Questions and Replies

09 April 2019 - NW287

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

(a)(i)&(b)The Department of Small Business Development (DSBD)

(a)(i) The DSBD did not advertise any tenders for the 2018/2019 and therefore no briefing sessions were held

(b) The Department did not have any briefing session and it must be noted that briefing session can no longer be made compulsory but rather suppliers would be encouraged to attend the briefing session.

(a)(ii)&(b) The Small Enterprise Development Agency (Seda)

No

Tender Number

Description

Compulsory / Non-compulsory

1.

RFP/T 01-2018/19

Invitation to tender for provision of Security Services at Seda National Office for eighteen (18) months period.

Compulsory

2.

RFP/T 06-2018/19

Invitation to tender for Rental Office Space for Seda’s JTG Northern Cape Branch Office in Kuruman for a period of three (3) and five (5) years

Compulsory

3.

RFP/T 08-2018/19

Appointment of a Service Provider to provide an Internal Audit Services on a co-sourced basis for a period of three (3) years

Compulsory

(a)(ii)&(b) The Small Enterprise Finance Agency (sefa)

No

Tender Number

Description

Compulsory / Non-compulsory

1.

Sefa: 19/DSBD/2018

Appointment of Service Provider to conduct the 2018 Annual Review on SMME and Co-operatives in South Africa (DSBD)

Non-compulsory

2.

Sefa: 11/FIN/2017

Appointment of Service Provider for Construction Work to reinstate the 1st floor shops and roof refurbishing at the Victoria Street Market located at 151/155 Bertha Mkhize Road, Durban, KZN

Compulsory

3.

Sefa: 17/FIN/2017

Appointment of a Service Provider for Public Sector Invoice Discounting

Compulsory

09 April 2019 - NW231

Profile picture: Ngwezi, Mr X

Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the President’s announcement in his state of the nation address of major technological overhaul for the South African education system which included rolling out tablets to all schools, her department is ready for this move in terms of the (a) budget, (b) teacher training and (c) provision of security at schools?

Reply:

a) Readiness in terms of budget

The plan will be operationalised starting 2019 with a preparatory phase, followed by three roll out phases focusing on the provision of gadgets with pre-loaded content including, but not limited to, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) Workbooks. The three phases target firstly learners in multi-grade and rural farm schools secondly learners in quintile 1 to 3 schools, and lastly learners in quintile 4 and 5 schools. The source of funds for the rolling out of tablets to all schools will utilise money previously allocated to the following:

  1. Printing of Workbooks and textbooks since workbooks and textbooks are being digitised and will be pre-loaded into gadgets. Currently the workbooks are printed for a single use. Through converting the books to a downloadable, interactive electronic format, the longevity of the books would be increased as they could be used multiple times. In addition, loading workbooks onto electronic gadgets would have the added benefit of decreasing the dating and marking workload for teachers (as this could be done electronically) and minor edits could be made to the electronic versions without having to reprint and distribute, which would be much more cost effective than re-printing and distributing the books annually.
  2. Grant money (e.g Operation Phakisa, Maths Science and Technology (MST) School Funding and other grants) will also be used for this purpose.
  3. Money will also be drawn from the Provincial Education Equitable share funding to fund the plan.
  4. The Private Sector will also be approached to beef up any short fall.

b) Readiness in terms of teacher training.

The DBE is on a trajectory towards the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) and recognises that it is crucial to onboard key stakeholders like teacher unions, and to provide effective change management, training and support, not only to teachers but also for subject advisors and curriculum developers. Since 2005 province wide programmes on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) integration training for both teachers and subject advisors have been running. Training is classified into three levels: Basic Skills, Intermediate Skills and Advanced Skills. In some provinces such as Gauteng where there has been a rollout of SMART boards in the classroom, subject advisors and coordinators were trained on the use of interactive boards and tablets. In October 2016 the Directorate Curriculum Innovation and e-Learning had already developed three online platforms to train teachers on the use of technology to deliver the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) curriculum. The three platforms are:

1. The DBE MOODLE PLATFORM available at : https://dbemoodle.dedicated.co.za, the platform is a Learning Management System (LMS) (paperless) to deliver lessons with daily content and self marking learner classroom activities that are CAPS compliant. Hence saving time and hard work for teachers. The platform is for classroom utalisation with a teachers laptop and learner gadget to run an LMS.

2. DBE Cloud available at: http://www.dbecloud.org.za/lms/dbe/, the platform aggregate content and make it available online for parents, learners, teachers, subject advisors, subject coordinators and subject specialists.

3. Thutong Portal available at: http://www.thutong.doe.gov.za/, the platform is an online learning space managed by subject specialists at the DBE.

Training of teachers, subject advisers, subject coordinators and subject specialists at the DBE is ongoing, utilising the three platforms to integrate ICTs into teaching and learning. These trainings are coordinated and guided by the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning which was approved by Council of Education ministers (CEM) in September 2017.

c) Readiness in terms of provision of security at school.

There is readiness in terms of security at school, conceptualised based on the categories as indicated below:

Computer Labs

Schools have to comply to very stringent security measures before a computer lab can be installed in that school. This will include among others the visibility of the lab to the surrounding community so that the community can report on matters that may put the security of the lab at risk. This go hand in hand with allowing communities to co-own these labs with schools so that communities can also benefit in using these labs. The specifications also include that the labs must be in the first floor to avoid roof entry, they must have safe iron doors and there should be only small horizontal windows with strong burglar bars to prevent entry. Other security measures include a dedicated alarm system, strict management protocols by schools regarding access to the lab and keys control.

Classroom tablets / cellphones

Suppliers of Classroom tablets/cellphones are required to adhere to strict supply specifications in terms of security of these gadgets. These include that these gadgets must be a trolley that is secured and can be locked while in the classroom. The trolley should have wheels to ensure that after use the gadgets can be transported from the classroom for safe keeping in the school safe made of brick and with an iron door. There should be a strict protocol approved by district and provinces from the school regarding the issuing and collection of these gadgets after lessons.

Take home gadgets

In other provinces such as Gauteng learners and teachers are allowed to take these gadgets home to keep them secured. In the next gadget delivery to teachers and learners, the DBE plans to design gadgets that are community unfriendly and only friendly for educational use only, without compromising the quality of the gadget.

