Questions and Replies

Filter by year

13 September 2019 - NW734

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

2. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function and thus the above does not apply.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

13 September 2019 - NW681

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the Government’s proposed land reform policy on expropriation without compensation will require that the title deeds of state-owned properties under her department’s custodianship be published before being transferred to beneficiaries to verify that there is no active land claim on the property; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what date does she intend to introduce amending legislation in the National Assembly to make provision for the publishing of the title deeds, (b) for which reasons, other than historical land claims, will a dispute for the change of ownership of the specified properties be allowed to be registered, (c) in which publication will the title deeds be published and (d) for what period of time will the title deeds be published?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The central theme of this question is around competence of the Department of Agriculture and Land Reform. All policies are formulated by following due process. The Expropriation Bill [B-2019] is currently in its development stage.

(a), (b), (c) and (d) Fall away.

13 September 2019 - NW543

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)(a) What number of wastewater treatment plants are currently in operation in the Joe Gqabi District Municipality and (b) what is the exact location of each treatment plant; (2) whether all the plants are functioning optimally; if not, (a) which ones are not functioning optimally and (b) what are the reasons the plants are not functioning optimally; (3) whether any untreated waste water is running in any stream and/or river; if so, what plans are in place to prevent this?

Reply:

1. (a) There are 16 Wastewater treatment works (WwTW) in operation in Joe Gqabi District in the Eastern Cape Province.

(b) The exact location of each treatment plant is presented with GPS Coordinates in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Location of treatment plants in Joe Gqabi District Municipality

Description

WwTW Type

Observation

Latitude

Longitude

Aliwal North WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-30.6799448770

26.7160608150

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.6838888890

28.5105555560

Maclear WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0605555560

28.3377777780

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-31.0607090030

28.3378840060

Prentjiesberg WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-31.1886054290

28.2514474910

Steynsburg WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.2844444440

25.8075000000

Oviston WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6964892960

25.7636853450

Burgersdorp WwTW

Activated sludge

Prime Condition

-31.0058333330

26.3380555560

Jamestown WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-31.1419444440

26.8075000000

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Sterkspruit WwTW

Package plant

Operational

-30.5169444440

27.3686111110

Lady Grey WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Prime Condition

-30.7094444440

27.1825000000

Barkley East WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9652777780

27.6044444440

Barkley East 2 WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-30.9521538460

27.5953846150

Herschel WwTW

Activated sludge

Operational

-30.6109075780

27.1590028000

Ugie WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Operational

-31.1880555560

28.2500000000

(2)(a) The Mount Fletcher, Maclear and Sterkspruit Waste Water Treatment Works are currently being monitored by my department as they are not functioning properly.

(b) The three treatment works are not functioning optimally due to poor operations and maintenance, overloading and the challenge of vandalism as indicated in the table below:

Table 2: Plants that are not functioning optimally and the reasons thereof:

(a) Not functioning optimally

Process

(b) Reasons not functioning optimally

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Maclear WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Poor O&M, Overloading & Vandalism

Sterkspruit WwTW

Oxidation ponds

Vandalised

(3) Yes, the three WwTW not functioning optimally are discharging partially treated effluent into the local streams. Table 3 below shows the local streams into which each plant (as mentioned above) discharges partially treated effluent.

Table 3: Streams/Rivers impacted by partially treated effluent

WWTW not functioning optimally

River

Mount Fletcher WwTW

Tokwana River

Maclear WwTW

Mooi River

Sterkspruit WwTW

Sterkspruit River

The Department, through the Eastern Cape Regional office has been in communication with the local municipalities to resolve this issue. Non-compliance letters requesting the action plan to address the issues were sent to the local municipalities. The action plan will be monitored by the Department.

13 September 2019 - NW710

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) amount does her department currently owe to the Sundays River Valley Local Municipality, (b) portion of the specified amount has been outstanding for more than 120 days and (c)(i) steps will her department take to settle the debt and (ii) by what date will payment be made?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) According to the records of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), an amount of R4 082.57 is owed to the Sundays River Valley Local Municipality by the DPWI.

b) According to the records of the Department, the amount of R4 082.57 has been outstanding for more than 120 days.

c) (i) The Department is working with the Municipality to correct the matter.

(ii) It is anticipated that this process will be completed by 30 September 2019.

13 September 2019 - NW620

Profile picture: Mulaudzi, Adv TE

Mulaudzi, Adv TE to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD), National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), Legal Aid South Africa, and Special Investigating Unit (SIU) have reported as follows:

A. Department of Justice and Constitutional Development

(aa) Cleaning

The function of cleaning and gardening is provided and paid for by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI). The Framework for the Devolution of Budget, Version 17, Clause 6.6 states that:

“DPW provides cleaning services for the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development utilizing internal staff and outsourced services/contracts”.  

The DoJ&CD is considering exercising optionality whereby DPWI is to devolve the function of cleaning and gardening to DoJ&CD. Discussions with DPWI, in respect of transferring cleaning and gardening services to DoJ&CD, are ongoing and a task team has been established to deal with the smooth transfer of the function from DPWI to DoJ&CD. Agreement in principle is that the function will be devolved in a phase out approach. The first phase will be to devolve all the outsourced cleaning and gardening contract to DoJ&CD and the second phase will be to transfer the in-house services. The target date for this devolution is April 2020.

(bb) Security Services

(aaa) R685 239 million in the financial year 2017/18.

