Questions and Replies

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13 March 2020 - CW52

Profile picture: Sileku, Mr IM

Sileku, Mr IM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether any measures are in place to ensure that the rate of issuing title deeds is improved; if not, why not; if so, (a) what measures, (b) how will her department ensure that such targets are met and (c) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

(a) For projects within the scope of the Title Restoration Project (projects approved before 31 March 2014), inconclusive township establishment processes have been identified as the major challenge. Township establishment has been prioritised in the Title Restoration Grant.

For newer projects (approved after 1 April 2014) I have issued directives for implementation by provinces. These include an instruction on when conveyancers must register title during the housing delivery process, as well as an instruction to withhold a minimum amount until registration of the property has been confirmed in the deeds office.

(b) The Department has put the following measures in place to ensure that the targets are met:

  1. Assessment of provincial business to ensure that targets for township establishment and registration of title are adequate;
  2. Project level monitoring;
  3. Quarterly performance reviews conducted with provinces and metros; and
  4. Quarterly reporting to MinMec.

(c) Township establishment is a lengthy process with legislated timeframes and a necessary precursor to titling. Where appropriate, the Department assists provinces to overcome some of the challenges associated with the formalisation of old townships through intergovernmental arrangements with other national departments.

13 March 2020 - NW34

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the relevant details of the proposed Ladysmith (Spioenkop) Bulk Water Supply Scheme water purification works and pipelines in the Uthukela district of KwaZulu-Natal, including, but not limited to, the (a) communities to be serviced with water from the specified project, (b) funding required to complete the project, including (i) design work and environmental impact assessments, (ii) land purchase agreements and payments for land to be purchased, (iii) raw water extraction, (iv) water purification works and (v) bulk water pipelines, (c) projected completion dates for each stage of the project, (d) details of the reasons for the delays in making progress with the project and (e) details of all contractors and subcontractors appointed for the project to date and the contract amounts awarded for the project to date?

Reply:

The project entails construction of a regional water treatment works near the Spioenkop Dam to replace the existing Ladysmith Water Treatment Works and Ezakheni Water Treatment Works, as well as the replacement of the existing old bulk raw water pipeline from Spioenkop Dam to Ladysmith Town with a larger pipeline.

(a) Communities to be served with water from the project are people residing in Ladysmith Town and surroundings, including Ezakheni, St Chads, Steadville, informal settlement of Roosboom, Driefontein, Matiwaneskop, Jononoskop, Steincoalspruit (Inkunzi), Indaka LM, Okhahlamba, Imbabazane and Umtshezi LM.

(b) A preliminary cost estimate for the project is R1 941 894 392. The social component of the project, projected to cost R479 397 225 will be funded through the Regional Bulk and Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) by the Department of Water and Sanitation. A difference of R1 462 497 167 which is the economic component of the project sourced from co-funding as it constitutes. The uThukela District Municipality has committed to contribute R500 million towards the cost of the economic component and entered into negotiations with Umgeni Water to fund the shortfall.

(c) However, a detailed feasibility study is currently being undertaken by Umgeni Water. It may be necessary to revise the cost estimate may be will be revised upon completion of the feasibility study. It is estimated that detailed feasibility and implementation readiness studies, which commenced towards the end of 2019 will take 24 months. Therefore, it is anticipated that the project will be ready for implementation during the 2021/2022 financial year. The duration of planning and project implementation stages will be informed by the outcomes of the feasibility and implementation readiness studies.

(d) The project is currently at a feasibility study stage and no delays have been experienced so far.

(e) No contractors have been appointed because the project has not yet reached construction stage.

12 March 2020 - NW166

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he confirms his statement, made to the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration during a committee meeting on 6 November 2019 that retired Ministers, retired Deputy Ministers and their spouses will continue to receive free business class flights for the rest of their lives despite recent changes made to the Ministerial Handbook; if so, why did he remove any reference to the free business class flights for retired ministers, deputy ministers and their spouses from the Ministerial Handbook?

Reply:

The Guide for Members of the Executive was approved by the President effective from 20 November 2020. The benefits due to former Members was removed from the Guide and the process to review same was left to Parliament to deal with as it is a Scheme that is administered by Parliament and the costs emanating therefrom is borne by Parliament.

End

12 March 2020 - NW167

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he approved the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished); if so, (a) on what date and (b) on what grounds did he approve the appointment of the person in light of his undertaking to the Portfolio Committee on Public Service and Administration on 6 November 2019 (name and details furnished)?

Reply:

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration does not exercise any authority to appoint staff in departments other than be the Department of Public Service and Administration.

The executive Ethics Code issued in terms of the Executive Member’s Ethics Act, 1998 regulates the conduct of Members of the Executive. The Public Service Commission may also be the appropriate institution to deal with this matter.

End

12 March 2020 - CW59

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Why was the building of the Thaba Chweu Boarding School (a) halted and (b) moved from the original identified land near Coromandel to Beetgekraal?

Reply:

The Question has been sent to the Province for a proper response, which immediately after receipt from Mpumalanga, will be rendered accordingly.

COMPILED BY:

MR E RAMASEDI MAFOKO

DIRECTOR: PHYSICAL PLANNING & RURAL SCHOOLING

DATE: 03/03/2020

OFFICIALS INVOLVED

QUESTION NO: 59. IS APPROVED

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE: 06/03/2020

QUESTION NO: 59. IS APPROVED

DR MR MHAULE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE: 08/03/2020

QUESTION NO: 59. IS APPROVED

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER

DATE: 12/03/2020

12 March 2020 - NW316

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the vacancy rate for teachers in each (a) province and (b) grade for (i) Mathematics, (ii) Science, (iii) English Home Language, (iv) English First Additional Language and (v) other subjects as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

Information on vacancy rates per subject is currently not available at the national level as it is not routinely collected as part of the monitoring framemeworks. The table below shows the overall vacancy rate per province as reported by the Provincial Education Departments at the end of September 2019. It is important to note that a vacancy as identified here does not imply that classes would be left without teachers, as substitute or temporary teachers would generally be appointed in such vacancies.

Province

Vacant Posts

Number of Allocated Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

5264

55126

9.5%

Free State

843

20782

4.1%

Gauteng

378

60027

0.6%

KwaZulu-Natal

2729

107413

2.5%

Limpopo

6957

52208

13.3%

Mpumalanga

538

34963

1.5%

North West

433

30724

1.4%

Northern Cape

296

10549

2.8%

Western Cape

1445

35651

4.1%

TOTALS

18883

407443

4.6%

 

COMPILED BY:

MRS LIEZEL CAROLISSEN

DIRECTOR - EDUCATION HUMAN RESOURCE PLANNING, PROVISIONING AND MONITORING

DATE: 10/03/2020

OFFICIALS INVOLVED

QUESTION NO: 316. IS APPROVED

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE: 11/03/2020

QUESTION NO: 316. IS APPROVED

DR MR MHAULE, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE: 11/03/2020

QUESTION NO: 316. IS APPROVED

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER

DATE: 12/03/2020

12 March 2020 - NW266

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department intends to phase out single-medium schools in future; if not, what measures has her department put in place to help address the mismatch between feeder zone requirements and the language barrier some schools have for some learners, as many learners do not understand the language used at the school closest to their community?

Reply:

No. It is highly impossible to phase out single medium schools in South Africa. Of the 25 762 schools, more than 20 000 are single medium, with very few dual or parallel medium. 

Language policy matters in schools are governed by the following legislation and policy frameworks: 

1. The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa

Section 29(2), under the Bill of Rights, provides that:

Everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is reasonably practicable.   In order to ensure the effective access to, and implementation of, this right, the state must consider all reasonable educational alternatives, including single medium institutions, taking into account-

(a) equity; 

(b) practicability; and

(c) the need to redress the results of past racially discriminatory laws and practices.

 2. The South African Schools Act (SASA) 

Section 6 of the SASA, on Language policy of public schools, provides the following:

  • Subject to the Constitution and this Act, the Minister may, by notice in the Government Gazette, after consultation with the Council of Education Ministers, determine norms and standards for language policy in public schools;
  • The governing body of a public school may determine the language policy of the school subject to the Constitution, this Act and any applicable provincial law;
  • No form of racial discrimination may be practised in implementing policy determined under this section; and
  • A recognised Sign Language has the status of an official language for purposes of learning at a public school.

3. The Language in Education Policy (LiEP)

The LiEP recognises that South Africa is a multilingual country and adopted the additive bi-multilingualism approach wherein learners are encouraged to learn through one language whilst learning, other additional languages as subjects. The LiEP acknowledges single, dual/parallel and multi-medium models and provides that "the language(s) of learning and teaching in a public school must be (an) official language(s)." Any of the eleven official languages and the South African Sign Language can be used as medium of instruction in public  schools.

The language medium model is primarily determined by the demography of the school. Single medium is implementable with ease in homogenous setup (wherein majority of our single medium schools are located); than in cosmopolitan areas with lots of languages. Where there are many languages in a prticular area,  schools offer dual medium.     

12 March 2020 - NW183

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What number of versions of the Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) textbooks will her department make available for teaching CSE lessons in schools for each grade; (2) will these CSE textbooks be produced in mother-tongue languages too; if so, with the exception of English, in which other additional languages will the textbooks be available?

Reply:

(1) The Department does not have a CSE textbook. The textbooks that are developed by the team are Life Skills and Life Orientation textbooks  and not a CSE textbook.

(2)The Scripted Lesson Plans are not textbooks; but serve as a teacher resource to support the delivery of the Life Skills and Life Orientation section of the subject; and are currently available in English only.

12 March 2020 - NW224

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has been informed that learners in Conville Primary School in George Local Municipality are learning in classrooms with cracked walls that can collapse at any time; if so, what steps has she taken in this regard?

Reply:

The Question has been sent to the Western Cape Department of Education, and will be rendered immediately after the receipt of a proper response from that province..

12 March 2020 - NW343

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department is implementing a first aid course at schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what courses are being offered and (b) are all schools involved in this training?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not formally implement a first aid training course at its schools.  Individual schools train their educators and learners on first aid techniques.

12 March 2020 - NW265

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to her department’s statement on 17 November 2019 which stated that the department is only testing the use of Scripted Lesson Plans, nothing more, and her reply to question 1605 on 16 January 2020 that the material in these Scripted Lesson Plans is not new, what are the differences between the scripted lesson textbooks and previously used methods; (2) (a) on what basis would her department be testing curriculum material that is not new in 1 500 schools and (b) what is the explanation for the apparent discrepancy between her department’s statement on 17 November 2019 and her reply to question 1605 on 16 January 2020?

Reply:

1. The topics and content in the Scripted Lesson Plans (SLPs) are guided by the Life Skills and Life Orientation Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) themes and topics. As such, the Scripted Lesson Plans are not bringing new themes and topics. The difference is that, other materials used to deliver Life Skils and Life Orientation is not scripted; and do not guide on what teaching methodolgy can be used to deliver the content which is offered by the Scripted Lesson Plans.  Once again, the Scripted Lesson Plans are not textbooks, and were never intended to be textbooks.

