Questions and Replies

Filter by year

12 December 2019 - NW1162

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Defence incurred cost relating to the:

(a) Inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 to the amount of (i) RM13,962 for the following (ii);

(aa) Subsistence and travel cost related to ceremonial proceedings, safety and security as well as the provisioning of the Presidential Medical Unit – RM6,340.

(ab) Jet fuel for aircraft, gun salute rounds as well as fuel for operational vehicles deployed – RM5,620.

(ac) Catering provided on behalf of The Presidency, not related to the Department of Defence – RM2,002.

(b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019, to the amount of (i) RM2,491 for the following (ii);

(ba) Subsistence and travel cost related to ceremonial proceedings as well as the provisioning of perimeter protection – RM2,094

(bb) Jet fuel for aircraft, gun salute rounds as well as fuel for operational vehicles deployed – RM0,397.

12 December 2019 - NW1542

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Given the perceived sustainable serviceability of the Presidential BBJ, Inkwazi, why did the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, use a chartered aircraft with tail or registration number ZS-KDR to attend the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan; (2) (a) what was the total cost for chartering the private aircraft and (b) from which budget item in the budget of the Department of Defence will this be funded; (3) whether Inkwazi is out of service; if so, (a) what are the reasons for its unserviceability and (b) by what date will it be returned to actively transport the President?

Reply:

The question requires a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence as it relates to the security and movements of the VVIP.

05 December 2019 - NW1501

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What number of luxury vehicles exceeding R600 000 were purchased by the SA National Defence Force for senior management in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17, (d) 2017-18 and (e) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what was the total cost of the specified luxury vehicles in each specified financial year; (3) what (a) make, (b) model and (c) quantity of each type of luxury vehicle was purchased in each financial year; (4) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. No luxury vehicles exceeding R600 000 were purchased by the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) in the 2014-15 to 2016-17 financial years. Twenty luxury vehicles were procured in the 2017-18 financial year, and two vehicles were procured in the 2018-19 financial year.

2. The total cost of the specified luxury vehicles in each specified financial year is as indicated in Enclosure 1.

3. The (a) make, (b) model and (c) quantity of each type of luxury vehicle is as indicated in Enclosure 1.

Enclosure 1

SER NO

FINANCIAL YEAR

NUMBER OF VEHICLES PROCURED

1

2014/15

NIL

2

2015/16

NIL

3

2016/17

NIL

4

2017/18

20

   

VEHICLE MAKE AND MODEL

COST

SERVICE/DIVISION

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R1, 027, 804. 00

Joint Operations Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R1, 027, 804. 00

Joint Operations Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R1, 027, 804. 00

Joint Operations Division

   

Audi 6

R 631, 365.06

Joint Operations Division

   

BMW 540i

R 831, 976. 80

Joint Operations Division

   

BMW X5

R 916, 883. 50

SA Army

   

BMW X5

R 916, 883. 50

SA Army

   

BMW330D

R 635, 200. 00

SA Military Health Services

   

BMW X5

R 947, 633. 50

SA Military Health Services

   

BMW 540i

R 849, 526. 80

SA Military Health Services

   

BMW750i

R 1, 683, 811. 04

Logistics Division

   

BMW750i

R 1, 559, 340. 00

Logistics Division

   

Audi Q7

R 964, 723. 11

Logistics Division

   

Audi Q7

R 964, 723. 11

Logistics Division

   

Audi Q7

R 964, 723. 11

Logistics Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R 812, 574. 00

Logistics Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R 812, 574. 00

Logistics Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R 812, 574. 00

Logistics Division

   

Mercedes Benz V2500 7 Seated

R 812, 574. 00

Logistics Division

   

BMW 540i

R 823, 326.80

Defence Intelligence Division

     

R19, 023824.33

 

5

2018/19

2

   

BMW520i

R 651, 862. 47

Defence Foreign Relations

   

BMW540i

R 812, 563. 87

Defence Foreign Relations

     

R 1, 464, 426. 34

 
   

GRAND TOTAL

R20, 488, 250. 67

 

05 December 2019 - NW1096

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed of the poor state of maintenance of the properties and infrastructure in the Thaba Tshwane military base in Centurion; (2) whether any plans have been put in place to address the poor state of maintenance of the properties and infrastructure in the specified base; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans is well informed of the poor condition of facilities in the Thaba Tshwane military base in Centurion, which is a serious matter of concern to her. Cognisance must be taken that Thaba Tshwane was built on dolomite land, and with virtually no upgrade or renovations during the last two decades due to predominantly a lack of funds and a huge backlog of maintenance and repair, poses serious structural maintenance problems for both the Department of Defence (DOD) and Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

Buildings and land that the units occupy are managed and maintained by the DPWI, who is the custodian of state land and facilities and therefore responsible for the maintenance and repair of these facilities, however, partly the DOD is responsible for the failure to address poor maintenance of own properties and infrastructure, by not taking the initiative to repair its facilities on realising that DPWI is failing in its mandate. Repairs and renovations of sewer, storm water and roads, as well as sinkholes are in process to take place. A Facility Strategic Plan has been compiled with the Thaba Tshwane military area as one of the first priorities to be addressed. The Defence Works Formation is in the process to capacitate itself to be able to execute maintenance and repair work.

05 December 2019 - NW1226

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With regard to the deployment of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) under Operation Prosper for the period 18 July 2019 to 16 September 2019, (a) what amount of the approved budget of R23 million was spent in this period, (b) from which cost centre within the SANDF budget was the funding of the deployment sourced, (c) how was the average cost of R8 712,12 per person for each month determined and (d) what are the details and justification of the spending for each cost item; (2) whether the whole budget was spent; if not, (a) why was (i) it spent only on the confirmed deployed strength of 421 persons versus the approved strength of 1 320 persons and (ii) the remainder of the R23 million not utilised for the deployment of more companies and (b) what will happen with the unspent amount; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) An amount of Rm35, 963, 32 has already been spent against the projected Rm23.

(1)(b) Funding is done through reprioritisation within the departmental budget.

(1)(c) The allowance consists of Standby (R80.75), Danger (R15.58) and
Deprivation Allowances (R326.35) to the amount R12, 680.40. These allowance are taxable and therefore the members qualify for R8 084, 59 after tax depending on the member’s taxable income.

(1)(d) The allowances (Rm 14,5) are based on the number of deployed members multiplied by amounts stated in (1)(c). Of the Rm35,963, 32 , Rm4.5 will be paid for the purchase of showers and ablution facilities by the end of November and Rm4, 665,820, will be paid to the South African Air Force. Rm2,322,500 is for Fuel Oil and Lubricants (FOL) and Rm 9,975 for rations.

(2) The whole budget was spent as explained in (1)(a).

05 December 2019 - NW1322

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

In view of the fact that the National Treasury only approved a budget of R50 billion against a Defence Review driven budget requirement of R80 billion (details furnished), how does she account for the R1 billion already spent from the defence budget on the Cuban mechanics, known as Project Thusano, while it is common knowledge that the technical skills were available in the Republic and it was an ideal catalyst for the intake, job creation and providing of much-needed technical skills to young soldiers, thus adding to reducing the unemployment in the Republic and upskilling the soldiers of the SA National Defence Force?

Reply:

1. The figures as indicated above are inaccurate. The expenditure on Project Thusano is as indicated in the table below per financial year:

Ser No

Financial Year

Amount Spent

 

a

b

1

2015/16

R6 Million

2

2016/17

R144 Million

3

2017/18

R163 Million

4

2018/19

R261 Million

5

2019/20

R25 Million

 

Total Expenditure

R599 Million

2. The total expenditure of R599 million, minus the planned expenditure of R229 million over five years on the initial contract terms equals to R370 million. This is an insignificant escalation compared to savings and recovered funds over five years.

3. It is estimated that the Department of Defence (DOD) will save R1, 9 billion, plus R192 million (10% inflation), that equals to R2.1 billion over the period of five years of the contract, excluding the costs of, amongst others:

a) labour;

b) reduced spares;

c) repair of components;

d) spray painting for the J Ops Division;

e) maintenance and repair at Special Forces;

f) support to internal and external operations;

g) maintenance and repair at Infantry School, and

h) training and qualifying of one-thousand-one-hundred-and-eighty-one (1181) apprentices.

4. The above mentioned calculations are based on R384 million that was saved in the FYs 2014/15 and 2015/16 of the initial contract and inclusive of the current contracted period.

