development, mandatory training days and minimum entry requirements for senior management service issued for implementation on 1 April 2015, is a subordinate legislation to the Public Service Act, 1994, which stipulates the minimum entry requirements for Senior Management Service (SMS) posts.

The Directive, which is currently being implemented by departments, indicates the entry requirements in terms of educational qualifications and years of experience for the different levels of SMS posts.

2. The Directive mentioned in paragraph 1 supra, also provides for the management of development priorities for existing SMS members in-so-far as providing specific training and development opportunities in order to ensure that the incumbent members who do not meet the minimum requirements are capacitated, as well as mandating the expected minimum qualification requirements for progression to higher posts.

(3) (a) A uniform salary dispensation applies to Directors-General across all national departments who are appointed in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994. A different salary dispensation applies to Directors-General in the so-called "services departments" who are appointed in terms of the Police Act, the Correctional Services Act and the Defence Act.

(b) The reason for the differentiation is the difference in employer contribution towards the Government Employees Pension Fund (GEPF) between Public Service Act appointees on the one hand and those appointed in terms of the Acts for the services departments on the other.

   (i) Directors-General appointed in terms of the Public Service Act are paid at the same level irrespective of the size of budget of the department because of the core responsibilities performed as accounting officers.

   (ii) The full-time salary scales (Total Cost-to-Employer packages) for Directors-General appointed in terms of the Public Service Act and the Acts for the services departments are contained in the Table below as follows:

PUBLIC SERVICE ACT
(Rpa)

POLICE ACT, CORRECTIONAL
SERVICES ACT AND DEFENCE ACT

(Rpa)

1

656

618

1

686

438

1

681

464

1

711

737

1

706

694

1

737

414

1

732

299

1

763

475

1

758

285

1

789

929

1

784

661

1

816

782

1

811

427

1

844

037

1

838

601

1

871

700

1

866

183

1

899

771

(4) No additional incentives are payable to employees possessing identified critical or scarce skills. Special salary dispensations, called Occupation Specific Dispensations (OSDs), have been implemented for identified occupations to stimulate recruitment and retention of personnel in these occupations. The following OSDs have been implemented in the Public Service:

  • Legally qualified personnel;
  • Engineers, Technicians, Technologists and Artisans and related occupations;
  • Nursing personnel;
  • Medical Officers, Medical Specialists, Dentists, Dental Specialists, Pharmacologists, Pharmacists and Emergency Care Practitioners, Therapeutic, Diagnostic and related Allied Health Professionals;
  • Correctional Services Officers;
  • Educators; and
  • Educators in the Department of Correctional services.

15 April 2016 - NW891

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Has he earned any additional income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, since his appointment as Minister; if so, (a) when, (b) how much did he earn, (c) from which businesses and (d) for what work; (2) whether his (a) spouse, (b) children and (c) close family earned income from businesses, in particular businesses doing work for the Government, through his appointment as Minister; if so, in respect of each case, (i) when, (ii) how much did each earn, (iii) from which businesses and (iv) for what work?

Reply:

  1. No. I have not earned any additional income from businesses, in particular business doing work for the Government, since appointment as Minister.

(a)(b)(c)(d) Falls away

(2) (a((b)(c) have not earned income from business, in particular business doing work for the Government, through my appointment as Minister.

(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) Falls away.

11 April 2016 - NW755

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Must the compulsory induction programme for public servants only be completed by making use of the services or material of the National School of Government (NSG); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the further relevant details; (2) (a) what is the full amount payable per employee to the NSG for services related to the successful completion of the induction programme for public servants, (b) what services are included in the fee and (c) what factors are contributing to the delays in the (i) implementation or (ii) roll-out of the compulsory induction programme for public servants; (3) (a) in what respects does the compulsory induction programme accommodate the diverse needs of disabled public service staff members and (b) has he found that disabled staff will not be discriminated against with the introduction of the compulsory induction programme for public servants?

Reply:

(1) Yes. The Directive (Circular No: HRD 1 of 2012) mandates the National School of Government (NSG) to develop and roll out the compulsory induction programme (CIP).