09 April 2019 - NW165

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the tragedy at Driehoek High School on 1 February 2019, she can provide the date of all inspections her department or any other relevant department have conducted since 1 January 2000 regarding the relevant school's infrastructure; if so, what were the findings of the last inspection; (2) Whether the inspections have taken place within the inspection intervals as prescribed by her department or any other relevant department; if not, what are the complete relevant reasons why the prescribed inspection time and interval standards have not been met; (3) What are the full relevant details of (a) the standards regarding infrastructure inspections and (b) how does the relevant inspection(s) fail to comply; (4) whether she will ensure that the provincial department honours its undertaking to bear the medical costs of injured pupils; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. The National Education Infrastructure Management System (NEIMS) database indicates the assessment history of the schools as follows:

  • An assessment was conducted on 08 April 2006, 20 September 2006 and 08 April 2014;
  • The last assessment was conducted in July 2018, as part of the capacity audits determination for feeder zones.
  • It must be noted that visual assessments were also conducted by the school and during the school readiness visits that occur on a quarterly basis.

2. Yes, the inspections have taken place in line with the education sector prescripts.

3. There are various prescripts for inspections in the education sector. These inspections vary and they include but are not limited to the following:

  • School-Readiness Quarterly Assessments;
  • Emergency Maintenance queries and complaints (inspections are done by works inspectors to ascertain the level of damage and the cost implication thereof);
  • Assessments done by professional service providers, once schools have been identified to undergo major capital rehabilitation to define the scope and extent of the works;
  • As part of the school capacity audits, assessments were done to look at the high level of infrastructure;
  • Research Assessments done by education stakeholders (e.g.) Equal Education and Section 27;
  • Visual inspections are done by principals of schools;
  • Provincial Legislature oversight committees conducting monitoring assessments; and
  • Condition assessments done by Department of Basic Education and the custodian Department (GDID) to update the NEIMS database.

4. All claims against the Department will be processed in accordance with Section 60 of the South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996, in line with the liability.

09 April 2019 - NW576

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What are the relevant details of the general criteria that (a) an educator needs to fulfil in order to become a marker for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations and (b) educators marking Business Studies had to fulfil for the 2018 NSC examinations; (2) whether she will furnish Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi with a list of each person marking the 2018 NSC Business Studies examinations, in each case indicating the person’s (a) qualifications and (b) experience relating to Business Studies?

Reply:

1. (a) In terms of Personnel Administrative Measures, Government Gazette No. 39684, dated 12 February 2016, an educator that is appointed as a marker must have at least a recognised three year post matric qualification which must include the subject concerned at second or third year level. In addition the marker must have appropriate teaching experience, including teaching experience at the appropriate level, in the subject concerned, language competency, and preference must be given to serving educators who are presently teaching the subject concerned.

(b) In terms of the appointment of markers for 2018, including Business Studies, the marker must have taught the subject or a related subject at the Grade 12 level for a minimum of two years in the last five years.

2. In terms of the Regulations Pertaining to the conduct, administration and management of National Senior Certificate Examination, the Head of an Assessment Body (i.e. the Provincial Education Department) is responsible for the appointment of markers. These records are therefore kept at the nine provincial education departments and not at the Department of Basic Education. Therefore access to the list of markers appointed to mark the 2018 NSC Business Studies examination should be obtained directly from the Heads of Department in each of the nine provinces.

09 April 2019 - NW655

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with regard to the Gauteng Education Department's regulations that learners may apply for admission at any school in the province, irrespective of the feeder area in which the learner resides, she could indicate whether the specified regulations are compatible with the (a) South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (b) court rulings that a single-medium school that is full may not be forced to take in learners; if not, what steps will she take to stop the implementation of the regulations; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) given the change regarding the language demographics of single-medium schools to English when learners who speak different languages are taken in, what will she do to protect single-medium schools in Gauteng and also nationwide, especially, given the fact that not all learners are fluent in English or have full command of the language at all?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Gauteng Education Department and will be provided as soon as it is received.

09 April 2019 - NW664

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What are the details of each supplier of air-ambulance services in terms of (a) name and (b) amounts paid to each supplier that is currently contracted to various provincial departments of health; (2) whether he has found that the manner in which the services were procured complies with the policies of (a) his department and (b) the National Treasury regulations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has found that the bona fides and competencies of the service providers are satisfactory; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The tables below reflect the details in this regard.

Province

(a) Name of service provider

(b) Amounts paid

(2018/19)

Eastern Cape

National Airways Corporation

R 25 000 000

Free State

Halo Aviation (Pty) Ltd

R 6 255.885.34

Gauteng

Netcare 911, ER24 and Halo HEMS

Services are requested on demand which is operated on a fee for services. Nil paid for the current financial year

KwaZulu-Natal

Air Mercy Services

R 34 542 587

Limpopo

Phuluso JV with Black Eagle

R 3 000 000

Mpumalanga

Halo Aviation

R 11 983 477

North West

No air-ambulance services

Not applicable

Northern Cape

Aero-care

R 743 850

Western Cape

Red Cross Air Mercy Service

R 54 000 000

(2) (a) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

Province

National Treasury

Relevant Details

Eastern Cape

Yes

Month to month contract, SCM busy with adjudication of the new tender

Free State

Yes

Service procured through departmental bid processes DOH(FS) 33/2018/2019

Gauteng

Yes

Services are requested on demand

KwaZulu-Natal

Yes

Month to month contract since expiry of National RT 79 contract.

Local SCM processes are underway to award a new contract.

Limpopo

Yes

Month to month contract since the expiry of the National RT79 Contract

Mpumalanga

Yes

Service procured through the National Transversal Tenders RT 79

North West

Not applicable

No air-ambulance services provided

Northern Cape

Yes

Service procured through the National Transversal Tenders RT 79

Western Cape

Yes

Contract was just awarded for the next 5 years commencing from the 1st April 2019

(3) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

Province

Satisfactory /

Not Satisfactory

Relevant Details

Eastern Cape

Satisfactory

Service in line with the specifications.

Free State

Satisfactory

Service in line with the specifications, no challenges experienced till date.

Gauteng

Satisfactory

Services are requested from the service providers on a rotation basis only when the need arises.

KwaZulu-Natal

Satisfactory

Service provision is according to the tender specifications. No challenges experienced.