(bbb) R718 602 million in the financial year 2018/19.

(b) and (c) The service providers paid by the Department are tabulated below:

 

GUARDING SERVICES

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

TOTAL PAID (R'000)

Tyeks Security Services

10 186

10 187

20 373

Mabotwane Security Services

99 208

71 329

170 537

Fidelity Security Services

221 963

225 565

447 528

Mcc Security Services

75 163

108 679

183 843

Jackcliffy Trading

115 770

120 118

235 888

Tshedza Protective Service

43 133

39 719

82 853

Office of the Chief Justice (Upgrading of Private Security for Judges)

0

534

534

Total

565 424

576 131

1 141 555

CASH IN TRANSIT

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID (R'000)

TOTAL PAID (R'000)

Fidelity Cash Solutions

22 996

19 558

42 553

Office Of The Chief Justice

542

0

542

Total

23 538

19 558

43 096

MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS EXPENDITURE

SERVICE PROVIDER

2017/18 AMOUNT PAID R'000

2018/19 AMOUNT PAID R'000

TOTAL PAID R'000

Global Technology Systems

94 097

121 177

215 274

Isecure Digital

1 723

1 736

3 459

R And D Screening Technologies

447

0

447

Mutual Safe & Security

5

0

5

Smiles Keycraft

1

0

1

Sysman Public Safety Systems

4

0

4

Total

96 277

122 913

219 190

2017/18 & 2018/19 Total Expenditure for Security Services

685 239

718 602

1 403 840

B. National Prosecuting Authority

a) and (c) The NPA has paid a total amount of R57 674 779.85 to suppliers during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years in respect of cleaning, security and gardening services. This amount is divided into the various services as follows:

2017/18

  • Cleaning - R7 852 550.63
  • Security - R17 687 208.14
  • Gardening - R944 387.44

2018/19

  • Cleaning - R10 354 139.25
  • Security - R19 870 152.47
  • Gardening - R966 341.92

b) Please see the attached spreadsheet, attached as Annexure A which provides details of the amount paid to each supplier.

C. Special Investigation Unit

a) The SIU has spent as follows:

No.

Description

2017/18

2018/19

(aa)

Cleaning Services

R1 502 063.18

R1 414 797.04

(bb)

Security Services

R320 888.45

R547 076.24

(cc)

Gardening Services

None, as it is included on the operating costs that are paid to landlords for office accommodation.

b) The amount paid to each service provider is tabulated on the link below:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW620_TableB.pdf

c) Thelink below provides the total amount paid to each of the service providers:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW620_TableC.pdf

D. Legal Aid South Africa

a) and (c) Legal Aid South Africa spent as follows during the 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years:

Total amounts paid to each of the service providers:

No.

Description

2017/18

2018/19

(aa)

Cleaning Services

R7 651 319

R8 459 042

(bb)

Security Services

R2 198 512

R2 342 609

(cc)

Gardening Services

No costs were incurred for gardening services.

b) The lists of service providers for cleaning and security services is attached as Annexures B and C respectively.

E. The Office of the Chief Justice

The office of the Chief Justice (OCJ) does not contract cleaning, security and gardening services directly at any of its services centres.

The Office of the Chief Justice uses cleaning services that are under the custodianship of the National Department of Public Works (DPW) and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD).

13 September 2019 - NW668

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of criminal (a) prosecutions and (b) convictions were dealt with in the (i) magistrates, (ii) district and (iii) high courts in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

The number of prosecutions finalised including ADRM is displayed in the table below:

Financial Years

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Number of cases (prosecutions) finalised including ADRM

National

503 463

477 802

505 376

494 815

425 778

District Courts

465 834

442 371

470 055

460 598

394 335

Regional Courts

36 651

34 419

34 257

33 246

30 477

High Courts

978

1 012

1 064

971

966

Number of cases (prosecutions) finalised with a verdict (convictions and acquittals)

National

319 149

310 850

341 360

335 161

276 309

District Courts

284 741

278 006

308 688

303 353

247 342

Regional Courts

33 430

31 832

31 608

30 837

28 001

High Courts

978

1 012

1 064

971

966

Number of Convictions

National

294 608

289 245

321 190

317 475

260 456

District Courts

268 127

263 377

295 013

291 609

236 705

Regional Courts

25 591

24 958

25 209

24 976

22 882

High Courts

890

910

968

890

869

13 September 2019 - NW708

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With reference to her reply to question 285 on 15 August 2019, what are the details of the (a) total remuneration, (b) salary level, (c) qualification and (d) job description of each of her two advisors? NW1751E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) - (d) Please refer to the table below:

Job Title

Salary Level

Total Remuneration

Qualifications

Job Description

Start date

Special Adviser (Only one Adviser appointed at this moment)

15

R361 594.50 for three months of contract.

Bachelor of Commerce, Bachelor of Laws and an LLM Degree

To provide legal advice to the Minister on the exercise or performance of powers and duties. Provide legal advice to the Minister on the development of policies that will promote departmental mandate and objectives

12 July 2019 to 12 October 2019

13 September 2019 - NW703

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in each province (i) have and (ii) do not have (aa) holiday and (bb) after-school programmes and (b) why do the specified schools not have the specified programmes?

Reply:

a)  (i) (aa) (bb) Given that holiday and after-school programmes are provincially determined and driven programmes, the number of schools that participate in these programmes per province is not in the possession of the Department of Basic Education and may therefore be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

b) (ii)(aa)(bb) Similarly, the number of schools that do not participate in these programmes may be requested from the PEDs.