(2) (a) Departments are expected to pay a total cost of R1876 (if NSG facilitator, venue and IICs costs are excluded), R8875 (if NSG internal satff is used and venue excluded) or R16275 (if IICs is used and venue is excluded) per employee

(b) the services included in the fee cover Programme management and administration, materials production and delivery, capacity building, professional support, monitoring and evaluation, and

(c) (i) (ii) factors are as follows, readiness of departments to implement the programme, absence of trainer policies to maximise trainer capacities developed by the NSG and use of cost-recovery model;

(3) (a) The NSG has ensured that the compulsory induction programme accommodates the diverse needs of public service staff members living with disabilities by availaing materials in Word to those who are visually impaired and collaborating with departments in securing the Braille services and of sign-language specialists.

(b) No. The NSG striven to ensure that staff living with disability are not be discriminated against with the introduction of the compulsory induction programme for public servants.

 

11 April 2016 - NW863

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

For each national department, what amount was spent on training for (a) Senior Management Service (SMS) members and (b) employees occupying grades lower than those qualifying for the SMS in the (i) 2012-13, (ii) 2013-14 and (iii) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)(iii) refer to the table herewith below

DEPARTMENT

(a)
SMS

(b)
NON SMS

 

(i)
2012-13

(ii)
2013-14

(iii)
2014-15

(i)
2012-13

(ii)
2013-14

(iii)
2014-15

Department in the Presidency

12 319

-

9 864

416 387

243 905

641 178

Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

21 867

112 489

56 874

1 035 018

1 864 952

1 592 482

Department of Arts and Culture

19 918

66 576

32 682

45 526

180 706

130 728

Department of Basic Education

-

5 386

-

395 100

226 197

499 776

Department of Correctional Services

447 405

350 644

-

1 043 945

1 658 816

1 395 545

Department of Defence

-

17 313

-

1 726 295

2 718 120

3 302 708

Department of Economic Development

12 664

-

5 528

4 221

44 325

33 165

Department of Education

 

-

 

 

71 288

 

Department of Energy

26 798

73 596

25 839

348 375

220 788

723 484

Department of Environmental Affairs

333 777

244 543

79 856

1 260 936

1 316 770

1 789 722

Department of Health

108 908

-

43 933

3 439 678

473 797

129 358

Department of Higher Education and Training

147 422

222 309

35 945

833 500

236 652

854 689

Department of Home Affairs

58 225

11 601

126 393

82 741

1 015 097

2 446 848

Department of Human Settlements

4 921

221 348

152 192

118 109

154 944

488 283

Department of International Relations and Cooperation

199 231

209 306

-

1 535 737

753 501

505 964

Department of Labour

296 264

435 061

192 976

1 915 858

1 489 388

3 315 866

Department of Military Veterans

 

 

-

 

 

77 430

Department of Mineral Resources

131 485

49 367

253 312

884 538

1 596 215

1 447 496

Department of Planning Monitoring & Evaluation

29 446

-

-

235 569

52 536

105 318

Department of Public Enterprises

64 928

16 124

68 053

64 928

46 760

198 487

Department of Public Service and Administration

124 567

138 871

69 007

1 575 078

1 666 447

2 180 617

Department of Public Works

405 583

46 789

4 197

1 598 299

823 480

591 761

Department of Rural Development and Land Reform

39 339

10 146

15 097

4 442 810

5 969 431

865 588

Department of Science and Technology

325 724

10 113

-

172 442

151 696

184 792

Department of Social Development

62 085

8 467

13 904

418 255

378 179

389 325

Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services

 

-

85 716

 

15 375

179 225

Department of Tourism

157 755

44 295

15 060

591 582

673 286

624 988

Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)

427 021

387 575

280 234

2 087 656

2 196 260

1 961 640

Department of Transport

194 950

231 783

7 367

27 850

267 054

445 685

Department of Transport

-

 

 

8 312

 

 