5. Vocational and technical skills that have been developed over the past three years came with not only college-text book-theory, but along with excellent work ethic that is military-operational results driven; which cannot be found in any civilian institution. A feeder system to this initiative by the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) is the Military Skills Development System (MSDS) recruitment, whereby youth is trained and employed every year; therefore in this case the project has indeed, and continues to contribute towards national objectives of creating sustainable jobs whilst imparting unparalleled skills development with a unique twist of excellent military operational work ethics.

6. Members of Parliament are invited to visit Project Thusano workshops to equate recovered and savings by observation on the ground, especially in the Department’s preservation facilities in Walmansthall (Pretoria) and De Brug (Bloemfontein).

04 December 2019 - NW1279

Profile picture: Gardee, Mr GA

Gardee, Mr GA to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has reinstated Lieutenant Colonel Babalo Mvithi according to the recommendations contained in the report of the Public Protector titled Allegations of failure by the South African National Defence Force to properly implement the recommendations of the Military Ombud in the case of Lieutenant Colonel Babalo Mvithi, Report 10 of 2017-18; if not, why not; if so, on what date did she reinstate the specified officer?

Reply:

On 27 November 2019, the North Gauteng High Court declared the report of the Public Protector (Report no 10 of 2017/18) unlawful and unconstitutional and declared that it has been reviewed and set aside in review proceedings brought by the Department of Defence. 

03 December 2019 - NW1288

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What total number of soldiers have (i) been diagnosed with mental health illness as a result of the nature of their work and (ii) committed suicide over the past five years and (b) what mental health programmes are there in her department to assist soldiers who suffer from mental illness?

Reply:

Mental disorder (Mental Health Illness) per se manifest in a wide range of conditions that affect mood, thinking and behaviour. The defined main groups are mood disorders (depression or bipolar disorder), personality disorders, psychotic disorders, eating disorders, trauma-related disorders (post-traumatic stress disorder) and substance abuse disorders. Given the complexity of the development and later manifestation of such disorders it is not possible to quantify the numbers that are involved without deep analysis of patient history per incident.

The suicide incidence is a problematic aspect. Suicides are classed as unnatural deaths and is therefore reverts to the state coroner for final classification. The cause of death coding is vague with most capturing indicated as “death unspecified”

All members have access to the full spectrum of clinicians in managing mental disorders. The SAHMS does have management and defusing programmes in place to render care after traumatic incidents and after every deployment. As mental health presents, more frequently than not, differently in individual, each individual group programmes are not commonly used.

Given the complexity of the clinical environment under discussion it would be prudent to do a complete study to be able to answer the question.

28 November 2019 - NW1122

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the unserviceability of SA Air Force (SAAF) aircraft, which is a problem made worse by the backlog of maintenance on the specified aircraft coupled with the challenges experienced by Denel, what (a) is her department doing to mitigate the challenges which, if not addressed urgently, might reduce the SAAF's capabilities to that of only a dismal Airwing status and (b) are the relevant details of the point at which certain types of aircraft will have to stop flying?

Reply:

a) Engagements between the Department of Defence and National Treasury are taking place to address the funding challenges of the SANDF in general. Capabilities will gradually come to a grinding stop if both State Owned Entities like Denel and the DOD are not adequately resources to fulfil on their various mandates. The decision to stop flying will be determined by airworthiness and aviation safety considerations. The SAAF has qualified personnel that monitor and certify aircraft airworthiness and safety.

27 November 2019 - NW949

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her answer to oral question 44 on 4 September 2019 in the National Assembly, what serious challenges does the SA Air Force have with (a) airlift capabilities and (b) the serviceability of our aged aircraft fleet, which is threatening the sovereignty of South Africa, in view of the fact that the essential aircraft maintenance was previously provided by Denel?

Reply:

 

a) The information requested in part (a) of this question refers to SANDF capabilities and can only be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence.

(b) Underfunding has a direct effect on:

  1. Denel Aeronautics losing key personnel
  2. The continual degradation of maintenance and repair capability and capacity has a pronounced effect on the Air Transport Fleet of the SAAF.
  3. Inability to fully fund all maintenance contracts has direct effect on survival of local industry like Denel ito the Maintenance and Repair Organisation (MRO) of the C130
  4. SAAF not fully funded to operate aged and new fleet

 

27 November 2019 - NW1225

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)In view of the absence of funding to provide for replacement, maintenance and upgrading of strategic defence assets and the soon-to-be-depleted Special Defence Account, (a) what does the (i) SA Army, (ii) SA Air Force and (iii) SA National Defence Force plan to do to stay relevant and be able to protect the integrity of the Republic and the safety of our citizens and (b) what are the contingency plans of the department in respect of deploying the army during disasters; (2) whether she has found that the (a) SA Army, (b) SA Air Force and (c) SA National Defence Force are able to (i) execute their operational mandates and (ii) sustain the Republic’s defence capabilities under the current funding levels?

Reply:

The question requires a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence as it relates to the ability of the Defence Force to execute its Constitutional mandate.

26 November 2019 - NW1466

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed of the complaint against the members of the SA National Defence Force by members of the community at Phongolo in KwaZulu-Natal (details furnished); if so, what action does she intend to take; if not, (2) whether she intends to institute an internal investigation; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what date will the investigation take place? NW2732E

Reply:

(1) The SANDF received a report of complaints from some community members of Phongolo in KZN with allegations of illegal house raids and searches that were conducted by members of the SANDF. The allegations central issue was the fact that the SANDF conducted the house raids illegally without the SAPS and or search warrants and are also alleged to have ill-treated some community members during the raids. The affected community members opened criminal cases at the local Police Station and laid charges of illegal conduct, theft and assault by these SANDF members.

(a) The SANDF duly responded by conducting an internal investigation and verifying these allegations and community complaints. The internal investigation found the allegations to be true and the complaints of the community members to be genuine.

(b) The SANDF will allow the legal process to take its course as per the criminal cases currently in the hands of the SAPS. The SANDF has already commenced with the internal Military Disciplinary processes on those involved and those found responsible will be dealt with accordingly and to ensure that such unbecoming conduct does not happen again.

The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans, and the SANDF, unreservedly condemns this unbecoming conduct by these members and condemns it in the strongest terms. This is not how we conduct our business and, we as the organisation charged with the responsibility to protect and defend the people of South Africa, tender our sincere apologies to the affected community members as well as to the entire community of the area of Phongola.

We can assure the citizens of this country that the SANDF members deployed to conduct operations are given the necessary training on all aspects relevant to their tasks during the conduct of operations. Furthermore, continuous training is conducted on the conduct and discipline expected of all members of the SANDF. We will not allow a few members to tarnish the good work done by the bulk of our dedicated and disciplined members.

As a consequence of this incident, the Minister of Defence has directed the CSANDF to ensure that effective disciplinary actions are undertaken against those found to have been responsible. Furthermore, the CSANDF is to ensure that effective measures are put in place to prevent similar incidents in future.

01 November 2019 - NW1227

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With the approved deployment of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) under Operation Prosper for a further period until 31 March 2020, (a) how was the approved budget of R64 127 000,00 and a strength of 1 322 determined, (b) from which cost centre within the SANDF budget will the deployment be funded, (c) how was the average cost of R8 084, 59 per person per month determined, (d) why is the average cost lower than for the previous period of deployment, (e) what are the details and justification of the spending for each of the cost items and (f) what are the merits and justifications for only deploying one extra company, thus a probable total deployment of only three companies compared to a potential deployment of six companies; (2) (a) why are the soldiers deployed under Operation Prosper still accommodated in hangers and not in proper sleeping facilities with bathrooms and (b)(i) by what date and (ii) how will this situation be redressed to accommodate the total deployment until 31 March 2020 in humane and similar facilities where they have been deployed from?

Reply:

The information requested relates to the operations on the ground of the SANDF troops deployed in the Western Cape and can only be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence due to its security sensitive nature.

29 October 2019 - NW680

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the media briefing by Lieutenant General Lindile Yam on 7 August 2019 (details furnished), (a) what plans (i) does she have to prevent the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) defence capabilities from total failure as implied by the specified person, (ii) have been developed to address the SANDF budget allocation and (iii) have been developed to downscale and rightsize her department and all the units of the SANDF to comply with the realistic defence requirements as determined by section 200 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, based on the realistic defence threats to and priorities of the Republic and (b) on what date will the plans be submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans?