13 September 2019 - NW738

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;

Reply:

environmental aFairs

Department: Environmental Affairs

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

(For written reply)

QUESTION NO.738 {NW1783E}

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 12 of 2019

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06 September 2019

Mr G K Y Cachalia (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries:

  1. Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;
  2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so,
    1. what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

738. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

REPLIES:

  1. The Department did not host any event and/or function related to the 2019 Budget Vote debate.
    1. The Department served refreshments like coffee, tea, soft beverages and light snacks at the Parliament Media Centre;
    2. The total cost incurred in serving these amounted to R71 000;
    1. The attendees at this event were members of the Portfolio Committee, officials of the Department, members of the public who attended the debate and members of the media.
  1. No gifts were distributed to any guests or attendees.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: !.I..(.it. 7J'3

13 September 2019 - NW660

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

(a) When last did her department monitor the waste dumping sites at the (i) Macadamia Military Base, (ii) Louisville sewer plant, (iii) Tonga Hospital and (iv) Shongwe Hospital in Mpumalanga, (b) what were the results in each case and (c) on what date will her department do a follow-up monitoring on the sites; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of the monitoring reports?

Reply:

 

  1. Officials from the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) have not conducted any monitoring at the Macadamia Military Base, Louisville sewer plant, Tonga Hospital and Shongwe Hospital in the Mpumalanga Province. These sites are not regulated in terms of the Waste Act, 2008 and as such, no waste licenses were issued by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. No auditing has therefore been conducted at these sites because they are not classified as waste facilities in terms of the Waste Act, 2008.

Departmental officials have consulted with compliance and enforcement officials from the following departments: National Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation (DHSWS)’s regional office in Mpumalanga, National Department of Health and the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Agriculture, Rural Land and Environmental Affairs (MDARLEA) with a view to determine the status quo at these sites.

In accordance with the response received from DHSWS’ Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA), the four sites mentioned above are Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). These WWTW were monitored recently by the agency between the period March 2019 and June 2019. Monitoring reports are available from the IUCMA.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

13 September 2019 - NW365

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

We wish to reply to the Honourable Member as follows:

a) The International trips for Minister are based on the requests for support from the Presidency and other key stakeholders such as the Department of International Relations and Cooperation, for essential issues of national interest related to justice and legal co-operation matters. However, the Departmental requests for international trips are based on the requirements of the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD)`s Annual Performance Plan as well as fulfilling prior commitments in multilateral engagements such as the United Nations (and its Special Agencies dealing with crime prevention and criminal justice matters such as the UNODC), African Union (AU) Ministerial meetings, engagements with the UN and AU Human Rights Mechanisms. Southern African Development Community (SADC), International Criminal Court (ICC) Commonwealth, Brazil, Russia, India, Chief and South Africa (BRICS) to advance South Africa`s position on international legal matters.

b) The size of the delegation to any Departmental international trip is governed by the DoJ&CD`s Travel Policy and approved by the Director- General. The delegation for Ministry is determined in line with the Public Finance Management Act and in line with the Ministerial Handbook.

c) The flights, accommodation costs and other expenses are as per National Treasury Guidelines for the applicable job levels.

Furthermore, it is impossible to accurately state the number of trips and persons making up the delegations as invitations arise from time to time , and are dependent on budgetary considerations and personnel capacity.

13 September 2019 - NW644

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the statement of the former President, Mr Jacob Zuma in his 2011 state of the nation address that all indigent school girls will receive free sanitary pads, (a)(i) what number of sanitary pads has been delivered to indigent school girls so far and (ii) in which provinces, (b) what number of indigent school girls have been identified by the Government as being in need of sanitary pads and (c) what is the time frame to ensure that all indigent school girls have access to sanitary pads?

Reply:

Since the 2011 State of the Nation Address, the Presidency has established an interdepartmental coordinating mechanism to explore innovative means for implementing a sanitary dignity campaign, given the prevailing lack of resources in each department. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) continues to mobilise partners in business and civil society to support the cause of providing sanitary pads to leaners.

13 September 2019 - NW476

Profile picture: Breytenbach, Adv G

Breytenbach, Adv G to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) intends to defend its constitutional independence in the review application against the Public Protector’s Report on an Investigation into Allegations of a Violation of the Executive Ethics Code through an Improper Relationship between the President and African Global Operations, formerly known as Bosasa, Report 37 of 2019-20, wherein the Public Protector instructs the NPA to conduct further investigation into prima facie evidence of money laundering as uncovered during her investigation, and deal with it accordingly; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I have been informed by the NDPP as follows:

“Paragraphs 8.2 and 9.4 of the Report of the Public Protector (Report), read together, order the NDPP to conduct an investigation into ‘prima facie evidence of money laundering’, and to submit an implementation plan for the approval of the Public Protector, within 30 days of publication of the Report (“the orders”). The Public Protector has agreed to stay the orders, pending the review of the Report.

In the spirit of co-operative governance, as is peremptory under Section 41 of the Constitution, the NDPP wrote to the Public Protector seeking clarity on whether the orders were meant merely to constitute notifying the NDPP of her opinion that the facts disclose the commission of an offence, as contemplated in s6(4)(c)(i) of the Public Protector Act.