2. (a) The DBE is testing the utility of Scripted Lesson Plans to deliver the existing curriculum content; and

    (b) There is no discrepency in the statements as explained in (1) and 2 (a).

12 March 2020 - NW254

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he approved the appointments of certain persons (names and details furnished) as Special Advisors to the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation; if not, what steps will he take against the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation for the appointments; if so, (a) on what date and (b) on what ground(s) did he approve each appointment?

Reply:

In terms of section 12A of the Public Service Act, 1994 and the dispensation for the appointment and remuneration of persons (Special Advisers) appointed to executive authorities on grounds of policy consideration. Executive Authorities must submit proposals/recommendations for the appointment of individual Special Advisers to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration (MPSA) for approval of the individual’s compensation level before the appointment is effected.

(a) On 03 and 24 July 2019, I approved the compensation levels for Advocate Menzi Simelane and Mr. Mo Shaik respectively, as Special Advisers to the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation.

(b) The MPSA is not responsible for the approval of appointments of Special Advisers but for the approval of the compensation levels of Special Advisers before appointment.

End

12 March 2020 - NW214

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) number of schools in each province use mobile classrooms and (b) are the relevant details in respect of the (i) name of each specified school, (ii) date of installation of each mobile classroom and (iii) name of the service provider in each specified case; (2) (a) were the mobile classrooms (i) bought or (ii) leased in each case and (b) what amount was and/or isspent on mobile classrooms at each school?

Reply:

The Question has been sent to all nine Provincial Education Departments for responses.  The response will be rendered immediately after the receipt and collation of the provincial inputs.

12 March 2020 - CW50

Profile picture: Zandamela, Mr S

Zandamela, Mr S to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

When will the moratorium on the filling of critical vacancies in all departments be lifted (details furnished)?

Reply:

There is no moratorium on the filling of funded vacant posts in the Public Service.

End

10 March 2020 - CW56

Profile picture: Michalakis, Mr G

Michalakis, Mr G to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to her reply to Question 63 on 2 September 2019, (a) how much was paid to a certain company (name furnished), (b) what percentage of work was done by the said company and (c) why was the contract only terminated in August 2019; (2) whether a new contractor has been appointed; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of the new contractor and (b) why is the contractor not on site; (3) whether the contract was handed over in the second week of September 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has informed me that the Development Bank of Southern Africa was implementing this project. (a) The Contractor, Soaring Summit Development (SSD), was awarded a contract of R69 745 826.97, of which R9 124 074.35 was spent on building work, civil works, electrical works and mechanical works for various buildings on the site.

(b) The percentage of works carried out by SSD was 8.2% of the scope at the time of termination.

(c) The DPWI informed me that under the Joint Building Contracts Committee (JBCC) of the Principle Building Agreement (PBA) contract, the contractor must be given notice first before the termination could be enacted. SSD was issued with several notices of non-performance and placed in Mora in November 2019, after that SSD provided a revised programme with a catch-up plan.

In January 2019, SSD exercised their rights under the contractor to cede the work to another contractor that will have the capacity to complete the work. The cession was finalised in March 2019 and the new contractor had to apply for a new construction permit before work could start on site. All this was done in the hope of continuing with work on-site, without a long pause and escalated cost associated with the appointment of a replacement contractor.

The new contractor commenced with work at the end of April 2019, and the progress was not satisfactory. The contractor was issued with notices as per the JBCC and given time to remedy the default. The contractor made commitments, but the non-performance was never remedied. The contractor was issued with a notice to terminate in July 2019 and issued with a termination letter thereafter. The prescripts of the contract had to be followed to the latter to avoid any legal ramifications from the contractor.

2. (a),(b) The Department has informed me that a replacement contractor has not been appointed and will be appointed as soon as DPWI issues a concurrence letter in March 2020. I have asked the Director-General Adv. Sam Vukela, to launch a full investigation into the matter.

3. Falls away

09 March 2020 - NW196

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether regular audits are conducted on federations receiving funds from Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA); if not, why not; if so, are the audit reports available; (2) what type of audits are conducted on federations to ensure that they have utilised the funding for the intended purposes; (3) whether the members of the federations and/or sports associations are contacted and/or surveyed to establish if they have received funding; if so, who contacts/surveys the federations and/or sports associations. (4) what number of athletes have benefitted from the funds received from SRSA, through the payment of the entrance fees and transport to compete internationally

Reply:

1. The Departments internal audit unit in consultation with the Auditor-General of SA, in order to avoid duplications, have on their approved annual internal audit plan federations to be audited for the year. On completion of the audit, reports on the audit findings are discussed and sent to the federations audited. Herewith follows the list of federations audited during 2018/19 and 2017/18 financial years respectively;

2018/19 Financial year

  1. Jukskei South Africa
  2. Bowls South Africa
  3. South African Table Tennis Board
  4. Rowing South Africa
  5. South African National Archery Association

2017/18 Financial year

  1. Netball South Africa
  2. South African Sports for Social Change Network
  3. Volleyball South Africa
  4. Tennis South Africa

2. Compliance Audits against the funding framework and the service level agreement between the department and the federations are conducted.

3. Sport and Recreation South Africa Financial and Non-Financial Policy aims to provide funding only to recognised national federations and any related monitoring is conducted to the funded federations and not the members.

4. A total of 393 athletes benefitted from SRSA funds

09 March 2020 - NW18

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the outbreak of the Coronavirus worldwide, what is the reason for him appointing seven State hospitals (names furnished) to treat patients who might be affected by the virus in South Africa;\(2) whether private hospitals are considered to assist the Government in a moment of a severe crisis; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) has he found that the specified hospitals are best equipped to deal with a crisis situation should the virus spread to South Africa; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) how fast will the specified hospitals be able to react if infected patients arrive at the hospitals and (b) how effective has he found the treatment at these hospitals to be; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) These hospitals were the designated hospitals for managing Ebola cases therefore they were already in a state of preparedness. Each of the said hospitals, were re-assessed to determine their current state of readiness and each of them showed that they were compliant for isolating and managing Coronavirus patients.

(2) The National Department of Health (NDoH) has always collaborated with the private sector. The official representative for the private sector is part of the national team responding to the Coronavirus outbreak. The private sector follows the NDoH guidelines and protocols. The private sector has supported the NDoH with developing training materials and sponsored video recording of training workshops for use by relevant health care professionals.

(3) All the selected hospitals are ready to receive and manage patients. Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital and Steve Biko Hospital were added to the initial list as they are also able to isolate and manage Coronavirus patients.

(4) (a) Protocols are in place to deal with patients from the time of them being suspected, through transport, to hospitalisation and isolation. Training is ongoing at the provincial level to strength management and care of possible Coronavirus infected patients.

(b) The designated hospitals are referral hospitals and offer quality care, with skilled personnel, using the best health care management practices.

(5) The Minister is willing to make a statement in the House.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW90

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Has he been informed of the pending liquidation of a certain company (Yekani Manufacturing) based in East London; (2) whether the specified company is a recipient of financial and operational support from his department; if so, what are the full relevant details of the support; (3) what steps does he intend to take to avoid the closure of the company in order to avoid further job losses?

Reply:

The Office of the Director General had been advised of the challenges faced by the company and the effort to place the company in liquidation. The company has been placed under business rescue, and I am advised that it has presented a turnaround plan in attempt to save the company and protect a number of jobs. Once approved, this court-sanctioned process will enable the company to restructure its operations.

The company received financial support from the dti amounting to R50million from the Black Industrialists Programme in November 2018. The company occupied a top-structure erected at the East London Industrial Development Zone.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW197

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether any action has been taken by the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) since the release of the Zulman report in August 2018 regarding the establishment of a National Colours Board; if not, what interim measures have been put in place by SASCOC regarding the (a) awarding of colours and (b) applications for colours; 2) Whether SASCOC is still awarding colours; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the process that is followed in this regard?

Reply:

  1. According to the Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee the proposed amendments contained in the Sports Bill seek to address the establishment of a colours board. (a) In the interim and until the amendment to the Sports and Recreation Act is complete, (b) SASCOC will continue to use the authority conferred by the Minister to receive applications and award colours
  2. SASCOC continues to award colours in terms of the Regulations and will continue to do so until the amendments to the Sport and Recreations Act is complete.

09 March 2020 - NW192

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) How does the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) intend to support the South African athletes who will be participating in the Olympics in Birmingham in Alabama, United States, in 2021, given the financial challenges faced by the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and (b) what is the role of the NLC in promoting women sport in the Republic through its funding?

Reply:

I am advised by the NLC that applications for participation in the 2021 Olympics in Birmingham in Alabama, United States, have not been made. All applications received will be considered.

The Sports and Recreation Distributing Agency approved funding for the following women sporting codes in the current financial year (2019/20) - soccer R8 Million (South African Football Association), cricket R1 Million (Cricket South Africa), swimming R2 Million (Swimming South Africa).

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW191

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

1) Whether the National Lotteries Commission (NLC) funded any organisation which belongs to a certain person (name furnished) or an organisation of which the specified person is a director; if so, (a) whether he will provide the details of the organisation(s) to Mr. TW Mhlongo and (b) what amount was granted in each case; 2) Whether the NLC funded any (a) organisation where the specified person’s spouse worked and/or (b) organisation associated with her; 3) Whether the NLC funded any organisation which is linked or was linked to any political party or an office bearer of a political party; if so, (a) what are the details of the (i) political party concerned, (ii) political party office bearer concerned and (iii) amount granted and (b) in which year or years was the grant made for members of political party or organisation; 4) What steps is he taking to ensure that the confidentiality of organisations’ information is protected, but also that they are implementing projects accordingly? NW212E

Reply:

I have been advised by the NLC that funding was provided to organisations linked to the person concerned and to an organization that the NLC says employed his spouse. Details have been supplied to my office by the NLC. I will be requesting further clarity from the NLC in order to determine the accuracy and relevance of the additional information to be disclosed and will thereafter advise the Honourable Member.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW62

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether he has extended the contract of a certain person (name and details furnished); if so, (a) for what period and (b) what provisions did he rely on to do so?

Reply:

During 2017, the then Chairperson of the National Lotteries Commission was re-appointed as Chairperson in accordance with section 3(3) of the Lotteries Act, 1997 (Act No. 57 of 1997) (the “Act”) for a further period of 2 years and 4 months. The Act provides that a member of the National Lotteries Commission’s board may be appointed for a period not exceeding five years.

The term of the Chairperson was due to end on 30 November 2019. Before the end this term, the Chairperson raised a number of concerns relating to the lawfulness of the determination of the period of his appointment and specifically the reasons provided therefore; and provided the Ministry with a legal opinion in support of his concern, to the effect that the period of appointment ought to have been for a five-year period.