Reply:

1. The prevention of the SANDF capabilities from declining further is entirely dependent on the budget allocation of the Defence Force, which has been decreasing at an alarming rate over the years with a negative impact of the entire capabilities.

2. The Defence Review 2015 has been developed has been developed with a plan to arrest the decline of the SANDF but unfortunately no funding has been received to attend to the declining capabilities of the SANDF.

3. The Defence Review 2015 is the defence policy document which has all the tenants of the requirements of the Defence Force. The defence has become progressively unsustainable in terms of declining defence allocations and have reached a point where the Republic must decide on the kind of Defence Force it wants and can afford.

14 October 2019 - NW577

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) What number of (a) security, (b) cleaning and (c) general worker personnel who work in buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure are employed through tenders obtained by their companies or third party service providers at Armscor; (2) What total amount does Armscor spend from their current budget on security, cleaning and general worker personnel who work in their buildings, facilities and all other infrastructure

Reply:

Total spend:

 

2017-18

2018-19

Cleaning

R 7,407,245

R 5,251,498

Security

R 8,146,346

R 1,833,180

Refer below for details.

14 October 2019 - NW1121

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to her reply to question 950 on 8 October 2019 and in view of the fact that the normal retirement age of members of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) is 60 years, (a) why has a certain person (name and details furnished) not gone on retirement and vacated the position, (b) is the specified person a full time member of the SANDF or acts as a reserve force member, (c) on what date will the specified person retire and (d) what is the (i) process and (ii) timelines for the appointment of a replacement commander?

Reply:

(a) Section 11 of the Defence Act, 2002 (Act No 42 of 2002), read with section 52(1) of the Act, makes provision for a uniformed member of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to serve in the regular force after reaching the statutory retirement age of 60 years for a period up to the age of 65 years on a contract. On 1 June 2016, the President extended the term of service of General Shoke for a period of 5 years.

(b) A regular force member.

(c) 31 May 2021

(d) Section 202(1) of the Constitution provides as follows: “The President as head of the national executive is Commander-in-Chief of the defence force, and must appoint the Military Command of the defence force”. Section 13(1) of the Defence Act, 2002 (Act No 42 of 2002), provides that the President must appoint the Chief of the South African National Defence Force (CSANDF).

08 October 2019 - NW950

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What number of generals who are currently serving in all arms of the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) are above the compulsory exit age of 60 years, given that 60 years is the compulsory retirement age for members of the SANDF, (b) what is the (i) the rank, (ii) name, (iii) age, (iv) entry and/or employment date of each specified general, (c) what are the reasons for allowing their continued service beyond the official exit age and (d) what are their actual exit and/or retiring dates of exit?

Reply:

Section 11 of the Defence Act, 2002 (Act No 42 of 2002), read with section 52(1) of the Act, makes provision for a uniformed member of the South African National Defence Force (SANDF) to serve in the regular force after reaching the statutory retirement age of 60 years for a period up to the age of 65 years on a contract.

30 September 2019 - NW679

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with reference to the dire financial position of the SA National Defence Force (details furnished), she has commissioned a new defence review based on the realistic defence requirements as determined by section 200 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) on what date will this new information be submitted to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans?

Reply:

1. No I have not commissioned a new Defence Review.

2. We have concluded that the Defence Review 2015 is, and remains, the National Policy on Defence and it should not be withdrawn. The bulk of the Defence Review 2015 remains valid and appropriate even though it was predicated on a steady-stream of improving defence allocation.3. 

3. Furthermore, we have concluded that I, as the Executive Authority responsible for Defence, must engage strongly with Cabinet and Parliament on the ever-declining defence allocation.

(a) This must include discussion, debate and resolution on the “Level of Ambition” that South Africa wants, including the shape and size of the Defence Force.

(b) The emerging security risks, contingencies and priorities that we require the Defence Force to be prepared for.

(c) The concomitant defence capabilities that we must fund and support.

26 September 2019 - NW951

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department will begin the acquisition process for urgently needed aircraft replacement for the (a) essential maritime patrol and reconnaissance capabilities at 35 Squadron, (b) essential cargo, logistical and personnel C130 carriers at 28 Squadron in support of the various operations and (c) essential helicopter capabilities, particularly of the Oryx and Rooivalk; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the steps she intends to take to provide the specified critically essential services?

Reply:

(a – c) No. The acquisition of main equipment to replace the aging fleet in the South African Air Force is inextricably linked to the budget allocation. There is currently no funding on the SCAMP to initiate the process for the acquisition process or to procure the replacement of the ageing fleet.

17 September 2019 - NW271

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

The Guide for Members of the Executive, dated 8 June 2019, distinguishes between private and administrative offices of the Executive.

a) R58 895 425

b)

Remuneration per annum at specified salary level

Salary level

Job title

Qualification

Job description

1251183

L 14

Chief of Staff

Bachelor of Social Science

Managing staffing and administration in the Ministry, as well as external and internal operations for the Minister/Ministry

1073202

L 13

Private Secretary

Masters in Business Administration

Manage the diary of the Minister, travel bookings and submissions

1073202

L 13

Medial Liaison Officer

Bachelors Degree

Spokesperson for the Minister

1269960

L 14

Community outreach officer

Matric / 15 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Manages special Ministerial projects and stakeholder management

895272

L 12

Assistant appointment secretary

Matric / 15 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Assist with the diary and bookings of the Minister

537432

L10

Secretary/receptionist

Matric / 17 years experience working in Ministries of Home Affairs, Correctional Services and Defence

Fulfil secretarial and receptionist duties

1105641

L13

Portfolio Coordinator

National Diploma: Public Relations

A post created for Ministers responsible for more than one portfolio – in this instance Defence and Military Veterans; including the following entities/Boards Armscor; Castle Control Board; Reserve Force Council; Defence Force Service Commission

16 September 2019 - NW791

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state-owned entities reporting to her went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

1)(a)(ii): (aa) 2016/2017 – R 19 768.57

(bb) 2017/2018 – R 0.00

(cc) 2018/2019 – R 0.00

(2)(b): for (i) 2016/2017 – R 12 768.57 (Independent Newspapers) and

R 7 000.00 (Ruben Richards Foundation)

(ii) 2017/2018 – nothing spent

(iii) 2018/2019 – nothing spent

(2)(c): for (i) 2016/2017 – nothing spent

(ii) 2017/2018 – nothing spent

(iii) 2018/2019 – nothing spent

MILITARY OMBUD

The Office of the Military Ombud incurred the following expenditure:

Ser No

Description

FY2016

FY2017

FY2018

 

a.

b.

c.

d.

1.

Advertisements: Recruitment

R360000.00

-

R480000.00

2.

Marketing Adverts

-

-

-

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

1 (a) Advertising Spent for Department of Military Veterans:

(aa) In 2016–17 was R 3 715 781, 51

(bb) In 2017-18 was R 2 626 847, 19

(cc) In 2018–19 was R 2 463 573, 20

REPLY:

DEFENCE FORCE SERVICE COMMISSION

1.  (a)(ii): (aa) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(bb) 2017/18 – nothing spent

(cc) 2018/19 – nothing spent

2. (b): (i) 2016/17 – Nothing Spent

(ii) 2017/18 – Nothing spent

(iii) 2018/19 – Nothing Spent

3. (c): (i) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(ii) 2017/18 – Nothing spent

(iii) 2018/19 – Nothing spent

 

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

Costing of Advertorials, Publications, Awareness Campaigns

2016

350 Years of the Castle of Goodhope: A year-long commemoration of the History of the Castle.

Armed Forces Day - Port Elizabeth: February 21, 2016

Recruitment

R4,878,248.93

2017

Centenary of the sinking of the SS Mendi (100 Years)

Armed Forces Day – Durban/Pietermaritzburg: February 21, 2017

MSDS Recruitment

R8, 539,139.24

2018

Minister of Defence Budget speech 2018

United Nations Peacekeepers Day

Return of the SS Mendi Bell

Centenary of Battle of Squarehill (100 Years)

Armed Forces Day – Kimberley: February 21, 2018

Notices – July 2018

Calling on Nominees for Defence Force Service Commission

R4, 547,874.00

2019

Minister of Defence Budget Speech 2019

Armed Forces Day – Cape Town: February 21 2013

Notices – Repeat May 2019

Calling on Nominees for the Defence Force Service Commission

R7,941.180.43

16 September 2019 - NW613

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD:

Question 613 (a)(ii): for (aaa) 2017/2018

(aa) Cleaning – nothing spent

(bb) Security – nothing spent

(cc) Gardening services – nothing spent

(a)(ii): for (bbb) 2018/2019

(aa) Cleaning – nothing spent

(bb) Security – nothing spent

(cc) Gardening services – nothing spent (kindly note that a service provider was appointed on 1 March 2019 through a Department of Defence process and funding at the cost of

 

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

REPLY

a) (i) During 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years, the Department of Military Veterans (DMV) spent R2 887 000.00 on Security Services utilizing a service provider named Red Alert. The Department did not utilize a service provider for both cleaning and gardening services.