The Public Protector responded by stating that the order in paragraph 8.2 is a referral to the NDPP on the basis of her opinion that the facts disclose a commission of an offence as, contemplated by s6(4)(c)(i), and that the order requiring the NDPP to submit a report for her approval, is a logical and legal consequence of paragraph 8.2 (read with paragraphs 7.1.3 and 7.3.3).

The NDPP understands that response to mean that the Public Protector persists with the orders. These orders impact on and infringe the constitutional and statutory mandate of the NPA to investigate and prosecute crime, free of supervision or interference by another party and without fear or favour.

The mandate of a Public Protector vis a vis an NDPP, in terms of the Constitution and the Public Protector Act is restricted to notifying the authority charged with prosecutions of his or her opinion that the facts disclose the commission of an offence. It is therefore a constitutional issue that requires the NDPP, in the interests of the independence of the NPA, to file an affidavit supporting the review to set aside the remedial orders against the NDPP in paragraphs 8.2 and 9.4 of the Report.

The NDPP will file an affidavit after having seen the record of decision and any supplementary affidavits by the applicants.

It must be emphasised that this is purely a legal issue and does not in any way impact on the NDPP’s consideration of the matter in light of the opinion of the Public Protector that the facts disclose the commission of an offence”.

13 September 2019 - NW266

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the name of each person who is a member of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa and (b) what criteria were used to appoint each person?

Reply:

a) The processes for the appointment of the second Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa are underway and Minister will announce names after appointment.

b) Constitution of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council is provided for by section 7 of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 2007 (Act No. 22 of 2007). The Criteria used in appointing members of the Council is detailed in the Regulations relating to the appointment of the interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa, Government Gazette No. R 685 of 22 August 2011 as follows:

Nomination of members of the Council

1. The Minister must by –

a) Notice in the Gazette;

b) An advertisement placed in at least two newspapers with national and regional circulation; and

c) Any other means considered necessary by him or her.

Invite nomination for persons to be considered for appointment of the Council.

2. The notice contemplated in sub-regulation (1) must state –

a) The requirements for consideration for appointment;

b) The period within which the nominations must be submitted; and

c) An address to which the nominations must be sent.

3. The Minister must request nominations of one person each from –

a) The Director-General for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (d) of the Act;

b) The Health Professions Council of South Africa for persons to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (f) of the Act; and

c) The South African Pharmacy Council of South Africa for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (g) of the Act

 

Selection process

1. The returning officer must, not later than 21 days after the close of nominations, submit all valid nominations to the Minister.

2. The Minister may appoint a panel comprising of at least four people, whom at least two shall be persons who have experience in traditional health practice, to consider and advise the Minister on the nomination received.

3. The Minister may call for further nominations if no nominations are received in a particular category or an insufficient number of nominations were received within the period specified in the notice for invitation contemplated in regulation 2 (1).

4. The panel may use a screening process and interviews of nominees in selecting candidates to be recommended for appointment by the Minister.

5. The panel must submit a report of the recommended candidate together with the list of all nominees and supporting documents to the Minister for consideration of appointment to the Council.

6. The Minister’s power to appoint members of the board is not limited to the recommended candidates.

END.

13 September 2019 - NW595

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What number of persons have registered for the allocation of housing on the National Housing Needs Register in each province?

Reply:

The table below indicates the number of households per province that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR).

The total number of households per province are presented as follow:

  • Approved on Housing Subsidy System (HSS): indicates the total number of households on the NHNR that have completed subsidy application forms and these subsidy applications forms were approved on HSS against the relevant project.
  • On National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) Only: indicates the total number of households that have registered their need for adequate shelter on the National Housing Needs Register. These households have not completed subsidy applications forms to date.

The Western Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements is not utilizing the National Housing Needs Register. The information related to Western Cape was imported onto the National Housing Needs Register in 2010.

12 September 2019 - NW426

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether the Public Service Commission has received the financial disclosures from each Director-General of each Government department for the current financial year; if not, (a) which Director-General has not submitted a financial disclosure yet, (b) from which department and (c) what action has the Commission taken to ensure that the Directors-General comply with the Financial Disclosure Framework?NW1398E

Reply:

 

As at 31 May 2019, the PSC received 45 financial disclosures forms of the Directors-General (DGs) at national and provincial level. Selected posts of DG were vacant.

  1. and (b) The PSC did not receive the financial disclosure forms of 8 DGs at national level. Of these, 7 DGs complied with Regulation 18(2) by disclosing their registrable interests on or before 30 April 2019, but their EAs did not submit copies of the financial disclosure forms to the PSC by 31 May 2019 as required by Regulation 18 (6). The extent of non-disclosure with the requirements of Regulation 18(2) and (6) is illustrated in Table 1 below.

Table 1: The extent of non-compliance by Heads of Department and/or EAs with the requirement to submit financial disclosure forms in respect of the 2018/2019 financial year

No.

DEPARTMENT

DATE OF DISCLOSURE BY THE HoD

DATE SUBMITTED TO THE PSC BY THE EA

1.

Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

29 April 2019

Complied

Not submitted to PSC

Not yet submitted to EA by Ethics Officer

2.

Communications

16 April 2019

Complied

Not submitted to PSC

Not yet submitted to EA by Ethics Officer

3.

Defence

26 April 2019

Complied

Not submitted to PSC

Submitted to EA by Ethics Officer on 03 May 2019

4.