After considering the merit of the verbal and written representations made to me, and taking into account the advice of the Director General of the Department of Trade and Industry, I concluded that it would be in the best interest of the National Lotteries Commission to secure a settlement and extended the period of appointment of the Chairperson for a one-year period to 30 November 2020, with an explicit agreement that this was in full and final settlement of any claims that he may have or believe he may have.

As the Minister determines the period of appointment and it falls within the prescribed maximum period of 5 years, I am advised this complies with the provisions of the Act as set out above.

The process for the appointment of a new Chairperson will follow the requisite processes as provided in the Act.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW92

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Why does South Africa’s ranking in the World Bank’s 2020 Ease of Doing Business Report remain at 84 despite his department and the World Bank having set up a working group to address the country’s poor performance in the 2019 version of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether this is evidence that he is unable to deliver the widespread economic reform required to put the country’s economy back on an upward growth trajectory; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW101E

Reply:

The Department is working with the World Bank to identify challenges that result in a low ranking on the Ease of Doing Business Index and as this work progresses, it is expected to impact positively on the country ranking.

The project with the World Bank was launched in March 2019. The Doing Business Report 2020 quoted by the Honourable Member is for the period 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019, released in October 2019.

A number of the factors that contribute to the country ranking fall outside of the Department’s legal mandate, but through this process, the Department can work with other public entities and the private sector to address concerns that have been identified.

One area that does falls within the mandate of the DTIC in the Starting a Business Indicator, relating to the ease of registering a company. The DTIC and its agency, the CIPC is pioneering an e-government platform through the establishment of the Biz Portal. Today a domestic firm through the Biz Portal can obtain the following online within one day:

  1. Company registration;
  2. Domain name registration;
  3. B-BBEE certificate;
  4. Tax registration number;
  5. Unemployment Insurance Fund registration;
  6. Compensation Fund registration;
  7. Business Bank account.

I am advised that since the launch of the Biz Portal pilot in November 2019, 8 759 companies have been registered within a day. This will significantly change the landscape and make strides in the Ease of Doing Business indicator.

It should be noted that the World Bank uses the major city in every surveyed country as a proxy for aspects of business regulation affecting small domestic firms. In the case of South Africa, it is the City of Johannesburg (CoJ) and covers the period 1 May 2018 to 30 April 2019 in the CoJ.

CoJ is directly responsible for following indicators:

(a) Getting Electricity

(b) Registering Property

(c) Dealing with Construction Permits

Progress on the pace of reforms at CoJ have been slow and this indicated in the Doing Business (DB) Report 2020 released in October 2019. The lack of movement on these impacted negatively on our rankings.

Since the appointment of the Executive Mayor of CoJ Mr. Geoff Makhubo, the Department team, World Bank and CoJ have been able to formalise an action plan for the above-mentioned indicators in order to improve turnaround times and service delivery. Since November 2019, the COJ has piloted an e-rates certificate and has issued 5772 e-certificates of which 98% were issued within 24 hours.

The Technical Working Group continues to work on improving the key elements of the measured indicators to ensure that an increase in South Africa’s rankings and I am advised that some of the successes and improvements to date include:

  • Measured improved customer service by SARS;
  • Service Delivery Charter published by SARS;
  • Service Charter developed by COJ for registering a property;
  • Increased transparency and availability of information fee schedules, documents for registration and services;
  • Expanded Preferred Traders Program rolled out for trading across borders;
  • Cut off time for pre-loading stacking vehicles to be at the port was reduced from 72 hours to 24 hours;
  • Queuing times are now measured from inside the port gate to the stack and not from outside the gate point of entry to the discharge of goods;
  • Transnet port services for import/export of vehicles now fully automated.
  • Updated Website by Deeds Office, improving access, quality and transparency of information to buyers and sellers of property.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW193

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1)What are the (a) names, (b) positions and (c)(i) start and (ii) end period of the board members of Volleyball South Africa 2) Whether a certain person (name and details furnished) is still playing a lead role in Volleyball SA; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what position is the specified person holding; 3) Why is he not blacklisting all administrators that were fired and found guilty in sports not to be involved in sport administration again?

Reply:

1. The (a) names, (b) positions and (c)(i) start and (ii) end period of the board members of Volleyball South Africa are as follows;

     

Anthony Kamohelo Mokoeana

President

2016-2020

Kribba Reddy

Vice

2016-2020

Vinesh Maharaj

Treasurer

2016-2020

Donovan Nair

Secretary General

2016-2020

William Mojapele

Social Responsibility and Transformation

2016-2020

Lisbeth Moatshe

Development Director

2016-2020

Jacob Thamaga

PR/ Media Director

2016-2020

Loet Groenewald

Technical Director

2016-2020

Vacant

Schools Volleyball Director

 

2) According to Volleyball SA Mr Reddy is no longer playing a lead role in Volleyball SA. He holds an honorary position with Volleyball South Africa. The Volleyball South Africa Congress unanimously voted him to hold an honorary position because of his exemplary leadership of the organization during difficult times to make it one of the strongest Federations in South Africa and In African volleyball. The position is one of advisor without voting rights.

3) The code of Sport must , first and foremost exercise and exhaust their constitutional directives in resolving these matters. According to Volleyball South Africa the Federation imposed sanctions on its officials as recommended by Volleyball SA tribunals. Two of its officials were employed by SASCOC and faced internal disciplinary actions. They have challenged their dismissal through the CCMA. Like SASCOC, who are waiting for the CCMA decision before they are permitted to replace these officials VSA cannot take any action against these officials bearing in mind that the final decision is still outstanding.

09 March 2020 - NW97

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What processes has his department followed in order to assess the impact of climate change on health needs and services; (2) what progress has his department made in addressing the challenges facing forensic chemistry laboratories relating to backlogs, low staff morale and infrastructure; (3) what progress has his department made in rolling out ideal clinics in each province?

Reply:

1. The Department has embarked on a project to develop a risk and vulnerability assessment framework to be used for assessing the impact of climate change on health needs and services. This project was started in May 2019 after appointment of a service provider, this follows a number of engagements since July 2018 between the National Department of Health and the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. Funding for the project was sourced from the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) through The Federal Ministry of the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU). The project managers are the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries and the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) who contracted the University of South Africa to develop the risk and vulnerability assessment framework. The final product is expected to be delivered at the end of February 2020. The framework will assist the Department in conducting the assessment on health needs and services.

2. Backlogs:

Following a meeting of the National Forensic Pathology Services Committee (NFPSC) with the previous Minister of Health on 25 February 2016, it was decided not to destroy the approximately 12,000 backlogged cases (multiple samples per case) without Case Administration System (CAS) numbers. A decision has been made to group the backlogged cases in certain year categories and to analyse them.

Resulting from this meeting, the Criminal Justice System Reform Committee (CJSRC) was tasked to perform an audit of all outstanding toxicology cases. Following this decision, during a third full audit of all outstanding cases during 2016 and 2017, they have provided the Forensic Chemistry Laboratories (FCLs) with a list of cases with SAPS CAS numbers where prosecution, and thus analysis, is still required. The list has been signed off by the Chair of the CJSRC on 31 March 2017. This list contained 3,112 cases before verification at the FCLs. Of these 3,112 cases, the FCL’s could only verify 754 cases that were still outstanding as at 31 March 2017.

Another verification in April 2019 has reduced the number of outstanding cases on the list to 705, which is used as the baseline list to monitor performance. The FCLs only analyse cases from this list, newly received cases to prevent them from becoming backlogged (as all have CAS numbers), as well as all urgent requests from pathologists (including insurance matters). The balance of cases without CAS numbers will only be tested once CAS numbers have been linked to them.

Table 1 below indicates the performance of the FCLs against reduction of the CJSRC baseline backlog list of cases where prosecution is still required. [APP target: Eliminate the backlog of toxicology tests by 2019/20 (70% by 31 March 2020)]

TABLE 1

2019/20 Financial Year

% Decrease in Toxicology backlog

APP Target (%)

Quarter 1

42.98

63

Quarter 2

43.26

65

Quarter 3

44.11

67

Quarter 4

 

70

The total number of blood alcohol samples older than 90 days for the four FCL’s that have not been analysed as at 31 March 2019, was 8,210.

The cumulative total backlogged samples completed for 2019/20, Quarter 1, 2 and 3 was 7,513 (91.51%) of the list of 8,210. The FCL’s have also tested newly incoming samples in order to prevent these samples from forming a backlog. Table 2 below reflects the FCL progress regarding the 2019/20 APP target [Eliminate the backlog of blood alcohol tests by 2019/20].

TABLE 2

2019/20

 

APP TARGET

 

% DECREASE IN BA BACKLOG

% DECREASE IN BA BACKLOG

Quarter 1

75.42

25

Quarter 2

90.17

50

Quarter 3

91.51

75

Quarter 4

-

100

The Toxicology and blood alcohol analysis output has been negatively affected by procurement system problems during quarter three of this financial year, causing delays in equipment repairs and procurement of consumables and chemicals required for the analysis processes. The FCL’s also currently have 30 vacancies out of a total establishment of 174.

Low staff morale:

Low staff morale in the Pretoria Laboratory is as a result of the poor building conditions. Progress is made in terms of obtaining alternative work accommodation.

Infrastructure:

Only the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory (FCL) in Visagie Street, Pretoria, has challenges with regards to accommodation. The FCL in Durban is new (established in 2015), and housed in the Kwa-Zulu Natal Department of Health building. The FCL in Cape Town is accommodated in a private building that has been recently renovated. They also have sufficient space for staff and equipment. The FCL in Johannesburg has been extensively renovated, with the project completed around 2011/12.

Two previous tender processes initiated by the Department of Public Works (DPW) have failed. An offer for accommodation by the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry, as well as an offer by the South African Bureau of Standards, have not been successful.

The DPW advertised a tender in June 2013. This process has however not been successful, as no suitable building could be located. In late 2013 the National Department of Health informed the DPW about the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) building (Material Laboratory) in Carl Street in Pretoria West that has not been utilized since 2009. Initially the DWAF was willing to allow the NDOH to utilize this building for the FCL Pretoria activities, but withdrew the offer in June 2014. The DPW then informed the National Department of Health (NDoH) that they did not have any other buildings available that would meet the FCL requirements and that the initial space requirements needed to be decreased. A second tender was advertised in December 2014, and that was also not successful.

In January 2015 the Chief Director: Trauma, Violence, Emergency Medical Services and Forensic Pathology Services (as it was previously called) came in contact with the office of Mr Govender, Deputy Director-General and Head of Real Estate and Facilities Management at the Department of Public Works (DPW). The DPW subsequently undertook to prioritize this matter. Shortly thereafter space was identified at the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) in Groenkloof, Pretoria. This facility was well situated, had ample parking space and had sufficient vacant floor space to be able to accommodate the FCL staff and equipment. In a meeting on 31 August 2016 where the Chief Financial Officer of the SABS was present, she informed all present that they were intending to commercialize the Groenkloof Campus, and that they might not be able to accommodate the FCL. This was followed by the DPW informing the NDoH team that they have been dealing with the wrong Department at the DPW from 2014 to 2016, and that the process had to be started from scratch.