(aaa) During 2017/18 financial year, DMV spent R1 448 000.00 on security services – service provider called Red Alert

(bbb) During 2018/19 financial year, DMV spent R1 439 000.00 on security services – service provider called Red Alert

(b) and (c) as per the below table, total amount paid per service provider per year is indicated

Services Provided

FY2017/18

 

FY2018/19

Service Provider

Cleaning

Nil

Nil

No service provider

Security

R1 448 000.00

R1 439 000.00

Red Alert

Gardening Services

Nil

Nil

No service provider

 

MILITARY OMBUD

The Office of the Military Ombud incurred the following expenditure:

 

Ser No

Description

FY2017/18

FY2018/19

a.

b.

c.

1.

Cleaning Services

R214,310.58

R253,275.66

2.

Security Services (Property)

-

R93,150.00

3.

Gardening Services

-

-

 

 

DEFENCE FORCE SERVICE COMMISSION

REPLY

(a) (ii): (aa) 2016/17 – Nothing spent

(bb) 2017/18 – Nothing Spent

(cc) 2018/19 – Nothing Spent

b)         Nothing

c)         Nothing

                       

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

REPLY:

  1. The Logistics Division (Directorate Procurement Management) obtained the data from State Information Technology Agency (SITA), through the office of Director Budget Control (DBC) at the Finance Management Division (FMD). Transactions paid by cash account system (CAS) are excluded, as neither the Finance Management System (FMS) nor any other system in the Department of Defence (DOD) makes provision for the retrieving/obtaining of such information. The amount spent by the DOD on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017/18 and (bbb) 2018/19 financial years is as indicated in Appendix A. The amount that was paid to each service provider for to provide each specified service is indicated in Appendix B and the total amount that was paid to each of the service providers is as indicated in Appendix C.

ARMSCOR

REPLY

06 September 2019 - NW737

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

a) The department didn’t host any event related to the 2019 budget vote

b) No gifts were distributed.

02 September 2019 - NW491

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Why was the deployment of troops only authorise for a two-month deployment instead of the several requests for a three-month deployment of soldiers in the Cape flats, Cape Town, (b) why were only about 400 soldiers deployed while the President authorised 1320 soldiers for deployment and (c) how will the R23 million authorised for the deployment be spent; (2) was the R23 million provided for in the existing budget of her department and the SA National Defence Force; if not, (a) how and (b) from where will the R23million be funded; if so, what will be the impact on the already underfunded budget?

Reply:

1. (a) The duration of the employment was decided upon following consultation with all relevant stakeholders.

(b) The Presidential Minute and the letters sent to Parliament indicated the employment of a total of 1320 soldiers, but for operational reasons the commanders can utilise the number of soldiers required at any given time during the operation.

(c) On allowances and operational support.

2. No

(a) and (b) through a reprioritisation with the existing budget allocation of the Department.

30 August 2019 - NW490

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the name changes of the Reserve Force Units, (a)(i) what was the costs related to the name change process to date and (ii) from which budget allocation was the process funded and (b)(i) what will the financial costs be related to the (aa) changing of names, (bb) new insignia including beret/cap badges and (cc) flashes as well as colours and (ii) from which budget allocation will this be funded; (2) is this a higher priority expense as compared to the expense to increase troops and resources deployed to our land borders and the replacement of essential SA National Defence Force equipment; if not, why is this expenses still prioritised over the essentially required expenses?

Reply:

1. a (i) No additional costs were incurred since the start of the name review process because information briefs and guidelines provided for the process, were issued during the normal scheduled meetings with SA Army Formations and Units. Furthermore, detailed instructions and guidelines were also issued as part of the normal processes in the SA Army.

(ii) The process was funded from the normal command and control budget without any additional costs allocated for the name review process.

b. It is estimated that the total cost to implement the approved Name Review Process will be Rm8. This includes new insignia beret/cap badges, colours as well as other requirements for example signage etc. This objective is currently one of the many lower priority unfunded objectives of the SA Army. The implementation of the Name Review Process will be phased in over a three-year period, as and when funds become available.

2. This is not a higher priority expense compared to the expense of increased troops and resources deployed to our land borders and the replacement of essential SANDF equipment. That is why this objective is currently indicated as unfunded. It will be phased in over a three-year period as and when funds become available.

This objective must be seen as a transformational imperative that is long outstanding. Although it cannot be phased in immediately due to budget constraints, just the mere fact that these new names have been approved in principle will contribute to unit cohesion and ensure that the rich and diverse military history of South Africa is now reflected in a balanced way. It was the aim of the name review process to address this omission in a sensible and innovative manner, without any additional costs, where in stakeholders were consulted over the past 5 years.

30 August 2019 - NW492

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether refunds from the United Nations are based on actual strength in the form of soldiers and equipment instead of the serviceability of deployed equipment as was reported to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans (details furnished); (2) whether she has found that the United Nations Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo secured and/or ring-fenced a refund for her department or the SA National Defence Force; if so, what are the costs and comparable revenue amounts for the past five financial years?

Reply:

1. The United Nations reimbursement is based on actual strength of personnel on the ground and the serviceability of equipment deployed. If a vehicle is not serviceable during Contingent Own Equipment (COE) inspection, a penalty is levelled against the vehicle and the would be drivers and supporting staff of the vehicle also. (For example serviceability of the vehicle can be questioned as a result of a missing mirror or fire extinguisher).

2. To date claims made to the United Nations amount to RM840 that includes flying hours, manpower and amunitionThe following depicts the comparable re venue amounts for the past five financial years:

Ser No

Year

Paid

Refund

a

b

c

d

01.

2014

1 155 767 612

356 088 658

02.

2015

1 035 291 166

451 096 017

03.

2016

985 927 629

887 227 546

04.

2017

886 945 063

509 547 709

05.

2018

820 494 657

320 612 050

08 August 2019 - NW356

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case

Reply:

We are not able to quantify information on the future related to official trips for both the Minister and the Deputy Minister of Defence and Military Veterans. All the international trips are undertaken as per invitation from host countries and serve a specific purpose in relation to the responsibilities and/or tasks assigned to the Executive Authority by the President of the Republic of South Africa.

05 August 2019 - NW149

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

In light of the shooting incident that recently took place along the border in the area of Ndumo in KwaZulu-Natal between South African soldiers and Mozambican Border Police resulting in the death of two Mozambican border police officials, what does she intend to do (a) with the findings of the board of inquiry’s investigation, (b) with the South African soldiers who are found to be involved in something untoward in respect of the incident and (c) in order to ease tensions and resume good relations between the two countries?

Reply:

1. (a) A Joint Multinational Board of Inquiry (BOI) was convened where the representatives of the respective countries involved will investigate the shooting incident. The agreed upon target date for the completion of the BOI is 30 July 2019. The normal legal process will be followed thereafter to ensure that the findings will be implemented.

(a) As this matter is sub judice at this stage, till the completion of the BOI, this question cannot be answered, but it needs to be mentioned that all members will be dealt with in accordance with the findings and recommendations of the BOI.

(b) With the SANDF agreeing to convene a Multinational Board of Inquiry to investigate the incident, it demonstrates the intention to be completely transparent and not to cover up any wrongdoing on the side of the SANDF members that resulted in the sad incident. This approach is believed to contribute and to ensure continued good relations between the two countries.

30 July 2019 - NW145

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether, with regard to the current and future plans to roll out a 5G network, a term used to reference the next generation of high-speed mobile networks, she has been informed of the potential risks to humans when the specified technology is turned into use for weapons; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has any plans in place to ensure that the technology will not be used against the Republic’s civilians; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plans?

Reply:

  • S/No
  • 5G Network
  • Service Provider/s
  • Monetary Value
  • Remarks
 

a.

b.

c.

d.

