Questions and Replies

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07 January 2020 - NW1494

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Mente-Nqweniso, Ms NV to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With reference to Ms Busisiwe Mavuso’s alleged statement that government interventions are hampering proper management and turnaround of Eskom, what were the interventions that he made that were against the plans of the Board and management teams at Eskom; (2) what was intended with his warning that Ms Mavuso must be careful?

Reply:

At the outset, it must be noted that it will take a long time for Eskom to recover fully from the damage caused by the State Capture.

The Memorandum of Incorporation of Company (including Eskom) sets out the responsibilities, duties and rights of the shareholder and directors. The shareholder, particularly 100% shareholder as in the case with government and many state owned companies, can have a range of rights in relation to the governance of SOEs. The Shareholder Compact, prescribes the various performance targets expected to be met by an entity.

In the case of Eskom, targets will include plant performance (the level of energy availability factor to be achieved), financial targets (reduction in overall costs including primary energy cost) or implementation of various “turnaround” plans. Within these parameters, the Board must hold management to account on delivery of these targets. Likewise, the shareholder department must hold the Board accountable. Where necessary, usually at critical stages of an entity, the shareholder may initiate processes to assist both the shareholder and Board to both diagnose a problem and suggest solutions: examples being the Presidential Sustainability Task Team (to make recommendations on the future direction of Eskom given the challenges and changes in the electricity market) and the Ministerial Technical Review Team (to make recommendations on improving plant performance).

07 January 2020 - NW1371

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

The Department has not used any of the individuals nor the companies as mentioned on the parliamentary question.

07 January 2020 - NW1718

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)Whether, with reference to the SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone in Limpopo, he will furnish Ms A M M Weber with a copy of the (a) agreement between the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, and the Chinese government for the investment of R145 billion in the Special Economic Zone (SEZ) and (b) environmental impact assessment for the SEZ Musina-Makhado in Limpopo; (2) apart from the Chinese government, who are all the investors into the SEZ; (3) whether there will be any hotel development; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who is involved and (b) where will the hotel be built?

Reply:

I have been advised that there is no agreement between the President and the Chinese government for investment in the SEZ Musina-Makhado. The honourable member may be referring to another agreement and is requested to clarify.

In respect of the environmental impact assessment, the Department reports that the assessment for the metallurgical cluster is currently underway and is targeted for completion in 2020.

The initial investor interest was from Chinese enterprises and it is expected that more enterprises, including locally-owned companies, will be encouraged to locate in the zone. I note that subsequent to the approval of this and other SEZs in past years, Cabinet reviewed the policy around SEZs during the latter part of 2019 and adopted a new approach, which formed the basis for the launch of the Tshwane Auto SEZ-hub and will be utilized in future. This includes a stronger role for national government in ensuring effective and higher-impact Special Economic Zones.

The Department notes that SEZs are aimed at attracting industrial investors and hotels would not be covered by the SEZ-designation in the area.

 

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1091

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1) What is the current status of all court cases that her department brought against Cash Paymaster Services (CPS); (2) (a) how far is the process of paying back R316 million by CPS to the SA Social Security Agency and (b) what steps will she take against officials who paid CPS contrary to documentation confirming that all the money that was due to CPS had been paid?

Reply:

(1)   SASSA has instituted legal proceedings against CPS for the recovery of R 74 million payments made to CPS. In the months of February and March 2018 SASSA paid 2 160 678 and 2 388 403 beneficiaries respectively, directly into their bank accounts without using the services of CPS.

CPS has, upon receipt of the summons claiming payment of R 74 million, filed a notice of exception to SASSA`s particulars of claim, demanding that SASSA provides more facts (such as contractual basis and principles upon which the claim is based). SASSA amended its particulars of claim (by incorporating other terms of the contract [contract for the payment of social grant services concluded with CPS during 2012]) and filed the notice to amend on 27 September 2019. CPS has filed a notice of objection to SASSA`s amendment on 11 October 2019. This matter is still pending arguments in Court.

(2)(a)  SASSA has sent a letter to CPS on 10 October 2019 demanding that CPS implements paragraph 36.2 (ordering CPS to pay R 316 million with interests) of the High Court order since CPS`s appeal to the Supreme Court of Appeal (SCA) has been dismissed. CPS indicated in its letter dated 14 October 2019 that it is preparing to appeal to the Constitutional Court (CC) against the SCA judgment. SASSA will await the outcome of the intended appeal and if the SCA judgment is not overturned, SASSA will enforce paragraph 36.2 of the High Court judgment.

(2)(b)  The official who authorised the R 316 million transaction (afforded CPS the right to claim R 316 million) is no longer in the employ of SASSA and it is only recently in  September 2019, that the Court made a ruling on the R316m payment which  was made in 2014.

 

Supported/Not supported

-----------------------------------

Mr M Toni

Acting Director-General: Dept. of Social Development

Date:

Supported/Not supported

-----------------------------------

Ms H Bogopane-Zulu

Deputy Minister: Dept. of Social Development

Date:

Approved/Not approved

-----------------------------------

Ms L Zulu, MP

Minister: Department of Social Development

Date:

07 January 2020 - NW1453

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has considered a more systematic approach to training shelter personnel on issues related to gender-based violence such as the impact it has on, amongst others, women's mental health and substance abuse; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has developed a draft training and development framework that seeks to address capacity building plans across the sector as a systematic approach to training. The framework will be looking into three year period. The framework will be ready following consultations with various stakeholders by 31 March 2020. The framework will cover the various thematic areas such as training within Gender Based Violence, Substance Abuse, Mental health, etc.

 

07 January 2020 - NW1663

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What amount of funding did his department contribute towards the March to Freedom exhibition in the City of Cape Town on 15 November 2019 and (b) how has he found did this fulfil the mandate of his department?

Reply:

I have been advised by officials that the department did not contribute funding to the event.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1709

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether the Eskom generation entity will be 100% state-owned; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Accordingly to the information received from Energy Team

The Eskom Generation entity will remain 100% state owned under Eskom Holdings consisting mainly of the current power plant base, which will be separated into a number of feasible smaller generation units.

Consideration for the creation of multiple generation companies (GENCOs) within Eskom Generation is currently under examination with the aim of introducing inter-company competition and drive efficiencies in generation. Each power station will have its own Power Purchase Agreement with predefined, fixed and guaranteed tariffs for energy with the Transmission Entity.

07 January 2020 - NW1669

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Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with regard to the recent strike action at SA Airways, the striking unions complied with the law in holding a strike ballot among their members; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) which organisation and/or persons supervised the ballot and (b) was the ballot conducted by secret vote?

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

Yes, the striking unions complied with the law in holding a strike ballot.

(a) Union of Metal Workers of South Africa (NUMSA) and the South African Cabin, Crew Association (SACCA). SAA also deployed its own observers for the supervision.

(b) Yes.

07 January 2020 - NW1686

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Transport to question 498 on 18 November 2019, (a) What are the details of the flight strategy that is mooted to boost tourism, (b) how was the conclusion regarding the flight strategy reached, (c) on what date was the flight strategy concluded, (d) what is the name of each stakeholder who was involved in drawing up the strategy and (e) what are the (i) mechanisms, (ii) milestones and (iii) timelines linked to the strategy?

Reply:

This question, I presume is referring to the National Airlift Strategy. The question will be better responded to by the Minister of Transport.

The Department of Transport (DoT) is the custodian of the National Airlift Strategy which is supporting the National Tourism Sector Strategy.

 

07 January 2020 - NW1707

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she can provide Ms L L van der Merwe with a detailed list of the locations of the 22 shelters in the North West, which were referred to in her department's presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Social Development on Wednesday, 30 October 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Department of Social Development (DSD) plays a leadership role to facilitate the establishment, coordination, and the implementation of the shelters/safe spaces for all victims of crime and violence.