In August 2017 a new needs and cost analysis were submitted to the DPW. Advertising of the needs for a new building has not proceeded, as the NDoH Infrastructure unit proposed to move the FCL into the CIVITAS building as an alternative. With current infrastructure challenges at CIVITAS, this is however no longer an option.

It has been established that there is laboratory, as well as office space available at the CSIR (Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research) campus on Meiring Naudé Road in Pretoria. The space will be suitable for the relocation of the Forensic Chemistry Laboratory, Pretoria – with the understanding that the space will have to be prepared accordingly. This will have cost implications.

3. The Ideal Clinic Realization and Maintenance (ICRM) programme is completing its fifth year of implementation in the 2019/20 financial year. The program is implemented in all the Primary Health Care facilities in the country. In the beginning of each year, the baseline status determination is conducted by Facility Managers in all facilities and confirmed by the District Perfect Permanent Team of the ICRM (PPTICRM). 

Since 2015/2016 to 2018/2019 the Department of Health had turned 1,920 primary health care facilities ideal. The preliminary results for 2019/2020 3rd quarter is 76 facilities that have achieve status. The breakdown per province is indicate in the table below.

Health facilities inspection tools for both Ideal Clinic and Office of Health Standards Compliance were recently aligned to ensure that they request same evidence for compliance with Norms and Standards by the health facilities. Provincial workshops were also conducted on the aligned tools. The effective date of implementation for aligned tools is the 1st of April 2020.

Table 1: Ideal Clinic Achievement by Province for 2015/16 to 2018/2019 and 2019/2020 (Quarter 3)  

Financial Years 

Province 

2015/2016 

2016/2017 

2017/2018 

2018/2019 

2019/2020 (Preliminary results) 

Eastern Cape 

 

14 

139 

157 

249 

15 

Free State 

 

22 

78 

114 

168 

0 

Gauteng 

 

89 

215 

291 

330 

6 

KwaZulu-Natal 

 

141 

288 

383 

461 

19 

Limpopo 

 

27 

51 

121 

165 

1 

Mpumalanga 

 

19 

66 

87 

133 

3 

Northern Cape 

 

3 

67 

89 

92 

0 

North West 

 

7 

92 

121 

141 

9 

Western Cape 

 

- 

41 

144 

181 

23 

TOTAL 

 

322 

1037 

1507 

1920 

76

           
           

END.

09 March 2020 - NW63

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the National Lotteries Commission has received applications from the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in support of delivering TeamSA to the (a) 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games and (b) 2020 Tokyo Paralympic Games; if so, (i) what are the relevant details of the applications, (ii) why was funding not paid out and (iii) on what date is it envisaged that the funds will be paid out?

Reply:

I am advised by the NLC that according to their records, they have not received any application from the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) relating to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic & Paralympic Games.

Following a further request for information, they have provided me with additional details that note the following:

  1. Funding was provided to SASCOC for activities which in the opinion of the NLC is not related to the Tokyo Olympic Games, namely tracking of team qualifications, athlete tracking and monitoring and sports equipment and apparel.
  2. Funding was provided to the organisation Special Olympics South Africa for “Tokyo 2020 Olympics and Paralympics Prospect Medallists, Olympic & Paralympic Athletes and Coaches Support”.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW159

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) Whether any mining permits were issued to certain companies (names furnished) since 1 January 2017; if so, what are the site locations of each permit that was issued; (2) whether it is possible for (a) one permit holder to transfer a permit to another and/or (b) multiple permits to be issued for the same site location? NW180E

Reply:

(1) Yes, the department has issued a mining permit to Hlelo mining (Pty) Ltd under the reference number 11218MP. It is located on portion of portion 3 of the farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS, within the magisterial district of Hendrina. The department has no record of a mining permit issued to Lunathi Mining.

(2)(a) Section 27(8) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act 28 of 2002 (MPRDA) as amended, provides that a mining permit may not be transferred, ceded, let, sublet, alienated or disposed of, in any way whatsoever, but may been cumbered or mortgaged only for the purpose of funding or financing of the mining project in question with the Minister’s consent.

(b) Yes, multiple permits can be issued for the same location in that a mining permit is issued only for 5 hectares and therefore other entities can apply on the same location for 5 hectares as long as it is not on the 5 hectare where there is an issued mining permit or a right.

DDG: MR

Date: 27 Feb 2020

Recommended

Advocate TS Mokoena
Director General: Department of Mineral Resources and Energy


Approved

Mr SG Mantashe
Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy
Date submitted: 09/03/2020

09 March 2020 - NW169

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)With reference to his reply to question 1738 on 7 January 2020, what are the details of the outcomes of the arbitration that took place on 16 and 17 January 2020; (2) What are the full details of any (a) current and (b) historical financial transactions between his department and EOH Mthambo? NW190E

Reply:

The department has advised as follows:

(1) The matter was concluded on 17 January 2020. All the parties submitted their closing arguments on 31 January 2020 to the GPSSBC as instructed by the Commissioner. The GPSSBC forwarded the closing arguments to the Commissioner on 6 February 2020. I am advised that the employee was found guilty of certain charges by the Commissioner.

(2) (a) There are no current financial transactions.

(b) the dti only processed five (5) payments to the total amount of R11 154 846. Such amount was paid for the milestones that were achieved with details as follows:

Payment

Milestone Achieved

Amount Paid

1

EOH Invoice Paid: Licencing Cost Support

R5,698,799.02

2

EOH Invoice Paid: Pilot (MCEP) Phase Initiation

R393,765.12

3

EOH Invoice Paid: SAP Maintenance Year 1 & 2

R2,858,517.62

4

EOH Invoice Paid: Acceptance of Design (Blue print)

R393,765.12

5

EOH Invoice Paid: Approved Change Request (CR_05) for Additional Requirements

R1,809,999.59

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW310

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether her department, in light of the overall audit outcome for the Joe Morolong Local Municipality in the Northern Cape which remained unchanged for the past three years with no improvement in audit findings, has found that the province was unable to place the municipality under administration; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why has her department not placed the municipality under administration considering that the financial statement qualification areas have worsened despite paying over R6 million to consultants in the past financial year?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

09 March 2020 - NW110

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the total estimated cost to launch the National Health Insurance; (2) why was the Portfolio Committee on Health not informed of the amount; (3) whether medical stakeholders in the industry from the public and private sector were consulted with a view to obtain their inputs; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the consultation process that was followed; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) Clause 57 (1)(b) of the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill states that NHI must be gradually phased in using a progressive and programmatic approach based on financial resource availability;

(b) Chapter 7 of the 2017 White Paper on NHI on Financing of NHI details expenditure projections and several new taxation options for sources of funding, including evaluating a surcharge on income tax, a small payroll-based taxes as financing sources for the Fund;

(c) As outlined in Section 8 of the Memorandum of Objects of the NHI Bill, NHI will be financed in various interrelated phases as determined in consultation with the National Treasury using general budget allocations. The costing/budgeting focuses on practical issues that focuses on three issues:

(i) Quality of care improvement programme: A new funding component is required to accelerate quality initiatives, to support a stronger response post OHSC audit and also to support progressive accreditation of facilities for NHI. In 2020/21 an amount of R25 million was prioritsed for this purpose. Subsequent funding will be dependent on the success of the current implementation

(ii) Establishment of NHI Fund Office: The preliminary allocations over the MTEF is 2020/21 R20 million, 2021/22: R40 million and 2022/23: R43 million. These should be seen as ideal and will probably be less given practical delays e.g. in passing NHI Bill.

(iii) Actuarial costing model: Treasury commissioned a simplified intervention based costing tool for NHI which provides simple estimates of costs of a set of 15 or so interventions.

These include for example removing user fees, extending chronic medicine distribution programme (CCMDD), extending ARV rollout, increasing antenatal visits, rolling out capitation model for General Practitioners (GPs), cataract surgery programme, establishing NHI Fund. The full set of interventions costs in the longer term around R30 billion per annum. The Department of Health will adapt the tool to find a set of priority interventions. Most of these interventions can be scaled up progressively as funding becomes available and does not need significant new funds in Budget 2020;

(iv) The Human Resources Capacitation Grant will be used to appoint staff to ensure implementation of NHI already increases to R905 million in 2019/20 and further to R1,052 billion in 2020/21 to R1,093 in 2021/22 and R1,1 billion in 2022/23. This should be focused in the first instance on statutory posts such as interns and community service, given problems in provinces funding these key posts and national interest in making sure these are fully funded;

(v) The NHI Indirect budget baseline amounts to R2,3 billion in 2020/21, R2,5 billion in 2021/22 and R2,6 billion in 2022/23.

(vi) In the next phase the NHI Fund and its Executive Authority will be able to bid for funds through the main budget as part of the budget process. Thereafter consideration will be given to shifting some of the conditional grants such as the National Tertiary Services grant and the HIV/AIDS and TB grant from the Department of Health to the Fund. Preliminary analysis suggests this will require legal amendments.

(d) In a later phase consideration will be given to shifting of funds currently in the provincial equitable share formula for personal health care services to the Fund. This will require amendments to the National Health Act, 2003. This will also depend on how functions are shifted, for example if central hospitals are brought to the national level.

2. No, this is not correct. The Portfolio Committee of Health has been informed of the initial estimated costs of implementation of NHI when the National Health Insurance (NHI) Bill, (Bill 11-2019) was introduced to Parliament on 8th August 2019. This is explained in Clause 57 of the NHI Bill as well as Section 8 of the Memorandum of Objects of the NHI Bill.

3. Stakeholders have been consulted to obtain their inputs.

(a) This was undertaken as part of the consultations on the 2011 Green Paper on NHI, the 2015 draft White Paper on NHI and the 2018 Draft Bill on NHI;

(b) The NHI Bill is currently in Parliament and going through public consultation process;

(c) As outlined in Clause 8.9 of the Memorandum of Objects, Chapter 7 of the 2017 White Paper on NHI on Financing of NHI details expenditure projections and several new taxation options for sources of funding, including evaluating a surcharge on income tax, a small payroll-based taxes as financing sources for the Fund. Due to the current fiscal condition, tax increases may come at a later stage of NHI implementation.

4. I am willing to make a Statement on the matter

END.

09 March 2020 - NW195

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What actions has his office taken with regard to the recommendations of the Zulman report regarding dispute resolution; 2) What interim measures have been implemented regarding dispute resolution to address the shortcomings pointed out by the Zulman Commission?