Department of Water Affairs

1 012 651

266 656

204 122

2 716 476

2 377 570

1 820 347

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

547 013

489 380

353 696

1 566 779

1 125 087

2 992 829

Government Communication and Information System

35 893

-

-

35 893

243 378

725 679

Government Pensions Administration Agency

-

-

5 383

359 534

336 112

231 488

Government Printing Works

-

-

3 804

125 120

94 341

64 662

Independent Police Investigative Directorate (IPID)

54 886

40 246

73 253

192 101

234 770

109 879

National Parliament

11 096

25 680

41 915

5 659 163

3 004 607

2 556 824

National Prosecuting Authority of SA

-

26 007

78 065

26 541

173 377

303 076

National School of Government

136 754

23 051

69 698

383 794

748 103

543 064

National Treasury

134 896

89 643

98 457

277 500

386 881

1 045 676

Public Service Commission

10 188

-

38 486

95 088

77 026

113 626

South African Police Service (SAPS)

-

-

5 116

6 541 413

6 473 637

1 959 404

South African Police Service (SAPS)

-

-

-

37 000

132 000

8 991

South African Revenue Service (SARS)

 

-

-

 

6 885

11 140

South African Social Security Agency

-

33 484

-

25 225

1 131 756

1 178 350

Statistics South Africa (Stats SA)

23 486

28 028

5 989

2 411 228

1 550 906

1 922 371

Grand Total

5 619 464

3 935 878

2 552 014

46 761 599

44 602 403

42 689 554

11 April 2016 - NW378

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to President Jacob G Zuma’s undertaking in his State of the Nation Address delivered on 12 February 2015, that the Government will set aside 30% of appropriate categories of state procurement for purchasing from Small, Medium and Micro-sized Enterprises (SMMEs), co-operatives, as well as township and rural enterprises, what percentage of the total procurement of (a) his department and (b) every entity reporting to him went to (i) SMMEs and (ii) co-operatives from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration's total procurement percentage is as follows:

(i) 34% of total procurement initiatives per respective categories were sourced from SMMEs,

(ii) The department has not procured any goods/services from co-operatives.

(b) The National School of Government’s total procurement percentage is as follows:

  (i) The National School of Government (NSG) has purchased 14.15% of its total procurement from SMMEs from 1 April 2015 up to 24 March 2016

  (ii) The National School of Government has not procured any goods/services from co-operatives

11 April 2016 - NW535

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to his department’s Budget Vote speech on 13 May 2015, what are the full relevant details of the progress made to date with his department’s commitments to (a) address gaps in efficiency and effectiveness of measures through improving performance measurement instruments in the 2015-16 financial year, (b) strengthen both the (i) Head of Department evaluation system and (ii) performance management system for all employees to ensure service quantity outputs and service quality outcomes are met and that the Government gets value for money and (c)(i) justify the number of employees recruited to the senior management level and (ii) review the post provisioning norms in order to ensure optimal utilisation of employees and personnel spend?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration has undertaken a systemic review and revision of the performance management and development systems (PMDS) applicable to all levels of staff. The focus of the exercise was to align organisational performance with employee performance whilst also bringing administrative efficiency to the processes. These revisions have been consulted extensively with national departments and provincial administrations as well as at various Public Service Consultative forums

(b) (i) Heads of Department (HODs) Evaluation system is at an advance stages of finalization for approval, with increased focus on departmental programme performance, performance against the Annual Performance Plan and the audit findings and opinions of the Auditor-General. The policy is in the final stages of consultation for concurrence with the Presidency and the Public Service Commission before being tabled at Cabinet for approval.

(ii) On a similar vein, the department has structured revised performance management and development systems for each of the other levels of the Senior Management Service (SMS), which will be communicated and implemented subject to the approval of the HOD PMDS.

In addition, as per Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) Resolution 1 of 2012, the department has crafted revisions to the Employee Performance and Development System (EPMDS) for non-SMS staff. These revisions have been published in the Government Gazette: 3 August 2015, Notice 800 of 2015 as part of the Draft Public Service Regulations, 2015: Invitation for public comment. The department has received comments which are being processed for finalisation and submission for approval.

