Questions and Replies

16 July 2019 - NW104

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has found that the statements via Twitter by the South African ambassador to the Kingdom of Denmark, Ms Z N Mandela, were inconsistent with the Government’s policy and outlook with regard to the land; if not, on what grounds did she reprimand the ambassador; if so , what are the relevant details? NW1061E

Reply:

1. On the matter of land ownership changing the Ambassador did not make any comments that directly linked to Government policy.

2. The Ambassador made some statements in the tweet that could be construed as personal and that made negative references to individuals she exchanged tweets with. I therefore advised her to always communicate in a manner that is consistent with our expectations as representative of South Africa and to have regards to the Social Media Guidelines of the Department.

 

16 July 2019 - NW120

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether any action will be taken against the South African Ambassador to the Kingdom of Denmark, Ms Z N Mandela, for tweeting messages contrary to the Government’s views on the weekend of 14 June 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether she will take any steps to ensure that the (a) specified person’s messages are retracted and (b) correct messages relating to the Government’s policies are conveyed to the residents and potential investors of the Kingdom of Denmark; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1080E

Reply:

1. No further action is planned beyond the public statements I previously made concerning this matter . I informed the Ambassador to articulate policies of South Africa and that she needs to adhere to the Social Media Guidelines of the Department.

2. (a) I and the Department have reiterated Government Policy on the land issue.

(b) Government Policy on the land issue has not changed, and is readily accessible to residents and investors in Denmark, and all other interested parties.

16 July 2019 - NW148

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether, with regard to current and future plans to roll out 5G high-speed mobile networks, he has been informed of the potential risks to humans when this technology is used in weapons; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether he intends to use this technology for crowd dispersal; if not, what alternative methods he is considering; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and {b) effects of using this technology as a weapon far crowd control?

Reply:

  1. 5G stands for fifth-generation cellular wirelass networks technology that provides broadband access, which has the potential to be 40 limes faster and suffer shorter fag times than the current 4G/LTE. The mobile networks service provider automatically upgrade to the latest version of network during the rollout where there is infrastructure for the coverage. It is uced to transmit data, voice, video and multimedia streaming cannot be used in weapons.
  2. SG is the cellular wireless networks technology that provides broadband accass, is not the tool to be used for ctowd dispersal:

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

I SERVICES NP MASIYE

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 5 JULY 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 3-2019)

Reply to question 148 recommended/not recommended

DEPUTY NATIONAL FN VUMA

Date:

LIEUTENANT GENERAL MIGSIONER- ASSET AND LEGAL MANAGEMENT

Reply to question 148 recommended/ not recommended

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER KJ SITOLE (SOEG)

GENERAL

SOUTH TH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

Reply to question 148 approved/not approved

GENER BH CELE, MINISTER OF POLICE

Date:

16 July 2019 - NW45

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the (a) name of each investment company that has invested in land owned by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her and (b)(i) nature, (ii) monetary value and (iii) duration of each investment?

Reply:

THE DEPARMENT OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

The Department of Human Settlements and five of its six entities namely, Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS), Estate Agency Affairs Board (EAAB), National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC), Social Housing Regulatory Authority (SHRA), Housing and Development Agency (HDA) have advised me that they do not own land and therefore the question is not applicable to these. However, the National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC) has indicated that it owns various properties and further details are provided below:

A) The President Place which is situated at 78 President Street (Corner of Odendaal Street) in Germiston and that,

  1. The property is a mixed use building, residential and commercial space, comprising of 320 rental apartments of 1, 2 and 3 bedrooms and 22 shops.
  2. Investment property in Germiston is worth R102 222 000.
  3. The duration of the investment is 10 years.

B. Investments in Cape Town and Upington

(a) (ii) The Cape Town Community Housing Company Pty Ltd (CTCHC), a company owned 100% by the NHFC.

(b) (i) CTCHC owns 1006 repossessed institutional subsidy houses, which are still occupied by the original beneficiaries. These houses are located in and around the Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s Plain area, Cape Town. The CTCHC also owns 94 gap-market houses in Upington which are available for sale to qualifying beneficiaries.

(ii) The houses in Khayelitsha and Mitchell’s have an approximate value of R 85 million and the ones in Upington are estimated to be worth R 4.6 million.

(iii) The houses are currently let on short-term rentals.

 

THE DEPARTMENT OF WATER AND SANITATION:

a) (i) As much as the department owns land, no investment company has invested on the land it owns.

(ii) Refer to the table below for responses from entities.

(a)(ii) Entity

(b)(i) Nature

(b)(ii) Value

(b)(iii) Length of each investment

Amatola Water

None

None

None

Bloem Water

None

None

None

Lepelle Northern Water

None

None

None

Magalies Water

Mhlathuze

None

None

None

Mhlathuze Water

None

None

None

Rand Water

None

None

None

Sedibeng Water

None

None

None

WRC

None

None

None

TCTA

None

None

None

BGCMA

None

None

None

IUCMA

None

None

None

Overberg Water

Transnet rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Transnet R45 265.65 pa (annual escalation 8%)

Transnet: Area 338 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

Telkom rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Telkom R51 757.49 pa (annual escalation 8%)

Telkom: Area 224 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

Vodacom rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

Vodacom R40 528.38.49 pa (annual escalation 10%)

Vodacom: Area 262 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

 

MTN rent income for access to the servitude land of Overberg Water

MTN R40 528.38.49 pa (annual escalation 12.38%)

MTN: Area 230.25 hectares - indefinitely based on a five year review basis

Umgeni Water

Brookdale farm in Howick: Cattle Farming

R 19 835.92

200.0408 hectares. 5 Years Lease duration

 

Doorenhoek farm (Pietermaritzburg): Sugarcane Farming

R18 163.11

297.4926 hectares. 10 Years Lease duration

16 July 2019 - NW103

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) At what stage is the process of the rationalisation of South African foreign mission with a view to reducing the number of such missions to save costs and (b) what is the projected saving to the State in the Medium – Term Expenditure Framework when the number of foreign missions are reduced? NW1060E

Reply:

a) Consultations on the rationalisation of South African foreign missions are ongoing.

b) Savings can only be determined once the process has been finalised.

16 July 2019 - NW60

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What percentage of water that was consumed in the Republic was recycled in each province in 2018?

Reply:

Water recycling is done by the Water Boards as Water Service Providers that are also operating Water Schemes on behalf of municipalities. The information provided to me by Water Boards in response to the Honourable Member is as follows:

Entities

What percentage of water that was consumed in the Republic was recycled in each province in 2018?

Amatola Water

Amatola Water does not recycle waste water as it is operating upstream of the water value chain in the bulk purification, distribution and storage space. Amatola Water’s processing methods at plant level involve an insignificant amount of water recycling which is approximately 1% of the raw water abstracted from source.

Bloem Water

Bloem Water Treatment works does not recycle consumed water at any of its plants; however during the purification stage water is backwashed and sent back to the catchment (Dams). This process is then metered and reported under unaccounted for water (apparent losses) which is one portion of the Non-Revenue Water for the Entity the other being water consumed by the Entity at Plants and the Head Office which is and average of 1.2%.

Lepelle Northern Water

Refer to Annexure A below for recycled water amounts by Lepelle Northern Water

Magalies Water

Magalies Water presents the quantities that constitutes 4,21% recycled water as a percentage of raw water abstracted for the period July 2018 up to 31 March 2019, for the 2018/19 financial year.

Mhlathuze Water

No recycled water activities.

Overberg Water

No recycled water activities.

Overberg Water only provides bulk drinking water to its customers mainly, the Hessequa and Theewaterskloof Municipalities and industrial agriculture.

Rand Water

Rand Water does not recycle water. However, our customers Tswane and Rustenburg do recycle water in their plants as follows:

Tswane:

Roodeplat pumping 30M;l/d (maximum capacity 60Mll/d)

Rietvliet pumping 36Ml/d (maximum capacity 40Ml/d)

Rustenburg:

Bospoort pumping 12M/d (maximum capacity 15Ml/d)

Sedibeng Water

15% of water consumed was recycled water in the North West.

Umgeni Water

The treated waste water effluent re-use is about 8% and the direct recycling is 2%

  • (At present all of Umgeni Water managed Waste Water plants discharge treated waste water to rivers that flow into downstream dams. In this way all of the treated waste water effluent is re-used / recovered in a downstream system (approximately 100Ml/d). This can be classed as indirect reuse.
  • Umgeni Water does not treat any wastewater to potable standards and hence do not have any direct reuse systems.
  • Umgeni Water has a 100% shareholding in Umgeni Water services (UWS) SOC Ltd. This subsidiary holds an 18.5% investment in Durban Water Recycling, with direct recycling volumes amounting to 30 Ml/d out of 1257 Ml/d (2%).

Annexure A

See the link: Lepelle Northern Water 

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW60_Annexure.pdf

16 July 2019 - NW100

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Police

(1) Whether any station commander from Voeloorus, East Rand, was found guilty at the Boksburg Magistrates' Court in the past 10 years and sentenced to 12 year' imprisonment o/ a fine of R12 000 and is back at work with the SA Police S MCO (SAP, (2) Whether there are any members of the SAPS who were (a) sentenced to jail, but instead choose to receive their salaries while in jail and (b) reinstated in the SAPS after serving their sentence In the past 10 years; or so, (I) what Is the total number of such employees in each caao, (ii) on which salary level/rank is each of the specified SAPS members employed and (III) at which police stations

Reply:

(1) The Station Commander of SAPS Vosloorus was found guilty and sentenced to twelve (12) months Imprisonment or R10 000 fine and 19 currently back at work. The disciplinary matter was finalised on 24 November 2017, by means of the expedition process and the officer was given a final written warning.

(2)

The Information provided Is for 2017/2018 and 2019-2020 financial years, from 1 April 2017 to September 2018.

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28 JUNE 2019 lNTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 2-2010)

Reply to question 100 recommended

VI NAL C NTSHIEA

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

Divisional Commissioner

Reply to question 100 recommended/ not recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL DEPUTY NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: ASSET AND LEGAL MANAGEMENT FN VUMA

Date:

Reply to questlon 100 recommended

S9I LE (SOEG)

GENERAL SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28 JUNE 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 2-2010)

Reply to question 100 approved/ not approved

16 July 2019 - NW46

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Khawula, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) On what date will the houses of the Msunduzi Local Municipality’s Wirewall Rectification Programme in Phase 4 be completed and (b) why has there been such a long delay in the construction of the houses?