Reply:

  1. The Minister appointed a compliance task team headed by independent facilitator to follow up on the implementation of the recommendations and to report regularly on progress to the Minister.
  2. The present act, the Constitutions of SASCOC and the National Federations will prevail. Any measures outside the prescript will be regarded as ultravires.

09 March 2020 - NW112

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the total number of (a) medical schemes in the Republic and (b) members in the specified medical schemes; (2) what is the total number of staff members currently working at each of these medical schemes; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) The number of registered medical schemes was 76 as at Quarter 3 of 2019 (compared to 79 as at December 2018);

(b) (i) The 2019 numbers have not been audited and will only be available on 1st April 2020;

(ii) As at Quarter 3 of 2019 the number of principal members was 4 067 003 (compared to the audited number of 4 039 705 at December 2018);

(iii) As at Quarter 3 of 2019 the number of beneficiaries including dependents was 8 954 814 (compared to the audited number of 8 916 695 at December 2018);

2. The Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) is currently not collecting this information routinely;

3. Yes I am willing to make a statement on the matter.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW194

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) (a) What total number of disputes were submitted to the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) for dispute resolution and (b) what total number of cases (i) were resolved and (ii) are still outstanding; (2) (a) what total number of disputes were submitted to his office to request intervention due to the failure of SASCOC and (b) what is the current status of each dispute?

Reply:

1. (a) According to the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) only a total of 11 disputes were submitted (b)(i) 5 cases were resolved (ii) 6 are in progress.

2. (a) A total of 5 disputes were submitted to the Minister (b) all of them are in progress.

09 March 2020 - NW51

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to his department’s office in their Aviation Department dealing with airfreight/air cargo, what (a) is the office’s purpose, (b) is each of the positions (details furnished) responsible for, (c) has the office done since its establishment, (d) is the role of his department on airfreight development, (e) are the short-, medium- and long- term goals of the department for airfreight/air cargo, (f) total amount has been paid to the persons in these positions since their appointment and (g) is the total budget allocated to this specific department over the past three financial years?

Reply:

a) The office dealing with airfreight, amongst other functions, is the Directorate: Aviation Industry Development and Airfreight. The Sub-Directorate: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics specifically has the functional responsibility to lead and provide strategic support for the management of civil airfreight logistics.

b) The Sub-Directorate: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics has two incumbents occupying the funded positions of Deputy and Assistant Directors. The position of the Director remains vacant. The designations of the officials within the Sub-Directorate: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics are Deputy Director: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics and Assistant Director: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics. In terms of the agreed upon and signed Job Descriptions, the functions enumerated below are their key areas of responsibilities:

  1. development and implementation of relevant frameworks, strategies and plans for civil aviation freight logistics system;
  2. provide strategic support to programmes within the Branch: Civil Aviation as well as the Department of Transport, relevant fora at national, regional and international levels;
  3. manage and control the Sub-Directorate; and
  4. coordination and integration of civil aviation freight logistics system with other transport infrastructure planning and broader planning.

c) The Sub-Directorate became fully operational as from 2015/16 financial year (FY) onwards following the appointment of the Deputy Director. Subsequent Business Plans of the Department of Transport featured the following targets, which were / are being carried out:

  1. strategic analysis on airfreight industry landscape whose aim was to gather intelligence from which priority intervention areas were affirmed [target for 2015/16 FY];
  2. sieved endorsement from relevant authorities to explore the consolidation of supply chain for regional bound exports [target for 2016/17 FY];
  3. facilitated the modernization of text for the Bilateral Air Safety Agreement (BASA) between South Africa (SA) and United States of America (USA), which seeks to ease access of aeronautical products / services from SA [target for 2017/18 FY];
  4. working with key government Departments and aviation entities, drive the compilation of Implementation Procedure for Airworthiness (IPA) to pave way for the conclusion of revised BASA between SA and USA [2018/19 – onwards];
  5. working with key government Departments and aviation entities, initiated a dialogue with the European Union (EU) aimed at concluding similar BASA [target for 2019/20 - onwards]

d) The role of the Department of Transport in airfreight development is to champion the vision set forth in the National Freight Logistics Strategy (NFLS). Its integral objective is on reducing the cost of doing business in South Africa through seamless movement of goods and services (for an example the cost of logistics is currently estimated at approximately 15% of the GDP compared to 8% international best practice).

Furthermore, the NFLS identified strategic intervention areas across all modes wherein priority attention should be focused. These are aiming at eliminating system blockages, increase (air) cargo movement capacity and improve service delivery in order to increase commodity throughput, growing the sub-sector while reducing transaction costs.

Some of the NFLS identified strategic interventions designed to turning around airfreight have been translated into action that is currently unfolding – please refer to point (c) above. In order to ensure a holistic approach, the DOT interfaces on a regular basis with government Departments and the industry at multi stakeholder fora including the Joint Aviation Steering Committee (JASC) and the South African Region Aircraft (SARA).

e) The short, medium and long term goals of the Department of Transport relating to airfreight are:

Short term

  • Consider and improve existing legally binding instruments archived with DIRCO with an objective of improving their offerings;

Medium

  • Engage Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEMs) with a view to secure export markets for South African manufactured goods and services;

Long term:

  • Promote diversification of exports to traditional and new markets to support growth and employment in the country;
  • Bilateral Air Safety Agreements (BASAs) are signed by the political principals and they come into force;

f) the current salary notches of the two middle and junior managers are as follows:

  • Deputy Director: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics is R 882 048.00 per annum since appointment date in March 2014;
  • Assistant Director: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics is R 470 040.00 per annum since appointment date in September 2018

g) In line with the Treasury prescripts, budget is allocated to the Directorate: Aviation Industry Development and Airfreight which hosts amongst others the Sub-Directorate: Civil Aviation Freight Logistics. Over the past three financial years (FY) the breakdown of Operational Budget availed to execute all the Directorate functions including airfreight is as follows:

  • 2016/17 FY = R 370 000, 00
  • 2017/18 FY = R 586 000, 00
  • 2018/19 FY = R 221 000, 00

09 March 2020 - NW170

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) What number of section 12I allowances which (i) are to be considered by the adjudication committee and (ii) have been submitted to his department are outstanding and require approval, (b) what are the relevant details of each company name and (c) how long they have been waiting to be approved; (2) (a) what are the economic implications of delayed approvals and (b) why have there been any delays in the approval of section 12I allowances? NW191E

Reply:

Three applications received since 1 February 2020 are to be considered by the Adjudication Committee and five applications are currently being considered. Details of decisions and the identity of companies concerned who receive the incentive are made public once the process is completed.

In two matters, applications being recommended to be declined are being reviewed to check whether they could be approved. One of these may require an opinion from SARS.

As a result of the need to ensure that public funds are deployed to maximum effect to achieve national goals, it has been necessary to review applications carefully for their economic impact and determine whether they fully assist with achievement of such goals.

To illustrate the value of the approach: a recent approval of a s12i application from Hi-Sense, an electronics company located in Atlantis, will now result in improved efficiencies and the creation of a significant number of new jobs. Further details of these will be released in due course.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW111

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the approximately 30 attacks on paramedics countrywide in the past six months, what measures is his department putting in place to stop these attacks; (2) whether he intends to collaborate with other departments in an attempt to stop the specified attacks; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which departments, (b) what are the details of such collaboration and (c) by what date can positive results be expected from the intended measures; (3) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health, together with the Provincial Health Departments have embarked on a number of intervention strategies to help curb the ongoing attacks on Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Workforce. To this end we have established a National EMS Safety Forum and have since developed a National EMS Safety Guideline for all provinces to implement based on their specific needs (Annexure A). These comprehensive guidelines have four main areas, namely Focus on Staff, Community, Technology and Management. The National Department of Health is also in the process of introducing a 2-day course aimed addressing increasing safety awareness to enhance EMS personnel skills in identifying hostile environments, dealing with such situations, undertake evasive action and protection of the patient/s.

2. Yes. The National Department of Health has engaged with the South African Police Services (SAPS), National Joint Operations and Intelligence Structure (NatJOINTS), to highlight the ongoing attacks on EMS workforce and to escalate the matter with the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security Cluster (JCPS Cluster), with recommendation to the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to deal with perpetrators more stringently. As a result, the NatJOINTS has issued a NatJOINTS Instruction to SAPS Provincial Commissioners to work closely with Provincial EMS managers. The aim of the collaboration is to provide the necessary security services to EMS workforce and to prioritise all cases reported.

In addition, this matter has been carefully deliberated upon by the National Health Council and a decision was taken to have Izimbizos within the affected communities in order to create awareness and to advocate for the support of EMS by the communities. Should Izimbizos in the affected areas fail, then EMS would be forced to withdraw services from danger areas to avert loss of life or injury.

Intervention strategies at both National and Provincial levels, but are not limited to, are listed below:

  • Participation and keynote address by Deputy Minister, Dr J Phaahla, at the National EMS Safety Symposium held at Cape Peninsula University of Technology in late 2018, involving all stakeholders which culminated in the development of an EMS Safety Position statement (Annexure B);
  • Denouncement of such attacks by the Minister of Health at the launch of National EMS Day in 2019;
  • Radio and television interviews;
  • Interaction with staff at grass roots level;
  • Participate in demonstrations and marches denouncing attacks on EMS staff;
  • Interact with the community in the affected communities; and
  • Feedback to National and Provincial parliamentary structures.

Intervention strategies by the EMS Managers and Senior Officials of the Provincial Health Departments include:

  • Regular stakeholders meeting with the Community Police Forum (CPF) in the identified affected areas;
  • On receipt of an emergency call, the EMS Communication Centre verifies the call with the CPF, who immediately respond to the location and confirm the emergency;
  • The EMS team respond to a safe area within the Red Zone (declared by SAPS) and are then escorted to the patient by SAPS;
  • Ongoing discussions with the labour caucus, CPF, SAPS and EMS management, have resulted in a decision to train CPF members in emergency medical care (First Responder Course) so as to provide the patients with immediate medical care upon the arrival of EMS; and
  • In addition, the media are invited to ride along with EMS to report first hand of the experience, challenges and difficult situation faced by the emergency services on a daily basis, EMS management and staff are regularly interviewed by the media to highlight the dangers and challenges EMS is confronted with, when serving such areas.

Interaction with the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, EMS Management and the Safety and Security Cluster continues, to ensure that:

  • Legal counsel employed by the state follows up the investigations to ensure prioritisation and possible conviction; and
  • Expert witness testimony by senior EMS manager on impact to EMS staff, EMS management, the community and service delivery.

