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20 September 2019 - NW924

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What amount has the African Renaissance Fund (ARF) loaned to Cuba to date, (b) on what terms, including interest and duration, was the loan made, (c) what amount of the loan (i) has been repaid and (ii) is still outstanding in terms of ( aa) money still to be loaned to Cuba and (bb) monies still repaid by Cuba and (d) does the ARF allow for loan initiatives to be made to countries outside the African continent?

Reply:

a) The loan amount was R 63 628 818.

b) The interest was charged at 3% daily compounded monthly, the repayment duration and term was 1 year. following the expiry of the availability period for tranch A in four equal quarterly payments.

c) A loan has been repaid in full with interest R 64 994 855.03

  1. R 64 994 855.03
  2. Nothing is outstanding

(aa) A concurrence has been issued for a total amount of R140 million

(bb) Nothing, as the loan has been repaid with interest

(d) Yes.

16 September 2019 - NW783

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) her department and (ii) state owned entities reporting to her in the (aa) 2016 – 17, (bb) 2017 – 18 and (cc) 2018 – 19 financial years: (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) her department and (b) state owned entities reporting to her went to (i) each specified black – owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by her department and state – owned entities reporting to him went to each black – owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

a) (i) Dirco

Total Amount = R 0

b) (ii) ARF

Total Amount = R 0

(aa) Financial year 2016-17

Total amount paid: R 0

(bb) Financial year 2017-18

Total amount paid: R 0

(cc) Financial year 2018-19

Total amount paid: R 0

05 September 2019 - NW619

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) total amount has (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

a) (i) Dirco

Total Amount = R 6 793 492.69

b) (ii) ARF

Total Amount = R 0

Financial year 2017-18

(aa) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 701 441.87

(bb) Security, None

(cc) Gardening, None

(bbb) Financial year 2018-19

(a) Cleaning

Total amount paid: R 2 639 082.47

(b) Security

Total amount paid: R 1 334 226.85

(c) Gardening

Total amount paid: R 118 741.50

05 September 2019 - NW559

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) whether she has been informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department has taken any measures against the ambassador regarding the charges; if not, what steps will be taken; if so, what are the relevant details? NW 1557E

Reply:

1. Honourable Berman, yes, I was informed of CAS 25/3/2019 opened at the Brooklyn Police Station.

A locally employed personnel at the Official Residence of the Ambassador of Algeria to South Africa alleged that she has been a victim of sexual assault perpetuated by the Ambassador, and as such CAS 25/3/2019 was subsequently opened at the Brooklyn Police Station. The National Prosecuting Authority informed the Department on 19 July 2019 that it “has declined to prosecute the case”.

2. Based on the decision by the National Prosecuting Authority, the Department has not taken any measures against the Ambassador regarding the charges.

03 September 2019 - NW578

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether a certain person (Ms Daniel De Bruin ) was ever employed in her department as SA Consul General or in any other specified role; if so, on what date was the appointment made; (2) whether the specified person is still employed in that role; if not, on what date did she (a) stop being an employee and (b) receive her last pay check; (3) (a) what experience and qualifications did she have that qualified her for the job and (b) did she pass the necessary security clearance required for the job; (4) whether her department has at any time during her time in office received complaints regarding her behaviour towards staff or members of the public; if so what are the relevant details ; (5) whether her department has ever had to use government resources to defend the specified person in legal and/ or criminal matters; if so, (a) on what date, (b) where and (c) what amount of government money was used?NW1575E

Reply:

(1) Yes, appointed on 01 March 2015

(2)(a) 26 January 2019

(2)(b) 26 July 2019 but debt will be recovered from date of termination.

(3) (a) Ms De Bruin-Grady has the following qualifications: L.L.M. Studies, International Human Rights; Post-Graduate course in International Relations and International Diplomacy; Master of Law, International Human Rights Law. Relevant experience include the following: Commissioner - Cape Cod Human Rights Commission; ANC Lawyer’s Delegation; Participant in the Oxford University Foreign Service Program; and Patrice Lumumba Univeristy’s Head of ANC Women’s Section

(b) In terms of paragraph 4.1.3 of Chapter 5 of the Minimum Information Security Standards (MISS), Ms De Bruin is temporarily not eligible for any grade of security clearance as she had not been residing in South Africa for at least five (5) years

(4) Yes. A complaint was made by a member of staff alleging that Ms De Bruin-Grady had inter alia spoken to her in threatening terms, and that she

had been blocked from leaving an office. These allegation(s) were denied by Ms De Bruin- Grady. There were also other complaints about management of the

office and about actions that had been undertaken.

(5)Yes

(5)(a) October 2018 / November 2018 / January 2019

(5)(b) USA (Washington / Los Angeles)

(5)(c) R241 048.35

20 August 2019 - NW364

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019 – 22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? NW 1336E

Reply:

(a) The major responsibilities of the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation is managing South Africa’s relations with the International World. This includes bilateral relations with countries across the globe, also engaging in the various multi-lateral institutions that deal with issues ranging from Peace and Security, Human Rights, Environmental Protection, Nuclear Non -Proliferation and Trade and Development. This means that over the course of MTEF, the

(i) Ministry inclusive of the Minister and

(ii) two Deputy Ministers would need to undertake various trips, to deal with Issues emanating from the bilateral and multi-lateral environments.

Some of the trips are standard, for an example we know that on annual basis, the South African President supported by the Minister of International Relations would be expected to travel to the United Nations, for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).So of course these kinds of trips we can pencil in and plan for well in advance. However, many of the trips arise from specific required interventions in the arena. Therefore it is not possible to provide a detailed schedule of trips on the MTEF as required by this question.

What I can undertake is to ensure that there are no trips that are undertaken when they are not necessary or relevant. I can also undertake that we would ensure that delegation sizes are not larger than what is needed to conclude diplomatic engagements successfully. I can undertake to ensure to keep the Ministry’s and the Department’s travel within the budget outlined in the MTEF. This may be difficult as South Africa has been asked as to serve as the Chair of the African Union during the year 2020. This will require additional funds which are not provided for on the MTEF. The Department will engage with National Treasury on this matter urgently.

06 August 2019 - NW394

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether the Government signed bilateral agreements with the (a) United Arab Emirates and/ or (b) Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; if not, by what date will each agreement be signed; if so, on what date was each agreement signed; (2) whether each agreement has been ratified yet; if not, in each case, why not; if so, on what date was each agreement ratified? NW 1366E

Reply:

1. South Africa has signed twelve (12) bilateral agreements with the United Arab Emirates and eight (8) with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia.

The areas of cooperation include economic, justice, tourism, defence, agriculture and energy collaboration.

According to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation’s records, the already signed agreements with the two countries and the dates of signature, is herewith detailed below:

a) United Arab Emirates

Date signed/ adopted

Title of agreement

Entry into Force

17 May 1994

Protocol on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations

Entry into force:
19940517

18 November 1999

Defence Cooperation Agreement

Entry into force:
Not in force

3 February
2001

Agreement for Air Services between and beyond the Respective Territories

Entry into force:
20010827

24 September
2005

Bilateral Agreement on Economic, Trade and Technical Co-operation

Entry into force:
Not in force

25 April
2006

Memorandum of Understanding on Police Cooperation

Entry into force:
20060425

14 November
2011

Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on the Establishment of a Joint Commission for Bilateral Cooperation

Entry into force:
20120529

14 November 2011

Defence Cooperation Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates

Entry into force:
20121009

14 November 2011

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Political Consultations

Entry into force:
20111114

23 November
2015

Agreement between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and the Prevention of Fiscal Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income. Plus Protocol

Entry into force:
20161123

25 September
2018

Extradition Treaty between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates

Entry into force: Ratification process underway.

25 September
2018

Treaty between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Mutual Legal Assistance in Criminal Matters

Entry into force: Ratification process underway.

25 September
2018

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the United Arab Emirates on Cooperation in the Field of Social Development

Entry into force:
Not in force

b) Saudi Arabia

29 October 1994

Protocol on the Establishment of Diplomatic Relations

Entry into force:
19941029

20 May 1999

Agreement on Economic, Trade, Investment and Technical Cooperation. Plus Protocol

20020522 (r)
Entry into force:
20020522

28 May
2000

Air Service Agreement

Entry into force:
Not in force

3 December
2006

Memorandum of Understanding on Co-operation in the Field of Higher Education

Entry into force:
Not in force

13 March
2007

Convention for the Avoidance of Double Taxation and Prevention of Tax Evasion with Respect to Taxes on Income and on Capital

Entry into force:
20080501

25 February 2009

Agreement on Scientific and Technological Cooperation

Entry into force:
Not in force

16 February 2014

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Republic of South Africa and the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia on Co-operation in the Field of Tourism

Entry into force:
20150415

27 March 2016

Memorandum of Understanding between the Government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and the Government of the Republic of South Africa on Bilateral Political Consultations

Entry into force:
20160327

2. The majority of the agreements are of a technical nature and as such, according to the Article 231 (3) of the Constitution, “binds the Republic without approval by the National Assembly (NA) and the National Council of Provinces (NCOP), but must be tabled in the NA and NCOP within a reasonable time.” In this regard, agreements only enter into force following their tabling in the NA and NCOP.

The responsibility for ensuring the ratification (if required) and tabling of the agreement rests with the relevant line function department and its Minister. Therefore, it would be incumbent of the relevant Minister to answer the question as to the ratification or tabling of such agreement.