Reply:

a) It is anticipated that the houses in the Msunduzi Local Municipality’s Wirewall Rectification Programme in Phase 4 project will be completed by 31 December 2020.

b) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements terminated a contract with the original Service Provider, Masiqhame Trading 376cc in 2013 due to failure to perform in terms of the contractual agreement agreed to. Subsequently, the Msunduzi Local Municipality was instructed by the Provincial Department to procure the services of a new Service Provider to rectify the houses that were not completed by Masiqhame Trading 376cc. A contractual agreement was then entered into between the Msunduzi Local Municipality and the new Service Provider, Farfield Development for the rectification of the outstanding houses and the agreement was signed on 16 May 2016. It then came to the attention of the Local Municipality that some of the houses that were constructed by Masiqhame Trading 376cc were not built in accordance with the layout plan of the area. As a result, a Town Planner was appointed to re-design the project area and amend the zoning of the properties where required.

16 July 2019 - NW86

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to the reply to question 53 on 11 March 2019, what is the total number of persons living in each informal settlement in each province?

Reply:

The number of persons living in each informal settlement in each province are given in the attached Annexure A. The status of the information is as at November 2017, based on information provided by Provinces and some Metropolitan municipalities, as well as information gathered by the Department during the informal settlement assessments, categorisation and development of the upgrading plans.

16 July 2019 - NW44

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of labour disputes are currently faced by (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her, (b) what is the (i) cause and (ii) nature of each dispute and (c) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b) what (i) number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) was the monetary value of each severance package?

Reply:

Honourable Member, please find information provided to me by the Department of Human Settlements, of Water and Sanitation and the entities reporting to me.

A. HUMAN SETTLEMENTS:

(1) (a)(i)The Department is currently faced with three (3) disputes, with two of these (2) at conciliation stage and one (1) at arbitration stage.

(b)(i) The Causes of the two (2) disputes at Conciliation are as follows:

  • The 1st dispute arose from an employee who lodged a formal grievance on 22 October 2018 alleging wrongful conduct by the employer in a disciplinary hearing which impaired her dignity resulting in suffering and humiliation. The employee further sought compensation for her suffering and humiliation:
  • The grievance was investigated with recommendations on findings thereof supported and approved by the Head of Department.
  • The aggrieved employee was however dissatisfied with the outcome and opted to refer a dispute to the CCMA.
  • The CCMA considered that it did not have jurisdiction to hear the matter and advised the employee to refer the dispute to the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).
  • The 2nd dispute arose after an employee was placed on pre-cautionary suspension on 29 April 2019 pending conclusion of investigations into possible acts of misconduct, including incidents of gross financial misconduct, gross insubordination, gross dishonesty, gross misrepresentation, gross violation of prescripts and gross negligence that occurred between July 2018 to March 2019.

The Cause of the one (1) dispute at Arbitration is as follows:

  • The dispute arose from an employee who lodged a formal grievance on 4 December 2017 regarding the department’s failure to pay acting allowance in that the DDG: CS granted approval for the payment of an acting allowance, however, the Director-General advised that the post the employee was acting against did not exist and the employee must move back to her original post:
  • The grievance was investigated and recommendations on findings thereof supported and approved by the Head of Department.
  • The aggrieved employee was however dissatisfied with the outcome and opted to refer the dispute to the General Public Service Sectoral Bargaining Council (GPSSBC).

(ii) The Nature of the two (2) disputes at Conciliation are as follows:

  • The 1st dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to an occupational detriment and contravention of the Protected Disclosure Act;
  • The 2nd dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to suspension.

The Nature of the dispute at Arbitration is as follows:

  • The dispute is regarding an unfair labour practice relating to the payment of benefits, i.e. the non-payment of an acting allowance.

(c) (i) The dates the two (2) disputes at Conciliation were reported:

  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 11 April 2019.
  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 20 May 2019.

The dates the dispute at Arbitration was reported:

  • One (1) dispute was reported to the GPSSBC on 6 June 2018.

(ii) Status on Resolution of the disputes

  • None of the disputes have been resolved.
  • The Department is awaiting notices of sit-down for the two (2) disputes referred for conciliation.
  • The dispute at arbitration is continuing in that parties are leading evidence and cross-examination.

(2) (a)(i) The Department dismissed four (4) employees in the past five years.

(ii) The four (4) dismissal by the Department were as follows:

  • One (1) employee was dismissed on 27 August 2014 after being charged and found guilty for the following:
    • Negligently mismanaging the finances of the state
    • False statements
    • Gross dereliction of duty
    • Prejudicing the administration of the Department
    • Fruitless expenditure of R114 100
  • Three (3) employees were dismissed on 23 May 2018, 1 June 2018 and 31 January 2019 respectively for absconding from the Public Service, in terms of Section 17(3)(a)(i) of the Public Service Act, 103 of 1994 .
  • A termination by virtue of the said provision is regarded, not as a dismissal, but a termination “by operation of law” and hence not arbitrable under the Labour Relations Act.

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages;

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

DHS Entities

Community Scheme Ombud Service

(1) (a)(ii) There is only one dispute being currently faced by the Community Scheme Ombud Service.

(b)(ii) The cause was subsequent to a precautionary suspension, pending an investigation.

(c)(ii) The nature of the labour dispute is: “Unfair suspension or disciplinary action”

(d)(i) The matter was reported to the CCMA on the 4th April 2019.

(d)(ii) The last set down for an arbitration was on the 25th June 2019. The matter was postponed to a date to be confirmed.

(2) (a) (i) Only one employee was dismissed in the past five years

(a) (ii) The employee was dismissed for poor performance.

(b) (i) No employees were paid severance packages.

(b) (ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

Estate Agency Affairs Board

The table below summaries the response to question 1(a) (b) (c) (d):

NO (a)

NATURE OF DISPUTE (c)

DATE REPORTED (d) (i)

STATUS OF THE MATTER (b)

OUTCOME (d) (ii)

1

Section 186(2) (a) - Unfair conduct - promotion/ demotion/ probation/ training/ benefits.

17 August 2018

The matter was scheduled for 4 September 2018 for In Limine/ Conciliation. The matter was not resolved and was scheduled for Con/Arb on 01 October 2018. Subsequently on 05 October 2018 a Jurisdictional Ruling was made for the matter to be heard by the Labour Court.

The matter was scheduled for 04 June 2019 with the Labour court, however on 27 May 2019 the EAAB received communication that the Labour Court removed the matter from the unopposed roll and the matter would not proceed as scheduled as it had been cancelled. This means NEHAWU may apply for a new court date, however no correspondence has been received in this regard thus far.

Pending

2

Section 186(2) (a) - Unfair conduct - promotion/ demotion/ probation/ training/ benefits.

20 December 2018

The matter was scheduled for In Limine on 09 January 2019. The matter resumed on 28 January 2019 where it the employee applied for condonation which was denied and the matter dismissed.

Resolved

3

Section 198B - Alleged unfair termination of contract.

30 November 2018

The matter was unresolved at conciliation and was referred for Arbitration on 28 February 2019 the applicants declared their intention to subpoena witnesses in support of their case. The commissioner postponed the matter to a later date in order to allow the witnesses to subpoenaed. The matter was rescheduled for Arbitration on 21 June 2019, however it was postponed due to unforeseen circumstances.

Pending

4

Section 191(5) (a) (iii) - Reason for dismissal not known.

22 March 2019

The matter was scheduled for Arbitration on 24 April 2019 however the HR Department received a postponement notice on 17 April 2019. Details of the new date have not been communicated.

Pending

5

Section 198B - Alleged unfair termination of contract.

03 April 2019

The matter was referred for conciliation on 03 April 2019 remained unresolved. The matter was scheduled for Arbitration on 21 June 2019 where both parties presented. The Commissioner is yet to make a ruling on the matter.

Pending

6

Section 191(5)(a)(iii) - Reason for dismissal not known

04 June 2019

The employee lodged the dispute at the CCMA on 04 June 2019. The matter sat for Con/Arb on 24 June 2019 where the Commissioner recommended a Section 198B application to be aligned to the applicant’s dispute.

Pending

(2) (a)(i) 1 (One) – Audit Compliance Officer was dismissed on 13 June 2016.

(ii) Reasons for dismissal - Gross dishonesty and unauthorised use of company property

(b)(i) No employees paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

Housing Development Agency

(1) (a)(ii) Number of labour disputes are currently faced by the HDA are as follow:

  • Fixed Term Temp employment contract ended (x3)
  • Claim of Constructive Dismissal (x3)
  • Unfair Dismissal (x1)
  • Allegations of Misconduct (Disciplinary enquiry pending) (x3)
  • Suspensions (x5) – matters are in progress
  • Internal Grievance (x5) – internal matters will be managed as guided by the organisations’ policies and procedures

(b) (i) The Causes of the three (3) disputes are categorised as follows:

  • Fixed Term Employment Contracts:
  • Both employees were dissatisfied that their Fixed Term Temp Contract of employment was not renewed, and the dispute was referred to the CCMA by the employee on grounds of unfair labour practice in April 2019. The matter is still in progress with the CCMA. This matter is unresolved.
  • Claim of Constructive Dismissal matter:
  • This is after the employees were placed through the internal Disciplinary process where they were facing gross allegations of misconducts and resigned during the course of the proceedings and later approached CCMA claimed constructive dismissal in June 2019. CCMA dismissed the case and closed the matter.
  • Unfair Dismissal matter:
  • The employee was seconded to HDA for a specified period with a proviso to return to his primary employer at the end of the secondment period. It appears that the primary employer had backfilled the role permanently while the said employee was on secondment.

(c)(i) The employee has referred the matter to the CCMA as unfair dismissal which is still to be heard in July 2019.