Furthermore, the Department forms part of the Justice, Crime Prevention and Security (JCPS) Cluster that has been given an important mandate to implement strategies and programmes that contribute towards priority 5 (social cohesion and safe communities) of the sixth government administration.

Is it therefore critical to note that due to the nature and sensitivity of the services rendered to victims of crime and violence, the Department is not in a position to provide the location of the shelters/safe houses/crisis centres since their safety is paramount.

Attached is Annexure A: Database for shelters/safe houses/ crisis centres.

07 January 2020 - NW1294

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With reference to the Eskom, Kusile and Medupi Power Station contracts with a certain company (name furnished), what are the details of (a) the contract bonds of any sort that were provided by the company to Eskom and (b) all expired contract bonds that were provided by the specified company that were (i) renewed and (ii) not renewed; (2) (a) why were the contract bonds that expired not renewed or called up and (b) what are the details of all contract bonds that (i) remain in place and (ii) will be utilised to complete the contracts that the specified company is unable to complete; (3) whether any Eskom officials were held responsible or accountable for not ensuring that the contract bonds were not renewed in time or, where necessary, called up; if not, why has no one been held responsible; if so, what are the relevant details of the Eskom officials who were held responsible in this regard? NW2505E

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forwarded to the entities and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

 

07 January 2020 - NW1668

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of the contingency measures and/or plans of the SA Airways (SAA) that are in place to assist its passengers when flights are grounded due to strikes?

Reply:

According to the information received from the South African Airways:

  1. SAA initiated the airlines Re- Accommodation Policy which provide customers with alternatives (Date Changes, Rebooking on other airlines).
  2. SAA customers are able to book on partner airlines, including SA Express, Mango, SA Airlink and Codeshare Partner Airlines, as well as Star Alliance partner Airlines.
  3. SAA provides hotel accommodation for those passengers who cannot be booked on a flight.
  4. SAA book passengers on South African Airways flights for a later date at no extra charge.
  5. SAA extends the validity of the affected tickets to a date determined by the airline.
  6. SAA offers refunds to customers who decide to cancel their flights.
  7. SAA opens multiple channels of communication and extend the Call Centres operating hours.
  8. SAA deploys additional resources to assist with passenger interaction at all airports, the airline operates from, with the bulk of resources at SAA’s hub at OR Tambo International Airport, in Johannesburg.

07 January 2020 - NW1200

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the details of the process currently used to remove ash from unit one at the Medupi power station in terms of the (a) daily operational hours of vacuum trucks, (b) number of operational days per week of each vacuum truck, (c) process followed to award the contract/s for the ash removal, (d) number of vacuum trucks being used, (e) number of round trips being undertaken by each vacuum truck every 24 hours and (f) daily cost of each vacuum truck; (2) what are the details of the additional costs resulting from the use of vacuum trucks to remove the ash including (a) dust suppression, (b) road cleaning, (c) road repairs and (d) staff expenses such as for traffic control? NW2410E

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forward to the entity and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

07 January 2020 - NW1354

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the reply to question 1269 on 16 July 2018, (a) what is the amount of the proceeds held in declared dividends, (b) in which bank account and account number are the dividends held and (c) who controls each bank account?

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forward to the entities and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

07 January 2020 - NW1199

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With regard to the completion of the dust handling and conditioning plant using the dense phase pneumatic conveying technology for unit one at the Medupi power station, what are the details of (a) the funding that was required by a certain company (name furnished) in order for the specified company to (i) complete the dust handling and conditioning plant and (ii) employ a new contractor to complete the dust handling and conditioning plant and (b)(i) tenders that were received and rejected, (ii) reasons for the tenders being rejected in each case, (iii) the estimated costs for the completion of the work by a new contractor and (iv) the date by which the (aa) tender adjudication will be completed and (bb) ash extraction unit will be completed and fully operational; (2) whether the specified company will be considered for the new contract; if not, why not?

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forward to the entities and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

07 January 2020 - NW1649

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

With reference to his reply to question 1293 on 18 November 2019, wherein he indicated that the second phase of the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme has not been initiated yet, pending funding approval, (a) why was budget for the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme not set aside for the 2019-20 financial year, (b) what further phases and deliverables are planned for the (i) 2019-20 and (ii) 2020-21 financial years for the specified programme and (c) what are the budgetary estimates for expenditure for the specified financial years for the specified programme?

Reply:

I have been advised by officials in the Department as follows:

(a) Funds for the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme projects derives from the Departments’ Critical Infrastructure Programme budget. The Department did not receive additional funding for the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme from the national fiscus, necessitating reallocation within existing budget. The outcome of an application for further expenditure related to the Ekandustria Revitalisation Programme will be relayed to relevant stakeholders once the application process has been completed.

(b)&(c) I refer to the response to the question of 18 November 2019. The second phase has been scoped and application for funding submitted. The work for subsequent phases will commence following implementation of each prior phase and subsequent strategic reviews completed. The outcome of the review will determine the extent of further phases and funding.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW1700

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the nature of the agreement between Transnet and Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape pertaining to the borehole that services Wolwefontein in respect of (a) maintenance, (b) fuel supply for the pump, (c) water provision to the community and (d) future transfer of the borehole to the auspices of the specified municipality?

Reply:

This response is according to information received from Transnet:

In response to the above questions, there is no agreement between Transnet and Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality pertaining to the borehole that supplies water to the community of Wolwefontein in the Eastern Cape.

(a)&(b) The borehole is the property of Transnet and is operated and maintained by service providers appointed by Transnet. Part of the maintenance includes the supply of fuel for the pump. The borehole has been out of service from August 2019 and a service provider was appointed to effect repairs, however, the service provider has been experiencing challenges to restore the water supply for the community of Wolwefontein.

(c) Currently, water is being supplied to the community with a tanker service to provide immediate relief.

(d) A new borehole will be drilled, preferably in front of the police station. The exact location will depend on the water table survey. Water can be restored within six (6) weeks after completion of the drilling of the borehole, considering that quality of water needs to be treated, together with other works that may be required. Until such time that the new borehole is functional, the tanker service will continue to supply water to the community of Wolwefontein.

Lastly, Transnet has no objection to the borehole being transferred to the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality. It must be noted that high level meetings were held in 2013 and 2014, between Transnet and the Dr Beyers Naudé Local Municipality to transfer the ownership of the borehole to the municipality, but no agreement was reached.

 

07 January 2020 - NW1719

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1)On what date will the building of the Mulilo Power Station at the SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone (SEZ) in Limpopo start; (2) what is the relationship between the SEZ and MC Mining; (3) what is the name of each of the six working groups? NW3119E

Reply:

I have been advised by the Director General, following consultation with the SEZ concerned, of the following:

1. “The SA Energy and Metallurgical Special Economic Zone has no knowledge nor association with building of Mulilo Power Station.

2. There is no standing or direct relationship between the Musina-Makhado SEZ and MC Mining, who is not an investor in the Zone.

(3) The titles of the 6 (six) working groups are:

  1. Governance
  2. Infrastructure
  3. Environmental Management
  4. Investments
  5. Town Planning
  6. Skills & Enterprise Development”

In addition to the above information, the honourable Member may wish to follow up further queries with the Province or SEZ concerned.

-END-

07 January 2020 - NW913

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she retained any of her predecessor’s Ministerial staff; if so, (a) what are the names and/or relevant details of staff members who were retained, (b) where have they been redeployed to and (c) what is their current (i) job description and (ii) remuneration package in each case?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Minister retained some of the officials who served the previous / former Minister, but also released some of the officials in accordance with the Ministerial Handbook.