3. I, as the Minister of Health, along with Deputy Minister of Health, Dr J Phaahla and senior managers of the National Department of Health have made several statements in this regard in the past and will continue to denounce such attacks going forward. It must be noted that there are a number of interventions implemented at multiple levels of government, yet, the attacks continue. No matter what we do, it is never enough, but we must continue to try, as we deal with this largely socioeconomic challenge. The National Department of Health together with our sector departments and provincial counterparts will continue to look for additional ways to address this serious challenge.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW175

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed that Klopper Park Clinic does not have a registered pharmacist on site; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has been informed as to why the specified clinic has not received any assistance from a medical practitioner on a weekly basis to assist with consultations and the medical needs of patients; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he has been informed as to (a) why the clinic has not had any telephonic and electronic communication for the past year and (b) what is being done to deal with the problem; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he has been informed as to (a) why the ambulances from Ekurhuleni Metro do not provide services to the local clinics, as the clinics solely depend on provincial ambulance services for assistance and (b) what the turnaround time of the provincial ambulance services is when called out for medical assistance to transfer patients to the general local hospitals; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes. I have been informed that Klopper Park Clinic does not have a registered pharmacist.

As a practice and a norm, not all the clinics have pharmacists and pharmacy assistants. Due to the shortage of these categories of workers, the decision was taken to prioritise Community Health Centers for allocation of pharmacists or pharmacy assistants; however, the process of having pharmacists or pharmacy assistants in clinics is ongoing until all clinics are covered.

2. Yes, I have been informed that Klopper Park clinic does not receive the assistance of a medical practitioner on a weekly basis to assist with consultations and medical needs of patients.

The contract for the Community Service Medical Doctor who was allocated to Klopper Park clinic to assist with consultations and medical needs of patients expired in December 2019, however the sessional Medical Officer was appointed in February 2020. The sessional Doctor works at the clinic every Thursday to assist with consultations and medical needs of patients.

3. (a) The clinic has not had telephonic and electronic communication for the past year due to infrastructure challenges. The new clinic was planned and it is currently on the CAPEX (capital expenditure) program. There is a weekly meeting with the ICT department to resolve the problem.

(b) The clinic has a mobile phone with the prepaid airtime available for emergency calls, whilst a permanent solution relating to infrastructure challenges is being sought.

4. (a) Ekurhuleni clinics receive ambulance services from both Ekurhuleni Metro and the Province. The Ekurhuleni ambulances collect clients / patients from home to different facilities, while provincial ambulances transfer clients / patients from the clinics to different hospitals.

(b) The turnaround time differs between urban and rural areas, and between obstetric and other emergency ambulances. For urban response, the turnaround time is 15 to 60 minutes. The obstetric ambulances’ turnaround time is less than 30 minutes.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW173

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether public clinics in Gauteng have mobile units to assist with health service delivery; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what number of clinics have mobile units and (b) which areas does each mobile unit serve?

Reply:

Public Clinics in Gauteng Province do not have mobile units, but the mobile units fall under sub districts and some of them are based at the clinics for overnight parking and refilling of medicines and medical commodities. All five districts have mobile units to assist with heath service delivery in sub-districts.

There are no clinics that have mobile units.

With regards to the areas that are served by the mobile units, the list is provided here below as (ANNEXURE A).

END.

09 March 2020 - NW174

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

Whether municipal clinics in the City of (a) Tshwane, (b) Johannesburg and (c) Ekurhuleni have mobile units to assist with health service delivery; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) what number of clinics have mobile units in each city and (ii) which areas does each mobile unit serve in each case?

Reply:

Both the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality and the City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipality have allocated mobile clinics/units according to the sub districts/regions; Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality has fixed clinics that have mobile units/clinics attached to them.

Details on the number of clinics that have mobile units, as well as areas that are served by mobile units, are contained in Annexure A.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW157

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department received any applications for mining licences in the City of Ekurhuleni; if so, (a) what number of applications have been (i) received (aa) in each of the past five years and (bb) since 1 April 2019 and (ii) issued in each case and (b) where is the mining taking place?

Reply:

Reply

  1. (i)The number of applications received in the last five years from 2015 to 31 March 2019 are 56

Year

Total No of Applications

Applications issued

2015

15

04

2016

07

01

2017

17

03

2018

10

01

2019

08

01

(bb)
(bb) Applications received from 1 April 2019 are 08

(ii) There are no applications issued in this category

(ii) There are no applications issued in this category

(b) Nigel, Brakpan and Benoni.

 

DDG: MR
Date: 27 FEB 2020

Recommended

Advocate TS Mokoena
Director General: Department of Mineral Resources and Energy


Approved

Mr SG Mantashe
Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy
Date submitted: 09/03/2020

09 March 2020 - NW52

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(a) On what legislative structural basis did the War Room of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) come into existence, (b) to whom did the PRASA War Room report, (c) who was in charge of the War Room, (d) what was the total expenses for the PRASA War Room during its existence, (e)(i) what total number of staff was employed at the PRASA War Room and (ii) on whose payroll were they and (f)(i) whose equipment did they use and (ii) what agreements were established on these arrangements?

Reply:

(a) The PRASA War Room was established by the Accounting Authority of PRASA under direction of the Executive Authority.

(b) The Steering Committee of the PRASA War Room reported to the Minister of Transport.

(c) The Steering Committee of the PRASA War Room met weekly and was chaired by the Director General: Department of Transport. A Technical Committee managed the day to day functioning of the War Room chaired by the Head of Strategic Planning at PRASA.

(d) No extra cost was attributed to the War Room as it was staffed with PRASA employees.

(e) (i) Five(5) PRASA employees staffed the War Room on a permanent basis.

(ii) Refer to (d) above.

(f) (i) All equipment used in the War Room is owned by PRASA.

(ii) Refer to (f)(i) above.

09 March 2020 - NW17

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed that the Civitas building in Pretoria that houses the headquarters of his department is a health hazard; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the building also houses his office; if so, on what date did he last visit his office; (3) has he put any measures in place to address the problems at the Civitas building in Pretoria; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) on what date will he and his department be moving to new premises and (b) where is this new premises; (5) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The Civitas building requires significant maintenance which must be facilitated by the Department of Public Works. The key areas that require maintenance are the air-conditioning, water proofing of the roof and the repair and replacement of the lifts.

When the air-conditioning does not function optimally, temperatures in offices can become unbearable. We have therefore allowed staff to leave early in such circumstances until the air-condition is repaired. It would be incorrect to refer to this as a “health hazard”. If these areas of maintenance are not addressed, then a “health hazard” may occur. At this stage the repairs to the air-conditioning system are underway and expected to be completed by mid-March 2020.

2. The Minister uses the Civitas building as his office and holds meetings in the building regularly.

(3) A maintenance company has been appointed to repair the air-conditioning and sprinkler systems and this is expected to be completed by mid-March 2020. The Department monitors and tracks the progress related to the maintenance of the building with special attention to addressing the recommendations of the Inspector of the Department of Labour.

Progress in addressing the identified defects is as follows:

- new chillers have been procured and installed, to address the Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC). They will be commissioned by end of March 2020.

- work is still underway related to addressing the sprinkler system and is expected to be completed by end of March 2020.

- roof water proofing project has been completed. A new deficiency has emerged related to the storm water system when there are heavy rains as recently experienced in Gauteng.

- the lifts project has been completed and currently on a maintenance status.

The revised completion date for other maintenance work by the contractor pending approval is 23 June 2020, which might be extended due to the phased approach of NDoH providing access to limited floors to the contractor, considering that the work is done while the building is occupied.

The maintenance project completion timelines are currently behind schedule in the region of 102 days due to unforeseen delays which include non-payment of invoices for work done, by DPW. Since the commencement of the project in April 2019, DPW has not paid any of the claims from the contractors.

(4) (a) The Department is currently participating in an acquisition and procurement process with the Department of Public Works regarding the process of moving to new premises. A formal and written indication was communicated to the DPW by NDOH on 10 February 2020 regarding the preferred building for the relocation. DPW has informed NDOH that they are still attending to procurement processes, including getting the necessary Treasury approvals. DPW has estimated the commencement of the move to a new building to be from October 2020.

(b) In Pretoria.

(5) A statement was issued on 4 February 2020 related to the relocation of the National Department of Health from the Civitas building.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW91

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)What was the cost of his trip to the meeting of the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in terms of (a) flights and accommodation, (b) daily allowance and (c) the (i) number of employees from his private office that attended and (ii) total cost for them to attend; (2) whether he flew in economy class to Davos, Switzerland; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether he intends flying economy class when attending to official business abroad; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW100E

Reply:

The trip to the World Economic Forum in January 2020 combined three separate meetings in one round-trip. These were:

  1. The 2020 World Economic Forum meeting held in Switzerland to meet investors, analysts and foreign government representatives
  2. The World Trade Organisation “Mini-Ministerial” meeting on trade, held in Switzerland to consider the progress made on trade reform at global level
  3. A session of the African Union’s Bureau of the Council of Ministers held in Ethiopia, to shortlist candidates for the Secretary General position for the new Secretariat of the AfCFTA.

The travel schedule was a flight from Johannesburg – Zurich followed by a car journey to Davos and back to Zurich; with flights from Zurich-Vienna (transit) – Addis Ababa (meeting) – Johannesburg. Travel for international visits are in business class.

The cost for the Addis Ababa meeting will be compensated by the African Union, as I attended in my capacity as Vice Chairperson of the Council of Ministers. The cost of travel, excluding the portion for which a refund has been made to the African Union, is R111 383, covering both airfare and accommodation.

A Ministerial Advisor attended the WEF meeting, at a cost of R58 454 and flew economy class.

No accompanying person from the Ministry travelled to Ethiopia for the African Union segment.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW161

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What government incentives are in place to encourage individuals to (a) install solar systems, and (b) use micro power generation for their own private power supply at household level?

Reply:

Currency government does not have incentives to encourage (a) individuals to install systems and (b) use micro power generation for their own private power supply at household level, However, it should be indicated that there are benefits to either install or use micro power generator through sayings that are made from the decrease on electricity bills be» one is not using the grid connected electricity.

NW182E

09 March 2020 - NW148

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(a)(i) On what date and (ii) under what terms was a set-top box testing facility established at the SA Bureau of Standards, (b) what was the cost to her department of establishing this facility and (c) what number of set-top boxes have been tested at the facility since it was completed?

Reply:

I have been advised by the department as follows:

(a)(i) The SABS decoder testing lab was established in February 2012.

(ii) The lab was established to test decoders to be manufactured in South Africa based on the SANS862 national DTT decoder standard administered by the SABS. A Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) was signed between the Department of Communications (DoC), Department of Trade and Industry [DTI] and the SA Bureau of Standards (SABS). Under the terms of the MoU, the SABS had to:

  1. Assume responsibility for the establishment and operations of the decoder conformance lab.
  2. Procure lab test equipment
  3. Appoint personnel to operate the lab
  4. Work closely with the DoC and broadcasters on operational matters of the lab as and when necessary.

(b)The SABS was given a once-off grant of R30-million for the establishment of the facility by the DoC under the terms of the MoU, to perform the duties as outlined.