Limpopo

Satisfactory

Service provision is according to the tender specifications. There were challenges in rendering service as there were problems between the JV partners which affected the department. Matter has been resolved and service is back in operation. Penalties were issued for no service provision.

Mpumalanga

Satisfactory

The service provider has always adhered to the terms of the contract and there has been no adverse reports.

North West

Not applicable

Not applicable

Northern Cape

Satisfactory

Service provision is according to the tender specifications. No challenges experienced.

Western Cape

Satisfactory

Tender specifications match the need well and the provider has a longstanding history with the province of excellent service delivery in accordance with the specifications.

END.

09 April 2019 - NW444

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What action is his department taking with regard to the horrific treatment of a certain patient (details furnished), (b) what is the name of each (i) nurse and (ii) doctor who attended to the patient, (c) what action has been taken against each nurse and each doctor and (d) how did the baby land up in a mortuary in Springs; (2) whether he has found that the National Health Insurance is going to curb the horrific treatment of patients at the country’s public healthcare facilities; if not, what is the position in this regard?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Hospital and provincial department of Health could not test the allegations as the complainant declined a redress meeting.

(b) (i) PN Mpho Lebese

(ii) Dr SM Kalasa

(c) No action was implemented against the staff since the allegations could not be confirmed.

(d) The body of the baby was procedurally handed over by the hospital to the Far East Funeral Undertakers. The hospital can therefore not comment on how it “landed up” in Springs. Far East Funeral Undertakers is located in Actonville, Benoni. The parent’s residential address, as provided by her is 697 Rawat Street, Actonville.

(2) Whether there is NHI or not, there should be no horrific treatment of patients in any healthcare system.

END.

05 April 2019 - NW584

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

What is the status of the investigation intD CAS 415/8/2018 opened at the Lyttleton Police Station?

Reply:

The abovementioned case is belng investigated by the Pretoria Serious Commercial Crime Unit. Certain warning statements and witness statements are being sought by the investigating officer.

 

 

Reply to question 584 recommended/

CO

LE (SOEG)

GENERAL NER: TH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 584 appro\/9d

05 April 2019 - NW653

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Police

What number of firearms is held by each security company registered with the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority at a (a) provincial level and (b) national level?

Reply:

a) A total of 2 677 security companies are registered with the Private Security Industry Regulatory Authority (PSIRA), with 102 943 firearms registered on the Central Firearm Register (CFR) database.

Province

Number of Security Companies

Number of Firearms

Eastern Cape

 

168

2 823

Free State

50

517

Gauteng

KwaZulu-Natal

909

499

64 305

17 676

Limpopo

649

11 172

Mpumalanga

126

2 193

North West

93

1 607

Northern Cape

20

135

Western Cape

163

2 515

Total

2 677

102 943

(b) There are no security companies registered at a national level.

 

 

Reply to question 653 recommended/

TI L C

OLE (SOEG)

Date: ygjj .gj. gy

GENERAL H AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 653 approved/natapprove&

MINIST OF POLICE BH CELE, MP

Date.' D

05 April 2019 - NW196

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of senior management level employees, including heads of departments, in (i) his department and (ii) each entity reporting to him have criminal records and (b) in each case, (i) what is the (aa) full name and (bb) position of the specified employee and (ii) what are the relevant details of the crimes for which each employee was convicted?

Reply:

The South African below.

(a)(i) To date, a total of 32 members of the Senior Management Service (SMS) in the SAPS, have criminal records against their names. The Head of the SAPS does not have a criminal conviction against his name.

(a)(ii) The SAPS is not in a position to provide this information.

(b)(i)(aa) and (bb) The SAPS is not in a position to provide the information, since it contains personal information, relating to the members concerned and the disclosure will constitute an unreasonable violation of the priVacy of the members concerned.

(b)(ii) The convictions relate to the following matters:

Three members have offences related to the contravention of the “Arms and Ammunition Act and the Firearms Control Act".

A total of 19 members have offences related to the contravention of road traffic legislation.

One member has an offence related to the contravention of liquor legislation, over and above the traffic offence.

Three members have offences related to the contravention of internal security legislation.

Seven members have common law related offences, namely; fraud, public Violence, contempt of court, malicious damage to property and assault respectively.

 

Reply to question 196 recommended/

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date:

Reply to question 196 approved/

05 April 2019 - NW197

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of SA Police Service members in each province have criminal records as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what is the breakdown of the type of crimes that the members were found guilty of in each case?

Reply:

To date, a total of 4 174 members of the South African Police Service (SAPS) haVe criminal records against their names, per national division and province, as indicated in the table below.

The SAPS is not in a position to provide the information, since it contains personal information, relating to the members concerned and the disclosure will constitute an unreasonable violation of the privacy of the members concerned.

(a) and (b)

The Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI): A total of 17 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Legislation

51.52%

Assault

15.15%

Fraud

12.12%

Malicious Damage to Property

6.06%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

6.06%

Contravention of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Act

3.03%

Attempted murder

3.03%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

3.03%

Total

100.00°/«

Management Intervention: Two members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of The Firearms Control Act

50.00%

Contravention of The Arms And Ammunition Act

50.00%

Total

100.00%

Find here: Division: Operational Response Services: A total of 66 members have offences against their names.

Division: Operational Response Services: A tota1 of 66 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

63.95%

Assault

12.79%

Theft

6.98%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

2.33%

Contravention of the Arms And Ammunition Act

2.33%

Defeating the Course of Justice

2.33%

Culpable Homicide

1.16%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

1.16%

Contravention of the Local Authorities Act

1.16%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

1.16%

Theft (Other)

1.16%

Contravention of the Explosives Act

1.16°/

Contravention of the Act on Films And Publicatlons

1.16%

Contravention of the Diamonds Act

1.16%

Total

100.00°/«

Division: Visible Policing: A total of 69 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contraventlon of the Road Traffic Act

53.26%

Assault

16.30%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

6.52%

Theft

4.35%

Crimen lnjuria

2.17%

Fraud

2.17%

Contravention of the Magistrates Courts Act

1.09%

Contravention of the Corruption Act

1.09%

Murder

1.09%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.09%

Contraventlon of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences And Related Matters) Amendment Act

1.09%

Contraventlon of the Flrearms Control Act

1.09%

Malicious Damage to Property

1.09%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of Oaths

1.09%

OWence unknown

1.09%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

1.09%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

1.09%

Kidnapping

1.09%

Culpable Homicide

1.09%

Division: Crime Intelligence: A total of 34 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