2. It is key to indicate that prior the introduction of Ministerial Handbook there were officials across Ministerial portfolios which were appointed permanently within Offices of different Ministers hence the below categories of staff compliments within Minister’s Office:

2.1 Permanent Contract:

The Accounting Officer is bound to accommodate officials with permanent contractual agreement. Furthermore they can be approached by considering the skills, competencies and qualifications they possess for correct placement in the vacant posts within the department by following due processes. The department has then placed the six (6) officials within the available vacancies in line with their expertise, competencies and skills.

The Minister retained an official whose contract was linked to the former Minister’s term of office. Minister needed the official’s skills and competencies to continue performing the work within her office;

The Minister did not have a vacancy for the Chief of Staff and the department found a placement in the department for the official. Transitionally the official is being managed by the Deputy Director-General: Corporate Support Services whilst finding a permanent placement. Furthermore the final placement will be addressed through the processes of organisational reconfiguration. Below is the list of officials redeployed within the department:-

a) Initials and surname

b) Redeployment

(c)(i)Current job description

(c)(ii) Current remuneration package

Ms SP Baninzi

Chief Directorate: Auxiliary Services

Administrative Assistant

R316,791.00 p.a.

Mr MM Koma

Office of the Director-General

Director: Stakeholder Management, Donor Funding and Coordination

R1,105,641.00 p.a.

Ms V Mangcu

Chief Directorate: Legal Services

Director: Legal Services

R1,245,495.00 p.a.

Ms M Nkone

Office of the Director-General (Cape Town Office)

Food Aid Service

R145,281.00 p.a.

Mr HLH Xaba

Office of the Director-General

Senior Administrative Officer.

R376,596.00 p.a.

Ms S Gola

Chief Directorate: Information Management Systems Technology

Administrative/secretarial Support

R470,040.00 p.a.

Ms TM Zabo

Branch Corporate Support Services

Providing support to the Deputy Director-General: Corporate Support services

R1,495,956.00 p.a.

Mr D Sambamba

Chief Directorate: Legal Services

Director: Legal Services

R1,245,495.00

_______________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

07 January 2020 - NW1558

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Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) With reference to his reply to question 241 on 19 August 2019, (a) what category of infrastructure are the pylons in (i) Kempton Park and (ii) Edenvale and (b) how often should these be inspected; (2) whether any pylons, during the last inspection in the above areas, were found to be (a) unstable and/or (b) decaying due to rust; if so, what number (i) was identified and (ii) has been repaired to date? NW2883E

Reply:

The parliamentary question has been forwarded to the entities and the Ministry of Public Enterprises awaits their urgent response. Further information will be conveyed to Parliament as soon as the response is received.

07 January 2020 - NW1452

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is her department’s plan to address the inconsistencies as well as delays in funding to shelters across provinces?

Reply:

The Department has embarked in process of developing a sector funding policy. The policy will provide guidelines to assist all Provinces to implement in a standardised way and address inconsistencies regarding funding. The draft sector funding policy was presented to MINMEC during the third quarter for consideration and approval. The MECs have not yet approved the policy and indicated the need for sufficient time to give the final inputs.

Furthermore, the Department developed the Victim Support Services (VSS) Policy and Bill which will be tabled to Cabinet during this financial year, 2019/20. The VSS Policy and Bill, amongst other elements, will be addressing the regulation of the provision of sheltering services.

The Department initiated a multi-year contracts approach to address the delays in funding of NGOs including shelters across provinces.

07 January 2020 - NW1394

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Since her speech during the Debate on Vote No 17 – Social Development on 11 July 2019, that more than 5 000 social workers who have been trained by the State remain unemployed, what progress has been made to secure employment of these social worker graduates?

Reply:

Respective provincial departments are engaging various provincial Treasuries to secure funding for appointment of social work scholarship graduates. In this regard by end September 2019 a total of 239 social work graduates were appointed by provinces as follows: Gauteng appointed 140 permanent, Western Cape appointed 14 on one year contract and 8 on 24 months internship, Northern Cape, North West and Eastern Cape also appointed 23, 21 and 31 graduates respectively on internships.

The Department secured special allocation of R93 million, which will be used by provincial departments of Social Development for employment of 200 social work graduates.

These graduates will be appointed to support the Gender Based Violence Programme.

The 2020 Medium Term Expenditure Framework baseline for the scholarship programme has been reduced, where funds will be shifted towards employment of scholarship graduates. The implication is that budget has been allocated for the next three years where R112.6 million will be allocated for 2020/21, R139.4 million for 2021/22 and R146.1 million for 2022/23. These funds will be shifted to provincial equitable share to sustain employment of 326 scholarship graduates.

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

06 January 2020 - NW1605

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has conducted trial runs of the proposed comprehensive sexuality education (CSE) to be taught in public schools from 2020; if so, (a) what number of schools participated in the trial run of the CSE, (b)(i) what is the name of each school and (ii) in which province is each school that participated in the trial run of the CSE, (c) for what period of time did each school participate in the trial run, (d) how did each of the participating schools receive the CSE and (e) what amount did her department spend on conducting the trial run;

Reply:

The Department reiterates that there is no new curriculum or topics introduced to the Life Skills (LS) or Life Orientation (LO) Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS). In South Africa, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has been providing Sexuality Education through the LS and LO CAPS since 2000.

There has been no piloting of a new CSE curriculum.

06 January 2020 - NW1557

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) Which schools in Gauteng still contain and/or are constructed from materials containing asbestos and (b) what total number of asbestos classrooms does each school have?

Reply:

(a) (b) According to the National Education Infrastructure Management System (NEIMS), there are 26 remaining schools entirely built out of asbestos in Gauteng. The Department intends to replace this 26 asbestos schools within the next 5 years. The table below indicates the remaining 26 schools and the number of asbestos classrooms in each school.

No.

School Name

EMIS Number

Classrooms

1

Noordgesig Primary School

700140079

39

2

Rust -Ter- Vaal Secondary

700400673

22

3

Faresani Primary School

700121335

8

4

EW Hobbs Primary School

700120113

33

5

Mdelwa Hlongwane Primary School

700121541

20

6

Nancefield Primary School

700120261

37

7

Ditau Primary School

700132068

20

8

Randfontein Secondary School

700270025

44

9

Toekomsrus Primary School

700270033

36

10

Kliptown Primary School

700120196

22

11

Kwena Molapo Comprehensive Farm School

700152223

22

12

Laerskool Hennopsrivier

700232462

14

13

Leihlo Primary School

700121475

10

14

Newclare Primary School

700141200

40

15

Pretoria Primary School

700400278

25

16

Riverlea Primary School

700140103

25

17

Tshwane Secondary School

700400276

17

18

Wilhelmina Hoskins Primary School

700141226

44

19

Wisani Primary school

700121889

10

20

Fred Magardie Primary School

700220038

30

21

Laerskool Broederstroom

700230805

11

22

Lukholweni Primary school

700132456

14

23

Paradise Bend Primary School

700232074

11

24

Parktown Public School

700133512

42

25

Reiger Park Primary School

700160077

30

26

T C Esterhuysen Primary School

700141192

23

It must be noted that 6 of the 26 schools above are already in the implementation phase. The table below indicates the 6 schools that are in the implementation phase.

No.

School Name

Project Status

1

Faresani Primary School

07. Works

2

Noordgesig Primary School

07. Works

3

Rust -Ter- Vaal Secondary

07. Works

4

EW Hobbs Primary School

06. Tender

5

Mdelwa Hlongwane Primary School

06. Tender

6

Nancefield Primary School

06. Tender

Further take note that 20 of the 26 schools above are in the planning phase.The table below indicates the 20 schools that are in the planning phase.

No.