(2) (a) (i) Five (x5) employees dismissed

(a) (ii) The five (5) dismissal by the Entity were as follows:

  • Three (x3) on Gross misconduct
  • One (x1) Insubordination and Incompatibility
  • One (x1) Gross Negligence and Misconduct

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

National Home Builders Registration Council

The table below summaries the response to question (1) (a) (b) (c) (d)

CAUSE OF DISPUTE (b)(i)

NATURE OF DISPUTE (c)

DISPUTE LODGED DATE (d)(i)

DISPUTE RESOLVED DATE

(d) (ii)

Alleged unfair suspension

Unfair labour practice

25-Apr-18

Pending

Breach of fiduciary duties

Section 188A CCMA Enquiry

25-Jun-18

31-Jul-18

Alleged unfair suspension

Unfair labour practice

25-Apr-18

Pending

Alleged corruption

Unfair dismissal

10-Jul-18

27-Jul-18

Failure e to work

Disciplinary hearing -

13-Jul-18

27-Aug-18

according to

Misconduct

   

operating procedures

     

& carry out

     

reasonable and

     

lawful instruction

     

Gross dishonesty

Disciplinary hearing –

15-Aug-18

14-Nov-18

Gross negligence

Disciplinary hearing

- Misconduct

16-Aug-18

14-Nov-18

Failure to adhere to company policies

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

17-Jul-18

17-0ct-18

Failure to respond to emails without valid reasons

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

06-Jul-18

06-Jul-18

Behaving

unprofessionally

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

06-Jul-18

06-Jul-18

Failure to discharge duties and obligations with due diligence and in the best interest of the organization

Disciplinary hearing - Misconduct

04-Jul-18

31-Oct- 18

Failure to carry lawful and reasonable instruction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

21-Jun-18

21-Jun-18

Failure to obey reasonable and lawful instruction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

16-Apr-18

16-Apr-18

Negligence and carelessness of duties

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

25-0ct-18

25-0ct-18

Failure to conduct a pre-inspection to confirm status of construction

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

10-Sep-18

28-Jan-19

Not attending to work at the mobile office in Umtata

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

07-Dec-18

07-Dec-18

Equal pay for work of equal value-discrimination

Unfair labour practice

18-Dec-18

09-Jan-19

Dishonest behavior in capturing a stand number

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

14-Jan-19

14-Jan-19

Submission of incorrect information in that construction has commenced on site

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

11-Feb-19

12-Feb-19

Misrepresentation and failing to act in the best interest of the organisation

Disciplinary hearing – Misconduct

26-Apr-18

26-Apr-18

Unfair discrimination in recruitment process

Unfair discrimination

09-Sep-14

06-Feb-19

(2) (b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

National Housing Finance Corporation

(1) (a) (ii) There are no disputes that the NHFC currently is facing

(b) (i) Not applicable

(c) (i) Not applicable

(d) (i) Not applicable

(d) (ii) Not applicable

(2) (a)(i) 2 (two) employees were terminated by the NHFC on issues of ill-health and poor performance , furthermore in and around 2014, the NHFC experienced a high cost to income ratio that would render it financially unsustainable if not addressed, the majority of the costs emanated from labour costs. The NHFC Board embarked on a company-wide restructuring that included recommendations on reducing the high labour cost. As a result, Management began consultation processes with the representatives of the union in terms of section 189 of the Labour Relations Act. The outcome of these consultative processes resulted in Twenty Eight (28) employees accepting voluntary severance packages.

(b)(i) Twenty Eight (28) employees were paid Severance Pay, the other two (2) employees were not paid severance packages only the normal notice pay;

(ii) The total cost of the severance packages were R 22 264 381.80.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority

(1) (a)(ii) There is one dispute currently faced by the Social Housing Regulatory Authority.

(b)(i) Allegations of an unfair precautionary suspension.

(c)(i) The nature of the dispute is unfair labour practice.

(d)(i) The case was reported to the Council for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration on the 13 November 2018 and second case was reported to the CCMA on the 23rd June 2019 as well as the Labour Court on the 24th June 2019.

(d)(ii) On the first case, a postponement was granted by the Commissioner on the 24th June 2019 due to a change in legal representation, thus case is still pending the arbitration award. With regard to the second case, the CCMA case has not been heard yet but the labour Court has heard the matter on the 28 June 2019 and reserved the judgment to the 3rd of July 2019.

(2) (a)(i) Two (2) employees were dismissed by the department in 2018.

(a)(ii) Both employees were dismissed for absconding from the Public Service, in terms of Public Service Act Section 17(3) (a) (i). A termination by virtue of the said provision is regarded, not as a dismissal, but a termination “by operation of law” and hence not arbitrable under the Labour Relations Act.

(b)(i) No employees were paid severance packages

(b)(ii) Therefore a nil monetary value.

 

B. WATER AND SANITATION:

(1) The information relating to labour diputes provided by entities in the water and sanitation portfolio is attcahed as Annexure A.

The information availed by the Deparrment of Water and Sanitation is provided in the table below:

(a)(i) Number of labour disputes are currently faced by the Department

A total of 229 labour disputes.

(b)(i) Cause of dispute

  • Unfair Dismissal and suspensions: Theft; Mismanagement and embezzlement of state funds; Misuse of state Property; Gross Dishonestly
  • Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and Benefits
  • Interpretation of collective agreement: movement of levels.
  • Discrimination for equal pay for equal work at equal value

(ii) Nature of each dispute

  • Total of Unfair Dismissal: 4
  • Unfair Dismissal outstanding at bargaining council: 1
  • Unfair Dismissal finalised: 3
  • Total of Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits and unfair suspensions: 133
  • Unfair Labour Practice outstanding at bargaining council: 94
  • Unfair Labour Practice finalised: 39

(c)(i) On what date was each dispute reported

Date reported: Unfair Dismissal

  • 28/09/2017
  • 26/04/2018
  • 25/5/2018
  • 18/08/2017

Date reported: Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits

  • 29/03/2019 total of 27
  • 18/05/2019 total of 70
  • 27/11/2018 total of 14
  • 20/04/2016 one case
  • 27/03/2017 total of 15
  • 26/04/2019 one case
  • 03/10/2017 total of 4
  • 07/05/2019 one case

Date reported: Interpretation of collective agreement

  • On 22/11/2018 total of 69
  • On 15/03/2019 total of 3
  • On 13/06/2019 total of 10
  • On 27/09/2017 total of 2
  • On 18/05/2019 one case
  • On 30/05/2019 one case
  • On 06/05/2019 total of 3
  • On 15/05/2019 one case

Date reported: Discrimination for equal pay for equal work at equal value

  • One 14/05/2019 one case matter still on going

(c)(ii) On what date was each dispute resolved

Date resolved: Unfair Dismissal

  • On 09/11/2018
  • On 07/03/2018
  • On 29/04/2019

Date Resolved: Unfair Labour Practice: Promotions and benefits

  • On 01/03/2019 total of 14
  • On 23/03/2019 one case
  • On 28/06/2018 a total of 2
  • On 09/05/2019 one case
  • On 23/07/2018 total of 15
  • On 07/03/2019 one case
  • 19/10/2018 total of 4;
  • 23/10/2018

Date Resolved: Interpretation of collective agreement

  • On 02/04/2019 total of 66;
  • On 11/05/2018 one case
  • On 21/09/2019 total of 2

(2) Information relating dismissal in the Department is provided in the table below:

(a)(i) The number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years

A total of 30 dismissal.

(ii) For what reason was each employee dismissed

  • Fraud a total of 8
  • Theft a total of 6
  • Assault a total of 4
  • Mismanagement and embezzlement of state funds a total of 3
  • Sexual Harassment a total of 1
  • Fraudulent qualification a total of 1
  • Absenteeism a total of 1
  • Irregular appointment in the Recruitment processes a total of 1
  • Gross dishonesty a total of 3
  • Misuse of state vehicle a total of 1
  • Racism a total of 1

(2)(a)(i) What number of the specified employees were paid severance packages

No severance packages was paid

(ii) was the monetary value of each severance package

No severance packages was paid

15 July 2019 - NW96

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What are the full relevant details of the steps he is taking, together with the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development, to ensure that the commercial cultivation of hemp in the Republic is legalised? NW948

Reply:

The response provided by my predecessor in August 2018, to a question by the Honourable Member, is still relevant.

I will request that updates be obtained from a task team led by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (“DALRRD”) looking at regulation for hemp and that further work be done to explore the commercial cultivation of hemp.

12 July 2019 - NW159

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in her department and (b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled.NW 1117E

Reply:

(a) Total number of vacancies: 200

(b) We have

Placed a halt on the filling of current vacancies due to inadequate resources.

12 July 2019 - NW13

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What is the current total number of (a) foreign nationals and (b) undocumented migrants in South African prisons?

Reply:

a) There is a current total of 13 437 foreign nationals incarcerated in South African Correctional Centres.

b) Currently there is a total of 2 052 undocumented migrants/illegal immigrants incarcerated in South African Correctional Centres.

Foreign nationals, whether documented or undocumented, upon receiving custodial sentence are expected to serve their sentences in correctional centres within the Republic of South Africa (RSA) due to the fact that there is currently no Inter-State Transfer Agreement with other Countries. They are considered for placement after serving the prescribed minimum detention or non-parole period and if placement is approved, undocumented foreign nationals are deported back to their country of origin after Department of Home Affairs (DHA) has finalised deportation process. The documented foreign nationals are allowed to serve parole within the Republic of South Africa if their permits are not revoked by DHA.

11 July 2019 - NW18

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Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) number of court intermediaries are currently employed by his department in each province, (b) court(s) do the intermediaries serve, (c) number of cases do the intermediaries attend to each month and (d) languages are the intermediaries proficient in?

Reply:

a) What number of court intermediaries is currently employed by the department in each province?

In the 2014/15 financial year, the Department created 185 permanent posts of court intermediaries and 9 permanent posts of Assistant Director (ASD) Intermediaries. The periodical recruitment process commenced in the 2015/16 financial year, and by the 2017/18 financial year, the Department had filled 179 of 185 posts of court intermediaries and 5 of 9 posts of ASD Intermediaries. However, due to the declining economy, austerity measures in budget allocations are persistently introduced, and in effect, constraining the Department’s plan to fill the remaining vacant posts. The current demand on social work services in the country has also resulted in the exodus of many intermediaries to better opportunities. As at 31 March 2019, the number of court intermediaries in permanent posts declined from 179 to 153, while the numerical capacity of the ASD intermediaries dropped from 5 to 4.

In bridging intermediary service gaps at our courts, the Department has recently introduced an automated Intermediary Diary Management System to ensure the shared use of the intermediaries within provinces and beyond. Through this system, the existing pool of intermediaries can be accessed by any court in the country, as and when the need arises, to match the special needs of the victim, often relating to language, age, disability, etc.