Energy

15 April 2019

Complied

Not submitted to PSC

Submitted to EA by Ethics Officer on 31 May 2019

5.

Health

18 April 2019

Complied

Submitted to PSC by EA on 14 August 2019 (after due date)

6.

Public Enterprises

30 April 2019

Complied

Submitted to PSC by EA on 04 June 2019 (after due date)

7.

Public Service and Administration

26 April 2019

Complied

Not submitted to PSC

Submitted to EA by Ethics Officer on 14 May 2019

8.

State Security Agency

Citing security reasons

Not submitted to PSC

(C) The PSC is constant contact with the Ethics Officers reminding them to ensure that their respective departments comply with the Financial Disclosure Framework (FDF). Ethics Officers in departments have been assigned specific duties to assist the HoDs and EAs with the implementation of the FDF. The PSC continuously made follow-up with the Ethics Officers where the submission of financial disclosures was moving slowly. The Ethics Officers and SMS members are also sensitised on the importance of complying with the deadlines for the submission of the financial disclosures through workshops that are conducted in the departments.

12 September 2019 - NW227

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the details of the institutional basis established by the formation of her department for a comprehensive approach to the economic development of the country’s rural areas, especially relating to the removal of constraints in accessing land, as declared by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, on 26 June 2019?

Reply:

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

The President in the State of the Nation address indicated that government will immediately release State land for agricultural and human settlement in order to make a contribution towards acceleration of land reform to address the inequality in terms of ownership and use. Similarly, the President highlighted the need to urgently address issues of economy. As a strategic intervention on the delivery model, the President has indicated that government will adopt a district approach.

Land release

The departments of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development together with other departments have identified state land that is suitable for agriculture and human settlement. Such identification has taken into consideration who is the holder of the land in question amongst the various spheres of government. Secondly such profiling will indicate the appropriate use of such land and its potential and whether such land is encumbered or not. Thereafter necessary processes of State land disposal will take effect.

Public works has identifies about 100 parcels of land where Restitution of land will be a beneficiary given that some of these properties are areas where communities were forcibly removed in the past.

Agricultural land therefore will enable those communities to engage in agricultural activities and government will give necessary support through its programs such as CASP, Letsema and Land care. A range of farmer support services will be provided for some from provincial departments of agriculture.

The combination of the two departments and the alignment of their programs will go a long way in creating viable farmer support to farmers. Building on the Agriparks, the department will focus on 27 Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) which are like service centres to support farmers with mechanisation, extension, market information, production inputs such as seeds and vaccines.

Honourable member, these FPSUs are located in the districts consistent with the President’s statement. Key to the functionality of the FPSUs will be the mobilisation of farmers to ensure that production is activated. The second phase will be the construction of production hubs such as storage facilities, pack houses as well as mini processing plants. However, this will be guided by the commodities that will be produced in those localities.

The department will engage municipalities and districts to activate farmers markets so as to create a value chain pipeline in the various localities. It is our view that these interventions by our department will make a contribution towards the development of economic activities in our communities especially in rural economies.

12 September 2019 - NW549

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Transport

What total number of Manual Train Authorisations have been issued by the Railway Safety Regulator to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa in each month since August 2018?

Reply:

The total number of Manual Train Authorisations (MTA’s) issued by the Railway Safety Regulator (RSR) to the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) since August 2018 are as follow:

MTA’s per province:

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF MTA’s

Eastern Cape

0

Gauteng

917 666

KwaZulu-Natal

322 885

Western Cape

248 783

Grand Total

1 489 334

MTA’s per province per month:

MONTH/ YEAR

GAUTENG

KZN

WC

TOTAL

August 2018

63,600

16,754

19,134

99,488

September 2018

67,063

22,111

19,715

108,889

October 2018

66,772

23,742

20,429

110,943

November 2018

84,358

26,589

17,873

128,820

December 2018

60,816

29,984

19,623

110,423

January 2019

92,046

32,424

27,574

152,044

February 2019

80,687

25,742

17,856

124,285

March 2019

87,279

28,297

32,929

148,505

April 2019

50,974

21,626

25,216

97,816

May 2019

90,215

24,621

16,184

131,020

June 2019

88,934

37,128

14,569

140,631

July 2019

84,922

33,867

17,681

136,470

TOTAL

917,666

322,885

248,783

1,489,334

12 September 2019 - NW446

Profile picture: Mulder, Mr FJ

Mulder, Mr FJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) What (a) total amount has been set aside for the Nkomazi Special Economic Zone destined to improve the lives of the communities beyond the southern border of the Kruger National Park in Mpumalanga and (b) are the relevant details of the individual projects that make up the specified amount; (2) What (a) will his department’s perceived total contribution towards the economic hub be and (b) time frames are envisaged for the project; (3) Whether his department is aware of the proposed mining project on 18 000 hectares of prime property, which is destined to interfere with his department’s plans; if so, what are his departments intentions in this regard; (4) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Funding is allocated on approved applications received. In the case of the Nkomazi Special Economic Zone (SEZ), the Province of Mpumalanga is currently establishing an SEZ company to develop, plan and operate the Economic Zone. One of the responsibilities of the entity will be to develop an SEZ implementation plan with clear timelines. The Province has been given twelve (12) months to establish a fully functioning entity. Funding will be allocated on approved applications once this process has been completed.

I have requested the Department to obtain further details about the proposed mining project referred to in the question and will consider the matter once the information has been obtained.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW721

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Why has there been no attempt to draft legislation around companion animal welfare in terms of backyard breeding when there is a huge problem with stray companion animals in the Republic?

