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04 April 2016 - NW653

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether all training programmes facilitated by the National School of Government are done in terms of registered unit standards recognised by the SA Qualifications Authority; if not, (a) why not and (b) what percentage of the training done during the past year was offered in accordance with registered unit standards; (2) how many full qualifications consisting of more than 120 credits have been (a) achieved by and/or (b) awarded to, learners who have been enrolled to study through (i) the National School of Government or (ii) its predecessor, the Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy in (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014 and (cc) 2015?

Reply:

(1) Not all training programmes facilitated by the National School of Government are done in terms of registered unit standards recognised by the SA Qualifications Authority;

a) Some training programmes need to be responsive to ‘just-in-time’ needs of the public service and do not require SAQA approval.

b) 16% of the training done during the past year was offered in accordance with registered unit standards.

(2) There were no full qualifications consisting of more than 120 credits been (a) achieved by and/or (b) awarded to learners who have been enrolled to study through (i) the National School of Government or (ii) its predecessor, the Public Administration Leadership and Management Academy in (aa) 2013, (bb) 2014 and (cc) 2015.

 

04 April 2016 - NW68

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What are the details of the steps (a) his department and (b) the Public Service Commission are taking to enforce the requirement that all government departments pay their suppliers within 30 days of receiving goods or services; (2) how he intends to (a) monitor the effectiveness of, and (b) ensure managerial accountability for, each of the steps he intends to take in this regard?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and also the National Treasury are in a better position to provide details of steps to enforce the requirement for departments to pay suppliers within 30 days.
  1. The Public Service Commission (PSC) derives its mandate from Section 196(4) of the Constitution, 1996. In terms of this mandate, the PSC promotes the constitutional principles in Section 195, including ensuring that resources (in this case financial) are used for the purpose they are earmarked, that services are rendered fairly, that ethics are promoted and that public administration is development-oriented. In addition, the PSC is mandated in Section 196(4)(b) to inter alia investigate, monitor and evaluate the organisation and administration of the public service and in Section 196(4)(c) to propose measures to ensure effective and efficient performance within the public service. Section 196(4)(f) tasks the PSC to monitor and investigate adherence to applicable procedures in the public service either on own accord or on receipt of a complaint.

In accordance with this mandate, the PSC conducted a series of public hearings at provincial and national level during the 2012/13 financial year. The hearings were intended to provide an overview of the challenges experienced in the payment of service providers and to develop possible solutions in this regard. The hearings were also designed to provide a forum for consultation and public participation with regard to the payment process. Departments with the highest incidence of non-payment (according to figures received from National Treasury) were also invited to these hearings. These departments were provided the opportunity to answer service providers’ questions, explain their challenges and solve cases of non-payment on the spot, where possible.

Reports on the individual hearings were compiled and coordinated through the relevant treasuries with government departments.

(2) (a) Outcome 12 Quarterly Report, which include monitoring of the 30 days payment of suppliers are tables at Cabinet as required. The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) is part of the Outcome 12 Implementation Forum and it is in a better position to provide details on the effectiveness of the mechanisms to enforce the 30 days payment of suppliers.

(b) To have performance Agreement of managers to also include payment of suppliers as key performance area, amongst other things.

29 March 2016 - NW455

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) With reference to the Government’s PERSAL records, what number of Public Service employees were employed in each provincial Department of Education as at the last day of the (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15 financial years; (2) with reference to the Government’s PERSAL records, what number of Public Service employees were employed in each provincial Department of Health as at the last day of the (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15 financial years; (3) with reference to the Government’s PERSAL records, what number of Public Service employees were employed in each Provincial Legislature as at the last day of the (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

  1. According to data from PERSAL, the number of Public Service employees employed in each provincial Department of Education as at the last day of the (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15 financial years are indicated in the table below. Please note that abnormal and periodical appointments are excluded.
  2. According to data from PERSAL, the number of Public Service employees employed in each provincial Department of Health as at the last day of the (a) 2010-11, (b) 2011-12, (c) 2012-13, (d) 2013-14 and (e) 2014-15 financial years are indicated in the table below. Please note that abnormal and periodical appointments are excluded.
  3. The Provincial Legislatures do not fall under the purview of the Department of Public Service and Administration and most of the Provincial Legislatures are not utilising PERSAL as a personnel administration and payroll system. Each Provincial Legislature can be contacted to obtain this information.

Number of Public Service employees in provincial Education and Health departments

March 2011 to March 2015

Provincial Department

201103

201203

201303

201403

201503

Eastern Cape

Education

86 181

82 816

80 154

78 791

74 279

 

Health

40 818

41 186

39 577

38 655

39 470

Free State

Education

31 113

31 885

32 013

31 368

30 382

 

Health

16 841

18 915

19 060

19 008

18 388

Gauteng

Education

79 554

82 134

82 318

83 794

84 353

 

Health

62 492

65 078

61 406

62 992

62 894

Kwazulu-Natal

Education

106 689

108 058

106 732

108 024

106 715

 

Health

71 001

78 543

82 436

72 731

71 865

Limpopo

Education

64 425

63 911

62 901

62 768

62 153

 

Health

36 472

38 112

37 094

36 650

37 203

Mpumalanga

Education

42 493

42 719

42 801

42 298

41 848

 

Health

18 026

18 485

18 269

19 225

19 446

North West

Education

30 425

30 242

30 329

30 703

29 473

 

Health

17 290

17 613

18 256

19 305

18 955

Northern Cape

Education

12 023

11 892

11 690

12 457

12 229

 

Health

6 176

6 372

6 474

6 713

6 781

Western Cape

Education

40 514

40 402

40 114

40 672

42 108

 

Health

29 306

30 446

31 092

31 654

31 882

Excluding Abnormal and Periodical appointments

29 March 2016 - NW321

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) When, (b) by whom, and (c) why was the decision made to halt the compilation and publication of the annual State of the Public Service report?

Reply:

(a) The decision was made in 2014 after publication of the last Report on the State of the Public Service.

(b) The decision was made by the Public Service Commission.

(c) The decision was made in order to review the work of the Public Service Commission in this area and also for consultation with relevant stakeholders on the values and principles in relation to section 195 of the Constitution, which have a bearing on the Report.

29 March 2016 - NW320

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the statement made on page 14 of his department's Annual Operational Plan for the 2015-16 financial year that the Public Service continues to face substantial challenges around recruiting competent senior managers and developing them to be able to carry out the mandate of Government effectively, what are the details of (a) the challenges, including (i) the departments affected, (ii) the magnitude of the challenges, (iii) the (aa) vacancy and (bb) turnover rate of senior managers per department, and (iv) the identified impact on service delivery, and (b) the measures (i) in place or (ii) planned to address the challenges?

Reply:

(a) The challenges include the following:

  • Departments have not consistently applied the required legislative prescripts in order to effect a fair and objective recruitment process.
  • Departments did not have standardised methods and procedures in place to ensure compliance.
  • Departments have challenges in determining inherent skills, competencies and training required.
  • Departments have further challenges determining valid and fair selection criteria.

  (i) The departments affected are listed on the attached Annexure A

   (ii) The magnitude of the challenges is small.

   (iii) (aa) The average vacancy rate at senior management level as at 31 December 2015 is 9.12%;

(bb) The average turnover rate at senior management level as at 31 December 2015 is 0.78%.

  (iv) The challenges are minimal due to the measures put in place to prevent them and also to address them as and when they are identified.

(b) (i) Measures in place to address the challenges include the following:

   a) Enforcement of the legislation that govern recruitment and selection namely; the Public Service Act, 1994 (as amended) and its subordinate legislation, the Public Service Regulations, 2011 (as amended).

  b) Implementation of a strategy to reduce the recruitment period and the vacancy rate in the Public Service, which include reduction of the period to fill a vacant post in the Public Service to four (4) months after being advertised; and reducing the average vacancy rate in the Public Service to 10%.

  c) Standardisation of the recruitment practices through introduction of the Executive Protocol on filling of the vacant posts of Directors-General and Deputy Directors-General at national sphere of government. This Protocol also provides norms and standards on recruitment.

  d) Introduction of a Directive on the selection practices in relation to Ministerial Directives.

  e) Introduction of a Directive on Compulsory Capacity Development, Mandatory Training Days and Minimum Entry Requirements into Senior Management Level.

 f) Introduction of a Directive on the Implementation of Competency Assessments for entry onto Senior Management Service levels.

  g) Introduction of a Directive on the minimum educational requirements for entry into the position of senior management service.

(ii) Plans to address the challenges;

Planned initiatives include introduction of a pre-entry certification for any individual who wishes to enter or progress within the Senior Management Service. A Public Service specific course is currently being developed by the National School of Government in this regard. A guideline for mentoring and peer support has also been drafted in order to improve the quality of individual leadership development for newly appointed as well as currently employed SMS members.

29 March 2016 - NW251

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Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he and/or his department has bought advertising space in The New Age in the (a) 2012-13, (b) 2013-14 and (c) 2014-15 financial years; if so, (i) what number of times and (ii) for what amount in each specified financial year?

Reply:

(a) No.

(b) and (c) Yes. (i) (ii) refer to the table herewith below;

Financial Year

Event

Amount

Number of Adverts

2012- 13

None

R0.00

0

2013- 14

MPSA Strategic Communication

R284 988.60

1

 

Launch of the Public Service Charter: Business breakfast

R240 574.50

1

2014- 15

National Batho Pele Excellence Awards

R33 379. 20

1

29 March 2016 - NW67

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What measures he (a) is considering and (b) will implement to achieve a reduction in the public sector wage bill, in each case providing the relevant details in terms of (i) timelines envisaged, (ii) affected (aa) departments and/or (bb) salary grades and (iii) the extent of (aa) possible job losses or (bb) ability to deliver services?

Reply:

(a) Measures being considered to achieve a reduction in the public sector wage bill include placing a moratorium on the filling of certain managerial and administrative vacancies in the public service.

(b) Relevant details and their implications thereof will only become available once all necessary consultations have been concluded.

(i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(iii)(aa)(bb) Falls away

29 March 2016 - NW20

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his Ministry has any frozen vacant positions; if so, (a) how many of the specified positions are vacant, (b) what are the designations of the specified positions and (c) for how long have the specified positions been vacant?

Reply:

No. (a)(b)(c) Falls away.

29 March 2016 - NW526

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Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to the rules of the Public Service Commission (PSC) dealing with meeting procedures, (a) how does the PSC deal with the leadership of meetings in the absence of the Chairperson and/or Deputy Chairperson, (b) when were the specified rules adopted, (c) when were the relevant sections of the rules that deal with vacancies in the leadership of the PSC last revised and (d) what is the exact wording of the sections that deal with the absence of the Chairperson and/or Deputy Chairperson during PSC meetings.

Reply:

(a) Section 196 (2) of the Constitution provides that the Public Service Commission (PSC) must be regulated by national legislation. The PSC Act in section 11 (c) provides for the PSC to make Rules as to the manner in which meetings of the PSC shall be convened, the procedure to be followed at those meetings and the conduct of its business, the quorum at those meetings, and the manner in which minutes of those meetings shall be kept. Provision is therefore made in the prevailing legislation for the PSC to make Rules to ensure that the standard of our own internal deliberations and decision-making processes meet the tests of accountability, transparency and responsiveness.

The PSC’s Governance Rules provide for operational functioning of its various governance structures, as well as the secretariat function. The Governance Rules take due consideration to the second Certification judgment of the amended text of the Constitution[1] which held that the PSC Commissioners will have joint responsibility for the work that it does. It provides that the Chairperson must provide overall leadership to the PSC, ensuring its effectiveness in all aspects of its role without limiting the principle of joint responsibility for the PSC’s decisions.

The Governance Rules provide for a variety of meetings. The Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson only leads the Plenary, which is the highest decision making body of the PSC. The Plenary is constituted by the 14 Commissioners. Plenary meetings are held on a quarterly basis. These meetings are held on dates determined in advance. Plenary meetings are convened and Chaired by the Chairperson or, if the Chairperson is absent or unavailable, by the Deputy Chairperson. If both are unavailable to chair a Plenary meeting or part of a meeting, nothing in the law or in the Rules prohibits the Chairperson or Deputy Chairperson to request a Commissioner to chair the meeting in their stead.

In order to execute the PSC’s mandate, subcommittees are established in the form of Specialist Teams. Each Specialist Team assigns a Convenor from amongst the Commissioners to coordinate and Chair the operations of the Specialist Team. The Chairperson and Deputy Chairperson serve on Specialist Teams in their capacity as Commissioners.