In strengthening further the existing human capital in intermediary services, the Department also utilises a pool of ad hoc intermediaries- mostly drawn from the NGO sector. This intervention also assists in relieving the pressure of unemployment in the country. In certain provinces, there are social workers employed by the Department of Social Development (DSD) who are released to assist, whenever the demand arises. The Table below gives a numerical spread of these services over all provinces in the country:

Province

DoJ&CD Intermediaries as at 31 Mar 2019

DSD Intermediaries

Total

 

Court Intermediaries

Assistant Director Intermediaries

Ad Hoc Intermediaries

   

Eastern Cape

16

1

-

-

17

Free State

10

-

3

2

15

Gauteng

12

1

27

16

56

KwaZulu-Natal

34

-

1

2

37

Limpopo

17

1

-

-

18

Mpumalanga

14

-

2

-

16

Northern Cape

9

-

-

-

9

North West

18

1

-

2

21

Western Cape

23

-

3

2

28

Total

153

4

36

24

217

b) What courts do the intermediaries serve?

In terms of section 170A of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act No 51 of 1977), intermediary services are offered in any criminal proceedings pending before any court where it appears to such court that such proceedings would expose any witness under the biological or mental age of 18 years to undue mental stress or suffering if such witness testifies without support. Among all witnesses appearing in criminal proceedings held at our courts in the country, only children and persons with mental disabilities are entitled to intermediary services. Likewise, section 61(2) of the Children’s Act, 2005 (Act No 38 of 2005) also require the use of intermediary services when children testify in proceedings held in terms of this Act.

At present, intermediaries are spread over and shared between regional criminal courts and children’s courts, where the demand for this service is predominantly high. As at 31 March 2019, the country has 405 regional criminal courts of which 89 are the sexual offences courts. The childrens’ courts are operating at 309 magisterial district courts and some at the 332 branch/ periodical courts. Intermediaries also service our high courts, whenever the need arises. Currently, in South Africa there are 11 high court divisions with 5 local seats. As indicated, the service of intermediaries is subject to demand and may therefore not be a daily occurrence at a given court.

c) What number of cases do the intermediaries attend to each month?

The Department uses the Integrated Case Management System (ICMS) for Intermediary Services to collect data from our courts. Currently, this system collects data of intermediary services offered at regional criminal courts and the children’s courts, where the demand for these services is currently highly concentrated. The statistics are collected in terms of people who receive these services and not in accordance to the cases registered at our courts. The plan is to increase the functionality of the ICMS and extend its scope to other cases. During the period of 12 months (i.e. 1 April 2018 to 31 Mar 2019) intermediaries rendered services to 14 907 children and 261 persons with mental disabilities who appeared in sexual offences and children’s courts proceedings held nationwide. The Table below gives the spread of these services over provinces per annum:

CASES WHERE INTERMEDIARY SERVICES WERE RENDERED: 2018/2019

Province

Sexual Offences

Children’s court

 

Child Witnesses

Child Victims

Mentally Disabled Witnesses

Mentally Disabled Victims

Witnesses

Victims

Total

EC

787

1 894

3

105

43

62

2 894

FS

451

890

1

5

54

64

1 465

GP

603

2 114

-

9

16

20

2 762

KZN

392

1 912

2

51

5

16

2 378

LIMP

269

640

6

15

21

23

974

MP

329

1 150

1

13

11

11

1 515

NW

198

585

1

11

61

30

886

NC

216

715

1

16

39

19

1 006

WC

340

915

4

17

4

8

1 288

TOTAL

3 585

10 815

19

242

254

253

15 168

The demand for the intermediary services differs from court to court and from month to month. In each month there are about 1 000 eligible persons who receive these services nationwide. Monthly statistics is only available in services rendered to child victims of sexual offences. Below is the number of child victims of sexual offences who received intermediary services per month in the 2018/ 19 financial year.

d) What languages are the intermediaries proficient in?

Intermediaries are appointed on the basis of proficiency in the language predominantly used at the courts they would be stationed at. With the recent introduction of the automated Intermediary Diary Management System, intermediaries are now booked for cases in accordance with the language needs of the victim/ witness and are shared throughout the country. This system is intended to avoid the unnecessary postponement of cases due to language shortages. Services are offered in all 11 official languages. For persons requiring sign language, ad hoc intermediaries are used. Below is a matrix showing language utilisation in each province:

Province

English

Afrikaans

Setwana

Sesotho

Isizulu

Siswati

Isixhosa

Isindebele

Tshivenda

Sepedi

Xitsonga

EC

216

70

1

27

50

0

257

5

0

0

1

FS

37

25

12

76

11

0

16

0

0

0

1

GP

116

73

72

84

172

6

89

9

17

77

33

KZN

209

9

0

11

275

0

74

0

0

0

1

LIMP

84

4

15

12

17

8

1

7

14

97

24

MPUM

55

10

5

6

63

39

0

23

0

44

11

NC

58

34

94

25

7

0

3

1

1

12

2

NW

55

97

75

0

0

0

22

0

0

1

1

WC

115

147

1

0

2

0

103

0

0

0

0

TOTAL

945

469

275

241

597

53

565

45

32

231

74

11 July 2019 - NW105

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether, with reference to tourism being one of the drivers of the economy, her department has a system in place to encourage transformation in the tourism sector, particularly with regard to providing job opportunities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

In line with National Tourism Sector Strategy (NTSS), the efforts to grow tourism have in the main two interrelated priorities, which are inclusive growth and sector transformation. Inclusive growth will bring about employment creation, investment and GDP contribution. In this regard, in partnership with the industry and other stakeholders we will increase the number of tourists to our country and their expenditure on related goods and services during their trips. Government overall has also highly placed tourism on the priority list and a whole-of-government approach to tourism development and promotion will be applied to maximise on our growth potential. On transformation, there are a number of initiatives aimed at increased participation of black people in sector. These are access to finance, development of capabilities of South Africans in particular youth and women across the tourism value chain, enterprise and supplier development, and implementation of the B-BBEE tourism sector codes of good practice. The department will continue to take advantage of the expanded Public Works Programme to empower youth through development of skills while they also earn a stipend wage through job opportunities.

11 July 2019 - NW125

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether any action is being taken to enforce compliance with the court order relating to the rehabilitation, maintenance and security of the Makhanda landfill site; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; and (2) Whether her Department conducts regular inspections of the landfill site to ensure compliance with relevant legislation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. No action has been taken to enforce compliance with the court order by the National Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (previously the Department of Environmental Affairs) as it has not been involved in the legal proceedings which resulted in the court order competing, among others, the Municipality to undertake rehabilitation, maintenance and installation of security measures at the Makana landfill site.
  2. The Makana landfill site is a general landfill site and, accordingly, the regulatory duties, including taking compliance and enforcement action when non-compliances are detected, falls within the mandate of the Eastern Cape Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism.

This Department has contacted the Eastern Cape Department of Economic Developement, Environmental Affairs and Tourism who confirmed that they are actively engaging with the Makana Municipality, and that they undertook a compliance visit to the landfill site as recently as June 2019.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

11 July 2019 - NW113

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

What are the full relevant details of the (a) progress her department has made in the fight against abalone poaching along the Western Cape Coastline, particularly in the coastal communities of Gansbaai, Kleinbaai, Franskraal and Pearly Beach where abalone poaching remains rife and (b) additional steps that will be taken by her department in co-operation with the SA Police Service, law enforcement agencies and other specialised environmental law enforcement bodies to eradicate this scourge from the coastline?

Reply:

a) There has been an increase in the number of enforcement operations conducted in the Gansbaai, Kleinbaai, Franskraal and Pearly Beach areas which have been identified as hot spots for abalone poaching. During the 2018/19 financial year, 10 (ten) operations took place in the Overberg area in the Western Cape under Initiative 5 of Operation Phakisa (Oceans Economy) — the Enhanced and Co-ordinated Compliance and Enforcement Programme. This initiative has created a platform to achieve an integrated and coordinated approach to ensure compliance with, inter alia, the South African Maritime Legislative and Regulatory frameworks within the coastal regions. These operations are a combination of proactive and reactive operations, focused in some instances on visible policing and, in others, are aimed at disrupting illegal activities and apprehending poachers.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OUESTION NO.33 NW990E

These operations resulted in arrests of some key role players and the confiscation and seizure of equipment used in illegal harvesting. Overall confiscations during Initiative S Phakisa operations for the 2018/19 financial year were R28 022 983, with the value of confiscated abalone and rock lobster being R21 317 365 and R675 050, respectively, with most of the abalone confiscated coming from the Overberg region. Confiscated equipment associated with illegal activity in the coastal region amounted to R5 052 160 for the same period. In the last six months, there have been four operations over 81 days, together with other law enforcement agencies where approximately 539 potential poachers were prevented from diving and 40 arrests were made.

b) The Department will continue to engage the South African Police Services around the approval and implementation of a medium-term deployment plan that will ask for additional resources in the affected areas to increase Government’s response to illegal harvesting of marine resources. In addition, we are looking at the dynamics driving demand, illicit exports and markets for illegal trade and obtaining a comprehensive threat assessment.

Operation Phakisa will also continue to undertake compliance and enforcement operations in the Overberg Region. Both proactive and reactive operations will be planned to ensure Government has a visible presence in the high-risks areas. The ongoing collaboration with the SANDF’s Operation Corona as a force multiplier will continue to have a positive impact on operations.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENYIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:.. .. ....... :..

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION NO. 33 N\/Y990E

10 July 2019 - NW35

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of teachers who have been trained in coding in the past academic year, (b) of the specified total number of teachers, what is the number of teachers trained in each province and (c) what level of training was offered in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not conducted teacher training for coding, however some PEDs and individual schools have conducted training and this information may be obtained from PEDs. DBE has finalised Plans to deliver training of Teachers on coding. 

10 July 2019 - NW61

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Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of commuters used the services of the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa in each (a) province and (b) of the past five financial years?