1

The current and future plans to roll out a 5G Network, a terms used to reference the next generation of high- speed mobile networks. She has been informed of the potential risks to humans when the specified technology is turned into use of weapons; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details.

None

None

The Department of Defence (DOD) is not rolling out nor planning to roll out any cellular network technologies including 5G in the foreseeable future. Currently the DOD is only a user of the cellular systems and services through Telkom, Vodacom, MTN, and Cell C.

       

The custodian of the roll out of 5G network resides in the Department of Telecommunications & Postal Services and thus that department is responsible for the total scope of the threat assessment, risk management and related counter measures across the entire scope of the network sphere in the

entire country”.

2

Whether she has any plans in place to ensure that the technology will not be used against the Republic’s civilians; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plans?

None

None

The DOD is aware of the identified dangers and risks pertaining to the 5G technology roll-out. It is the DOD policy to invest only on tested and matured

technologies that are safe in accordance to international best practices.

30 July 2019 - NW208

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(a) According to the Department of Defence policies on Leave of Absence; (i.e. DODI/PERS/18/2000 Edition No: 3A and DODI/POL&PLAN/00036/2001 Edition No 2) a member has 36 working days normal sick leave in a three-year cycle where after a member is entitled to temporary and permanent incapacity leave. The previous sick leave cycle started on 01 January 2016 and ended on 31 December 2018. A total of 5 290 DOD officials were on extended periods of sick leave over the period 01 January 2018 to 31 December 2018.

(b) The estimated cost of the extended sick leave for the reporting period is R123 110 000.

 

30 July 2019 - NW207

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What is the total number of vacancies in (i) her department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to her and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The strength for the FY2019/20 of the Department of Defence (DOD) is 74,901. The strength at 30 June 2019 was 74,053. The vacancy rate at 30 June 2019 was 848 (military and civilian).

(b) The military posts will be filled in January 2020 with the annual Military Skills Development Intake and the civilian posts are advertised and filled according the Department of Public Service and Administration processes.

 

30 July 2019 - NW59

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property, (c) for how long has each property been rented and (d) from whom is each property rented?

Reply:

1. (a) The Minister of Defence and Military Veterans has under her custodianship seven thousand one hundred and fifteen buildings, fifty eight properties (land portions) and one hundred and forty six facilities.

More work is being done to determine the value and the purpose for which each one is used.

 

18 April 2019 - NW33

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has been informed of allegations that persons are being recruited and promised employment in the SA Navy without it materialising; if not, will she institute an investigation into the allegations; if so, what steps has she taken to address the allegations?

Reply:

No. We would be in a position to conduct an investigation upon receipt of a formal complaint.

18 April 2019 - NW658

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) What number of claims were brought separately against the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) during the past five financial years by landowners who suffered damages due to fires caused by the SANDF and (b) what was the monetary value of each claim; (2) what (a) number of stated claims were paid out in each financial year and (b) was the monetary value of the settlement in each case; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) One, in 2018

(b) Eight Hundred and Seventy Thousand Seven Hundred and Six Rand Eighty Five Cents (R870 706.85).

2. (a) Nil, as parties are still negotiating on possible settlement.

(b) Nil, same as sub-paragraph (a).

3. No, as the matter is sub judicae

18 April 2019 - NW418

Profile picture: Madisha, Mr WM

Madisha, Mr WM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What are the reasons that informed the decision of the Department of Military Veterans to withdraw participation and financial support to an SAS Mendi memorial service in Cape Town by the Gunners Association and (b) what is her official position regarding this decision and the reasons advanced for the withdrawal of support?

Reply:

a) The Department of Military Veterans supports all military veterans associations as represented in the South African National Military Veterans Association (SANMVA). The Gunners Association is represented by the Council of Military Veterans Organisation (CMVO) which is part of SANMVA, and therefore has not withdrawn any support.

b) The Ministry of Defence and Military Veteran has not withdrawn any support and therefore there are no reasons to specify.

02 April 2019 - NW660

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What number of (a) firearms and (b) ammunition of each (i) type and (ii) calibre were (aa) stolen and (bb) lost in the SA National Defence Force (aaa) during the periods (aaaa) 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017 and (bbbb) 1 April 2017 to 31 March 2018 and (bbb) since 1 April 2018; (2) whether her department had instituted any prosecution and taken disciplinary action; if not, why not; if so, against how many persons and what the steps were?

Reply:

660 (1&2) (a)(i) (ii)(aa) (bb)(aaa)(aaaa) - 1 April 2016 until 31 March 2017

Weapons

Manufacture

Any other lethal objects

Action taken

 

Type

Calibre

Stolen

Lost

 

a

b

c

e

f

g

Pistol

Star

9mm

None

One (1)

Kroonstad Legsato on 04/09/2018 awaiting trial date

Pistol

Z88

9mm

One (1)

None

Bloemfontein Court for trial on 30/04/2019

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

One (1)

Member was found guilty in Military Court sentence to 12 Months in Detention Barracks

Launch Grenades

Hand Grenades

40mm

Thirty Six (36)

None

Two members was found guilty and sentence for 42 years in prison

Uzi Machine Guns

Uzi Machine Guns

9mm

Four (4)

None

Two members was found guilty and sentence for 42 years in prison

The person that bought the weapons was sentence to One (1) year in prison

Rifle

R 5

5.56mm

One(1)

None

Case docket still under investigation

Pistol

Z88

9mm

One(1)

None

The accused was found guilty and received a fine of R 4000.00 and 2 years imprisonment suspended for a period of 3 years.

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

One(1)

None

The member was found guilty and was fined R 5000.00.

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

Three (3)

On 13 August 2018 Accused No1 was found guilty for the theft of firearm and was sentence for two years. Accused No2 and 3 were found guilty on Negligent Loss of Negligent and sentence to repay the value of the firearm.

Pistol

Z88

9mm

None

One(1)

Case docket still under investigation

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

Four(4)

Case docket still under investigation

Pistol

Z88

9mm

None

Six (6)

Case docket at Pretoria Regional Court for decision.

Pistol

Clock

9mm

None

One(1)

The accused was found guilty and fined of R 2000.00

660 (1&2) (b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb) (aaa)(aaaa) - 1 April 2016 to 31 March 2017

Ammunition

Manufacture

Any other lethal objects

Action taken

 

Type

Calibre

Stolen

Lost

 

a

b

c

e

f

g

Small calibre ammunition

R 4

5.56mm

Two Thousand Seven Hundred (2700) Rounds

None

Still under investigation for Sec 204 Application

Small calibre ammunition

R 4

5.56mm

Thirty (30) Rounds

None

Case still under investigation

Small calibre ammunition

R 4

5.56mm

Three Thousand (3000) Rounds

None

Case trail date is 07/05/2019 at Krugersdorp Magistrate Court

Small calibre ammunition

R 4

5.56mm

One thousand one hundred and Seventy Three (1173) Rounds

None

Accused was charged and case post phoned until 04 April 2019.

660 (1&2) (a)(i) (ii)(aa) (bb)(aaa)(bbbb) - 1 April 2017 until 31 March 2018

Weapons

Manufacture

Any other lethal objects

Action taken

 

Type

Calibre

Stolen

Lost

 

a

b

c

e

f

g

Pistol

Baretta

9mm

Three (3)

None

Pistols circulated on CAS.

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

One(1)

Member found guilty in Military Court and was fined

R1000.00

(One Thousand Rand)

Rifle

R 5

5.56mm

None

One (1)

Case docket at Bloemfontein Legsato on 09/11/2017 awaiting trial date.

Rifles

R 4

5.56mm

Six (6)

None

On 06 August the six accused was found not guilty at Cape Town Legsato

Pistol

Sig Sauer

9mm

One(1)

None

Case docket investigation finalised handed over to Legsato Langebaan on 19 March 2019

Pistol

Star

9mm

One(1)

None

Member was found guilty and discharged from the SANDF.

Pistol

Baretta

9mm

One (1)

None

Member will appear in court on the 08 April 2019.

Pistol

Z88

9mm

One (1)

None

The firearm was recovered still under investigation the two(2) civilian members that was involved was sentence to Five(5) years imprisonment.

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

Three (3)

None

Case docket still under investigation

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

One (1)

None

Case docket still under investigation

Pistol

Clock Pistol

9mm

None

One(1)

Accused was found guilty and fined R 3000.00 (Three Thousand Rand.)

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

One(1)

Case docket to Court for decision.