The Specialist Teams provide strategic oversight on the key performance areas of the PSC and make findings and recommendations on behalf of the PSC in line with the Delegations Frameworks, providing for the delegation of powers by the PSC to provincially based commissioners as envisaged in section 11 (b) of the Act and the delegation of powers and assignment of duties by the PSC to Commissioners as envisaged in section 13 of the PSC Act.

Working committees of Specialist Teams in the form of panels are established to deal with decision-making in respect of investigations in terms of section 196 (4)(f) of the Constitution, in line with the Governance Rules and the Delegations Frameworks mentioned above.

(b) The specified rules were adopted in March 2005. Amendments to the Governance Rules were adopted in February 2015 and implemented with effect from 01 April 2015.

(c) There are no Rules in relation to the management of vacancies. However, the process for appointment of Commissioners is prescribed in section 196 (7) of the Constitution, read with section 4 of the PSC Act, which state that:

  • Five nationally based commissioners are appointed by the President in terms of section 196(7)(a) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), following the approval of the National Assembly after a public notice process and a recommendation by a committee of the National Assembly.
  • One commissioner for each province is appointed by the President in terms of section 196(7) (b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996), in the PSC following a nomination by the Premier of the province after a public notice process and a recommendation by a committee of the provincial legislature and approved by that legislature.

(d) Rule E.1 (b) of the Governance Rules provide that “Plenary meetings are convened and chaired by the Chairperson or, if the Chairperson is absent or unavailable, by the Deputy Chairperson.” This Rule must be read in conjunction with section 11 (c) of the PSC Act, the Certification Judgements, as well as the Delegations Frameworks, providing for the delegation of powers by the PSC to provincially based commissioners as envisaged in section 11 (b) of the Act and the delegation of powers and assignment of duties by the PSC to Commissioners as envisaged in section 13 of the PSC Act.

  1. Certification of the amended text of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Case CCT 37/96)

29 March 2016 - NW525

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Oosthuizen, Mr GC to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

For what periods since 1 January 2014 have the (i) position of (aa) Chairperson and (bb) Deputy Chairperson and (ii) any members designated by (aa) provinces and (bb) Parliament been vacant at the Public Service Commission and (b) what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)(b) are as follows:

Chairperson

Commissioner

Period

Mr B Mthembu

First Term of Office

21 October 2009 to 20 October 2014

Adv RK Sizani

First Term of Office

19 December 2015 to 31 August 2016

Deputy Chairperson

Commissioner

Period

Ms TM Tengeni

Second Term of Office Continues

21 October 2009 to 16 January 2014

Adv RK Sizani

First Term of Office

24 October 2014 to 18 December 2015

Commissioner: National

Commissioner

Period

Ms SS Nkosi

First Term of Office

23 February 2009 to 22 February 2014

Ms SS Nkosi

Second Term of Office

24 April 2014 to 23 April 2019

Mr B Mthembu

Second Term of Office

1 January 2016 to 31 December 2020

As at March 2016, there are no vacancies at National level. Commissioners RK Sizani, LV Sizani and CP Nzimande are not included in the table above due to the fact that their periods of appointment do not fall within the period in question, i.e. 1 January 2014.

Free State Province

Commissioner

Period

Mr P Helepi

Second Term of Office

1 February 2009 to 31 January 2014

Dr WH Boshoff

First Term of Office

1 March 2014 to 28 February 2019

Limpopo Province

Commissioner

Period

Mr MZ Mawasha

First Term of Office

5 October 2009 to 4 October 2014

Mr TG Mashamba

First Term of Office

24 August 2015 to 23 August 2020

Northern Cape Province

Commissioner

Period

Ms MA Marais

First Term of Office

1 March 2010 to 28 February 2015

Ms MA Marais

Second Term of Office

13 April 2015 to 12 April 2020

Eastern Cape Province

Commissioner

Period

Mr S Mafanya

First Term of Office

1 February 2009 to 31 January 2014

Mr S Mafanya

Second Term of Office

11 February 2014 to 10 February 2019

Mpumalanga Province

Commissioner

Period

Mr DS Mkwanazi

First Term of Office

23 April 2009 to 22 April 2014

Mr DS Mkwanazi

Second Term of Office

1 May 2014 to 30 April 2019

KwaZulu-Natal Province

Commissioner

Period

Ms PM Tengeni

Second Term of Office

16 January 2009 to 20 October 2009

Dr MP Sithole

First Term of Office

1 September 2015 to 31 August 2020

As at March 2016, there are no vacancies at Provincial level.

It should be noted that Commissioners for Gauteng, North West and Western Cape are not included in the table above due to the fact that their periods of appointment do not fall within the period in question, i.e. 1 January 2014.

29 March 2016 - NW458

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)With reference to section 7 of the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council Resolution 1 of 2012, and for every relevant organ of state, what are (a) the details of all qualifications recognised as an improved qualification which is related to an employee's scope of work and enhances the employee's performance and the service delivered by the employee and (b) the conditions or criteria applicable for recognition of such qualifications; (2) whether (a) a determination is made of an employee's improved performance before a cash bonus is paid to the employee or (b) the bonus is paid on attainment of the improved qualification; (3) (a) for every relevant organ of state and (b) for each financial year since the implementation of the scheme on 1 January 2013, (i) how many cash bonuses for improved qualifications have been paid out and (ii) what has been the cost of such bonuses in each of the specified financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) Mandate to determine appropriate qualification/s related to an employee’s scope of work and the expected levels of improvement in performance as results of the attainment of the identified qualification/s resides with the Executive Authority of the respective departments.

     (b) In terms of the Resolution, Sectors and/or Departments must define the qualifications which are relevant to their respective areas of work and which they intend to recognise.

(2) (a) Determination of performance levels in the public service is managed in terms of the Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) as stipulated in Chapter 1, Part VIII of the Public Service Regulations (2001) as amended. This benefit was also introduced to encourage public servants to acquire academic qualifications in their respective areas of work in an attempt to professionalise and to build confidence in the public service.

(b) Bonus is paid on attainment of a qualification subject to terms and conditions stipulated in the resolutions and the circular.

(3) (a)(b) There is no record of any department implementing this agreement so far (since o1 January 2013), except for departments where this benefit has been in existence before the PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2012 was concluded.

17 December 2015 - NW4171

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether ethics and integrity officers have been appointed for each national and provincial department; if not, (a) why not, (b) what are the relevant details in each case and (c) by when is it intended that such appointments will be made; if so, what (i) minimum criteria were used for the recruitment of the ethics and integrity officers, (ii) vetting or screening have the incumbents undergone and (iii) training are the incumbents required to attend after commencement of their employment as ethics and integrity officers; (2) (a) what are the details of the job description of an ethics and integrity officer in the public service, (b) what job grade does an ethics and integrity officer occupy in a (i) national and (ii) provincial department and (c) to whom does an ethics and integrity officer report in a (i) national and (ii) provincial department?

Reply:

(1) Yes. There are currently 306 Ethics Officers either appointed or designated in the public service.

(b) Appointments are made in terms of the prescribed public service procedure, with regard to designation, existing employees in their respective departments are assigned a new or additional functions in line with the responsibilities attached to the post of an ethics officer.

(c) (i) Departments follow an open recruitment process to identify and appoint appropriate officials. The grade of the post is determined using the approved Job Evaluation process and System. Departments currently utilise the job description as contained in the Public Service Integrity Management Framework.

(ii) All employees, prior to appointment to the public service, are subject to a background checks, which include credit and criminal record, verification of qualification, disciplinary record, etc.

The DPSA has initiated a process of amending the Public Service Regulations, 2001. One of the objectives is to formalize and standardize the designation and / or appointment of Ethics Officers and provide for more functions relating to the management and promotion of ethics in the public service. This process will be finalised early in 2016.

(iii) The Department of Public Service and Administration together with the National School of Government have development a set of new ethics courses. These courses were finalised and are being rolled-out. These courses include the following:

        • Ethics Management for Local Government
        • Ethics Management Workshop for National and Provincial Government
        • Ethics Module to use in senior management induction
        • Ethics Workshop to use for Ethics Officer Training
        • Ethics Module to use in Compulsory Induction Programme for Public Service

Furthermore, all designated Ethics Officers have been trained on the Financial Disclosure Framework and the use of the e-Disclosure system.

(2) (a) Departments currently utilise the job description as contained in the Public Service Integrity Management Framework. The following functions are performed by ethics officers:-

  • Promote integrity and ethical behaviour in departments;
  • Advise employees on ethical matters;
  • Ensure integrity of organisational policies, procedures and practices;
  • Identify and report unethical behaviour and corrupt activities to the head of department;
  • Manage conflicts of interest, including:
  • Financial disclosures of employees;
  • Application for external remunerative work; and
  • Departmental gift registers.
  • Develop and implement awareness programmes to educate officials on ethics, good governance and anti-corruption measures; and
  • Keep a register of all employees under investigation and those disciplined for unethical conduct.

(d) The job grade is determined using the approved Job Evaluation process and System. Where Ethics Officers are appointed (and not designated), whether in the national or provincial department, the size, risk profile, budget, qualification requirement, etc of the post will determine the job grade.

(d) Ethics officers are generally appointed under programme 1 (administration), and report to the head of Corporate Services or the Director’s-General head of office. However, going forward, ethics officers will report to the Head of the Department (HoD) in terms of the proposed Public Service Regulations.

07 December 2015 - NW4174

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What is his department's target with respect to the compilation of citizen report cards and (b) what are the exact details of how an assessment for such a report card is carried out; (2) whether a member of the public can access these citizen report cards; if not, why not; if so, how can such access be achieved?

Reply:

(1) (a) The target of the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is to conduct a Citizen Report Card survey every 3 years or so. The DPSA aims to deepen the Citizen Report Card (CRC) methodology in the departments and the municipalities. At this stage, DPSA is focusing on assisting the departments in the development of the Improvement Plans and the implementation of the interventions geared to improving service delivery. The DPSA is also in the process of setting up a mechanism for ongoing reporting and assessment of implementation of interventions. Once implementation of interventions has taken root in the departments, another CRC survey will be undertaken and its purpose will be to assess progress made against the baseline.

(b) The Citizen Report Card by definition reflects the performance of government from the perspective of the citizens. The citizens through focus group discussions and interviews get involved in the entire CRC process. The determination of the service delivery areas to be assessed and the eventual design of the questionnaire is a direct result of the consultative process. Flowing from the design of the questionnaire, a pilot survey gets conducted whose purpose is to further refine and finalise the questionnaire before full deployment.

The deployment of the questionnaire is preceded by the development of a sampling plan to ensure that specific randomly selected households and qualifying random respondents are identified. To ensure successful execution of the sample plan and administration of the questionnaire, carefully selected data collectors or field workers are thoroughly trained in understanding the content of the questionnaire and the broader research objectives of the CRC survey.

It should be noted that right at the beginning of the CRC process there are engagements with the various stakeholders in the community to ensure buy-in and support throughout the entire process. The stakeholders key to the process are the traditional authority, Municipal leadership, Non-Governmental Organisations and other organised interest groups in the areas of assessment.

(2) The Citizen Report Card survey is available to the public and can be accessed through the departmental website.

07 December 2015 - NW4173

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) For which (i) departments and/or (ii) municipalities were citizen report cards compiled in the (aa) 2013-14, (bb) 2014-15 and (cc) 2015-16 financial years and (b) on what basis were the specified selections made; (2) (a) what were the scores for each of the entities assessed in the specified financial years, expressed as the (i) overall score and (ii) score per assessed aspect for each assessed entity, (b)(i) what score is considered acceptable for each aspect and (ii) why and (c) what are the details of the action taken in the event of a score that indicates unacceptable customer service?

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) (aa)(bb) The Citizen Report Cards (CRC) were compiled for the following:
  • Department of Basic Education;
  • Department of Health:
  • Department of Home Affairs;
  • South African Police Service; and
  • South African Social Security Agency.

(ii) (aa)(bb) The Citizen Report Cards were compiled for the following:

  • Ga-Segonyana Local Municipality;
  • Mookgopong Local Municipality;
  • Okhahlamba Local Municipality;
  • Matatiele Local Municipality;
  • Emalahleni Local Municipality;
  • Moretele Local Municipality;
  • City of Mangaung (Botshabelo);
  • City of Johannesburg (Diepsloot and Alexandra); and
  • City of Cape Town (Gugulethu and Khayelitsha).

(cc) None. The Citizen Report Card survey was conducted in the 2013-14 financial year and the subsequent reports were finalised in the 2014-15 financial year.

(b) The selection was based on the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) priorities, which set out key focus areas of the departments over the MTSF period. One municipality per province was chosen to benefit from the survey and the selection of the municipality in every province was based on the readiness of the municipality to accommodate the study within the set timelines.

(2) (a) (i) The overall scores for each department and municipality are shown herewith below on figure 1 and figure 2 respectively:

Figure 1: Overall Ranking of Departments

Figure 2: Overall Ranking of Municipalities

(2) (a) (ii) The scores are reflected on figure 3 and figure 4 herewith below. The departments were assessed on Accessibility, Reliability, Quality of Service, Staff Performance, Transparency and Openness and also Avenue for Redress whilst the municipalities were assessed using the Batho Pele principles. The satisfaction of citizens against a range of municipal basic services was also assessed.

Figure 3: Ranking of Departments against service delivery attributes

 

Figure 4: Performance of municipalities against Batho Pele principles

(2) (b) (i) The benchmarks reflected in figure 1 and figure 2 above were on the following:

 

  • Minimum level of service expected and
  • Ideal level of service required.

 

 

Minimum service expected

Ideal level of service required

Departments

73.78%

87.78%

Municipalities

67.00%

89.40%

 

(ii) The benchmarks indicated above are considered acceptable as they were sourced from the citizens regarding the level of service they expected and required from the assessed government departments and municipalities..

(c) Action taken was the development of Service Delivery Improvement Plans, which entail interventions to improve performance.

07 December 2015 - NW4172

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether each (a) national and (b) provincial government department, unit, entity and component is required to submit a service delivery improvement plan; if not, why not; if so, (i) how often, (ii) by what date for each submission period and (iii) to whom; (2) (a) what process is followed to assess the service delivery plans that have been submitted, (b) what standards are used to assess the value of each specified plan and (c) what action is taken in the event that a specified plan is not considered as acceptable; (3) how is compliance with commitments made in the service delivery plans monitored; (4) whether a member of the public can access the plans of the various departments; if not, why not; if so, how is such access achieved?

Reply:

(1) Yes. In terms of the Directive on Service Delivery Improvements Plans dated 30 October 2008, issued by the Minister for Public Service and Administration, the national and provincial departments are required to submit their Service Delivery Improvement Plans by 31 March every three years and to report on the progress made annually to the Department of Public Service and Administration.

The Service Delivery Improvements Plans should be aligned to the Public Access Information Act (PAIA) and to the Public Administrative and Justice Act (PAJA) and should also provide an indication on how Service Delivery Improvements Plans are cascaded to service points. The Service Delivery Improvements Plans must be signed-off by Head of the Department (HOD) and also the Executive Authority.

(2) (a) The assessment process of the Service Delivery Improvement Plans include; (i) scrutinizing preliminary scoring using an assessment tool, (ii) structured peer and/or sector assessments for verification and validation of scoring by the cross-cutting teams using the same assessment tool, (iii) provision of preliminary feedback to the participants by the Department of Public Service and Administration.

(b) The standards used to assess the value of the specified plan are based on critical compliance areas of the Service Delivery Improvements Plans Assessment Tool and include;

(i) Openness & transparency on the process followed in developing the Service Delivery Improvement Plans (SDIP).

  1. Meaningful utilization of a situation analysis in identifying the critical service areas that should be addressed in the SDIP.
  2. Process mapping, human resources and Unit costing that should lead to a problem statement to be addressed through the mandatory SDIP template.

(c) The cluster and sector of the SDIP assessment and the capacity building workshops organized by the DPSA assist departments to identify their weaknesses, develop and implement corrective measures to address the unacceptable SDIPs developed by the departments.

The workshops provide a platform for technical support, capacity building and practical solutions with departmental cross cutting teams in order to develop realistic, credible and effective SDIPs.

(3) Monitoring and reporting of compliance with commitments is undertaken through annual progress reporting and Annual Operational Plans. Service Delivery Improvement Plan monitoring follow-ups are made through the Khaedu programme and Public Service Month programme.

National and Provincial departments have also put in place internal processes and system to monitor compliance with commitments in the service delivery plans, including reporting to internal departmental structures and eventually to the DPSA in line with the legislative framework.

(4) The Service Delivery Improvements Plan is currently an Internally Driven Plan. However, it is not a confidential document and can be made available on request.

07 December 2015 - NW3920

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the Public Service is subject to any requirement to employ (a) students and/or (b) graduate interns; if not, what is his department’s position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the specified requirement (i)(aa) in the (aaa) 2013-14 and (bbb) 2014-15 financial years and (bb) from 1 April 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (ii) what are the actual achievements for the (aa) specified financial years and (bb) period?

Reply:

Yes. The Human Resource Development Strategic Framework Vision 2015 and the Skills Development Act, 1998, provide for the placement of young people in Learnership and Internship programmes in the national and provincial departments. The intention is to establish an effective and efficient internship programme aimed at bridging the gap between academic study and competent performance in the workplace by offering structured internship opportunities to students and unemployed youths. The intended outcome of this internship programme is to enable school leavers and unemployed graduates to gain practical work experience over a maximum period of 12 months.

In 2009, the Minister for the Public Service and Administration issued a Determination on the Internship Programmes and Implementation Guidelines for Public Service.

Flowing from the signing of the National Skills Accord in October 2011 and a Youth Employment Accord in April 2013, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) issued a Circular directing the scaling up of internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes in the public service. Through the same Circular, the scope of internship programmes in the public service was expanded to include graduates, learners seeking work-integrated learning (experiential learners), graduates seeking to meet statutory requirements for professional registration and those seeking minimum work experience for employment purposes both within the public service and other sectors.

The annual target for internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes is five (5) percent of the departments’ fixed staff establishment on an annual basis.

During 2009-2012, annual target for the public service was 25 000 for each financial years. The following numbers were reported:

(a) 4002 in 2009/10;

(b) 19 278 in 2010/11; and

(c) 20 370 in 2011/12.

For the 2012-2015 period, the target was revised to 50 000. The target for 2012/13 and 2013/14 was 15 000 and 20 000 for the 2014/15 financial year. The following numbers were reported:

  1. 17 820 in 2012/2013;
  2. 27 351 in 2013/14; and
  3. 40 891 in 2014/15.

As at 30 September 2015, a total of 9 320 interns, learners and apprentices have been reported to have been recruited since 1 April 2015.

For the period since January 2012 to 30 September 2015 a total of 50 988 candidates who had been recruited as either interns, learners or apprentices have been absorbed into departments on a permanent or contract employment.

The DPSA has initiated a review of the Determination issued in 2009 to address concerns raised by departments regarding amongst others, the duration of the internship programme, especially for individuals involved in regulated programmes, and to facilitate recruitment and retention of scarce skills.

The outcome of a feasibility study on the development and piloting of a graduate recruitment scheme as recommended by the National Development Plan is currently underway and consultation is also taking place with the national and provincial departments.

Proposals have been made to amend the Public Service Regulations to accommodate the retention of individuals recruited into the public service via internship, learnership and apprenticeship programmes when filling entry levels posts.

07 December 2015 - NW3979

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he will implement an open procurement process involving full public disclosure of all contracts signed by all (a) spheres of government reporting to him, (b) state-owned enterprises, (c) entities and (d) components with government’s service providers, as recently discussed at the Open Government Partnership’s global summit held in Mexico from 27 to 29 October 2015; if not, why not; if so, (i) by what date and (ii) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

During the Open Government Partnership (OGP) Global Summit held in Mexico from 27 to 29 October 2015, South Africa was appointed as the Lead and or Chair of the OGP. In accepting the responsibility to Lead the OGP , the South African government reiterated its profound commitment to ensure that the OGP’s Programme's on the Principles of Transparency, Accountability and Responsiveness performs better.

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) will further engage the Office of the Chief Procurement Officer at National Treasury with the intention of finding ways in which the OGP’s commitments and principles around Open Contracting are domesticated.

07 December 2015 - NW3978

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) How were the reported 36 000 ghost workers detected in the North West, (b) what is the extent of the financial loss to the specified provincial government as a result of this fraud, (c) who benefitted from the salaries being paid to these workers and (d) what action has been taken as a result of this discovery, including any appropriate disciplinary actions; (2) whether measures to detect the existence of ghost workers in each national and provincial department (a) have been or (b) will be implemented in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

  1. (a) As part of an exercise undertaken by the North West Office of the Premier to determine the cost drivers of the wage bill in the Province, misinterpretation of employee information lead to the reports in the media about the 36 000 ghost workers in the Province. After realisation of this misunderstanding the Director-General of the North West Office of the Premier, Dr Keneilwe Sebego issued a media statement, early in November 2015, indicating that there were no ghost workers in North West, but that non-permanent type of appointments were erroneously labelled as ghost workers. This was also officially confirmed in a letter, dated 13 November 2015, addressed to the Director-General of the DPSA in response to enquiries made to the North West Office of the Premier.

(b) Taking the information in (a) above into consideration, there was no fraud or financial loss in the North West Provincial Administration since the payments made to these non-permanent type of appointments were made legitimately.

(c) The non-permanent appointees themselves benefited from the salaries legitimately paid to them.

(d) The DPSA is not aware of any disciplinary action taken as a result of the misunderstanding. The Office of the Premier in North West indicated that it will continue to monitor appointments in the Provincial Administration.

(2) The management and employment of public servants at national and provincial level are managed through a decentralized Human Resource Management framework where Heads of Department and Executive Authorities are responsible for the employment and management of their own employees. Departments’ employee numbers and payroll fall under the purview of the respective Executive Authorities and are audited by the Auditor-General.

(a) The Public Finance Management Act, 1999; Treasury Regulations and other legal prescripts contain provisions to deal with monitoring of payments to employees in the Public Service. Fraud and non-compliance to these measures are managed through the disciplinary processes in the Public Service.

(b) See the reply to (a) above.

07 December 2015 - NW3972

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What are the details of the actions taken by his department to resolve the claims of Mr J G Abraham that were lodged with his department (details furnished) for (a) a long-service award and (b) a two-thirds contribution towards his medical aid contributions; (2) whether the specified claims have been resolved to the specified person’s satisfaction; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the reasons in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has not received a complaint from Mr. Abraham.

(2) The complaint was lodged with his previous employer, the Department of Social Development in KwaZulu-Natal. The DPSA will investigate and also respond once the Department of Social Development has furnished the DPSA with details of the complaint.

07 December 2015 - NW3973

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether any studies have been undertaken to determine whether there are any duplication of services in the Public Service; if not, why not; if so, (a) what were the findings of such studies and (b) how will the findings contribute to (i) advancements of services and (ii) savings in the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

The Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation in the Presidency is in a better position to respond to this parliamentary question, since it is responsible for “monitoring” in the public service. However, flowing from the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) Outcome 12, various projects were initiated, such as the development of Generic Organisational Structures. The Government’s Outcomes Based Programme identified key service delivery outcomes which necessitate collaboration across government Departments.

As part of the implementation of this Outcome 12 initiatives, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) is tasked with the responsibility to support departments with the development of sector specific generic functional structures, with a view to improve the quality of organisational structures in the public service. The aim is to ensure consistency and common understanding with regard to what constitutes departmental core functions in order to ensure alignment of organisational structures to the mandate and strategic objectives of such departments, as well as to achieve appropriate grouping of national and provincial functions to clearly define roles and responsibilities.

Furthermore, the DPSA conducts analysis of proposed organisational structures submitted to the Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA) for consultation in terms of the 2015 Directive on the Changes to the Organisational Structures by the Departments, which has been issued in terms of the Public Service Regulations 1/III/B.2.

The analysis of the proposed organisational structures also ensures alignment of organisational structures and functions to the strategic objectives and mandates of departments to ensure the elimination of the duplication of functions, the findings of the analysis are provided to relevant Executive Authority.

04 December 2015 - NW3614

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) What are the relevant details of each toll-free helpline and/or hotline for the public service and (b) how can the public access the specified details; (2) are there any plans to consolidate any of the specified hotlines; if not, why not; if so, (a) why and (b) who will be responsible for the specified initiative; (3) is anything hampering the specified initiative; if so, what are the further relevant details; (4) does his department track the number of queries that are referred to other helplines; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the percentage of queries that are referred to other helplines and (b) how many queries that were made through the specified hotlines were (i) referred to other helplines and (ii) marked as satisfactorily resolved despite only being referred to other hotlines in the 2014-15 financial year; (5) does his department have any plans in place to modernise the support services offered through hotlines, particularly by making use of mobile phones and/or smart phones; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Refer to attached Annexure 1 for details of the toll-free helpline and or hotline.

The following provinces indicated that they have call centres and/or hotlines; Free State, Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Western Cape. The other three (3) provinces (i.e. Eastern Cape, Northern Cape and North West) indicated that they do not have call centres or hotlines.

The following key service delivery oriented national government department indicated that they have call centres; Social Development, Labour, Human Settlements, Health, Home Affairs, Department of Public Service and Administration, Public Service Commission, Government Employees Medical Scheme, South African Police Services and the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation.

(b) The public can access the details in many ways including from the website of the relevant departments and government telephone directory

(2) Discussions on rationalising the hotlines are in progress. The final decisions will be communicated as soon as they are concluded. The Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation, the Department of Public Service and Administration, the Public Service Commission and the National Treasury are the initiators of such discussions.

(3) Nothing is hampering discussions towards rationalisation of the hotlines/ call centres.

(4) No.

(5) The Department of Public Service and administration has developed a national framework to guide complaints and compliments in the public service. It is currently supporting departments and provinces to align their complaints and compliments systems to the national framework.

04 December 2015 - NW3613

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)(a) When did the lease agreement for the previous office accommodation for the National Office of the Public Service Commission lapse, (b) has the process to find new accommodation for the Office of the Public Service Commission commenced and (c) when is it expected that the staff of the Office of the Public Service Commission will be moving to the new office accommodation; (2) is his department giving any (a) financial and/or (b) other support to the Office of the Public Service Commission in respect of the commission’s repeated relocation; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) why is the Office of the Public Service Commission currently making use of temporary office accommodation?

Reply:

(1) (a) The lease agreement for the previous office accommodation for the National Office of the Public Service Commission (PSC) (Commission House) expired on 31 January 2012.

(b) Yes, the initial request forwarded to the Department of Public Works (DPW) on 29 October 2010 was that the lease agreement should be extended for a period of five (5) years as the building was still suitable and met the requirements of the Public Service Commission (PSC). The PSC experienced challenges with the renewal process.

Seeing that there were delays with the renewal of the lease as well as the fact that the PSC had reached the optimal occupancy of the building, the PSC requested the DPW to procure alternative office accommodation in July 2012.

In order to allow the DPW to commence with the procurement process of the alternative accommodation, the PSC agreed that the lease agreement be renewed for a further period of eighteen (18) months to ensure that PSC relocate into the new alternative office building on 1 April 2014.

DPW then commenced with the procurement process and a building was identified as a suitable alternative accommodation for the PSC and a lease agreement was signed. However, during tenant installation process there were concerns raised by the PSC e.g. additional costs to be borne by the PSC relating to tenant installation. This resulted in the process being suspended by the DPW. Due to the dispute, the PSC did not take occupation of the building.

Furthermore, the PSC forwarded another request to DPW in June 2015, after receiving notice to vacate Commission House, to commence with sourcing the alternative accommodation. To date, the PSC has not received an update from DPW on this matter. The PSC has requested the Minister for Public Works to intervene.

(c) The lease agreement for the interim accommodation is for a period of 18 months, with an exit clause in the event a new building is procured before the expiry date of 18 months.

(2) (a) The PSC has not received any financial support from the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) as the request for additional funding was forwarded to National Treasury.

(b) The PSC has not received any other support from the DPSA as the PSC is interacting directly with DPW and National Treasury.

(3) The National Office of the PSC moved to ABSA Towers in July 2015, as an interim arrangement between PSC and DPW until such time that suitable permanent office accommodation has been sourced. The contract for the previous building (Commission House) was on a month to month basis and the landlord gave the PSC notice to vacate the premises as the landlord wanted to refurbish the building.

03 December 2015 - NW3977

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Since 1 April 1994, what are the details of all the groups and/or teams of departments and/or individuals that were formed as part of the fight against corruption in the public sector in which his department participated in terms of the (a) name given to each group, (b)(i) participating and (ii) lead departments in each case, (c) mandate of the specified group, (d) life-span of each group and (e) achievements of each group; (2) (a) what is his department’s estimation of the amount of money lost as a result of public sector corruption (i) for the (aa) 2010-11, (bb) 2011-12, (cc) 2012-13, (dd) 2013-14 and (ee) 2014-15 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2015 and (b) how is this loss measured; (3) whether the loss to corruption in the public sector is calculated for each national and provincial department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details for each specified financial year in this regard?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Public Service and Administration participates in the following groups and or teams of Departments namely; Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC), Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT) and National Anti-Corruption Forum (NACF)

ANTI-CORRUPTION INTER-MINISTERIAL COMMITTEE (ACIMC)

(a) Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC) is chaired by the Minister in the Presidency: Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation.

(b) (i) Minister of Justice and Correctional Services,

Minister of State Security,

Minister of Police,

Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

Minister for Public Service and Administration,

Minister of Finance,

Minister of Home Affairs,

Minister of Social Development and

Minister in the Presidency responsible for Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation.

(ii) Presidency: Lead Department,

Department of Public Service and Administration,

Department of Social Development,

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development,

Department of Home Affairs,

National Treasury,

State Security,

South African Police Service,

(c) Mandate of the Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC) is to coordinate and oversee the work of state organs aimed at fighting and combating the scourge of corruption in the public and private sectors.

(d) Chairperson of the Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee is in a better position to respond to this part of the parliamentary question.

(e) Achievements of the Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee include the following:

  • Coordinated approach for the implementing of government Agenda on the preventing and combating of corruption, as stipulated in the National Development Plan.
  • Coordinated reporting on identified international anti-corruption obligations.

ANTI-CORRUPTION TASK TEAM (ACTT)

(a) Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT) is at an operational level and works under the oversight of the Anti-Corruption Inter-Ministerial Committee (ACIMC), the ACTT has been established as the central body to implement government’s anti-corruption strategy.

(b) (i)(ii) Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI): Lead Department

National Prosecuting Authority

Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA)

Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

Special Investigating Unit (SIU)

National Intelligence Coordinating Committee (NICOC)

Financial Intelligence Centre

South African Revenue Service (SARS)

National Treasury

State Security Agency

Government Communications and Information Services

(c) Mandate of the Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT) is to fast-track high-priority and high-profile corruption cases. The ACTT works with government departments to strengthen governance systems, reduce risks and prevent corruption.

(d) The Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) as Lead is in a better position to respond to this part of the parliamentary question.

(e) Achievements Anti-Corruption Task Team (ACTT) includes the following:

  • Developed several inter-related programmes aimed at ensuring a structured, consolidated and coordinated governmental and societal approach to fight corruption
  • Leads departments and institutions to the periodic reporting to the Executive Committee of the ACTT on progress made in their areas of responsibility.

NATIONAL ANTI-CORRUPTION FORUM (NACF)

(a) National Anti-Corruption Forum (NACF) contribute to the establishment of a national consensus through the co-ordination of sectoral strategies against corruption

(b) (i)(ii) Public Service Commission (as Secretariat)

Business representative

Civil society presentative

Public Sector represented by the Department of Public Service and Administration

(c) Mandate of the National Anti-Corruption Forum (NACF) is to:

  • contribute towards the establishment of a national consensus through the co-ordination of sectoral strategies against corruption;
  • advise Government on national initiatives on the implementation of strategies to combat corruption;
  • share information and best practice on sectoral anti-corruption work; and
  • advise sectors on the improvement of sectoral anti-corruption strategies.

(d) There is no sunset clause on the National Anti-Corruption Forum.

(e) Achievements of the National Anti-Corruption Forum include the following:

The NACF held conferences of which resolutions were adopted leading to a anti-corruption programme. This Forum provides a platform for government, business and civil society organisations to work together in the prevention and combating of corruption.

(2) Corruption, given its definition by the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004 involves offering and acceptance of gratification whether for one’s benefit or for the benefit of another person. It is by its nature a crime committed behind closed doors by parties who will do their utmost not to be detected.

In most cases understanding of the public on what is corruption differs from what is prescribed in the Act, as a result, there has been a fair amount of speculation as to how much money is lost as a result of public sector corruption. The figures are sometimes based on the total value of irregular expenditure, fruitless expenditure, wasteful expenditure and unauthorized expenditure. This measure is inaccurate, as the definitions of such expenditure clearly show that they refer to something different to corruption.

(3) There is currently no measure applied in the public sector to estimate financial losses as a result of corruption. The value of such actions over the last few years would, therefore, be very difficult to calculate or estimate, at a national or provincial department level.

03 December 2015 - NW3918

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) the Public Service Commission carried out any analysis of the Public Service to determine any duplication of services or functions that took place during the period (i) 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2014 or (ii) 1 January 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, (aa) why not and (bb) when will such an analysis be carried out; if so, what (aaa) are the relevant details in each case, including the findings and (bbb) step(s) has he taken as a result of the findings?

Reply:

The (a) department and/or (b) the Public Service Commission have not conducted a systematic analysis of the Public Service to determine any duplication of services or functions. However, there is work that is being conducted in this area.

In terms of the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) obligations under Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) Outcome 12 various projects were initiated, such as the development of Generic Organisational Structures. The Government’s Outcomes Based Programme identified key service delivery outcomes which necessitate collaboration across government Departments.

As part of the implementation of the Outcome 12 initiatives, the Governance and Administration (G&A) Cluster tasked the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) to support departments with the development of sector specific generic functional structures, with a view to improve the quality of organisational structures in the public service. The aim is to ensure consistency and common understanding with regard to what constitutes departmental core and support functions, to ensure alignment of organisational structures to the mandate and strategic objectives of such departments, as well as to achieve appropriate grouping of national and provincial functions to clearly define roles and responsibility in order to do away with duplications and overlap of functions.

Furthermore, the DPSA conducts analysis of proposed organisational structures submitted to the Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA) for consultation in terms of the 2015 Directive on the Changes to the Organisational Structures by the Departments in terms of the Public Service Regulations 1/III/B.2, which provides that Executive Authorities (EAs) shall, based on the strategic plan of his/her department, determine, after consultation with the MPSA, the department’s organisational structure. The consultation requests submitted to the MPSA by the EAs are in relation to all changes to the organisational structure affecting all units or posts from salary level 9 to level 16 (PSA posts and equivalent grades in OSD posts) with regard to creation of units, posts and functional reorganisation within the key programmes.

The analysis of the proposed organisational structures also ensures alignment of organisational structures and functions to the strategic objectives and mandates of departments to ensures the elimination of functional duplications and overlaps. The findings of the analysis are provided to specific EAs to be addressed before the proposed organisational structures are approved for implementation.

02 December 2015 - NW3827

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What challenges has his department experienced with regard to the appointment of a service provider to process and adjudicate on applications for incapacity leave and ill-health retirement within the public service; (2) whether a service provider has now been appointed; if not, (a) why not and (b) when is it anticipated that an appointment will be made; if so, (i) who has been appointed, (ii) when was the appointment made and (iii) how was the service provider identified; (3) what is the backlog of applications for (a) incapacity leave and (b) ill-health retirement measured in (i) the number of applications in each case and (ii) years outstanding in respect of each national and provincial department forming part of the public service; (4) what (a) are the full details of the matter referred to as Mahaye v Department of Education, case number PSCB450-10/11, in his department’s Strategic Plan 2015/20, (b) is the progress in respect of the specified case in the Durban Labour Court and (c) are the implications of the matter on the management of the Policy on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement?

Reply:

(1) No challenges were experienced with regard to the appointment of the Panel of Accredited Health Risk Managers.

(2) Yes. Panel, not a single service provider, of Accredited Health Risk Managers has been appointed. The five Health Risk Managers on the current Panel of Accredited Health Risk Managers were appointed during 2012 to assume duty with effect from 1 January 2013, which was the date of commencement of the three year sick cycle that ends on 31 December 2015. Since the Department of Public Service and Administration was interdicted from commencing with the service by a disaffected Health Risk Manager, which was unsuccessful during the bid process, the service only resume on 1 November 2013

The following table depicts the names of the service providers and the implementation areas within which they are contracted:

Health Risk Manager

Implementation Area

Alexander Forbes Health

Cluster 1 of National Departments

Cluster 2 of National Departments

Provincial Administration of the Western Cape

Pro Active Health Solutions

Provincial Administration of Gauteng

Provincial Administration of Limpopo

Provincial Administration of the Northern Cape

Metropolitan Health Risk Management

Dormant member, but has been contracted to dispense of the stockpiled applications for the public service.

Soma Initiative

Cluster 3 of National Departments

Cluster 4 of National Departments

Provincial Administration of the Eastern Cape

Provincial Administration of Mpumalanga

Provincial Administration of North West

Thandile Health Risk Management

Provincial Administration of the Free State

Provincial Administration of Kwazulu-Natal

(3) The Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-health retirement and contracts entered into with the Health Risk Managers does not provide a definition of a concept such as a “backlog application”.

However, during the period of the Northern Gauteng High Court interdict from 31 December 2012 to 30 October 2013, at which the implementation of PILIR was suspended, incapacity leave and ill-health retirement applications begun to stockpile.

A summary of the stockpiled applications as recorded on the special codes created on PERSAL for this purpose are depicted in the table below. As indicated earlier, Metropolitan Health Risk Management has been contracted to assess the stockpiled applications and it is anticipated that this process will be completed by 31 March 2016.

Implementation Area

Department

Incapacity Leave

Ill-health Retirement

North West Provincial Administration

     
 

NORTH WEST OFFICE OF THE PREMIER

3

 
 

NORTH WEST PUBLIC WORKS ROADS AND TRANSPORT

167

6

 

NORTH WEST AGRICULTURE AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

65

 
 

NORTH WEST HEALTH

555

1

 

NORTH WEST SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

7

 
 

NORTH WEST SPORT ARTS AND CULTURE

18

 
 

NORTH WEST PUBLIC SAFETY

77

 
 

NORTH WEST EDUCATION

311

 
 

NORTH WEST LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND TRADITIONAL AFFAIR

28

 
 

Total

1231

7

Gauteng Provincial Administration

GAUTENG INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT

1

 
 

GAUTENG SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

49

1

 

GAUTENG COMMUNITY SAFETY

3

 
 

GAUTENG DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

699

2

 

GAUTENG DEPARTMENT OF FINANCE

7

 
 

GAUTENG EDUCATION

1295

 
 

DEEDS REGISTRATION TRADING ACCOUNT

14

 
 

Total

2068

3

National Departments Cluster 1

 

   
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

1219

1

 

Total

1219

1

National Departments Cluster 2

NAT DEPT JUSTICE CONSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT

1066

9

 

OFFICE OF THE PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION

3

 
 

INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS AND COOPERATION

65

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR

152

 
 

GOVERNMENT PENSIONS ADMINISTRATION AGENCY

47

 
 

PERFORMANCE MONITORING AND EVALUATION

2

 
 

NATIONAL DEPT OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

5

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

25

 
 

INDEPENDENT POLICE INVESTIGATIVE DIRECTORATE

1

 
 

PUBLIC ADMIN LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT ACADEMY

4

 
 

Total

1370

9

National Departments Cluster 3

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY

32

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF WATER AFFAIRS

34

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

5

 
 

STATISTICS SOUTH AFRICA

52

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

11

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT ARTS AND CULTURE

2

 
 

Total

136

0

National Departments Cluster 4

DEPARTMENT OF SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

9

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS

5

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF HOME AFFAIRS

309

 
 

NATIONAL DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS

23

3

 

DEPT GOVERNMENT COMMUNICATIONS AND INFO SYSTEMS

18

 
 

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

40

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

15

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

46

 
 

NATIONAL DEPT OF SPORT AND RECREATION SOUTH AFRICA

7

 
 

NATIONAL TREASURY

8

 
 

NATIONAL PROSECUTING AUTHORITY

230

 
 

THE PRESIDENCY

9

 
 

Total

719

3

Mpumalanga Provincial Administration

MPUMALANGA DEPT OF PUBLIC WORKS ROADS AND TRANSPOR

46

 
 

MPUMALANGA AGRICULTURE RURAL DEV AND LAND ADMIN

5

 
 

MPUMALANGA EDUCATION

190

 
 

MPUMALANGA HEALTH

276

3

 

Total

517

3

Limpopo Provincial Administration

LIMPOPO PROVINCE PROVINCIAL TREASURY

10

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE SPORT ARTS AND CULTURE

14

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE OFFICE OF THE PREMIER

11

 
 

LIMPOPO PROV ECONOMIC DEVELOP ENVIRONMENT TOURISM

24

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE HEALTH

9

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE DEPARTMENT OF ROADS AND TRANSPORT

136

2

 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE PUBLIC WORKS

99

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE EDUCATION

553

 
 

LIMPOPO PROVINCE AGRICULTURE

114

4

 

LIMPOPO SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

44

 
 

Total

810

6

Free State Provincial Administration

FREE STATE OFFICE OF THE PREMIER

9

 
 

FREE STATE ECONOMIC DEV TOURISM AND ENVIRON AFF

25

 
 

FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF PROVINCIAL TREASURY

17

 
 

FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

720

 
 

FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

729

 
 

FREE STATE DEPART OF POLICE ROADS AND TRANSPORT

10

2

 

FREE STATE SPORT ARTS CULTURE AND RECREATION

14

 
 

FREE STATE GOVERNMENT MOTOR TRANSPORT TRADING ACC

1

 
 

FREE STATE DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE

25

 
 

Total

1550

2

Kwazulu-Natal Provincial Administration

KZN PROV GOV AGRICULTURE ENVIRONMENT AFF RURAL DEV

110

 
 

KZN PROV GOV EDUCATION

939

 
 

KZN PROV GOV: HEALTH

3962

3

 

KZN PROV GOV ARTS AND CULTURE

25

 
 

KZN PROV GOV SPORT AND RECREATION

4

 
 

KZN PROV GOV HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

42

 
 

KZN PROV GOV: TRANSPORT

79

 
 

KZN PROV GOV SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

85

 
 

KZN PROV GOV PUBLIC WORKS

158

 
 

KZN PROV GOV PREMIER

9

 
 

KZN PROV GOV PROVINCIAL TREASURY

13

 
 

KZN PROV GOV ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND TOURISM

2

 
 

Total

5428

3

Western Cape Provincial Administration

WC Education

854

2

 

DEPT OF TRANSPORT AND PUBLIC WORKS

29

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

402

 
 

DEPARTMENT:LOCAL GOVERNMENT AND HOUSING

14

 
 

PROVINCIAL TREASURY: WESTERN CAPE

7

 
 

WESTERN CAPE SOCIAL SERVICES: HEAD OFFICE

51

 
 

DPT ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND DEVELOPMENT PLANNING

7

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF COMMUNITY SAFETY

52

 
 

Office of the Premier

16

 
 

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE: WESTERN CAPE

14

 
 

DEPARTMENT CULTURAL AFFAIRS AND SPORT

11

 

Northern Cape Provincial Administration

Total

1457

2

 

NORTHERN CAPE: FINANCE

3

1

 

NORTHERN CAPE: PREMIER

2

 
 

NORTHERN CAPE: Education

182

 
 

NORTHERN CAPE: DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORT

17

 
 

NORTHERN CAPE: SPORT ARTS AND CULTURE

8

 
 

NORTHERN CAPE: Health

19

3

 

NORTHERN CAPE: DEP OF SOCIAL SERVICES & POPULATION

17

 
 

NORTHERN CAPE TOURISM ENVIRONMENTAL AND CONSERVATI

2

 
 

Total

250

4

Eastern Cape Provincial Administration

OFFICE OF THE PREMIER

32

 
 

Health

16

 
 

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT

1

 
 

ROADS AND PUBLIC WORKS

71

 
 

EDUCATION

790

 
 

LOCAL GOVERNMENT TRADITIONAL AFFAIRS

22

 
 

RURAL DEV. AND AGRARIAN REFORM

29

 
 

ECONOMIC AFFAIRS

22

2

 

TRANSPORT

69

 
 

DEPT OF FINANCE AND PROV EXPENDITURE

2

 
 

SAFETY AND LIAISON

5

 
 

Total

1059

2

 

Grand Total

17814

45

Source: Cases recorded by departments on special register created on PERSAL for stockpiled applications.

(4) The matter of Mahaye v Department of Education (case number PSCB450-10/11) is sub judice since applications for review was brought before the Labour Appeal Court. Therefore details on the matter cannot be disclosed at this point.

02 December 2015 - NW3420

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department meets the Government’s 2% employment equity target for the employment of persons with disabilities that was set in 2005; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As at end of June 2015, the department had 11 employees with disabilities, out of a total of 437 staff complement, the representation of people with disabilities is standing at 2.52%. The demographics of this total is as follows:

 

 

 

 

 

Occupational Level

     

 

A

C

I

W

A

C

I

W

   

SMS

1

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

1

2

MMS

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

2

1

L2-10

 

1

1

 

1

1

 

 

1

3

2

Total

3

1

 

2

2

 

 

3

6

5

02 December 2015 - NW3565

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department engaged the services of a certain company (name and details furnished) (a) in the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2015; if not, why not, in each specified case; if so, in each specified case, (aa) why were the specified services engaged, (bb) when did the specified services (aaa) begin and (bbb) end and (cc) what was the (aaa) total amount and (bbb) breakdown of the specified amount spent by his department for the specified services?

Reply:

The department has not engaged the services of Foresight Advisory Services (Pty) Ltd during the (i) 2013-14 and (ii) 2014-15 financial years as well as since 01 April 2015.

02 December 2015 - NW3615

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Why did the Public Service Commission’s branch for Leadership and Management Practices choose the Western Cape for an audit to establish a benchmark for appropriate human resource and financial management skills for senior managers; (2) (a) did the specified audit include both provincial and national senior managers and (b) what were the findings of the specified audit; (3) have any benchmarks been developed from the findings of the specified audit; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) was the specified audit followed by similar studies in other provinces; if so, what were the findings; (5) were any conclusions and/or recommendations made based on the comparison made between the specified provinces; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Public Service Commission (PSC) on an annual basis identifies key areas to be investigated, monitored and evaluated both at national and provincial level. Due to financial and human resource capacity constraints, the scope of projects does not comprise the entire Public Service. Provincially Based Commissioners identify projects to be undertaken in each Province, which is the case with regard to the skills and competency audit of human resource and financial management of senior managers in the Western Cape.

(2) (a) The audit included senior managers (levels 13 and above) from the Western Cape Provincial Administration.

(b) The findings indicated that senior HR managers have improved their components in terms of competence, teamwork, morale and most notably increased efficiencies, compliance and service delivery through streamlined processes. The areas of development identified include the need to enhance on knowledge management within the HR function and strategic capability and leadership.

Finance managers were highly regarded in terms of attention to detail, continuous scoping and analysis of the policy environment, as well as the manner in which most help staff improve competence add value within their context. Developmental areas identified for this group include enhanced interpersonal competencies, especially those that allow them to thrive when managing larger and more diverse teams, contribution towards service delivery innovation and managing change.

(3) The instruments developed and methodology used as part of this project can be refined and adapted for use in departments and other provinces. The project was designed to highlight the required critical skills and knowledge from Human Resource Management and Financial Management portfolios in order to assure high performance.

(4) The audit was not conducted in any other province.

(5) See point 4 above.

30 November 2015 - NW3552

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department approved the revised organisational organogram of the Northern Cape Department of Education that was submitted to his department for approval; if so, when; if not, (2) did the head of department at the specified education department have the necessary authority based on the revised organogram to (a) appoint an official at a deputy director-general level in 2013 and only advertise the position in 2014 and (b) make several further appointments; (3) what is the current national benchmark for the appointment of a secretary general in a provincial education department?

Reply:

(1) The Minister for Public Service and Administration (MPSA) does not approve organisational structures of departments. The role of the MPSA during the consultation process is to monitor compliance by departments to the relevant organisational design prescripts. The relevant Executive Authorities (EAs) have the authority to approve the organisational structures of their departments after consultation with the MPSA.

The Northern Cape Member of the Executive Council (MEC) for Education, submitted a consultation request on the proposed organisational structure to the MPSA on 21 February 2013. The MPSA, on 24 April 2014, concurred with the proposed organizational structure and requested the Department to correctly grade all newly created posts using the Equate Job Evaluation System and to ensure that sufficient funds are available over the medium term prior to commencing with the recruitment process.

(2) The Head of Department derives the necessary authority to approve appointments in his or her department in terms of the approved Delegations from the relevant Executive Authority (EA) to the Head of Department. The Delegations are issued in terms of the Public Service Act and Regulations.

The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) supports departments in the development of their respective Delegations. However, for the period 2013 there was no obligation for departments to submit their approved set of Delegations to the DPSA, which maintain a register of departments’ Delegations.

(3) The Department of Public Service and Administration is not aware of the existence of the post of secretary general refer to in this question.

30 November 2015 - NW4158

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether any feasibility studies for (a) the Technical Assistance Unit for Ethics, Integrity and Discipline Management and (b) the Office of Standards and Compliance for Minimum Norms and Standards for Public Administration were carried out in compliance with Regulation A of Chapter 6 of the Public Service Regulations 2001 as amended; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in terms of the requirements instituted by Regulations A1, A2 and A3 of Chapter 6?

Reply:

(a)(b) Preparatory work towards the establishment of the Unit has started. Such work includes the appointment of an inter-disciplinary team, initiating a process to conduct a feasibility study which will include the development of a business model that provides for a service delivery model; funding arrangement for the Unit and the identification of relevant legislation that is likely to impact on the establishment of the Unit. All of this information will also inform the organisational form of the Unit.

30 November 2015 - NW4074

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether the review of the Ministerial Handbook has been completed; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will the review be completed; if so, (2) whether the Ministerial Handbook has been revised; if not, why not; if so, when will the revised handbook (a) be made public and (b) become applicable?

Reply:

(1) The process on the review of the Ministerial Handbook is at advance stages of completion. The Inter-Ministerial Committee established for this purpose met on 17 November 2015 to finalise its inputs. The matter will now be submitted to the Cabinet Secretariat for further processing to the Cabinet for approval.

(2) No. The review of the Ministerial Handbook is still a work in progress. The Revised Ministerial Handbook will be made public when approved by the Cabinet. The Cabinet will also decide with regard to when the Revised Ministerial Handbook will become applicable.

30 November 2015 - NW4073

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, with reference to his speech introducing the debate on the budget vote for the 2015-16 financial year for his department, the promised Technical Assistance Unit for Ethics, Integrity and Discipline Management (a) has been constituted and (b) is operational; if not, (i) why not and (ii) when the unit will be operational; if so, (aa) when was the unit launched, (bb) how is the unit constituted and (cc) what is the envisaged mandate of the unit; (2) whether, with reference to the specified speech, the promised Office of Standards and Compliance for Minimum Norms and Standards for Public Administration (a) has been constituted and (b) is operational; if not, (i) why not and (ii) when will the unit be operational; if so, (aa) when was the unit launched, (bb) how is the unit constituted and (cc) what is the envisaged mandate of the unit?

Reply:

(1) and (2) The establishment and functioning of the Regulatory Institutions such as Technical Assistance Unit for Ethics, Integrity and Discipline Management, forms part of the implementation of the Public Administration Management Act (PAMA), 2014 of which the Department of Public Service and Administration is currently putting mechanisms in place, such as the Regulations to operationalize.

Preparatory work towards the establishment of the Unit has started. Such work includes the appointment of an inter-disciplinary team, initiating a process to conduct a feasibility study which will include the development of a business model that provides for a service delivery model; funding arrangement for the Unit and the identification of relevant legislation that is likely to impact on the establishment of the Unit. All of this information will also inform the organisational form of the Unit. Once established, the Unit will perform amongst others, the following functions:

  • Provide technical assistance and support to institutions in all spheres of government regarding the management of ethics, integrity and disciplinary matters relating to misconduct in the public administration;
  • Develop the norms and standards on integrity, ethics, conduct and discipline in the public administration;
  • Build capacity within institutions to initiate and institute disciplinary proceedings into misconduct;
  • Strengthen government oversight of ethics, integrity and discipline, and where necessary, in cases where systemic weaknesses are identified, to intervene;
  • Promote and enhance good ethics and integrity within the public administration; and
  • Cooperate with other institutions and organs of state to fulfil its functions.

30 November 2015 - NW3976

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any of the entities reporting to him have done any studies to compare the salaries of employees in the Public Service to those employees in the private sector; if not, why not; if so, (i) when last was such a study conducted, (ii) what were the findings in each case and (iii) are the specified studies publicly available?

Reply:

(a) Every five (5) years, the Department for Public Service and Administration conducts a Personnel Expenditure Review (PER) study to determine the status of remuneration matters in the Public Service.

(i) The last study was conducted in 2012.

(ii) The study found that employees on the lower salary levels, i.e. salary levels 1 to 10 compared favorably to the market median. However, employees remunerated on salary levels 11 to 16 compared below the acceptable range of the market median.

(iii) The Personnel Expenditure Review was distributed to all participatory stakeholders.

30 November 2015 - NW3975

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department (a) has done any studies or (b) is in possession of any studies comparing the morale levels of staff in the Public Service with that of staff in the private sector; if not, why not, in each case; if so, (i) what are the findings of the specified studies and (ii) are the specified studies and subsequent findings publicly available; (2) whether the specified findings have identified any shortcomings in the Public Service and in comparison to the private sector; if so, what steps has he taken to improve the morale of staff in the Public Service since the findings of the specified studies were revealed?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has not done studies comparing morale levels of staff in the public service with that of staff in the private sector.

However, the department is working with the Offices of the premier in all provinces and national departments in institutionalising the periodic assessments of employee morale/satisfaction in their respective provinces and sectors. The focus of the department currently is largely on building internal capacity within government departments by providing technical support, requisite tools and instruments for effective assessment of employee morale/satisfaction.

(2) Falls away.

30 November 2015 - NW3919

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether persons appointed for fixed periods by government departments and paid stipends for their services, such as those who man the various victim support centres, are considered employees of the respective departments; if not, (a) why not, (b) what is the status of the specified employees, (c) for what periods are the specified employees generally employed and (d) how are the stipends calculated; if so, why are the specified employees not paid salaries; (2) whether he has any plans in place to improve the conditions of service of the specified employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(1) Where the employment is temporary in nature, the employee may be appointed under a special contract, on a casual basis or on a sessional basis.

In the Public Service, an employee is defined as a person contemplated in section 8 of the Public Service Act, 1994 (as amended). In terms of section 8(1) of the said Act, the Public Service shall consist of persons who are employed

(a) in posts on the establishment of departments; and

(b) additional to the establishment of departments.

Executive Authority (EA), in terms of section 9 of the Public Service Act, 1994, is vested with the powers to appoint any person in his or her Department in accordance with the Act and in such a manner and on such conditions as may be prescribed. In terms of the provisions of the Public Service Regulations 2001, an Executive Authority may appoint employees on a permanent or temporary basis, either full time or part time.

(a), (b) and (c) Persons appointed in terms of the aforesaid provisions of the Public Service Act, 1994 are employees irrespective of how their remuneration is structured.

It should be noted that the Public Service Act, 1994 is not the only legislative provision whereby departments can obtain the services of persons. In certain cases, other legislation also mandates departments to utilise/employ persons for specific needs, as may be prescribed. Whether persons not employed in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 are employees or not will have to be derived from either the provisions of the specific legislation that mandates their employment or if no such specific legislation exists, from section 200A of the Labour Relations Act, 1995. (The latter contains general criteria whereby persons are to be deemed employees). Therefore individual departments will be best placed to answer the question pertaining to the utilisation/employment of a specific category of persons/employees in terms of the context outlined in this question.

(d) In terms of the provisions of the Public Service Regulations, an Executive Authority have the powers to determine the grade of a post and as far as possible the salary of a part-time, sessional or temporary employee should be set proportional to the salary of an equally graded full-time equivalent. Where the remuneration is determined on a basis other than job evaluation, the relevant department will be best placed to advise on the basis used to calculate the stipend.

(2) The Public Service Act, 1994, Chapter 2, section 3(5)(a) provides for departments to approach the Minister for a determination regarding the conditions of service of employees generally or categories of employees subject to the Labour Relations Act, 1995 and Collective Agreements.

30 November 2015 - NW3898

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Has the National School of Government developed any training programmes that are unique to the needs of the public service in the (a) 2013-14 and (b) 2014-15 financial years; if not, why not; if so, (i) what are the relevant details of the specified training programmes and (ii) how many public servants have successfully completed the specified training programmes?

Reply:

Yes. The National School of Government has developed and reviewed 27 training programmes that are unique to the needs of the public service.

(i) Relevant details of the specified training programmes are as follows:

(a) 2013-14

  • Finance Management and Budgeting,
  • Mentoring Support for Supervisors
  • Support for the Transfer of Learning
  • Re-orientation Programme, and
  • Citizen Centred Service Delivery
  • Review of CIP Module 4

(b) 2014-15

  • Anti-corruption L4
  • Anti-corruption L5
  • Breaking Barriers to Entry into Public Service
  • Compulsory Induction Programme for Levels 13-14
  • Developing HRD Implementation Plans for the Public Service
  • Disability management for Public Service
  • Diversity Management
  • Ethics
  • Excellent Customer Care for Front Line Staff
  • Executive Development Programme
  • Gender Mainstreaming
  • Grievance and Disciplinary Action Procedures
  • Human Resource Monitoring and Evaluation
  • Induction to Human Resource Management in the Public Service
  • Investigating and presiding skills
  • Lead Facilitator Development Programme for Citizen Centred Service Delivery
  • Lead Facilitator Development Programme for Reorientation
  • PAJA
  • Recruitment and Selection in the Public Service Strategic HR Planning for the Achievement of Organisational Results.
  • SCOA
  • Training of Trainers Programme for the Public Service
  • Use of Human Resource Management Information

ii) Number of public servants who have successfully completed the specified training programmes is 30358 in the financial year 2013/14, whilst 38307 public servants have completed their specified training programmes in the financial year 2014/15.

30 November 2015 - NW3897

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Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1) When will the backlog of new appointees in the Public Service who have not been able to successfully complete the compulsory induction programme be eliminated; (2) How will his department make up for the failure to successfully implement the compulsory induction programme, which has affected public servants’ careers?

Reply:

  1. The National School of Government anticipates that the backlog will be eliminated in 2018.
  2. The National School of Government, in cooperation with the Department of Public Service and Administration and the National Treasury, ensured removal of PERSAL restriction to allow PERSAL controllers to confirm public servants’ probation should they successfully meet with their workplace requirements. New recruits who were appointed in July 2012 receive confirmation of their pay progression from 01 April 2016. Officials are therefore not negatively affected in terms of their careers. Professional development in line with personal development and work place skills plans of departments are actioned as normal.

30 November 2015 - NW3893

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, in relation to the Agreement on the Review and Impact of Existing Outsourcing and Agentisation Practices within the Public Service and Conducting an Independent Impact Study on the Principles of Decent Work signed on 10 February 2015, each (a) review set out in paragraph 5 of the specified agreement and (b) study set out in paragraph 6 of the specified agreement have been completed; if not, why has there been a delay in each case; if so, what are the results of the specified (i) reviews and (ii) studies; (2) whether the specified (a) reviews and (b) studies will be made available to the public; if not, why not; if so, when?

Reply:

(1) (a)(b) No. The Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council (PSCBC) has therefore appointed a service provider to conduct the review on outsourcing and agentisation. The International Labour Organisation has agreed to assist the PSCBC with the development of the decent work agenda. Both proposals will be ready for engagement between parties at the PSCBC during 2016.

(2) The PSCBC parties will decide on whether the outcomes of the reviews should be made public or not

30 November 2015 - NW3892

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) was the budget for the compensation of employees of each (i) national department, (ii) entity of any national department, (iii) organ of state and (iv) department of each of the provincial governments in the (aa) 2012-13, (bb) 2013-14 and (cc) 2014-15 financial years and (b) is the budget in each specified case for the 2015-16 financial year?

Reply:

(a)(b) The responsibility of budget for the compensation of employees of national departments, entities of national departments, organs of state and provincial departments rests with the National Treasury.

30 November 2015 - NW3890

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) are the details of each of the investigations that the Public Service Commission will complete in the 2015-16 financial year and (b) investigations are planned for the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what process does the specified commission undertake to develop its schedule of investigations, in alignment with its constitutional mandate; (3) what steps will the specified commission take to ensure that negative findings arising from any of its investigations are appropriately addressed?

Reply:

(1)(a) The PSC’s workplan for the 2015-16 financial year contains the following own accord investigations:

  • Assess the effective, efficient and economic functioning of the Office of the State Attorney
  • Assess the effective, efficient and economic functioning of the Office of the Chief State Law Advisor
  • Skills and competency audit of human resource and financial management of senior managers in the Western Cape
  • An assessment of the effects of organisational restructuring on service delivery in Gauteng
  • An assessment of the management of service terminations and pension payouts in the Public Service
  • Factsheet on irregular appointments in the Public Service
  • Audit on the recruitment and selection processes in the Gauteng Department of Finance
  • An assessment of the handling of disciplinary cases in the Public Service
  • Report on the nature and extent of the protection of whistleblowers and investigators in the Public Service
  • Awarding of higher salaries on appointment and counteroffers in the National Departments of Transport and Labour

The completion date of “investigations conducted on receipt of any complaint lodged with the PSC”, is dependent on a number of factors including the time when the complaint is lodged, the number of allegations contained therein and the complexity of the investigations. The PSC aims to finalize investigations of the complaints lodged with it within ninety (90) days after the receipt of all necessary documentation.

(1)(b) Investigations to be conducted in the ensuing year are determined annually at the Public Service Commission Strategic Planning Session and compilation of a list of these investigations is still a work in progress.

(2) The process to develop a schedule of investigations is informed, amongst others by the Public Service Commission’s (i) legal mandate, (ii) vision and mission, (iii) strategic objectives, and include compilation of Workplans from the trends on the nature of complaints received, previous research conducted and an external environmental scan, this Workplan is presented annually at the Public Commission Strategic Session for consideration and adoption. Furthermore, the Public Service Commission Annual Performance Plan are tabled in Parliament annually

(3) Upon finalization of investigation, a provisional report with findings is forwarded to the relevant executive authority for comment, and should comments be provided, these comments are considered by the Public Service Commission in the issuance of a final report with recommendations. The executive authority is requested to indicate whether it accepts the Public Service Commission recommendations or not. In instances where the recommendations are not accepted, the executive authority should indicate reasons for not accepting the recommendations. The Public Service Commission’s report and findings are submitted to the National Assembly or to Provincial Legislature in line with section 196(6) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996.

30 November 2015 - NW3828

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Lovemore, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What was the number of employees for each national and provincial department in the public service (a) as at the most recent date of capture on the Vulindlela website and (b) for each similar date in the (i) 2011-12, (ii) 2012-13, (iii) 2013-14 and (iv)2014-15 financial years?

Reply:

The number of employees for each national and provincial department in the Public Service, as at the end of each of the requested financial years (March), is provided in the table below. Please note that abnormal and periodical appointments are excluded. Where departments appear to be duplicated it is due to the restructuring of departments over the reporting period (2011/12 to 2014/15). Data was obtained from PERSAL as it is the source system for data published on Vulindlela. No data is directly captured on the Vulindlela website.

NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES BY DEPARTMENT
MARCH 2011 TO MARCH 2015

National/Provincial Department

March

2011

March

2012

March

2013

March

2014

March

2015

Eastern Cape

Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism

611

627

605

600

578

 

Education

86 181

82 816

80 154

78 791

74 279

 

Health

40 818

41 186

39 577

38 655

39 470

 

Human Settlements

406

460

544

556

616

 

Local Government and Traditional Affairs

1 584

1 595

1 608

1 637

1 537

 

Office of the Premier

415

402

386

369

402

 

Provincial Planning and ,Treasury

512

545

565

540

480

 

Roads and Public works

3 433

3 601

3 715

3 699

4 163

 

Rural Development and Agrarian Reform

3 404

3 288

3 172

3 051

2 959

 

Safety and Liaison

117

120

121

128

129

 

Social Development and Special Programmes

3 443

4 101

3 929

4 415

4 690

 

Sport, Recreation, Arts and Culture

1 198

1 161

1 144

1 205

1 229

 

Transport

1 631

1 668

1 694

1 602

1 602

 

Total

143 753

141 570

137 214

135 248

132 134

Free State

Agriculture

1 090

1 187

1 189

1 194

1 185

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

651

437

378

374

393

 

Economic Development, Tourism and

Environmental Affairs

595

650

680

702

709

 

Education

31 113

31 885

32 013

31 368

30 382

 

Health

16 841

18 915

19 060

19 008

18 388

 

Human Settlements

121

126

206

287

308

 

Office of the Premier

345

348

616

620

612

 

Police, Roads and Transport

2 325

2 388

2 289

2 306

2 552

 

Provincial Treasury

390

402

427

373

398

 

Public Works

2 013

2 432

2 652

2 813

2 153

 

Rural Development

0

0

53

0

0

 

Social Development

1 602

2 003

2 015

2 007

1 999

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

664

713

694

729

790

 

Total

57 750

61 486

62 272

61 781

59 869

National/Provincial Department

March

2011

March

2012

March

2013

March

2014

March

2015

Gauteng

Agriculture and Rural Development

841

803

850

854

901

 

Community Safety

934

935

968

1 010

1 096

 

Economic Development

353

338

373

357

439

 

Education

79 554

82 134

82 318

83 794

84 353

 

Finance

1 734

1 673

1 197

1 147

1 053

 

Health

62 492

65 078

61 406

62 992

62 894

 

Housing

0

0

0

849

882

 

Infrastructure Development

1 444

1 809

1 987

1 947

1 930

 

Local Government and Traditional Affairs

1 666

1 586

1 582

638

675

 

Office of the Premier

232

235

233

243

271

 

Provincial Treasury

0

0

417

489

500

 

Roads and Transport

2 038

1 908

1 838

1 881

1 999

 

Social Development

0

0

3 469

3 541

4 190

 

Sport, Arts, Culture and Recreation

383

392

391

464

473

 

Total

151 671

156 891

157 029

160 206

161 656

Kwazulu- Natal

Agriculture, Environmental Affairs and Rural Development

3 384

3 825

3 729

3 754

2 900

 

Arts and Culture

422

457

463

526

565

 

Community Safety and Liaison

105

105

106

141

165

 

Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

1 216

1 331

1 461

1 658

1 633

 

Economic Development and Tourism

298

300

349

432

667

 

Education

106 689

108 058

106 732

108 024

106 715

 

Finance

280

359

462

491

517

 

Health

71 001

78 543

82 436

72 731

71 865

 

Human Settlements

796

733

743

789

763

 

Office of the Premier

319

366

430

447

461

 

Public Works

2 085

2 070

2 086

2 038

1 888

 

Social Development

2 880

3 425

6 005

4 357

3 862

 

Sport and Recreation

172

165

207

233

218

 

The Royal Household

141

143

138

120

108

 

Transport

4 289

4 153

4 022

3 873

4 015

 

Total

194 077

204 033

209 369

199 614

196 342

National/Provincial Department

March

2011

March

2012

March

2013

March

2014

March

2015

Limpopo

Agriculture

4 015

3 946

3 785

3 470

3 281

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs

1 464

2 343

2 286

2 211

2 197

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

1 591

1 595

1 443

1 390

1 390

 

Education

64 425

63 911

62 901

62 768

62 153

 

Health

36 472

38 112

37 094

36 650

37 203

 

Office of the Premier

626

508

486

456

469

 

Provincial Treasury

454

461

441

479

449

 

Public Works

3 403

3 305

2 618

2 764

4 237

 

Roads and Transport

4 560

4 316

4 061

4 101

2 403

 

Safety, Security and Liaison

112

107

104

96

108

 

Social Development

2 658

3 250

3 152

2 962

3 351

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

416

489

457

396

389

 

Total

120 196

122 343

118 828

117 743

117 630

Mpumalanga

Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Administration

1 621

1 718

1 731

1 767

1 602

 

Co-operative Governance and Traditional Affairs

775

789

730

850

867

 

Community Safety, Security and Liaison

176

1 257

1 292

1 371

1 320

 

Culture, Sport and Recreation

312

311

324

482

501

 

Economic Development, Environment and Tourism

490

459

446

457

267

 

Finance

329

332

340

342

326

 

Health

18 026

18 485

18 269

19 225

19 446

 

Human Settlements

351

362

371

376

387

 

Office of the Premier

277

263

254

272

262

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

5 307

4 109

3 900

3 787

3 643

 

Social Development

1 862

1 879

1 819

1 903

2 069

 

Total

29 526

29 964

29 476

30 832

30 690

National/Provincial Department

March

2011

March

2012

March

2013

March

2014

March

2015

National Departments

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

6 356

6 367

6 445

6 424

6 205

 

Arts and Culture

455

436

448

484

447

 

Basic Education

639

721

746

814

837

 

Civilian Secretariat for the Police Service

0

0

0

0

130

 

Communications

305

299

290

332

301

 

Cooperative Governance

450

486

566

558

475

 

Correctional Services

40 170

41 166

42 216

41 913

40 691

 

Defence

78 663

78 674

78 202

78 649

78 091

 

Economic Development

68

106

118

126

126

 

Energy

485

560

559

547

581

 

Environmental Affairs

941

1 439

1 571

1 762

1 941

 

Government

Communication and Information System

471

493

479

455

472

 

Health

1 276

1 450

1 913

1 893

2 071

 

Higher Education and Training

858

916

1 069

1 234

6 673

 

Home Affairs

9 782

9 655

9 786

10 248

10 251

 

Human Settlements

693

684

663

710

,

637

 

Independent Police Investigative Directorate

270

277

303

308

322

 

International Relations and Cooperation

2 383

2 465

2 439

2 364

2 323

 

Justice and Constitutional Development

22 543

23 248

23 726

23 960

24 851

 

Labour

7 408

7 623

7 708

7 746

8 149

 

Military Veterans

0

0

0

136

228

 

Mineral Resources

1 081

1 108

1 122

1 165

1 115

 

National School of Government

190

184

199

205

204

 

National Treasury

2 122

2 192

2 246

2 300

2 380

 

Office of the Public Service Commission

225

225

261

272

317

 

Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation

0

139

184

207

261

 

Police

194 293

199 610

198 175

195 182

194 269

 

Public Enterprises

158

168

185

215

225

 

Public Service and Administration

448

420

457

485

461

 

Public Works

5 010

5 851

5 624

5 714

5 783

 

Rural Development and Land Reform

4 565

4 855

4 837

5 596

5 871

 

Science and Technology

421

425

459

477

500

 

Social Development

714

757

748

802

917

National/Provincial Department

March

2011

March

2012

March

2013

March

2014

March

2015

 

Sport and Recreation South Africa

209

189

172

164

174

 

Statistics South Africa

5 429

4 797

3 356

3 577

3 969

 

The Presidency

708

635

677

678

666

 

Tourism

299

401

465

505

530

 

Trade and Industry

1 776

1 881

1 950

1 568

1 563

 

Traditional Affairs

0

0

0

0

79

 

Transport

543

530

592

623

691

 

Water and Sanitation

8 047

7 100

7 209

7 348

7 475

 

Women

44

126

126

137

113

 

Total

400 498

408 658

408 291

407 883

413 365

North West

Agriculture and Rural Development

1 556

1 569

1 525

1 468

1 641

 

Economic Development, Environment and Conservation

192

361

355

408

216

 

Education and Training

30 425

30 242

30 329

30 703

29 473

 

Finance

506

512

472

478

541

 

Health

17 290

17 613

18 256

19 305

18 955

 

Human Settlements

310

346

344

360

0

 

Local Government and Traditional Affairs

732

740

800

823

735

 

Office of the Premier

321

290

313

397

716

 

Public Works, Roads and Transport

3 551

3 469

3 536

3 521

3 089

 

Public safety and liaison

844

859

1 006

1 117

1 442

 

Social development, Woman, Children and Persons with Disabilities

1 803

1 983

2 030

2 099

2 183

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

590

649

682

701

671

 

Tourism

0

0

0

0

114

 

Total

58 120

58 633

59 648

61 380

59 776

National/Provincial Department

 

March

2011

 

March

2012

 

March

2013

 

March

2014

 

March

2015

Northern Cape

Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

 

547

   

556

 

575

 

570

 

609

 

Co-operative Governance, Human Settlement and Traditional Affairs

 

652

   

651

 

653

 

662

 

640

 

Economic Development and Tourism

 

167

   

167

 

166

 

178

 

177

 

Education

 

12 023

 

11

892

 

11 690

 

12 457

 

12 229

 

Environment and Nature Conservation

 

400

   

207

 

218

 

225

 

242

 

Health

 

6 176

 

6

372

 

6 474

 

6 713

 

6 781

 

Office of the Premier

 

228

   

225

 

231

 

247

 

250

 

Provincial Treasury

 

238

   

241

 

287

 

278

 

304

 

Roads and Public Works

 

575

   

780

 

827

 

845

 

827

 

Social Development

 

933

   

943

 

942

 

929

 

970

 

Sport, Arts and Culture

 

422

   

504

 

364

 

401

 

402

 

Transport, Safety and Liaison

 

341

   

320

 

347

 

351

 

347

 

Total

 

22 702

 

22

858

 

22 774

 

23 856

 

23 778

Western Cape

Agriculture

 

969

   

953

 

941

 

961

 

973 ,

 

Community Safety

 

830

   

871

 

898

 

947

 

343

 

Cultural Affairs and Sport

 

608

   

604

 

612

 

648

 

635

 

Economic Development and Tourism

 

198

   

229

 

236

 

252

 

242

 

Education

 

40 514

 

40

402

 

40 114

 

40 672

 

42 108

 

Environmental Affairs and Development Planning

 

313

   

337

 

359

 

390

 

380

 

Health

 

29 306

 

30

446

 

31 092

 

31 654

 

31 882

 

Human Settlements

 

392

   

432

 

434

 

482

 

461

 

Local Government

 

306

   

345

 

376

 

376

 

394

 

Premier

 

913

 

1

052

 

1 065

 

1 087

 

1 157

 

Provincial Treasury

 

248

   

240

 

279

 

321

 

317

 

Social Development

 

1 750

 

1

762

 

1 822

 

2 129

 

2 098

 

Transport and Public Works

 

1 730

 

1

676

 

1 887

 

1 913

 

2 472

 

Total

 

78 077

 

79

349

 

80 115

 

81 832

 

83 462

Total

1

256 370

1

285

785

1

285 016

1

280 375

1

278 702

* Please note that the new departments that were created during the National Macro Organisation of the State (NMOS) process are not reflected here as these only came onto effect after March 2015.

Excluding Abnormal and Periodical appointments

Where departments are duplicated it is due to the restructuring of departments over the reporting period

30 November 2015 - NW3757

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether, in view of the enormous publicity given in print and on television regarding the 36 000 ghost workers on the payroll of North West, he has ascertained (a) how such an army of ghost workers remained undetected for years and (b) the resultant cost to the taxpayer; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether ghost workers are also drawing salaries and benefits in (a) other (i) provincial and (ii) national departments and (b) municipalities; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) why the Government has failed to (a) undertake annual audits of its employees and (b) run unannounced checks to verify figures; (4) what action has been taken against managers and recipients who have defrauded the state; (5) what measures the Government has in place to run departments efficiently, ethically and economically?

Reply:

  1. The Department of Public Service and Administration is aware of the pronouncements made in the media in relation to 36 000 ghost workers in the North West province. This matter is currently under investigation.
  2. The management and employment of public servants at national and provincial level is managed through a decentralized human resource management framework where Heads of Department and Executive Authorities are responsible for the employment and management of their own employees. Currently Municipal workers do not fall within the ambit of the Public Service’s human resource management framework. Departments’ employee numbers and payroll fall under the purview of the respective Executive Authorities and are audited by the Auditor-General.
  3. Mechanisms for annual audit and verification on the number of government employees are in place. A process of strengthening these mechanisms to mitigate the challenges of ghost employees, amongst others is currently underway, these process include the cleaning up of the PERSAL System.
  4. Fraud and non-compliance to the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 and the Treasury Regulations and other legal prescripts are dealt with through the disciplinary processes.
  5. The Public Finance Management Act, and the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) Outcome 12 amongst others, outlines government’s endeavors to ensure that departments are run efficiently, effectively and economically. Furthermore, government has introduced the National School of Government, which provide training programme to the public servant in order to ensure that these public servants run government departments efficiently, effectively and economically.

30 November 2015 - NW3560

Profile picture: Maynier, Mr D

Maynier, Mr D to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the cost containment measures outlined in National Treasury Instruction 01 of 2013/2014 have been included as a prescription in the revised Ministerial Handbook; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Treasury Instruction paragraph 1.2 states that, “cost containment measures related to Executive Authorities will be prescribed in the Revised Ministerial Handbook. The process to review the Ministerial Handbook is at advance stages of completion. The Inter-Ministerial Committee established for this purpose met on 17 November 2015 to finalise its inputs. The matter will now be submitted to the Cabinet Secretariat for further processing to the Cabinet for approval

21 September 2015 - NW3388

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

With reference to his reply to question 1947 on 18 June 2015, has there been punitive measures taken against managers in the Public Service who have allowed long periods of incapacity leave to public servants under their management not due to such public servants; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

An employee’s applications for long periods of incapacity leave must in terms of the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave be dealt with in keeping with defined time frames. The Head of Department has the authority to consider such an application taking into account all available information such as the employee’s application, additional medical information, including the advice of the Health Risk Manager. Managers are in terms of their core management responsibilities as defined in their core management criteria (CMC’s), responsible for the management of their staff. Therefore, if a manager fails to properly manage long periods of incapacity leave, the relevant Executive Authority and/or Head of Department can discipline that particular manager for not executing his/her responsibilities. Therefore relevant Heads Department (HODs) are in a better position to indicate the measures taken in this regard.


END

21 September 2015 - NW3389

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What has he done to expedite the filling of the post of the chairperson for the Public Service Commission that has been vacant for 10 months?

Reply:

The Public Service Commission (PSC) is an independent constitutional body established in terms of Section 196 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996. It comprises 14 Commissioners appointed by the President of which five (5) are approved by the National Assembly and nine (9) are nominated by each of the Premiers of the respective province.

Section 4(1) and (2) of the Public Service Commission Act, 1997 states that:

“(1) Whenever the President is required to appoint a commissioner who has been approved by the National Assembly, the President shall address a request in writing to the Speaker of the National Assembly that a fit and proper person contemplated in section 196(10) of the Constitution be approved of as soon as may be practicable by the National Assembly in accordance with section 196(8)(a) of the said Act”, and

“(2) Whenever the President is required to appoint a commissioner who has been nominated by the Premier of a province, the President shall address a request in writing to the premier of that province that a fit and proper person contemplated in section 196(10) of the Constitution be nominated as soon as may be practicable by that Premier in accordance with section 196(8)(b)”,

In terms of Section 5(1) of the Public Service Commission Act, 1997, “the President shall designate one commissioner as chairperson and another as deputy chairperson of the Commission”.

Therefore, the chairperson of the Public Service Commission is not a direct appointment as the vacancy does not get advertised but the chairperson is drawn from amongst Commissioners within the employ of the Public Service Commission. It is the prerogative of the President to designate one Commissioner as the chairperson and another as a deputy chairperson of the Public Service Commission.

The President is waiting for the filling of the vacant post at national level of which the National Assembly of Parliament is in a process of identifying the candidate for nomination and recommendation to fill this vacant post.


END

21 September 2015 - NW3390

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister for Public Service and Administration

(1) On what dates did he formally consult with the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs in respect of the local government remuneration framework as published in April 2015; (2) what (a) did he communicate to the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, (b) did the specified Minister communicate to him and (c) were the conclusions of the consultation; (3) what is his (a) position and (b) the respective reasons thereof regarding the draft salary bands for (i) municipal managers and (ii) senior managers in local government?

Reply:

1. The Minister for Public Service and Administration formally consulted with the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, in a letter dated 23 June 2015, in respect of the local government remuneration framework as published in April 2015.

​2. (a) Minister communicated the following:

  • agreement with the proposed extension of the number of categories for the classification of municipalities from 8 to 10 for purposes of the remuneration of Senior Managers;
  • noted that the proposed annual (2015) increase of the minimum and maximum remuneration for the revised municipal categories ranges between 12% and 18.7% for Municipal Managers and 12.7% and 60.9% for Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers; and
  • recommended that the 2015 increases should be based on National Treasury’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) forecast of 4.8% for the 2015/16 financial year.

(b) and (c) There was no further official communication received from the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs after the afore-mentioned letter dated 23 June 2015.

3.  (a)(b) That the 2015 salary increases for Municipal Managers and Managers directly accountable to Municipal Managers should be based on National Treasury’s Consumer Price Index (CPI) forecast of 4.8% for the 2015/16 financial year.



END

 

 

21 September 2015 - NW3253

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)For each of the four vehicles on his department’s asset register, what (a) was (i) the cost price and (ii) date of acquisition and (b) is (i) the odometer reading, (ii) model number and (iii) description of each of the specified vehicles; (2) have any of the specified vehicles been fitted with optional equipment which does not come standard with the basic models available from the factory; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) was the cost of these options; (3) in which centre or city is each of the specified vehicles normally in use?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b)

(a)(i)(ii)

(a)(i) – Cost Price

  • YZF721GP - R678 248.85
  • BF66SVGP - R995 512.00
  • BJ01DPGP - R948 612.00
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - R319 228.41

(ii) – Acquisition Date

  • YZF721GP – 17 February 2010
  • BF66SVGP – 17 March 2011
  • BJ01DPGP – 14 June 2011
  • 2RD85CA4574599 – 9 March 2012

(b)(i)(ii)(iii)

(b)(i) – Odometer Reading

  • YZF721GP – 98937 km’s
  • BF66SVGP – 84664 km’s
  • BJ01DPGP – 79172 km’s
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - 7045 km’s

(ii) – Model Number

  • YZF721GP – E350 CDI
  • BF66SVGP – S350
  • BJ01DPGP – S350
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - KB300 LX

(iii) – Vehicle Description

  • YZF721GP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • BF66SVGP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • BJ01DPGP – Mercedes Benz four door sedan
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - Isuzu double cab LDV

(2) Yes

(a)(i) – Optional Equipment Fitted are:

  • YZF721GP – Center Console Rear View Entertainment
  • BF66SVGP – None
  • BJ01DPGP – None
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - None

(ii) – Optional Equipment Fitted

  • YZF721GP – R11 398.86

(3) Yes. The cities are Pretoria and Cape Town:

  • YZF721GP – Pretoria
  • BF66SVGP – Pretoria
  • BJ01DPGP – Cape Town
  • 2RD85CA4574599 - Pretoria. Vehicle has been disposed.





    END

21 September 2015 - NW3269

Profile picture: Mente, Ms NV

Mente, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) total amount did his department spend on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the 2014-15 financial year and (b) is the total number of trips that were undertaken; (2) what is the total amount that his department spent on (a) accommodation and (b) car rental in Cape Town for employees attending Parliament business in the specified financial year?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total amount spent on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliamentary businesses in the 2014-15 financial year is R983 417.69.

(b) Total number of trips on air travel between Gauteng and Cape Town for employees attending Parliamentary businesses in the 2014-15 financial year is one hundred and fifty (150)

(2) (a) The total amount spent on accommodation for employees attending Parliamentary businesses for the 2014-15 financial year is R362 555.05

(b) The total amount spent on car rental for employees attending Parliamentary businesses for the 2014-15 financial year is R111 693.96



END

21 September 2015 - NW3386

Profile picture: Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP

Van der Westhuizen, Mr AP to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(a) What has his department done to address backlogs in respect of the compulsory induction programme for civil servants and (b) to what extent have these backlogs been addressed?

Reply:

(a)(b) The National School of Government (NSG) is taking the following steps to address the backlog:

1.  Entering into Service Level Agreements (SLAs) with Provincial Academies and other State Colleges to include the CIP in their course offerings so that they could help to eliminate the backlog within the two years as projected.
 
2.  Discussion with the Department of Public Service and Administration around the utilisation of public servants for public service training and a proposed approach is at an advance stage for submission for approval.

​3.  Continues support to fully equipped trainers, for example, the number of departmental trainers that were trained for the delivery of the compulsory induction programme (CIP) has increased from 775 in 2014/15 to 868, of which 848 trainers have been screened to date. Of this number, 483 are “ready to train” and will be supported to be fully equipped as trainers; and 172 departmental trainers have been actively delivering on the CIP.

The backlog remains a challenge. There is a turnaround strategy in place to build dedicated capacity within the National School of Government for compulsory induction programme (CIP) training and administration. This capacity, together with department-based trainers, will assist in providing the institutional support for the delivery of high volume training in the public service.



END 

17 September 2015 - NW1416

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Does his department have a Regulatory Burden Reduction strategy in place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the strategy?

Reply:

No. The Department of Public Service and Administration (the DPSA) does not have a Regulatory Burden Reduction Strategy. The Minister for Public Service and Administration, issues Regulations that are required and necessary in terms of the Public Service Act, 1994 and no Regulations have been identified as burdensome to date.