Reply:

 

 

PRASA Rail

     

Metrorail Passenger Trips (Journeys)

       
 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Western Cape

174 934 932

163 002 997

127 745 294

75 074 682

46 986 046

Kwa Zulu Natal

78 810 656

78 783 593

71 536 136

63 443 383

55 060 960

Gauteng

252 807 231

197 743 040

164 871 194

117 603 876

99 972 237

East London

7 765 109

7 267 814

6 403 992

5 437 730

5 070 622

Port Elizabeth

1 691 877

1 582 061

1 466 963

1 333 550

1 411 218

TOTAL

516 009 805

448 379 505

372 023 579

262 893 221

208 501 083

           
           

Main Line Passenger Services (MLPS)

       

Number of passengers using the service

     
 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

MLPS

930 881

854 164

658 100

465 862

387 504

10 July 2019 - NW106

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Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

Whether he has any plan of action in place to ensure that security is strengthened at our train stations and on the trains to address disruptions, vandalism and damage to state property that has become a norm and to ensure that commuters not only use an efficient service but also a safe one; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. Currently PRASA has an approved Security Operational Plan which is based on five critical issues namely:

1.1 Stop non-compliance with the relevant legislative and regulatory requirements with emphasis on the Private Security Industry Regulating Act (PSIRA) and regulations and the Railway Safety Regulator of South Africa Act (RSR) and regulations to turn PRASA Protection Services around into a professional security service;

1.2 Stop the un-procedural selection and appointment of security officials who do not meet the minimum physical, training, fitness and other PSIRA qualification standards and turn the inefficiencies and other challenges caused by this practice around to comply with PRASA Company Policies;

1.3 Stop the scourge of theft and M.D.T.P (Malicious Damage To Property) which paralyses the business and will destroy our capacity and ability to meet our strategic objectives and performance targets determined by the Department of Transport;

1.4 Stop crime affecting our passengers and staff. Turn it around through joint operations with the police and other law enforcement agencies to meet our constitutional obligations, security performance and targets;

1.5 Stop the escalating operational security cost. Turn ineffective and inefficient security services (and the perceptions) around through the implementation of technology and the correct balance between own and contracted security services.

2. From the 1st of September 2019, Prasa will be employing new security companies, with new performance based contractual arrangement. The new agreements will include a heavy emphasis on reducing the vandalism and theft that is bedevilling our infrastructure.

3. A strong technology roll out is underway, in the form of CCTV, and other surveillance equipment. These are aimed to act as force multipliers to assist in areas where physical security cannot reach.

4. The new approved PRASA Group Security Strategy supports a different security outlook that fosters professionalism and a culture of sensitivity towards commuters and passengers alike.

5. This is supported by a new structure that is dedicated to give credence to the prioritization of security at stations.

10 July 2019 - NW47

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Who are the current 20 largest recipients of fishing quotas in terms of (a) total fishing quota and (b) type of fish?

09 July 2019 - NW2

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he is aware of a proposed 2 dose Glaxo Smith Klein (GSK) ChAd155-RSV Vaccine Trial, to be conducted in the Republic (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) why is the Government exposing infants to (a) untested and (b) potentially fatal drugs for profit and ongoing science experimentation contrary to the protection contained in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996?

Reply:

(1) Yes. I am aware that the MRC Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit (based at the University of the Witwatersrand) is taking part in a multi-centre, multi-country study that aims to provide critical information on the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity profile of the ChAd155-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccine in infants likely to be unexposed to RSV. Sites in European, South American and North American countries are also participating.

Although RSV infection is a leading cause of death in young children, interventions to protect children against RSV infection and to treat children who acquire RSV infection are not available. For this reason, the World Health Organisation ranked a vaccine against RSV as the most important vaccine that needs to be developed in order to protect children in low- and middle-income countries from preventable mortality.

(2) (a) The vaccine should not be regarded as untested. The immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of the ChAd155-RSV vaccine in healthy adults has been evaluated and determined to be satisfactory by an Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC). A clinical study is currently being conducted in RSV-sero positive infants aged 12 to 23 months (study 204838 [RSV PED-002]) in Europe. The proposed study will only proceed if the safety profile of the current study is evaluated as being satisfactory by an IDMC. The study will be monitored by an IDMC at each step for safety, and any reports communicated to the regulatory authorities in real-time.

(b) There is no merit in the concern that children are being exposed to a dangerous vaccine, since this is a non-replicating vaccine and the vaccine itself cannot biologically cause any illness. As noted above, the trial will be conducted in line with clinical trial guidelines and will be strictly monitored to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW52

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to each type of antiretroviral drug, for how long is it envisaged that the Government’s stockpile will last?

Reply:

The Department of Health currently stockpiles the first line treatment regimen (Tenofovir/metrictabine/efavirenze) which 90% of patients are prescribed on. There is adequate supplies of the first line treatment , 10 million units currently with no shortage of API at this time. The stockpile will last for eight (8) weeks.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW94

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation:

Whether she will review or rescind the decision to downgrade the SA Mission to Israel to a Liaison Office in order to give priority to other diplomatic means and processes to resolve the Israeli — Palestine impasse; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African government remains seized with the modalities of downgrading the South African Embassy in Israel, and we will communicate further actions once we concluded our deliberations.The South African government remains seized with the modalities of downgrading the South African Embassy in Israel, and we will communicate further actions once we concluded our deliberations.

09 July 2019 - NW50

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of citizens have not received ARVs in the past three months as a result of the second-line ARV shortage and (b) are there any further expected shortages?

Reply:

(a) There is a shortage of the abacavir/lamivudine and zidovudine/lamivudine combination used in second line. The shortage meant that there was lesser stock than is ordinarily available but we do not have stock. There are 360 000 patients on both combinations that are in short supply. There is currently 558 382 (AL = 177 741 + ZL = 380 641) units of the second line regimen available as at 28 June 2019.

Additionally the contracted supplier is bringing 650 000 units in July 2019. The National Department of Health has implemented stock visibility system where we have sight of the medicine stock holding at facility level. We have managed this situation by asking facilities to reduce the quality dispensed. Some patients receive two/three months supply at a time and we have advice that patients are dispensed only 1 month treatment. Secondly, we have moved stock around between facilities with higher stock levels to facilities with less stock. Thirdly, we have proposed an alternative treatment regimen should the current second line regimen not be available;

(b) The global supply of lamivudine API remains erratic however, the new ARV tender commenced on the 1st July 2019 where we have contracted additional suppliers, which we anticipate will fill the gap.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW51

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the (a) name and (b) location of each (i) clinic and (ii) hospital that does not have 24/7 security?

Reply:

(a) The Name and Location

i) There are 429 Primary Health Care facilities that do not have 24 hours’ security in place.

ii) There is no hospital that does not have 24/7 security

A list with names and location of each facility is attached as Annexure A

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF FACILITIES

Eastern Cape

112

Free State

129

Gauteng

6

KwaZulu-Natal

22

Limpopo

15

Mpumalanga

15

Northern Cape

75

North West

34

Western Cape

21

END.

09 July 2019 - NW36

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the recorded total number of (a) alcohol-related deaths and (b) children who have been born with foetal alcohol syndrome in (i) each province and (ii) each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a)(i)-(ii) Table 1 below provide information on the numbers of alcohol related deaths in South Africa was obtained from the South African Medical Research Council, that was extracted from unit records of deaths provided by Statistics South Africa which are available up to 2016.

Table 1:

Number of registered deaths with underlying causes that is alcohol related by province, 2012-2016

PROVINCE

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

47

87

110

116

107

467

Free State

19

26

39

30

33

147

Gauteng

40

53

45

48

57

243

KwaZulu-Natal

65

76

73

83

75

372

Limpopo

20

15

18

23

20

96

Mpumalanga

18

12

16

22

11

79

North West

22

18

16

26

22

104

Northern Cape

21

33

36

30

29

149

Western Cape

118

120

129

123

139

629

TOTAL

370

440

482

501

493

2286

(b)(i)-(ii) Currently, data is available on the prevalence of foetal alcohol syndrome among grade-1 learners which is collected through surveys that were conducted in selected communities. Table 2 below provides a summary of the prevalence data that is available and was provided by the Foundation for Alcohol Related Research[1]

Table 2:

Summary of the prevalence of foetal alcohol syndrome among grade-1 learners

PROVINCE

COMMUNITY

PREVELANCE RATE AS A PERCENTAGE

REFERENCE

Eastern Cape

Bethelsdorp,

Port Elizabeth

13,0

Olivier, et al., 2017a

 

Burgersdorp

6,2

Still to be published

Free State

Jacobsdal

12,9

Still to be published

Gauteng

Soweto,

Diepsloot,

Lenasia

2,6

Viljoen, 2001

Northern Cape

De Aar

11,9

Urban et al., 2008

 

Upington

7,4

Chersich et al., 2012b

 

Kimberley

6,4

Urban et al., 2015

 

Renosterberg Municipality

28,2

Olivier et al., 2017b

 

Hanover

20,8

Still to be published

Western Cape

Wellington

8,9

Viljoen, Gossage, Brooke, Adnams, Jones, Robinson ... & May, 2005

 

Aurora

10,0

Olivier et al., 2013

 

Witzenberg Sub-district

9,6

Olivier et al., 2016

 

Saldanha Bay Municipality

6,7

Olivier et al., 2016

 

Wellington,

Montague,

Ashton,

Robertson

13,5 - 20,8

May et al., 2016

END.

  1. Probst, C, Parry C, Wittchen H, Rehm J. The socioeconomic profile of alcohol-attributable mortality in South Africa: a modelling study. BMC Medicine. 2018; 16:97

09 July 2019 - NW10

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What support does he and/or his department intend to give in order to restore the dignity of the African people through the integration of traditional medicine in primary health care and the national health system?

Reply:

The Department of Health supports the integration of traditional medicine in primary health care and the national health system as follows:

(1) The Department of Health has taken steps towards the official recognition and inclusion of Traditional Medicine in the National Health System through relevant regulatory frameworks;

(2) The Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 2007 (Act No. 22 of 2007) was enacted as one of the tools to assist the Department in achieving this goal. The objectives of the Act are:

(a) to establish the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa;

(b) to make provision for control of the registration, training and practices of Traditional Health Practitioners in South Africa;

(c) to serve and protect the interests of Practitioners and those of members of the public who use the services of Traditional Health Practitioners.

(3) In implementing the Act, the Department has appointed the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa. It was established to oversee the registration and regulation of the practice of Traditional Medicine by setting practice standards. This will assist in eliminating bogus practitioners and charlatans in the practice. The Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council has to ensure safety, efficacy and quality of services provided by Traditional Health Practitioners through the enforcement of the code of ethics and conduct.

(4) The Department has appointed the Registrar of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa who assumed duty on 1 September 2017. The Registrar is the secretary and accounting officer of the Council and performs the functions assigned to him by the Interim Council in terms of the Act. Amongst his responsibilities is to set up institutional arrangements such as structures and systems for the registration of Traditional Health Practitioners. Registration of Traditional Health Practitioners will commence as soon as this office is capacitated and it is functional to carry out its mandate.

(5) Processes are underway to finalise the draft policy on Traditional Medicine in South Africa. The policy on Traditional Medicine will serve as a guide to avoid a clash between the traditional medicine system and western medicine. Within the context of primary health care, they should blend in a beneficial harmony, using the best features of each system, and compensating for weaknesses in each.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW37

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total number of drug-related deaths that have been recorded (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The table below reflects the total number of drug-related deaths in South Africa. This data has been extracted by the South African Medical Research Council from unit records of deaths provided by Statistics South Africa which is available up to 2016.