Reply:

DAFF’S RESPONSE:

PQ.  721/NW1766E Ms H S Winkler (DA) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development:

Why has there been no attempt to draft legislation around companion animal welfare in terms of backyard breeding when there is a huge problem with stray companion animals in the Republic? NW1766E

Animal welfare in South Africa, except for performing animals, is administered under the Animal Protection Act, 1962 (Act No.71 of 1962). The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development has not considered drafting a separate legislation relating to companion animals.

12 September 2019 - NW526

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1) What amount has his department (a) spent on the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project to date and (b) transferred to the (i) Gauteng, (ii) Mpumalanga and (iii) Limpopo provincial governments to date? (2) Whether any feasibility and viability studies have been conducted yet; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details in each case and (b) will he furnish Mr T B Mabhena with copies of each study? (3)(a) Which consultants did his department employ in the development of the specified project, (b) what was the scope of each consultant’s contract and (c) did each consultant meet their contractual obligations?

Reply:

  1. (a) The Department of Transport spent R 10,199,673-88 in the 2013/14 and R7,680,457-17

in the 2014/15 financial year’s on undertaking a detailed feasibility study that was concluded in October 2014.

(b) (i) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Gauteng Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

(ii) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Mpumalanga Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

(iii) No funding was transferred by the Department of Transport to Limpopo Province for the development of the Moloto Railway Corridor project.

2. Please refer to the response in 1(a).

(a) The feasibility study on the Moloto Rail Corridor project was undertaken in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 29 of 1999 (PFMA) and the Public Private Partnership Guidelines.

The feasibility considered the main axis of commuter movements in the study area along the R573 Moloto Road and R568 serving the numerous settlements located between Moloto village and the Siyabuswa area. The feasibility study came to the conclusion that the preferred solution is a 117 km Rapid Rail line on the line-haul section, a fleet of 226, 40-seater buses to provide the feeder and distribution services and 46 train sets to reduce the current 4 hours peak to 2 hours at operating speeds of a 120 km/h on a cape gauge network.

 

In October 2014, the feasibility report was endorsed by a Political Oversight Committee, with a directive that PRASA should submit a Treasury Approval 1 (TA 1) application to National Treasury for funding considerations. PRASA, subsequently submitted the TA 1 application to National Treasury on 30 October 2014.

(b) The Moloto Rail Corridor feasibility study has not been made available publicly. Access can be requested via the provision of the Promotion of Access to Information Act, 2000.

3. (a)&(b) The Department appointed a consortium with SMEC as lead consultant and transportation

expert, Deloitte (Financial experts) and DLA Cliffe Dekker Hofmeyr (Legal experts), assisted by sub-consultants SiVest (Environmental experts) and Demacon (Demographics, mapping and economics).

(c) The Consortium was appointed to undertake a detailed feasibility in terms of Treasury Regulation 16 of the PFMA and prepare a Treasury Approval 1 (TA1) application to National Treasury. The consortium met all the project contractual obligations, resulting in the feasibility and the TA1 application approved for submission to National Treasury in October 2014.

12 September 2019 - NW512

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the status of communication between her department and the General Administration of Customs of the People’s Republic of China (GACC) regarding the clarification on the interpretation of announcement 122 made on 23 July 2019, (b) by what date is it expected that the situation will be resolved and (c) what are the details of all steps taken by her department to communicate the outcomes of all interactions with the GACC to wool industry role players to avoid unnecessary panic?

Reply:

 

 

Response to Parliamentary Question

 

QUESTION NO.:

512/NW1505E

TO:

MINISTER

FROM:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

SUBJECT:

QUESTION 512/NW1505E FOR WRITTEN REPLY BY MR N P MASIPA (DA) TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION:

CONFIDENTIAL

 

   
   
   

DAFF’S RESPONSE:

PQ.  512/NW1505E MR N P Masipa (DA) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development:

(a) What is the status of communication between her department and the General Administration of Customs of the People’s Republic of China (GACC) regarding the clarification on the interpretation of announcement 122 made on 23 July 2019, (b) by what date is it expected that the situation will be resolved and (c) what are the details of all steps taken by her department to communicate the outcomes of all interactions with the GACC to wool industry role players to avoid unnecessary panic? NW1505E

a) Letters seeking clarity on the wool exports and the health attestation were forwarded to the People’s Republic of China’s (PRC’s) General Administration of Customs of China by the department on the 12th of August 2019 and 19th of August 2019. A response to the letters was received through the South African Embassy in Beijing on the 22nd of August 2019. The interpretation of the response letter by the Embassy outlined that the Chinese government had replied with two main options for the South African government. The one option was to continue with the certificate as agreed upon before Announcement 122 of 23 July 2019. The second option was to propose a new health certificate. Pursuing the second option of proposing a new health certificate would have resulted in the suspension of trade on wool to PRC for the period of negotiation. The first option was the preferred option.

b) The situation is resolved. The industry has also accepted the option of South Africa continuing to certify according to the requirements as agreed before Announcement 122 of 23 July 2019. This option guarantees the clearing of the backlog created by the suspension of export of wool to China. However, the department, in line with Announcement 122 of 23 July 2019 is committed to continue engaging with the PRC on a new draft of the health certificate during a period where there would be minimal impact on wool exports to the PRC. The wool industry has affirmed this position and has requested that should discussions with the PRC commence, the industry should be consulted.

c) The Department held a meeting with representatives of Cape Wools and two wool buyer companies on the 15th of August 2019 to understand the challenges faced by industry. Subsequent to this meeting, a follow-up letter was forwarded to the PRC on the 9th August 2019. The Department also telephonically engaged the industry during the period when the response from the PRC was awaited. Upon receipt of a response from the PRC on 22nd August 2019, the industry was immediately informed telephonically and through an email. An official letter to this effect was also sent to the industry on 23rd August 2019. In its reply, the industry indicated that the existing health certificate will be utilized to address the backlog of wool exports in the stores.