The third column of the table above shows when the agreements were ratified.

02 August 2019 - NW279

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) remuneration, (ii) salary level,(iii) job title,(iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

29 July 2019 - NW183

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) For what number of days was each ambassador at work in their respective embassies in the period from 1 January to the 30 June 2019 and (b) what are the full relevant details in this regard for the specified period of six months? NW 1141E

Reply:

The table below indicates Amabassadors according to regions, and number of days each Ambassador was at work.

A. Region: Global Governance and

Continental Agenda

Number Of Days At Work

1

118

2

110

3

120

4

85

B. Region: Americas & Europé

Number Of Days At Work

1

119

2

98

3

129

4

111

5

85

6

83

7

103

8

110

9

92

10

85

11

146

12

49

13

96

14

112

15

121

16

105

17

116

18

114

19

117

20

181

21

111

22

163

23

123

24

109

25

123

26

109

27

89

28

111

29

117

30

168

31

59

C. Region: Asia and Middle East

Number Of Days At Work

1

150

2

84

3

170

4

181

5

63

6

125

7

171

8

174

9

145

10

72

11

163

12

61

13

158

14

90

15

112

16

152

17

173

18

176

19

15

20

64

21

111

D. Region: Africa

Number Of Days At Work

1

162

2

81

3

146

4

23

5

155

s

124

7

174

22 July 2019 - NW220

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) (a) On what date was the Chief Financial Officer of her department suspended and (b) on what grounds; (2) whether the specified person’s disciplinary process has been finalized; if not why not; if so, (a) on what date was the process finalized and (b) what are the details of the outcome? NW1179E

Reply:

(1)(a)The CFO was placed on precautionary suspension on the 20th June 2018.

(b) The grounds for the precautionary suspension was that further investigations needed to be conducted into allegations of impropriety against him.

(2)(a) The disciplinary process has been finalised and the outcome was communicated to the Department on 25th June 2019.

(b) The outcome was that the CFO was not found guilty on all charges levelled against him.

19 July 2019 - NW160

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on a suspension and (b) cost to Government in each case? NW 1118E

Reply:

a) Currently there are no officials in the Department who are on suspension.

b) None

 

19 July 2019 - NW158

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to Government in each case? NW 1116E

Reply:

(a)

CASE NUMBER

SALARY LEVEL

AMOUNT

1

07

R45 725.99

2

13

R192 308.37

3

12

R427 075.43

4

10

R84 541.79

5

10

R191 611.69

6

10

R97 756.50

7

13

R127 216.33

8

10

R192 880.78 (R74 600.83 + R118 279.95)

(b) R1,359,116.88

 

16 July 2019 - NW103

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) At what stage is the process of the rationalisation of South African foreign mission with a view to reducing the number of such missions to save costs and (b) what is the projected saving to the State in the Medium – Term Expenditure Framework when the number of foreign missions are reduced? NW1060E

Reply:

a) Consultations on the rationalisation of South African foreign missions are ongoing.

b) Savings can only be determined once the process has been finalised.

16 July 2019 - NW120

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1) Whether any action will be taken against the South African Ambassador to the Kingdom of Denmark, Ms Z N Mandela, for tweeting messages contrary to the Government’s views on the weekend of 14 June 2019; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether she will take any steps to ensure that the (a) specified person’s messages are retracted and (b) correct messages relating to the Government’s policies are conveyed to the residents and potential investors of the Kingdom of Denmark; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1080E

Reply:

1. No further action is planned beyond the public statements I previously made concerning this matter . I informed the Ambassador to articulate policies of South Africa and that she needs to adhere to the Social Media Guidelines of the Department.

2. (a) I and the Department have reiterated Government Policy on the land issue.

(b) Government Policy on the land issue has not changed, and is readily accessible to residents and investors in Denmark, and all other interested parties.

16 July 2019 - NW104

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has found that the statements via Twitter by the South African ambassador to the Kingdom of Denmark, Ms Z N Mandela, were inconsistent with the Government’s policy and outlook with regard to the land; if not, on what grounds did she reprimand the ambassador; if so , what are the relevant details? NW1061E

Reply:

1. On the matter of land ownership changing the Ambassador did not make any comments that directly linked to Government policy.

2. The Ambassador made some statements in the tweet that could be construed as personal and that made negative references to individuals she exchanged tweets with. I therefore advised her to always communicate in a manner that is consistent with our expectations as representative of South Africa and to have regards to the Social Media Guidelines of the Department.

 

12 July 2019 - NW159

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in her department and (b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled.NW 1117E

Reply:

(a) Total number of vacancies: 200

(b) We have

Placed a halt on the filling of current vacancies due to inadequate resources.

09 July 2019 - NW94

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation:

Whether she will review or rescind the decision to downgrade the SA Mission to Israel to a Liaison Office in order to give priority to other diplomatic means and processes to resolve the Israeli — Palestine impasse; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African government remains seized with the modalities of downgrading the South African Embassy in Israel, and we will communicate further actions once we concluded our deliberations.The South African government remains seized with the modalities of downgrading the South African Embassy in Israel, and we will communicate further actions once we concluded our deliberations.

05 April 2019 - NW705

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Hoosen, Mr MH to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy ministers and/or former deputy ministers (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

In response to the question asked by the Honourable Member, my Department provided the following information:

2016/17:

A Mercedes Benz, C250 Avant-garde was purchased for the current Deputy Minister and its cost price was R506 060.58.

2017-2018:

A Mercedes Benz, E250 Avant-garde was purchased for the former Deputy Minister and its cost price was R771 570.99.

2018/19:

A Mercedes Benz, GLE 350 d – 2018 was purchased for the newly appointed Deputy Minister and its cost price was R 1 157 015.19.

During the past three financial years, no car was purchased for former Minister or the current Minister.

25 March 2019 - NW481

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperations

What measures is her department putting in place to ensure that persons from the diplomatic corps do not abuse diplomatic immunity in order to avoid the killing of persons in the Republic and in so doing undermine the sovereignty of the Republic as it were in the case of the alleged murder and attempted murder of Mr Patrick Karegeya and Mr Faustin Kayumba Nyamwasa respectively?

Reply:

The Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, 1961 and the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, 1963 read in conjunction with applicable local legislation, in South Africa's case the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act, 2001 (Act 37 of 2001), are the definitive legal instruments that regulate the standing of Diplomats and Consular Agents globally.

Article 41.1 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, 1961 and Article 55.1 of the Vienna Convention on Consular Relations, 1963 state as follows: “Without prejudice to their privileges and immunities, it is the duty of all persons enjoying such privileges and immunities to respect the laws and regulations of the receiving State. They also have a duty not to interfere in the internal affairs of that State.”

In accordance with the stipulations of the Act, as well as the Vienna Conventions, having force of law in the Republic, no diplomatic immunity shall exempt a diplomatic or consular agent from the consequences of the commission of any crime in the Republic of South Africa.

I wish to point out that the case referred to by the Honourable Member does not belong in the category of persons who enjoy diplomatic immunity. Further enquiries into this matter should be referred to the Minister of Police and/or the Minister of Justice and Constitutional Development.

22 March 2019 - NW651

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the total number of staff members who are employed in each (a) South African embassy and (b) consulate?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is attached.

11 March 2019 - NW229

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Since assuming office, (a) what number of official international trips has (i) she and (ii) her two Deputy Ministers undertaken with officials or staff of her office, (b) to which country or jurisdiction, (c) for what purpose and (d) what was the total cost of (i) air travel, (ii) accommodation and (iii) all other specified expenses of each trip?

Reply:

The details of international trips undertaken by my two Deputy Ministers and I are attached as Annexure A.

However, the information requested is currently being audited and as such the total cost of air travel, accommodation and other costs will be provided once the audit process is completed. The Honourable Member would appreciate that being an International Relations and Cooperation Department, international travel is a part of its core mandate and the verification process takes time. This is further compounded by the fact that all accommodation and land transport are arranged by various embassies across the world.

11 March 2019 - NW228

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether, given the breakdown of democratic processes, the ongoing human rights violations and the humanitarian aid blockade currently underway in Venezuela, the Government will continue its support for the disputed President of Venezuela, Mr Nicholas Maduro; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what is the position of the Government regarding the ongoing human rights violations and the humanitarian aid blockade underway in Venezuela?

Reply:

(1) South Africa fully subscribes to the principles of international law embodied in the Charter of the United Nations, that is, equal rights and self-determination of peoples, sovereign equality and independence of all States, non-interference in the domestic affairs of States, prohibition of the threat or use of force and universal respect for, and observance of human rights and fundamental freedoms for all.

South Africa remains concerned at the attempt by outsiders to evade Venezuela’s constitutional legal mechanisms and electoral processes. South Africa believes that any political grievances or disputes inside Venezuela should be resolved in a peaceful manner through the proper mechanisms and processes provided for in the constitution of Venezuela and its electoral laws, without external influence. This is regarded by South Africa as a standard and indeed best practice in all democracies that subscribe to the Rule of Law. South Africa also calls on all parties in Venezuela to participate in a national dialogue process to ensure unity and reconciliation, and in furtherance of a political solution to the situation.

South Africa is firmly against any attempts at undue or unconstitutional change of government in Venezuela. The UN Security Council (UNSC) should never be an instrument that validates unconstitutional changes of any Government. Instead, the UNSC should promote avenues that create an environment conducive to dialogue and cooperation that would ease the challenges and hardships faced by the people of Venezuela.