Number of registered deaths with underlying causes that is drug-related by province, 2012-2016

PROVINCE

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

25

24

56

38

34

177

Free State

26

21

23

14

26

110

Gauteng

42

46

56

82

88

314

KwaZulu-Natal

38

52

53

42

65

250

Limpopo

5

12

13

13

17

60

Mpumalanga

5

16

14

13

23

71

North West

13

23

13

12

15

76

Northern Cape

16

25

24

19

19

103

Western Cape

27

39

22

42

24

154

TOTAL

197

258

274

275

311

1315

END.

08 July 2019 - NW17

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) With reference to the reply of the Minister of Police to question 3737 on 15 January 2019, (a) what are the (i) dates, (ii) details of contractors and (iii) costs of the latest renovations done at the Van Reenen Police Station in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) what number of days has it been since the renovations were last done at the specified police station; (2) has the police station been without water; if so, what are the details of why the police station did not have water; (3) (a) what are the reasons for (i) there being no permanent supply of clean water to the police station and (ii) the lack of permanent water supply not being resolved and (b) what arrangements have been made to provide a permanent supply of clean water to the police station?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

(a) (i) The completion date for the Van Reenen Police Station in KwaZulu-Natal was 07 November 2016.

(ii) The name of the contractor who finished the project was Emcakwini Construction & Fencing CC.

(iii) The cost of the renovation was R8 750 523.65.

(b) The number of days since the last renovation is 2 years, 7 months and 17 days (as at 24 June 2019).

2. The police station has had very limited water supply due to the following reasons:

(a) from an altitude perspective, the police station is built in a mountainous area and during the low rainfall season (i.e. winter months) the yield (water supply) of the boreholes drops considerably, as a result of the low water table;

(b) the existing water supply installation consists of 3 boreholes; 2 boreholes are approximately 50 metres outside the fence on the south eastern side of the police station, and a third is in the brick building between the houses in the precinct. All three boreholes were equipped with submersible pumps. The boreholes pump into a 24 000 litre steel tank, which is housed on an elevated (concrete) tank stand, which then supplies the police station with water.

3. (a) (i) There are various reasons that contribute to the police station not having permanent supply of clean water, due to the following circumstances:

  • The police station is situated remotely, across the N3 and in a mountainous area that does not have bulk municipal water supply.
  • The non-availability of bulk municipal water supply with sufficient pressure is the reason why the police station is fed through 3 boreholes.
  • The 3 boreholes, which are placed at 3 different strategic areas are not effective due to the low water table. The continuous recurrence indicates that there is not enough water yield due to the low water table in the mountain (especially in winter and low rainfall season).

(ii) The lack of permanent water supply is currently not resolved as the local municipality does not have a water bulk supply network with adequate pressure feeding the police station. The existing municipal bulk water supply pipeline runs on the opposite side of the N3 whereas the police station is situated across the N3 without access to the municipal supply; hence the use of boreholes.

(b) In order to provide a permanent supply of clean water supply to the police station, an inter-governmental agreement shall be put into place. The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure has commenced with an investigation into the permanent supply of clean water supply to the police station by entering into talks with SANRAL and the UThukela District Municipality, with a view to securing an agreement on the modalities to supply water from the municipal bulk water, through a new proposed pipeline that crosses the N3 servitude to feed the police station. At this stage it is anticipated that an inter-governmental agreement will be in place within a period of six months. The process is at an early stage and after the inter-governmental agreement has been reached a feasibility study will be necessary to define the scope, costs and implementation timelines prior to registration of a project for design and implementation.

08 July 2019 - NW8

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether his department is taking any steps to include the youth in the mainstream economy and job creation to ensure active youth involvement, particularly local youth, if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details, (2) what measures wi\\ his department put in place to develop and assist young people into active participation in the mineral resources and energy sector?

Reply:

  1. The department has developed Youth Policy in the Energy Sector. The policy seeks to attract young people and create an environment that enables youths to reach their potential in the energy sector. The policy is aimed at addressing amongst others; employment creation, youth economic participation and access to business opportunities, speed up transformation in a way that will benefit young people, enhance skills development to ensure that young people are equipped with necessary skills to enter energy sector job market and access to business opportunities throughout the value chain, outreach projects, youth volunteerism on energy projects, and public private partnenhip.
  2. There are different measures in place to develop and assist young people to participate in the energy sector:

the measures are as follows:

  •  Learners Week (LFW) Programme - The LFW programme is a department’s flagship project focusing on awareness on careers in the energy sector, The programme aims to promote skills development amongst the youth by creating awareness and exposure of career opportunities within the Energy sector for learner doing Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM). The programme targets 250 learners from five provinces per year, whereby the Department of Education in the provinces identifies 50 top Grade 11 12 learners in quintile 1-3 schools doing STEM to pa#icipate in the programme. This year alone the department through our partners (private energy companies) will give 56 bursaries to learners from disadvantage communities to study engineering, computer sciences and other related energy programmes.
  • Integrated Energy Centre Programme - The Integrated Energy Centre (leC) is aimed at enhancing access to energy, stimulate enterprise development and job creation. The IeC trades in petrol, diesel, liquefied petroleum gas, convenience shop and other services such as internet café in other instances. This programme is a partnership between the Department and oil and gas companies The Depa#rrent has established a youth owned Integrated Energy Centre enterprise which will trade in Liquefied Petroleum Gas in Makhado Local Municipality, Limpopo. This enterprise is expected to be operationalized by July 2019. There are different IeC fuel service stations around the country whose ownership and management include young people.
  • Youth in Energy Dialogues - Youth in Energy Dialogue encompasses youth from different facets with interest in the energy industry and encourage youth to participate in the energy sector as entrepreneurs, investors, professionals, and leaders within the energy field. The dialogues take advantage of th opportunities in the energy sector and how to access them. The dialogue further explore how young people fit into the growing industry and I\ow they can better their industry reach and growth potential to take advantage of this growing sector. The programme showcase opportunities in the energy sector,
  • School Ener9y Days — School Energy Days is aimed at providing and exposing learners in Grade 09 to 11 rural areas in particular studying Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics to careers, opportunities in the energy sector and other energy related information. The department hosts approximately four School Energy Days per year from different provinces in pannership with different Stakeholders and expose them on career opponunities in the energy sector. The event is an appropriate platform to interact with learners on career development, economic development issues and information dissemination on variety of energy issues aimed at:
  •  
  • Encourage learners who take STEM to choose energy related career development path
  • Promotion of sustainable use of energy iesou‹ces; and
  • Encourage participation of young people located in rural and developing areas in business opportunities within the energy sector.

In this financial year alone, the Department has already conducted two school energy days in the Eastern Cape with the target of about 700 learners.

 

08 July 2019 - NW6

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department has put in place any processes to ensure transparency and measure the competence of service providers for departmental tenders; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how effective has she found the specified processes to be in ensuring that (a) those persons who have connections will no longer benefit and (b) new markets will open up for the youth in particular?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

Yes, the Department’s Annual Procurement Plan, which contains a list of all planned tenders for any one particular financial year is published on the National Treasury website on a quarterly basis, as a process of ensuring transparency. This gives service providers a preview of the available/possible tenders that will be published and processed in that particular period and avails to suppliers a mechanism to plan for business opportunities within Public Works.

Transparency within the procurement process is enhanced further through the publication of all tender adverts indicating high level evaluation criteria/methods in four media platforms, namely, the Departmental website; Government Tender Bulletin; National Treasury eTender Portal; and in the case of construction projects in the CIDB iTender Portal as well. Furthermore, as a transparency measure the responses from all bidders for any one particular tender are published in the Departmental website indicating also the offers of the respective bidders. All tender awards are also published through various media platforms, wherein the tenders were also advertised.

The processes to measure the competence of service providers are entrenched in the evaluation criteria that assess functionality/quality levels of all the tender responses received. Further to this a recommended tender within the construction procurement space is subjected to a risk assessment by professional service providers appointed on the respective project. The risk assessment is based on criteria that include technical risk and commercial risk. The technical risk assessment is further sub-divided into two criteria, namely: an assessment on the quality of current and previous work performed by the tenderer in the class of construction work stated in tender document, as well as adherence to contractual commitments demonstrated by the tenderer in the performance on current work and previous work.

a) In an effort to root out fraud and corruption, to support the prevention of collusive practices and SCM abuse, detect possible conflict of interest through ‘connections’ in the SCM system, as well as ensuring compliance to all relevant prescripts and policies a number of controls have been put in place and these include:

All SCM practitioners/officials involved in the SCM processes are required to annually sign a Code of Conduct for all Departmental Officials Engaged in Supply Chain Management (PA00), which specifically enjoins the relevant officials to declare in writing to the Head of Supply Chain Management Unit, to the extent required by their respective positions, any business, commercial or financial interest or any activity undertaken for financial, material and/or personal gain.

In respect of every tender/bid specification/evaluation process that an official or SCM practitioner participates in there is a requirement for the disclosure of their respective financial interest by signing a Declaration of Interest and Confidentiality form (PA18) every time there is either a specification or evaluation meeting in relation to that particular tender.

Further to this and as part of disclosures in the quarterly financial statements all SCM practitioners are required to complete Related Party Declarations in which the official is required to disclose in detail the participation of spouses and close family members in partnerships, close corporations and/or companies.

  • Any official failing to adhere to this requirement by declaring his/her interest is subjected to the relevant disciplinary code. Where an official declares interest, that official is required to recuse him/herself from the relevant process.
  • All bidders that participate and respond to bids are required to complete a Declaration of Interest and Bidder’s Past SCM Practices (PA11) that stipulates that the bidder or his/her authorised representative declare his/her position in relation to the evaluating/adjudicating authority and/or take an oath declaring his/her interest, where:
  • The bidder is employed by the State; and/or
  • The legal person on whose behalf the bidding document is signed, has a relationship with persons/a person who are/is involved in the evaluation and or adjudication of the bid(s), or where it is known that such a relationship exists between the person or persons for or on whose behalf the declarant acts and persons who are involved with the evaluation and or adjudication of the bid.

b) Through the implementation of the Preferential Procurement Regulations (PPR) of 2017 new markets and opportunities have been opened for designated groups, with the youth also being provided for in that regard.

c) I am currently busy reviewing the tender procedures that are used in the Department and will in due course introduce measures, including a Procurement Transparency initiative that will, among other features, open up tender processes by way of tender registration and making bid adjudication processes open to public observation.