(c) According to the records provided by the SABS, they have tested and issued certificates for eleven (11) decoder samples from a number of local suppliers since the inception of the lab in 2012. The method was to test one decoder sample per model of decoder that the manufacturer was in the process of putting into production. The list of the samples is provided below:

Supplier

DTH-Satellite STB

DTT-Terrestrial STB

Model

ABT

x

 

STB351-SNT-MTC-01

ABT

 

x

STB341-MTC01

African Digitech Solutions (ADS)

 

x

TJ5023U

BUA Africa

 

x

DTD 4N

BUA Africa

 

x

HT8863L

BUA Africa

x

 

HSJ10

BUA Africa

 

x

HS6100

Altech UEC

 

x

DTD 4126

CZ Electronics

 

x

FR9600

Leratadima

 

x

STB341-MTC01

M-Net

 

x

Go-TV

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

09 March 2020 - NW16

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Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the (a) reason for a certain person’s (name and details furnished) appointment and (b) relation of the person to him; (2) whether the relevant position was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) where was it advertised, (b) what number of (i) candidates applied for the position and (ii) interviews were conducted with candidates and (c) how was the decision made to appoint the specified person in the position; (3) what role will the specified person play in the National Health Insurance?

Reply:

(1) (a) The appointment of the Chief of Staff in the Health Ministry was done in line with the Public Service Regulation 66.

(b) The Chief of Staff is not a family member of the Minister.

(2) Regulation 66 explains the process of filling of posts in the Office of an Executive. Regulation 66 (2) states that the Minister is not required to follow the normal recruitment  process as set out in Regulation 65. It should however be recorded that the person has the necessary qualifications, skills and experience to occupy this position.

(3) All employees of the National Department of Health are required to implement the NHI strategy. Furthermore all staff members in the Executive’s office are also required to provide support in ensuring that the mandate the Executive is required to fulfill in terms of his portfolio is achieved. NHI is part of this mandate and the specified person will play a role as required by her job description.

END.

09 March 2020 - NW152

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

By what date (a) does he envisage the forensic investigation into the conduct and payments to Ndzabandzaba Attorneys launched in 2018 will be completed and (b) will the outcomes of the forensic investigation be made public?

Reply:

I am advised by the Economic Development Department that the report is expected to be completed within six weeks. The key findings and recommendations, together with any actions required from the Commission, will be made public.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW95

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of claims of negligence have been submitted against his department in each province in the past two financial years, (b) are the details of each claim, (c) number of these claims have been paid out and (d) was the monetary value of each claim?

Reply:

The National Department is supporting and overseeing the Provinces in the handling of medico-legal cases. In this regard, the common approach is the public health defence with regard to future medical treatment. This is to ensure that future medical expenses must not be paid in monetary value but in kind by providing future medical treatment in public health facilities. This approach has been dealt with in the case of Zulu. The Zulu Case was confirmed by Judge Keightley in the Gauteng Local Division of the High Court in which the Court developed the common law by allowing that MEC for Health in Gauteng to provide services (future medical treatment) at Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital instead of paying a lump sum of money.

Furthermore, the State Liability Amendment Bill, 2018 is being revived to expressly provide for the provision of services (future medical treatment) at public facilities. In this regard, there are Gazetted health facilities in the implementation of the Bill.

The South Africa Law Reform Commission (SALRC) is also conducting an investigation into law reform in the field of medico-legal litigation in terms of Project 141. The Issue Paper was issued in May 2017 with due date of comments to 30 September 2017 which recommended the amendment to the State Liability Act. The SALRC is currently busy with the Discussion Paper.

Mediation is also being encouraged to Provinces as one of the intervention measures and aimed at the reduction of the legal costs and lengthy and costly court processes.

Further intervention relates to forensic investigations of suspicions cases. The investigations project commenced in December 2019 with a focus on identified cases in KZN and recently in EC; as well as investigations of the top law firms participating in the medico-legal cases at provincial leave. In addition, the services of the newly established Health Anti-Corruption Forum will be utilized. Partnership with the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) is also being forged as it is already a case in the Eastern Cape Province.

Provinces: As per the table below:

((a) number of claims of negligence have been submitted against the National Department and in each province in the past two financial years,

(b) details of each claim have been summarised in the third column in the table below per province;

(c) number of the claims paid out per province;

(d) total monetary value of claims per province.

2017-18 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

NUMBER OF MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS SUBMITTED (including letters of demand)

SUMMARY DETAILS OF EACH CLAIM

MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS ACTUAL PAYMENTS

TOTAL AMOUNT OF CONTINGENT LIABILITY MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS

(not paid)

     

No of claims

Total Amount paid

 

Eastern Cape

524

Cerebral Palsy; Surgical

59

R427 706 138.84

R7 741 496 122.24

Free State

52

Cerebral Palsy, Wrong diagnosis / medication, Surgical complications

5

R 14 150 000.00

R 584 222 853.00

Gauteng

386

Cerebral Palsy; surgical

74

R 243 250 339.32

R 3 660 646 406.20

Kwazulu- Natal

402

Obstetrics & Gynaecology; Surgical

Oncology; Urology; Ophthalmology

151 

R 134 436 666.80

R 2 978 441 462.30

Limpopo

275

Cerebral Palsy; Obstetrics & Gynaecology Orthopaedic Other Surgical

9

R 17 550.000.00

R 2 880 271 000.00

Mpumalanga

80

Maternity cases

Orthopaedic cases

Mental Health care user case

25

R 25 947 455.00

R 1 025 412 726.00

Northern Cape

23

Cerebral Palsy; Surgical

0

0

R 315 855 194.00

North West

77

Maternity cases; Orthopaedic cases

10

R 34 633 128.60

R 601 176 148.00

Western Cape[1]

92

Obstetrics, surgical, neurosurgery

50

R86 873 630.75

R614 857 118.09

TOTALS

1911

 

384

R 984 547 359.31

R 20 402 379 029.83

2018-19 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

NUMBER OF MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS SUBMITTED (including letters of demand)

SUMMARY DETAILS OF EACH CLAIM

MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS ACTUAL PAYMENTS

TOTAL AMOUNT OF CONTINGENT LIABILITY MEDICO- LEGAL CLAIMS

(not paid)

     

No of claims

Total Amount paid

 

Eastern Cape

459

Cerebral Palsy; Surgical

87

R 797 120 477. 00

R 6 673 891 443.79

Free State

67

Cerebral Palsy, Wrong diagnosis / medication, Surgical complications

7

R 10 400 258.25

R 873 494 171.00

Gauteng

120

Cerebral Palsy; surgical

70

R 378 983 765.88

R 1 357 938 619,11

Kwazulu- Natal

446

Obstetrics & Gynaecology; Surgical Oncology; Urology; Ophthalmology

86

R 444 129 604.90

R 2 636 105 361. 09

Limpopo

254

Cerebral Palsy; Obstetrics & Gynaecology Orthopaedic Other Surgical

6

R 9 800 000.00

R 2 329 815 300.00

Mpumalanga

132

Maternity cases

Orthopaedic cases

18

R 25 597 039.12

R 2 170 079 941.43

Northern Cape

19

Cerebral Palsy; Surgical

2

R 3 600 000.00

R 176 438 110.00

North West

92

Maternity cases; Orthopaedic cases

7

R 34 027 549.00

R 513 958 416.73

Western Cape

46

Obstetrics, ophthalmology, neurosurgery

32

R 60 971 721.70

R 2 536 987 682.49

TOTALS

1 635

 

315

R 1 764 630 415.85

R19 268 709 045.64

As at March 2019, the Contingent liability submitted by provinces was at R100 billion over a period of ten years. There is currently a cleaning up process of the data and the amount to ensure that the contingent liability is only for medico-legal cases and does not include all litigation matters such as RAF; Procurement matters; non-payment of invoices due to disputes or budget issues etc. As at June 2019, the reduced amount was R68b and this is an ongoing process.END

09 March 2020 - NW64

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With regard to the African Continental Free Trade Area, what budget has been allocated specifically for trade promotion in the medium term for South African manufacturers to take advantage of this agreement?

Reply:

I have requested the Department to prioritise trade with the rest of the Continent over the MTEF and accordingly, a growing part of the budget will be directed to trade promotion and the activities of the Development Finance Institutions will also be harnessed.

R80 million of the current export promotion budget supports intra-Africa trade and investments over the MTEF period, but, as indicated above, we will be drawing on a wider resource-envelope.

-END-

09 March 2020 - NW121

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the name of each health facility that offers abortion in the Republic and (b) in which province is each specified facility located?

Reply:

The following tables provide the details in this regard:

Name of health facility that offers Choice of Termination of Pregnancy (CTOP) in the Republic

Province in which facility is located

(a)

(b)

Adelaide Hospital

Eastern Cape

All Saints Hospital

Eastern Cape

Andries Vosloo Hospital

Eastern Cape

Bambisana Hospital

Eastern Cape

Bedford Hospital

Eastern Cape

Bhisho Hospital

Eastern Cape

Butterworth Hospital

Eastern Cape

Cala Hospital

Eastern Cape

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

Eastern Cape

Civic Centre Clinic (Mthatha)

Eastern Cape

Cloete Joubert (Barkley East) Hospital

Eastern Cape

Cofimvaba Hospital

Eastern Cape

Cradock Hospital

Eastern Cape

Dora Nginzi Hospital

Eastern Cape

Duncan Village CHC

Eastern Cape

Elliot Hospital

Eastern Cape

Empilisweni Hospital

Eastern Cape

Empiliweni Gompo CHC

Eastern Cape

Frere Hospital

Eastern Cape

Frontier Hospital

Eastern Cape

Glen Grey Hospital

Eastern Cape

Hewu Hospital

Eastern Cape

Humansdorp Hospital

Eastern Cape

Idutywa Village CHC

Eastern Cape

Lady Grey Hospital

Eastern Cape

Laetitia Bam CHC

Eastern Cape

Lanti Clinic

Eastern Cape

Marie Stopes Port Elizabeth Clinic

Eastern Cape

Midland Hospital

Eastern Cape

Motherwell CHC

Eastern Cape

Mthatha General Hospital

Eastern Cape

New Rest Clinic

Eastern Cape

Ngqwaru Clinic

Eastern Cape

Nompumelelo (Peddie) Hospital

Eastern Cape

Nontyatyambo CHC

Eastern Cape

Nqamakwe CHC

Eastern Cape

Port Alfred Hospital

Eastern Cape

Settlers Hospital

Eastern Cape

SS Gida Hospital

Eastern Cape

St Elizabeth's Hospital

Eastern Cape

Rafalofefe Hospital

Eastern Cape

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Elundini)

Eastern Cape

Tayler Biquest Hospital (Matatiele)

