Questions and Replies

23 October 2018 - NW2679

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) In which combat zones are troops of the SA National Defence Force currently deployed and (b) what number of troops are deployed in each combat zone?

Reply:

Internal Deployments/External Deployments

(a) The SA National Defence Force has no troops deployed in any combat zone.

(b) Zero troops are deployed in any combat zone.

23 October 2018 - NW1510

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

What number of the medal winners at the 2018 Commonwealth Games (a) form part of the operational expenditure of the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) and (b) received any money from SASCOC in the year preceding the Commonwealth Games?

Reply:

(a) seventeen(17)

Please find here: (b)

23 October 2018 - NW2817

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he has been informed of any persons who have been restricted from obtaining the unabridged marriage certificates of their parents solely on the grounds that the parents got divorced and the unabridged marriage certificate has been locked away and cannot be accessed; if so, (2) what (a) is the reasoning behind such a restriction and (b) procedure must the affected persons follow to get the certificates?

Reply:

1. No. The Honourable Member is thereby requested to furnish information or evidence alluded to in this regard.

(2)(a) None, there are no restrictions.

(2)(b) An application form for marriage certificate (DHA 130) must be completed with the correct and relevant personal particulars (names, surname, identity number, date and place of marriage, etc.), together with a payment of seventy five rands (R75.00) which must be submitted at the nearest Home Affairs local front office. A marriage entry number and place of marriage may be required to trace some marriage records, in particular the African race group that were registered prior to 1990. The processing time for such applications is eight (8) weeks subjected to accessibility of records.

 

23 October 2018 - NW2804

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to injuries that were sustained (a) at railway stations and/or (b) on trains (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (aa) what number of injuries were sustained in each month, (bb) what were the reasons for the injuries in each case, (cc) how was each victim injured, (dd) where were the injuries sustained in each month, (ee) what steps has his department taken to reduce injuries at railway stations and on trains, (ff) how has each victim been compensated and (gg) what are the costs involved in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b) (i) & (ii) (aa) & (bb) See detail attached.

Reasons for Injuries are provided in terms of the categories of the Rail Safety Regulator.

Description of SANS 3000 -1 Categories

A

Collisions

B

Derailment

C

Train pass signal at danger without the necessary authority (SPAD)

D

Level crossing

E

Struck by train

F

Fell from the train in the section

G

Travelling outside the designated area of the train (staff rididng, surfing, travelling between train coaches, hanging outside the train,

H

Fell from stationary or moving train onto the platform

I

Infrastructure related incidents (fell in the manhole, slippery floor, )

J

Electrocutions

L

Operational train fires (HT explosions)

 

Hard coupling by MLPS trains.

(cc) The information on how each victim sustained injuries are volumes and extends over 7000 records. These records are available at PRASA for observation.

(dd) See detail attached.

(ee) Steps taken

Actions PRASA is taking to reduce the injuries at railway stations:

  1. Ongoing Safety Awareness Campaigns conducted at Stations and at high incident Level Crossings.
  2. Elimination of illegal crossings in the Rail environment mainly through fencing, including walling of the operational tunnel in the long term.
  3. Acceleration of the Fencing Programme is an area where PRASA is focusing on in terms of reduction of fatalities as well as improved security that will enable better train performance.
  4. Elimination of high risk level crossings in the medium to long term. Speed restrictions -enforcement of speed restriction on platforms.
  5. Provision of staff at high risk locations, specifically to watch for people loitering in the Operational areas.
  6. Speed restrictions - enforcement of speed restriction on platforms and in the operational tunnel.

Actions PRASA is taking to reduce the injuries on trains:

  1. Train Service Performance improvement to reduce overcrowding and the need to rush for a train.
  2. Introduction of new trains with open walkthrough between coaches - no doors between coaches.
  3. Redesign/rebuild Platform (Platform Alignment). For example, three Platforms on the Pienaarspoort Corridor in Gauteng aligned with the new train set height.
  4. Improve surfaces on platforms and footbridges through the station modernisation, station upgrades, station improvement and footbridge projects.
  5. Staff Training in Crowd Control Procedures.
  6. Return coaches to service to improve availability of train sets and reduce overcrowding.
  7. CCTV Cameras/Monitoring on Stations.
  8. Platform Marshalls and Safety Patrollers deployed in high capacity corridors and stations.
  9. Introduce replacement of door mechanism (design options) during routine maintenance of train sets.
  10. Improve Inspection, Testing and Maintenance regimes for doors prior to train release - Daily Train Inspections conducted by Train Crew and Technicians.

(ff) Compensation of injured in the PRASA environment is based on a claim submitted against the insurers. Claims can be submitted years after an incident and compensation are not directly linked to injuries in a specific year. See detail attached

Note for those incidents that are not as result of a major incident where there is a R0 value reflected, PRASA is still litigating on the merits and quantum that’s to be paid to the plaintiff. The files for the various major incidents over the past three years are also attached.

(gg) See detail attached.

23 October 2018 - NW2036

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Lotriet, Dr A to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

(1) What are the details of the (a} number of accidents that vehicles owned by her department were involved (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1April2018, (b) cost for repairs in each case and (c}(i) number of and (ii} reasons for vehicles being written off in each case; (2) whether all vehicles owned by her department have tracking devices installed?

Reply:

Please find here: REPLY

23 October 2018 - NW2515

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Davids, Ms S to ask the Minister of Energy

(1)With reference to his apology to the Portfolio Committee on Energy for the absence of his department from the meeting of 14 August 2018 where the fuel price would have been discussed, what is the (a) name and (b) position of the person in his department who is being held responsible for the alleged miscommunication; (2) Whether any disciplinary action has been instituted against the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what are the terms of reference of the technical team established to look into the high cost of fuel, (b) what is the total number of meetings that the technical team has held, (c) what is the name of each official who is a member of the technical team and (d) by what date is the technical team expected to complete its work?

Reply:

1. (a) Mr Lungisile Pakati

(b) Parliamentary Officer

2. Yes, disciplinary action has been instituted against the employee. The disciplinary hearing was on 06 September 2018 and finalised o 18 September 2018. The department awaits the outcome of the disciplinary process from the Presiding Officer.

3. (a)The main purpose of the task team is to come up with short, medium and long term strategies to alleviate the problem of high fuel prices.

As a result, both the DDG of the Tax and Financial Sector Policy of the NT and the DDG of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Regulation Branch of the DoE are leading a task team to analyse fuel prices and fuel taxes so there is a better understanding of the distributive impacts of fuel price increases on the economy, business and consumers. This will help with crafting ideas on ways to alleviate the impact of the fuel price increases on the various stakeholders.

The other team members other than other than officials from DOE and NT involved with administering the collection of fuel levies and tariffs are NERSA, SARS and CEF.

(b) To date 2 plenary meetings have been held. Work continues in the various work streams.

(c) Mr. Ismail Momoniat: DDG of the Tax and Financial Sector Policy at the National Treasury and Mr Tseliso Maqubela: DDG of Petroleum and Petroleum Products Regulation Branch at the Department of Energy; supported by officials in their respective Programmes. Officials from NERSA, SARS and CEF are also providing support to the team.

(d) The initial report was expected at the end of September 2018, however, more work is still required before the report is finalised. It is anticipated that the work would be completed by the end of November 2018.

23 October 2018 - NW1098

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation

What (a) number of consulting firms or companies are currently contracted by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her and (b)(i) is the name of each consultant, (ii) are the relevant details of the service provided in each case and (iii) is the (aa) start date, (bb) time period, (cc) monetary value in Rands of each contract and (dd) name and position of each individual who signed off on each contract?

Reply:

(a) The department has not contracted any consulting firms or companies currently

(i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) (aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(cc) Not applicable

(dd) Not applicable

 

RECOMMENDATION

It is recommended that the Executive Authority approves the reply, should she concur with its contents.

MR M.E MOEMI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE: 07/09/2018

DECISION

Reply approved/amended.

MS T XASA, MP
MINISTER OF SPORT AND RECREATION
DATE: 09/09/2018

23 October 2018 - NW2405

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McLoughlin, Mr AR to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the reply to question 1412 on 25 June 2018 (Annexure “A”), what are the details of the figures and calculations that resulted in the determination that it would cost R60 billion to shut down SA Airways?

Reply:

This response is according to information received from South African Airways:

The calculation was based on SAA’s balance sheet as at March 2017 calculated on a liquidation basis (calculation attached as Annexure “B”). A determination of the likely proceeds of the assets was made together with the value of liabilities, which includes loans, trade and other creditors and the liabilities associated with the aircraft leases. The greatest cost of the amount is related to settlement of contractual liabilities and settlement of loans.

23 October 2018 - NW2765

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

Whether, with reference to Silverton CAS 155/07/2011, (a) a certain person (name furnished) will be charged as a result of the report drafted by a certain person (name furnished) and signed off by the then-acting crime intelligence boss (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The investigation and a comprehensive charge sheet, with regard to Silverton, CAS 155/07/2011, has been finalised. The suspects in this matter were arrested, on 21 September 2011 and on 4 October 2011, respectively. The case was subsequently withdrawn against the accused, on 4 December 2011, based on a decision by the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA).

Based on a decision by the Supreme Court of Appeal, the matter was re-enrolled on the court roll at the Serious Commercial Crimes Court, Pretoria, on 1 April 2015. However, it was struck from the roll, on 6 July 2015, due to the fact that the documentation, which the State would be relying upon, was not yet declassified by the South African Police Service (SAPS).

This matter cannot proceed as the SAPS has not yet declassified the documentation, which was used in the commission of the alleged crimes.

The investigation includes the allegations made by Major General M Hankel, in the report to the Inspector General of Intelligence.

On 17 May 2017, the then Acting National Commissioner of the SAPS, Lieutenant General Phahlane, informed the National Director of Public Prosecutions (NDPP),


NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTIONS FOR WRITTEN REPLY


Internal Ref Number 1529 2018
Submission Date: 11-09-2018
Question Asked by : Ms D Kohler
Question Asked to: Minister of Police

Question:

1. With regards to Silverton CAS 155/07/2011, (a) Is Richard Mdluli going to be charged as a result of the report drafted by Major General Mark Hankel and signed off by then-acting crime intelligence boss Chris de Kock; if not, why not?

23 October 2018 - NW2834

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Figlan, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) Why has the new Home Affairs office in Sterkspruit not been opened, as community members have to travel long distances to the closest Home Affairs office due to a lack of service delivery in Sterkspruit and (b) on what date does he expect the Sterkspruit office to be opened?

Reply:

(a-b) The office could not be opened due to lack of datalines which would link the office with Head Office. The datalines have however since been installed. The office has been opened and commenced operations on 01 October 2018.