School Name

Project Status

1

Kliptown Primary School

03. Project Initiation

2

Kwena Molapo Comprehensive Farm School

03. Project Initiation

3

Laerskool Hennopsrivier

03. Project Initiation

4

Leihlo Primary School

03. Project Initiation

5

Newclare Primary School

03. Project Initiation

6

Pretoria Primary School

03. Project Initiation

7

Riverlea Primary School

03. Project Initiation

8

Tshwane Secondary School

03. Project Initiation

9

Wilhelmina Hoskins Primary School

03. Project Initiation

10

Wisani Primary school

03. Project Initiation

11

Fred Magardie Primary School

02. Feasibility

12

Laerskool Broederstroom

01. Identified

13

Lukholweni Primary school

01. Identified

14

Paradise Bend Primary School

01. Identified

15

Parktown Public School

01. Identified

16

Reiger Park Primary School

01. Identified

17

T C Esterhuysen Primary School

01. Identified

18

Ditau Primary School

05. Design

19

Randfontein Secondary School

05. Design

20

Toekomsrus Primary School

05. Design

The Department has included the asbestos schools in the current Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) and anticipates that the eradication of all schools entirely built of asbestos materials will be completely addressed by the 2023/24 financial year.

The Department is prioritizing the asbestos schools so that it meets the target that relates to appropriate learning spaces and the reliability of the basic services in terms of the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, 2013.

06 January 2020 - NW1289

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of (a) disabled learners who attend full service schools in the Republic and (b) schools that have facilities for disabled students; (2) whether there is a disjuncture between the demand and supply for disabled learner facilities at the specified schools by her department?

Reply:

1. (a) 570 471

    (b) There are 848 full service schools across the country.

2. In order to determine the demand and supply for disabled learners at full service schools, in August 2019, the Department of Basic education (DBE) issued Circular S4 of 2019 requesting Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) to assess the status quo and to develop plans to address such. This process is currently underway.

06 January 2020 - NW1684

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether any assessments have been done to ascertain the need for additional schools to be built in Johannesburg in Wards 23, 54, 55, 56, 57, 124 and 125; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) was the outcome of each such assessment, (b) plans are in place to build additional schools in the specified areas and (c) are the timeframes and deadlines in this regard?

Reply:

Information received from the Gauteng Department of Education indicates that their Districts have completed infrastructure assessments with regard to the number and type of facilities during the 2018/19 financial year. This data informs the number of additional facilities, including classrooms, required per school and by implication the number of new schools required in any given residential area.

a)  The table below summarises the findings of the assessments for all the schools in the 7 wards:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW1684_Table.pdf

Based on a learner: classroom ratio of 40:1, none the schools in the 7 wards are overcrowded except one secondary school in Ward 55, i.e. Glenvista Secondary School. The school is overcrowded by 77 learners and this will be addressed by providing the school with 2 additional classrooms.

b) Given the current occupancy rate of the schools in the 7 wards there is no need for additional schools in the area. When a growth in learner enrolment in any of the schools occurs, the need will be addressed by providing additional classrooms to the affected schools.

It must be noted that where new schools are to be built that the availability of suitable sites are key. If suitable sites are available there are several processes that must be complied with before construction work can commence. These include inter alia the finalisation of ownership, approval of applications for rezoning if required, Environmental Impact Assessments, Traffic Impact Studies, Geotechnical Surveys and the approval of Site Development Plans by the relevant municipality. This is however not applicable to these 7 wards at this stage as there are currently no plans in place to build new schools. If new schools are to be built in any of these areas in the future, the above mentioned processes will have to be complied with.

c) See (b) above

06 January 2020 - NW1614

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to spending cuts announced by the Minister of Finance on 30 October 2019, (a) what is the total cut to the budget for her department and (b) which infrastructure projects are affected; (2) whether allocations to provinces will be affected; if so, (a) how and (b) what steps will be taken by her department to continue with the projects that are affected?

Reply:

(1) (a) MTEF BASELINE REDUCTIONS

2020/21

R’000

2021/22

R’000

2022/23

R’000

(659 416)

(856 412)

(1 050 774)

1 (b)SCHOOL INFRASTRUCTURE BACKLOGS: Indirect Grant (buildings and other fixed structures)

2020/21

R’000

2021/22

R’000

2022/23

R’000

(32 623)

(43 836)

(46 345)

(1) (b) With regard to the provincial infrastructure programme funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant, the reduction will have a negative impact in terms of meeting the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure. There has always been a deficit in terms of total budget required to eradicate backlogs and the current reduction will exacerbate the challenge. Provinces will also be left with a small window to introduce new projects into the pipeline.

(2)(a) ADJUSTMENTS TO CONDITIONAL GRANTS

MTEF YEAR

2020/21

R’000

2021/22

R’000

2022/23

R’000

National School Nutrition Programme

(30 014)

(40 010)

(53 055)

HIV and AIDS (Life Skills Education)

(23 945)

(26 987)

(33 939)

Education Infrastructure Grant

(458 665)

(616 331)

(775 099)

Maths, Science and Technology Grant

(12 397)

(13 079)

(13 708)

TOTAL

(525 021)

(696 407)

(875 801)

(2)(b) The Provincial Departments of Education will have to revise their plans and delay planned projects that cannot be funded as a result of the cut. On the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI) projects, no current projects will be affected as savings derived from the programme will be used to ensure that projects continue as scheduled.

06 January 2020 - NW1426

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there are plans in place to upgrade and/or refurbish the facilities at the Kgosi Shope Secondary School in the Ngaka Modiri Molema District Municipality in Ratlou; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what amount is (i) budgeted and (ii) allocated and (b) by what date will the project be finalised?

Reply:

Information has been requested from the North West Department of Education and the response will be provided once the requested information has been received from the province.

24 December 2019 - NW1524

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In view of the massive strain on key water and sanitation systems in the Republic, (a) which provinces have been the worst affected in their ability to deliver on their approved human settlement business plans and (b) what plans are in place to ensure provinces deliver on their approved human settlement business plans?

Reply:

(a) Consistent with the reply I submitted in respect Parliamentary Question 1523, I wish to reiterate that at present, no province has reported an inability to deliver on their approved human settlements business plans due to the massive strain on key water and sanitation systems.

(b) The Department will continue to exercise oversight on the performance of provinces for the commitments in their approved business plans. Moreover, we shall continue in our resolve to provide technical implementation support in pursuit of the targets set out in the business plans and Medium Term Strategic Framework.

24 December 2019 - NW1680

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Basson, Ms J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What total number of title deeds has her department issued since 29 May 2019, (b) where is each building located and (c) on what date was each title deed issued?

Reply:

Title deeds have been handed over by Members of the Executive Members (MECs) in the various provinces since 29 May 2019. I have therefore referred the question to provinces to provide the detailed information requested by the Honourable Member.

However, the information at the Departments’ disposal with respect to the status of the delivery of title deeds since July 2019 is as follows:

Western Cape – 60 Title deeds were handed over in August 2019

Eastern Cape - 500 title deeds were handed over to beneficiaries in July 2019.

Northern Cape – 209 title deeds were handed over in the province through the ‘Title Deeds Friday’ campaign in Tlhabane, Rustenburg with another 250 titles handed over in September 2019.

North West – 490 title deeds were handed over in August 2019.

Kwazulu Natal – 50 title deeds were handed over in the August 2019 and 500 in July 2019.

Gauteng – 217 title deeds were handed over in Johannesburg during August 2019

Mpumalanga – 700 title deeds were handed over in Barberton during August 2019.

A detailed breakdown will be submitted as soon as the outstanding information is available.

 

24 December 2019 - NW1588

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What number of applications for asylum seekers were received (i) in the period 1 January 1994 to 31 December 2014 and (ii) since 1 January 2015 remain unprocessed and (b) what is the country of origin of each asylum seeker?

Reply:

a) (i) The Department only has statistics from 1998 as published in its reports and the totals are as below:

Year

Total

1998

11135

1999

31592

2000

12226

2001

16325

2002

24187

2003

41741

2004

41369

2005

43289

2006

53361

2007

45637

2008

207206

2009

223324

2010

124336

2011

106904

2012

85058

2013

70010

2014

71914

Total

1 209 614

(ii) As at 30 September 2019 the total number of active and inactive cases for the periods indicated in (a) (i) above that remain unprocessed since 1 January 2015 is 812 472 (117 991 active cases and 694 481 inactive cases.