(2) South Africa echoes the statements made by the UN Secretary-General, Antonio Guterres in Davos on 24 January 2019, where he urged for a de-escalation of tensions to prevent violence. South Africa further supports the Secretary-General’s call for the “urgent need for all relevant actors to commit to inclusive and credible political dialogue to address the protracted crisis in the country, with full respect for the rule of law and human rights”. South Africa is also concerned about the humanitarian situation in Venezuela and the resultant migration that has taken place and the influx of Venezuelan asylum seekers to neighbouring countries. South Africa calls on the international community, as well as the relevant UN bodies to work with the Venezuelan government and its neighbours to assist those in need.

South Africa fully subscribes to the Viena Convention’s commitments on the promotion and protection of human rights as adopted by the World Conference on Human Rights in Vienna on 25 June 1993 and all international laws governing humanitarian action which needs to be independent of political, military or other objectives

08 March 2019 - NW480

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether her department has been kept informed of the investigation of the murder and attempted murder of Mr Patrick Karegeya and Mr Faustin Kayumba Nyamwasa in Gauteng allegedly at the hands of the Rwandan government in clear violation of the Republic’s sovereignty and rule of law; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department is (a) aware of the individuals who were involved in the specified murder and attempted murder and (b) working on declaring the persons involved persona non grata in the event that they are diplomats; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes, Honourable Member, we have been kept informed of the investigation on the death of Col Patrick Karegeya who was found dead in a hotel room at Michelangelo Towers in Sandton on 31 December 2013. The National Prosecuting Authority and the Hawks are handling the matter to the extent that the case was recently submitted to the magistrate for an inquest.

(2) The Honourable Member would recall that on 6 March 2014 following the attempted assassination of Gen. Faustin Kayumba Nyamwasa, our Government declared three Rwandan diplomats and one Burundian diplomat persona non grata and expelled them from South Africa, for illegal activities inconsistent with their diplomatic work which was in violation of Article 41 of the Vienna Convention and Article 9 of the Diplomatic Immunities and Privileges Act. Our Government took that decision based on evidence from our security agencies pointing to the involvement of these diplomats in illegal activities.

08 March 2019 - NW421

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Lekota, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What reasons informed the recall of a certain person (name and details furnished)?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the official referred to in your question is amongst a number of officials from the Department of State Security whose expertise are required back home. The Minister of State Security requested me to release them and in the interests of our country, I acceded to her request.

06 March 2019 - NW262

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

In response to the Honourable Members’ question, my department advised as follows:

(a) (i) Eight (8) tender briefings were held in 2018 by the department.

(ii) One (1) tender briefing was held in 2018 for entity reporting to DIRCO.

(b) Eight (8) compulsory tender briefing were conducted in 2018.

01 March 2019 - NW346

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) On what date were the invitations to the 2019 Ubuntu Awards sent to the various foreign missions in the Republic, (b) why was the event cancelled and (c) was the cancellation communicated?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, I am not aware of any invitation issued or sent out for the Ubuntu Awards in 2019.

(b) Falls away.

(c) Falls away.

14 February 2019 - NW133

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Bucwa, Ms H to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I am not aware of any provision in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook which caters for Departments to incur travel expenditure for former Ministers and their spouses, Deputy Ministers and their spouses, Ministers’ widows or widowers and Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers. Travel privileges for former Members of Parliament are administered and paid for by Parliament.

14 February 2019 - NW60

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether she has been informed that she has been implicated in testimony made under oath and in written documents by Mr Agrizzi at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, chaired by Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo; if so, were the allegations made by Mr Agrizzi in respect of her true; (2) whether she declared any financial or material gifts from Bosasa as required by the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) I wish to inform the Honourable Member that I was not implicated in a testimony made by Mr Agrizzi to the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, chaired by Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo. Mr Agrizzi stated during his testimony that he was told that I, among others, was a director of Dyambu Holdings.

The following media statement was issued on 17 January 2019 in response to Mr Agrizzi’s testimony:

“The Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation noted with concern false statements made by the former Chief Operations Officer of Bosasa in his testimony before the State Capture Commission on Wednesday, 16 January 2019.

Mr Agrizzi stated that Minister Lindiwe Sisulu was a Director or shareholder of the company that gave birth to Bosasa, namely Dyambu Holdings. This is incorrect and false. 

The Ministry would like to refer Mr Agrizzi to the company registration documents of Dyambu Holdings and the BCCSA ruling of July 12, 2000 when the BCCSA corrected MNET and ruled that Carte Blanche broadcast an apology on the same matter, and the Parliamentary Hansard of February 1997, where Mr A J Leon apologised for falsely accusing her of being a Director of Dyambu Holdings. 

The Ministry calls on Mr Agrizzi to correct his statement in public and before the commission.”

(2) Not applicable.

14 December 2018 - NW3898

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, her department and the entities reporting to her implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council Resolution 3 of 2009 that all persons employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to level 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 11 to level 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Honourable Member, Clause 18.1 of PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2012 determines that; “clause 3.6.3.2 of PSCBC Resolution 3 of 2009 is hereby amended to allow employees whose posts are graded on salary levels 10 and 12; to be appointed and remunerated on salary levels 10 and 12 respectively”.

My department has informed me that it implemented Resolution 1 of 2012 and upgraded all employees serving in Assistant Director and Deputy Director posts in accordance with the grading system.

14 December 2018 - NW3701

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What are the details of the Government’s policy position regarding the voting structures and powers of the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly?

Reply:

Honourable Member, South Africa's participation in multilateral institutions is guided by the country's foreign policy objectives based on its vision of "a better South Africa, a better Africa and a better world". Our foreign policy is informed by our constitutional values and principles, national values and interests and strategic considerations based on domestic and international imperatives.

Our participation is further aligned with an understanding of the nexus that exists between peace, security and sustainable development. Consequently, South Africa's approach and voting patterns in the United Nations Security Council (UNSC) and the General Assembly (GA) resonates strongly with the African Union's (AUs) aspirational goals contained in the Agenda 2063 and its Ten (10) Year Implementation Plan of contributing to peace and security of "Silencing the Guns by the year 2020".

South Africa further upholds the principle that there could be no peace without development, thus the advancement of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda Goals adopted by UN Heads of State and Government in New York in September 2015 is essential requirement to continental efforts towards advancing the achievement of the African Union Agenda 2063.

Additional information on voting structures and powers in the United Nations Security Council and United Nations General Assembly is provided below:

Voting structures and powers of the United Nations Security Council

  • Each member of the United Nations Security Council has one vote. There are two sets of decisions that are taken by voting, namely on procedural matters and non-procedural matters which the latter could be vetoed by the Permanent Five. The UNSC is the only organ of the United Nations which has been conferred with the power to take decisions with a binding force in line with the "Purposes and Principles of the United Nations" in discharging its duties of maintaining international peace and security.

Voting structures and powers of the General Assembly

The Government policy position regarding voting structures and powers of the United Nations General Assembly is guided by the following provisions of the United Nations General Assembly's Rules of Procedure, Rules 82 to 90 on Voting:

  • Each member of the General Assembly have one vote. Decisions of the General Assembly on important questions shall be made by a two-thirds majority of the members present and voting, for instance in matters pertaining to international peace and security, the election of the non-permanent members of the Security Council, etc. On the other hand, decisions of the General Assembly on questions other than those considered important that requires a two­ thirds majority, shall be made by a simple majority of the members present and voting, i.e. affirmative and negative votes only; abstentions are considered as not voting.

12 December 2018 - NW3264

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her awarded any contracts and/or tenders to certain companies (names and details furnished) from 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, in each case (i) what service was provided, (ii) what was the (aa) value and (bb) length of the tender and/or contract, (iii) who approved the tender and/or contract and (iv) was the tender and/or contract in line with all National Treasury and departmental procurement guidelines?

Reply:

(a) & (b) I have been informed by my Department that the Department of International Relations and Cooperation and the African Renaissance Fund (ARF) have not awarded any contracts or tenders to the companies listed in the Honourable Member’s question. However, this will be investigated and should any new information emerge, the Honourable Member will be furnished with that information.

11 December 2018 - NW3448

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Majola, Mr F to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) On what date did her department last conduct an audit of artwork owned by Government which is under her department’s curatorship and (b) what are the details of each artwork under the curatorship of her department according to the Generally Recognised Accounting Practice 103; (2) whether any artworks under her department’s curatorship have gone missing (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2018; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3937E

Reply:

(1) (a) My Department advised me that it conducts an audit of all Departmental assets (including artwork) every six months at Head Office as well as offices in Missions abroad. During the period December 2016 – September 2017 the Department launched and finalised a project to identify Heritage Artwork on its Asset Register.

(b) Details of Heritage Artwork on Asset Register, as per the chapter on Capital Assets contained in the National Treasury’s Modified Cash Standard are indicated below:

    • Artwork assessed worldwide: 2600 (125 missions and its offices in South Africa)
      • Heritage works of art identified: 191 heritage artwork: valued at R157, 388, 760
      • Heritage Immovable item: 1 Statue: Value of R1, 810, 816

(2) (a) & (b) My Department indicated to me that no artworks have gone missing.