64.29%

Assault

11.90%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

9.52%

Malicious Damage to Property

4.76%

Extortion (Under the Common Law or Statutory Law)

2.38%

Theft

2,38%

Contravention of the Act on Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

2.38’/»

Culpable Homicide

2.38%

Total

100.00°/•

Division: Detective Service: A total of five members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

83.33%

Assault

16.67%

Total

100.00%

Division: Personnel Management: A total of five members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contraventlon of the Road Traffic Act

83.33%

Culpable Homicide

16.67%

Total

100.00%

Division: Human Resource Utilisation: One member has an offence against his/her name,

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

100.00%

Total

100.00%

Division: Human Resource Development: A total of 36 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

54.55°%

Assault

15.91%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

15.91%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

4.55%

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Sexual Offences Act

2.27%

Theft

2.27%

Contravention of the Explosives Act

2.27%

Nature Conservation

2.27%

Total

100.00°/>

Division: Finance and Administration: One member has an offence against his/her name.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Arms And Ammunition Act

100.00%

Total

100.00°/

Division: Supply Chain Management: A total of 20 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

66.67%

Crimen lnjuria

4.17%

Contravention of the Sexual Offences Act

4.17%

Culpable Homicide

4.17%

Malicious Damage to Property

4.17%

Defeating the Course of Justice

4.17%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

4.17%

Fraud

4.17%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

4.17%

Total

100.00%

Division: Protection and Security Services: A total of 78 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

45.69%

Assault

14.66%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

12.07%

Theft

6.03%

High Treason

4.31%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

2.59%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

1.72%

Contravention of the Internal Security Act

1.72%

Contempt of Gourt

1.72%

Robbery

0,86%

Contravention of the Riotous Assemblies Act

0.86%

Contravention of the Trespass Act

0.86%

 

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Demonstrations in or Near Court Buildings Prohibition Act

0.86%

Attempted Murder

0.86%

Murder

0.86%

Culpable Homicide

0.86%

Publlc Violence

0.86%

Rape

0.86%

Malicious Damage to Property

0.86%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.86%

Total

100.00°/

Division: Forensic Services: A total of 14 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

50.00%

Fraud

16.67%

Culpable Homicide

16.67%

Assault

5.56%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of

Oaths

5.56%

Malicious Damage to Property

5.56%

Total

100.00°/«

Western Cape Province: A total of 360 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contraventlon of the Road Traffic Act

54.53%

Assault

17.94%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

7.49%

Crimen lnjuria

2.26%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

1.74°/

Malicious Oamage to Property

1.57%

Theft

1.39%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.39%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.22%

Culpable Homlcide

1.22%

Contravention of the Sexual Offences Act

0.87%

Fraud

0.87%

Housebreaking

0.70%

Contravention of the Internal Security Act

0.52%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

0.52%

Indecent Assault

0.35%

Perjury

0.35%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of Oaths

0.35%

 

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.35%

Rape

0.35%

Contravention of The Criminal Procedure Act

0.35%

Abuse of Dependence-produclng Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.35%

Kidnapping

0.35%

Theft (Other)

0.35%

Contravention of the Act on Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.35%

Contravention of the Local Authorities Act

0.35%

Contravention of the Abortion and Sterilisation Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Corruption Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Trespass Act

0.17%

Contravention of the South African Police Service Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Business Act

0.17%

Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Makers) Amendment Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Usury Act

0.17%

Robbery

0.17%

Breach of Peace

0.17%

Total

100.00%

Eastern Cape Province: A total of 614 members have offences against their names.

OWence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

54.20%

Assault

16.99°/

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

9.05%

Fraud

2.95%

Theft

2,59%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.57%

Culpable Homicide

1.57%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.29%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

1.20%

Malicious Damage to Property

1.20°/

Crimen lnjuria

1.11%

Contravention of the South Afncan Police Service (SAPS) Act

0.83%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

0.46%

Contravention of the Act on Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.37%

Attempted Murder

0.28%

Perjury

0.28%

Abuse of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.28%

Contravention of the Griminal Law (Sexual OWences And Related Matters) Amendment Act

0.28%

Housebreaking

0,28%

Public Violence

0.18%

7

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act

0,18%

Murder

0,18%

Contravention of the Defence Act

0.18%

Contravention of the Prevention Of Corruption Act

0.18%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

0.18%

Contravention of the Local Authorities Act

0.18%

Nature Conservation

0.18%

Bribery

0.09%

Robbery

0.09%

Contravention of the Marine Livinq Resources Act

0.09%

Theft (Other)

0.09%

Contravention of the Sexual Offences Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

Ooe%

Contravention of the Public Safety Act

0.09%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.09%

Bigamy

0.09%

Extortion (Under the Common Law or Statutory Law)

0.09%

Contravention of the Sea Fishery Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of Oaths

0.09%

Contravention of the Medicine Act

0.09%

Contraventlon of the Usury Act

0.09%

Offence Unknown

0.09%

Theft of Livestock and Related Matters

0.09%

Indecent Assault

0.09%

Abduction

0.09%

Kidnapip

0.09%

Total

100.00°/

Northern Cape Province: A total of 156 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

61.54%

Assault

16.92%

Contravention of the Arms And Ammunition Act

7.69°/»

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

2,69%

Fraud

2.69%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.54%

Culpable Homicide

1.15%

Contravention of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act

0.77%

Crimen lnjuria

0.77%

Attempted Murder

0.38%

Malicious Damage to Property

0.38%

Contravention of the Magistrates Courts Act

0.38%

 

OWence

Percentage

Contravention of the Sexual Offences Act

0.38°/

OWence Unknown

0.38%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

0.38%

Theft

0.38%

Contravention of the Indecent or Obscene Photographic Matters Act

0.38%

_Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

0.38%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.38%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

0.38%

Total

100.00°/«

Free State Province: A total of 417 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

46.31%

Assault

22.43%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

10.27%

Theft

2.46%

Fraud

2.17%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

2.03%

Defeating the Course of Justice

2.03%

Malicious Damaqe to Property

1.59%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.30%

Culpable Homicide

1.30%

Crimen lnjuria

0.87%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

0.72%

Contravention of the Local Authorities Act

0.58%

Attempted Murder

0.58%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

0.43%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.43%

Contravention of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act

0.43%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.43%

Theft fOther/

0.29%

Contravention of the Prevention of Corruption Act

0.29%

Contravention of the South African Police Service Act

0.29%

Contravention of the Explosives Act

0.29%

Contravention of the Social Asslstance Act

0.29%

Offence Unknown

0.29%

Public Violence

0.14%

Contravention of the Prevention of Counterfeiting Act

0.14%

Contravention of the Gambling Act

0.14%

Contravention of the Criminal Law Amendment Act

0.14%

Contravention of the Prisons Act

0.14%

Contravention of the Customs And Excise Act

0.14%

Rape

0.14°/

 

Offence

Percentage

Constitution of the Republic of South Africa

0.14%

Contravention of the National Land Transport Transition Act

0.14%

Murder

0.14%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of

Oaths

0.14%

Perjury

0.14%

Housebreaking

0.14%

Total

100.00°/»

KwaZulu-Natal Province: A total of 533 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

52.71%

Assault

12.02%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

6.85%

Fraud

3.36%

Theft

3.10%

Culpable Homicide

2.07%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.68%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.68%

Crimen lnjuria

1.55%

Mallclous Damage to Property

1.29%

Social Assistance Act

1.29%

Contravention of the National Land Transport Act

1.03%

Contravention of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Act

1.03%

Attemtied Murder

0.78%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

0.65%

Extortion (Under the Common Law or Statutory Law)

0.65%

Contravention of the Prevention of Corruption Act

0.65%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

0.65%

Rape

0.39%

Contravention of the Crimlnal Procedure Act

0.39%

Contravention of the National Land Transport Transition Act

0.39%

Murder

0.39%

Contravention of the Aliens Act

0.39%

Breach Of Peace

0.26%

Contraventlon of the Act on Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.26%

Cont a entio of the I te nal Sec rit A t

Contravention of the Customs and Excise Act

0.26%

 

0.26%

Robbery

0.26%

Contravention of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act

0.26%

Contravention of the Trespass Act

0.26%

Theft(Other)

0.26%

Theft of Livestock and Related Matters

0.26%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.26%

10

OWence

Percentage

Contravention of the Mining Rights Act

0.13%

KZN/Nature Conservation Ordinance

0.13%

Public Indecency

0.13%

Child Theft

0.13%

Bribery

0.13%

Contravention of the Nature Conservation Act

0.13%

High Treason

0.13%

Perjury

0.13%

KZN/Nature Conservation Ordinance

0.13%

Contravention of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.13%

Contravention of the Animals Protection Act

0.13%

Contravention of the Precious Stones Act

0.13%

Contravention of the South African Reserve Bank Act

0.13%

Contravention of the Currency Act

0.13%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.13%

Contravention of the Kwazulu-Natal Liquor Licensing Act

0.13%

Contravention of the Prisons Act

0.13%

Abuse of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.13%

Kidnapping

0.13%

Total

100.00°/

North West Province: A total of 260 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

56.21%

Assault

18.08%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

4.52%

Theft

3.11%

Culpable Homicide

2.26%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.98%

Crimen lnjuria

1.98%

Fraud

1.98%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

1,69%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

1.41%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

1.13%

Attempted Murder

0.85%

Defeating the Course of Justice

0.85°/»

Malicious Damage to Property

0.85%

Rape

0.28°/•

Contravention of the Prevention of Corruption Act

0.28%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.28%

Contempt of Court

0.28%

Contravention of the Prevention of Organised Crime Act

0.28%

Abuse of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.28%

Animal Matters Amendment

0.28%

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Act

0.28%

Indecent Assault

0.28%

Contravention of the Precious Metals Act

0.28%

Murder

0.28%

Total

100.00%

Mpumalanga Province: A total of 240 members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

51.62%

Assault

17.70%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

7.37%

Contravention of the Firearms Gontrol Act

2.65%

Fraud

2.36%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

1.77%

Theft

1.77%

Culpable Homicide

1.77%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.77%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

1,47%

Contravention of the Domestic Vlolence Act

1.18%

Crimen lnjuria

0.88%

Attempted Murder

0.88%

Malicious Damage to Property

0.88%

Contravention of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Act

0.59%

Perjury

0.59%

Contravention of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.59%

Housebreaking

0.59%

Contravention of the Sexual OWences Act

0.29%

Contravention of the Riotous Assemblies Act

0.29%

Stock Theft

0.29%

Theft of Livestock and Related Matters

0.29%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

0.29%

Contravention of the Gambling Act

0.29%

Murder

0.29%

Public Indecency

0.29%

Offence Unknown

0.29%

Contravention of the Public Safety Act (Regulations for KwaZulu-Natal)

0.29%

Abuse of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation Centre

0.29%

Contravention of the Contravention of the Indecent or Obscene

Photographic Matters Act

0.29%

Total

100.00°/+

Limpopo Province: A total of 401 members have offences against their names.

OWence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

55.57%

12

Offence

Percentage

Assault

17.40%

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

6,42%

Theft

3.38%

Culpable Homicide

2.70%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.86%

Crimen lnjuria

1.52%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

1.35%

Defeating the Course of Justice

1.35%

Malicious Damage to Property

0.84%

Attempted Murder

0.68%

Contravention of the Crimlnal Procedure Act

0.68%

Fraud

0.68%

Contravention of the Prevention and Combatinq of Corrupt Activities Act

0.51%

Contravention of the South African Pollce Service (SAPS) Act

0.51%

Abuse Of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.51%

Murder

0.51%

Rape

0.34%

Contraventlon of the General Law Amendment Act

0.34%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.34%

Contravention of the Medicine Act

0.34%

Contravention of the Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of Oaths

0.17%

Contravention of the Corruption Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Insurance Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Sorghum Beer Act

0,17%

Housebreaking

0.17%

Stock Theft

0.17%

Contravention of the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act

0.17%

Theft (Other)

0,17%

Animal Matters Amendment

0.17%

Contravention of the Companies Act

0.17%

Contravention of the Witchcraft Suppression Act

0.17%

Perjury

0,17%

Contravention of the Act on Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.17%

Total

100.00°/•

Gauteng Province: A total of 824 members have offences against their names.

OWence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

49.91 %

Assault

15.61 9•

Contravention of the Arms and Ammunition Act

10.00%

Theft

3.60%

Culpable Homicide

2.28%

 

Ofience

Percentage

Fraud

2.11%

Contravention of the Firearms Control Act

1.49%

Defeating the Course of Justlce

1.40%

' Attempted Murder

1.32%

Malicious Damage to Property

1.14%

Contravention of the Liquor Act

1.14%

Crimen lnjuria

0.96%

Contravention of the Prevention of Corruption Act

0.96%

Contravention of the South African Police Service (SAPS) Act

0.96%

Contravention of the Domestic Violence Act

0.79%

Extortion (Under the Common Law or Statutory Law)

0.53%

Contravention of the Prevention and Combating of Corrupt Activities Act

0.44%

Contravention of the Social Assistance Act

0.44%

Murder

0.35%

Perjury

0.35%

Act on Justices of the Peace and Commissioners of Oaths

0.26%

Abuse of Dependence-producing Substances and Rehabilitation centre

0.26%

Contravention of the Intimidation Act

0.26%

Contravention of the Trespass Act

0.18%

Contravention of the Local Authorities Act

0,18%

Gontravention of the Gauteng Liquor Act

0.18%

Housebreaking

0.18%

Contravention of the Aliens Act

0.18%

Contravention of the Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act

0.18%

Theft(Other)

0.18%

Contravention of the Criminal Procedure Act

0.18%

Rape

O.18%

Contravention of the Hire Purchase Act

Contravention of the Tear-Gas Act

 

0.18%

   

0.09%

Robbery

0.09%

Contravention of the Animals Protection Act

0.09%

C0 a entio of the ct on D u s and D Tra c n Act Contravention of the Sexual OWences Act

0.09%

 

0.09%

Offence Unknown

o o9%

Contravention of the Corruption Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Companies Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Internal Security Act

0.09%

Contravention of the General Law Amendment Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Sea Fishery Act

0.09%

Contravention of the Post Office Act

0.09%

Contempt of Court

0.09%

Kidnapping

0.09%

Contravention of the Diamonds Act

0.09%

Arson, under the Common Law or Statuto Law

0.09%

Contravention of the Public Safety Act

0.09%

'

14

Offence

Percentage

Indecent Assault

0.09%

Total

100.00°/

Office of the National Commissioner: A total of 19 members have offences against their names.

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

45.83%

Contravention of the Ams and Ammunition Act

16.67%

Contravention of the Gauteng Liquor Act

16.67%

Theft

8.33%

Assualt

4.17%

 

Crimen Injuria

4.17%

 

Contraventlon of the Domestic Violence Act

4.17%

TOTAL

100.00%

Division: Technology Management Services: Two members have offences against their names.

Offence

Percentage

Contravention of the Road Traffic Act

100.00%

Total

100.00%

Reply to question 197 recommended/

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: ! !! ! g\- 0

Reply to question 197 approved/ d

05 April 2019 - NW616

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) is the average processing time for the consideration and approval of firearm competency certificates, (b) is the current backlog for the processing of such applications and (c) are the reasons for this backlog?

Reply:

a) The average processing time for the consideration and approval of firearm competency certificates is 90 working days.

b) On 11 March 2019, a total of 6 190 competency applications had exceeded the target of 90 working days.

c) The reasons for the backlog, range from outstanding illicit reports from the Criminal Record Centre and system challenges, such as the slowness of the system.

 

 

Reply to question 616 recommended/

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: !!" ” ' '

Reply to question 616 approved

05 April 2019 - NW705

Profile picture: Hoosen, Mr MH

Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy ministers and/or former deputy ministers (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

In response to the question asked by the Honourable Member, my Department provided the following information:

2016/17:

A Mercedes Benz, C250 Avant-garde was purchased for the current Deputy Minister and its cost price was R506 060.58.

2017-2018:

A Mercedes Benz, E250 Avant-garde was purchased for the former Deputy Minister and its cost price was R771 570.99.

2018/19:

A Mercedes Benz, GLE 350 d – 2018 was purchased for the newly appointed Deputy Minister and its cost price was R 1 157 015.19.

During the past three financial years, no car was purchased for former Minister or the current Minister.

05 April 2019 - NW570

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What is the status of CAS 149/7/2014 reported at the Edenvale Police Station and (b) who is the investigating officer; (2) what are the reasons that the victim has had to wait over three years without the case being finalised?

Reply:

(1)(a) On 6 March 2019, the case was taken to the Senior Public Prosecutor (SPP) for a decision.

(1)(b) In the interest of the case being investigated without fear or favour, the particulars of the investigating officer cannot be divulged.

(2) On 15 July 2014, the suspect was arrested and the case was taken to court for the first appearance. On 28 August 2014, the court requested that the complainant and the accused was to appear for mediation, as it was a common assault case. The complainant refused, stating that he wanted to be compensated.

On 7 November 2014, the matter was withdrawn by the SPP. The case was closed and filed. The complainant was informed and was dissatisfied with the SPP's decision.

On 22 July 2015, the docket was reopened on request of the complainant. On 21 October 2015, the complainant met with the Station Commander and the Detective Branch Commander, after which the case was closed.

On 2 December 2015, the case was reopened. On 3 February 2016, the complainant met with the SPP, where the complainant informed the SPP that

there was a witness to the assault, thereby resulting in a witness statement being taken. The case docket was taken to the SPP for a decision. The case was withdrawn again and filed at the police station.

On 26 July 2018, the case was reopened and sent to the Independent Police Investigative Directorate {lPlD), as the complainant was still dissatisfied. The docket was then sent to the Director of Public Prosecution (DPP) and a decision was made to issue a summons against the accused. On 28 November 2018, the case was before the court and remanded to 13 December 2018. On 13 December 2018, the case was again remanded to 21

January 2019.

On 30 January 2019, the accused passed away. The death certificate was obtained and the docket is currently with the SPP, at the Germiston Magistrate’s Court, for a decision.

 

 

Reply to question 570 recommended d

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: /§]g -t3- 2 f

Reply to question 570 appro\lead

MINISTE F POLICE BH CELE, M

05 April 2019 - NW757

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

What is the total number of children who were killed at school in 2018?

Reply:

NW880E

Province

Number of children who were killed at schools in 2018

Eastern Cape

Free Sate

  0

  0

 

Gauteng

  0

 

KwaZulu-Natal

  9

Limpopo

  3

Mpumalanga

  3

North West

   4

Northern Cape

   1 

Western Cape

   2

Total

   22

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Date: §§{g -0 - g

Reply to question 757 recommended/cat o ended

MINISTER POLICE BH CELE, M

05 April 2019 - NW710

Profile picture: Motau, Mr SC

Motau, Mr SC to ask the Minister of Police

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each Vehicle was purchased for use by (i) him and/or the former minister and (ii) his deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

A total of four vehicles were procured for the office of the Ministry of Police during the 2017/2018 financial year:

(a)(b)(c) and (d) The details are as follows:

Number of vehicles

a) Make

b) Model

c) Total price

d) Date

4

BMW

30d

R3 528 025,00

2018-03-20

(i) and (ii) The four vehicles, as reflected in the table above, were purchased for the current Minister of Police and the current Deputy Minister of Police.

(aa)(aaa) In 2016/2017, no vehicles were purchased for the Minister or the Deputy Minister of Police.

(aa)(bbb) In 2017/2018, four vehicles were purchased, as reflected in the table above.

(bb) Since 1 April 2018, no vehicles were purchased for the Minister or the Deputy Minister of Police.

 

 

 

Reply to question 710 recommended/

GENERAL AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 710 approved/ pp o ed

MINISTE OF POLICE BH CELE, MP

Date: .

04 April 2019 - NW797

Profile picture: Esterhuizen, Mr JA

Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

With reference to the existing contract between his Department and the African Institute of Arts, Culture and Heritage (AIACH) regarding the King Dinuzulu Project and considering that all obligations have been met by the AIACH, (a) will funds be released to the AIACH in the current financial year for the Dinuzulu Exhibition augmentation and the first film and (b) what are the reasons for the delay in releasing the funding?

Reply:

a) No, funds will be released to the African Institute of Arts, Culture and Heritage until the institution complies with the contractual obligations and provides fully detailed information on how the allocated funds were spent on the project, and the beneficiary further furnishes the Department with satisfactory documented proofs such as invoices and/or receipts of expenditure with additional documentation on the utilisation of funds as requested by the Department as a prerequisite to release the funds to the project. Once all the required documents and information are submitted to the Department, then the funds will be released to the AIACH.

(b) The following are the reasons for the delay in releasing the funding to the AIACH:

  • The beneficiary did not submit the audited financial statements which indicates that the funds already allocated to the project have been utilised in accordance with the signed Memorandum of Agreement (MoA);
  • The financial report submitted is not substantiated by proof of expenditure such as invoices, receipts, bank slips, bank statements, etc., and based on the documents submitted by AIACH, the Department is not provided with the necessary assurance that the funds transferred were used in accordance with the agreement;
  • The Department further noticed that some of the items bought for the project were not part of the signed Memorandum of Agreement and even the content of the narrative report is not aligned with the financial report provided by the beneficiary; and
  • The Department is not clear when and where the exhibition will take place or whether it really took place or not.

03 April 2019 - NW686

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the reply to question 898 on 20 April 2018, do the operating costs stated only include the limited kerbside services or a fully operational phase 1; if so, how is the huge cost of limited kerbside services justified; (2) do the operational cost include the paying of consultants; if so, (a) what amount is to be paid to consultants in each year, (b) on what date will the consultants contracts come to an end and (c) what is the purpose of employing consultants in each case?

Reply:

1. The operating costs are based on a very limited kerb side pre-pilot service with 6 operational buses initially. While this would have been palatable if scaled up to aPhase 1-like 40 and then 80 buses carrying over 20 000 average weekday passenger trips within 6 months to a year, this did not happen and hence the current scale of costs and ridership is unbalanced and unviable.

Despite 2 years of DoT appeals, the city has proven incapable of correcting this. Hence a final warning has been communicated to the city project team in March 2019 and they have 6 months to rebalance costs and revenues and move to viability.

2. a) Amount: R 50 million per annum

b) June 2020

c) To increase the City’s capacity

03 April 2019 - NW558

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) What investments have been made in each month by (i) his department and (ii) entities reporting to him (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what was the nature of each investment, (c) why was each investment made in each case, (d) what were the projected returns in each case, (e) who represented the department or entity when negotiating the investments, (f) on what date was each investment made, (g) what returns have been enjoyed to date in each case and (h) with whom were investments made in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)(aa) None

(a)(i)(bb) None

(b), (c), (d), €, (f), (g), (h) Not applicable

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

  1. R250 million was put into a six-month fixed term deposit with Nedbank from March 2016 – September 2016.
  2. Six-month fixed term deposit
  3. Maximize interest received
  4. 7.65%
  5. Chief Financial Officer
  6. March 2016 to September 2016
  7. 7.65%
  8. Nedbank – being the transactional banker at the time

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRTA)

(i0 (a) No investments were made by (ii) the CBRTA (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g) and (h) are not applicable.

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

(j) (a) No investments were made by (ii) The RAF has not made any investments (in the sense of “funds under management”) (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g) and (h) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(i) (a) No investments were made by (ii) The RTMC has not made any investments (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g) and (h) are not applicable.

Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA)

(i) (a) No investments were made by (ii) The RTIA has not made any investments (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, consequently questions (b), (c), (d), (e), (f), (g) and (h) are not applicable.

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(a) Please refer to the attached spreadsheet for a detailed response. (Annexure ‘A’)

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a) (i) Not applicable. (a) (ii) (aa) The South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA) has not made any investments in the past three financial years other than depositing surplus funds in call accounts with banking institutions as disclosed to National Treasury on an annual basis as per Treasury Regulations.

(aa) and (bb) As per table below – Deposits in call accounts: 

 

 

2016/03/31

2017/03/31

2018/03/31

2019/02/28

SACAA Call Accounts

Balance

Balance

Balance

Balance

Investec Call account

26 816 234

28 711 924

30 687 860

32 540 602

Absa Call account

26 675 429

28 391 238

30 164 946

31 810 956

Nedbank Call account

25 811 325

27 584 337

29 438 724

31 173 458

Standard Bank Call account

109 922 727

155 916 512

206 096 735

195 026 950

Total Call Account Balances

189 225 715

240 604 011

296 388 266

290 551 966

b) the nature of each investment & (c) why each investment was made in each case: the call accounts are utilised to invest surplus funds.

c) the projected returns in each case: rates on call accounts as published by the respective banks from time to time.

d) who represented the entity when negotiating the investments: the Chief Financial Officer and the Senior Manager: Finance as per the approvals and Delegation of Authority.

e) on what date each investment was made: on a daily basis all surplus cash identified is invested in a call account.

(g) The Annual returns as per the financial statements is:

Current year to 28 February 2019 R16 983 320

Year ended 31 March 2018 R17 006 783

Year ended 31 March 2017 R14 549 007

(h) with whom investments were made in each case: Standard Bank, Investec, ABSA, and FNB.

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

(a)(ii) The Ports Regulator has not made any investments in the past (aa) three financial years

and since (bb) 01 April 2018.

(b)(c)(d)(f)(g)(h) Not applicable

Railway Safety Regulator (RSR):

a) The RSR invests only in the Corporation for Public Deposits (CPD) at the South African Reserve Bank. Withdrawals at CPD can be done at any time at no charge. The RSR earns interest from these investments.

(aa) The following investments were made in the past three financial years:

2015/2016 R7,105,000

2016/2017 R81,000,000

2107/2018 R144,700,000

(bb) An amount of R189,900,000 was invested since 1 April 2018.

b) The nature of each investment were short term deposits with the CPD at the South African Reserve Bank.

c) Each investment was made for the purpose of earning interest.

d) The projected returns were for interest earned at variable interest rates.

e) No negotiations took place when deposits were made to the CPD.

f) The dates on which each investment was made are as follow:

2015/2016

Date

Amount Invested

2015/11/25

5,000

2015/12/04

1,000,000

2015/12/23

1,000,000

2016/01/20

5,000,000

2016/03/30

100,000

Total

R7,105,000

2016/2017

Date

Amount Invested

2016/08/15

40,000,000

2016/10/12

7,500,000

2016/11/02

25,000,000

2016/12/28

7,500,000

2017/01/11

1,000,000

Total

R81,000,000

2017/2018

Date

Amount Invested

2017/04/21

5,000,000

2017/04/21

5,000,000

2017/04/21

5,000,000

2017/04/21

5,000,000

2017/04/21

5,000,000

2017/07/04

2,000,000

2017/07/13

4,000,000

2017/07/13

2,000,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

3,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/20

4,500,000

2017/07/21

4.500.000

2017/08/01

14,000,000

2017/10/13

3,000,000

2017/10/17

1,500,000

2017/10/18

5,000,000

2017/10/18

700,000

2018/01/15

500,000

2018/02/19

2,000,000

2018/02/23

700,000

2018/03/12

4,000,000

2018/03/15

300,000

Total

R144,700,000

2018/2019

Date

Amount Invested

2018/04/07

4,800,000

2018/04/24

20,000,000

2018/06/20

80,000,000

2018/06/21

40,000,000

2018/06/26

25,000,000

2018/06/24

4,500,000

2018/10/12

1,000,000

2018/10/19

1,500,000

2018/10/26

11,500,000

2018/11/09

1,600,000

Total

R189,900,000

g) Returns enjoyed to date are:

2015/2016 R396,953 interest earned

2016/2017 R1,061,724 interest earned

2017/2018 R2,096,959 interest earned

2018/2019 R5,473,457 interest earned from 1 April 2018 to 28 February 2019

h) The RSR invested only in the Corporation for Public Deposits (CPD) at the South African Reserve Bank

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

 

(aa) in the past three financial years

(bb) Since 1 April 2018

(b) Nature of investment

Monies, for which we do not have an immediate need for, are transferred from the current bank account to a call account in order to maximise interest earned.

(c) Why was the investment made

 

(d) Projected Returns

Interest rates can vary from time to time, but the rates are currently:

Current Account – 5.25%

Call Account – 5.6%

(e) Who represented SAMSA in negotiations

There are no negotiations – these accounts were set up many years ago. Transfers to and from the Call account are authorised by the Chief Financial Officer and released by 2 bank signatories as per the Delegation of Authority.

(f) Date of Investment

Various dates as and when surplus monies are identified so that we can maximise interest earned.

(g) Return on investments received

The following interest was received in:

2016 – R401 000

2017 – R688 000

2018 – R2 534 000

From 1 April 2018 to 31 January 2019 SAMSA received interest of R2 315 000

(h) Investments made with

ABSA Bank

ABSA Bank

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

Airports Company South Africa has a Board approved Investment Policy which governs the investment of surplus funds in line with the Section 31.3.1 of the Treasury Regulation which stipulates the following “A government business enterprise listed in Schedule 2, 3B and 3D or a public entity listed in Schedule 3A or 3C authorised to invest surplus funds, must have an investment policy approved by the accounting authority”.

Please see attached Investment portfolios, addressing the following questions: (a) What investments have been made in each month by (ii) entities reporting to him (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what was the nature of each investment, (d) what were the projected returns in each case, (f) on what date was each investment made, (g) what returns have been enjoyed to date in each case and (h) with whom were investments made in each case?

(e) The Company’s Treasury Department under the Finance Division is responsible for negotiating the investments of surplus cash on behalf of the company.

(b) The Company invests in various instruments such as money market funds, term deposits, income funds and call deposits which ensures that the company is able to meet its financial obligations at all times.

(c) The Treasury Department invests surplus cash in accordance with the Board approved policy to ensure that capital is preserved, adequate liquidity is maintained, and returns are optimised. The counterparty risk is managed by monitoring and diversifying the list of approved counterparties. To mitigate credit risk, the Treasury Department conducts credit risk assessment of investment counterparties whenever there is new information such as financial statements and credit rating reports. In addition, the Company invests with institutions and funds with a minimum national long-term credit rating of A- or equivalent and/or minimum national short-term credit rating of F1 or equivalent.

The Board Approved Investment Policy further stipulates the following thresholds regarding counterparties and approved financial instruments for the investment of surplus cash: counterparty limit, asset class allocation, credit rating limit, weighted average duration, assessment of investment instruments based on liquidity requirements and financial instruments and products.

Airports Company Investment portfolio as 30th June 2018

Airports Company Investment portfolio as 30th September 2018

Airports Company Investment portfolio as 31st December 2018

Airports Company South Africa Investment Portfolio as 31st March 2016

Airports Company South Africa Investment Portfolio as 31st March 2017