08 July 2019 - NW66

Profile picture: Mthenjane, Mr DF

Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether the Republic has any rare earth mineral resources; if so, (a) what is the (i) location, (ii) value and (iii) quantity of the rare earth minerals and (b) which companies are currently extracting the rare earth minerals in each case?

Reply:

(a) The Republic has rare earth mineral resources (i) Found in the Western Cape Province on the farms, Steenkampskraal and Zanddrift, while surrounding farms are being explored for them (ii) the value of the resources is not known (iii) At the Steenkampskraal mine, the quantity is estimated at 605,000 tons at an average grade of 14.36 percent and total rare earth content of 86, 900. tons but, it is not known for Zanddrift.

(b) None

 

Mineral Policy Promotion

: Ms Ntkozo Ngcwabe Date: @@

Recommended /

Director General: Department of Mineral Resources

. ....../.... ..../2019

Approved

08 July 2019 - NW95

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department has made any progress to reduce the public wage bill; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. During and post the 2018 Wage negotiations, economic realities and financial pressures were discussed with organised labour. The purpose was to jointly look at tangible measures going forward, to remain within the budgetary ceiling without negatively impacting on job security, as well as ensuring continuous efficient and effective functionality of departments within the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) and beyond.

Numerous Human Resources (HR) related areas to reduce the Public Service wage bill have been jointly identified between the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) and the National Treasury (NT) as follows:

(i) Organisational structures interim measures

Regulation 25(2) of the Public Service Regulations (PSR), 2016 confers the authority to executive authorities to determine their department’s organisational structures, define and create posts necessary to perform the relevant functions of the department, grade the proposed new jobs and to engage in human resources planning.

Organisational structure of each government departments will be finalised when the National Macro Organisation of Government (NMOG) Project has been concluded by the 6th Administration.

(ii) Creation and filling of posts

Due to the current financial constraints, executive authorities of the 5th Administration were encouraged to align their organisational structures with their respective personnel budgets, and to create posts within the available funds in the current MTEF. Furthermore, executive authorities were encouraged to only fill critical posts in terms of section 9 of the Public Service Act (PSA), 1994.

Where the creation of a post is based on the redirection of funding from an abolished post to another post, the redundant post must first be abolished before the creation of the newly funded post.

(iii) Employment of persons additional to the approved fixed establishment

Regulation 57(2) of the PSR, 2016 states that “an executive authority may, unless otherwise authorised by the Act, within the available budget and at a salary linked to a grade determined through job evaluation or as determined in an OSD, employ persons additional to the establishment”.

The employment of persons additional to the establishment shall not exceed 12 consecutive calendar months unless otherwise directed by the MPSA. Requests made for the extension or continuation of the employment for periods longer than 12 months, must be assessed against the original reasons for the employment of persons additional to the fixed establishment to reduce such expenditure if no longer necessary.

(iv) Posts in the Offices of Executive Authorities

Chapter 3 of the guide to Members of the Executive and regulation 66 of the Public Service Regulation (PSR), read in conjunction with section 9 of the Public Service Act (PSA) 1994, stipulates the standard configuration of Offices of executive authorities and the capacity requirements for such offices.

The DPSA has issued a circular informing government departments that appointment made to private office of Executive Authority or Deputy Minister in terms of Regulation 66 of the PSR should be linked to their term of office of the relevant Executive Authority or Deputy Minister.

(v) Granting of Early Retirement without penalty for employees between 55 and 60 years

Section 16(6) of the Public Service Act, 1994 as amended states that “an executive authority may at the request of an employee allow him or her to retire from the public service before reaching the age of 60, notwithstanding the absence of any reason for dismissal in terms of section 17(2) if sufficient reasons exist for the retirement”.

Granting of Early Retirement without penalty for employees is in response to a need identified by employees who wish to exist the public service before the official retirement age of 60 years.

The provision for applications for early retirement, where National Treasury provides funding support to departments, is limited to the period 01 April 2019 to 30 September 2019. An assessment will therefore be conducted to determine whether a further need for financial support for early Retirement is required by departments.

The DPSA and NT have between April and June 2019 concluded National, Provincial and Sectoral workshops with the relevant human resource officials to support implementation. In addition the requisite governance, financial and administrative tools, documentation and reporting templates have been issued to departments.

(vi) Decremental Budgets allocated for payment of Performance Bonus

Regulation 73(3) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that “the Minister shall from time to time determine a percentage of a department’s remuneration budget that shall not be exceeded for the purpose of granting performance rewards. This regulation is supported by regulation 73(4) which states that “the Minister shall from time to time determine the maximum percentage reward to be granted to an employee or category of employees”.

A strategy to decrease the percentage of a department’s allocated remuneration budget for the payment of performance rewards has been developed together with the National Treasury.

The approved Incentive Policy Framework (2017), provides that departments may not utilise more than 1.5% of their annual remuneration budget for the payment of performance rewards. The strategy decreases the budget allocation as follows:

Financial Year

Maximum % of Remuneration Budget

2018/19

1.5%

2019/20

0.75%

2020/21

0.5%

2021/22

0%

Post 2022

To be determined based on the comprehensive review of all PMDSs for all categories of employees

The above initiatives are envisaged to support government’s approach to manage the wage bill. The DPSA and NT monitor the public service wage expenditure to identify new and further areas for potential savings.

08 July 2019 - NW12

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What is the current total number of documented asylum seekers in the Republic and (b) from which countries are they?

Reply:

a) The total number of active asylum seekers (section 22 permit valid) as at 31 December 2018 is 184 976.

(b) They are from the following countries:

Countries

Total

Ethiopia

50135

DRC

34754

Bangladesh

27243

Zimbabwe

14861

Pakistan

9383

Congo

8626

Nigeria

6781

Burundi

6425

Uganda

4461

India

4267

Somalia

4152

Malawi

2175

Ghana

2032

Cameroon

1767

Kenya

1081

Rwanda

1015

Eritrea

978

Senegal

899

Niger

818

Mozambique

648

Tanzania

605

Zambia

264

Egypt

227

Ivory Coast

183

Algeria

167

China

126

Mali

120

Nepal

88

Liberia

70

Sudan

57

Benin

55

Lesotho

53

Guinea

52

Burkina Faso

44

Thailand

31

Togo

30

Syria

25

Comoros

23

Swaziland

17

Gabon

16

Afghanistan

16

Sierra Leone

15

Yemen

14

Bahamas

14

Sri Lanka

13

Palestine

12

Gambia

11

Guinea Bissau

10

Morocco

9

East Timor

8

Estonia

8

Angola

7

Iraq

6

Chad

6

Central African Republic

6

Jordan

6

Bahrain

5

Turkey

5

Ukraine

4

Botswana

3

Hungary

3

Mauritania

3

Other

3

Libya

3

Denmark

2

Jamaica

2

Madagascar

2

Malaysia

2

Venezuela

2

Mauritius

2

Iran

2

Solomon Islands

2

Paraguay

1

New Zealand

1

Namibia

1

Suriname

1

Azerbaijan

1

Colombia

1

Wallis and Futuna

1

Kyrgyzstan

1

Uruguay

1

Myanmar (Burma)

1

Bosnia

1

Ireland

1

Haiti

1

Russia

1

Barbados

1

Lebanon

1

Grand Total

184976

END

08 July 2019 - NW72

Profile picture: Pambo, Mr V

Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) What number of requests for asylum have been processed by his department in each of the past 10 financial years, (b) from which countries were the individuals whose asylum requests were granted and (c) what number of such requests is still outstanding?

Reply:

a) The total number of cases processed per year for the past 10 years (First instance adjudication):

Year

Total

2009

157 204

2010

77 071

2011

43 953

2012

63 228

2013

68 241

2014

75 733

2015

60 640

2016

41 241

2017

27 980

2018

18 104

b) The cases granted for the past 10 years per country according to the Departmental system is as below:

Country

Total

Somalia

36512

DRC

25953

Ethiopia

18022

Congo

4859

Zimbabwe

3432

Burundi

2774

Angola

2365

Eritrea

2096

Rwanda

1416

Bangladesh

563

Uganda

443

Cameroon

368

Kenya

143

Sudan

134

Zambia

69

Liberia

51

Syria

47

Palestine

41

Ivory Coast

37

Tanzania

32

Pakistan

28

Sierra Leone

19

Sri Lanka

15

Iraq

15

Russia

13

Togo

12

Nigeria

11

Ghana

11

Solomon Islands

10

Malawi

9

Swaziland

7

Central African Republic

7

Ukraine

7

Turkey

6

Egypt

6

Mali

6

India

6

Afghanistan

5

Other

5

Morocco

4

Estonia

4

Namibia

4

Yemen

3

Mozambique

3

Bulgaria

3

Myanmar (Burma)

3

Lebanon

3

Niger

3

Iran

3

Seychelles

3

China

2

Macau

2

Bahamas

2

Jordan

2

Gabon

2

Saint Kitts and Nevis

2

Comoros

2

Benin

2

Lesotho

2

Kyrgyzstan

1

Guinea Bissau

1

East Timor

1

Poland

1

Colombia

1

Brazil

1

Senegal

1

Chad

1

Oman

1

Algeria

1

Djibouti

1

Sweden

1

Cambodia

1

Libya

1

Principality of Andorra

1

Grand Total

99624

(c) As at 31 December 2018 there were 3 534 cases still to be processed by the Refugee Status Determination Officers.

END

08 July 2019 - NW121

Profile picture: McGluwa, Mr JJ

McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs:

(1) What are the basic requirements for asylum seekers to obtain a waiver certificate; (2) whether any personnel and/or agency is appointed to guide asylum seekers who want to legalise their stay in the Republic; if not, whether he will consider appointing such personnel and/or agency; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he can provide a detailed list of (a) the number of asylum centres and its addresses and contact details that currently exist in the Republic, (b) any and/or reasonable shelters that were erected and/or provided for asylum seekers by her department, (c) the number of asylum seekers and/or residency permit holders who have received full birth certificates and (d) asylum applications being rejected due to fraudulent documents; (4) whether any security personnel is provided at asylum centres; if so, (a) where and (b) what are the relevant details; (5) whether any difficulty in obtaining a full birth certificate for any asylum seeker has been eradicated; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The departmental legislation does not make provision for ‘waiver certificate’ as stated above. Rather, the department will issue an asylum transit visas to new asylum applicants that declare their intention to apply for asylum on arrival at designated ports of entry. The basic requirement is that a person must declare the intention to apply for asylum.

2. The department has personnel appointed at the Refugee Reception Centres for the above asked function in terms of section 8(2) that reads with section 21(1), (2) and (5) of the Refugee Act.

The United Nations High Commission for Refugee is the UN agency operating in South Africa with offices and implementing partners across the country that is also assisting new and existing asylum applicants through the asylum process. The agency is fully equipped and mandated to provide support to both clients and the department.

(3)(a) The department has five Refugee Reception Centres.

Addresses and contact details that currently exist in the Republic are as follows:

OFFICE

LOCATION

CENTRE MANAGER

CONTACT DETAILS

Cape Town Refugee Reception Office

5th Floor, Custom House, Corner Heerengracht & Table Boulevard Streets, Cape Town

Akos Essel

Phone: 021 421 9173 / 9200

Mobile:

Email: Akos.Essel@dha.gov.za

Desmond Tutu Refugee Reception Office

Corner Eskia Mphahlele & Struben Streets, Pretoria

Bangwalang Chiloane

Phone: 012 395 4174 / 4000 

Email: Bangwalang.Chiloane@dha.gov.za

Durban Refugee Reception Office

137 Che Guevara Street, Durban

Naleen Balgobind

Phone: 031 362 1201

Mobile:

Email: Naleen.Balgobind@dha.gov.za

Musina Refugee Reception Office

8 Harold Grenfel Street, Musina

Jimmy Malemela

Phone: 015 534 5300
Mobile: 083 852 0104

Port Elizabeth Refugee Reception Office

10A Gidbaud Road, Sydenham, Lakeside

Sabelo Ngxitho

Phone: 041 404 8361/ 3

Mobile:

Email Sabelo.Ngxitho@dha.gov.za

(3)(b) The department does not provide shelter to asylum seekers and refugees.

 

(3)(c) Asylum seekers and refugees are not issued with full birth certificates, rather a recognition of birth that must be taken to the centre for a full asylum permit.

(3)(d) This category of decision/rejection does not exist in the Refugee Act.

(4)(a) All Centres have security personnel.

(4)(b) Centres have private security in uniform 24 hours, whilst the Department’s security personnel are present during the day.

(5) There are no difficulties in registering children of asylum seekers born in South Africa. Asylum seekers are issued with recognition of birth document. It is the responsibility of the parents to take such document and submit them to the Refugee Reception Centre with immediate effect to allow their children proper registration and issuance of the asylum permit.

 

END

08 July 2019 - NW68

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

By what date will the new integrated Resource Plan be published?

Reply:

The Draft IRP is undergoing a consultation process with Nedlac. As soon as the process is completed and subject to the outcome of Cabinet, it will then be released.

08 July 2019 - NW83

Profile picture: Dlamini, Mr MM

Dlamini, Mr MM to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does his department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(aa (i) None

(aa) (ii) None

(aa) (iii) None

(bb) (i) 14 buildings

(bb) (ii)14 properties

(bb) (iii) 14 facilities

(b) (i) Value - Not applicable

(ii) The purpose of renting the properties is for office accommodation.

(c) The table below indicates the value, how long has each property been rented, from which building/property and monthly rental fee:

Number

(c) (i)

Period of rentals

(c) (ii)

Landlord of the property

(c) (iii)

Monthly rental fee

1.

01 April 2010

Mowana Properties -

Public Investment Corporation

R3,657,813.49

2.

01 November 2009

Old Mutual Properties

R414,363.57

3.

01 February 2009

JHI Properties - Atterbury

R417,359.25

4.

01 May 2009

X Vest Investment

R153,403.57

5.

01 November 2009

Olympic Flame

R534,650.77

6.

01 April 2009

Vaal University of Technology

R549,997.71

7.

01 April 2014

Park with Spark/ Interpark

R36,216.20

8.

01 March 2017

Redefine Properties

R265,436.54

9.

01 January 2016

Hopley Centre

R54,590.01

10.

01 January 2019

ELS Properties

R258,358.99

11.

01 January 2016

Mvulazana Trading

R387,802.42

12.

01 September 2015

Gritpop Investment

R248,533.78

13.

01 January 2016

JHI Properties

R339,938.91

14.

01 January 2017

Public Investment Corporation

R35,929.07

NCooperate Services DDG: Patricia amede Date:

         


Recommendedl

Director General : Department of Mineral Resources

Approved/ -

08 July 2019 - NW90

Profile picture: Mokause, Ms MO

Mokause, Ms MO to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What steps has his department taken to encourage the retraining of mine workers by mining companies in order to adjust to (a) automation and (b) new jobs?

Reply:

The MPRDA provides for submission of a Social and Labour Plan (SLP) which is one of the requirements of the granting criteria. The Human Resource Development (HRD) is one of the elements of the SLP. Its key objective is to ensure that mining right holders provides for training of employees and community workers. The training provided is aimed at improving the skills base such that productivity is improved. Furthermore companies must provide portable skills which prepares employees to compete in the broader labour market. In order to realise the HRD objective, mining right holders must invest a minimum 5% of leviable amount (excluding the statutory skills development levy) on essential skills development.

In the event that there might be threatening job losses, the mining right holders should identify and reskill workers with the objective of either adjusting to the new methods of working or competing in the labour market.

 

Recommendedl

Director General: Department of Mineral Resources

proved/

Mr Ma tasher

::

a:S::::

aIRD. ources

./2019

08 July 2019 - NW26

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) Whether, since the reply of the former Minister of Energy to question 556 on 19 March 2019, the forensic report has been finalised; if not, by that date will it be finalised; (2) what is the current actual (a) volume in barrels, (b) average cost in dollars per barrel and (c) valve of the country's strategic fuel reserve; (3) what are the details of the Strategic Fuel Fund's current actual policy relating to the rotation of the strategic fuel reserves; (4) (a) how often was a rotation of the strategic fuel reserve undertaken in the 2018-19 financial year and (b) what was the reason actually given for each rotation undertaken in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

 

  1. The Forensic Report has been completed and will 6e tabled before the Board of Directors of CEF for adoption and submission to the Minister.
  2. The assertion of government is that the:

  • volume in barrels is - 10 300 000 barrels of Crude Oil.
  • average cost in dollars per barrel is - $63.99
  • value of the counFy’s strategic fuel reserve currently is - Ma‹tet Value USD 659 Million

3.The Policy on Stock Rotation is being formulated

4. No stock rotation of strategic fuel reserve was undertaken in 20f8-19 financial year.

(b) (i) For 20\&17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial year them was no stock rotation.

08 July 2019 - NW14

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a) How does he intend to address the undocumented, migrant crisis and (b) what number of undocumented, illegal migrants have been repatriated (i) in the past year and (ii) to which countries?

Reply:

a) The department has an inspectorate unit which combats all forms of illegal migration. Improved biometric capability and more effective co-operation with other law enforcement agencies are amongst some of the efforts being improved on to combat illegal migration and department is also finalising the Border Management Authority Bill which will seek to strengthen efforts in preventing undocumented migrants from entering South Africa.

b) Attached is the list of undocumented migrants that have been deported and the countries they have been repatriated to.

END

05 July 2019 - NW194

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What are the details of the initiatives undertaken by the National Khoi and San Council in each province since its establishment to address its aims of (a) joining fellow African leaders and communities in the recognised legislative framework regulating traditional leadership in the Republic, (b) ensuring the recognition of the Khoi and San’s traditional knowledge to certain indigenous biological resources, (c) advocating for the (i) developmental and (ii) human rights concerns of the Khoi and San communities, (d) ensuring that the Khoisan languages become official languages and (e) addressing the historical issues relating to land of the Khoisan;\ (2) what has the Council found to be the five top issues or concerns raised by the Khoisan communities in each province?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW131

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the attached firearm audit of the City of Ekurhuleni (details furnished) where 382 firearms were reported missing or stolen, (a) what is the value of the missing and/or stolen firearms, (b) what are the names of the EMPD officers in whose possession the 382 firearms were reported missing or stolen; (2) whether all missing or stolen firearms were reported to the SA Police Service and cases opened; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what number of (a) the 382 firearms were used in criminal cases and (b) persons lost their lives in each case; (4) why is the report silent on the amount of ammunition that has gone missing or has been stolen?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW186

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What was the (a) approved and (b) actual spend for the maintenance budget of each region within the City of Ekurhuleni for the electrical network (i) in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (ii) for the 2018-19 financial years and (b) detailed spending including on orders placed, signed delivery notes and/or completion of work certificates and proof of payment; (2) whether any of the specified regional maintenance budgets were reduced for any of the regions over any of the three specified financial years; if so, (a) which regions were affected, (b) in which financial years and (c) what were the budgets reduced to?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW187

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)(a) What number of tenders were awarded by the City of Ekurhuleni for the supply of switchgear in the past three financial years, (b) who were the winning bidders in each case and (c) what was the value and length of the tender awarded in each case; (2) whether any of the above-mentioned tenders were reduced with regard to the length of the tender; if so, what (a) were the reasons in each case and (b) are the names of any company that benefited from these reductions? NW1145E

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW107

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether she can provide a detailed progress report regarding the back-dated payment of salaries to izinduna; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW185

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(a) What (i) preventative maintenance and (ii) routine maintenance is being conducted on electrical substations within the boundaries of the City of Ekurhuleni by the City and Eskom, (b) when last was each substation maintained by the City, (c) what is the frequency of the City’s maintenance actions and (d) what records or proof of such actions are being kept by the City?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW129

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the firearm audit of the City of Ekurhuleni (details furnished), (a) how often is the City of Ekurhuleni supposed to conduct an audit of its armoury and make it public and (b) who conducted the current audit; (2) what (a)(i) are the (aa) names and (ii) is the (bb) rank of each Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department (EMPD) officer who did not report for the audit and (b) action has been taken against each specified EMPD officer; (3) with regard to each identified problem in the audit, (a) who has been held accountable in each case and (b) what action has been taken against each specified person in each case; (4) what steps has her department taken to implement each recommendation?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you

05 July 2019 - NW130

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)With regard to the firearm audit of the City of Ekurhuleni (details furnished) where 357 firearms are unaccounted for, (a) what are the names of the Ekurhuleni Metro Police Department (EMPD) officers to whom each of the 357 unaccounted firearms were last assigned to, (b) what action has been taken against each specified EMPD officer and (c) how many of the specified firearms have been used in crimes; (2) what action has her department taken against the head of the armoury for the 357 cases of unaccounted firearms?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is not readily available in the Department. The information will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is available

Thank you