11 December 2018 - NW1796

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Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What number of official (i) domestic and (ii) international flights has she undertaken since her appointment to this position on 27 February 2018 and (b) what was the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose, (iv)(aa) name and (bb) professional designation of every person travelling with the delegation and (v) detailed breakdown of cost of (aa) flights and (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

I wish to remind the Honourable Member that the provision of names when responding to Parliamentary Questions is not permissible according to practise applicable to parliamentary questions and guidelines contained in the document titled, “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly”. The document referred to prohibits Members of Parliament, including the Executive, from divulging names of persons, bodies when asking or responding to parliamentary questions. It states the following:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

Further, at the end of each financial year, we table annual reports with audited financial statements containing the information requested by the Honourable Member.

11 December 2018 - NW3024

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Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Which (a) embassies and (b) high commissions are (i) currently allowing and (ii) not allowing South Africans living abroad to register to vote; (2) when will she issue a directive to all (a) embassies and (b) high commissions making them aware that South Africans living abroad can register to vote at any time according to the amendment to the Electoral Act, Act 73 of 1998; (3) whether she will ensure that South Africans living abroad who apply or collect documentation at (a) embassies and (b) high commissions are made aware and encouraged to register while they are at the specified places; if not, why not; if so, when will this be done and (b) how will it be advertised?

Reply:

(1) Honourable Member, none of our Missions abroad are not allowing South Africans to register to vote. This could never be because it would be unlawful to do so. Arrangements are being made to facilitate the registration process. In this regard, an agreement is being concluded with the IEC which would outline how my Department and the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC) will cooperate with each other to facilitate the registration and voting process for South Africans abroad.

(2) The IEC and my Department issued a communique on 7th December 2018 indicating that Voter registration for South African citizens living abroad will take place at all South African foreign missions from 1 to 4 February 2019.

(3) The IEC is the appointed institution to administer and oversee the 2019 General Elections, both in South Africa and abroad, and as such, is the responsible institution to encourage South Africans to register and vote, both in South Africa and abroad. The Missions and Embassies will be available to assist to the extent required by the IEC.

Every party registered for the election has its own vested interest to encourage South Africans living abroad to exercise their right and vote. I hope your party is also playing its part in rallying South Africans to register and vote.

11 December 2018 - NW3326

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Lesoma, Ms RMM to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) were some of the key discussions that featured during the Indian Ocean Conference that took place from 27 to 28 August 2018 in Hanoi, Vietnam and (b) are the objectives and policy priorities of the South African chairmanship of the Indian Ocean Rim Association?

Reply:

(a) The third (3rd) Indian Ocean Conference took place in the Socialist Republic of Vietnam under the theme “Building Regional Architecture” from 27-28 August 2018. The event focused almost exclusively on the concept of the Indo-Pacific region, a new concept in international relations being espoused and advanced by the United States and India.

South Africa is encouraged by the focus that the Indian Ocean Region is receiving of late, with several international conferences highlighting the importance of the Indian Ocean Region as a leading region with the potential to contribute to global security, economic growth, and sustainable development.  South Africa’s view, as advanced at the conference in Vietnam, is that the future of the Indian Ocean Region must be centered on the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA). South Africa views IORA as the pre-eminent regional organization linking Africa, Middle East, Asia and Australasia via the Indian Ocean, as encapsulated in our theme for our Chairship (2017-2019) of “IORA: Uniting the Peoples of Africa, Asia, Australasia and the Middle East through Enhanced Co-operation for Peace, Stability and Sustainable Development”.  This theme encompasses South Africa’s view that the Indian Ocean Region should be characterized as a region of peace, stability and development; and we view IORA as the primary regional organisation with which to pursue this ambitious goal. 

(b) Priorities for South Africa as Chair of IORA include the following:

  1. Realising Over-Arching consensus principles, i.e. commitment to sustainably advancing peace, stability and development by strengthening cooperation, partnership, and constructive dialogue to promote the welfare and livelihood for its people.
  2. Striving for Continuity of leadership;
  3. Strengthen the work programme of IORA;
  4. Consolidate IORA’s membership;
  5. Strengthen relations with IORA’s Dialogue Partners;
  6. Enhance partnership with international organisations;
  7. Support for the African Agenda;
  8. Strengthen IORA mechanisms;
  9. Improve the functional efficiency of the Chair; and
  10. Strengthening the capacity of the Secretariat

 

11 December 2018 - NW3702

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is the total amount that the country pays to each international organisation of which it is a member?

Reply:

Membership of an international organisation means that while joining the body and enjoying the privileges and advantages of membership, this also comes with a financial obligation for the state joining. South Africa is a member of a number of international organisations. The Department of International Relations and Cooperation is responsible for administering South Africa’s relations with the principal mainstream multilateral and regional organisations, these being the United Nations, the African Union, the Southern African Development Community and the Commonwealth. The figures reflected below indicate the assessed membership contributions payable by South Africa for 2018. Other national departments are responsible for their membership payments for membership of international specialised agencies, funds and programmes (technical organisations). In this regard, specific questions should be directed to the respective departments.

 

INTERNATIONAL/REGIONAL ORGANISATION

ASSESSMENT AMOUNT IN FOREIGN CURRENCY

1.a.

United Nations (this includes assessments for the Regular Budget, Peacekeeping and criminal tribunals)

USD 13,053,515

1.b.

UN Development Programme (Government Local Office Costs)

USD 506,448

2.a.

African Union Membership

USD 30, 310, 983

2.b

New Partnership for Africa’s Development (NEPAD)

USD 500,000

2.c

African Peer Review Mechanism (APRM)

USD 200,000

2.d.

African Commission on Nuclear Energy (AFCONE)

USD 162,492

3.

The Southern African Development Community (SADC)

USD 8,456,000

4.

The Commonwealth

GBP 442, 138

03 December 2018 - NW3703

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) number of (i) embassies (ii) high commissions and (iii) consulates does the Government have, (b) is the (i) location of (ii) staff contingent of and (iii) latest annual budget for each embassy, high commission and consulate?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is provided in my reply to question 875. The reply referred to is attached for ease of reference.

 

19 November 2018 - NW3666

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Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) My Department has advised me that it did not receive any loan from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years.

(ii) None

(b) Falls away.

(c) Falls away.

(d) Falls away.

19 November 2018 - NW3236

Profile picture: Rabotapi, Mr MW

Rabotapi, Mr MW to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) My Department has advised me that it did not receive any loan from any entity in the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years.

(ii) None

(b) Falls away.

(c) Falls away.

(d) Falls away.

25 October 2018 - NW2772

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Schmidt, Adv H to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether (a) she and/or (b) her department have been informed of the dispute in respect of South Africa’s northern border with the Republic of Namibia (Namibia), in particular with reference to the determination of the international border between South Africa and Namibia regarding the Orange River Delta Diamond Megaplacer paleo channel; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether the dispute has been resolved; if not, what steps does she intend to take to resolve the dispute; if so, what was the outcome of the dispute resolution?

Reply:

(1) a) Yes, my Department and I are fully aware of the matter of the Orange River Boundary between South Africa and Namibia. The Honourable Member may be aware that as early as 1992, soon after its independence, Namibia requested the then apartheid South African government to move the border between South Africa and Namibia to the middle of the Orange River. Before 1994, discussions on this matter were inconclusive. Later on after 1994, the Namibian government approached the democratic South African government with the same request, namely to move the border between South Africa and Namibia to the middle of the Orange River. The South African government position on this matter is anchored on four (4) pillars, namely:

i. The 1890 Anglo-German Agreement that put the border on the northern bank of the Orange River;

ii. South Africa’s Constitution (Schedule 1A) which defines the territory of the Republic;

iii. The OAU 1964 Resolution AHG/Res.16 (1) on colonial borders, as well the AU Constitutive Act 2001, Article 4(b); and

iv. International Law.

(2) The matter has not yet been resolved. The two countries continue to engage with the view to resolve the matter of the Orange River Boundary. In this regard, in April 2013, the two countries established a Joint Committee of Experts which subsequently submitted its final report to the two governments. In a nutshell, in this report the two sides restate their position on the matter of the Orange River Boundary.

19 September 2018 - NW2377

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether any businesspersons accompanied the Government on any visits to foreign countries since 1 January 2018; if so, what are the relevant details of each visit?

Reply:

Honourable Member, no businesspersons have accompanied me, as Minister of International Relations and Cooperation, on any visits abroad.

19 September 2018 - NW2682

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What (i) number of international organisation is the Government a member of, (ii) are the names of the other countries who are members of the specified organisation and (iii) is the purpose of each organisation and (b) on what date did South Africa join each organisation?

Reply:

South Africa is a member of the principal multilateral bodies at the global, regional and sub-regional level. These are, the United Nations, the African Union and the Southern African Development Community and the Southern African Customs Union.

(a)(i) South Africa is represented in 40 international organisations and structures.

The balance of the question is addressed in each specified organisation listed.