23 October 2018 - NW2757

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Bozzoli, Dr B to ask the Minister of Higher Education and Training

(1)What number of (a) cases of (i) rape, (ii) gender-based violence, (iii) murder, (iv) homicide and (v) fatal attacks have been reported at each campus of each (aa) university and (bb) technical and vocational education and training college since 1 January 2014 and (b) the specified cases (i) went to court and (ii) resulted in convictions; (2) will her department be monitoring the rates of gender-based violence occurring on campuses in order to assess whether her department’s new gender-based violence policy is having an effect; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. The Department currently does not routinely monitor such cases at university and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) campuses. The Department has initiated a process to collect such data from institutions and developed an instrument to be distributed to institutions. Once responses have been received, a report will be provided.
  2. The Gender Based Violence (GBV) Policy and Strategic Framework is still in the process of development. HEAIDS developed the draft GBV Policy and Strategic Framework, and handed them over to the Department on 26 August 2018. The formal policy development process still needs to be conducted, such as conducting further external consultation, including with the Departments of Social Development, Health, Women, Justice and Constitutional Development, and the National Prosecuting Agency; a Socio-Economic Impact Assessment Study needs to be conducted; and a public comments process. The GBV Policy and Strategic Framework will provide an implementation plan that includes monitoring and reporting on incidents. Once finalised and published, the Department will monitor the implementation of the policy.

23 October 2018 - NW2643

Profile picture: Kohler-Barnard, Ms D

Kohler-Barnard, Ms D to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What number of (a) truck scanners are currently at the country's border crossing points and (b) border crossing points (i) are there and (ii) have K9 units; (2) what number of trucks (a) pass through each border crossing daily and (b) are emptied each (i) day, (ii) week and/or (iii) month coming into and out of the country in the search for (aa) human trafficking victims, (bb) firearms and (cc) drugs or contraband; (3) what number of victims of human trafficking were discovered in each of the past three financial years?

Reply:

(1)(a) Three.

(1 )(b )(i) 72 Ports of Entry, with 53 land ports, of which 22 are commercial Ports of Entry.

(1)(b)(ii) Five.

(2)(a) An average of 2 345 trucks pass through the Ports of Entry daily.

(2)(b)(i) An avarage of 31.11 vehicles, including trucks are searched daily.

(2)(b)(ii) An average of 218.38 vehicles, including trucks are searched weekly.

(2)(b )(iii) An average of 946.33 vehicles, including trucks are searched monthly.

(2)(aa) - (cc) There is no differentiation between searches for human trafficing, firearms, drugs or contraband. All cross-border crimes are addressed during searches.


(3) 2015/2016- 14

2016/2017- 306

2017/2018- 22

Reply to question 2643 recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2018 – 10- 17


Reply to question 2643 approved


MINISTER OF POLICE
BH CELE, MP
Date: 22/10/2018

23 October 2018 - NW2734

Profile picture: Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV

Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1)What are the names of the (a) individuals and (b) organisations that undertook the research and wrote the White Paper on an Integrated National Disability Strategy (INDS); (2) whether the persons who undertook the research and wrote the paper were external contractors; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount were they paid in each case?

Reply:

1.(a) The INDS completed in 1997, was compiled through a multi stakeholder consultative process which was led by the Office of the Status of Disabled Persons (OSDP).

(b). The stakeholders comprised of officials from all spheres of government, members of civil society, members from academic institutions, persons with disabilities and various organizations of persons with disabilities.

2. The process was not commissioned to external contractors and therefore no individual / external contractor was compensated

22 October 2018 - NW2811

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Brauteseth, Mr TJ to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) Who are the persons in his department and entities reporting to him who had remuneration monies incorrectly paid to them (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b)(i) what amount has been over-paid to each person and (ii) over what period was each amount paid, (c) what amount (i) was paid back and (ii) is still owed, (d) what payment arrangements have been made in each case, (e) under what conditions in each case, (f) what interest has been charged in each case and (g) how was the interest calculated in each case?

Reply:

Department

i. 2015/2016, 2016/2017 and 2017/2018:

Name

(a)

Amount Overpaid

(b)(i)

Period

(b)(ii)

Amount Repaid

(c)(i)

Amount Outstanding

(c)(ii)

Payment Arrangement

(d)

Conditions

(e)

Interest Charged

(f)

Interest Calculation

(g)

DOT EMPLOYEE 1

16,867.74

2015/04/01

16,867.74

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 1,405.65 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 2

24,863.16

2015/04/01

24,863.16

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 6,215.79 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 3

24,863.16

2015/04/01

20,719.30

4,143.86

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 2,071.93 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 4

1,885.46

2016/02/29

1,885.46

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

Once off

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 5

9,000.00

2016/03/16

9,000.00

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 337.50 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 6

6,300.00

2016/03/16

6,300.00

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 262.50 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 7

7,200.00

2016/03/16

7,200.00

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 337.50 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 8

6,300.00

2016/03/16

6,300.00

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

Once off

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 9

8,100.00

2016/03/16

8,100.00

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 337.50 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 10

6,878.75

2016/04/01

6,878.75

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 1,000 p/m

0.00

N/A

DOT EMPLOYEE 11

17,491.95

2017/09/28

17,491.95

0.00

SALARY DEDUCTION

R 1,000 p/m

0.00

N/A

ii. 1 April 2018 to 31 August 2018:

No salary overpayments occurred in this period.

Airports Company South Africa SOC Limited (ACSA)

(a) None of the employees have been paid incorrectly.

i) None of the employees have been paid incorrectly for the past three financial years

ii) No incorrect payment has been made since 1 April 2018.

(b)(i) No over payment has been made since 1 April 2018

ii) No over payment has been made since 1 April 2018,

(c)(i) No back payment (retrospective payment) has been made since 1 April 2018 and

ii) No amount is due to the Company.

(d) No arrangement is made, because no amount is due to the Company

(e) No conditions, because nothing is due to the Company

(f) No interest charged, because nothing is due to the Company

(g) No interest calculated, because no amount is due to the Company

Air Traffic and Navigation Services SOC Limited (ATNS)

2015_2016

Employee

Reason

Total Recovered

TOTAL OWED

BALANCE

REPAYMENT PERIOD

1

Global Allowance incorrectly paid

-13976.04

13976.04

0

5 Months

2

Dismissal after payroll closed

-8843.8

8843.8

0

Once off

3

Dismissal after payroll closed

-10094.8

10094.8

0

Once off

4

Incorrect Ex-gratia payment paid

-23460.35

23460.35

0

8 Months

5

Dismissal after payroll closed

-4989.17

4989.17

0

Once off

6

Late notification of unpaid maternity leave

-13365.72

13365.72

0

7 Months

7

Paid after contract had expired

-79387.66

73344.5

0

Once off

2016_2017

Employee

Reason

TOTAL RECOVERED

TOTAL OWED

BALANCE

REPAYMENT PERIOD

1

Global Allowance incorrectly paid

-9317.36

9317.36

0

2 Months

2

Global Allowance incorrectly paid

-7562.49

7562.49

0

Once off

2017_2018

Employee

Reason

TOTAL RECOVERED

TOTAL OWED

BALANCE

REPAYMENT PERIOD

1

Dismissal after payroll closed

-2970.91

2970.91

0

Once off

2

Dismissal after payroll closed

-4173.69

4173.69

0

Once off

2018_2019

Employee

Reason

TOTAL RECOVERED

TOTAL OWED

BALANCE

REPAYMENT PERIOD

1

Resigned after payroll closed

-963.31

963.31

0

Once off

2

Paid after contract expired

-58333.33

58333.33

0

Once off

3

Paid unpaid maternity

-3000.00

12500

9500

4 Months

No interest was charged in all the cases.

South African Civil Aviation Authority (SACAA)

(a)(i) in the past three financial years: One namely: Esther Strydom : She retired in August 2017 a month before full payments of 13th cheque savings in September 2017 instead of one month less.

(ii) And since 1 April 2018: None

(b)(i) Amount has been over-paid to each person is R 4,229.

(ii) In August 2017 as part of the 13th cheque savings payment. The 13th cheque was paid in full i.e. 12 months instead of 11 months.

(c)(i) Paid back in full – R4,229.32

(ii) None

(d) None in this case

(e) None in this case

(f) None in this case

(g) None in this case

Cross-Border Road Transport Agency (CBRT)

a) The Cross-Border Road Transport Agency incorrectly paid Mr. Ronnie Mokhari in (i) May 2016 and (ii) No employees were incorrectly paid since 1 April 2018.

b) (i) An amount of R20, 255.76 was over-paid to the above-mentioned employee.

(ii) The amount was paid once, in May 2016.

c) (i) The total amount of R20, 255.76 was paid back to the Agency by the employee.

(ii) No amount is still owed by the employee to the Agency.

d) The Agency entered into an acknowledgement of debt agreement with the employee.

e) A once-off amount of R11, 900.00 was paid back in May 2016 and the balance of R8, 355.76 was spread over six (6) months as shown below:

May 2016

June 2016

July 2016

Aug 2016

Sep 2016

Oct 2016

Nov 2016

Total

R11,900.00

R1,338.94

R1,338.94

R1,338.94

R1,338.94

R1,338.94

R1,661.06

R20,255.76

f) No interest was charged for the aforesaid amount.

g) Not Applicable

Road Accident Fund (RAF)

a) The following persons (names and surnames redacted in compliance with the Promotion of Access to Information Act, No. 2 of 2000) in the Road Accident Fund (RAF) had remuneration monies incorrectly paid to them:

 

(i) in the past three financial years

(b)(i) the amount overpaid to each person was:

and (ii) the amounts were paid over the following periods:

the following amounts (c)(i) were paid back:

and (ii) are still owed:

(d) the following payment arrangements have been made in each case:

(e) under the following conditions in each case:

(f) the following interest was charged in each case:

and (g) interest was calculated as follows in each case:

Employee 1

R1 646.51

1July 2016

R1 646.51

R0.00

the employee agreed to a deduction from his or her salary in respect of the overpayment in terms of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 9 months

the RAF did not levy interest in respect of overpayments to employees in terms of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy. Clause 8.8 (iii) of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy. provides that no interest will be levied on staff debt

not applicable

Employee 2

R806.60

1July 2016

R806.60

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 4 months

   

Employee 3

R1 950.14

1July 2016

R1 950.14

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 4 months

   

Employee 4

R5 736.64

1July 2016

R5 736.64

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 5

R3 117.25

1July 2016

R3 117.25

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 4 months

   

Employee 6

R3 866.67

1July 2016

R3 866.67

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 2 months

   

Employee 7

R6 451.83

1July 2016

R6 451.83

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 12 months

   

Employee 8

R2 089.63

1July 2016

R2 089.63

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 6 months

   

Employee 9

R2 422.13

1July 2016

R2 422.13

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 5 months

   

Employee 10

R1 368.89

1July 2016

R1 368.89

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 4 months

   

Employee 11

R8 955.28

1July 2016

R8 955.28

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 13 months

   

Employee 12

R3 594.08

1July 2016

R3 594.08

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 13

R199.10

1July 2016

R199.10

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 14

R1 413.00

1July 2016

R1 413.00

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 3 months

   

Employee 15

R459.61

1July 2016

R459.61

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 2 months

   

Employee 16

R2 354.72

1July 2016

R2 354.72

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 17

R3 475.65

1July 2016

R3 475.65

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 7 months

   

Employee 18

R2 555.78

1July 2016

R2 555.78

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 6 months

   

Employee 19

R5 416.74

1July 2016

R5 416.74

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 6 months

   

Employee 20

R1 163.53

1July 2016

R1 163.53

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 2 months

   

Employee 21

R1 075.74

1July 2016

R1 075.74

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 3 months

   

Employee 22

R1 365.22

1July 2016

R1 365.22

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 23

R927.43

1July 2016

R927.43

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 24

R9 075.88

1July 2016

R9 075.88

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 25

R1 689.76

1July 2016

R1 689.76

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 2 months

   

Employee 26

R8 455.59

1July 2016

R8 455.59

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 27

R3 934.92

1July 2016

R3 250.00

R684.92

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 16 months

   

Employee 28

R2 998.01

1July 2016

R1 750.00

R1 248.01

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 29

R2 610.03

1July 2016

R1 305.00

R1 305.03

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 23 months

   

Employee 30

R4 842.01

1July 2016

R3 500.00

R1 342.01

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 18 months

   

Employee 31

R3 213.89

1July 2016

R1 740.96

R1 472.93

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 25 months

   

Employee 32

R3 886.91

1July 2016

R2 270.22

R1 616.69

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 33

R3 954.58

1July 2016

R2 142.01

R1 812.57

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 34

R4 256.45

1July 2016

R2 339.34

R1 917.11

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 35

R4 521.44

1July 2016

R2 449.20

R2 072.24

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 36

R5 134.68

1July 2016

R2 995.16

R2 139.52

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 37

R5 646.83

on 1July 2016

R3 500.00

R2 146.83

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 38

R5 013.29

on 1July 2016

R2 800.00

R2 213.29

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 39

R6 436.19

1July 2016

R4 200.00

R2 236.19

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 40

R11 035.74

1July 2016

R8 252.94

R2 782.80

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 41

R6 724.45

1July 2016

R3 922.66

R2 801.79

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 42

R7 395.31

1July 2016

R4 005.82

R3 389.49

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 43

R7 428.98

1July 2016

R4 024.15

R3 404.83

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 25 months

   

Employee 44

R7 951.16

1July 2016

R4 306.90

R3 644.26

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 45

R10 959.68

on 1July 2016

R7 000.00

R3 959.68

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 21 months

   

Employee 46

R6 035.72

on 1July 2016

R1 447.18

R4 588.54

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 11 months

   

Employee 47

R11 019.98

on 1July 2016

R5 969.21

R5 050.77

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

Employee 48

R11 087.24

on 1July 2016

R4 328.73

R6 758.51

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 26 months

   

Employee 49

R2 237.50

1July 2016

R0.00

R2 237.50

no payment arrangement was entered into with the employee as the employee resigned while owing the debt and the debt recovery process was initiated in accordance with the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee resigned without agreeing to payment terms

   

Employee 50

R15 266.65

1July 2016

R0.00

R15 266.65

no payment arrangement was entered into with the employee as the employee resigned while owing the debt and the debt recovery process was initiated in accordance with the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee resigned without agreeing to payment terms

   

Employee 51

R6 000.00

25 Sep 2016

R0.00

R6 000.0

the employee agreed to a deduction from his or her salary in respect of the overpayment, the agreement was made in terms of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 52

R1 914.76

24 Sep 2017

R1 914.76

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 53

R1 195.30

24 Sep 2017

R1 195.30

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 54

R1 205.63

24 Sep 2017

R1 205.63

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 55

R1 542.98

24 Sep 2017

R1 542.98

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 56

R2 441.28

24 Sep 2017

R2 441.28

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 57

R2 585.38

24 Sep 2017

R2 585.38

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 58

R2 684.59

24 Sep 2017

R2 684.59

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 59

R1 306.63

24 Sep 2017

R1 306.63

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 60

R2 625.35

24 Sep 2017

R2 625.35

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

 

Employee 61

R2 985.52

24 Sep 2017

R2 985.52

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 62

R1 576.48

24 Sep 2017

R1 576.48

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 63

R1 115.56

24 Sep 2017

R1 115.56

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 64

R1 237.28

24 Sep 2017

R1 237.28

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 65

R3 857.18

24 Sep 2017

R3 857.18

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 66

R713.63

24 Sep 2017

R713.63

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 67

R1 636.99

24 Sep 2017

R1 636.99

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 68

R734.57

24 Sep 2017

R734.57

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 69

R819.90

24 Sep 2017

R819.90

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 70

R1 893.59

24 Sep 2017

R1 893.59

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 71

R1 075.96

24 Sep 2017

R1 075.96

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 72

R1 330.24

24 Sep 2017

R1 330.24

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 73

R1 614.67

24 Sep 2017

R1 614.67

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 74

R2 015.13

24 Sep 2017

R2 015.13

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 75

R805.17

24 Sep 2017

R805.17

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 76

R1 503.29

24 Sep 2017

R1 503.29

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 77

R2 010.83

24 Sep 2017

R2 010.83

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 78

R849.38

24 Sep 2017

R849.38

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

 

Employee 79

R803.60

24 Sep 2017

R803.60

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 80

R1 448.70

24 Sep 2017

R1 448.70

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 81

R1 664.72

24 Sep 2017

R1 664.72

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 82

R1 211.75

24 Sep 2017

R1 211.75

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 83

R2 316.16

24 Sep 2017

R2 316.16

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 84

R765.76

24 Sep 2017

R765.76

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 85

R1 797.51

24 Sep 2017

R1 797.51

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 86

R2 462.94

24 Sep 2017

R2 462.94

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 87

R878.13

24 Sep 2017

R878.13

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 88

R1 121.07

24 Sep 2017

R1 121.07

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 89

R1 699.12

24 Sep 2017

R1 699.12

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 90

R1 265.55

24 Sep 2017

R1 265.55

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 91

R2 008.73

24 Sep 2017

R2 008.73

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 92

R1 324.42

24 Sep 2017

R1 324.42

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 93

R1 626.82

24 Sep 2017

R1 626.82

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 94

R1 059.15

24 Sep 2017

R1 059.15

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 95

R1 351.41

24 Sep 2017

R1 351.41

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 96

R1 548.25

24 Sep 2017

R1 548.25

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 97

R860.08

24 Sep 2017

R860.08

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 98

R830.91

24 Sep 2017

R830.91

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 99

R433.94

24 Sep 2017

R433.94

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 100

R1 059.15

24 Sep 2017

R1 059.15

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 101

R667.03

24 Sep 2017

R667.03

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 102

R1 612.63

24 Sep 2017

R1 612.63

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 103

R1 026.20

24 Sep 2017

R1 026.20

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 104

R1 798.53

24 Sep 2017

R1 798.53

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 105

R555.75

24 Sep 2017

R555.75

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 106

R1 120.22

24 Sep 2017

R1 120.22

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 107

R1 563.60

24 Sep 2017

R1 563.60

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 108

R364.86

24 Sep 2017

R364.86

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 109

R573.83

24 Sep 2017

R573.83

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

 

Employee 110

R895.03

24 Sep 2017

R895.03

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 111

R336.77

24 Sep 2017

R336.77

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 112

R761.10

24 Sep 2017

R761.10

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 113

R1 100.00

24 Sep 2017

R1 100.00

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 114

R1 000.36

24 Sep 2017

R1 000.36

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 115

R1 081.16

24 Sep 2017

R1 081.16

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 116

R1 158.48

24 Sep 2017

R1 158.48

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 117

R538.91

24 Sep 2017

R538.91

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 118

R892.13

24 Sep 2017

R892.13

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 119

R1 005.47

24 Sep 2017

R1 005.47

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 120

R989.29

24 Sep 2017

R989.29

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 121

R1 954.50

24 Sep 2017

R1 954.50

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 122

R1 220.70

24 Sep 2017

R1 220.70

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 123

R1 075.16

24 Sep 2017

R1 075.16

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 124

R1 639.11

24 Sep 2017

R1 639.11

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 125

R1 098.55

24 Sep 2017

R1 098.55

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 126

R1 562.64

24 Sep 2017

R1 562.64

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 127

R1 659.18

24 Sep 2017

R1 659.18

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 128

R1 739.24

24 Sep 2017

R1 739.24

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 129

R1 709.55

24 Sep 2017

R1 709.55

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 130

R1 713.19

24 Sep 2017

R1 713.19

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 131

R1 700.27

24 Sep 2017

R1 700.27

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 132

R1 062.94

24 Sep 2017

R1 062.94

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 133

R1 666.82

24 Sep 2017

R1 666.82

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 134

R1 667.26

24 Sep 2017

R1 667.26

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 135

R1 055.36

24 Sep 2017

R1 055.36

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   
 

R1 000.86

24 Sep 2017

R1 000.86

R0.00

the employee agreed to a deduction from his or her salary in respect of the overpayment, the agreement was made in terms of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

 

Employee 137

R1 115.87

24 Sep 2017

R1 115.87

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 138

R1 694.64

24 Sep 2017

R1 694.64

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 139

R1 694.64

24 Sep 2017

R1 694.64

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 140

R1 785.39

24 Sep 2017

R1 785.39

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 141

R1 033.34

24 Sep 2017

R1 033.34

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 142

R984.39

24 Sep 2017

R984.39

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 143

R1 228.34

24 Sep 2017

R1 228.34

R0.00

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

Employee 144

R58 088.56

25 Aug 2017

R33 884.96

R24 203.60

 

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment over a period of 24 months

   

and (ii) since 1 April 2018:

Employee 145

R3 491.32

28-June 2018

R0.00

R 3 491.32

the employee agreed to a deduction from his or her salary in respect of the overpayment, the agreement was made in terms of the RAF’s Debtors Management Policy

the employee agreed to re-pay the overpayment in one instalment

   

(a) Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA);

Specialist: Information Management -Information Management Unit –Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA);

(i) 2015/2016= None, 2016/2017=None and 2017/2018-One (1);

(ii) None;

(b) Not applicable;

(i) Birthday Bonus;

(ii) One Month,

(c) R23 398.10;

(i) The amount was paid back once-off;

(ii) Not owed,

(d) Once off re-Payment-September 2017.

(e) Payroll deduction,

(f) None; and

(g) Not applicable

Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC)

(a) (i)(ii) Please see attached spreadsheet for the names of people remunerated incorrectly in the past 4years. (Including the current financial year) by the Road Traffic Management Corporation.

(b) (i) Please see attached spreadsheet for the amounts over-paid to each person in the past 4 years. (Including the current financial year)

(ii) These amounts were paid only once in each of the three years.

(c) (i)(ii) Please see attached working paper for amounts paid back and still owing.

(d) The employees agreed to pay back the money over a period ranging from 4 to 24 months

(e) The 2015/16 overpayment relates to the upskilling of traffic officers as per collective agreement 1 of 2015 between RTMC and organised labour. The collective agreement excluded senior inspectors from payment of an upskilling benefit however 24 names of senior inspectors were incorrectly included in the list of officials entitled to the benefit.

This mistake was identified after payment and senior inspectors were informed of the erroneous payment and repayment arrangements made.

In 2016/17, 17 employees were overpaid as a result of resignations subsequent to the salary payment date which is the 15th of each month. These overpayments were recovered from the leave pay-outs.

In this period an allowance due to the one official was incorrectly calculated resulting in overpayment. This was identified and the official made arrangements to repay the money.

In 2017/18, 16 employees were overpaid as a result of incorrect calculation of their 13th cheque.

(f) No interest was charged.

(g) Refer to (f) above

Initial and Surname

Balance as Per April 2016

Addi O/payments Apr 16 - March 17

Repayments ( Apr 16 - March 17 )

Balance as Per March 2017

Additional Overpayments ( Apr 17 - March 18 )

Repayments ( Apr 17 - March 18 )

Balance as Per March 2018

Additional Overpayments ( Apr 18 - August 19)

Repayments ( Apr 19 - August 19 )

Balance as Per August 2018

                     

Employee 1

22 400,00

-

(7 466,68)

14 933,32

-

(14 933,32)

-

 

 

-

Employee 2

22 400,00

-

(7 466,68)

14 933,32

-

(14 933,32)

-

 

 

-

Employee 3

22 400,00

-

(12 075,00)

10 325,00

-

(12 075,00)

(1 750,00)

 

 

(1 750,00)

Employee 4

23 449,47

-

(11 724,74)

11 724,73

-

(11 724,73)

-

 

 

-

Employee 5

23 985,85

-

(12 075,00)

11 910,85

-

(12 075,00)

(164,15)

 

 

(164,15)

Employee 6

24 149,99

-

(11 068,75)

13 081,24

-

(12 075,00)

1 006,24

 

(1 006,25)

(0,01)

Employee 7

24 150,00

-

(12 075,00)

12 075,00

-

(12 075,00)

-

 

 

-

Employee 8

24 150,00

-

(11 068,75)

13 081,25

-

(12 075,00)

1 006,25

 

(1 006,25)

-

Employee 9

24 150,00

-

(8 050,00)

16 100,00

-

(16 100,00)

-

 

 

-

Employee 10

24 150,00

-

(11 048,61)

13 101,39

-

(12 000,00)

1 101,39

 

(1 101,39)

-

Employee 11

24 150,00

-

(11 068,75)

13 081,25

-

(12 075,00)

1 006,25

 

(1 006,25)

-

Employee 12

24 150,00

-

(12 075,00)

12 075,00

-

(12 075,00)

-

 

 

-

Employee 13

24 150,00

-

(11 230,00)

12 920,00

-

(12 720,00)

200,00

 

(200,00)

-

Employee 14

24 150,00

-

(24 150,00)

-

 

 

-

 

 

-

Employee 15

24 150,00

-

(4 025,00)

20 125,00

-

(17 075,00)

3 050,00

 

(3 050,00)

-

Employee 16

24 150,00

-

(12 383,30)

11 766,70

-

(11 689,50)

77,20

 

 

77,20

Employee 17

24 150,00

-

(9 056,25)

15 093,75

-

(15 093,75)

-

 

 

-

Employee 18

24 150,00

-

(12 075,01)

12 074,99

-

(12 074,99)

-

 

 

-

Employee 19

24 150,00

-

(11 068,75)

13 081,25

-

(12 075,00)

1 006,25

 

(1 006,00)

0,25

Employee 20

24 150,00

-

(12 062,50)

12 087,50

-

(12 075,00)

12,50

 

(2 012,15)

(1 999,65)

Employee 21

24 150,00

-

(6 025,00)

18 125,00

-

(12 000,00)

6 125,00

 

(2 000,00)

4 125,00

Employee 22

24 150,00

-

(12 075,00)

12 075,00

-

(5 031,25)

7 043,75

 

 

7 043,75

Employee 23

24 150,01

3 462,82

(8 050,00)

19 562,83

-

(16 100,01)

3 462,82

 

 

3 462,82

Employee 24

24 150,01

-

(12 075,00)

12 075,01

-

(12 075,00)

0,01

 

 

0,01

Employee 25

19 511,73

-

-

19 511,73

-

(5 000,00)

14 511,73

 

 

14 511,73

Employee 26

-

6 433,88

-

6 433,88

-

-

6 433,88

 

 

6 433,88

Employee 27

-

2 560,82

-

2 560,82

-

(2 560,82)

-

 

 

-

Employee 28

-

12 467,91

-

12 467,91

-

(12 467,91)

-

 

 

-

Employee 29

-

12 505,83

(6 443,99)

6 061,84

-

-

6 061,84

 

 

6 061,84

Employee 30

-

128,01

-

128,01

-

(128,01)

-

 

 

-

Employee 31

-

101,56

-

101,56

-

(101,56)

-

 

 

-

Employee 32

-

308,09

-

308,09

-

(308,09)

-

 

 

-

Employee 33

-

69,10

-

69,10

-

(69,10)

-

 

 

-

Employee 34

-

69,11

-

69,11

-

(69,11)

-

 

 

-

Employee 35

-

360,53

-

360,53

-

(360,53)

-

 

 

-

Employee 36

-

1 802,11

-

1 802,11

-

(1 802,11)

-

 

 

-

Employee 37

-

402,97

-

402,97

-

(402,97)

-

 

 

-

Employee 38

-

150,36

-

150,36

-

(150,36)

-

 

 

-

Employee 39

-

106,78

-

106,78

-

(106,78)

-

 

 

-

Employee 40

-

7 197,48

-

7 197,48

1 514,95

(8 712,43)

-

 

 

-

Employee 41

-

2 868,50

-

2 868,50

-

-

2 868,50

 

 

2 868,50

Employee 42

-

8 885,42

(6 790,37)

2 095,05

-

-

2 095,05

 

 

2 095,05

Employee 43

-

-

-

-

3 415,23

-

3 415,23

 

 

3 415,23

Employee 44

-

-

-

-

1 671,72

-

1 671,72

 

 

1 671,72

Employee 45

-

-

-

-

2 673,83

-

2 673,83

 

 

2 673,83

Employee 46

-

-

-

-

3 349,19

-

3 349,19

 

 

3 349,19

Employee 47

-

-

-

-

2 953,06

-

2 953,06

 

 

2 953,06

Employee 48

-

-

-

-

1 305,69

-

1 305,69

 

 

1 305,69

Employee 49

-

-

-

-

3 358,20

-

3 358,20

 

 

3 358,20

Employee 50

-

-

-

-

1 709,50

-

1 709,50

 

 

1 709,50

Employee 51

-

-

-

-

3 337,15

-

3 337,15

 

 

3 337,15

Employee 52

-

-

-

-

1 596,03

-

1 596,03

 

 

1 596,03

Employee 53

-

-

-

-

3 716,78

-

3 716,78

 

 

3 716,78

Employee 54

-

-

-

-

2 842,08

(2 842,08)

-

 

 

-

Employee 55

-

-

-

-

2 260,63

(2 260,62)

0,01

 

 

0,01

Employee 56

-

-

-

-

3 972,51

(3 972,60)

(0,09)

 

 

(0,09)

Employee 57

 

 

 

 

1 850,40

 

1 850,40

 

 

1 850,40

 

592 997,06

59 881,28

(274 773,13)

378 105,21

41 526,95

(333 540,95)

86 091,21

-

(12 388,29)

73 702,92

South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL)

(i) 2014/2015 none

2015/2016 none

2017/2018 (1 month)

(ii) 2018/2019 (5 months) – the persons incorrectly paid from March 2018 to Aug 2018

Total overpayment from March to August 2018 was R88 864 for 74 employees

Total under payment from March to August 2018 was R59 406 for 59 employees

In line with employer-employee confidentiality arrangements, the details of the affected employees can be made available for perusal at the SANRAL offices, subject to securing consent from the affected employees.

(b) As above info can be made available for perusal at SANRAL subject to securing consent from affected employees.

 

(b)(i)(ii) March 2018 Period: 1 Month

(b)(i)(ii) Apr to Aug 2018 Period: 5 Months

(c)(ii) Amount still owed

(f)

(g)

Total Amount Overpaid to EE

Number of EE affected

R14 811

74

R74 055

74

R88 864

74

0

n/a

Total Amount underpaid to EE

Number of EE Affected

R9 901

59

R49 505

59

R59 406

59

   
  1. The executive decided that all moneys must be recovered from those overpaid, and those underpaid must be compensated. In addition, the error on the system has been rectified as of 15 September 2018.

Negotiations are underway with staff for repayment arrangements.

The employer is still in the consultation process with the employees regarding options of payment which include:

  • Repayment / Recovery using the bonus payment
  • Repayment / Recovery over a period of months, not exceeding the overpayment period.
  • Leave encashment

(e) Exact figures that were overpaid will be recovered.

(f) no interest will be charged as payment errors were discovered within a 12-month period.

(g) Not Applicable

Ports Regulator of South Africa (PRSA)

  1. There were no persons who were incorrectly paid any monies by the Ports Regulator in the past three financial years.
  2. N/A
  3. N/A
  4. N/A
  5. N/A
  6. N/A
  7. N/A

South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA)

a) No persons in South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) have had monies incorrectly paid to them:

  1. in the past three years; or
  2. since 1 April 2018;

SOUTH AFRICAN MARITIME SAFETY AUTHORITY (SAMSA)

No.

Question

Response

(a) (i) (ii)

Who are the persons in his department and entities reporting to him who had remuneration monies incorrectly paid to them in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2016/2017/2018

No persons in South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA) have had monies incorrectly paid to them

(b)(i)

What amount has been over-paid to each person

N/A

(ii)

Over what period was each amount paid

N/A

(c)(i) (ii)

What amount was paid back and is still owed

N/A

(d)

What payment arrangements have been made in each case

N/A

(e)

Under what conditions in each case

N/A

(f)

What interest has been charged in each case

N/A

(g)

How was the interest calculated in each case?

N/A

 

 

 

Railway Safety Regulator

(a)(i) During March 2017, the Railway Safety regulator became aware of overpayment of bonusses during the 2015/16 Financial Year period had been detected, and that recovery of such overpayments had to be initiated. The over-payment resulted in the incorrect salary scales being utilized for calculation of bonuses. A total of thirty nine (39) employees were affected:

The current RSR Debt Recovery Policy makes provision for recovery of overpayments for salaries, allowance and other related payments. The recovery of 2015/16 bonus overpayments was in line with the Debt Collectors Policy, and full consultations of employees has been concluded, as required. Recovery of the overpayment amounts for bonusses paid to executives during the 2015/16 financial year period, had commenced in March 2017. Recovery from other employees commenced in September 2017, in accordance with Section 9.6.2 of the RSR Debtor Management policy, which stipulates that “all internal debts shall be recovered within twelve months. The CEO may, under exceptional circumstances and upon submission of a motivation, approve any repayment period exceeding twelve months”. Consultations with the affected employees were conducted and employees were provided with the opportunity indicate their repayment preferences. Although it was the intention of the RSR to recover such overpayment during the 2017/18 financial year, with effect from September 2017 salary payments, certain RSR employees opted to repay their respective debt amount over a 12-month period, whilst permission was granted to 2 employees to exceed the twelve-month provision.

(a)(ii) No overpayments since April 2018 have occurred.

The Table below indicates the amounts which were recovered, as well as the period for such recovery. All monies have been recovered, and no interest was charged or paid.

(a)

Employee

No.

(b)(i)

Overpayment amount due

(b)(ii)

Overpayment Period

(c)(i)

Overpayment amount recovered

(c)(ii)

Balance

(d)

Repayment Period

(e)

Conditions

(f) & (g)

Interest paid

1

49 372,44

Dec 2016

49 372,44

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

2

45 953,63

Dec 2016

45 953,63

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

3

22 246,04

Dec 2016

22 246,04

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

4

30 379,22

Dec 2016

30 379,22

0

18 months

Salary deduction

0

5

11 170,00

Dec 2016

11 170,00

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

6

2 012,47

Dec 2016

2 012,47

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

7

2 012,47

Dec 2016

2 012,47

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

8

7 396,40

Dec 2016

7 396,40

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

9

7 548,55

Dec 2016

7 548,55

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

10

4 529,00

Dec 2016

4 529,00

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

11

16 043,00

Dec 2016

16 043,00

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

12

14 570,70

Dec 2016

14 570,70

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

13

8 311,58

Dec 2016

8 311,58

0

12 months

Salary deduction

0

14

2 740,49

Dec 2016

2 740,49

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

15

3 498,30

Dec 2016

3 498,30

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

16

3 498,40

Dec 2016

3 498,40

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

17

2 146,00

Dec 2016

2 146,00

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

18

2 012,46

Dec 2016

2 012,46

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

19

704,47

Dec 2016

704,47

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

20

707,84

Dec 2016

707,84

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

21

3 849,43

Dec 2016

3 849,43

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

22

1 980,21

Dec 2016

1 980,21

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

24

2 012,46

Dec 2016

2 012,46

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

25

2 259,98

Dec 2016

2 259,98

0

1 months

Salary deduction

0

26

2 012,46

Dec 2016

2 012,46

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

27

6 845,12

Dec 2016

6 845,12

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

28

6 467,35

Dec 2016

6 467,35

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

29

8 526,09

Dec 2016

8 526,09

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

30

15 040,92

Dec 2016

15 040,92

0

7 months

Salary deduction

0

31

3 074,50

Dec 2016

3 074,50

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

32

16 625,49

Dec 2016

16 625,49

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

33

2 802,80

Dec 2016

2 802,80

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

34

8 190,19

Dec 2016

8 190,19

0

12 months

Salary deduction

0

35

4 057,97

Dec 2016

4 057,97

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

36

15 196,00

Dec 2016

15 196,00

0

1 month

Salary deduction

0

37

34 779,53

Dec 2016

34 779,53

0

18 months

Salary deduction

0

39

26 649,73

Dec 2016

26 649,73

0

12 months

Salary deduction

0

 

397 223,69

 

397 223,69

0

   

0

Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA):

(a)(i) During 2015/16 no remuneration monies were incorrectly paid.

During 2016/17 the following Board members had remuneration monies incorrectly paid to them:

(a)

Employee No.

(b)(i) & (ii)

2016/17

(c)(i)

Amount paid back

(c)(ii)

Amount still owed

(d)

Payment Arrangement

(e) & (f)

Interest paid

1.

R211 420.92

Not paid back

R211 420.92

None

None

2.

R358 532.19

Not paid back

R358 532.19

None

None

3.

R245 797.44

Not paid back

R245 797.44

None

None

4.

R315 028.27

Not paid back

R236 271.20

None

None

5.

R324 036.04

Not paid back

R324 036.04

None

None

6.

R350 909.18

Not paid back

R350 909.18

None

None

7.

R291 941.62

Not paid back

R291 941.62

None

None

8.

R1 077 322.12

 

R1 077 322.12

None

None

During 2017/18 no remuneration monies were incorrectly paid.

(a)(ii) Since 1 April 2018 no remuneration monies were incorrectly paid.

22 October 2018 - NW2353

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department or any provincial health department sources services from a certain company (name furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did the contract commence and (b) what is the total amount that has been paid to the specified company since the commencement of the contract; (2) was the tender advertised; if not, why not; if so, what is the name of each company that submitted a bid?

Reply:

(1) No services were sourced from Inhlazeko Project Management System.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(2) N/A

END.

22 October 2018 - NW1025

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the (a) total number of (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics that his department is currently building, (b) location of each building, (c) purpose of each construction, (d)(i) starting and (ii) end date of each construction,(e) overall cost of each construction and (f) capacity of facility?

Reply:

The following tables reflect the details in this regard:

Table 1

Table 2

Table 3

Table 4

END.

22 October 2018 - NW423

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Mr TE

Mulaudzi, Mr TE to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What are the (i) names and (ii) locations of all hospitals in each province that are mandated to remain open for 24 hours a day, seven days a week and (b) of those, (i) what number of hospitals are not open for the specified period and (ii) why?

Reply:

a) All hospitals in the country are mandated to remain open 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

b) Not applicable.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2884

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of student doctors (a) have been sent to Cuba for medical training by all government departments at all levels in each year in the past five financial years and (b) are currently in Cuba; (2) what is the approximate amount that it costs the State to train a doctor in Cuba in comparison to training a doctor in South Africa; (3) does the Government have any plans to increase the number of student doctors that are sent to Cuba for training; if so, what are the relevant details of such plans?

Reply:

Student doctors that have been sent to Cuba for medical training have been sent there only by the Department of Health and not any other Government Department. The total number in the past five financial years is 1 912.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2527

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the total amount that was paid to each (a) shallow water mining, (b) new innovative technology, (c) beach mining, (d) coffer dam mining and (e) mid-water mining contractor by Alexkor in each of the past five financial years what (i) is the total volume of gravels that were treated, (ii) carats of diamond were produced, (iii) is the total number of diamonds that were produced and (iv) is the total income that was generated?

Reply:

Based on information received from Alexkor SOC Limited:

 

CONTRACTORS:

2012/13 FY

2013/14 FY

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

(a)

SHALLOW WATER MINING

R68 940 143

R90 887 459

R87 228 846

R133 120 377

R129 427 373

(b)

NEW INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY

-

-

-

-

 

(c)

BEACH MINING

R23 879 407

R1 425 687

R17 245 950

R2 133 092

R268 825

(d)

COFFER DAM MINING

-

R25 993 234

R51 290 985

R43 865 772

R44 949 244

(e)

MID-WATER MINING

-

-

-

-

-

 

DESCRIPTION:

2012/13 FY

2013/14 FY

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

(i)

VOLUME OF GRAVELS TREATED:

         
 

(aa) BEACH

13 292

17 671

12 042

9 889

12 147

 

(bb) SHALLOW WATER MINING

4 807

5 321

5 196

12 159

13 331

(ii)

CARATS OF DIAMONDS PRODUCED

28 267

26 726

26917

29086

36081

(iii)

NUMBER OF DIAMONDS PRODUCED

58 313

53 809

45 717

48 908

48 508

(iv)

TOTAL INCOME GENERATED

R154 757 620

R195 925 590

R241 107 055

R314 499 408

R308 145 577

 

 

22 October 2018 - NW2842

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Science and Technology

(a) What is the total number of partnership projects that her department embarked on with the Chinese government since 1 January 2014 and (b) What is the estimated investment made by her department and the Chinese government?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Science and Technology (DST) and the Ministry of Science and Technology (MOST) in China run a Joint Research Programme under the Science and Technology Agreement signed by the parties in 1999. The Joint Research Programme is a joint mechanism for soliciting joint research projects from science communities in both countries, which are evaluated, ranked and funded with matched funds provided by the DST and the MOST. The DST funds the South African researchers and the MOST funds the Chinese researchers, with equal matched funds.

(b) The collaborative areas of joint research supported includes themes such as mining, traditional medicines, advanced materials, renewable energy, biotechnology, water research, palaeontology, environment and geosciences.

PLEASE FIND HERE: The tables below indicate the joint projects funded in line with the agreements negotiated between the DST and the NRF and the MOST and the Natural Science Foundation, China (NSFC).

22 October 2018 - NW1572

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1292 on 7 May 2018, those found to have been implicated in the 2015 report of the Ministerial Task Team to Investigate Allegations of Administrative Irregularities, Mismanagement and Poor Governance at the Health Professions Council of South Africa, were criminally investigated and prosecuted?

Reply:

No, no one was criminally investigated and prosecuted.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2354

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department or any provincial health department sources services from a certain company (name furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date did the contract commence and (b) what is the total amount that has been paid to the specified company since the commencement of the contract; (2) was the tender advertised; if not, why not; if so, what is the name of each company that submitted a bid?

Reply:

(1) No, The Department did not source services from Clout Media and no services were requested from the said company.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(2) N/A

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2467

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 566 on 20 August 2018, (a) since what date has the position of facility manager been vacant in each instance and (b) what is the responsibility of the facility manager?

Reply:

a) The positions of the facility managers have been vacant at different times over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework period.

b)  The responsibilities of the facility manager are:

(i) Consolidation and collation of the population health profile of the facility;

(ii) Ensure that priority health programmes and projects are implemented as intended according to the Annual Performance Plan (APP) and Operational Plan;

(ii) Development of the service delivery plan for the facility;

(iv) Mobilisation and management of the human resources of the facility;

(v) Mobilisation and management of the finance and assets;

(vi) Management of the supply chain management in the efficient and effective manner;

(vii) Mobilisation and management of health technology and health facility including the infrastructure;

(viii) Liaising and management of the stakeholders working with and support the health facility;

(ix) Collaboration and supporting the clinic committees

END.

22 October 2018 - NW1691

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of civil law suits involving cases of negligence is the Mpumalanga department of health currently facing, (b) what is the reason for each civil suit involving medical negligence and (c) what is the value of each claim?

Reply:

There are 588 civil law suits involving cases of negligence that the Mpumalanga Department of Health is currently facing. The nature of the cases differs from maternity, orthopaedic, head injury, circumcision etc. The nature of each case, institution where it occurred and the value of the claim, is attached as an Annexure. Please note that what is regarded as the value of each case is actually contingent liability, i.e it is the money that the litigant is claiming. The actual value can only be determined after the case has been settled in court or by mediation as the case may be.

Annexure A: Number of civil law suits involving cases of negligence in the Mpumalanga Department of Health.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW1574

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What are the powers and functions of the Remuneration Committee and (b) on what legislative provisions do these powers rely?

Reply:

The Remuneration Committee (REMCO) of the Health Professions Council (HPCSA) is a Committee of Council established in terms of Section 10(1)(a) of the Health Professions Act, 1974 (Act No. 56 of 1974).

For powers and functions of REMCO, I refer you to the attached Annexure A containing terms of reference of REMCO.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW257

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of nurse and doctor vacancies at each (i) hospital and (ii) clinic in terms of (aa) position and (bb) institution, (b) for how long has each position been vacant and (c) by what date will each vacancy be filled?

Reply:

a) Vacant nurses (i) hospital (aa) position and (bb) institution.

b) Information not available

c) Positions to be filled as soon as funds are available.

Please refer to the attached Annexure 1.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2175

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Health

Do any public institutions provide dental services outside of normal working hours; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Dental Services, like any other health service can be provided in health institution at any time if it is an emergency.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2809

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his reply to question 1040 on 4 May 2018 pertaining to the Rail Safety Regulator Level Crossing Technical Committees, (a) when was the specified committee established, (b) what were the reasons for the delays in establishing this Committee, (c) what provincial restructuring was taking place that delayed the establishment of the Committee, (d) who sits on the committee and (e) how were they elected in each case?

Reply:

a) The Committee has not been established.

b) The RSR has been invited to become a member of the Free State Provincial Transport Planning Forum, which is currently being established. This Forum focuses on transport related issues. Issues pertaining to level crossing can be addressed at this Forum.

c) Delays were because of the provincial department restructuring where officials were moved between sections.

d) The members of the Forum comprise of representatives from the Free State Department of Police, Roads and Transport, transport related SOE’s and municipalities

e) Members are elected by their respective organisations.

22 October 2018 - NW1571

Profile picture: Ketabahle, Ms V

Ketabahle, Ms V to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 1294 on 7 May 2018, (a) what is the name of each (i) director of the company and (ii) person who created each purchase order and (b) was the company vetted before each contract was awarded?

Reply:

(a) (i) Ms Freda Xaluva and Mr Charles Mziwakhe;

(ii) Mr Tshepiso Victor Mahlake, the Procurement Officer;

(b) As indicated in the reply to Question 1294, this was not tender or specific contract, it was sourced as three quotes in line with policy. When companies are in the supplier database, vetting would have been done and would not need to be repeated for each order.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW1567

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Health

1. What is the (a) total number of cleaners are employed at each hospital in the country, (b)(i) name and (ii) location of each hospital and (c) name of each company that employees the cleaning personnel?

Reply:

1. (a)(b)(i) and (ii) - Your attention is directed to the table attached of cleaners appointed on the PERSAL system.

2. (c) Information regarding private cleaners employed have been requested from Provincial Departments

Please find here: Cleaners per Hospital as at May 2018 (PERSAL)

22 October 2018 - NW2554

Profile picture: Malatsi, Mr MS

Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

1.Whether she will furnish Mr M S Malatsi with details of all the beneficiaries on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) in the Northern Cape to identify the proper beneficiaries for the purposes of monitoring and accountability; if so, whilst respecting privacy rights, a) what are (i) the names, (ii) ID numbers and (iii) dates on which each person was added to the needs register, (b) what is the projected waiting-period for the persons currently on the waiting list and (c) what is the average length of time a beneficiary spent on the NHNR before receiving housing for those no longer on the list; 2. whether the complete list of beneficiary details for persons registered with the NHNR has been provided to all councillors in the relevant municipalities; if not (a) why not and (b) on what date will the list be provided to the municipalities; if so, on what date was the list provided to each relevant municipality; 3. whether the list are regularly updated as new names are added; if not what is the position in this regards; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Northern Cape has 78,271 households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system.

(i) The names of the main member of the households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system will be disclosed based on the required compliance with the provision of the Promotion of Access to Information Act.

(ii) The Identity Number (ID) of the main member of the household that has registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR), in compliance with the POPI Act, has been excluded from the list.

(iii) The date that the main member of the households has registered his / her household’s need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system.

(b) The projected waiting-period depends on budget allocation and project planning that occurs at a Provincial and Municipal level. The current average waiting-period calculated based on the households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) is on average about 14 years. These households have not been assisted to date.

(c) The average waiting-period of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) and met the qualifying criteria is 3 years. The households are advised to complete subsidy application forms if a project has been identified in the area where they are residing. Such a project must form part of the Provincial Business Plan, after approval by the MEC and funding must be assigned based on the Human Settlements Development Grant.

2. (a) The National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) system is a web base application that is accessible on any web enabled device: cell phone, tablet, laptop and PC to registered users of the system. Users of the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) at provincial and municipal levels are able to provide on request, to elected representatives a report that contains information about households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) for their specific area of responsibility. To protect the personal information of households the National Department is in the process to develop a report that could be provided to elected representatives on request. The report will as a minimum contain the following: Municipality, Area, Surname and First Name of the head of the household, physical address and ward number. It must also be noted that the Department has encouraged Provinces and Municipalities to publish allocation lists in order to ensure that allegations or perceptions of corruption and manipulation are confronted and action taken where it happens.

(b) The National Department has also embarked on a process to develop a specific National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) application for elected representatives. This will provide a live feed of household information as it occurs, relevant to their municipality. As a minimum the following information will be available: Municipality, Area, Surname and First Name of the head of the household, physical address and ward number.

3. Yes, the NHNR is updated regularly

 

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 2554 [NW2843E]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 31 AUGUST 2018

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

N LETSHOLONYANE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

N CHAINEE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: STRATEGY AND PLANNING

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

M TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N. MFEKETO, MP

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

22 October 2018 - NW1693

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of civil law suits involving cases of negligence is the North West department of health currently facing, (b) what is the reason for each civil suit involving medical negligence and (c) what is the value of each claim?

Reply:

a) The North Department of Health is currently facing 432 cases;

b) The reason for each civil suit involving medical negligence ranges from neonatal deaths, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, obstetrics and gynaecology, post caesarean section sepsis, orthopaedic and surgical, anaesthetics, patient falls, etc;

c) We do not know the actual value of the claims. The value can only be determined after each and every case has been settled either by a court of law or through mediation. What we do know is the contingent liability, i.e the total amount which litigants are claiming which is R682,779,881.00. Whether they will get it or still has to be determined.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2559

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his comments on the alleged corrupt collusion between the State Attorney’s office and claimants of supposed malpractice in his department (details furnished), (a) what were the circumstances that resulted in this type of fraud to be committed over a protracted period of time without detection, (b) who should have been exercising oversight and (c) what measures has his department put in place to stop this type of fraud?

Reply:

The State did not pay R 60 Billion since 2013 as alleged in your statement. The figure of R 60 Billion is the contingency liability and not the actual money paid to the claimants by the State. This is the money that if proved in the Court of Law, the State will have to pay to the claimants. This will only happen if we do not detect bogus or invalid claims.

(a) The Department of Justice will be better placed to respond to this as it has oversight over the State Attorney;

(b) The State Attorney is under the Department of Justice and they report the Chief Litigation Officer. Therefore, the Department of Justice is responsible for oversight;

(c) The Department is liaising with the law enforcement agencies such as the Hawks and SAPS and other bodies such as Law Societies.

Furthermore, the Department is in the issues a transversal tender to deal with Medico-Legal Cases and with the Terms of Reference that include among others, the following:

(i) Improved co-ordination of anti-corruption initiatives with the Provincial Government; and

(ii) Investigating effectively alleged economic crime (fraud, theft and corruption) as well as maladministration.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2938

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has officially or unofficially met with any member of the Gupta family at any time between 1 January 2009 to date; if so, (a) what was the nature of the specified meeting and (b) where was it held?

Reply:

No.

(a) and (b) Not applicable.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2662

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether Alexkor has put in place any polygraph policies to vet (a) security, (b) treatment plant, (c) sales, (d) marketing and/or (e) any other staff members; if not, in each case, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

 

Based on information provided by Alexkor SOC Limited:

 

VETTING OF STAFF FOR:

POLYGRAPH POLICY IN PLACE:

POSITION:

DETAILS:

(a)

SECURITY

Yes, as per the Employment Agreement Clause.

Pre-employment vetting; there after every 12 months.

Within the Security contract between PSJV and the contractors, there is a clause on polygraph testing.

(b)

TREATMENT PLANT

No, Security Check only

Normal security check routine

N/A

(c)

SALES

No, Security Check only

Normal security check routine

N/A

(d)

MARKETING

No, Security Check only

Normal security check routine

N/A

(e)

OTHER STAFF MEMBERS

No.

N/A

Alexkor and Alexkor RMC PSJV applicants are vetted before any appointments made. These include Police Clearance and Credit Checks

 

 

22 October 2018 - NW1573

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1300 on 7 May 2018, the Remuneration Committee (REMCO) have the authority to recruit; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, who did REMCO recruit?

Reply:

Yes, the Remuneration Committee (REMCO) of the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) has the authority to recruit executive managers in consultation with Council. So the power to employ rests with Council. REMCO is a sub-committee of Council. The Council can however delegate such powers to the Registrar, in terms of Section 12(1) of the Health Professions Act, 1974 (Act No. 56 of 1974).

END.

22 October 2018 - NW255

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) total number of specialist doctors who are at each (i) hospital and (ii) clinic in the country as at 1 January 2018 and (b) speciality of each doctor; (2) what is the total number of specialist doctors who are needed at each (a) hospital and (b) clinic in the country in order for each health facility to operate at maximum capacity?

Reply:

1. The table below indicate (a) the total number of specialist doctors who are at (i) hospital (b) the speciality of each specialist is not known;

2. The table below also include the number of specialists who are needed at each hospital for now, according to Vulindlela system. We do not think there can ever be a maximum capacity when it comes to staffing of hospitals with doctors. There can be a minimum but not a maximum.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW1428

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the notice at the Spa Park Clinic in Bela-Bela in Limpopo indicating that a mobile clinic will be available at the Spa Park every Friday starting from 4 December 2015, (a) what are the reasons for closing the specified clinic, (b) who took the decision to close the clinic, (c) what medicine is still stored in the clinic, (d) who has the keys of the clinic, (e) how many times have the mobile clinic rendered services in the specified area since the notice was posted, (f) who is responsible to monitor the services of the mobile clinic, (g) what qualifications do the staff have that works in the mobile clinic and (h) what is the exact time schedule of the mobile clinic currently to this area?

Reply:

a) Bela Bela town has only two clinics namely: Warmbath Town Clinic and Bela Bela Clinic. Spa Park community never had a clinic that rendered services under Department of Health.

b) The SPA park facility is part of a community hall and has not functioned as a clinic. It was utilized by a NGO called HIV AIDS Prevention Group (HAPG) as an office and storage.

c) No medicine is stored in the SPA park facility

d) The keys are kept by the NGO called HAPG

e) The SPA Park community is serviced by Warmbath Town Clinic

f) The Operational Manager is responsible to monitor the services in the mobile clinic .

g) The qualifications for the staff working at the mobile clinic is the following:

Professional Nurse with Midwifery

Enrolled Nursing Assistant

Mobile Clinic Driver

h) The schedule for mobile services is available however it does not include Spa Park community which receives services from Warmbaths Town Clinic.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2565

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether the reported R290 million loan by the Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality to Denel was lawful; if not, what steps are being taken to ensure that the money is being repaid in this regard?

Reply:

Based on information received from Denel SOC Limited:

Yes. The facility was lawful.

The facility was approved by the Board of Denel on 04 September 2012. Government (National Treasury and the Department of Public Enterprises) had approved the Domestic Medium Term Note (DMTN) in 2007/2008 for R2 200 000 000, which provided for both secured and unsecured components. The Regiments Capital R290 million loan (which funds turned out to be that of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality’s), was part of the unsecured component of the DMTN programme. This loan, like all the other loans under the DMTN programme, was duly registered with the Johannesburg Stock Exchange Securities. The identification and contracting of the up-takers of the facility would be the responsibility of the Board without further involvement of the Ministers of Finance and Public Enterprises.

 

22 October 2018 - NW1689

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Mrs NKF

Hlonyana, Mrs NKF to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of civil law suits involving cases of negligence is the Gauteng department of health currently facing, (b) what is the reason for each civil suit involving medical negligence and (c) what is the value of each claim?

Reply:

a) The Gauteng Department of Health is currently facing 1 559 cases;

b) The reason for each civil suit involving medical negligence ranges from neonatal deaths, hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy, obstetrics and gynaecology, post caesarean section sepsis, orthopaedic and surgical, anaesthetics, patient falls, etc;

c) We do not know the actual value of the claims. The value can only be determined after each and every case has been settled either by a court of law or through mediation. What we do know is the contingent liability. The total amount which litigants are claiming which is R14,782,472,790.80, whether they will get it or not still has to be determined.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW924

Profile picture: Lekota, Mr M

Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What is the modus operandi that was utilised to justify and conclude the contracts that were pursued by a certain company (name furnished) with the Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal department of health?

Reply:

According to the Mpumalanga Department of Health, the Mpumalanga Department of Health did not enter into contract with Gupta-related Mediosa-like contracts.

According to the KwaZulu Natal Department of Health, the matter is still under investigation in that Department and information will be tabled once the investigation has been finalised.

END.

22 October 2018 - NW2780

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to Broad-based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) targets of new outsourced contracts at Armscor, (a) on what legal provisions did her department and/or Armscor rely when setting the target of 45% to be awarded to BBBEE service providers belonging to military veterans, (b) what will constitute justified exceptions to this rule and (c) why are the management obliged to implement the specified target?

Reply:

Both the Department of Defence (DOD) and Armscor apply the Preferential Procurement 2017 Regulations (PPR) as promulgated. Wherein the 80/20 and 90/10 preference point system is applied as provided for in the Regulations and Guidelines. The 30% threshold for subcontracting applies to all designated groups where feasible. There is no special arrangement of 45% targeted for award to BBBEE service providers belonging to military veterans.

22 October 2018 - NW1568

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

1. What is the (a) total number of cleaners are employed at each clinic in the country, (b)(i) name and (ii) location of each clinic and (c) name of each company that employees the cleaning personnel?

Reply:

1. (a)(b)(i) and (ii) - Your attention is directed to the table attached of cleaners appointed on the PERSAL system.

2. (c) Information regarding private cleaners employed have been requested from Provincial Departments

Please find here: Cleaners per Clinic as at May 2018 (PERSAL)

22 October 2018 - NW2528

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the total amount that was paid to each (a) deep water mining, (b) tailings mineral resource reprocessing and (c) bedrock sweeping contractor by Alexkor in each of the past five financial years, what (i) is the total volume of gravels that were treated, (ii) carats of diamond were produced, (iii) is the total number of diamonds that were produced and (iv) is the total income that was generated?

Reply:

Based on information received from Alexkor SOC Limited.

 

CONTRACTORS:

2012/13 FY

2013/14 FY

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

(a)

DEEP WATER MINING

*

*

*

*

R294 647 577

(b)

TAILINGS MINERAL RESOURCE REPROCESSING

**

**

**

**

R741 286

(c)

BEDROCK SWEEPING

***

***

***

***

***

 

DESCRIPTION:

2012/13 FY

2013/14 FY

2014/15 FY

2015/16 FY

2016/17 FY

(i)

VOLUME OF GRAVELS TREATED: m3

-

-

-

-

769 200

(ii)

CARATS OF DIAMONDS PRODUCED:

0

616.96

1 521.43

1 623.70

113 792.40

 

(aa) TAILINGS MINERAL RESOURCE REPROCESSING

0

616.96

1 521.43

1 623.70

1 745.40

 

(bb) International Mining and Dredging SA (IMDSA)

0

0

0

0

112 047.00

(iii)

 

NUMBER OF DIAMONDS PRODUCED:

0

985

5 127

5 520

530 702

 

(aa) TAILINGS MINERAL RESOURCE REPROCESSING

0

985

5 127

5 520

2 127

 

(bb) International Mining and Dredging SA (IMDSA)

0

0

0

0

528 575

(iv)

TOTAL INCOME GENERATED

   -

R2 086 007

R10 156 765

R7 444 997

R362 470 919

Notes:

*

DEEP WATER MINING

:

Operations only commenced during the 2016/17 FY

**

TAILINGS MINERAL RESOURCE REPROCESSING

:

No information available prior to the 2016/17 FY; during 2016, the XRT Diamond Recovery technology was used to do exploration on some of the old tailing dumps. The exploration was stopped in 2017 as the operations were not viable.

***

BEDROCK SWEEPING

:

There has been no Bedrock Sweeping Contracts for the period under review.

 

19 October 2018 - NW2770

Profile picture: Gqada, Ms T

Gqada, Ms T to ask the Minister of Energy

a)What is the cost of integrating the Grand Inga Project into his department’s 2018 Integrated Resource Plan (IRP); b) On what basis was the decision taken to deviate from the low-cost scenario by integrating the specified project into the IRP; c) By what date will the project be completed; and d) Which South African companies are involved in the project? NW3063E

Reply:

a) Based on assumptions made in the IRP, the combined effect of including coal and Inga as policy adjustment is about 1.9 cents per kilowatt hour on projected tariff of 119 cents per kilowatt hour.

b) The decision taken to deviate from the least cost scenario by including the Inga hydropower into the IRP was on the basis that there is a treaty signed between the government of South Africa and the Democratic Republic of Congo for South Africa to off take 2500MW from the project.

c) The IRP assumes the project to come online by year 2030.

d) At this stage of project development we are not aware of South African companies involved in the development of the project.

19 October 2018 - NW2468

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Mrs NKF

Hlonyana, Mrs NKF to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What is the current cost of building one RDP house in the 2018-19 financial year?

Reply:

The total cost of a Government subsidised houses is made up of three major cost elements comprising of the purchase of the site (raw land), the costs relating to the township establishment process and installation of municipal engineering services, as well as the construction cost of the top structure.

The cost of acquiring raw land is influenced by factors such as its location and market value and this even varies from one human settlements project to the next situated within the same municipal area. The purchasing of raw land is funded from a Provinces' Operational Budget while in some scenarios the raw land is already in the ownership of the Province. As a result, no standard purchase price can be used for reporting purposes.

The cost of the township establishment process and the installation of municipal engineering services are influenced by whether A Grade or B Grade services are being installed. My Department has calculated these costs and announced it to be of an indicative nature. The indicative cost of A Grade services is set at R45 985,00 while that of B grade services is set at R36 258,00.

Besides, for the level of the municipal engineering services the installation costs may escalate due to the introduction of precautionary measures that are required to adequately address extraordinary circumstances such as dolomite, sinkholes, retention walls and rocky areas.

These measures are required to ensure that houses can withstand the conditions of the area. Resulting from these precautions there will also be an increase in the fees for professional services. For contract and budgeting purposes all variations in cost are calculated by using an electronic Variation Calculator.

Ultimately it is the prerogative of the Provincial Member of the Executive Council (MEC) responsible for Human Settlements to approve of the final costs of the installation of the municipal engineering services. The cost is to be funded from the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG).

For the 2018-19 financial year the subsidy amount available for the construction of a standard top structure is set at R116 867,00. The actual cost of the construction of the top structure may increase due to a number of factors. The Ministerial Minimum National Norms and Standards for the construction of Stand Alone Residential Dwellings financed through National Housing Programmes provides that each house comprising of 40m² gross floor area, must as a minimum, be designed on the basis of:

  • Two bedrooms;
  • A separate bathroom with a toilet, a shower and hand basin;
  • A combined living area and kitchen with wash basin;
  • A standard basic electrical installation comprising a pre-paid meter with distribution box and lights and plugs in all living areas of the house;

Subsidised houses to be provided to disabled persons who are dependent on wheel chair use comprises of 45m² gross floor area. The increased size provides for the specific needs in respect of the layout of the house as a bigger bathroom, and wider doors are a pre-requirement to ensure adequate movability

In addition my Department has entered into a Joint Position with the Department of Military Veterans to provide subsidised houses comprising a maximum 50m² of gross floor area to qualifying military veterans. The cost resulting from the additional 10m2 increased gross floor area and other additional aspects such as the ceramic floors tiles throughout the house, kitchen cupboards with a electric twin hop, carport with paving and perimeter fence for each property are financed by the Department of Military Veterans

With regard to the special housing needs of certain categories of disabled beneficiaries, an increase in the subsidy amount is needed to ensure that housing units delivered through the National Housing Scheme are adjusted to accommodate the special housing needs of a disabled beneficiary (or a member of the beneficiary household) to enable them to live independently, certain additions/alterations are necessary.

These disabled beneficiaries fall into the following categories and assistance is provided in line with their specific needs and additions or alterations to the housing product are effected:

  • Needs walking aids;
  • Partial/Full-time usage of wheel chair;
  • Partially/profoundly deaf;
  • Partially/totally blind; and/or
  • Partially/total movement loss/paralysis in the upper body limbs.

For comparative purposes the costs involved in the provision of subsidised houses during the 2018-19 financial year are provided below. The table provides for the installation of A Grade municipal engineering services (which is R9 727,00 more expensive than B Grade services but is most often installed) and shows the financial impact of providing different sizes of houses:

 

Standard

40m2 house

Disabled

45m2 house

Military Veterans

50m2 house

Land price or value if in ownership

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

A Grade municipal engineering services (indicative)

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

Top structure

R116 867,00

R172 929,00

R199 014,00

Total cost

R162 852,00

R218 914,00

R244 999,00

Once again the following table provides for the installation of A Grade municipal engineering services and the different house sizes but the financial impact resulting from geo-technical circumstances and a disability that does not result in an increase of the house size:

 

Standard

40m2 house

Disabled

45m2 house

Military Veterans

50m2 house

Land price or value if in ownership

Unknown

Unknown

Unknown

A Grade municipal engineering services (indicative)

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

R45 985,00

Hard rock excavation (25%)

R1 554,49

R1 554,49

R1 554,49

Average ground slope of more than 1:5

R3 844,44

R3 949,42

R4 054,41

Top structure

R116 867,00

R172 929,00

R199 014,00

Category E: Partially/totally blind.

Installation of fittings to improve quality of life: Access to house (12 m² paving, and ramp at doorway), kick plates to doors, hand rails and grab rails, lever action taps, 1 m vinyl folding door in bathroom, slip resistant flooring and colour contrast on doorways, stairs, corners of buildings and skirting on walls.

R20 088,95

R20 088,95

R20 088,95

Total cost

R188 339,88

R244 506,86

R270 696,85

With effect from 1 April 2018 the Housing Subsidy Scheme has been enhanced to provide for the inclusion of six new higher density housing typologies for individual and sectional title ownership. The new higher density housing typologies and the maximum subsidy amount per unit are:

  • Double storey semi detached unit with mono pitch roof R133 147,82
  • Double storey semi detached unit with dual pitch roof R135 176,54
  • Double storey semi detached unit with mono pitch roof R138 577,15
  • Three storey walk-up: 12 units per block R166 046,32
  • Three storey walk-up: 12 units per block R166 704,99
  • Three storey walk-up: 6 units per block R180 104,38

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: 2468

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 24 AUGUST 2018

A VAWDA

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS DELIVERY FRAMEWORKS

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Recommended/not recommended

M TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

___________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

N MFEKETO, MP

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

19 October 2018 - NW2332

Profile picture: Mathys, Ms L

Mathys, Ms L to ask the Minister of Public Works

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) his department and (ii) the entities reporting to him, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by his department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2509E

Reply:

1. (a) (i) The Department of Public Works is currently dealing with 16 labour disputes.

(a) (ii) See second table below in respect of information pertaining to the entities.

(b) The cause of each dispute

(c) The nature of each dispute

(d) (i) Date each dispute was reported

(d) (ii) date of resolution of dispute

Application and interpretation of a collective agreement

No translation of OSD to Professional Quantity Surveyor

2018-03-05

2018-04-03

Unfair Labour Practice with respect to Promotion

No shortlisting done

2017-11-30

Arbitration in progress

Unfair Labour practice with respect to benefits

No upgrading to another level

2018-02-19

2018-05-31

Unilateral change to terms and condition of employment

Non-agreed transfer to another regional office

2018-04-12

2018-08-15

Unfair labour practice with respect to Promotion

No shortlisting done

2018-02-21

Arbitration in progress

Unfair labour practice with respect to Promotion

No shortlisting done

2018-04-16

2018-08-06

Misconduct

Unfair dismissal

2018-04-09

Arbitration in progress

Misconduct

Unfair suspension

2018-03-16

Arbitration in progress

Unfair Labour practice with respect to Promotion

No shortlisting done

2018-05-24

2018-07-20

Payment of OSD grade progression

Application and interpretation of a collective agreement

2018-06-19

Arbitration in progress

Unfair labour practice with respect to Promotion

No shortlisting done

2017-12-14

2018-04-13

Unfair labour practice with respect to Promotion

No Implementation of retention conditions

2018-04-24

Awaiting arbitration award

Unfair Labour practice with respect to Promotion

Non-appointment

2018-06-08

Arbitration in progress

Unfair labour practice with respect to Promotion

Non-appointment

2017-07-16

Arbitration in progress

Application and interpretation of a collective agreement

Declined Incapacity leave

2018-08-24

2018-09-17

Application and interpretation of a collective agreement

Non- payment of overtime exceeded 30% threshold

2018-08-24

2018-09-17

(2) (a)(i) A total number of 30 employees were dismissed in the last five years:

  • 13 employees in 2014;
  • 6 in 2015;
  • 7 in 2016;
  • 4 in 2017.
  • 11 employees were dismissed for absenteeism;
  • 5 for theft;
  • 5 for the appointment of service providers without following due procurement processes;
  • 4 for fraud and misrepresentations;
  • 3 for corruption/bribery;
  • 1 for abuse of a State vehicle;
  • 1 for unlawful benefitting from the service provider.

(b)(i) None of the employees dismissed received a severance packages.

(ii) Falls away.

(1) (a) (ii) Information in respect of the entities:

Name of Entity

No. of labour disputes

b)

Cause of each dispute

c)

Nature of Dispute

d)i)

Date each dispute was reported

d)ii)

Date each dispute was resolved

Agrément South Africa

ASA

Nil

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Total

0

Council for the Built Environment

CBE

2

Employees release after expiry of their contracts

Expiry of Contracts

CCMA ruling received on 8 June 2016

 

 

 

 

Matter unresolved pending Labour Court date.  Date of lodgement 22 June 2016.

 

1

Unfair dismissal

The former CEO lodged a claim first to CCMA and after to the labour court about her disputing the Council resolution to dismiss her after a long disciplinary process.

CCMA ruling received on 19 October 2016.

 

Arbitration notice received on 11 April 2017.

 

 

 Case was reported to the labour court by the former CEO on 4 September 2017.

Matter unresolved pending Labour Court date. 

Total

3

Construction Independent Development Board

CIDB

1

Employee failed to record leave days causing fruitless and wasteful expenditure.

Dishonesty

17/05/18

16/08/2018

Employee resigned and subsequently withdrew case.

 

1

Cidb instituted civil proceeding to recover the money from ex- employees provident fund pay-out.

Civil Proceedings

31/07/18

In progress

 

1

 

Employer recovered paid bursary funds upon employee resignation, as per the terms and conditions of the study contract and policy.

Employee instituted a dispute unfair labour practice, upon employer recovering paid bursary fund.

28/ 06/18

In progress, arbitration set-down for 10 October 2018.

 

1

Employee failed to record leave taken. It was later discovered that they were submitting fraudulent medical certificate.

Dishonesty

29/08/18

Employee resigned with immediate effect on the day of disciplinary hearing (29 August 2018).

 

1

Cidb instituted civil proceeding to recover the money from ex- employee’s provident fund pay-out.

Civil proceeding

17/09/2018

In progress

 

1

Dispute over job grading disparities between help- desk and admin clerk positions.

NEHAWU instituted a dispute unfair labour practice

27/07/18

Set-down 25/09/18

Total

6

Independent Development Trust

Name of Entity

No. of labour disputes

b)

Cause of each dispute

c)

Nature of Dispute

d)i)

Date each dispute was reported

d)ii)

Date each dispute was resolved

IDT

1

Salary Negotiation

Salary negotiation deadlock

29 July 2018

06 September 2018

Total

1

19 October 2018 - NW2344

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Energy

(a)On what date was a certain person (name furnished) appointed in her current position, (b) when was the position advertised, (c) who were the other candidates that were considered and (d) what is the salary level of the specified person?

Reply:

(a): The certain person is not an employee of the Department of Energy.

(b) and (c): The position was not advertised. The appointment of the certain person evolved from the initial support role of the PPP Unit of the National Treasury to the Department of Energy in the design and establishment of the Independent Power Producer Procurement Programme (IPPPP). The certain person was initially contracted as a consultant of the PPP Unit intimately involved in the development of the IPPPP and was in this capacity initially seconded to and formally assigned the role of the manager of the project office (IPP Office) responsible for the coordination and facilitation of the IPPPP.

(d): It is advised that the question be directed at the appropriate appointing party (currently the Development Bank of Southern Africa) with due recognition of and subject to the prescript of relevant applicable laws and institutional policies.

19 October 2018 - NW2263

Profile picture: Figg, Mr MJ

Figg, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Works

With reference to his reply to question 993 on 30 July 2018, what (a) number of the 29 322 land parcels in his department’s custodianship are located in each province, (b) is the total size of the land parcels in each province and (c) is the total size of land parcels for each use category in terms of (i) government offices, (ii) agriculture and (iii) any other categories?

Reply:

(a), (b) and (c) Please refer to Annexure A accompanying this reply for details pertaining to the question posed by the Honourable Member.

18 October 2018 - NW2776

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) With regard to the Mala Mala deal which cost taxpayers R70,000 per hectare and the Kruger National Park deal of R84 million which cost taxpayers approximately R560,00 per hectare, why is there such a huge difference in price when both Mala Mala and Kruger National Park are similar in value regarding game, including the Big 5 territory and natural habitat; (2) are there beneficiaries that benefitted from both the Mala Mala and Kruger National Park claims; if so, why did they benefit twice?

Reply:

1) The prices for Mala Mala and Kruger National Park were determined by professional valuers appointed by the Department on the basis of the distinct approaches. For Mala Mala, the valuers determined the current value using the comparable sales method for the purposes of acquisition of the properties whereas for the Kruger National Park, the valuers determined the historical value which was subsequently escalated to the present value in line with the Consumer Price Index for the purpose of determining financial compensation due to the claimants. Consequently the amounts paid for Mala Mala and Kruger National Park cannot be the same.

(2) Yes, there are beneficiaries who experienced multiple removals from both Kruger National Park (KNP) and to the private game reserves (including Mala Mala) next to the park (KNP).