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

One(1)

None

Docket at Court suspect send for psychological evaluation.

Rifle

R 5

5.56mm

None

One(1)

Case referred back to IO for further instructions to be executed from Prosecutor at Pretoria Regional Court

Rifle

R 5

5.56mm

None

Two(2)

Case docket still under investigation

Pistol

Z88

9mm

None

Two(2)

Case docket still under investigation

Small calibre ammunition

R 5 Rifle Ammunition

5.56mm

Hundred and Fifty Five (155) Rounds

None

Awaiting report from Welkom SAPS.

Small calibre ammunition

LMG Rifle Ammunition

7.62mm

Four (4)Rounds

None

Awaiting report from Welkom SAPS.

Small calibre ammunition

R 4 Rifle ammunition

5.56mm

Sixty (60) Rounds

None

On 06 August the six accused was found not guilty at Cape Town Legsato

660 (1&2) (a)(i) (ii)(aa) (bb)(aaa)(bbb) - 1 April 2018 to current date

Weapons

Manufacture

Any other lethal objects

Action taken

 

Type

Calibre

Stolen

Lost

 

a

b

c

e

f

g

Pistol

Star

9mm

Two(2)

None

Case still under investigation.

Pistol

Star

9mm

One (1)

None

Case still under investigation

Pistol

Z 88

9mm

None

One(1)

Weapon was recovered no suspect case still under investigation

Rifle

R 4

5.56mm

None

Three(3)

Case still under investigation.

660 (1&2) (b)(i)(ii)(aa)(bb) (aaa)(bbb) - 1 April 2018 to current date

Ammunition

Manufacture

Any other lethal objects

Action taken

 

Type

Calibre

Stolen

Lost

 

a

b

c

e

f

g

Small calibre ammunition

Z88

9mm

Seven (7) Rounds

None

Case docket still under investigation

Small calibre ammunition

R4

5.56mm

None

Two Hundred and Ten (210) Rounds

Undetected not enough evidence found for prosecution

Small calibre ammunition

R4

5.56mm

Hundred and Twenty (120) Rounds

None

One member was found guilty Discharge from the SANDF

Small calibre ammunition

R 4

5.56mm

None

Two Hundred and Ten (210)

Rounds

Case reopened against one member for further investigation

12 March 2019 - NW260

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

1) Tender briefings held in 2018 are as follows:

(a) Simons’ Town Procurement Service Centre – 60 tender briefings.

(b) Central Procurement Service Centre – 69 tender briefings.

2) All briefings were compulsory.

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

The Department of Military Veterans had no tender briefings held in 2018.

OFFICE OF THE MILITARY OMBUD

The office of the Military Ombud did not hold any tender briefings in 2018.

ARMSCOR

Armscor held 10 tender briefings in 2018. One (1) was a published tender bid with a compulsory bidders briefing and nine (9) bids were published with non-compulsory bidders’ briefings.

DFSC

The DFSC did not hold any tenders briefings in 2018.

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

The Castle Control Board (CCB) did not hold any tenders briefings in 2018

12 March 2019 - NW610

Profile picture: Atkinson, Mr P

Atkinson, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I am not in a position to respond to this question as there are no details furnished with regards to the company referred to in the Parliamentary Question.

07 March 2019 - NW43

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has ever done an audit to determine the number of former SA Defence Force members who are currently serving in the SA National Defence Force; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the audit findings?

Reply:

The SANDF is the result of the successful integration of statutory and non-statutory forces during the 1990’s.  It is one of the best examples of integration in South Africa following our liberation struggle and those who integrated undertook to defend the country and sacrifice their lives in the ultimate confirmation of patriotism.  I will therefore not provide a response that seeks to break the SANDF down into individual components, whereas the SANDF represents a unified force and a unified South Africa. 

07 March 2019 - NW416

Profile picture: Carter, Ms D

Carter, Ms D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What SA National Defence Force (i) equipment and (ii) manpower were utilised in the 2019 Armed Forces Day, (b) from where was the specified equipment and manpower deployed, (c) what was the total cost of the 2019 event and (d) how is this cost justified against the objectives and intended outcomes of the event?

Reply:

(a) All SANDF capabilities were utilised.

(b) From various units of the SANDF in the country

(c) The total costs relating to the activities and exercises of the 2019 Armed Forces Day cannot be disclosed currently as the Department is busy with reconciliation of all the expenses related to the Armed Forces Day.

(d) In 2012, the former President of the Republic of South Africa, His Excellency JG Zuma declared the 21 February of every year as Armed Forces Day which coincide with the sinking of the SS Mendi 101 years ago.

The proclamation has since seen the defence force holding this celebration of Armed Forces Day and commemoration of the tragic sinking of the SS Mendi.

In addition, this event is also used to test the ability of the SANDF to mobilise and move equipment and manpower to defend the country from any position in accordance to the doctrine.

07 March 2019 - NW308

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Mr EM

Buthelezi, Mr EM to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1) (a) What was the total cost of the activities and exercises relating to Armed Forces Day, (b) what number of active members of the SA National Defence Force were deployed to the City of Cape Town for this project and (c) who authorised the activities and exercises; (2) whether an environmental impact study was conducted before commencing with the exercises; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The total costs relating to the activities and exercises of the 2019 Armed Forces Day cannot be disclosed currently as the Department is busy with reconciliation of all the expenses related to the Armed Forces Day.

(2) Environmental studies are conducted by our environmental division and environmental officials of the local authorities where the event will take place, and we always abide by the stringent bi-laws of each given municipality on environmental matters.

06 March 2019 - NW124

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

We do not have any former Ministers or Deputy Ministers for the time periods requested as the current appointees hold their portfolios since before the dates mentioned in the question.

05 March 2019 - NW66

Profile picture: Mokoena, Mr L

Mokoena, Mr L to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether she has been informed that she has been implicated in testimony made under oath and in written documents by Mr Agrizzi at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, chaired by Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo; if so, were the allegations made by Mr Agrizzi in respect of her true; (2) whether she declared any financial or material gifts from Bosasa as required by the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. I have not been informed by the Commission that evidence has been or will be led.

2. In 2009, in response to Parliamentary question 1661, I confirmed that I am a founding member of Dyambu and that I have always declared this in the Register of Members’ Interests. I further indicated that I have not received any dividends from Dyambu and that I have declared such in either the public or private part of the Register of Members’ Interests over the years. I have continued to declare same in both the Parliamentary register, as well as the Register of Member’s Interests of the Presidency.

04 March 2019 - NW25

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Does the National Codification Bureau employ certain persons (names furnished); if so, (a) in what position is each specified person employed, (b) were the positions advertised, (c) what are the qualifications of each person, (d) what salary level is each person currently getting paid on, (e) on what date was each person appointed and (f) who approved the appointment of each person; (2) are any of the specified persons relatives of other employees of her department; if so, who?

Reply:

(1) Yes; the National Codification Bureau employed contractors between year 2015, 2016, and 2018 respectively. The total amount of contractors employed is 71.

a) The persons specified are currently utilised as codifiers since they were all trained for the codification environment.

b) No; the positions were not advertised since in line with the provision of the Department of Defence Instruction C PERS NO 89/99 the advertisement of contract positions within the Department of Defence is not regulated.

c) Contracted members qualification in various fields are as follows:

i. Honours (1)

ii. National Diploma (18)

iii. N4 (2)

iv. N5 (1)

v. N6 (3)

vi. Matric (46)

d) Salary Lev 7 (47), Salary lev 8 (23) and Salary Lev 9(1).

e) The appointment of contract workers took place in the following dates:

i. 01 October 2015 – 37 casual workers were appointed.

ii. 01 April 2016 – 3 casual workers were appointed.

iii. 01 February 2018 – 31 casual workers were appointed.

f) The Chief of the Division approved all appointments of contract workers.

(2) Seven (7) are related to already retired military veterans and 3 are related to active members of the Department of Defence.

04 March 2019 - NW55

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What number of grant applications for military veterans is waiting to be processed?

Reply:

The Department of Military Veterans does not disburse grants to military veterans.

14 February 2019 - NW30

Profile picture: Rawula, Mr T

Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) On what date was the information technology (IT) infrastructure of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her last upgraded or updated, (b) what is the name of the company contracted to do the upgrades, (c) what was the monetary value of the contract and (d) what is the name of each IT system that was upgraded; (2) what is the (a) name of the company that is currently responsible for the maintenance of the IT systems of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her and (b) monetary value of the contract?