(c) (i) Since the powers to perform organisational review and redesign process are decentralized to departments. The competency of Executive Authorities regarding the internal organisation of departments is exercised within the Norms and Standards issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA). The MPSA gives effect to the organisational design Norms and Standards through the Public Service Act (PSA), 1994, the Public Service Regulations (PSR) (2001), Guidelines, Directives and Frameworks.

Furthermore, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) for example, has recently conducted a study on the Minimum Norms and Standards for the provisioning of SMS posts for provincial administrations, which is calculated on citizen segmentation factors, geographic accessibility and spatial norms, reasonable minimum span of control and the complexity of the job role.

(ii) The Norms and Standards will also assist in determining an ideal split between how many SMS posts as a maximum should be located at a national level and how many SMS posts should be located at a provincial level. Furthermore, the MPSA has issued a Directive on the process to coordinate the grading of an entire occupational category or certain level within an occupation category that is utilised by more than one department. The aim of the Directive is to ensure consistence in the provision and grading of posts.

11 April 2016 - NW757

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether all training offered to public servants takes place through the National School of Government (NSG); if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the training offered by the NSG that is indeed mandatory; (2) whether specific training has been identified as appropriate for each position or grade within the public service; if not, (a) who decides what training should be carried out, (b) according to what guidelines and (c) who is responsible for quality assurance of training that is selected and offered; if so, what are the relevant details of such training; (3) whether any competency tests or assessments are performed within the public service to measure the effectiveness of training; if not, (a) why not and (b) how is it determined that any particular training is effective or otherwise; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether (a) his department and (b) the Public Service Commission recommend training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. Yes. Not all training offered to public servants takes place through the National School of Government. There is no regulation that mandates departments to send public servants to the National School of Governement to be trained.

Mandatory training programmes are the Compulsory Induction Programmes (CIP) for newly appointed public servants from salary levels 1 to 16 as per the Directives issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration namely;

  (a) Amendments to the Directive on the Implementation of the Compulsory Induction Programme (CIP) in the public service, April 2015

  (b) Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum entry requirements for Senior Management Services (SMS).

    (i) CIP 1-12 focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 1 to 12. This CIP 1-12 is divided into two programmes, namely CIP 1-5 and CIP 6-12 with dedicated focus on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that is relevant and responsive at these salary levels respectively.

   (ii) CIP 13-14 focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 13 and 14, namely Directors and Chief Directors. These programmes focus on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that are relevant and responsive at these salary levels.

   (iii) CIP 15-16 or the Executive Inductive Induction Programme (EIP) focuses on newly appointed public servants on salary levels 15 and 16, namely Deputy-Director Generals and Director-Generals. This programme focuses on the unique requirements of knowledge, skills, values and competencies that are relevant and responsive at these salary levels.

2. Yes. All the training programmes are focused on a specific target group or salary level of public servants.

   (a) The department that identified the training needs decides what training should be carried out.

   (b) The guidelines that inform the training programmes are the Learning Provision Cycle and the Learning Programme Design Matrix. The Learning Provision Cycle provides the strategic framework for planning, design, development, approval, delivery and monitoring and evaluation of the training programmes. The Design Matrix provide the specific guidelines with regard to the specific/enabling outcomes, assessment criteria, learning statements, assessment activities, and related critical cross filed outcomes to ensure integration of learning.

   (c) The National School of Government is responsible for the quality of training that is selected and offered. It does this using its Quality Management and Monitoring and Evaluation Systems. The Quality Management System involves the Quality Management System Policies with accompanying implementation toolkits. The Monitoring and Evaluation processes include the 100% monitoring of all NSG programmes, regular on-site visits and evaluation reports as well as application or learning studies focusing on selected National School of Government programmes.

3. (a) Every training programme has assessment requirements to ensure the effectiveness of training.

   (b) Training is monitored and evaluated on a regular basis. The National School of Government conducts evaluations of the training programmes and the application of learning thereof in the workplace to establish (i) whether training is achieving its intended objectives and (ii) whether training is resulting in expected changes in the workplace; and if so, what these changes mean to the public.