The United Nations

(a)(ii) There are currently 193 member states of the United Nations. These are;

Afghanistan

Albania

 Algeria

Andorra

Angola

Antigua and Barbuda

Argentina

Armenia

Australia

Austria

Azerbaijan

Bahamas

Bahrain

Bangladesh

Barbados

Belarus

Belgium

Belize

Benin

Bhutan

Bolivia (Plurinational State of)

Bosnia and Herzegovina

Botswana

Brazil

Brunei Darussalam

Bulgaria

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cabo Verde

Cambodia

Cameroon

Canada

Central African Republic

Chad

Chile

China

Colombia

Comoros

Congo

Costa Rica

Côte d'Ivoire

Croatia

Cuba

Cyprus

Czech Republic

Democratic People's Republic of Korea

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Denmark

Djibouti

Dominica

Dominican Republic

Ecuador

Egypt

El Salvador

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Estonia

Eswatini

Ethiopia

Fiji

Finland

France

Gabon

Gambia (Republic of The)

Georgia

Germany

Ghana

Greece

Grenada

Guatemala

Guinea

Guinea Bissau

Guyana

Haiti

Honduras

Hungary

Iceland

India

Indonesia

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

Iraq

Ireland

Israel

Italy

Jamaica

Japan

Jordan

Kazakhstan

Kenya

Kiribati

Kuwait

Kyrgyzstan

Lao People’s Democratic Republic

Latvia

Lebanon

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Liechtenstein

Lithuania

Luxembourg

Madagascar

Malawi

Malaysia

Maldives

Mali

Malta

Marshall Islands

Mauritania

Mauritius

Mexico

Micronesia (Federated States of)

Monaco

Mongolia

Montenegro

Morocco

Mozambique

Myanmar

Namibia

Nauru

Nepal

Netherlands

New Zealand

Nicaragua

Niger

Nigeria

Norway

Oman

Pakistan

Palau

Panama

Papua New Guinea

Paraguay

Peru

Philippines

Poland

Portugal

Qatar

Republic of Korea

Republic of Moldova

Russian Federation

Rwanda

Saint Kitts and Nevis

Saint Lucia

Saint Vincent and the Grenadines

Samoa

San Marino

Sao Tome and Principe

Saudi Arabia

Senegal

Serbia

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Singapore

Slovakia

Slovenia

Solomon Islands

Somalia

South Sudan

Spain

Sri Lanka

Sudan

Suriname

Sweden

Switzerland

Syrian Arab Republic

Tajikistan

Thailand

The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia

Timor-Leste

Togo

Tonga

Trinidad and Tobago

Tunisia

Turkey

Turkmenistan

Tuvalu

Uganda

Ukraine

United Arab Emirates

United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland

United Republic of Tanzania

United States of America

Uruguay

Uzbekistan

Vanuatu

Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of

Viet Nam

Yemen

Zambia

Zimbabwe

(a)(iii) Purpose of the United Nations.

The UN Charter describes the Purposes of the United Nations as:

1. To maintain international peace and security, and to that end: to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to the peace, and for the suppression of acts of aggression or other breaches of the peace, and to bring about by peaceful means, and in conformity with the principles of justice and international law, adjustment or settlement of international disputes or situations which might lead to a breach of the peace;

2. To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principle of equal rights and self-determination of peoples, and to take other appropriate measures to strengthen universal peace;

3. To achieve international cooperation in solving international problems of an economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character, and in promoting and encouraging respect for human rights and for fundamental freedoms for all without distinction as to race, sex, language, or religion; and

4. To be a centre for harmonizing the actions of nations in the attainment of these common ends.

(b) South Africa was one of the 51 founding members of the United Nations and joined the organisation on 7 November 1945.

The African Union

(a)(ii) The African Union has 55 sovereign states that have ratified or acceded to the Constitutive Act of the African Union to become member states to the African Union (AU). The members are;

Algeria

Angola

Benin

Botswana

Burkina Faso

Burundi

Cabo Verde

Cameroon

Central African Republic

Chad

Comoros

Congo

Côte d'Ivoire

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Djibouti

Egypt

Equatorial Guinea

Eritrea

Eswatini (Swaziland)

Ethiopia

Gabon

Gambia (Republic of The)

Ghana

Guinea

Guinea Bissau

Kenya

Lesotho

Liberia

Libya

Madagascar

Malawi

Mali

Mauritania

Mauritius

Morocco

Mozambique

Namibia

Niger

Nigeria

Rwanda

Sahrawi Arab Democratic Republic (not a member of the United Nations)

Sao Tome and Principe

Senegal

Seychelles

Sierra Leone

Somalia

South Sudan

Sudan

Togo

Tunisia

Uganda

United Republic of Tanzania

Zambia

Zimbabwe

(a)(iii) Purpose of the African Union.

The main stated purpose of the AU is to;

  • To achieve greater unity and solidarity between the African countries and Africans.
  • To defend the sovereignty, territorial integrity and independence of its Member States.
  • To accelerate the political and social-economic integration of the continent.
  • To promote and defend African common positions on issues of interest to the continent and its peoples.
  • To encourage international cooperation, taking due account of the Charter of the United Nations and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  • To promote peace, security, and stability on the continent.
  • To promote democratic principles and institutions, popular participation and good governance.
  • To promote and protect human and peoples' rights in accordance with the African Charter on Human and Peoples' Rights and other relevant human rights instruments.
  • To establish the necessary conditions which enable the continent to play its rightful role in the global economy and in international negotiations.
  • To promote sustainable development at the economic, social and cultural levels as well as the integration of African economies.
  • To promote co-operation in all fields of human activity to raise the living standards of African peoples.
  • To coordinate and harmonize the policies between the existing and future Regional Economic Communities for the gradual attainment of the objectives of the Union.
  • To advance the development of the continent by promoting research in all fields, in particular in science and technology.
  • To work with relevant international partners in the eradication of preventable diseases and the promotion of good health on the continent.

(b) South Africa joined the Organisation of African Unity (OAU) on 6 June 1994, and became a member of the African Union at its launch in Durban on 9 July 2002.

Southern African Development Community (SADC)

(a)(ii) The Southern African Development Community currently has 16 members. These are;

Angola

Botswana

Comoros

Democratic Republic of Congo

Lesotho

Madagascar

Malawi

Mauritius

Mozambique

Namibia

Seychelles

Eswatini

United Republic of Tanzania

Zambia

Zimbabwe

(a)(iii) Purpose of SADC.

To promote sustainable and equitable economic growth and socio-economic development that will ensure poverty alleviation with the ultimate objective of its eradication, enhance the standard and quality of life of the people of Southern Africa and support the socially disadvantaged through regional integration.

(b) The Republic of South Africa acceded to the SADC Treaty on 29 August 1994

Southern African Customs Union (SACU)

(a)(ii) The Southern African Customs Union has 5 members. These are;

Botswana

Eswatini

Lesotho

Namibia

(a)(iii) The purpose of SACU.

To serve as an engine for regional integration and development, industrial and economic diversification, the expansion of intra-regional trade and investment, and global competitiveness.

(b) The Union of South Africa joined SACU on 29 June 1910.

United Nations Specialised Agencies

South Africa is also a member of the following United Nations Specialised Agencies. It should be noted that while South Africa is a member of these agencies, the specialised technical nature of the work undertaken by these bodies is dealt with by respective line function departments in South Africa. Individual member countries of the various institutions will not be listed individually, but the information is freely available on the web pages of the respective bodies.

(a)(ii) There are currently 16 specialised agencies. These are;

Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO)

(a)(ii) The current membership of the FAO is 195 countries.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the FAO.

The FAO is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN), which leads international efforts to eliminate hunger with the objective of achieving food security and nutrition for all, and to ensure that people have regular access to food and nutrition. The FAO works in over 130 countries worldwide and has established their Sub-Regional office in Johannesburg, South Africa.

(b) South Africa joined the FAO on 16 October 1945.

International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO)

(a)(ii) There are 192 ICAO members, consisting of 191 of the 193 UN members (all but Dominica, Liechtenstein), plus the Cook Islands.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the ICAO

ICAO's primary role is to provide a set of standards which will help regulate aviation across the world. It classifies the principles and techniques of international air navigation, as well as the planning and development of international air transport to ensure safety and security

(b) South Africa became a member of the ICAO in 1947, having ratified the Chicago Convention of 1944, on 1 March 1947.

International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)

(a)(ii) There are currently 176 members of IFAD.

(a)(iii) Purpose of IFAD.

The United Nations International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is a specialised agency of the United Nations dedicated to eradicating rural poverty in developing countries. It was established as an international financial institution in 1977 as one of the major outcomes of the 1974 World Food Conference.

(b) South Africa became a member of IFAD on 14 February 1997.

International Labour Organization (ILO)

(a)(ii) The ILO currently has 187 member states, all of which are members of the United Nations.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the ILO.

The International Labour Organisation (ILO) is devoted to promoting social justice and internationally recognised human and labour rights, pursuing its founding mission that social justice is essential to universal and lasting peace. The ILO is the only tripartite U.N. agency that brings together governments, employers and workers representatives of 187 member States, to set labour standards, develop policies and devise programmes promoting decent work for all women and men. Today, the ILO's Decent Work agenda helps advance the economic and working conditions that give all workers, employers and governments a stake in lasting peace, prosperity and progress.

(b) South Africa was re-admitted as a member of the ILO on 26 May 1994. This followed a period of 30 years of isolation from international labour forums after the country withdrew from the ILO in 1964 as a result of political pressure.

International Maritime Organization (IMO)

(a)(ii) As of 2018, there are 173 member states of the IMO, which includes 172 of the UN member states plus the Cook Islands.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the IMO.

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is a permanent international body devoted to improving safety at sea. The purposes of IMO are “to provide machinery for cooperation among Governments in the field of governmental regulation and practices relating to technical matters of all kinds affecting shipping engaged in international trade; to encourage and facilitate the general adoption of the highest practicable standards in   matters concerning maritime safety, efficiency of navigation and prevention and control of marine pollution from ships”. The Organization is also empowered to deal with administrative and legal matters related to these purposes.

(b) South Africa became a full member of the IMO in February 1995 after having observer status from 1948.

International Monetary Fund (IMF)

(a)(ii) The IMF currently has 189 member countries.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the IMF.

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) is an organization working to foster global monetary cooperation, secure financial stability, facilitate international trade, promote high employment and sustainable economic growth, and reduce poverty around the world.

(b) South Africa joined the IMF on 27 December 1945.

International Telecommunications Union (ITU)

(a)(ii) An organization based on public-private partnership since its inception, ITU currently has a membership of 193 countries and almost 800 private-sector entities and academic institutions.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the ITU.

The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) is an agency of the United Nations (UN) whose purpose is to coordinate telecommunication operations and services throughout the world. Originally founded in 1865, as the International Telegraph Union, the ITU is the oldest existing international organization. ITU headquarters are in Geneva, Switzerland.

(b) South Africa joined the ITU on 1 January 1910.

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO)

(a)(ii) There are 193 member states in UNESCO, including that of Palestine.

(a)(iii) Purpose of UNESCO.

UNESCO’s mission is to contribute to the building of peace, the eradication of poverty, sustainable development and intercultural dialogue through education, the sciences, culture, communication and information. The Organization focuses, in particular, on two global priorities: Africa and Gender equality.

(b) South Africa joined UNESCO on 12 December 1994.

The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA)

(a)(ii) The IAEA has 170 member states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the IAEA.

The IAEA seeks to accelerate and enlarge the contribution of atomic energy to peace, health and prosperity throughout the world. It ensures that assistance provided by it or at its request or under its supervision or control is not used in such a way as to further any military purpose. The IAEA has two regional offices in Toronto and Tokyo, and two liaison offices in New York City and Geneva. The IAEA runs laboratories specialized in nuclear technology in Austria and Monaco.

(b) South Africa is a founding member of the IAEA which was established in 1957.

United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO)

(a)(ii) UNIDO currently has 168 member states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of UNIDO.

The mission of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO is to promote and accelerate inclusive and sustainable industrial development (ISID) in Member States.

(b) South Africa joined UNIDO on 24 October 2000.

Universal Postal Union (UPU)

(a)(ii) The UPU has 192 member countries.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the UPU.

The Universal Postal Union (UPU), established by the Treaty of Bern of 1874, is a specialized agency of the United Nations (UN) that coordinates postal policies among member nations, in addition to the worldwide postal system. Purpose of the UPU.

(b) South Africa joined the UPU on 22 August 1994.

World Bank

(a)(ii) The World Bank has 189 members.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the World Bank (IBRD)

The World Bank is an international financial institution that provides loans to countries of the world for capital projects. It comprises two institutions: the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD), and the International Development Association (IDA). The organizations that make up the World Bank Group are owned by the governments of member nations, which have the ultimate decision-making power within the organizations on all matters, including policy, financial or membership issues. Member countries govern the World Bank Group through the Boards of Governors and the Boards of Executive Directors. These bodies make all major decisions for the organizations. To become a member of the Bank, under the IBRD Articles of Agreement, a country must first join the International Monetary Fund (IMF). Membership in IDA, IFC and MIGA are conditional on membership in IBRD.

(b) South Africa joined the World Bank on 27 December 1945.

World Health Organization (WHO)

(a)(ii) The WHO has 194 member states, most of which are UN members with the exception of the Cook Islands and Niue.

(a)(iii) What is the purpose of the WHO.

WHO's main functions can be described as to act as a directing and coordinating authority on international health work, to ensure valid and productive technical cooperation, and to promote research. The objective of WHO is the attainment by all peoples of the highest possible level of health

(b) South Africa was a founding member of the WHO in 1947.

World Meteorological Organization (WMO)

(a)(ii) There are 191 member states and territories in the WMO>

(a)(iii) Purpose of the WMO.

WMO provides world leadership and expertise in international cooperation in the delivery and use of high-quality, authoritative weather, climate, hydrological and related environmental services by its Members, for the improvement of the well-being of societies of all nations

(b) South Africa joined the WMO after its establishment on 23 March 1950.

World Tourism Organization (UNWTO)

(a)(ii) The UNWTO currently has 158 member states, all of which are members of the United Nations.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the UNWTO.

The World Tourism Organization (UNWTO) is the United Nations agency responsible for the promotion of responsible, sustainable and universally accessible tourism. As the leading international organization in the field of tourism, UNWTO promotes tourism as a driver of economic growth, inclusive development and environmental sustainability and offers leadership and support to the sector in advancing knowledge and tourism policies worldwide. The UNWTO Regional Commission for Africa (CAF) seeks to leverage tourism as a catalyst for economic development on the African continent.

(b) South Africa joined the United Nations World Tourism Organisation in 1994.

World Intellectual Property Organisation (WIPO)

(a)(ii) The World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) is one of the 16 specialized agencies of the United Nations. WIPO currently has 191 member states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the WIPO.

WIPO promotes the protection of intellectual property throughout the world through cooperation among states and, where appropriate, in conjunction with other international organizations. Amongst other things, WIPO encourages the conclusion of new international treaties and the modernization of national legislation; gives technical assistance to developing countries; assembles and disseminates information; assists in obtaining protection of inventions, marks and industrial designs for which protection in several countries is desired; and promotes administrative cooperation among member states.

(b) South Africa became a member of WIPO on 23 March 1975.

Treaty Bodies

South Africa is also a member of a range of United Nations human rights treaty Bodies. These are;

  • International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR)

(a)(ii) The ICCPR has 167 state parties.

(a)(iii) The ICCPR’s purpose is that, in accordance with the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the ideal of free human beings enjoying civil and political freedom and freedom from fear and want can only be achieved if conditions are created whereby everyone may enjoy his civil and political rights, as well as his economic, social and cultural rights, and to promote universal respect for, and observance of, human rights and freedoms.

  1. South Africa ratified the ICCPR on 10 December 1998, and the Optional Protocol (on abolishing the death penalty) on 28 August 2002.
  • International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR)

(a)(ii) The ICESCR has 160 state parties.

(a)(iii) The International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) together with its sister Covenant, the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR), and the Universal Declaration, form the International Bill of Human Rights. The ICESCR was adopted by the General Assembly on 16 December 1966. The Covenant reflects the commitments adopted after World War II to promote social progress and better standards of life, reaffirming faith in human rights and employing the international machinery to that end. Since the ICESCR is an international human rights treaty, it creates legally binding international obligations to those States that have agreed to be bound by the standards contained in it.

  1. South Africa ratified the ICESCR on 12 January 2015.
  • Convention on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD)

(a)(ii) The CERD has 175 state parties.

(a)(iii) Parties to the ICERD condemn racial discrimination’ and commit ‘to the elimination of racial discrimination in all its forms.’ States promise to guarantee the right of everyone, without distinction as to race, colour, or national or ethnic origin, to equality before the law.

(b) South Africa ratified the CERD on 10 December 1998.

  • Convention on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW)

(a)(ii) The CEDAW has 187 state parties.

(a)(iii) The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW), adopted in 1979 by the UN General Assembly, is often described as an international bill of rights for women.  Consisting of a preamble and 30 articles, it defines what constitutes discrimination against women and sets up an agenda for national action to end such discrimination. The Convention defines discrimination against women as "...any distinction, exclusion or restriction made on the basis of sex which has the effect or purpose of impairing or nullifying the recognition, enjoyment or exercise by women, irrespective of their marital status, on a basis of equality of men and women, of human rights and fundamental freedoms in the political, economic, social, cultural, civil or any other field."

(b) South Africa ratified the CEDAW on 15 December 1995.

  • Convention against Torture (CAT)

(a)(ii) The CAT has 153 state parties.

(a)(iii) United Nations Convention against Torture (UNCAT) is an international human rights treaty that aims to prevent torture and other acts of cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment around the world. The Convention requires states to take effective measures to prevent torture in any territory under their jurisdiction, and forbids states to transport people to any country where there is reason to believe they will be tortured.

(b) South Africa ratified the CAT on 10 December 1998.

  • Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC)

(a)(ii) The CRC has 193 state parties.

(a)(iii) The Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) is a human rights treaty which sets out the civil, political, economic, social, health and cultural rights of children. The Convention defines a child as any human being under the age of eighteen, unless the age of majority is attained earlier under national legislation. Nations that ratify this convention are bound to it by international law. Compliance is monitored by the UN Committee on the Rights of the Child, which is composed of members from countries around the world. Once a year, the Committee submits a report to the Third Committee of the United Nations General Assembly, which also hears a statement from the CRC Chair, and the Assembly adopts a Resolution on the Rights of the Child.

(b) South Africa ratified the CRC on 16 June 1995.

  • Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD)

(a)(ii) The CRPD has 129 state parties.

(a)(iii) The CRPD Convention is intended as a human rights instrument with an explicit, social development dimension. It adopts a broad categorization of persons with disabilities and reaffirms that all persons with all types of disabilities must enjoy all human rights and fundamental freedoms. It clarifies and qualifies how all categories of rights apply to persons with disabilities and identifies areas where adaptations have to be made for persons with disabilities to effectively exercise their rights and areas where their rights have been violated, and where protection of rights must be reinforced.

(b) South Africa ratified the CRPD on 30 November 2007.

Other international bodies, treaties and structures

(a)(ii) The Commonwealth

The Commonwealth consists of 53 members including: 19 African members, 7 Asian members, 13 members from the Caribbean and the Americas, 3 members from Europe and 11 members from the Pacific. Membership include countries amongst the world’s largest, smallest, richest and poorest countries, and were those that had historical linkages with the United Kingdom. More recently, newer members, like Rwanda, have no such historical linkage, but see benefit in the association. Thirty-one (31) members are classified as small states.

Africa

Asia

Caribbean

Europe

Pacific

(a)(iii) The Commonwealth supports member countries to achieve development, democracy and peace and provides a voice for small and vulnerable states and acts as a champion for young people.

The Organisation helps to strengthen governance, build inclusive institutions and promote justice and human rights. Its work includes, growing economies, boosting trade, empowering young people, and addressing threats such as climate change, debt and inequality.

The Commonwealth also provides training and technical assistance and support decision-makers to draw up legislation and deliver policies. It deploys experts and observers who offer impartial advice and solutions to national problems and also provides systems, software and research for managing resources.

(b) South Africa re-joined the Commonwealth in 1994.

World Trade Organisation

(a)(ii) The WTO has 164 members, and 23 observers.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the WTO.

The World Trade Organization (WTO) is the international organization that oversees trade among member nations and acts as a forum for governments to negotiate trade agreements and settle trade disputes under a system of rules and procedures. Its aim is to increase world trade by lowering barriers to the international sale of goods and services, including intellectual property. The WTO was formed on January 1, 1995, replacing the postwar multilateral trading order under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT) with a more formal institutional arrangement. Headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland.

The WTO, as the only global international organisation dealing with the rules of trade between states, convenes its topmost decision-making body, the Ministerial Conference, every two years as mandated by the Marrakesh Agreement establishing the WTO. The WTO provides the multilateral framework of rules governing international trade relations, an essential mechanism for preventing and resolving trade disputes, and a forum for addressing trade related issues that affect all WTO members. The Ministerial Conference is empowered to take decisions on all matters under any of the multilateral trade agreements.

(b) South Africa was a member of the GATT and participated in the Uruguay Round of negotiations. The country ratified the Marrakesh Agreement in December 1994 and thus became a founding member of the WTO when the Organisation was established.

International Union for the Protection of new Varieties of Plants (UPOV)

(a)(ii) The UPOV currently has 75 members.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the UPOV.

The purposes of the UPOV Convention are to oblige member states of the Union to recognise and secure to breeders of new plant varieties an industrial property right (plant breeder's right), to harmonise such rights and to encourage cooperation between member states in their administration of such rights.

(b) South Africa joined the UPOV on 6 November 1977.

International Organisation for Migration (IOM)

(a)(ii) The IOM currently has 172 members.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the IOM.

As the leading international organization for migration, IOM acts with its partners in the international community to:

  • Assist in meeting the growing operational challenges of migration management.
  • Advance understanding of migration issues.
  • Encourage social and economic development through migration.
  • Uphold the human dignity and well-being of migrants.

(b) South Africa joined the IOM on 22 October 1997.

Antarctic Treaty System

(a)(ii) The total number of Parties to the Treaty is 53.

(a)(iii). Purpose of the Antarctic Treaty System.

The Antarctic Treaty was signed in Washington on 1 December 1959 by the twelve countries whose scientists had been active in and around Antarctica during the International Geophysical Year (IGY) of 1957-58. It entered into force in 1961. Some important provisions of the Treaty are:

Antarctica shall be used for peaceful purposes only (Art. I)

Freedom of scientific investigation in Antarctica and cooperation toward that end … shall continue (Art. II).

Scientific observations and results from Antarctica shall be exchanged and made freely available (Art. III).

(b) The Treaty was signed on 1 December 1959 and entered into force on 12 June 1961.

The Organisation of Vine and Wine (OIV)

(a)(ii) The OIV has 46 member states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the OIV.

The OIV is an intergovernmental organisation of a scientific and technical nature of recognised competence for its works concerning vines, wine, wine-based beverages, table grapes, raisins and other vine-based products.

(b) South Africa joined the OIV when it went into effect on 1 January 2004.

International Organisation for Standardisation (ISO)

(a)(ii) The ISO has 162 members.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the ISO.

The ISO is a world-wide federation of national standards bodies. The aim of the ISO is to promote the development of standardisation and related activities in the world with a view to facilitating the international exchange of goods and services and to develop cooperation in the spheres of intellectual, scientific, technological and economic activity. The scope of the ISO covers standardisation in all fields except electrical and electronic engineering standards, which are the responsibility of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The ISO brings together the interests of producers, users, governments and the scientific community in preparation for International Standards.

(b) South Africa joined the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) in 1946 as one of 25 founding members.

World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE)

(a)(ii) The OIE currently has 182 members.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the OIE

The need to fight animal diseases at global level led to the creation of the Office International des Epizooties through the international Agreement signed on January 25th 1924. In May 2003 the Office became the World Organisation for Animal Health but kept its historical acronym OIE. The OIE is the intergovernmental organisation responsible for improving animal health worldwide.

(b) South Africa joined the OIE on 7 November 1945.

Bureau of International Expositions (BIE)

(a)(ii) The BIE currently has 170 members.

(a)(iii) The purpose of the BIE.

The BIE is the Intergovernmental Organisation in charge of overseeing and regulating all international exhibitions that last more than three weeks and are of non-commercial nature ("Expos"). Today, 4 main types of Expos are organised under its auspices: World Expos, Specialised Expos, Horticultural Expos and the Triennale di Milano. 

(b) South Africa joined the BIE on 1 September 1993.

International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA)

(a)(ii) There are currently 158 member states with a further 24 states in the process of accession.

(a)(iii). Purpose of IRENA

IRENA is an intergovernmental organisation that supports countries in their transition to a sustainable energy future, and serves as the principal platform for international cooperation, a centre of excellence, and a repository of policy, technology, resource and financial knowledge on renewable energy.  IRENA promotes the widespread adoption and sustainable use of all forms of renewable energy, including bioenergy, geothermal, hydropower, ocean, solar and wind energy in the pursuit of sustainable development, energy access, energy security and low-carbon economic growth and prosperity. With a mandate from countries around the world, IRENA encourages governments to adopt enabling policies for renewable energy investments, provides practical tools and policy advice to accelerate renewable energy deployment, and facilitates knowledge sharing and technology transfer to provide clean, sustainable energy for the world’s growing population.

(b) South Africa is a founding member of IRENA, signing the Statute on 17 January 2010, with ratification on 17 October 2010.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW)

(a)(ii) The OPCW currently has 193 member states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the OPCW.

The Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons is the implementing body of the Chemical Weapons Convention (CWC), which entered into force in 1997. The OPCW has 193 Member States, who are working together to achieve a world free of chemical weapons.

The OPCW Member States share the collective goal of preventing chemistry from ever again being used for warfare, thereby strengthening international security. To this end, the Convention contains four key provisions:

•destroying all existing chemical weapons under international verification by the OPCW;

•monitoring chemical industry to prevent new weapons from re-emerging;

•providing assistance and protection to States Parties against chemical threats; and

•fostering international cooperation to strengthen implementation of the Convention and promote the peaceful use of chemistry.

(b) South Africa ratified the OPCW on 13 September 1995 and joined the body when it came into force on 29 April 1997.

The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT)

(a)(ii) The ATT currently has 97 states parties and 130 signatory states.

(a)(iii) Purpose of the ATT.

The Arms Trade Treaty (ATT) is an international treaty that regulates the international trade in conventional arms and seeks to prevent and eradicate illicit trade and diversion of conventional arms by establishing international standards governing arms transfers.

(b) South Africa’s instrument of ratification was deposited on 22 December 2014 and came into effect on 24 December 2014.

Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO)

(a)(ii) The CTBTO has 183 Member States, although the Treaty has not yet entered into force.

(a)(iii) The Preparatory Commission for the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty Organization (CTBTO) was established by the States Signatories to the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty on 19 November 1996 and has its headquarters in Vienna, Austria. The objective of the CTBTO is to achieve the object and purpose of the Treaty, namely to ban nuclear test explosions and to provide a forum for consultation and cooperation among Member States.

(b) South Africa signed the Treaty in 1996 and ratified it in 1999.

19 September 2018 - NW2523

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What is South Africa’s position regarding the (a) alleged arbitrary firing of the Clerk of the Pan-African Parliament (PAP) and (b) refusal by the President of the PAP to implement a decision by the Executive Council of the African Union to lift the firing of the clerk and other staff members?

Reply:

(a) South Africa, like all African Union (AU) member states, desires to see the Pan-African Parliament (PAP) operating in a more effective way in order to better serve the people of Africa. South Africa’s position is that while the dismissal of the Clerk is an internal matter of the PAP, the decision of the Executive Council of the AU should be implemented, namely that the AU Commission should “initiate an urgent independent audit of PAP to be concluded by October 2018 and that “the President of PAP shall refrain from adopting decisions with regard to staff disciplinary measures without prior approval from the Chairperson of the AU Commission until the audit is completed”.

(b) In terms of this decision, the Permanent Representatives Committee (PRC) will “consider the Audit Report and conclude its consideration no later than 15 November 2018, and based on the findings take appropriate action and report back to the Executive Council at the January 2019 Summit”.

  • The Secretariat had indicated that the Bureau of the PAP has not yet made a decision on the question of reinstating the Clerk It is expected that the PRC, when considering the envisaged Audit Report, will decide on the future of the Clerk of the PAP.
  • Paragraph 5 (c) of the Investigation Report on Pan African Parliaments Recruitment states that the “President, APROB and Clerk of Parliament should ensure that the injustices perpetrated during the recruitment process concerning certain staff is corrected forthwith”.
  • Following the Executive Council Decision, the Department of International Relations and Cooperation sent a Note Verbale to the Secretariat of the PAP requesting the re-instatement of Tebogo Mhlongo, a South African national whose employment was terminated in June 2016.
  • Through a Note Verbale, dated 10 August 2018, the Secretariat of the PAP responded as follows:

Quote

“After consideration by the Bureau of the Pan-African Parliament, direction has been provided by the Bureau of the Pan-African Parliament and the Secretariat is in the process of processing it. The institution will ensure that it finalizes its reflection of the way forward of implementing the said Executive Council decision as soon as possible. Once the institutional position and options are determined, the Pan-African Parliament will be expected to consult with the African Union Commission, as indicated in the said decision and give a hearing to the concerned staff members to get their perspectives. Upon doing so implementation will commence upon receipt of funds to finance the implementation.

Unquote

19 September 2018 - NW2400

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether, in view of her department’s mandate to manage and implement international relations and co-operation, she has been informed that land ownership around Mpumalanga and other parts of the country has been contested by external parties before the land reform programme started; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) did the Government at any stage engage the Kingdom of eSwatini about land and border issues since 27 April 1994; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what was the (a) purpose or objective of the commission that was set up by the Government in 2006 (details furnished) to discuss land and border matters with their counterparts from eSwatini and (b) outcome of those talks; (4) what was the outcome of the various Diplomatic Notes sent between the United Kingdom, the Republic of South Africa and the Kingdom of eSwatini, between 1966 and 1969, requesting that borders between the two countries be defined; (5) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) Yes, I have been informed and I am aware that the Government of Kingdom of eSwatini has over the years submitted claims on some parts of South Africa’s territory. South Africa’s position on such cases will be informed by:

i) South Africa’s Constitution (Schedule 1A) defines the territory of the Republic.

ii) The OAU 1964 Resolution AHG/Res.16 (1) on colonial borders, as well as the AU Constitutive Act 2001, Article 4(b), and

iii) International Law.

(2) Yes, at the request of the Kingdom of eSwatini, the South African Government has since 1994 engaged them on their land and border claims. In this regard, the two governments engaged with a view to resolving the land and border matters.

(3) (a) In 2005, the then Minister of Foreign Affairs, established the South African International Boundaries Committee (SAIBC) to investigate the land and border claims by the Kingdom of eSwatini. In this regard, the SAIBC had met with the Swaziland Border Restoration Committee (BRC) on several occasions to discuss the land and border matters.

(b) The outcomes of those meetings resulted in both sides restating their positions on the land and border dispute. The SAIBC presented its report to the then Minister of Foreign Affairs, subsequent to which, the then Minister, disbanded the SAIBC.

(4) It has proven difficult to find such material and to even determine the location where the information may be kept, considering that the diplomatic notes referred to, date back from the period between 1966 and 1969.

(5) No.      

19 September 2018 - NW2360

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Have there been any businesspersons on the foreign delegations who have visited the country on diplomatic visits since 1 January 2018; if so, (a) what are the names of the businesspersons and (b) which foreign delegation did each businessperson accompany?

Reply:

There has not been any businessperson who accompanied me abroad as Minister of International Relations and Cooperation.

17 September 2018 - NW2656

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Government has an official position on the (a) alleged maltreatment of a certain person (name furnished), (b) deployment of the armed forces to Kasumbalesa and Kinshasa, who used violence to oppress peaceful supporters of the specified person, (c) use of controversial electronic voting machines despite domestic and international opposition, (d) credibility of voters’ rolls with particular reference to allegations of significant numbers of duplicates and/or (e) continued detention of political prisoners in the Democratic Republic of the Congo; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) During President Ramaphosa’s visit to the DRC, President Kabila briefed the President about the matter of Mr Katumbi during which the government of the DRC explained their national legal requirements that prevented Mr Katumbi from registering in the national elections.

b) It should be noted that the deployment of the members of the DRC armed forces within the sovereign territory of the DRC remains a decision of the government of DRC. In this regard, South Africa, however, echoes the Statement of the UNSC of 17 August 2018 that underlined the importance of the entire Congolese political class and the institutions responsible for organizing elections to remain committed to ensure the success of the rest of the electoral process, leading to a peaceful transfer of power, in accordance with the Congolese constitution.

Further, South Africa also continues to encourage all Congolese stakeholders to create all the necessary conditions to ensure an environment conducive to the peaceful and inclusive conduct of political activities to ensure that the elections take place with the requisite conditions of transparency, credibility and inclusivity.

c) In terms of the concerns regarding the utilisation of electronic voting machines, it should be noted that the Independent National Electoral Commission of the DRC (CENI) gave a presentation on the preparations for the elections and the utilisation of the electronic voting machines to the SADC Double Troika Summit that took place in April 2018. The presentation was noted.

In addition, I wish to refer the Honourable Member to the Joint Communique issued by the Presidency on 10 August 2018 on the President’s Working Visit to the DRC, it states:

“The two Heads of State noted that the political and security situation is calm throughout the national territory of the Democratic Republic of the Congo and took note of the significant progress made in the ongoing electoral process in the country, with regard to the commitments made in accordance with the electoral calendar published on 5 November 2017 by the Independent National Electoral Commission (CENI) and providing for the organization of presidential, legislative and provincial elections at the end this year.

The two Heads of State noted, among other things, the continued financing of the electoral process by the Congolese Government, which has just completed the stage of submitting candidatures for the presidential, legislative and provincial elections, in compliance with the constitutional rules and national laws of the Democratic Republic of Congo”.

e) The matter of the detention of any individual was not discussed during the meeting.

17 September 2018 - NW2524

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Kalyan, Ms SV to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)Whether her department received any requests from any African state to provide training to its presidential VIP protection units in each of the past five financial years and since 1 April 2018; if so, (a) which States submitted requests for assistance, (b) which department(s) provided training, (c) what number of persons were trained, (d) what was the duration of the training and (e) what total costs did the department(s) incur in terms of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation, (iii) food and (iv) transport for each training period; (2) whether the States that requested training contributed to the costs incurred; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes, requests were received from the Central African Republic and the Republic of Liberia.

(b) The training for the Central African Republic is provided by the South African Police Service (SAPS). The request from the Republic of Liberia is still being considered, therefore, no further details are available with respect to this request.

(c) A Thirty-two (32) member team from the Central African Republic will be receiving training.

(d) The training for the Central African Republic team will be conducted for six (6) weeks.

(e) The total cost projected for training a team from the Central African Republic is R 1 765 800.00.

(i) The projected costs for flights is R 1 080 000.00.

(ii) The projected cost for accommodation is R 267 840.00. This amount includes projected cost for food.

(iii) Transport costs will be covered by SAPS.

(2) The Central African Republic will not make a contribution towards this training.

17 September 2018 - NW2568

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) DDGs: There are two (2) Acting Deputy Directors-General (DDGs) currently.

(ii) CDs: There are two (2) Acting Chief Directors at this stage.

(bb) DDGs: There are sixteen (16) DDGs employed on a permanent capacity.

CDs: There are fifty five (55) Chief Directors employed on a permanent capacity.

(b) DDGs: Five (5) of the 16 DDGs are women.

CDs: Twenty eight (28) of the Chief Directors are women.

(2) (a) and (b) The African Renaissance and International Cooperation Fund (ARF) does not have a chief executive officer or directors as per the Honourable Member’s question. ARF is not essentially an entity as contemplated in Schedule 3A and 3C of Public Finance Managment Act of 1999. It is a Fund that International Relations and Cooperation oversees. ARF has an Advisory Committee comprising of officials from the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) and the National Treasury.

14 September 2018 - NW2717

Profile picture: Mokgalapa, Mr S

Mokgalapa, Mr S to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether the Government has a policy on the conditions and/or circumstances under which South Africa is willing to engage with perceived dictatorial leaders in Africa and beyond; if so, (a) do such leaders have to meet any requirements in order to enjoy the support of the Government and (b) did the Government take the Democratic Republic of the Congo’s (DRC) refusal to permit Mr Moise Katumbi, an opposition party candidate, entry into the country into consideration while planning the President’s trip to the DRC, given that it posed an alleged fundamental threat to democratic processes in the DRC?

Reply:

(a) At the heart of South Africa’s foreign policy since 1994 is the promotion of democracy, rule of law, good governance and observance of human rights. South Africa therefore conducts her bilateral relations with the countries on the Continent and beyond desiring to achieve these objectives.

(b) The Working Visit of the President to the DRC was part of his courtesy visit to the region since he assumed office. The purpose of such visits is to consult on bilateral cooperation and issues of common interest. The matter of Mr Katumbi was part of bilateral discussions during which the Government of the DRC explained their national legal requirements that prevented Mr Katumbi from registering in the national elections. The explanation was noted.

14 September 2018 - NW2681

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

(a) What (i) number of multi-lateral agreements with other States is the Government engaged in, (ii) are the names of the countries involved in each agreement and (iii) is the purpose of each agreement and (b) on what date was each agreement signed?

Reply:

a) (i) Since 1994 the Government of the Republic of South Africa has signed, ratified or acceded to four hundred and sixteen (416) multilateral agreements.

(ii) & (iii) The information requested by the Honourable Member is available on the Department’s website, http://www.dirco.gov.za.

(b) Please see my response above.