Eastern Cape

Uitenhage Hospital

Eastern Cape

Victoria Hospital

Eastern Cape

Xhora CHC

Eastern Cape

Albert Luthuli Memorial Clinic

Free State

Albert Nzula District Hospital

Free State

Botshabelo Hospital

Free State

Bren Health Care Clinic

Free State

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

Free State

Dr Moeti Surgery

Free State

Elizabeth Ross Hospital

Free State

Fezi Ngumbentombi Hospital

Free State

Karabo Clinic

Free State

Katleho Hospital

Free State

Kgotsong (Welkom) Clinic

Free State

Mediclinic Welkom Hospital

Free State

Molemo Healthcare Clinic

Free State

National District Hospital

Free State

Phekolong Hospital

Free State

Tokollo Hospital

Free State

Bertha Gxowa Hospital

Gauteng

Carletonville Hospital

Gauteng

Chiawelo CHC

Gauteng

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Gauteng

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

Gauteng

Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital

Gauteng

Heidelberg Hospital

Gauteng

Jabulane Dumane CHC

Gauteng

Johan Heyns CHC

Gauteng

Jubilee Hospital

Gauteng

Kalafong Hospital

Gauteng

Kgabo CHC

Gauteng

Kopanong Hospital

Gauteng

Laudium CHC

Gauteng

Lenasia South CHC

Gauteng

Leratong Hospital

Gauteng

Phedisong 4 CHC

Gauteng

Protop Women's Clinic (Vereeniging)

Gauteng

Sebokeng Hospital

Gauteng

Soshanguve CHC

Gauteng

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

Gauteng

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

Gauteng

Vaal Woman's Choice Clinic (Evaton)

Gauteng

Vaal Woman's Choice Clinic (Vereeniging)

Gauteng

Zola CHC

Gauteng

Addington Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Appelsbosch Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Benedictine Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Bethesda Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Catherine Booth Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Christ the King Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Dannhauser CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Dundee Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Edendale Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

eDumbe CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Emmaus Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Eshowe Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Estcourt Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

General Justice Gizenga Mpanza Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

GJ Crooke's Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Greytown Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Hlengisizwe CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Inanda C CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Itshelejuba Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Khululeka Clinic

KwaZulu-Natal

KwaDabeka CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

KwaMagwaza Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Ladysmith Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Manguzi Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Marie Stopes Durban Clinic

KwaZulu-Natal

Marie Stopes Isipingo Clinic

KwaZulu-Natal

Mbongolwane Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Montebello Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Murchison Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Ndwedwe CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Newcastle Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Nkandla Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Nkonjeni Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Northdale Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Nseleni CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Phoenix CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Pomeroy CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Port Shepstone Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Rietvlei Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

RK Khan Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Rose Clinic (Durban)

KwaZulu-Natal

St Andrew's Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

St Apollinaris Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

St Chads CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Sundumbili CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

TLMSM Health Care Clinic

KwaZulu-Natal

Tongaat CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Turton CHC

KwaZulu-Natal

Umphumulo Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Untunjambili Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Vryheid Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Wentworth Hospital

KwaZulu-Natal

Botlokwa Hospital

Limpopo

Buffelshoek Clinic (Blouberg)

Limpopo

Burgersfort Clinic

Limpopo

Dendron Clinic

Limpopo

Dilokong Hospital

Limpopo

Donald Fraser Hospital

Limpopo

Dr CN Phatudi Hospital

Limpopo

Elim Hospital

Limpopo

Ellisras Hospital

Limpopo

FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital

Limpopo

George Masebe Hospital

Limpopo

HC Boshoff CHC

Limpopo

Helen Franz Hospital

Limpopo

Jamela Clinic

Limpopo

Jane Furse Hospital

Limpopo

Kgapane Hospital

Limpopo

Lebowakgomo Hospital

Limpopo

Letaba Hospital

Limpopo

Letsitele Clinic

Limpopo

Levubu Clinic

Limpopo

Louis Trichard Hospital

Limpopo

Makhado CHC

Limpopo

Malamulele Hospital

Limpopo

Mamotshwa Clinic

Limpopo

Mankweng Hospital

Limpopo

Mariveni Clinic

Limpopo

Mashishimale Clinic

Limpopo

Matlala Hospital

Limpopo

Matoks Clinic

Limpopo

Mecklenburg Hospital

Limpopo

Mokopane Hospital

Limpopo

Mookgophong CHC

Limpopo

Nancefield Clinic

Limpopo

Nchabeleng CHC

Limpopo

Northam Clinic

Limpopo

Philadelphia Hospital

Limpopo

Rapahlelo Clinic

Limpopo

Ratshaatshaa CHC

Limpopo

Rethabile CHC

Limpopo

Sekororo Hospital

Limpopo

Seloane Clinic

Limpopo

Seshego Hospital

Limpopo

Siloam Hospital

Limpopo

St Rita's Hospital

Limpopo

Thabazimbi Hospital

Limpopo

Tiyani CHC

Limpopo

Tshilidzini Hospital

Limpopo

Tshilwavhusiku CHC

Limpopo

Voortrekker Memorial (Potgietersrus) Hospital

Limpopo

Warmbaths Hospital

Limpopo

WF Knobel Hospital

Limpopo

Willows Clinic

Limpopo

Witpoort Hospital

Limpopo

Zebediela Hospital

Limpopo

Amajuba Memorial Hospital

Mpumalanga

Barberton Hospital

Mpumalanga

Bernice Samuels Hospital

Mpumalanga

Bethal Hospital

Mpumalanga

Bhuga CHC

Mpumalanga

Carolina Hospital

Mpumalanga

Embhuleni Hospital

Mpumalanga

Empumelelweni CHC

Mpumalanga

Ermelo Hospital

Mpumalanga

Evander Hospital

Mpumalanga

Ezamokuhle Clinic

Mpumalanga

Kabokweni CHC

Mpumalanga

Kanyamazane CHC

Mpumalanga

KwaMhlanga Hospital

Mpumalanga

Lebohang CHC

Mpumalanga

M'Africa CHC

Mpumalanga

Mapulaneng Hospital

Mpumalanga

Matsulu CHC

Mpumalanga

Mmametlhake Hospital

Mpumalanga

Naas CHC

Mpumalanga

Nelspruit CHC

Mpumalanga

Phola-Nzikasi CHC

Mpumalanga

Piet Retief Hospital

Mpumalanga

Sabie Hospital

Mpumalanga

Standerton Hospital

Mpumalanga

Thulamahashe CHC

Mpumalanga

Tintswalo Hospital

Mpumalanga

De Aar (Central Karoo) Hospital

Northern Cape

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

Northern Cape

Galeshewe Day Hospital

Northern Cape

Postmasburg Hospital

Northern Cape

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

Northern Cape

Tshwaragano Hospital

Northern Cape

Atamelang CHC

North West

Bafokeng CHC

North West

Bapong CHC

North West

Brits Hospital

North West

Ganyesa Hospital

North West

Gelukspan Hospital

North West

General de la Rey Hospital

North West

Hartebeesfontein Clinic

North West

JB Marks CHC

North West

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

North West

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

North West

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

North West

Klipdrift Health Post

North West

Koster Hospital

North West

Letlhabile CHC

North West

Mabeskraal CHC

North West

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

North West

Makapanstad (Seaparankwe) Clinic

North West

Mamusa CHC

North West

Mogwase CHC

North West

Moses Kotane Hospital

North West

Nic Bodenstein Hospital

North West

Potchefstroom Hospital

North West

Ramabesa Health Post

North West

Schweizer-Reneke Town Clinic

North West

Taung Hospital

North West

Annie Brown Clinic

Western Cape

Bergsig Clinic

Western Cape

Bredasdorp Clinic

Western Cape

Caledon Clinic

Western Cape

Caledon Hospital

Western Cape

Cape Town Reproductive Health Centre

Western Cape

Ceres CDC

Western Cape

Ceres Hospital

Western Cape

Clanwilliam Hospital

Western Cape

Cloetesville CHC

Western Cape

Cogmanskloof Clinic

Western Cape

De Doorns Clinic

Western Cape

Dr Abdurahman CDC

Western Cape

Eerste Rivier Hospital

Western Cape

Elim Satellite Clinic

Western Cape

Empilisweni (Worcester) Clinic

Western Cape

False Bay Hospital

Western Cape

George Hospital

Western Cape

Grabouw CHC

Western Cape

Great Brak River Clinic

Western Cape

Groendal Clinic

Western Cape

Groote Schuur Hospital

Western Cape

Guguletu CHC

Western Cape

Hanover Park CHC

Western Cape

Happy Valley Clinic

Western Cape

Harry Comay TB Hospital

Western Cape

Heidelberg Clinic

Western Cape

Helderberg Hospital

Western Cape

Hermanus Hospital

Western Cape

Idas Valley Clinic

Western Cape

Karl Bremer Hospital

Western Cape

Khayelitsha Hospital

Western Cape

Klapmuts Clinic

Western Cape

Knysna Hospital

Western Cape

Kraaifontein CHC

Western Cape

Kuyasa CHC

Western Cape

Lady Michaelis CDC

Western Cape

Life Bay View Private Hospital

Western Cape

Life Kingsbury Hospital

Western Cape

Mbekweni CDC

Western Cape

McGregor Clinic

Western Cape

Mediclinic Cape Gate Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Cape Town Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Constantiaberg Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Durbanville Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic George Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Hermanus Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Paarl Hospital

Western Cape

Mediclinic Worcester Hospital

Western Cape

Michael Mapongwana CDC

Western Cape

Mitchells Plain CHC

Western Cape

Mitchells Plain Hospital

Western Cape

Montagu Clinic

Western Cape

Montagu Hospital

Western Cape

Mossel Bay Hospital

Western Cape

Nduli clinic

Western Cape

New Somerset Hospital

Western Cape

Nkqubela Clinic

Western Cape

Nolungile CDC

Western Cape

Otto Du Plessis Hospital

Western Cape

Oudtshoorn Hospital

Western Cape

Paarl Hospital

Western Cape

Patriot Plein Clinic

Western Cape

Prince Alfred Hamlet Clinic

Western Cape

Radie Kotze Hospital

Western Cape

Railton Clinic

Western Cape

Robertson Hospital

Western Cape

SAMHS 2 Military Hospital

Western Cape

Site C Youth clinic

Western Cape

Stellenbosch Hospital

Western Cape

Suurbraak Clinic

Western Cape

Swellendam Hospital

Western Cape

Swellendam PHC Clinic

Western Cape

TC Newman CDC

Western Cape

Thembalethu CDC

Western Cape

Touws River Clinic

Western Cape

Town 2 CDC

Western Cape

Tulbach Clinic

Western Cape

Tygerberg Hospital

Western Cape

Vanguard CHC

Western Cape

Victoria Hospital

Western Cape

Villiersdorp Clinic

Western Cape

Vredenburg Hospital

Western Cape

Vredendal Hospital

Western Cape

Wellington CDC

Western Cape

Wesfleur Hospital

Western Cape

Wolseley Clinic

Western Cape

Worcester CDC

Western Cape

Worcester Hospital

Western Cape

Zolani Clinic

Western Cape

(Source: DHIS)

END.