Reply:

Ser

no

ICT Systems Upgraded or Updated

Service Provider/s

Monetary Value

Remarks

 

a.

b.

c.

d.

1

Upgrade the DOD IBM Central Computing Platforms at the DOD Secondary- and Primary Data Centres.

SITA & IBM

Rm 35,803

Activity initiated during 2017 and completed mid-2018.

2

Procurement of a Hyper Converged Infrastructure for the DOD Secondary- and Primary Data Centres.

SITA and IT Agility

Rm 77,640

A three year contract with effect from the FY 2018/19.

3

Upgrade the DOD VMAX Storage Disk and communication switches for the DOD Secondary- and Primary Data Centres.

SITA and EMC

Rm 40,660

Activity initiated during 2017 and completed mid-2018.

4

Upgrading of the DOD Bankserv System.

SITA, Paytech, Koponong and Vivid Technologies

Rm 1.876

Initiated in 2016 and commissioned Aug 18.

5

 

Upgrading of the DOD Active Directory System.

 

SITA, XON and Microsoft SA

Rm 92,684

 

Requirement registered 19 Aug 14 and project completed 06 Aug 18.

6

The upgrading of the DOD National Telecommunication Back Bone Infrastructure.

XON

FY 2018/19-Rm 66.3      FY 2019/20-Rm 115,3         FY 2020/21-Rm 113,768 FY 2021/22-Rm 119 392

A four year contract with effect from the Financial Year 2018/19.

2.         What is the (a) name of the company that is currently responsible for the maintenance of the IT systems of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her and (b) monetary value of the contract?

 

REPLY:

See attached Appendix

14 February 2019 - NW21

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr P

Mhlongo, Mr P to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) number of co-operation agreements does the SA National Defence Force have with defence forces of other nations, (b) are the names of the specified nations and (c) are the details of each of the agreements?

Reply:

1. Please find herewith the written reply as follows:

a. Question a: What number of cooperation agreements does the SA National Defence Force have with defence forces of other nations?

Answer: Since 1994, the Department of Defence, on behalf of the South African Government has entered into 101 x binding international agreements with 63 x foreign governments, 1 x multilateral organisation (UN) and 1 x trilateral agreement (RSA, Mozambique, Tanzania) in terms of Section 231(3) of the Constitution of the RSA, No 108 of 1996 and which are currently all in force.

b. Questions b and c: What are the names of the specified countries and what are the details of each of the agreements?

Answer: (See below)

         

2

           

Serial No

Country / Org

 

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

           

1

Algeria

Agreement – Cooperation in the Field of Defence

Def Coop

22 Sep 00

10 yrs – extended for a further period

2

Angola

Protocol – Defence cooperation

Def Coop

17 Feb 05

5 yrs – automatically renewed unless terminated

3

Argentina

Agreement – Exchange of Information on Maritime Traffic

Exchange of Maritime Info

30 Aug 91

Open-ended

4

Argentina

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

20 Nov 10

Open-ended

5

Argentina

Additional Protocol – Protection of Classified Information exchanged between the Parties within the Framework of Defence Cooperation

Protection of Class Info

20 Nov 10

Open-ended

6

Argentina

Agreement – Peacetime Cooperation between their Respective Navies

Def Coop

Oct 97

Open-ended

7

Australia

Agreement – Reciprocal Protection of Classified Information of Defence Interest

Protection of Class Info

11 May 00

Review after every 5 yrs

8

Belarus

Agreement – Military-Technical Cooperation

Def Coop

29 Sep 06

5 yrs – automatically extended for 5 yrs periods

9

Belgium

Agreement – Military Partnership

Def Coop

28 Feb 06

Open-ended

10

Benin

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

24 Jun 08

Open-ended

11

Botswana

Technical Arrangement – Military Health Services Cooperation

Def Coop

2 Mar 11

Open-ended

12

Brazil

Agreement – Cooperation in Defence Related Matters

Def Coop

4 Jun 03

Open-ended

13

Bulgaria

Agreement – Cooperation in the Fields of Defence and Defence Technology

Def & Tech Coop

Jul 97

5 yrs – automatically remain in force after expiration

14

Burundi

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

11 Aug 11

5 yrs – automatically remains in force after expiration

15

Central African Republic

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

31 Dec 12

5 yrs – extended for successive 5 yrs period

16

Chile

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

11 Oct 06

5 yrs – automatically renewed

17

Rep of Congo (Brazzaville)

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

14 Apr 08

6 yrs – renewed automatically unless terminated

18

Cuba

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

10 Jan 12

Open-ended

19

Czech Republic

Arrangement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

9 Nov 99

Open-ended

           
           
         

3

           

Serial No

Country / Org

Name of Agreement

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

20

DRC

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

18 Jun 04

3 yrs – renewed automatically unless terminated by either party

21

DRC

MOU – Practical Assistance to the Government of the DRC on the Integration of the Armed Forces of the DRC in accordance with the Terms of the Defence Cooperation Agreement signed between them

Project Coop

18 Jun 04

3 yrs – renewed automatically

22

Ecuador

MOU – Defence-Industrial Cooperation

Def Ind Coop

3 Nov 11

Open-ended

23

Egypt

Protocol – Intelligence Cooperation

Int Coop

24 Jan 00

5 yrs – automatically renewed

24

Equatorial Guinea

Agreement – Cooperation on Defence and Security

Def Coop

16 Feb 04

In force unless terminated by either Party

25

Equatorial Guinea

Status of the SANDF Personnel and Associated Equipment present in the Territory of the Republic of Equatorial Guinea

SOFA

26 Jun 14

5 yrs – automatically renewed

26

Ethiopia

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

13 Feb 09

In force for period of 6 yrs – thereafter automatically renewed for 6 more yrs

27

Finland

MOU – Cooperation in the Fields of Defence Research, Development, Production and Procurement of Defence Equipment and Industrial Cooperation

Def Ind Coop

29 Nov 13

10 yrs

28

France

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

28 May 98

Open-ended

29

France

Security Agreement – Exchange of Classified Information in the Field of Defence

Protection of Def Related Info

31 Jul 01

Open-ended

30

Germany

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

4 Oct 96

Open-ended

31

Germany

Agreement – Cooperation in the Fields of Naval Defence Economy and Naval Technology

Def Coop

11 Sep 97

5 yrs – continue for successive periods of 1 yr

32

Germany

MOU – Exchange of Medical Personnel

Exchange of Personnel

13 Oct 96

Open-ended

33

Germany

Agreement – Conditions for the Reciprocal Provision of Support for Information and Working Visits

Bilateral Supp

23 Feb 98

Open-ended

34

Germany

Agreement – Reciprocal Provision of Health Care to Military Personnel in the Military Attaché Service

Bilateral Supp

23 Feb 98

Open-ended

           
         

4

           

Serial No

Country / Org

Name of Agreement

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

35

Germany

Agreement – Cooperation in the Field of Defence Economy and Defence Technology

Def Ind Coop

25 Jun 99

5 yrs – continue for successive period of 1 yr

36

Germany

MOU – Joint Execution of Helicopter Cross Deck Operations within the Scope of Maritime Cooperation

Trg Coop

29 Jan 03

Open-ended

37

Germany

Agreement – Provision of Equipment Aid

Bilateral Supp

5 Apr 02

Open-ended

38

Germany

Specific Arrangement – Training of Members of the RSA Armed Forces at Bundeswehr Facilities as Part of Military Training Assistance

Trg coop

12 Aug 02

Open-ended

39

Gabon

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

2 Nov 06

Automatically renewed after 5 yrs

40

Ghana

Agreement – Defence Training and Technical Cooperation

Def Coop

6 Oct 00

5 yrs – automatically renewed for further periods of 5 yrs

41

Guinea-Bissau

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

8 Aug 07

Open-ended

42

India

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

27 Sep 00

3 yrs – automatically renewed

43

India

Agreement – Supplies of Defence Equipment

Def Inc Coop

11 Dec 03

Open-ended

44

India

MOU – Training of SAN Personnel by the Indian navy

Trg Coop

8 Jun 06

Open-ended

45

Indonesia

MOU – Cooperative Activities in the Field of Defence

Def Coop

17 Mar 08

5 yrs – automatically renewed for another term

46

Iran

MOU – Cooperation in the Field of Defence

Def Coop

13 Dec 16

5 yrs – automatically renewed for another term

47

Italy

Agreement – Cooperation in the Field of Defence and Defence Equipment

Def & Def Equip Coop

12 Feb 18

 