NB: Active cases refer to clients who regularly visit the office in relation to their application and inactive cases refer to clients who no longer visit the office to finalise their application.

b) The breakdown per country of origin for (a) (i) and (ii) above is:

Country

Inactive

Active

Afghanistan

41

8

Albania

1

0

Algeria

462

98

Angola

1071

5

Armenia

1

0

Australia

10

0

Azerbaijan

5

0

Bahamas

11

12

Bahrain

1

1

Bangladesh

13480

15979

Barbados

2

0

Belize

2

0

Benin

207

26

Bosnia

3

0

Botswana

41

2

Brazil

1

0

Brunei

1

0

Bulgaria

24

0

Burkina Faso

50

39

Burundi

3021

3588

Cambodia

3

0

Cameroon

3119

1000

Cape Verde

1

0

Central African Republic

10

6

Chad

11

4

Chile

23

0

China

13528

61

Colombia

2

1

Comoros

29

14

Congo

8761

7680

Croatia

1

0

Cuba

2

0

Czech Republic

1

0

Denmark

1

1

DRC

16204

22630

East Timor

5

7

Ecuadorian

1

0

Egypt

2076

62

Eritrea

375

382

Estonia

7

5

Ethiopia

11704

33737

Fiji

1

0

Gabon

44

6

Gambia

26

3

Germany

1

0

Ghana

8085

989

Guinea

95

37

Guinea Bissau

29

8

Guyana

1

0

Haiti

3

1

Ice Land

18

1

India

8871

2460

Indonesia

8

0

Iran

8

1

Iraq

12

1

Ireland

1

1

Israel

5

0

Italy

2

0

Ivory Coast

175

140

Jamaica

2

0

Jordan

40

6

Kenya

2014

807

Kiribati

1

0

Korea

1

0

Kuwaiti

1

0

Laos

1

0

Latvia

1

0

Lebanon

3

0

Lesotho

6744

31

Liberia

114

49

Libya

7

0

Macau

23

0

Macedonia

1

0

Madagascar

17

0

Malawi

40933

1294

Malaysia

5

2

Maldives

1

0

Mali

228

95

Mauritania

4

0

Mauritius

8

2

Mayotte

1

0

Mexico

1

0

Moldova

2

0

Monaco

1

0

Morocco

38

4

Mozambique

12842

300

Myanmar (Burma)

3

0

Namibia

13

0

Nepal

36

18

New Zealand

1

0

Nicaragua

2

0

Niger

5506

716

Nigeria

18502

3759

Niue

6

1

Pakistan

11672

5208

Palau

1

0

Palestine

26

5

Panama

1

0

Papua New Guinea

1

0

Philippines

18

0

Poland

4

0

Portugal

2

0

Principality of Andorra

5

0

Russia

2

0

Rwanda

666

676

Saint Kitts and Nevis

3

0

Saint Lucia

1

0

Saudi Arabia

1

0

Senegal

1163

433

Serbia

6

0

Sierra Leone

65

13

Slovenia

1

0

Solomon Islands

21

0

Somalia

9962

1587

Sri Lanka

109

11

Sudan

81

42

Suriname

1

1

Swaziland

196

10

Syria

8

1

Tajikistan

6

0

Tanzania

7740

422

Thailand

120

1

Togo

80

24

Tonga

1

0

Trinidad and Tobago

1

0

Tunisia

5

1

Turkey

7

1

Uganda

5993

3089

Ukraine

10

1

USA

5

1

Uzbekistan

2

0

Vietnam

2

0

Wallis and Futuna

1

0

Yemen

7

0

Zambia

2308

174

Zimbabwe

475390

10210

Total

694481

117991

Grand Total

812 472

END

24 December 2019 - NW1664

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will outline how the appointment of the former Minister of Social Development, Ms B O Dlamini, as chairperson of the interim board of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority will enhance the performance and reputation of the entity towards its goal of restructuring and developing new systems, policies and procedures by 2019; (2) (a) what (i) was the justification for the above-inflation increase in the salary of a certain person (details furnished) and (ii) is the salary of the specified person for the 2020-21 financial year and (b) how is the increase justified when the entity has failed to meet its targets; (3) in light of the statement by the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni, that the public wage bill of the Republic needs to be cut by R150 billion, what budget cuts to the remuneration of public office bearers does she intend to implement and (b) by what date will the budget cuts to the remuneration and allowance of public office bearers take place?

Reply:

(1) To ensure the validity of the data the Department of Human Settlements has been working on and which was received from municipalities, we have been comparing this with the data from the Department of Social Development as its records are comprehensive in respect of those who require social protection from the state. The data held by the Department of Social Development is credible, based on processes approved by government.

 

In line with the decision of the United Nations to ensure that all social protection should be packaged together by 2020, we are on track to complete that process which already started in 2012. By the end of this process we will have all those who are entitled to benefit from social assistance disaggregated according to the various categories of the state’s assistance for housing. This will assist us to ensure that the rampant duplication of demands by people who have previously benefited is curbed and sift those who do not need free housing but require other assistance in the acquisition of housing. One of these is social housing, which is provided to a particular category of subsidised housing.

With her intimate knowledge of the process of building a social assistance database, Ms Dlamini will be able to guide the process.

(a)(i) The salary increase resolved upon by the Council of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) for the CEO of SHRA was 6%. This was made up of a 5,5% inflation linked cost of living increase plus an additional 0,5% performance linked increase arising from the 2017/18 performance result. This is in accordance with the SHRA remuneration policy and the terms of the employment contract.

(ii) The salary of SHRA CEO for the 2020/21 financial year has not yet been determined by the SHRA Council.

(b) Falls away.

(3)(a) I have no authority over the salaries of Public Office Bearers, like yourself. In terms of the Independent Commission for the Remuneration of Public Office- Bearers Act, 1997, the Independent Commission for the Remuneration of Public Office -Bearers is mandated to make annual recommendations relating to the salaries and /or the upper limits of the salaries, allowances and benefits of Public Office –Bearers.

(b) Refer to (3)(a) above.

 

24 December 2019 - NW1393

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of citizens from (i) China, (ii) India, (iii) Bangladesh, (iv) Somalia, (v) Nigeria, (vi) Cameroon, (vii) the Democratic Republic of Congo and (viii) Ethiopia hold a valid visa and (b) type of visa do the citizens of each specified country hold?

Reply:

(a - b) The number and types of visas issued to citizens from the mentioned countries are listed on the table below. This data is for the period 01 January 2018 to the 30th of September 2019.

Country – Category

2018

2019

Total

Nigeria

8010

4131

12141

Visitors

5840

3100

8940

Study Visa Section 13

1511

698

2209

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

251

127

378

Retired Person Visa Section 20

180

22

202

Medical Treatment Section 17

157

103

260

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

55

75

130

Work Visa Section 19(5)

15

5

20

Exchange Visa Section 22

1

1

2

India

6375

4195

10570

Visitors

4565

3212

7777

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

699

358

1057

Study Visa Section 13

705

412

1117

Retired Person Visa Section 20

160

8

168

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

142

87

229

Work Visa Section 19(5)

73

85

158

Medical Treatment Section 17

31

33

64

Country – Category

2018

2019

Grand Total

Bangladesh

3067

2139

5206

Visitors

2605

2083

4688

Retired Person Visa Section 20

379

13

392

Study Visa Section 13

65

30

95

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

8

5

13

Medical Treatment Section 17

8

6

14

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

2

1

3

Work Visa Section 19(5)

 

1

1

       

Congo Dem. Rep. of the

2320

1265

3585

Study Visa Section 13

1208

468

1676

Visitors

600

464

1064

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

224

90

314

Medical Treatment Section 17

242

219

461

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

31

20

51

Retired Person Visa Section 20

14

4

28

Work Visa Section 19(5)

1

 

1

China

2145

1405

3550

Visitors

1301

1165

2466

Retired Person Visa Section 20

533

52

585

Study Visa Section 13

228

91

319

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

24

16

40

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

12

56

58

Work Visa Section 19(5)

33

21

54

Medical Treatment Section 17

12

3

15

Exchange Visa Section 22

1

1

2

Visitors(CAU)

1

 

1

Cameroon

922

480

1402

Visitors

420

270

690

Study Visa Section 13

329

127

456

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

120

48

168

Medical Treatment Section 17

23

26

49

Retired Person Visa Section 20

10

2

12

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

17

6

13

Work Visa Section 19(5)

3

1

4

Ethiopia

673

356

1029

Visitors

493

281

774

Study Visa Section 13

108

44

152

Retired Person Visa Section 20

34

5

39

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

11

6

17

Medical Treatment Section 17

21

19

40

General Work Visa Section 19(2)

5

1

6

Work Visa Section 19(5)

1

 

1

Country – Category

2018

2019

Grand Total

Somalia

36

22

58

Visitors

16

14

30

Medical Treatment Section 17

9

5

14

Study Visa Section 13

7

2

9

Critical Skills Visa Section 19(4)

1

1

2

Retired Person Visa Section 20

3

 

3

END

24 December 2019 - NW1648

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department is committed to meeting the deadline for the international community to end statelessness by 2024 as set by the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees in October 2013; if not, why not; if so, what (a) steps has his department taken since 1 January 2014 to end statelessness in the Republic and (b) are the details of the plan going forward to end statelessness in the Republic by 2024?

Reply:

Yes. In its commitment to end statelessness the Department has addressed gaps in its immigration and civil registration laws to assist stateless persons to acquire enabling documentation confirming their status within the country. This accorded status enables stateless persons to legally reside within the country and to apply for citizenship.

Section 31 of the Immigration Act, Act no. 13 of 2002 as amended, provides for foreigners or a category of foreigners the rights of permanent residence for a specified or unspecified period when special circumstances exist which would justify such a decision.

The South African Citizenship Act 88 of 1995 Act as amended, allows for acquisition of citizenship by birth, descent and naturalization. It also allows any person in the Republic and who is not a South African citizen by virtue of the provisions in the Act, to be granted citizenship by birth if s/he does not have the citizenship or nationality of any other country, or has no right to such citizenship or nationality and his or her birth was registered in the Republic in accordance with the Births and Deaths Registration Act.

Below are steps and plans put in place and implemented on an ongoing basis to address any challenges arising from statelessness.

A. Birth Registration

The Department, amongst other commitments, has implemented the Births and Deaths Registration Act. In terms of the Act, notice of birth must be given within 30 days of the birth occurence. This is aimed at ensuring that every child born is registered. In support of the above commitment, the Department embarked on the following programmes:

(i) Hospital connectivity:

Established birth registration offices in health facilities with maternity wards to facilitate the registration of birth and ease the burden of birth registration. This has resulted in the country seeing an increase in birth registration within the specified period. Conversely, we have begun to see a steady decrease of late registration of birth.

(ii) oreign births:

Notice of birth tendered at our offices of children born of parents who are non-South African citizens, are given DHA 19 (handwritten unabridged birth certificate for non-South African) in terms of the Regulations on the Registration of Births and Deaths, 2014.

South African citizens who live abroad can also register their newly-born children by completing relevant documents at the South African embassies and missions.

(iii) Late Registration of birth:

The Department has also opened a window for late registration of birth for persons who were not registered within the specified period. The long term plan is to eradicate late registration of birth.

B. Civil Registration and Vital Statistics

It must also be mentioned that South Africa is collaborating with neighbouring countries to promote civil registration through Civil Registration and Vital Statistics [CRVS] conferences, to ensure that all nationals of countries are registered on their respective national population registers.

END

24 December 2019 - NW1213

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)On what legislative provisions did the Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB) rely when it charged estate agents Value-Added Tax (VAT) on all levies paid from 2006 to 2016, in light of the fact that the EAAB was never registered as a VAT vendor; (2) whether all monies that were collected in terms of VAT on levies were paid to SA Revenue Services; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2423E

Reply:

(1)&(2) Honourable Member, please be advised that the question relates to transactions that fall over a ten-year period between 2006 and 2016. This period precedes the term of office of both the current Board as well as the current Executive Team.

I have therefore instructed the Board to conduct an investigation into this matter and provide me with a report, which upon completion will be shared with the Portfolio Committee.

 

24 December 2019 - NW1720

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the details of each (a) position filled in (i) her Ministerial Office and (ii) the Water and Sanitation’s Ministerial National Rapid Response Task Team since 1 June 2019 and (b) person occupying each specified position in terms of (i) qualification (s) and (ii) remuneration?

Reply:

Conditions of employment such as salaries and qualifications of staff are confidential.  Laws such as the Protection of Personal Information Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment, amongst others, protects the confidentiality of such information.

                                                                                                                       

(i)         I However, wish to indicate to the Honourable Member that posts in the Ministry have been filled as outlined in the Guide for Members of the Executive, otherwise commonly referred to as the Ministerial hand Book.

No

Designation/ Position

1. 

Head of Ministerial Services

2.

Cabinet & Parliamentary Liaison Officer 

3. 

Chief Protocol Officer

4. 

Private Secretary

5. 

Director: Communications

6. 

Stakeholder Relations Officer

7. 

Assistant Private Secretary

8. 

Appointments Secretary

9. 

Office Manager to Head of Ministry

10.

Office Manager to Special Adviser

11. 

Personal Assistant

12. 

Ministerial Aide

13. 

Assistant Stakeholder Relations Officer

14.

Driver/ Messenger

15. 

Domestic Worker

16. 

Domestic Worker

           

(ii)  I will preface my response to this question by providing background to the Ministerial National Rapid Response Task Team (NRRTT). As far back as 7 May 2015 during my Budget vote speech I said the following: 
 

“Communications and outreach programmes are part of our frontline services to ensure that the correct messages reach our people, in order to reduce the social distance referred to. I have decided to appoint a National Rapid Response Task Team that will help us communicate with our communities before implementing any policies, so that they understand the benefits, who would qualify and who would not, etc. This, we believe will lessen the tension that always arise when there is a development. This Task Team will also assist us understand where there is a problem and allow us to rapidly respond to problems as they arise”.

 The NRRTT has been in existence since the Fifth Administration when I was the Minister of Human Settlements. The Team did not only act as communicators and a consultation arm of the department but it is also in the frontline when there are emergencies in informal settlements. A case in point is the disaster which befell the community of Imizamo Yethu in Hout Bay in 2017, where a large section of this area was devastated by fires. Another example is the delay that was caused to the implementation of the N2 Gateway Project in 2007 and 2008 where people who were due to benefit from the project refused to relocate.

Due to the enormity of the challenges facing the Department of Water and Sanitation, which I am now also responsible for, we replicated the model and appointed additional NRRTT members to assist with water and sanitation issues such as the protests in the Vaal and Butterworth areas.

Accordingly, the NRRTT consists of a Convenor, two Deputy Convenors, for Human Settlements and for Water & Sanitation, as well as eight members responsible for Human Settlements and eight members for Water & Sanitation.

24 December 2019 - NW1721

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she established a committee to advise her on the appointment of the interim board of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority as required by section 9(2)(b) of the Social Housing Act, Act 16 of 2008; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Minister is referred to my response to her question 1665, which deals with the same matter. I wish to reiterate that the appointment of the interim Council of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority is an interim measure to restore good governance at the entity. A selection committee will be established to advise me on the candidates to be appointed for the new Council, in terms of Section 9(2)(b) of the Social Housing Act, Act 16 of 2008.

24 December 2019 - NW1665

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What are the specific competencies of the former Minister of Social Development, Ms B O Dlamini, that satisfy her appointment as a council member of the Board of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority in terms of section 9(1) of the Social Housing Act, Act 16 of 2008; (2) (a) what is the name of each member of the selection committee who has been appointed in compliance with section 9(2)(b) of the Social Housing Act, Act 16 of 2008 and (b) will she provide Ms E L Powell with the recommendations submitted to her?

Reply:

(1) Ms B O Dlamini holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Studies from the University of Zululand. She also possess in-depth practical knowledge of a vast range of social development issues that she obtained through participation in various social development organisations and structures over an extensive period. She will undoubtedly contribute immensely to ensuring that SHRA objectives are realised. The Chairperson will be supported by ten non-executive Council members.

(2)(a) The Social Housing Regulatory Authority plays a key role in the provision of social housing in South Africa and manages a budget allocation of close to R1 billion per annum. The derailment of good governance of the entity, as observed during the first half of the current financial year, required swift action to protect the investment of the state, as required in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, as amended, and to ensure continued service delivery to the citizens of the country. The appointment of the interim Council of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority is an interim measure to restore good governance at the entity. A selection committee will be established to advise me on the candidates to be appointed for the new Council, in terms of Section 9(2)(b) of the Social Housing Act, Act 16 of 2008.

(b) Refer to the answer provided in 2(a) above.

24 December 2019 - NW1717

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the Home Affairs Office in West Street, Centurion, what (a) is the expiry date of the lease agreement for the office building, (b) plans are in place to move to a more suitable venue considering the extensive population in the catchment area and (c) measures have been put in place to provide affordable parking for clients since the Gautrain station was built?

Reply:

The mandate to manage immovable assets on behalf of government departments (including lease agreements) is with the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

a) The expiry date for the lease agreement for the Centurion office is 31 May 2024.

b) The Department of Home Affairs has requested DPWI, as part of the long term strategy, to source state owned building or build per DHA specifications.

c) The Department of Home Affairs does generally provide parking for clients in all its offices throughout the country. The parking that is leased is only for state vehicles.

END

24 December 2019 - NW1456

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 379 on 5 August 2019, in which it was indicated that the date for the re-opening of the Cape Town Refugee Reception Office (CTRRO) is dependent on the finalisation of the lease agreement with the prospective landlord and the related project plan for refurbishment, the lease agreement with the specified landlord for the CTRRO has been finalised; if not, why not; if so, what (a) steps still need to be taken by his department to reopen the CTRRO and (b) is the planned date for the reopening of the CTRRO?

Reply:

The lease agreement with the specified landlord for the Cape Town Refugee Reception Office (CTRRO) could not be finalised. The prospective landlord, who had been appointed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) through its Supply Chain Management processes, did not sign the lease agreement and sent a letter withdrawing from the process. The letter was dated 16 September 2019.

a) The Department of Home Affairs (DHA) requested DPWI to restart the procurement process on the 27th September 2019.

b) The planned date cannot be determined as DPWI has not commenced with the procurement process which will follow these key steps:

  1. Specifications Committee to be set up to develop the specifications,
  2. Publication of the tender advert,
  3. Evaluation and adjudication of bidders.

The planned date for the re-opening of the CTRRO can only be determined after these processes are completed. Furthermore, the building obtained will need to be refurbished to be in line with the CTRRO processes before the office can be re-opened.

END

24 December 2019 - NW1056

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether he has been informed of the backlog in the issuing of birth certificates, identity documents, marriage certificates and permanent residence permits, including the delay in the issuing of documents to immigrants from India at his department’s offices in Mitchells Plain; if so, (2) What steps has his department taken in view of the many complaints from residents in Mitchells Plain, the broader public and immigrants who make use of services at his department’s offices in Mitchells Plain? NW2206E

Reply:

1. No, the Department is not aware of any backlogs pertaining to issuing of birth certificates, identity documents, marriage certificates and permanent residence permits prevailing at its Mitchells Plain office. It should be clarified that the Department’s office in Mitchells Plain deals with citizen affairs only, i.e. processing of applications mainly concerning identity documents, passports, birth, marriages and death in relation to South African citizens and naturalised persons. The office does not have an Immigration Unit and therefore does not process any citizenship or permitting applications.

2. We have not received any complaints from the broader public and immigrants.

END

24 December 2019 - NW1730

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether he intends to revise the tariffs pertaining to (a) identity documents and/or (b) passports; if not, what is the reason for a zero increase in the said tariffs; if so, what effect has he found that any increase will have on (i) the citizens and (ii) his department?

Reply:

(a-b) Yes. The intended tariff adjustments for identity documents (re-issues) and passports is envisaged for the 2020/2021 financial year.

(i) In revising the tariff structure, the Department considers, amongst others, socio-economic factors, the principle of inclusivity and service provision to the public since the Department is not geared to profit making. This is due to the fact that all base documents (first issues) for identity documents, birth, marriage and death certificates are free and charges are only for reissue.

(ii) All revenue collected by the Department is deposited into the National Revenue Fund. In addition to complying to Treasury Regulation 7.3.1 that requires the Department to review all fees, charges or rates, scales or tariffs of fees and charges that relate to the National Revenue Fund, improved revenue collection by the Department will ensure the recovery of costs for production of enabling documents in a manner that suitably compensates for the cost drives relating to the provision of the service and meet the regulatory and wider government objectives as well as to ensure that the transaction costs where possible are minimized for the users and stakeholders.

END

Thulani Mavuso Dr PA Motsoaledi, MP

A/Director-General Minister of Home Affairs

Date: Date:

24 December 2019 - NW1627

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether his department and metropolitan municipalities have a memorandum of understanding in place to assist with the loss of documentation in an event of shack fires; if so, what are the details of the processes including turnaround times within the metropolitan municipalities;

Reply:

1. No, the Department does not have memorandum of understanding with municipalities in place to assist with the loss of documentation in an event of shack fires. However National government, has a crucial role to play in conjunction with municipalities as a form of redress, whereby the affected settlement was declared a disaster area, to enable victims to access basic services from the municipalities with their enabling documents. When the fire disaster occurs, disaster management of the municipality concerned compiles a report with a name list of families that have been affected by shack fires and submits a disaster certificate through the Departments’ District Managers: Operations or Provincial Manager’s office. Subsequently the Department’s provinces draft submissions to the Accounting Officer (Director-General), to consider waiving of fees for reproduction and printing of temporary identification certificates or identity documents and birth certificates. Upon approval by the Accounting Officer, clients are immediately issued with temporary identity certificates and birth certificates on the spot. The turnaround times for issuance of Smart Identity Cards is within 13 working days.

2. In collaboration with District/Local municipalities, Councillor and CDWs an outreach programme is organised for such communities to lodge applications and in most instances, municipalities assist by arranging transport for the affected persons to be ferried to the nearest Departments front offices to apply for the services required. Once documents are issued, clients are brought back to the office to collect in the same arrangement.

END

24 December 2019 - NW1666

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)What (a) percentage of its budget did the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) spend against the 51,2% of its target that it met for social housing units for the 2018-19 financial year, (b) were the material reasons that the SHRA did not meet its target of social housing units and (c) remedial actions are being taken to ensure that the situation improves in the current financial year; (2) whether she can provide the performance contract and the performance outcomes for the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of the SHRA for the 2018-19 and 2019-20 financial years to Ms E L Powell; (3) how does she and the SHRA Council justify the more than 12% increase in salary of the CEO of the SAHRA?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) spent 105% of its R743,64 million budget in the 2018-19 financial year on the development of social housing units, thus representing a total expenditure of R778 273 327.

(b) Yes, there were material reasons why SHRA missed some of its targets. Those reasons have been summarized on page 129 of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA) 2018-19 Annual Report in the column entitled “Variance and comments.” Further explanations were provided by the SHRA on page 35 of the 2018-19 Annual Report in section 4.3.4 of the report entitled “Project Development & Funding (PD&F) Programme”.  For a more detailed explanation of the reasons at a project level, this can be found in Table 4 on pages 17 through 20 of the 2018-19 Annual Report. The table is entitled “Project Challenges and Solutions.”

(c) The remedial actions being taken to ensure that the situation improves are also documented on the same pages of the SHRA 2018-19 Annual Report as has been stated under (b) above. Further to this, the following remedial actions are being implemented by the SHRA:

  • Non-performing contracts are terminated within the provisions of the contracts and law;
  • Improvements have been introduced in the project accreditation process to curtail delays in planning and projects meeting financial closure;
  • The SHRA has engaged with financiers to provide debt/ loan and equity funding to projects toward meeting financial closure;
  • The SHRA has employed additional resources to improve the project approval by the provinces in order to ensure contract compliance earlier in the process;
  • The SHRA is intervening in the non-performing contracts with a bespoke approach according to the needs per contract.

(2) Conditions of employment such as salaries and qualifications of staff are confidential. Laws such as the Protection of Personal Information Act and the Basic Conditions of Employment, amongst others, protects the confidentiality of such information.

(3) The salary increase of the CEO resolved upon by the SHRA Council was 6% and not 12%. The increase comprises of a 5,5% inflation linked cost of living increase plus an additional 0,5% performance linked increase arising from the 2017 – 18 performance result. This is in accordance with the SHRA remuneration policy and the terms of the employment contract.

 

23 December 2019 - NW1451

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to her 2019 budget speech where she stated that R50 million rand has been allocated from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account (Cara) to support shelters and the fact that the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa in his address to protestors at Parliament promised increased funding for women's shelters and safe houses, (a) the increase that the President referred to is the same or additional to the Cara funding that she referred to and (b) her department is also ensuring that provinces increase allocations to shelters for victims of crime and violence; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a)Yes, the R50 million that the Minister of Social Development referred to during her budget speech is allocated from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account for funding of Non-Profit Organisations providing services to victims of crime and violence. Additional amount of R50 million has been recommended from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account as part of the Emergency Response Plan on Gender Based Violence. This funding will be used to fund Non-Governmental Organisations that provide direct services to victims and survivors of gender-based violence. The process of submitting the recommended additional amount of R50 million from the Criminal Assets Recovery Account for Cabinet approval is underway. (b) The Department of Social Development is also ensuring that provinces increase allocations for services to victims of crime and violence including shelters for victims of crime and violence. The provincial allocations for the Medium Term Expenditure Framework are as follows:

Provinces

MTEF Allocations

 

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

 

R’000

R’000

R’000

Eastern Cape

1 058 220

1 120 267

1 178 549

Free State

545 086

563 780

586 850

Gauteng

2 457 722

2 634 964

2 906 075

KwaZulu-Natal

1 600 679

1 705 787

1 796 502

Limpopo

991 860

1 048 534

1 141 305

Mpumalanga

673 557

745 092

806 043

Northern Cape

322 153

341 577

357 909

North West

531 800

578 602

613 132

Western Cape

804 918

845 940

884 365

Total

8 985 995

9 584 543

10 270 730

20 December 2019 - NW1616

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Esterhuizen, Mr JA to ask the President of the Republic

What (a) is the name of each investor who pledged funds at the 2018 investment conference, (b) amount did each investor pledge, (c) project was each pledge invested in, (d) is the time frame of each project and (e) number of jobs did each project create; (2) whether each project was new or an existing project in each case; (3) what (a) is the name of each investor who pledged funds at the 2018 investment conference, but never invested the pledged funds, (b) amount did each investor pledge but not invest and (c) projects were never implemented as a result?

Reply:

Of the 31 announcements made at the 2018 investment conference, 8 projects have been launched or are about to be launched.

A further 20 projects are in the implementation stage, meaning that either ground has been broken, construction has begun, equipment ordered and installed or, in the case of financial institutions like the IDC, DBSA and NDB, funds are being disbursed.

Of the 31 announcements, 3 are progressing more slowly due to regulatory and other challenges. Invest SA is working with these companies to unblock and resolve any challenges so that projects can be implemented.

ANNEXURE 1 contains the detail of the projects.

1617. The Leader of the Opposition (DA) to ask the President of the Republic:

  1. What (a) is the name of each investor who pledged funds at the 2019 investment conference, (b) amount did each investor pledge, (c) project was each pledge invested in, (d) is the time frame of each project and (e) number of jobs did each project create;
  1. whether each project was new or an existing project in each case?

NW2973E

REPLY

Seventy companies announced investments at the second South Africa Investment Conference, held in Johannesburg from 5-7 November 2019. The total value of these commitments was just over R363 billion.

Invest SA is working with the companies that made announcements to categorise and determine the level of implementation and to provide assistance to unblock and fast-track these investments where necessary.

ANNEXURE 2 contains the details of the projects.

20 December 2019 - NW1146

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)Whether her department is executing capital projects in the Central Karoo; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the Apricot Farm Project is part of the specified projects; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the name of the person(s) who executed the project, (b) on what date is it envisaged that the project will be completed, (c) on what date was the tender awarded, (d) what was the contract amount, (e) who was the successful contractor and (f) what is the contract period? NW2306E

Reply:

The Department has requested the provincial Department of Agriculture and Rural Development to compile a comprehensive response to the question raised by M. Gen O S Terblanche (DA).

The comprehensive response will be submitted in January 2020.

20 December 2019 - NW682

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Government’s proposed land reform policy on expropriation without compensation will require that title deeds of properties earmarked for expropriation be published before being transferred to beneficiaries to verify that there is no active land claim on the property; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date does she intend to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to make provision for the publishing of the title deeds, (b) for which reasons, other than historical land claims, will a dispute for the change of ownership of the specified properties be allowed to be registered, (c) in which publication will the title deeds be published and (d) for what period of time will the title deeds be published?

Reply:

The function of amending the Constitution to allow for expropriation of land without compensation is currently the responsibility of Parliament.

(a)(b),(c),(d) Falls away.

19 December 2019 - NW1691

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether the Government is negotiating with the banking sector to ensure that banks will be compensated for any loan(s) against a property that is expropriated; if not, what impact will this have on the economy; if so, what amount has been allocated to pay the banks as a result of the mooted expropriation without compensation and redistribution policy?

Reply:

No.

19 December 2019 - NW1723

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will furnish Mrs G Opperman with a list of claimants of the Community Property Association (CPA) of Loeriesfontein in the Hantam Local Municipality who have been struggling for 25 years to receive their communal land; (2) (a) what number of claimants of the Loeriesfontein CPA have deceased and (b) on what date will the claimants receive their ancestral land; (3) what mechanisms are in place to ensure the CPA of Loeriesfontein becomes sustainable and economically viable?

Reply:

(1). Please find attached original list of 240 claimant beneficiaries.

(2). (a) Of the 240 claimant beneficiaries on the original verified list, 91 are deceased. There is a need to regularly update the verification list by the CPA to replace household representatives of those that passed away.

(b) Hantam Municipality donated the land (Commonages A, B and C) for restitution purposes. Commonage A was transferred to the CPA on 30 March 2017 However, this property is currently being used by the emerging farmers under a formal lease agreement with Hantam Municipality. The municipality is yet to issue the tenants with termination letters so that the CPA can fully occupy the land. The CPA can only occupy the land once the current tenants have been relocated elsewhere.

(3). There was a need for regularisation of the CPA and a new Executive Committee was elected on 05 November 2019. In addition, a panellist has been appointed to assist the CPA on disputes regarding access to the land.