4. (a) The National School of Government is continually analysing the Report on National Skills Development Strategy of South Africa from the Human Resource Development Council of South Africa, and also the Workplace Skills Plans of departments, in order to recommend training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified;

(b) The Public Service Commission has released reports on the “State of the Public Service” as well as reports such as “ Assessing the effectiveness of training provided by PALAMA in improving skills and competencies of public service leadership with a view to inform curriculum development by the National School of Government, September 2014” . The recommendations provided in these AMPAT reports inform the training offered through the NSG as an appropriate mechanism to improve performance where performance weaknesses are identified.

04 April 2016 - NW68

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the details of the steps (a) his department and (b) the Public Service Commission are taking to enforce the requirement that all government departments pay their suppliers within 30 days of receiving goods or services; (2) how he intends to (a) monitor the effectiveness of, and (b) ensure managerial accountability for, each of the steps he intends to take in this regard?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and also the National Treasury are in a better position to provide details of steps to enforce the requirement for departments to pay suppliers within 30 days.
  1. The Public Service Commission (PSC) derives its mandate from Section 196(4) of the Constitution, 1996. In terms of this mandate, the PSC promotes the constitutional principles in Section 195, including ensuring that resources (in this case financial) are used for the purpose they are earmarked, that services are rendered fairly, that ethics are promoted and that public administration is development-oriented. In addition, the PSC is mandated in Section 196(4)(b) to inter alia investigate, monitor and evaluate the organisation and administration of the public service and in Section 196(4)(c) to propose measures to ensure effective and efficient performance within the public service. Section 196(4)(f) tasks the PSC to monitor and investigate adherence to applicable procedures in the public service either on own accord or on receipt of a complaint.

In accordance with this mandate, the PSC conducted a series of public hearings at provincial and national level during the 2012/13 financial year. The hearings were intended to provide an overview of the challenges experienced in the payment of service providers and to develop possible solutions in this regard. The hearings were also designed to provide a forum for consultation and public participation with regard to the payment process. Departments with the highest incidence of non-payment (according to figures received from National Treasury) were also invited to these hearings. These departments were provided the opportunity to answer service providers’ questions, explain their challenges and solve cases of non-payment on the spot, where possible.

Reports on the individual hearings were compiled and coordinated through the relevant treasuries with government departments.

(2) (a) Outcome 12 Quarterly Report, which include monitoring of the 30 days payment of suppliers are tables at Cabinet as required. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) is part of the Outcome 12 Implementation Forum and it is in a better position to provide details on the effectiveness of the mechanisms to enforce the 30 days payment of suppliers.

(b) To have performance Agreement of managers to also include payment of suppliers as key performance area, amongst other things.

04 April 2016 - NW653

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether all training programmes facilitated by the National School of Government are done in terms of registered unit standards recognised by the SA Qualifications Authority; if not, (a) why not and (b) what percentage of the training done during the past year was offered in accordance with registered unit standards; (2) how many full qualifications consisting of more than 120 credits have been (a) achieved by and/or (b) awarded to, learners who have been enrolled to study through (i) the National School of Government or (ii) its predecessor, the Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy in (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014 and (cc) 2015?

Reply:

(1) Not all training programmes facilitated by the National School of Government are done in terms of registered unit standards recognised by the SA Qualifications Authority;

a) Some training programmes need to be responsive to ‘just-in-time’ needs of the public service and do not require SAQA approval.

b) 16% of the training done during the past year was offered in accordance with registered unit standards.

(2) There were no full qualifications consisting of more than 120 credits been (a) achieved by and/or (b) awarded to learners who have been enrolled to study through (i) the National School of Government or (ii) its predecessor, the Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy in (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014 and (cc) 2015.

 

04 April 2016 - NW652

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)How many (a) new staff members joined the Public Service as permanently appointed staff (i) in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2015 and (b) of the specified staff members (i) have successfully completed the full compulsory induction course for public servants, (ii) are currently in training or (iii) still need to commence training in the compulsory induction course; (2) (a) how many accredited trainers are there in the Public Service to facilitate training in the full public service induction programme in each province, (b) what are the targets going forward and (c) when will the public service reach a situation where all newly appointed employees in the public service would have completed the compulsory induction programme within two years of being appointed for the first time?

Reply:

  1. (a) new staff members joined the Public Service as permanently appointed staff:

Question

Years

Number permanently appointed to the Public Service[1]

Number of officials eligible for CIP – that is officials with first time appointment after 1 July 2012[2]

Number of officials that have completed the full CIP

Number currently training on CIP

Number still need to commence training on CIP

(aa)

2012 – 2013

40 547

18 776

43

326

18 407

(bb)

2013 – 2014

46 592

32 499

25

7 897

24 577

(cc)

2014 – 2015

53 881

37 773

188

15 563

22 022

(dd)

2015 - 2016

43 005

34 125

143

8 861

  1. 21

(b) (i) 399 have completed the full CIP

(b) (ii) 32 647 are currently training on CIP

(b) (iii) 90 127 still need to commence training on CIP

(2) (a) Accredited trainers in the Public Service responsible to facilitate training of the induction programme:

Province /National

Number of departmental

officials ready to train

Eastern Cape

97

Northern Cape

30

Western Cape

21

Gauteng

34

Limpopo

19

Mpumalanga

14

North West

67

Free State

28

KwaZulu Natal

52

National

260

National School of Government

27

Total

649

(b) For the financial year 2016-17 the target is 36 000

(c) The National School of Government process of putting in place necessary systems, capacity and procedures to ensure that all newly appointed employees in the public service complete their compulsory induction programme within two years of being appointed for the first time, is a work in progress.

 

 

 

  1. Data Source: PERSAL, excluding Defence

  2. Data Source: PERSAL, excluding Defence and Teachers, and all on probation

04 April 2016 - NW651

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the 2014 Report on Management Performance Assessments that showed that a number of government departments were struggling to comply with the regulations regarding Human Resource Management (HRM), (a) what (i) will his department do to assist senior management in developing the knowledge and skills base of senior public officials regarding HRM and (ii) curricula have been developed by the National School of Government (NSG) to address these shortages, (b)(i) how many senior public officials successfully completed formal training programmes of the NSG in HRM regulations in 2015 and (ii) at what level(s) has/have the specified training programmes been pitched and (c) how many credits on the National Qualifications Framework does each of these training programmes entail?

Reply:

(a) (i) The Executive Development Programme (EDP) is tailor made primarily for the Senior Management Service (SMS) in the public service, as well as for specially identified Middle Managers working in the public service. The programme is aligned to the Senior Management Service (SMS) competency framework and aims to equip participants with necessary knowledge and skills to perform effectively as senior managers and team leaders.

(ii) The design and delivery of the EDP is informed by extensive international research on management and leadership competency based programmes and a senior management training needs analysis. The EDP meets both competency-based needs (recruitment) and ongoing professional development of SMS members (PDP).

The following curricula were developed to assist public service managers and HRM&D specialists in developing knowledge and skills regarding HRM Regulations:

  • Investigating Corruption is a five-day credit-bearing course developed by the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) and handed to the NSG for roll out. It is aimed at building and strengthening competencies of learners to investigate corruption in the public sector. The course is at NQF level 6 and has 10 credits. NSG roll-out is envisaged for April 2016.
  • Application of Policy and Procedure on Incapacity and ill-health retirement (PILIR) is a 5 day, non-credit-bearing course that capacitates learners to implement and apply the PILIR in the public service. The course has as its foundation the PILIR policy and addresses the management of absenteeism, ill-health and incapacity, thereby ensuring sustained service delivery and improved productivity in the public service.
  • PILIR online for supervisors enables supervisors to implement the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and ill-health Retirement (PILIR) in their units on a daily basis. The main aim of this non-credit-bearing course is to develop capacity to comply with the PILIR Guide direct reports and/or team members with regard to the application of the PILIR process;
  • Strategic HR Planning for the achievement of organisational results:. The course on Strategic Human Resource Planning for the achievement of organisational results is aligned to the DPSA Strategic Framework on HR Planning and enables learners to acquire knowledge and skills to develop human resource strategies and plans which are integrated with their departmental strategic and operational plans, in order to ensure that their future staffing needs are met. This 5 day credit-bearing course is at NQF level 6 and has 12 credits.
  • Development of HRD Implementation Plans is a credit-bearing course intended specifically for senior and middle management in the public service who are involved in the development of Annual HRD Implementation Plans. This is a 5 day course at NQF level 5 and has 10 credits.
  • Disability Management in the Public Service enables learners to facilitate the inclusion of persons with disabilities in the workplace, and remove barriers that prevent their successful participation in the job market. It is at NQF level 5 and has8 credits.
  • Investigating and Presiding Skills is developed for Public Servants and managers involved in workplace investigations related to employee misconduct, as well as persons appointed as Presiding Officers or Chairpersons at disciplinary enquiries. It is non-credit bearing.
  • Grievance and Disciplinary Action Procedures is a 5 day credit-bearing course that equips learners with the requisite knowledge, skills and values to resolve employee grievances; monitor and adjust the application of the grievance procedure; and evaluate, analyse and address grievance patterns. It is at NQF level 5 and has 13 credits.
  • Recruitment and Selection in the public service is a 5 day credit-bearing course that enables learners with knowledge and skills on how to effect the recruitment of employees in the Public Service. It is at NQF level 5 and has 9 credits.
  • An online course in Managing Performance has been developed in the public service to assist senior management in developing the knowledge and skills base of senior public officials regarding Human Resource Management. The online performance management programme is not credit bearing.

(b) (i) Number senior public officials successfully completed formal training programmes of the NSG in HRM regulations in 2015

Course:

Number trained: (2012/13 to 2015/16)

     

EDP: Strategic HRM Module

453

Investigating Corruption

Envisaged roll-out is April 2016

Application of Policy and Procedure on Incapacity and ill-health retirement (RUM

757

PILIR online for supervisors (launched during 2015)

379

Strategic HR Planning for the achievement of organisational results

700

Development of HRD Implementation Plans

55

Disability Management in the Public Service

1 648

Investigating and Presiding Skills

503

Grievance and Disciplinary Action Procedures

651

Recruitment and Selection in the public service

217

Managing Performance in the public service

2 517

(ii) The online performance management programme is open to all public servant who manage their own and team performance.

(c) National Qualifications Framework (NQF) credits for each of these training programmes are follows:

  • Investigating Corruption is at NQF level 6 and has 10 credits.
  • Application of Policy and Procedure on Incapacity and ill-health retirement (PILIR) is a non-credit-bearing course.
  • PILIR online for supervisors is a non-credit-bearing course,
  • Strategic HR Planning for the achievement of organisational results is at NQF level 6 and has 12 credits.
  • image1Development of HRD Implementation Plans is at NQF level 5 and has 10 credits.
  • Disability Management in the Public Service is at NQF level 5 and has 8 credits.
  • Investigating and Presiding Skills is non-credit bearing.
  • Grievance and Disciplinary Action Procedures is at NQF level 5 and has 13 credits.
  • Recruitment and Selection in the public service is at NQF level 5 and has 9 credits.
  • An online course in Managing Performance has been developed is not credit bearing.

29 March 2016 - NW67

Profile picture: Lovemore, Ms AT

Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What measures he (a) is considering and (b) will implement to achieve a reduction in the public sector wage bill, in each case providing the relevant details in terms of (i) timelines envisaged, (ii) affected (aa) departments and/or (bb) salary grades and (iii) the extent of (aa) possible job losses or (bb) ability to deliver services?

Reply:

(a) Measures being considered to achieve a reduction in the public sector wage bill include placing a moratorium on the filling of certain managerial and administrative vacancies in the public service.

(b) Relevant details and their implications thereof will only become available once all necessary consultations have been concluded.

(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(iii)(aa)(bb) Falls away