48

Kuwait

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

15 Jul 02

5 yrs – automatically extended for successive terms of 2 yrs

49

Malawi

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

25 Feb 08

5 yrs – renewed automatically unless terminated

50

Malaysia

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

12 Nov 96

Open-ended

51

Malaysia

Agreement – Governing the Exchange and Protection of Classified Information in the Field of Defence

Protection of Class Info

26 Jun 97

Open-ended

52

Mali

Agreement – Defence and Technical Cooperation

Def & Def Ind Coop

3 May 05

Automatically renewed after 5 yrs for another 5 yrs

           
           
         

5

           

Serial No

Country / Org

Name of Agreement

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

53

Mozambique

MOU – Conduct of Combined Maritime Patrols within the Territory of the Republic of Mozambique

Bilateral Supp

1 Jun 11

1 yr – automatically renewed unless terminated

54

Mozambique

Agreement – Establishment of a Joint Permanent Commission on Defence and Security

Establishment of bilateral structure

20 Nov 07

Open-ended

55

Namibia

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

10 Jun 97

Open-ended

56

Netherlands

Agreement – Status of Military and Civilian Personnel of their Department / Ministry of Defence Present in Each Other's Territory for Activities related to Military Cooperation

SOFA

8 Jun 07

Open-ended

57

Niger

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

25 Oct 17

Open-ended

58

Nigeria

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

7 May 13

Open-ended

59

Oman

MOU – Military Cooperation

Def Coop

13 Mar 12

5 yrs – automatically extended for a period of 5 yrs

60

Pakistan

MOU – Defence and Defence-Industrial Cooperation

Def & Def Ind Coop

27 Mar 17

5 yrs – automatically renewed for another term

61

Pakistan

Agreement – Peacetime Cooperation between their Respective Navies

Def Coop

26 Jan 98

Subject to biennial (2 yrs) revision

62

Peoples Republic of China (PRC)

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

11 Dec 01

10 yrs – extended automatically for successive terms of 2 yrs

63

Poland

Agreement – Industrial, Technological and Commercial Cooperation within the Scope of the Military Industries

Def Ind Coop

19 Sep 99

5 yrs – automatically be extended for indefinite period

64

Qatar

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

19 May 16

5 yrs – may be extended for further period of 5 yrs

65

Romania

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

7 May 03

5 yrs – automatically extended for periods of 1 yr at a time

66

Russian Federation

Agreement – Protection of Classified Defence and Defence-Industrial Related Information

Protection of Class Def & Def Ind Info

18 Mar 05

Open-ended

67

Russian Federation

Agreement – Defence Intelligence Cooperation (No Classified Information)

Def Int Coop

27 Jun 00

Open-ended

68

Russian Federation

Agreement – Military-Technical Cooperation

Mil Tech Coop

26 Nov 95

Open-ended

69

Russian Federation

Agreement – Cooperation between the two Ministries of Defence

Def Coop

14 Jul 95

5 yrs – automatically extended for a new period of 5 yrs

           
           
         

6

           

Serial No

Country / Org

Name of Agreement

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

70

Russian Federation

Agreement – Reciprocal Protection of Intellectual Property Rights Used and Established in the Course of Bilateral Defence-Industrial Cooperation

Protection of Intellectual Property Rights

15 May 13

Open-ended

71

Senegal

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

20 Apr 08

Open-ended

72

Singapore

Agreement – Military Cooperation

Def Coop

10 Nov 97

Open-ended

73

Singapore

Agreement – Status of Singapore Forces Deployed in the RSA

SOFA

23 Oct 98

Open-ended

74

Slovak Republic

Protocol on Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

Jul 97

Open-ended

75

South Sudan

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

30 Jan 18

Open-ended

76

Spain

MOU – Field of Defence Material

Def Ind Coop

22 Oct 97

10 yrs – automatically extended for similar periods

77

Spain

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

19 Apr 07

Open-ended

78

Sweden

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

2 Jun 00

Open-ended

79

Sweden

General Security Agreement – Exchange of Classified Information

GSA

2 Jun 00

Shall be reviewed jointly by Parties within 10 yrs after effective date

80

Tanzania

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

12 Jun 99

Open-ended

81

Tunisia

MOU – Military Cooperation

Def Coop

6 May 05

 

82

Uganda

MOU – Cooperation in Defence

Def Coop

9 Nov 12

Open-ended

83

UK

Arrangement – Mapping and Survey Cooperation and the Exchange of Geographic Materials

Exchange of Def Related Info

2 Aug 12

Open-ended

84

UK

General Security Arrangement – Protection of Classified Information Exchanged for the Purpose of Defence Cooperation, Production, Research and Procurement between the two Countries

GSA

2016

5 yrs

85

UK

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

8 Nov 07

Open-ended

86

UK

Bilateral Arrangement- Hydrographic Offices

Project Coop

18 Nov 96

Open-ended

87

UK

Supplementary Arrangement – Provision of Support during Exercises, Training and Operations

Bilateral Supp

2 Aug 04

Open-ended

88

UK

Administrative Arrangement – Exchange of Air force Officers

Trg Coop

18 Mar 97

Open-ended

89

Ukraine

Agreement – Military-Technical Cooperation

Mil-Tech Coop

19 Jul 95

Open-ended

90

UN

MOU – Contributing Resources to the UN Mission in the DRC (MONUC) (now MONUSCO)

SOFA

24 Sep 01

Valid for duration of MONUSCO

           
           
         

7

           

Serial No

Country / Org

Name of Agreement

Type of Agreement

Date Signed

Duration

91

UN

MOU – SAAF Aviation Unit to MONUSCO

SOFA

29 Mar 12

Valid from 2006 for duration of MONUSCO

92

United Arab Emirates (UAE)

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

14 Nov 11

Open-ended

93

USA

Exchange of Notes – Provision of Excess Defence Articles

Def Coop

23 Oct 95

Open-ended

94

USA

Agreement – Security Measures for the Protection of Classified Military Information (GESOMIA)

Protection of Class Def Related Info

20 Nov 98

5 yrs – automatically extended annually

95

USA

Exchange of Notes – Administrative and Technical Status of Visiting Forces

SOFA

10 Jun 99

Open-ended

96

USA

Acquisition and Cross-Servicing Agreement (ACSA)

Def Ind Coop

8 May 01

10 yrs – automatically extended annually

97

USA

Basic Exchange and Cooperation Agreement- Geospatial-Intelligence

Exchange of Class Def Related Info

Mar 13

 

98

USA

Agreement – Defence Research, Development, Testing and Evaluation Project (RDT&E)

Def Ind Coop

14 Apr 16

Open-ended

99

Vietnam

MOU – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

9 May 06

Open-ended

100

Zambia

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

2012

5 yrs – may be renewed for further period of 5 yrs

101

Zimbabwe

MOU – Defence Training, Technical Cooperation and Technological Transfer

Def Coop

3 Dec 10

Open-ended

102

Zimbabwe

Agreement – Defence Cooperation

Def Coop

21 Feb 96

Open-ended

           
 

TRILATERIAL

       

103

RSA – Mozambique – Tanzania

MOU – Maritime Security Cooperation

Trilateral Coop

13 Dec 11

1 yr – automatically renewed

* Note: "MOU" means Memorandum of Understanding

"SOFA" means Status of Forces Agreement

"GSA" means General Security Agreement / Arrangement

14 December 2018 - NW3229

Profile picture: Ryder, Mr D

Ryder, Mr D to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

There is no entity and/or department reporting to the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans that borrowed any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China

12 December 2018 - NW3366

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)What is the (a) total number of pieces of artillery that the SA National Defence Force currently owns and (b) type of each piece of artillery; (2) whether each piece of artillery is functional; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

Due to security sensitivity on this question, the response thereto can only be disclosed in a Closed Session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence

12 December 2018 - NW2936

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Mr M

Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has officially or unofficially met with any member of the Gupta family at any time between 1 January 2009 to date; if so, (a) what was the nature of the specified meeting and (b) where was it held?

Reply:

I have attended events organised by the Hindu community to mark their Diwali, a Hindu Festival, wherein members of the Gupta family attend as part of the members of the Hindu society.

These invitations have always been extended to Ministers, Deputy Ministers, and the Business community long before I even assumed the responsibility of being the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans.