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02 September 2019 - NW283

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) Total amount budgeted for his private office for the 2019/20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since May 2019?

Reply:

(a)

R20 717 000.00

(b)

(i)

R16 595 000.00

       
 

(ii)

(iii)

(iv)

 

Salary Level

Job Title

Qualification

 

13

Private Secretary

  • Professional Receptionist and Personal Assistant Certificate,
  • IMM Marketing management Diploma,
  • Advanced Taxation Graduate Programme
 

9

Assistant Private Secretary

  • Diploma Secretarial,
  • Office Administration,
  • Advanced Certificate : Office Management
 

13

Senior Parliamentary and Cabinet Services

  • Bachelor of Commerce Degree
 

13

Head: Administration

  • Diploma in Human Resources Management
 

13

Media Liaison Officer

  • B. Tech Degree in Journalism
  • National Diploma in Journalism
 

12

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support Officer

  • Senior Certificate
 

9

Administrative Secretary

  • National Senior Certificate
 

8

Registry Clerk

  • Bachelor of Administration
 

7

Receptionist

  • Diploma in Office Administration
 

6

Driver/Messenger

  • National Senior Certificate
 

6

Driver/Messenger

  • National Senior Certificate
 

5

Food Service Aid

  • National Senior Certificate
 

(v)

Job Description of each employee appointed in his private office since May 2019. As per the DPSA benchmark job descriptions for Ministerial Support Staff.

02 September 2019 - NW528

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) How does his department ensure that proper monitoring and evaluation is done on the allocation of the provincial budget towards Sports, Arts and Culture; (2) (a) what amount was allocated to each province to Sports, Arts and Culture for the past five years, (b) has any of the provinces underspent their budgets, (c) what total amount in each province was spent on (i) salaries and (ii) actual development of sports, arts and culture and (d)(i) what amount of the total amount was spent on soprts development in Namaqualand in the Northern Cape over the past five years and (ii) where was it spent; (3) Whether there is any allocation towards young developing cricket players in the Northern Cape, if not, why not?

Reply:

1.  – The Department coordinates quarterly meetings with all nine provinces to discuss the progress, challenges and the way forward in the implementation of the grant projects,

- Provinces also submit monthly financial, quarterly and annual evaluation reports for the department to monitor their spending and performance,

- Monitoring visits to projects are conducted and site meetings are attended regularly,

- The Department conducts an evaluation of the performance of the grant annually as required by the Division of Revenue Act.

- The Department allows provinces to use a maximum of 5 per cent of the total amount allocated to them for capacity building and provincial coordination of the grant. The Department advises provinces to utilise these funds for the purpose it is meant for and to improve project management skills and capacity.

- The Department continues to provide oversight over the implementation of the project through MINMEC and the TIC on a quarterly basis to ensure regular communication and reporting.

2. (a) what amount was allocated to each province to Sports, Arts and Culture for the past five years

past five years allocation

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

109 418

143 694

149 320

156 105

160 584

FS

119 013

155 776

157 758

159 017

159 504

GP

125 608

155 693

163 339

172 428

168 530

KZN

122 754

157 696

163 162

173 093

174 397

LP

81 010

112 156

115 295

121 184

125 643

MP

114 781

150 325

155 289

162 777

162 479

NC

118 396

147 121

152 313

163 000

159 554

NW

98 883

130 096

136 494

141 092

136 369

WC

126 347

158 469

164 162

171 264

176 624

TOTAL

1 016 210

1 311 026

1 357 132

1 419 960

1 423 684

(b) has any of the provinces underspent their budgets?

Yes,

Underspending

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

26 873

5 174

1 268

0

5 844

FS

5 566

459

1 528

14 805

17 650

GP

9 587

49 534

33 008

53 109

18 606

KZN

14 199

38 995

9 878

-68

-288

LP

37 439

15 502

408

7 041

14 200

MP

12 404

36 186

15 112

0

145

NC

18 549

23 976

18 703

30 714

3 754

NW

20 404

20 526

17 032

12 729

21 473

WC

0

464

0

0

0

TOTAL

145 021

190 816

96 937

118 330

81 384

(c) what total amount in each province was spent on

(i) salaries

budget spent on salaries

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

34 303

39 707

46 635

52 886

57 697

FS

25 383

38 834

60 906

72 996

68 533

GP

15 322

37 866

40 000

53 600

59 698

KZN

4 245

4 789

7 344

10 398

10 018

LP

12 214

20 783

31 946

35 430

37 182

MP

22 904

26 079

30 250

42 341

42 343

NC

25 037

27 821

37 652

43 408

51 171

NW

27 083

32 973

39 082

43 821

48 398

WC

86 762

110 774

122 710

134 147

151 531

TOTAL

253 253

339 626

416 525

489 027

526 571

(c) what total amount in each province was spent on

(ii) actual development of sports, arts and culture,

budget spent towards development of sports, arts and culture

 

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EC

75 115

103 987

102 685

103 219

102 887

FS

93 630

116 942

96 852

86 021

90 971

GP

110 286

117 827

123 339

118 828

108 832

KZN

118 509

152 907

155 818

162 695

164 379

LP

68 796

91 373

83 349

85 754

88 461

MP

91 877

124 246

125 039

120 436

120 136

NC

93 359

119 300

114 661

119 592

108 383

NW

71 800

97 123

97 412

97 271

87 971

WC

39 585

47 695

41 452

37 117

25 093

TOTAL

762 957

971 400

940 607

930 933

897 113

02 September 2019 - NW485

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1) Whether the integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department have commenced as she undertook during the Debate on Vote 11 - Public Works and Infrastructure Appropriation Bill in the National Assembly, on 10 June 2019; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the audits commence; if so, (i) what are the relevant details and (ii) by what date will the audits be completed; (2) what (a) are the terms of reference of the integrity and lifestyle audits and (b) aspects of the senior officers’ professional and personal lives will be audited; (3) whether integrity and lifestyle audits include declarations of conviction in cases of theft, criminal charges and pending prosecutions or convictions; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether the integrity and lifestyle audits are being conducted by an external service provider; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, (a) who is the service provider and (b) how was the service provider appointed; (5) whether the integrity and lifestyle audits are based on self-disclosure; if so, how is the personal information being verified?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

1. The integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials within the Department have not as yet commenced. The SIU has been identified to conduct this work in Government Departments. This mandate will be effected through a Presidential Proclamation which is still under consideration. On the day of the Budget Vote, 10 July 2019, the Department formally advised the SIU of its readiness to subject the Minister, Deputy Minister, the Director General and the rest of senior management to integrity and lifestyle audits.

(a) See the response above

(b) We will be advised by the SIU as soon as a Proclamation (which will spell out the terms of reference of the audit) is issued by the Presidency.

(i) See the response in paragraph 1 above

(ii) See the response in paragraph 1 above

2. See response in paragraph 1 above

3. See response in paragraph 1 above

4. See response in paragraph 1 above

5. See response in paragraph 1 above

02 September 2019 - NW216

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in

(i) his department

32 vacancies

(ii) each provincial departments reporting to him; and

None

(b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case.

The post of Director General was advertised during July 2019. Critical posts been prioritised to be filled.

02 September 2019 - NW486

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the results of the integrity and lifestyle audits of senior officials in her department, as undertaken by her during the Debate on Vote No 11 – Public Works and Infrastructure, Appropriation Bill in the National Assembly on 10 June 2019, will be available to the public; if not, why not; if so, how will the information be made available?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

The decision to disclose the results of the integrity and lifestyle audits has not been made. I will apply my mind after consulting with Cabinet colleagues on the best way to deal with the outcome of the reports arising from lifestyle audits.

02 September 2019 - NW491

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Why was the deployment of troops only authorise for a two-month deployment instead of the several requests for a three-month deployment of soldiers in the Cape flats, Cape Town, (b) why were only about 400 soldiers deployed while the President authorised 1320 soldiers for deployment and (c) how will the R23 million authorised for the deployment be spent; (2) was the R23 million provided for in the existing budget of her department and the SA National Defence Force; if not, (a) how and (b) from where will the R23million be funded; if so, what will be the impact on the already underfunded budget?

Reply:

1. (a) The duration of the employment was decided upon following consultation with all relevant stakeholders.

(b) The Presidential Minute and the letters sent to Parliament indicated the employment of a total of 1320 soldiers, but for operational reasons the commanders can utilise the number of soldiers required at any given time during the operation.

(c) On allowances and operational support.

2. No

(a) and (b) through a reprioritisation with the existing budget allocation of the Department.

02 September 2019 - NW257

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department reserved a percentage of the department’s budget for the current financial year for disaster management; if not, why not, considering the risky nature of the agricultural sector; if so, what informed the percentage?

Reply:

The former Department of Rural Development and Land Reform established at national level, has sub-programme called Rural Disaster Mitigation Services which is aimed at coordinating departmental disaster management related functions in compliance with the Disaster Management Framework of 2005. As a result, the Department allocates within its budget, funds for capacity building and disaster risk reduction that are implemented annually. The sub-programme is allocated a total amount of R15.4 million.

During unforeseen disaster events, the Department, upon declaration of a disaster reprioritization or funding within existing budget for relief efforts in consultation with relevant stakeholders is made to cater for the disaster.

02 September 2019 - NW529

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(a) What amount does his department spend on funding and overseeing the five national playhouses, (b) (i) in what provinces do they function and (ii) with how many productions in each province and (c) what total amount is annually generated by the playhouses? (

Reply:

(a) Amount spent by the Department:

Name of playhouse

(a) Total amount

(b) (i) Which Province they function

(ii) the number of productions in each province

(c) amount of self generated income

Artscape

60 912

Western Cape

844

22100

KZN Playhouse

49632

Kwa Zulu-Natal

172

31880

South African State Theatre

55 453

Gauteng

170

34753

Market Theatre Foundation (Windy Brow)

46303

Gauteng

35

22336

PACOFS

45322

Free State

24

3599

02 September 2019 - NW520

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether any cases of sexual harassment emanating from her department have been referred to the Commission for Gender Equality since 1 January 2016; if not, why not; if so, what number of (a) cases were referred to the Commission, (b) the specified cases resulted in findings against the perpetrator and (c) the specified cases are still not finalised?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

Yes, there is a case of sexual harassment that was referred to the Commission for Gender Equality by the complainant.

  1. only one case was referred to the Commissioner for Gender Equality;
  2. the case is still pending disciplinary hearing;
  3. the case is still pending disciplinary hearing.

02 September 2019 - NW212

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the total (a) number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(a) None

(b) None

 

30 August 2019 - NW201

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(a) What is the combined generation capacity of rooftop solar installations in the Republic according to his department's estimate and (b) what number of hours of load-shedding was prevented by such installations? NW1157E

Reply:

a) There are no official rooftop solar 1nstaiied capacity numbers as most of these installations were considered "generation for own use" in line with the old Schedule 2 of the Electricity Regulation Act (ERA) which exempted !hem from the requirement to be licensed or registered. Realising the impact these installations are likely to have on capacity planning, power systems operations and personal safety, in year 2017 the Department amended Schedule 2 of ERA therefore compelling these facilities to be registered or licensed with National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA). NERSA is in the process of finalising the registration processes and rules, which will enable formal collection and analysis of information and data or. distributed generation.
The South African Photovoltaic Association (SAPV!A) estimate installed rooftop solar capacity in the country to be about 280MW.

b) There are no official number of hours as the installed capacity of rooftop solar is not known.

30 August 2019 - NW124

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy:

Whether certain persons and certain companies (names and details furnished) played any role in the (a) negotiation, (b) facilitation and/or (c) finalisation of the South Sudan oil deal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) was the role of each specified person and company in the deal, (ii) outcome was achieved by the involvement of each person and company and (iii) amount did each person and company receive in remuneration for services rendered? NW1085E

Reply:

(a) Njock Ajuk Eyong is the CEO of Centurion Law Goup.
(b) The "Joint working committee" from SFF and Nilepet thus constituted for the "Nile-Orange Energy Project" appointed Centurion Law Firm, South Africa:-

(a)(b) to perform the function of Legal Services Advisory in order to assist with the completion and submission of Exploration Production Sharing Agreement (EPSA) after following due process.

(c) Centurion Law Firm was the only company contracted to SFF.

(i) Centurion Law Firm rendered Legal Advisory Services. The key factors considered for appointment of any law firm were knowledge and proven expertise in completing an Exploration Production Sharing Agreement in South Sudan post cessation from Sudan; Knowledge and proven expertise regarding South Sudan Upstream Legislation; Presence and local content in South Sudan and knowledge of South African laws; Easily approachable and quick turnaround time.

(ii) The Centurion Law firm appointed, delivered the set objectives, resulting in signing of Exploration production sharing agreement (EPSA) being signed on Q6th May 2019 at Juba.

(iii) Centurion Law Firm was the only company in this regard that was contracted to SFF and were paid according to the agreed contracted rates.

(c) Eric Prince did not play any role

(d) Blackwater America did not play any role

(e) Frontier Resource Group did not play any role
(f) Thiangrial Petroleum did not play any role

30 August 2019 - NW320

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) With reference to his reply to question 26 on 8 July 2019, by what date will he table the forensic report in the National Assembly; (2) whether any disciplinary action will be taken against anyone found to be implicated; if not, in each case, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of each person found to be implicated and (b) by what date will disciplinary action be taken in each case; (3) whether any (a) criminal and/or (h) civil action is envisaged as a result of the conclusion of the investigation; if not, why not; if so, what is the (i) name of each person in this regard and (ii) current status of the criminal and/or civil action; (4) Whether the costs incurred as a result of (a) the sale of the strategic fuel reserves under investigation, (b) the resulting investigation and (c) all criminal and civil action taken and planned will be recovered from those persons found guilty; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1287

Reply:

(1) The forensic report will be tabled in Parliament once all the necessary internal governance processes are completed.

(2) Appropriate action and sanction will be taken against those found to be implicated in due course.

(a) Given that the civil litigation and parallel criminal investigation processes are at a sensitive and critical stage and we would not want to jeopardise the case it is thus that further details in relation to name of the implicated parties will be disclosed at an appropriate time.

(b) The timing of the disciplinary action will also be based on the outcomes of the parallel civil litigation and criminal investigation process currently under way.

(3) (a)(b) It is the intent of the organisation to fully pursue appropriate civil and criminal action without any fear or favour with the intentions of ensuring restoring good governance and curbing any harmful acts of dishonesty and associated activities in our State Owned Entities.

(i)(ii) Details pertaining to this process will be disclosed in due course given that the civil litigation and parallel criminal investigation is at sensitive stage.

(4) In line with legislation and best practice the entity intents to fully ensure that all costs incurred by the state in relation to this matter are recovered from those that are found to be implicated in the sale of the strategic reserves. This is to• end a very strong message that such behaviours cannot be tolerated and will be dealt with harshly

30 August 2019 - NW221

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What (a) is the incidence level as a percentage of mineworkers of (i) pneumoconiosis and (ii) silicosis in South African mines, (b) steps is his department taking to reduce the incidence levels of these occupation related diseases and (c) is the trend of the specified diseases in the mining sector over the past 10 years?

Reply:

(a)(i) The incidence level as a percentage of mineworkers with pneumoconiosis is 0.01 % reported from the 2017 annual medical reports and 0,00% in 2018.

(a)(ii) silicosis is 0.13% in 2017 and 0.09% in 2018.

(b)The department has carried focused audits and inspections on airborne pollutants in all the regions. The department has reviewed the Guideline on Airborne Pollutants in 2017/2018 financial year which was popularised industry-wide during 2018/2019 financial year. The department is monitoring airborne pollutants overexposures through occupational hygiene statutory returns on a quarterly basis. During the 2014 OHS Summit the South African Mining Industry, (State, Employers and Organised Labour) committed to reduce the Occupational Exposure Levels (OEL) of airborne pollutants by 2024 to reduce occupational lung diseases. The mining sector is engaged at annual Occupational Health Dialogues and quarterly regional tripartite forums to deliberate on programmes initiatives to reduce the incidence of occupational lung diseases (OLD) at mines.


Find here: (c)Trends of specified occupational diseases in the mining sector over the past 10 years: (i) Coal worker's pneumoconiosis (CWP) cases reported from the annual medical reports

30 August 2019 - NW490

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the name changes of the Reserve Force Units, (a)(i) what was the costs related to the name change process to date and (ii) from which budget allocation was the process funded and (b)(i) what will the financial costs be related to the (aa) changing of names, (bb) new insignia including beret/cap badges and (cc) flashes as well as colours and (ii) from which budget allocation will this be funded; (2) is this a higher priority expense as compared to the expense to increase troops and resources deployed to our land borders and the replacement of essential SA National Defence Force equipment; if not, why is this expenses still prioritised over the essentially required expenses?

Reply:

1. a (i) No additional costs were incurred since the start of the name review process because information briefs and guidelines provided for the process, were issued during the normal scheduled meetings with SA Army Formations and Units. Furthermore, detailed instructions and guidelines were also issued as part of the normal processes in the SA Army.

(ii) The process was funded from the normal command and control budget without any additional costs allocated for the name review process.

b. It is estimated that the total cost to implement the approved Name Review Process will be Rm8. This includes new insignia beret/cap badges, colours as well as other requirements for example signage etc. This objective is currently one of the many lower priority unfunded objectives of the SA Army. The implementation of the Name Review Process will be phased in over a three-year period, as and when funds become available.

2. This is not a higher priority expense compared to the expense of increased troops and resources deployed to our land borders and the replacement of essential SANDF equipment. That is why this objective is currently indicated as unfunded. It will be phased in over a three-year period as and when funds become available.

This objective must be seen as a transformational imperative that is long outstanding. Although it cannot be phased in immediately due to budget constraints, just the mere fact that these new names have been approved in principle will contribute to unit cohesion and ensure that the rich and diverse military history of South Africa is now reflected in a balanced way. It was the aim of the name review process to address this omission in a sensible and innovative manner, without any additional costs, where in stakeholders were consulted over the past 5 years.

30 August 2019 - NW153

Profile picture: Nxumalo, Mr MN

Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether he has a plan in place to ensure the safety of mine workers. Particularly when trade union members and workers decide to embark on a strike while they are underground; if not. why not: if so. what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The legislation compels all underground mines to ensure that all employees are brought to surface as soon as possible at the end of their shift, as per regulation 4.1.1 in force in terms of Schedule 4 of the Mine Health and Safety Act No 29 of 1996, as amended. The primary objective of this regulation is to prevent mine employees from being exposed to a dangerous environment for long periods of time unnecessarily. In this regard, the Department will encourage the mine employers to ensure compliance with the respective legal provisions.

Also, any dispute between the labour and employer must be resolved by using the established negotiation processes. The Commission of Conciliation Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA) can also be called to assist when there is an impasse between the two parties. Again, I want to stress that labour must refrain from underground sit-in and rather apply for a protected strike as enshrined in the Labour Relations Act


Chief Inspector Mine
Date: 09/07/2019

Recommended

Advocate T Mokoena
Director General: Department of Mineral Resources
10/07/2019

Approved/Not approved


Mr S.G Mantashe

Minister of Mineral Resource and Energy
…………./2019

30 August 2019 - NW290

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) The total amount that is budgeted for the Ministry is per Annual Performance plan approved by Parliament

(b) The proposed staff establishment of the Office of a Members Administrative staff is informed by the Guide for Members of the Executive as approved by the President with effect from 8 June 2019.

(b)The (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

(i) Remuneration is in accordance to the level of the employee in public service

(b)

(ii) salary level

(iii) job title,

(iv) Qualification

(v)Job description

1

IV

Special Advisor

DPhil, Engineering

Dispensation for the appointment and Remuneration of persons (Special Advisers) appointed to executive Authorities on ground of policy Considerations in terms of section 12A (1) of the Public Service Act, 1994): Provides that Special Advisers may be appointed-

  • to advise the Executive Authority on the exercise or performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties;
  • to advise the Executive Authority on the development of policy that will promote the relevant department’s objectives; or
  • to perform such other tasks as may be appropriate in respect of the exercise or performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties.

2

IV

Special Advisor

D Phil, Economics

Dispensation for the appointment and Remuneration of persons (Special Advisers) appointed to executive Authorities on ground of policy Considerations in terms of section 12A (1) of the Public Service Act, 1994): Provides that Special Advisers may be appointed-

  • to advise the Executive Authority on the exercise or performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties;
  • to advise the Executive Authority on the development of policy that will promote the relevant department’s objectives; or
  • to perform such other tasks as may be appropriate in respect of the exercise or performance of the Executive Authority’s powers and duties.

3

14

Chief of Staff

Advance Certificate in Municipal Governance and Management

Current study: Advanced Diploma in Public Management

  • To manage the office of and render a support service to the executive authority (EA).
  • Manage and coordinate matters emanating from Parliament/ Cabinet / other legislative structures and community outreach.
  • Ensure that administrative support is rendered to the executing authority on Parliamentary/Legislature and Cabinet/ matters.
  • Ensure and manage the required administrative functions are performed within the office of the EA
  • Assist the EA with his/her constituency work.
  • Assist the EA with matters emanating from his/her portfolio and official matters emanating from other activities, e.g. participation in national and international forums and structures.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

4

13

Administrative Secretary

Bachelor of Administration Honours

Current study:

Masters Degree in Public Administration

  • To manage the administrative activities in the office of the EA.
  • Provide registry support services on the office of the EA.
  • Provide logistical support for meetings.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly

5

13

Media Liaison Officer

Baccalaureus Technologiae: Journalism

  • To provide media liaison services to the EA.
  • Monitor and analyse reporting in the media on the portfolio of the EA. And prepare responses as required
  • Prepare and coordinate responses on matters relating to the portfolio.
  • Participate in GCIS forums like the Communications Forum and the Media Liaison Forum, and in the collective planning of the communication and media issues of Government.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

6

13

Private Secretary

Advanced Diploma: Public Management

Current study:

Honours in Public Administration

  • Render an administrative support service to the EA
  • Provide support to the EA with regard to preparation for meetings.
  • Support the EA with private obligations.
  • Provide a secretarial/receptionist support service to the executive authority.
  • Assist the executive authority with constituency work.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

7

13

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

Baccalaureus Legum LLB (Postgraduate)

  • To manage and coordinate matters emanating from Parliament/ Cabinet / other legislative structures and community outreach.
  • Monitor events in parliament to identify matters that have a bearing on the portfolio of the executive authority.
  • Monitor events in Cabinet/ to identify matters that have a bearing on the portfolio of the executive authority.
  • Co-ordinate activities between Pretoria and Cape Town Offices for Parliamentary sessions.
  • Support Provide assistance to the executing authority on matters that have a bearing on his/her portfolio.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents to ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

8

11

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

Diploma: Journalism

  • To manage and coordinate matters emanating from Parliament/ Cabinet / other legislative structures and community outreach.
  • Monitor events in parliament to identify matters that have a bearing on the portfolio of the executive authority.
  • Monitor events in Cabinet/ to identify matters that have a bearing on the portfolio of the executive authority.
  • Co-ordinate activities between Pretoria and Cape Town Offices for Parliamentary sessions.
  • Support Provide assistance to the executing authority on matters that have a bearing on his/her portfolio.
  • Render an efficient and effective parliamentary service.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents to ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

9

11

Community Outreach Officer

Matric

  • Provide assistance to the EA with community work.
  • Engage communities on services of the Portfolio.
  • Reach out to unblock service bottlenecks within the portfolio.
  • Address citizens’ complaints on the work of the portfolio.
  • Facilitate easy access to Public Services.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly

10

9

Assistant Appointment Secretary

Matric

  • Render an administrative support service to the executive authority.
  • Provide support to the EA with regard to preparation for meetings.
  • Support the EA with private obligations.
  • Provide a secretarial/receptionist support service to the executive authority.
  • Assist the appointments secretary with constituency work of the executive authority.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly

11

7

Registry Clerk

 

Baccalaureus Artium Cum Honoribus

  • Provide registry support services in the office of the EA
  • Ensure the smooth, efficient and effective flow of documents (receive and distribute) between the office of the executive authority, the department and other structures like cluster committees, external role players, etc.
  • File all documents in accordance with the relevant prescripts like the National Archives Act and the MIS prescripts.
  • Render a general support function in the office of the executive authority.
  • Control stock and stationary as chief user clerk for the executive authority’s office.
  • Study the relevant Public Service and departmental prescripts/policies and other documents and ensure that the application thereof is understood properly.

12

7

Secretary / Receptionist

National Diploma: Internal Auditing

  • Provide a secretarial/receptionist support service to the office of the executive authority.
  • Provides a clerical /administrative support service to the office.
  • Remain up to date with regard to prescripts/policies and procedures applicable to her/his work terrain.

13

5

Messenger/Driver

Advanced Diploma: Small Business Management

  • Provide messenger and driver services in the office of the EA.
  • Collect and deliver documents.
  • Transport employees in the office of the executive authority and guests and special advisors of the executive authority.
  • Maintain knowledge on the policies and procedures that applies in the work environment.
  • Render a general support function in the office of the executive authority.

 

30 August 2019 - NW492

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether refunds from the United Nations are based on actual strength in the form of soldiers and equipment instead of the serviceability of deployed equipment as was reported to the Portfolio Committee on Defence and Military Veterans (details furnished); (2) whether she has found that the United Nations Organisation Stabilisation Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo secured and/or ring-fenced a refund for her department or the SA National Defence Force; if so, what are the costs and comparable revenue amounts for the past five financial years?

Reply:

1. The United Nations reimbursement is based on actual strength of personnel on the ground and the serviceability of equipment deployed. If a vehicle is not serviceable during Contingent Own Equipment (COE) inspection, a penalty is levelled against the vehicle and the would be drivers and supporting staff of the vehicle also. (For example serviceability of the vehicle can be questioned as a result of a missing mirror or fire extinguisher).

2. To date claims made to the United Nations amount to RM840 that includes flying hours, manpower and amunitionThe following depicts the comparable re venue amounts for the past five financial years:

Ser No

Year

Paid

Refund

a

b

c

d

01.

2014

1 155 767 612

356 088 658

02.

2015

1 035 291 166

451 096 017

03.

2016

985 927 629

887 227 546

04.

2017

886 945 063

509 547 709

05.

2018

820 494 657

320 612 050

30 August 2019 - NW488

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) What is the status of the Thyspunt site, in the Kouga Local Municipality, which was intended to be the site of the nuclear build programme; (2) why are public participation processes around the specified site continuing; (3) what is the status of the nuclear build programme? NW1481E

Reply:

1. Thyspunt remains one of Eskom's suitable sites to host a nuclear power plant. It has undergone extensive environmental studies in the form of environmental impact assessment and nuclear site safety review by independent consultants. Eskom has submitted nuclear site installation license (N ISL) applications for Thyspunt in order to get the site ready for any South African future nuclear power plans.

2. Site approvals for nuclear power plants, the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) by the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and Nuclear Installation Site License (N ISL) from National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) are long-lead items. Consequently, the NNR is continuing with Eskom's application for NISL. The public hearings are an integral part of this NISL process.

Since receipt and acceptance of the Nuclear Installation Site Licence applications, the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR) has been seized with its internal technical review process of the Thyspunt site application, which is a lengthy and thorough process focusing on technical, scientific and onsite assessments amongst others.

The reason for holding NNR public hearings around the Thyspunt during this time is that NNR has completed its internal review process of the Thyspunt site application and is now embarking on an external consultation process to listen to health, safety and environmental concerns related to the application from interested and affected parties. The NNR embarks on this process to ensure that its regulatory decision making is independent, robust and transparent.

3. In terms of the Nuclear Energy Policy for 2008, the new nuclear build programme is still part of the energy mix. The Nuclear Energy Policy provides the government vision for developing extensive nuclear energy programme and to become self-sufficient in all aspects of the nuclear value chain for peaceful use of nuclear energy.

The nuclear build programme is informed by the Integrated Resources Plan (IRP). NEDLAC is in the process of finalizing IRP. In September 2019, the Integrated Resource Plan will be tabled in Cabinet for approval. The Integrated Resource Plan considers a diversified energy mix that include cleaner coal, nuclear, gas, hydro, renewables and battery storage. The outcomes of the revised IRP, will determine how the nuclear new build programme becomes phased in future. Government policy position is that South Africa will acquire nuclear at the price, pace and scale that the country can afford.

30 August 2019 - NW375

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a) Number of international trips planning to undertake in 2019-22

Government is currently in the process of concluding MTSF and MTEF 2020 -2025, once this is concluded the department will conclude its plans and budget.

  1. N/A
  2. N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

29 August 2019 - NW301

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) number of hectares is currently sitting in the Agricultural Land Holding account and (b) is the annual income for the account?

Reply:

a) There are 85 325 total hectares currently sitting in the Agricultural Land Holding account for the financial year 2018/2019 and

b) The amount of R 15,038,040.58 is the annual income for the account in 2018/2019 financial year.

NB:

The hectares sitting in the Agricultural holding account refers to the total number of hectares acquired in the financial year 2018/2019 which is not related to the amount of annual income since not all farms/hectares acquired qualify for rental billing/collection

29 August 2019 - NW440

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Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What (a) progress has been made with conducting the State land audit and (b) are the timelines for completing the specified audit; (2) what (a) methodology is being applied in compiling the audit and (b) sources are being consulted for conducting the land audit; (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) The final report of the audit of state land conducted by the department was published in 2013.

(b) The audit was carried out between 2010 and 2012.

(2) (a) The audit involved desktop analysis and field physical verification.

(b) Deeds ownership data and Cadastral Data.

(3) No.

28 August 2019 - NW371

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?”

Reply:

(a) The international trips for the Minister are based on the requests for support from the Presidency and other key stakeholders such as the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO), for essential issues of national interest related to SME and Co-operatives development. However; the Departmental requests for international trips are based on the requirements of the Department of Small Business Development (DSBD) Annual Performance Plan as well as fulfilling prior commitments in multilateral engagements such as the Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa (BRICS) and the Indian Ocean Rim Association (IORA) that have strong SME and Co-operatives development element.

(b) The size of the delegation to any Departmental international trip is governed by the DSBD Travel Policy and approved by the Director-General. The Delegation for Ministry is determined in line with the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) and in line with the Ministerial Handbook.

(c) The (i) flights; (ii) accommodation costs and (iii) other expenses are as per National Treasury Guidelines for the applicable job levels.

 

28 August 2019 - NW385

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural DevelopmentQUESTION

(1) What (a) number of investigations undertaken by her department are currently underway and (b) are the reasons for each specified investigation; (2) whether she will make the reports of each investigation public; if not, why not; if so, by what date? NW1357E

Reply:

AGRICULTURE

1(a) Cabinet invoked Section 100 (1) of the Constitution of South Africa on the Provincial Administration of the North West Province in May 2019. President Ramaphosa then established an Inter-Ministerial Task Team (IMTT), chaired by Minister Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma, to address matters relating to the administration in North West. The IMTT was supported by the Technical Task Team (TTT) comprising of Directors-General (DGs). The TTT recommended that a forensic audit and investigation be conducted into the appointment and operations of Agridelight, which was an implementing agent for North West Department of Rural, Environment and Agricultural Development (READ) projects.

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) engaged the National Treasury (NT) in September 2018 to conduct a forensic audit on the indicators of possible fraud, financial irregularity, financial mismanagement and corruption relating to the appointment of Agridelight. This audit and investigation had to delve into subsequent operations and activities of projects funded through Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) in READ. The National Treasury began with the forensic audit and investigation in November 2018.

To date, satisfactory progress has been made on this forensic audit and investigation. The DAFF Audit Committee was briefed on the progress made relating to the process. The National Treasury will conclude its work in due course.

(b) This is the only forensic audit and investigation that is currently being conducted by the DAFF and the reason are outlined above.

2. All matters related to this forensic audit and investigation will be dealt with in terms of decisions by Cabinet which invoked Section 100 (1) of the Constitution of South Africa relating to Provincial administration of the North West Province.

RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM

(1) (a) There are 43 allegations scheduled for investigation on the rolling annual case management register. In addition, the Special Investigating Unit (SIU) was authorised to conduct investigations in terms of the following Presidential Proclamations:

Proclamation No. R. 53 of 2012 for Restitution matters;

Proclamation No. R. 7 of 2014 for State Information Technology Agency;

Proclamation No. R. 599 of 2015, and amendment to Proclamation No. R. 7 of 2014, to include Deeds matters; and

Proclamation No. R.24 of 27 for land reform matters.

(b) The Department has a duty to investigate allegations of irregularities, including fraud, corruption, financial mismanagement, financial irregularities and mismanagement, amongst others. The allegations investigated were received from the Anti-Corruption Hotline managed by the Office of the Public Service Commission, management, whistle-blowers, officials of the department and members of the public. Alleged offences based on these reports include amongst others fraud, corruption, financial mismanagement and maladministration. The investigations conducted by the SIU are carried out in terms of Proclamations by the President as provided in the Special Investigating Units and Special Tribunals Act No 74 of 1996.

2. The investigation reports of the Department are confidential and are generally not shared with the public; however requests for access to the reports may be made in terms of the applicable law, namely the Promotion of Access to Information Act 2 of 2000.

 

28 August 2019 - NW330

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

What number of licenced firearms are there in the Republic for every 100 persons?

Reply:

The total number of licensed firearms, on 31 July 2019, was 2 582 656.

The population estimate, published by Statistics South Africa (Stats SA), for June 2019. Is. 58 775022. ·

There is a total of 4,39 licensed firearms, per 100 population, In the Republic of South Africa.


Reply for question 330 recommended
GENERAL NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE
KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/23

Reply for question 330 approved

GENERAL BH CELE
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 26/08/2019
 

28 August 2019 - NW377

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Transport

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

Financial Year: July 2019 / March 2020

  1.  

b) i) Destination

ii) Date

iii) Purpose

iv) No. of Delegates

c) i) Flights

ii) Accommodation

iii) Allowances

Minister

Colombia, Cartegena

15 -17 Sept

IMO World Maritime Day Parallel Event

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R400 000, Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

USD 85 x 5persons x 5 days = USD 2125 = R32 445.80

 

Canada, Montreal

24 Sept - 4 October

ICAO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

R 832 489.65 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$174 x 5 persons x 5 days =C$ 4350 = R 50032.90

 

Tanzania

16-20 September

SADC Ministers Meeting

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately

R90 000. 00 Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

USD 117 x 5 persons x 5 days = USD 2925= R44 660.70

 

USA, New York

September

UN Climate Summit

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately

R 600 000.00 Five business class

Rates provided by the mission *

USD 153 x 5 persons x 5 days = USD 3825 =R 58 402.40

 

UAE, Abu Dhabi

6-10 October

26th World Road Congress

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

R 274 689.65 Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

UAE Dir 635 x 5 persons x 5 days = UAE Dir 5875.20 = R 24 416.80

 

Singapore, Singapore

21-10 October

26th Intelligent Transport Systems World Congress

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R400 000, Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

Singapore $ 211 x 5 persons x 5 days = Singapore $ 5275 = R 58 043.90

 

Spain, Torremolinos

21-23 October

Ministerial Conference on Fishing Vessel Safety and Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated Fishing

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R450 000, Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

Euro 102 x 5 persons x 5 days = Euro 2550 = R 43 164.10

 

Canada, Montreal

18-29 Nov

ICAO Council – Council Phase

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately

R 998 987.58 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$ 174 x 5 persons x 5 days = C$ 4350 = R 50 032.90

 

United Kingdom, London

21-22 Nov

IMO Council- Extraordinary Session

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately

R 506 913.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

 

United Kingdom, London

25 Nov - 6 December

IMO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately

R 608296.3 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

 

Switzerland

December

Geneva Convention and Conference on Road Traffic

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R500 000 Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

Swiss Francs183 x 5 persons x 5 days = Swiss Francs 4575 = R 71 710.70

 

Sweden, Stockholm

19-20 February

3rd Global Ministerial Conference on Road Safety

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

R 479 503.65 Three business class and two economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

Swedish Krona 1309 x 5 persons x 5 days = Swedish Krona 32725 = R 52 094.60

Financial Year: April 2020 – March 2021

a)

b) i) Destination

ii) Date

iii) Purpose

iv) No. of Delegates

c) i) Flights

ii)Accommodation

iii) Allowances

Minister

Canada, Montreal

April-May

ICAO Council Phase

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 900 000.00 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$ 174 x 5 persons x 5 days = C$ 4350 = R 50 032.90

 

United Kingdom, London

July

IMO Council

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 875 946.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

 

Canada, Montreal

September

ICAO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 900 000.00 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$ 174 x 5 persons x 5 days = C$ 4350 = R 50 032.90

 

United Kingdom, London

November

IMO Council

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 875 946.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

 

United Kingdom, London

December

IMO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 875 946.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

Financial Year: April 2021 – March 2022

a)

b) i) Destination

ii) Date

iii) Purpose

iv) No. of delegates

c) i) Flights

ii)Accommodation

iii) Allowances

Minister

Canada, Montreal

April-May

ICAO Council Phase

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 900 000.00 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$ 174 x 5 persons x 5 days = C$ 4350 = R 50 032.90

 

United Kingdom, London

July

IMO Council

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 729 955.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47 880.90

 

Iran, Bandar Abbas

September

World Maritime Day Parallel Event

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R500 000 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

USD 109 x 5 persons x 5 days = USD 2725 = R 41 607.00

 

Canada, Montreal

September

ICAO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 900 000.00 Five business class

Rates provided by the Mission *

C$ 174 x 5 persons x 5 days = C$ 4350 = R 50032.90

 

United Kingdom, London

November

IMO Council

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 875 946.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47880.90

 

United Kingdom, London

December

IMO Assembly

5 – Minister, Ministerial officials, IR and line function

Approximately R 875 946.00 Four business class and one economy

Rates provided by the Mission *

GBP 104 x 5 persons x5 days = GBP 2600 = R 47880.90

*The budget for foreign accommodation for the 2019/2020 financial year isR5million

ADDITIONAL NOTES:

  1. Minister may be invited by the President to participate in Binational Commissions (BNCs), State Visits, High-Level meetings, conferences etc.
  2. Minister receives, from time to time, invitations from international organisations concerned with the transport sector (maritime, aviation, road and rail).
  3. DIRCO will most often advise of confirmed meetings closer to the date, making it difficult to plan well in advance for such meetings.
  4. Almost all of the invitations are directed to the Minister, who may delegate some of these engagements to the Deputy Minister. Currently there is no indication of which international meetings the Deputy Minister will attend.
  5. Daily Allowance will be amended as per the Financial Manual.
  6. Flight prices fluctuate on a daily basis, thus it is difficult to forecast accurately. The amounts provided are an estimation and are subject to change

28 August 2019 - NW286

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?”

Reply:

The Guide for Members of the Executive give guidance on the appointment of the staff in the Private Office. It equally provides the recommended salary levels of each post. The salary levels are adjusted on an annual basis as prescribed in the Public Service Regulations.

The Office of the Minister has a staff complement as defined in the Guide for Members of the Executive. In line with the Protection of Personal Information Act (PoPi) and the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, I am unable to provide the members with such confidential information in the manner it is requested.

I however draw the honourable members to the Department’s Annual Report wherein the organogram of the Department provides the information required. Should it be insufficient, the Department will make the personal files of the officials available for further scrutiny by the Auditor General as prescribed by the Act.

a) Total amount budgeted for the private office for both the Minister and the Deputy Minister is

R 15, 844,624.00

b) (i) (ii) (iii) Ministry- the Minister’s office staff

  • One employee at salary level 14
  • Three employees at salary level 13
  • Two employees at salary level 11
  • One employees at salary level 7
  • Two employees at salary level 3
  • One employee at salary level 5

c) Deputy Minister’s office staff

• One employee at salary level 13

• One employee at salary level 12

• One employee at salary level 11

• One employees at salary level 11

One employee at salary level 3

 

_______________________________________________________________________________

27 August 2019 - NW380

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of asylum seekers have currently been awaiting an interview with a refugee status determination officer (RSDO) for more than (i) 30 days and (ii) 90 days and (b) is the average waiting time, in number of days, between the time that an application for an appointment with an RSDO is lodged until the interview takes place for all current asylum seeker applications?

Reply:

a) (i) The total number of asylum seekers registered on the Departmental system with an active section 22 permit waiting an interview with the RSDO for more than 30 days but less than 90 days is 516.

(ii) The total number of asylum seekers with an active section 22 permit awaiting an interview with the RSDO for more than 90 days is 2503.

b) The average waiting time for current asylum seeker applications is 30 days or less for an interview. It must be noted the Department can only provide accurate information on the average waiting period for cases registered on the National Immigration Information System (NISS) as from 1 January 2018 due to the enhancements done on the NIIS at that time.

 

END

26 August 2019 - NW322

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What relationship does her department have with other government departments in order to meet its objectives, (b) what is the nature of the relationship in each instance and (c) how are these relationships monitored and measured in each instance; (2) (a) what relationship does her department have with the provinces in each instance in order to meet the objectives of her department, (b) what is the nature of the relationship in each instance and (c) how are these relationships monitored and measured in each instance?

Reply:

1. (a) The department’s relationship with other government departments:

(i). We work with other departments on a whole of government approach through the cluster systems as part of both the Economic Sector, Investment, Employment and Infrastructure Development Cluster (ESIEID) and International Cooperation, Trade and Security Cluster (ICTS). We also engage with individual departments on a case by case basis.

(b). What is the nature of the relationship in each instance?

(i). The relationship that exist is that of an intergovernmental relationship where government departments work with its counterpart on intergovernmental matters.

(c). How are these relationships monitored and measured in each instance?

(i). Through Cluster systems

2. (a). The department’s relationship with provinces

(i). The department works closely with provinces and SALGA through the Tourism MINMEC. We also engage with individual municipalities and provinces on a case by case basis.

(b). What is the nature of the relationship in each instance?

(i). The relationship that exist is that of an Intergovernmental relationship where the Department of Tourism meets with provincial departments and with municipalities through SALGA to discuss intergovernmental matters and solutions to tourism challenges at provincial, local and district level.

(c). How are these relationships monitored and measured in each instance?

(i). Through intergovernmental forums e.g. MINMEC

26 August 2019 - NW247

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)Do the producers have to deliver all signed artist contracts to the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) at least 14 days prior to the first production payment by SABC and not later than 60 days after signing of the production contract; (2) whether the producers have to provide the SABC with a list of the principal performers and their remunerations for the purpose of repeat fees; if so, what clause of the SABC Freelance Contract for Performers reflects this; (3) whether the SABC has the records of fully signed contracts with producers and contracts of all actors in all productions in the SABC archives; if so, why does a certain person (name furnished) insist on fully signed contracts from contractors when the specified person could retrieve the contracts from the records kept by the SABC; (4) why (a) does the fact that the contract lacks the signature of the producer make the contract invalid and (b) can the SABC not sign as producer, as the SABC is the ultimate commissioning producer? NW1206E

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

1. Yes.

2. Yes. Producers have to provide a list of the principle performers. There is no clause in the SABC Freelance Contract for Performers that reflects this.

3. No, the SABC has records of contracts captured on its CRM system dating back to 2009 only. If actors for older programmes are claiming fees, the SABC will ask for a copy of the contract and if they don’t have a copy, an affidavit will be required. The SABC Content Drama department will watch the programmes and check the onscreen credits to establish the actors that were principled.

4. (a) A contract is only valid when all parties sign.

(b) No, the SABC cannot sign the contract as it is not the Producer of the

programme. The SABC commissions the content but does not produce it.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

26 August 2019 - NW349

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What were the main reasons cited in the applications of a certain number of individuals (details furnished) from (a) Bangladesh, (b) Pakistan, (c) India, (d) Malawi, (e) Ghana, (f) Kenya, (g) Mozambique, (h) Tanzania, (i) Zambia and (j) Thailand that led to them being granted asylum in the Republic?

Reply:

The table below indicates the main reasons for cases granted asylum from the mentioned countries as recorded on the National Immigration Information System (NIIS): -

Country

Reasons for granting

A) Bangladesh

  • Political persecution. Conflict between the ruling party and the various political parties.

b) Pakistan

  • Political instability on the border of Pakistan and Afghanistan.
  • Religious grounds, Ahmadiyya group not recognised by the Pakistani Government.
  • Clashes between Sunni and Shia.
  • Tribal conflict between the Taliban and smaller Islamic groups.

 

 

c) India

  • Religious clashes between Hindu and Muslim.

d) Malawi

  • Political reasons, conflict between the ruling party MCP and the oppositional party UDF.

e) Ghana

  • Inter-tribal clashes.
  • Female genitalia mutilation.
  • Forced Marriages.

f) Kenya

  • Political Instability (aftermath of 2007/08 elections).
  • Persecution on grounds of sexual orientation (LGBTI).
  • Persecution of the banned Mungiki ethnic group.

g) Mozambique

  • Although these cases are reflected on NIIS, the claims could not be confirmed. One case has already been withdrawn by the Standing Committee for Refugee Affairs and the other two have been inactive since 2011 and 2012 respectively. Their claims will be related to the old refugee processes. The Department is currently in a process of closing these files.

 

h) Tanzania

  • Family joining with spouse (from a different nationality) who is already a recognized refugee.
  • Albino victimization.
  • Conflict between Zanzibar and Tanzania.

i) Zambia

  • Family joining with spouse (from a different nationality) who is already a recognized refugee.
  • Political Reasons.

 

j) Thailand

  • No applications were granted asylum.

Note: According to the NIIS only a total of 1 322 cases were granted asylum (Refugee Status) from the countries indicated above.

END

26 August 2019 - NW345

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 1606 on 12 July 2017 regarding the Constitutional Court ruling in 2011 that the practice of repossessing homes without having the claims tested by a judge is illegal, Legal Aid South Africa and Lungelo Letho Human Rights Foundation have been successful in ensuring that the illegal repossession of the house of Mr Ernest Mashaba does not take place; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In July 2017, the Impact Litigation Unit of Legal Aid South Africa made contact with Lungelo Lethu Human Rights Foundations (LLHRF) who were assisting Mr Mashaba in order to start the process to apply for legal aid. We were informed that legal counsel, Advocate Douglas Shaw was already instructed to act on behalf of Mr Mashaba and 243 other persons in the same position as Mr Mashaba. Further, that counsel is considering a Class Action against 4 major banks and that Advocate Alexandra Benjamin is acting as amicus.

We further reiterated that should they require legal assistance herein they can contact Legal Aid South Africa. We have not received any further requests for assistance from Mr Mashaba or Lungelo Lethu Human Rights Foundations (LLHRF).

Legal Aid SA has in the past been involved in the litigation to protect the rights of the poor people who are set to lose their home due to foreclosure of the bond.

In the following two (2) cases Legal Aid SA was admitted as an amicus.

1. ABSA vs Mokebe

Firstly, Absa Bank Limited v Mokebe and Other Related Cases 2018 (6) SA 492 (GJ) is a landmark ruling in the protection of the Constitutional right to housing set out in section 26 of the Constitution. Legal Aid South Africa made a submission which was accepted by the full court that the monetary judgment, special execution order and the setting of a reserve price should be heard and adjudicated upon simultaneously to reduce litigation costs which may be incurred by the indigent and poor if those applications were to be heard separately in 2 or 3 separate applications. [para 26]. This court for the first time made a ruling that courts have a discretion when considering the monetary judgment and special execution order to set a reserve price in terms of the Rules of Court. This means that the risk of selling the repossessed house on auction for trifling amounts and at far less than the market value has been reduced tremendously as a result of this judgment. Any reduction in the reserve price would have to be motivated to the Court that set the original reserve price. This procedure has been documented in the Practice Directives of this Court.

2. Std. Bank vs Hendricks

Secondly, the matter of Standard Bank of South Africa v Hendricks and another and related matters 2019 (2) SA 620 (WCC). The matter dealt with seven Foreclosure matters where the Standard Bank and Absa Bank sought an order of execution against immovable property which was the primary resident of the judgement debtor. Legal Aid South Africa made important submissions where the proposed practice directive of Western Cape was developed to align with the Practice Directive in Gauteng to include the necessary factors for consideration in Foreclosure applications which was in line with Mokebe’s decision. The Full Court followed the Mokebe’s decision on the question of whether or not a reserve price should be set. The court further held setting a reserve price outweighs any prejudice that may arise and that only in exceptional circumstances that the court should exercise its discretion to not make such an order.

26 August 2019 - NW325

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the Republic’s missions abroad, (a) what measures are put in place to use the missions in order to increase tourism, (b) what targets have been set for each mission, (c) what targets were achieved by each mission in the past three years, (d) how do the targets set compare to each mission, (e) how is the achievement of targets being monitored and (f) who is monitoring the achievement of targets?

Reply:

(a) Measures to use the Republic’s missions to increase tourism

Tourism development and promotion has become an important area of economic diplomacy and the Department of Tourism and South African Tourism (SA Tourism) work closely with the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (DIRCO) in this regard. SA Tourism supports missions abroad to promote South Africa as the entity responsible for this function.

In order to leverage on the network of South African Embassies in various countries, SA Tourism currently provides support to the Missions in the following ways:

  • Providing DIRCO staff with Tourism Training at all levels, including Heads of Missions
  • Provide SA Embassies with toolkits to promote tourism in various countries
  • Support Missions in country with understanding their consumer, tourism trade and media landscapes, and to identify opportunities to engage them.

(b) What targets have been set for each mission

We don’t set targets for Missions

(c ) – (f) Not Applicable

26 August 2019 - NW341

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Communications

In light of the SA Revenue Service (Sars) Vat News No. 20, dated September 2002, which announced that tax invoices may be issued electronically instead of the paper format, why does the SABC (a) repeat claims department still insists on originally signed tax invoices and (b) not allow invoices via email in PDF format which are in accordance with SARS instructions?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Department as follows:

a) The SABC Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for Repeat Fees still requires the original tax certificates. The SOP will, however, be updated.

b) The SABC accepts invoices via email in PDF format in accordance with SARS instructions.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER

26 August 2019 - NW321

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)(a) What are the monthly statistics with reference to domestic tourism (i) in the past three years and (ii) since 1 January 2019, (b) where did the tourists travel to in each month, (c) what targets were set in this regard and (d) how did the set targets measure up to actual number of arrivals at domestic travel destinations in each month; (2) (a) what is being done to ensure that tourism targets set are met and (b) how are these targets measured; (3) (a) how is South African tourism marketed (i) in countries abroad and (ii) locally and (b) what budgets have been allocated in this regard for the next three years?

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) and (ii)

Total domestic trips see th link below:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW321Total_domestic_trip.pdf

Note: Data reported in millions

Source: South African Tourism domestic surveys

Domestic holiday trips see th link below:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW321Holiday_domestic_trip.pdf

Note: Data reported in millions

Source: South African Tourism domestic surveys

1. (b) Where did the tourist travel each month?

Provincial distribution cannot reliably be reported on at a monthly level. Data is provided at an annual level.

(c) What targets were set in this regard?

Targets on the number of total domestic trips per destination are set on an annual basis not on a Monthly basis

(d) How did the targets set, measure up to actual number of arrivals at domestic travel destinations each month?

Not Applicable. Refer to response (c)

(2) (a) what is being done to ensure the targets that were set are met?

Refer to response 1(c)

(b) How are these targets measured?

Refer to response 1(c)

(3)(a) How is SA tourism marketed

Marketing the South Africa a tourist destination is the responsibility of the Department of Tourism and this responsibility is shared between the department and its implementation entity South African Tourism. The latter devices programmes aimed at marketing the country with the support of the department. In addition, SAT has established stations in almost all the major regions of the world to implement marketing programmes tailored to suit each region and in some instances to suit countries within a region. South African Tourism’s marketing approach is two-pronged focussing on building a unified brand and marketing communications plan and leveraging synergistic partnerships

(i) Countries abroad

South African Tourism has a defined selection of prioritised markets that have been shortlisted for dedicated in-market marketing investments, based on their tourism potential and SA Tourism’s ability to win in these markets.

South African Tourism’s strategy is to market a unified brand in order to improve brand awareness and positivity by building brand appeal among first-time and repeat tourists, through the provision of information that shows South Africa as a value-for-money, safe and secure destination that offers unique and varied experiences.

This is achieved in the following ways:

  • Marketing South Africa in its different markets and segments using different channels that provide user-friendly and fit for purpose content to consumers as well as trade and partners that sell South Africa as a tourism destination;
  • Implementing an enhanced 360-degree global communications plan that conveys appealing messages to consumers, trade and media; and
  • Supporting Brand SA’s reputation management strategy.

Marketing campaigns in countries are localised based on the global brand campaign and target the following segments:

  • Wanderluster Segment who are older wealthier and experienced international travellers between the ages of 40 and 60
  • Next Stop South Africa (NSSAs) Segment who are younger singles or couples between the ages of 25 and 50 with considerable travel experience.
  • Niche Market Segments such as Millenials, LGBTQ+, African Americans and others.

Key Business drivers for international tourism marketing are:

  • Hostings
  • In-Country Roadshows
  • Domestic and International Trade Platforms
  • Trade Training and
  • Strategic Partnerships

(ii) Locally

The Domestic Tourism Marketing Strategy focusses on inspiring the targeted segments of travellers to take more trips by showcasing a variety of affordable, desired experiences in a clear and accessible manner using the Domestic Sho’t Left Campaign. The Campaign is executed through a mix of various channels such as social media, radio and television, out of home marketing as well as a number of various consumer and trade activations and partnerships.

For domestic tourism, target travel groups are identified based on the degree of holiday-taking culture, which can be differentially targeted according to the behaviour that underpins the segment. The focus segments targeted through domestic tourism marketing initiatives are:

  • The Build Segment has the appropriate socio-economic background and is not travelling and thus there is a need to build a culture of travel within this grouping.
  • The Convert Segment are people who travel for a number of reasons, but not necessarily and need to be converted to travel for a holiday.
  • The Defend Segment is mature in terms of holiday travel and there is therefore a need to defend this market and up-sell where possible.

SA Tourism also partners with and educates the distribution channel (traditional and non-traditional) to package and promote relevant deals supporting affordable, consumer-desired holiday and business events experiences, to encourage our prioritized segments to book and travel.

 

(b) What budgets have been allocated in this regard for the next three years

Name of the Programme

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

 

 

 

 

 

Budget

Budget

Budget

 

(R’000)

(R’000)

(R’000)

1

Corporate Support

135 033

140 926

146 483

2

Business Enablement

90 743

94 704

98 438

3

Leisure Tourism Marketing

1 083 397

1 130 676

1 175 257

4

Business Events

135 029

140 922

146 479

5

Visitor Experience

69 494

72 526

75 386

Total

1 513 696

1 579 755

1 642 043

26 August 2019 - NW280

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

a) The budget information for Minister’s private office is contained in the Annual Performance Plan.

b) Salary of staff range between level 5 and level 14, and staff component is tabulated below:

JOB TITLE

LEVEL

REMUNERATION

QUALIFICATION/S

JOB DESCRIPTION

Chief of Staff

14

R1 251 183.00

Snr Certificate, B Com Accounting and Postgraduate Diploma in Business Management.

  • Manage, create and maintain systems and procedures for tracking and following up on all correspondence related to the portfolio of the executing authority.
  • Co-ordinate and ensure the compliance with requests and instructions from the executing authority, including the elimination of unnecessary duplication of activities and serve as the main link between the office of the executing authority and the institutions falling under the portfolio of the executing authority.
  • Providing content support to the executing authority regarding Cabinet matters, meetings, conferences and documents received from the institutions falling under the portfolio of the executing authority. Ensure that the executing authority timeously receives the correct documentation and briefing notes for meetings.
  • Responsible for strategic planning, human resource and financial management in the office of the executing authority.
  • Ensure strategic leadership and co-ordination of communication with the media on activities pertaining to the portfolio of the executing authority.
  • Conduct research and manage special projects on request of the executing authority.
  • Follow and be guided by all instructions as prescribed in the ministerial handbook.
  • Oversee the management and maintenance of the executing authority’s official residence through liaison with Public Works.
  • Manage VIP Security through liaison with Commissioners at SAPS.

 

Administrative Secretary

13

R1 057 326.00

Snr Certificate, Public Management

  • Ensure timeous acknowledgement and appropriate referral of all EA’s correspondence.
  • Oversee administrative correspondence to assist the EA with her/his administration.
  • Assist the EA with the preparation of briefing notes, memoranda (confidential and highly confidential) and other documentation required by the EA, through inter alia:
  • Edit and comment where necessary on submissions prior to submitting to EA.
  • Provide content direction and input to enquiries made to the EA.
  • Facilitate, and ensure the distribution of Cabinet memoranda/ submissions to the Cabinet, the legislature and/or various standing/ portfolio committees to ensure that key issues are adhered to.
  • Liaise with heads of components in the Department, external and internal clients, service providers, other governments, and other Departments to co-ordinate the activities of the EA and its Office.
  • Manage all administrative activities in the office of the EA through inter alia-The management and maintaining of work flow systems in EA’s office, including tracking and monitoring of work.
  • Ensure that registry, filling and document management systems are maintained effectively.
  • Ensure that staff is able to operate administrative systems through continuous training.
  • Ensure maintenance of office equipment.
  • Manage all procurement and logistical support within the Office of the EA to ensure that an effective support service is rendered to the EA.
  • Brief the Chief of Staff on matters pertinent to the EAs portfolio on the agenda of the Cabinet to ensure that the EAs prepared regarding all issues affecting the department.

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

13

R1 057 326.00

Snr Certificate, National Diploma Public Management

  • To monitor events in Parliament, as well as represent the Department in Parliament.
  • To monitor Parliamentary question papers (i.e. identifying questions addressed to the Minister, especially those that impact in his/her functional terrain, ensuring that the responses are done in a format prescribed by Parliament and tabling of the approved responses in Parliament).
  • To monitor the meetings of committees of houses of Parliament relevant to the Departmental portfolio.
  • To act as a link and/ or facilitate the movement of information between Parliament, the Department and the Ministry.
  • Conduct personal liaison with officers of the department, other departments, MPs, MEC’s, ministries and other organizations on departmental/functional matters.
  • Compile secret documents and cabinet memoranda and ask for comments from the department.
  • Handle draft acts, prepare documents, and keep a register thereof.
  • Make and receive telephone calls on general parliamentary and departmental matters.
  • Maintain the filing system of secret documents and cabinet memoranda and control the safekeeping thereof.
  • Control the overall packing and dispatching of official documents and equipment for the parliamentary session and the recess, and manage the movement of equipment and households to and from Cape Town.
  • Follow current affairs and bring relevant information to the attention of the Executing Authority.
  • Provide support to the department in respect of key parliamentary events, such as the budget vote.

Media Liaison Officer/Spokesperson

13

R1 057 326.00

Snr Certificate, B. Law

  • Develop, implement and manage an effective media liaison service.
  • Liaison with the media on subjects, conditions and events of the department through different mediums of communication to market the activities of the Executing Authority.
  • Liaison with the communication component of the department to ensure co-ordination and alignment with the political priorities and programs of the Executing Authority.
  • Monitor public attitudes in order to plan and execute actions to project a positive image of the office of the Executing Authority/department.
  • Monitor media reports to ensure that the Executing Authority is well informed on current affairs that impacts on the department.
  • Write speeches for the Executing Authority for all events.
  • Issue media statements and press releases for purposes of communicating departmental information to the public on behalf of the Executing Authority.

Parliamentary Officer

11

R733 257.00

Snr Certificate, National Diploma, B-Tech Public Management

  • To monitor events in Parliament, as well as represent the Department in Parliament.
  • To monitor Parliamentary question papers (i.e. identifying questions addressed to the Minister, especially those that impact in his/her functional terrain, ensuring that the responses are done in a format prescribed by Parliament and tabling of the approved responses in Parliament).
  • To monitor the meetings of committees of houses of Parliament relevant to the Departmental portfolio.
  • To act as a link and/ or facilitate the movement of information between Parliament, the Department and the Ministry.
  • Conduct personal liaison with officers of the department, other departments, MPs, MEC’s, ministries and other organizations on departmental/functional matters.
  • Compile secret documents and cabinet memoranda and ask for comments from the department.
  • Handle draft acts, prepare documents, and keep a register thereof.
  • Make and receive telephone calls on general parliamentary and departmental matters.
  • Maintain the filing system of secret documents and cabinet memoranda and control the safekeeping thereof.
  • Control the overall packing and dispatching of official documents and equipment for the parliamentary session and the recess, and manage the movement of equipment and households to and from Cape Town.
  • Follow current affairs and bring relevant information to the attention of the Executing Authority.
  • Provide support to the department in respect of key parliamentary events, such as the budget vote.

Appointments/Private Secretary

12

R869 007.00

N2 Business Studies, N4 Human Resource Management

  • Manage the diary of the Executing Authority, which include:
  • reception of visitors;
  • the arrangement of appointments, interviews and appearances; and
  • the compiling of programmes of appointments and journeys.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with logistical arrangements, which include:
  • handling of travel and accommodation arrangements;
  • provision and maintenance of office and living accommodation and furniture; and
  • making arrangements for movements to attend meetings.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with executive obligations, which include:
  • the requesting, receiving and checking of documents for meetings, draft replies, speeches and comments;
  • the arrangement for placement of items on the agendas of meetings, and circulation of accompanying memoranda including Cabinet memoranda to other ministries;
  • the monitoring of order-papers, lists of questions and minutes of the relevant executing authority;
  • the collection of replies to questions; and
  • accompanying the Executing Authority to official functions and on official journeys.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with representative obligations, which include:
  • the arrangement of absence from meetings;
  • taking care of enquiries and representations from members of the public;
  • making arrangements for the attendance of meetings and other gatherings;
  • taking care of accompanying correspondence and records; and
  • accompanying the Executing Authority on visits.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with constituency work, which include:
  • support with party political activities; and
  • liaise with constituency.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with diverse private obligations of a routine nature.
  • Liaise with Parliament, stakeholders and constituency.
  • Supervise Assistant Appointment Secretary (if there is any).

Assistant Appointments and Administrative Secretary

10

R758 537.50

Snr Certificate, B. Accounting

  • Assist the Appointments and/ or Administrative Secretary to manage the diary of the Executing Authority, which include:
  • the arrangement of interviews, appointments and appearances;
  • the reception of visitors;
  • the arrangement of admission to the Executing Authority;
  • the compiling of programs of appointments and journeys; and
  • taking care of accompanying correspondence.
  • Assist the Appointments and/ or Administrative Secretary with logistical matters, which include:
  • handling of travel and accommodation arrangements;
  • provision and maintenance of office and living accommodation and furniture;
  • making arrangements for movements to attend meetings; and
  • handle arrangements for meetings.
  • Maintain an efficient filling system.
  • Attend to correspondence in the office of the executing authority.
  • Liaise with Parliament, stakeholders and constituency in consultation with the Appointment Secretary.
  • Assist the Executing Authority with his/her personal matters to enable her/him to attend to her/his other duties.

Driver/Messenger

5

R237 973.10

Grade 10–

  • Collect mail and documents from and to the department.
  • Collect and deliver correspondence/parcels for the Executing Authority at various collection and distribution points.
  • Provide a transport service for the office of the Executing Authority.
  • Maintenance of the vehicle.

Registry

7

R368 909.50

Snr Certificate, B-Tech Public Management

  • Maintain the electronic correspondence management register.
  • Record keeping of all documentation (correspondence and submissions) processed and received in the office of the EA to ensure an efficient and effective flow of information.
  • Ensure the updating and safekeeping of the filing system to ensure easy access to information.
  • Ensure that all documents are filled in accordance to the prescripts of the National Archives Act and the Ministerial filling system.
  • Draft reply of acknowledgement to all letters received.
  • Assist with the distribution of Cabinet/Executive Council Memoranda.
  • Control stocks and stationary as chief user clerk for the EA’s office.

Department of Correctional Services

01 May 2019

No.

Job Title

Salary level

Remuneration

Qualification

1.

Special Projects and Stakeholder Relations

13

R1 183 932

  • National Senior Certificate
  • B comm

2.

National Council on Correctional Services (NCCS)

13

R 1 017 972.00

  • National Senior Certificate
  • BA
  • Bachelor of Laws

3.

Parliamentary Officer

11

R733 257

  • National Diploma : Public Management
  • B-Tech Public Management

4.

Personal Assistance

10

R470 040

  • National Senior Certificate

5.

Registry Clerk

07

R257 508

  • National Senior Certificate

6.

Driver

05

R173 703

  • National Senior Certificate

Office of the Deputy Minister

No.

Job Title

Salary level

Remuneration

Qualification

1.

Head of Office

13

R1 183 932

  • Certificate of exemption
  • Lower Diploma in Library and Information Science(UWC)
  • MA: International Studies (Stellenbosch University)
  • MA International Politics (University de Paris XI)

2.

Technical Specialist

13

R1 183 932

  • Matric
  • Master of Management
  • Diploma in Labour Law

3.

Private Secretary

12

R869 007

  • National Senior Certificate
  • BA in Philosophy
  • Post graduate dip in Personnel Management

4.

Parliamentary Cabinet Liaison

12

R869 007

  • National Senior Certificate
  • ND Public Management

5.

Community Outreach Officer

11

R733 257

  • National Senior Certificate
  • B Admin (University of Transkei)
  • Postgraduate Dip in Social Research Methods

6.

Secretary/ Receptionist

07

R303 339

  • National Senior Certificate
  • ND Administrative Management

7.

Registry Clerk

07

R257 508

  • National Senior Certificate

8.

Messenger Driver

05

R173 703

  • National Senior Certificate

9.

2X Domestic Workers

03

R122 595

  • No Matric

23 August 2019 - NW378

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister in The Presidency

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? NW1350E

Reply:


Minister Jackson Mthembu, MP

Below is a few known and planned international trips and there could be additional as per invitations and mandated by the President.

Month

Destination

Trip Purpose

Number of Persons

Estimated Costs

2020/2022

(yearly programme)

Addis Ababa,

Ethiopia

Ordinary Session of the Assembly of Heads of State and Government of the

Estimated 5 persons

Not known
rates of the flights and accommodation


Find here: table

23 August 2019 - NW267

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the MS A M M WEBER

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019? NW1233E

Reply:

a) R26,369,000

b) (i) Total Remuneration (ii) salary level and (iii) job title

Component

Subcomponent

Post Description

Post Salary Level

Post Costing

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Private Secretary

13

1 005 063

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Community Outreach Officer

11

733 257

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Assistant Appointment Secretary

9

376 596

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Secretary/Receptionist

7

257 508

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Domestic Worker

3

122 595

Office of the Chief of Staff

Private Office

Domestic Worker

3

122 595

TOTAL

2 617 614

(b) (iv) highest qualification and (v) job description

Post Description

Post Status

Highest Qualification

Job description

Private Secretary

Filled

B.Com (HRM)

Provide a direct secretarial support service to the Executive Authority.

Community Outreach Officer

Vacant

 

To facilitate Member’s interface with Citizens on matters falling within portfolio

Assistant Appointment Secretary

Vacant

 

Assist the appointments/private and administrative secretaries to provide a direct support service to the executive authority.

Secretary/Receptionist

Filled

BA Art (Hons) Psychology

To render a secretarial and receptionist service to the office of the Executive Authority

Domestic Worker

Vacant

 

The main purpose of this position is” To provide household service aid

Domestic Worker

Vacant

 

The main purpose of this position is” To provide household service aid

23 August 2019 - NW305

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Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)What has he found were the reasons for not reporting on the 2018-19 Fourth Quarter expenditure; (2) whether the Railway Safety Bill has been submitted to Cabinet in the past five years; if so, (a) on what date was it submitted and (b) what was the outcome or decision in this regard; (3) whether any legislation on railway safety is currently being developed; if so, (a) on what date did work on the specified legislation start, (b) at what stage of development is the legislation in each case and (c)(i) which of the legislation have been assigned to external contractors and (ii) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

1. During the Fourth Quarter of the 2018-19 financial year there were no expenditure incurred on the development of the Rail Safety Bill and therefore there was no reporting.

2. The Railway Safety Bill was submitted to Cabinet (a) on 7 February 2018 and (b) approved for public consultation.

3. (a) Work on the development of the Railway Safety Bill commenced on 15 September 2015 and was concluded on 31 March 2019.

(b) The Railway Safety Bill has been developed.

(c) (i) The specialist drafting of the Bill was assigned to external contractors

(ii) R2,421,796-62

23 August 2019 - NW418

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister in the Presidency

(1) Whether, with reference to the reply by the former Minister in The Presidency to question 3866 on 7 January 2019, he will furnish Dr LA Schreiber with a copy of the Policy on the Benefits of Executive Office; if not, why not; (2) what is the (a) name and (b) designation of each person who currently qualifies for benefits contained in the specified policy?

Reply:

(1) We are unfortunately, unable to avail the Policy on the Benefits of the Executive Office as it contains sensitive information about security and private residences of former principals;

(2) The benefits in the policy apply to the following former principals and their respective spouses, as indicated below: -

a. Former President De Klerk and spouse;

b. Former President Mbeki and spouse;
c. Former President Motlanthe and spouse;

d. Former President Zuma and spouse/s;

e. Former Deputy President Mlambo Ngcuka and spouse; and

f. Former Deputy President Mbete and spouse.



DRAFTER OF THE REPLY

Name: Ms Linese Pillay
Designation: Administrative Manager: Former Principals Unit
Contacts: (012) 300 5581

Recommended

Director-General and Secretary to the Cabinet
Date: 22/08/2019

Recommended

Hon. Thembi Siweya, MP

Deputy Minister in The Presidency

Date:

Approved

Hon. Jackson Mthembu, MP

Minister in The Presidency

Date: 22/08/2019

21 August 2019 - NW268

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) Job Description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) The total amount Budgeted for her private office is R 9 342 585.00

Incumbents from 31 May 2019 to date

(b)(i) Total Remuneration

(b)(ii) Salary Level

(b)(iii) Job Title

(b)(iv) Qualification

(b)(v) Job Description

PRIVATE OFFICE

       

P Sehlabelo

1,308,345.00

14

1 X Chief of Staff

Baccalaureus Artium (BA), University Education Diploma,

Chief of Staff

S Mabua

978,924.00

12

1 X Private Secretary

Diploma Office Administration, Diploma Secretarial Skills & Computer Software

Private Secretary

W Mncube

1,089,294.00

13

1 X Media Liaison Officer

Bachelors Degree In Technology Journalism, National Diploma Journalism

Media Liaison Officer

MJ Letsoha-Mathae

1,023,645.00

12

1 X Community Outreach Officer

Diploma: Project Management

Community Outreach Officer

EN Mbatha

553,677.00

10

1 X Assistant Appointment Secretary

National Diploma: Hospitality Studies

Assistant Appointment Secretary

JN Skwatsha

303,339.00

7

1X Principal Ministerial Typist

Grade 12 & Certificate In Introduction

Principal Ministerial Typist

PM Mphigalale

234,960.00

6

1X Secretary/ Receptionist

Bachelor of Social Science

Secretary/ Receptionist

DR Kunene

122,595.00

3

2 X Domestic Worker

Grade 12 Matric

Domestic Worker

PT Mashaba

122,595.00

3

 

Grade 12 Matric

Domestic Worker

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

       

MB Masuku

1,245,495.00

13

1 X Administrative Secretary

Bachelors Degree in Paedagogia, Masters of Law

Administrative Secretary

NM Ramahuma

908,694.00

12

1 X Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

Primary Teachers Diploma, Further Diploma In Education, Baccalaureus Educationis Honoribus, Master Artium (MA)

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

T Mohlala

869,007.00

12

1 X Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

N4 Certificate: Business Studies, UNISA - Executive Leadership Municipal Development Programme

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

A Segakweng

261,372.00

7

1 X Registry Clerk

Grade 12 Matric

Registry Clerk

MA Mashaba

218,109.00

6

1 X Driver/Messenger

Grade 12 Matric

Driver/Messenger

SM Hlatshwayo

102,534.00

2

1 X Food Aide Services

Grade 11

Food Aide Services

21 August 2019 - NW402

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What period is covered by the National Education Infrastructure Management System report dated January 2018 and (b) on what date will the report for the next period be tabled; (2) whether any measures are in place to confirm the accuracy of the reports; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The National Education Infrastructure Management System Report dated January 2018, is information of NEIMS condition Assessment done in the years 2013 to 2014, also information of completed projects which the Provincial Education Department submit every quarter.

2. Yes, DBE have engaged with Provincial Education Department requesting them to make budget allocations for the financial year 2019/20 to ensure that NEIMS condition assessments are done for the updating of the system.

21 August 2019 - NW362

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) the annual multilateral engagements that may be attended at Ministerial or Deputy Ministerial level are:

  • African Union (AU) Summit
  • Migration Dialogue for Southern Africa (MIDSA) Ministerial Conference
  • SADC Ministerial Committee of the Organ (MCO) meeting on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation
  • Executive Committee meeting of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees’ (UNHCR) Programme

(ii) annual or biannual bilateral meetings with the neighbouring counterparts

(iii) bilateral meetings with other international counterparts and other multilateral meetings are attended if relevant to the mandate of Home Affairs

(iv) international workshops, seminars, conferences, etc will be attended if relevant to the mandate of Home Affairs

AU Summit

(b) (i) Ethiopia

(ii) Dates to be announced by the AU

(iii) Migration related

(iv) Support staff, and experts on issues tabled for discussion

 

MIDSA Ministerial Conference

(i) SADC member state – rotational basis

(ii) Dates to be announced by the IOM and hosting country

(iii) Migration related

(iv) Support staff, and experts on issues tabled for discussion

SADC MCO

(i) SADC member state – rotational basis

(ii) Dates to be announced by SADC Secretariat and hosting country

(iii) Migration and civics related

(iv) Support staff, and experts on issues tabled for discussion

 

UNHCR EXCOM

(i) Switzerland

(ii) Dates to be announced by the UNHCR

(iii) Asylum seeker and refugee related

(iv) Support staff, and experts on issues tabled for discussion

All other engagements as listed above

(i) Bilaterals take place in host’s country and for remaining engagements, the host will announce.

(ii) To be announced by hosts

(iii) Migration and / or civics related

(iv) Support staff, and experts on issues tabled for discussion

(c) Costs cannot be pre – determined as dependent on duration of engagement, available flights, accommodation and ground transport, size of delegation, etc.

END

21 August 2019 - NW65

Profile picture: Sindane, Mr P

Sindane, Mr P to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the names of the ten largest commercial land owners in each province?

Reply:

The Branch Deeds Registration does not have a record of the use of land. However the table below reflects the land owners of the top 10 largest farms, according to its extent per province. Various municipalities are the custodian of the land use.

Province

Property/ Land Owner

Eastern Cape

1. Geyer Hermanus

2. Mun Ikwezi

3. South African National Roads Agency S O C Ltd

4. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

5. Moravian Church In South Africa

6. South African National Roads Agency Ltd

7. Watt Handrie Van Der

8. Roelofse George Frederik

9. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

10. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

Free State

1. Macholo Moramang Simon

2. Plessis Jacoba Johanna Du

3. Die Suid-Afrikaanse Nasionale Padagentskap Ltd

4. South African National Roads Agency Soc Ltd

Mangaung Local Municipality

  1. Zwarts Johannes Jurgens
  1. Oppermansgronde Communal Property Association
  1. Universiteit Van Die O V S
  1. Eskom Holdings Ltd
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

Gauteng

  1. Joubert Christel Dorothea
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Marine Civil Pty Ltd
  1. Nekiap Prop No 5 Cc
  1. In2food Prop Pty Ltd
  1. Far West Rand Dolomitic Water Assoc
  1. Technicrete I S G Pty Ltd
  1. Chessboard Trade & Invest 67 Pty Ltd
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Afric
  1. Chris Vlok Prop Services Cc

 Kwazulu Natal

  1. Delport Andries Christoffel
  1. Emcakwini Community Trust
  1. The Shawe Family Trust
  1. Wild Dog Estate Pty Ltd
  1. Roman Catholic Church-Dundee
  1. Nodunga Communal Property Association
  1. Stein Walter Mark
  1. Izimbiwa Coal Proprietary Limited
  1. Ingonyama Trust-Trustees
  1. Kuzwayo Witness Bongane

 Mpumalanga

  1. Pretorius Maria Sophia
  1. Capstone 33 Pty Ltd
  1. Paardekop Boerdery Pty Ltd
  1. Welgelegen Communal Prop Assoc
  1. Vos Johannes
  1. Botes Gemma Louise
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Roos Gysbert Johannes
  1. Nic Grobler Familie Trust
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd

 North West

  1. Linda Trust
  1. Pieter Ernst Familie Trust
  1. Wolverand Trust
  1. Hennie Pieters Trust
  1. Botha Theunis Louis
  1. Rietfontein Trust
  1. Bluebird Farm Pty Ltd
  1. Hennie Pieters Trust
  1. Klipkop Boerdery Familie Trust
  1. Martha Theunissen Trust

 Limpopo

  1. Limpopo Landowners Pty Ltd
  1. Tygerfontein Beleggings Cc
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. Tokmar Familie Trust
  1. Boukrag Eiendomsbeleggings Pty Ltd
  1. Schut 4 Now Pty Ltd
  1. Boschplaats Boerdery Pty Ltd
  1. Lema O Phele Group A Trust
  1. Lema O Phele Group A Trust
  1. Kruger Petrus Jacobus

 Northern Cape

  1. Duikerfontein Trust
  1. Gemeenskap Van Richtersveld
  1. Gemeenskap Van Concordia
  1. Frances Baard Distriksmunisipaliteit
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. Nasionale Regering Van Die Republiek Van Suid Afri
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa
  1. Riemvasmaak Gemeenskapsontwikkelingstrust
  1. Richtersveld Sida Hub Communal Prop Association
  1. Gemeenskap Van Komaggas

 Western Cape

  1. Wit Maria Dorathea De
  1. Garden Route Gateway Plaza Pty Ltd
  1. Brand Adri Ronel
  1. Plessis Jacobus Lodewicus Du
  1. Garden Of Eden District Pty Ltd
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Sanbona Game Reserve Pty Ltd
  1. Hoon Trust
  1. Gemeenskap Van Ebenezer

21 August 2019 - NW265

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will clarify the (a) policy of her department regarding the promotion of learners in the Foundation Phase and (b) educational basis for the specified policy; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. a) The Foundation Phase policy on promotion requirements is stipulated in the National Policy Pertaining to the Programme and Promotion Requirements of the National Curriculum Statement (NCS) and the National Protocol on Assessment (NPA), which state that a learner may only be retained once in the Foundation Phase in order to prevent the learner being retained in this phase for longer than four years.

  • In the Basic Education Budget Vote Speech for the 2018/19 Financial Year, it was announced that the progression and promotion policies, especially in the lower Grades needed to be reviewed, a policy proposal that is currently under consideration.

 

b) The international literature on this topic demonstrates very little evidence for repetition policies actually benefitting children. At best, these policies appear to have no effect on learner achievement and dropout, despite the immense financial stress they place on the schooling system. However, in many cases they have a negative effect on child outcomes.

Two early meta-analyses (Holmes, 1989; Jimerson 2001) showed strong negative effects of retention policies on academic achievement and socio-emotional adjustment. A recent and more rigorous meta-analysis (Allen 2009), indicated that on average repetition either had a negative effect or a null effect on academic achievement.

As such, support for automatic progression within the South African context is being considered as a possible policy position, given that repetition is regarded as being associated with learner dropout and poor academic performance (Branson, Hofmeyr and Lam, 2013; Hartley, 2006).

Indeed, many scholars (Jimerson et al., 1997) hold the view that the negative effects of repetition far outweigh automatic promotion.

Within this debate, we must also consider issues of efficiency and human rights aspects of over-sized classes, as well as the unaffordability of bringing the learner/educator ratio down substantially via hiring of additional teachers.

Many school systems in both developed and developing countries have adopted automatic promotion policies which stipulate that all learners who complete a given school year be promoted to the next grade, regardless of their levels of achievement.

2. The Minister will not make a statement. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is putting plans in place to make the necessary policy amendments which could give effect to automatic progression in the Foundation Phase:

  • Every learner will be supported to achieve the expected levels of performance for the grade. There will be adequate support for learners at risk throughout the phase.
  • For the breadth of foundational skills across the phase, there will be an identified set of skills per grade to focus on, thus making it possible to give more opportunities to demonstrate competence in the next grade on the same skills if there is a need.
  • Learners who experience barriers to learning will be given the opportunities to demonstrate their competence in ways that suit their needs. This has the following implications:
  • Some learners may need concrete apparatus for a longer time than their peers.
  • Assessment activities, especially written activities, may have to be broken up into smaller sections for learners who cannot concentrate or work for a long time, or they may be given short breaks during the tasks.
  • A variety of assessment instruments should be used, as a learner may find that a particular assessment instrument does not allow her to demonstrate her true competence.
  • In the Foundation Phase the inability to read should not prevent learners from demonstrating their mathematical competence, because this produces misleading results that are of no use to the learner, the teacher who has to plan the learner’s learning sequence, and the education authorities who have to identify problems in the education system.
  • The usage of Mathematical terms should not be confined to the Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT), the knowledge of Mathematical concepts in other languages should be accepted as correct.
  • Reporting will be comprehensive, giving the teacher in the next grade and the parents a clear indication of strengths and skills that need further development.

21 August 2019 - NW428

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the name of each provider of learner transport that has not received payment for services rendered within the prescribed 30 days in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) is the reason for not abiding by the policy of payment within 30 days for services rendered in each case and (c) number of days were exceeded in each case?

Reply:

Procurement of learner transport service providers and payment of these service providers take place at a provincial level, as such, the information on these payments, or lack thereof is located in provinces. Information has been requested from all the Provincial Departments responsible for the provision of Learner Transport Programme and will be provided as soon as it is received. The Honourable member must also note that the Learner Transport Programme is provided by both the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Transport and that in some provinces the function resides with the education sector whilst in others resides with the transport sector.

21 August 2019 - NW249

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What total number of land claims are currently in court, (b) how long has each of the cases been going on in court, (c) what number of judges are currently serving in land claims courts and (d) how many are needed in order to speed up the processes?

Reply:

a) 349

b) Currently the earliest (long serving) case dates back to 1998. It becomes difficult to state how long a case can stay at the Land Claims Court solely because a litigant sues the department or Commission based on a decision taken by a Commissioner. Once that decision is reviewed/ set aside or corrected, for example, in acceptance/ gazetting of a claim, such a litigant will then compel referral of the claim to the Land Claims Court under the same case number as the initial case, then there might be other interlocutory applications on the same case requiring a number of various actions or directives to be issued by the judge or bring certain things to be done e.g Research / Mapping or valuation of lease rights.

c) The total number of the Land Claims Court Judges known to the Commission is (Four) being:

  1. Acting Judge President Justice Meer
  2. Acting Judge Molefe
  3. Acting Judge Ngcukaitobi
  4. Acting Judge Canca

d) The Department of Justice via the Land Claims Court can be the relevant institution to respond to this question as the Commission does not know the time period a judge requires to fast-tract the finalisation of the cases.

 

END

21 August 2019 - NW353

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)The official international trips that the Minister and her deputy might undertake in 2019-22 depends on, as and when the Department of Basic Education receive an invite, the invitation is then assessed and accepted subject to the president’s approval, or declined if it’s of little value to the department for consideration.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii) Dependant on (a) above, therefore currently not available.

(c)(i)(ii)(iii) Dependant on (a) above, therefore currently not available.

20 August 2019 - NW250

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What is the current status of each of the AgriParks; (2) (a) what amount has been (i) budgeted for each park and (ii) spent on it to date and (b) which parks have been completed; (3) whether any outstanding payments is owed to contractors; if so, (a) what amount and (b) to which projects?

Reply:

(1) Of the proposed 44 Agri-Parks, none have been fully completed. Please refer to Annexure A for a list of projects under implementation and planning status.

The following 4 Agri-Hubs are partially operational:

  • Nchora: EC;
  • Springbokpan: NW;
  • Witzenberg : WC; and
  • Mkhulu Agri-Hub: MP.

The following 23 Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) are partially operational:

  • Qamata-Bilatye - FPSU (EC);
  • Emalahleni – FPSU (EC);
  • Makholokoeng – FPSU (FS);
  • Sediba FPSU (Mangaung, FS);
  • Tarlton – FPSU (GP);
  • Bakkerdals - (Westrand: GP);
  • Ndumo FPSU (KZN);
  • Makhatini FPSU (KZN);
  • Nsuze FPSU (KZN);
  • St Paul FPSU (KZN);
  • Mapela FPSU (LP);
  • Nwanedi FPSU (LP);
  • Tshiombo (LP);
  • Huntington FPSU (MP);
  • Dundonald FPSU (MP);
  • Sybrandskraal FPSU (MP);
  • Heuningsvlei FPSU (NC);
  • Eksteenskuil FPSU (NC);
  • Taung FPSU NW);
  • Ebenaeser FPSU (WC);
  • Napier FPSU (WC);
  • Suurbraak PFSU (WC); and
  • Haarlem FPSU (WC)

(2) (a),(i),(ii) Please refer to Annexure B.

(b) There is no fully completed Agri-Park to date.

(3) (a) Invoices are paid as per job completed/ satisfied.

(b) Please refer to Annexure A for projects still under implementation or retention and still to be paid.

20 August 2019 - NW364

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019 – 22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? NW 1336E

Reply:

(a) The major responsibilities of the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation is managing South Africa’s relations with the International World. This includes bilateral relations with countries across the globe, also engaging in the various multi-lateral institutions that deal with issues ranging from Peace and Security, Human Rights, Environmental Protection, Nuclear Non -Proliferation and Trade and Development. This means that over the course of MTEF, the

(i) Ministry inclusive of the Minister and

(ii) two Deputy Ministers would need to undertake various trips, to deal with Issues emanating from the bilateral and multi-lateral environments.

Some of the trips are standard, for an example we know that on annual basis, the South African President supported by the Minister of International Relations would be expected to travel to the United Nations, for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).So of course these kinds of trips we can pencil in and plan for well in advance. However, many of the trips arise from specific required interventions in the arena. Therefore it is not possible to provide a detailed schedule of trips on the MTEF as required by this question.

What I can undertake is to ensure that there are no trips that are undertaken when they are not necessary or relevant. I can also undertake that we would ensure that delegation sizes are not larger than what is needed to conclude diplomatic engagements successfully. I can undertake to ensure to keep the Ministry’s and the Department’s travel within the budget outlined in the MTEF. This may be difficult as South Africa has been asked as to serve as the Chair of the African Union during the year 2020. This will require additional funds which are not provided for on the MTEF. The Department will engage with National Treasury on this matter urgently.