12 September 2019 - NW527

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1 ) Whether it is still his department’s position to develop the Moloto Rail Corridor project; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will the first (a) track be laid and (b) train be operational; 2. (a) What number of public participation engagements has his department conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities in relation to the specified project, (b) what amount did his department spend on these public engagements and (c) on what date was the last public participation engagement held?

Reply:

  1. The Department’s position is that rapid rail provides the most feasible long term solution to address the transport challenges being experienced in the Moloto corridor. For the Department to pursue the implementation of the Moloto Rail Corridor project, funding will have to be reprioritised within Government.

(a) The construction of the rail line can only be undertaken once the detailed design of the rail line has been concluded and the required funding has been secured for construction.

(b) See (a) above.

2. (a) Seven (7) public engagements in the form of Imbizos were conducted with the Siyabuswa, KwaMhlanga, Moloto and surrounding communities. These were conducted as part of providing progress on the planned Moloto Rail Project and the overall exposure of the service delivery by Government and the Department of Transport’s public entities.

(b) The Department did not spend any amount on the hosting of the public engagements. As per the last part of the response in 2 (a), The costs of the public engagements were covered by the entities of the Department namely SANRAL, the Road Accident Fund and PRASA.

(c) The last public engagement was held on 5 June 2017.

12 September 2019 - NW581

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the R50 to R60 billion that he stated was allegedly lost to state capture, (a) what are the reasons he did not raise this figure at the Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture (b) which companies and/or entities stole the R50-R60 billion and, (c) what are the reasons he did not open a case to report the illegal activity?

Reply:

(a) The evidence presented when I appeared at the Commission of Inquiry into State Capture was based on information that was available to me at the time. Subsequent to my representations at the Commission, new information was brought to light by the forensic investigations completed by them estimating that R50-60 billion was stolen from them. The evidence presented before the Zondo Commission estimates the amount stolen to be within the R50-60 billion range.

(b) In my written reply to PQ No 11 that was published on 20 June 2019, I mentioned several successful civil recoveries registered by Eskom and Transnet, the amounts involved as well as the names of the companies that were ordered by the courts to return the funds stolen from the two SOCs. Therefore, in due course we will provide relevant details as some of the unfolding investigations are successfully concluded and specific companies and/or individuals held liable by the courts.

(c) Forensic reports concerning SOCs have been handed over to the Hawks and the SIU in order to determine those that must be held liable for the amounts stolen from the state.

12 September 2019 - NW545

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Regarding the amendment of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, which places more than 30 wild animals within the legal purview of agriculture and, essentially, farming, (a) what are the reasons this has been done, (b) was there a public consultation process and (c) what research was undertaken by scientists in planning the amendment; (2) Whether, in view of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, allowing improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance, permitting breeders to manipulate breeding outcomes and also allowing artificial insemination to be used, her department has considered the implications of the change for the 33 species of wild animals listed in the Amendment; if not, why not; if so, what are the implications?

Reply:

 

 

Response to Parliamentary Question

 

QUESTION NO.:

545/NW1541E

TO:

MINISTER

FROM:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

SUBJECT:

QUESTION 545/NW1541E FOR WRITTEN REPLY BY MR M BAGRAIM (DA) TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION:

CONFIDENTIAL

fety

DAFF’S RESPONSE:

PQ.  545/NW1541E Mr M Bagraim (DA) to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development:

  1. Regarding the amendment of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, which places more than 30 wild animals within the legal purview of agriculture and, essentially, farming, (a) what are the reasons this has been done, (b) was there a public consultation process and (c) what research was undertaken by scientists in planning the amendment;
  2. whether, in view of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, allowing improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance, permitting breeders to manipulate breeding outcomes and also allowing artificial insemination to be used, her department has considered the implications of the change for the 33 species of wild animals listed in the Amendment; if not, why not; if so, what are the implications? NW1541E

1 (a)The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) received a request from the industry in a letter dated 15 January 2017 to have game animals declared in terms Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act 62 of 1998). DAFF added the wildlife species to the list of Game animals regulated to under Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act No. 62 of 1998) for game farming production. The species were then declared in the government gazette dated 17 May 2019. Industry is registered in terms of the Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998 to represent game breeders societies to ensure genetic purity and sustainable utilization; do research on feeding and nutrition; define and measure traits of economic importance; and study regulatory gaps on game for food production.

(b) The DAFF did not conduct public consultation on the declaration of these animals.

(c) No research was undertaken by scientists in planning to have the game animals

declared in terms Animal Improvement Act, 1998 (Act 62 of 1998). These animals are landraces (endemic) to South Africa, hence the declaration of landrace (a kind of animal indigenous to or developed in the Republic). However, research will be executed on the species based on research questions in areas such as genetic purity, feeding and nutrition.

2. The Animal Improvement Act, Act 62 of 1998, provides for improvement of genetically superior animals to increase production and performance. This act is progressive, and can therefore not be implemented to the detriment of animal (biological) genetic resources. Declaration of the animals is aimed at ensuring that these landraces are conserved. It is also important to indicate that, due to changing farming systems in South Africa, game animals are included as these are already part of farm animal production systems in the country.

12 September 2019 - NW757

Profile picture: Khanyile, Mr S

Khanyile, Mr S to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

The departments of Economic Development and Trade and Industry did not host any event or function for the 2019 Budget Vote. No gifts were distributed.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW294

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the details of the (a) financial and (b) in-kind assistance, including fuel, ground handling and so on, provided by the SA Airways (SAA) to SA Express (i) in the past two years and (ii) since 1 January 2019; (2) Whether the SAA passed board resolutions as required by section 46 of the Companies Act, Act 71 of 2008, before providing any financial and/or other assistance to SA Express; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) Whether the Board of the SAA performed (a) solvency and/or liquidity tests to satisfy the requirements of section 46 of the specified Act before providing any financial or other assistance to SA Express; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (4) Whether the relevant trade unions were informed of the financial and other assistance before it was provided to SA Express; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) What are the relevant details of the (a) assessments conducted relating to the SA Express’ ability to repay any financial or other assistance to the SAA and (b) the impact of the SA Express’ extended grounding of its aircraft in 2018 on its ability to repay financial and other assistance to the SAA?

Reply:

 

  1. SAA has not provided financial assistance to SA Express (i) in the past two years; (ii) since 1 January 2019
  2. Not applicable as no financial assistance was provided to SA Express.
  3. Not applicable as no financial assistance was provided to SA Express.
  4. Not applicable as no financial assistance was provided to SA Express.
  5. Not applicable as no financial assistance was provided to SA Express.

12 September 2019 - NW550

Profile picture: Hunsinger, Mr CH

Hunsinger, Mr CH to ask the Minister of Transport

What number of positions are currently vacant in the boards of each of the different entities reporting to him?

Reply:

NAME OF ENTITY

VACANCIES

  1. SANRAL

1 Vacancy

  1. C-BRTA

There are currently 4 Vacancies

The Board term expired in May 2016 and was extended until 31 October 2019

  1. RTIA

7 Vacancies

  1. RTMC

None

  1. RAF

12 Vacancies

(Currently there is an Interim Board appointed)

  1. ACSA

2 Vacancies

  1. SACAA

None

  1. ATNS

None

  1. PRASA

12 Vacancies

(Currently there is an Interim Board appointed)

  1. RSR

2 Vacancies

  1. SAMSA

2 Vacancies

Board term expired 31 March 2019 and extended until 30 September 2019.

  1. Ports Regulator

The whole Board 12 Vacancies

12 September 2019 - NW459

Profile picture: Terblanche, Mr OS

Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Transport

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Police to question 335 on 14 August 2019, what (a) number of closed circuit television cameras are (i) installed and (ii) not in working order at each train station in each province and (b) are the reasons that the cameras are not working?

Reply:

a) (i) A total per region of installed CCTV cameras at PRASA managed railway stations is

highlighted in the table below:

Stations in provinces not listed in the table above are managed by Transnet.

(ii) As indicated in the table above in (a)(i), a total of 2 824 of the installed CCTV cameras

at PRASA managed railway stations are not in working order.

b). The reasons attributed to the non-functionality of CCTV cameras at PRASA managed railway stations can be categorized as follows:

  • Theft of electrical and telecommunication tables
  • Theft and vandalism of CCTV equipment
  • Delayed maintenance
  • CCTV project installation in progress / not completed yet

12 September 2019 - NW566

Profile picture: Cuthbert, Mr MJ

Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) Whether there are tariff exemptions on goods imported with the intention of doing humanitarian work; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether there are any (a) provisions within the Southern African Development Community (SADC) and the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) agreements that prevent the tariffs from being removed and (b) future plans within his department to remove tariffs on goods that are intended for humanitarian use; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Provision is made under Schedule 4 of the Customs and Excise Act, 1964, that allows for tariff exemptions on goods imported under certain circumstances, including for charitable and welfare organisations. Attention is drawn on rebate item 405.04 as an example of this. The International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) administers this provision to ensure that local jobs are not negatively affected and that markets are not disrupted. This is achieved through the application of set criteria.

South Africa is a Member of the Southern African Customs Union (SACU) that establishes a common customs area amongst Botswana, Eswatini, Lesotho, Namibia and South Africa. SACU has a common external tariff for imports coming into common customs area, and goods within SACU circulate freely without any tariffs. Changes to the external tariff – either increases or reductions - can be effected through the due process established under South Africa’s International Trade Administration Act. Nothing in the SACU Agreement prevents tariffs from being removed following the agreed process under the Act.

In terms of the Trade Protocol in the Southern African Development Community (SADC), over 99% of goods imported from the other SADC countries that are party to the SADC Trade Protocol enter South Africa/SACU free of any duty if those goods meet the terms of the agreed rule of origin.

Provision is already made for the rebate of duty for goods imported for humanitarian use. I am advised that the department currently has no plans to make any changes to this dispensation.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW500

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

What is the nature of the relationship amongst provinces to ensure that tourism targets are met in each province, (b) what communication mechanisms exist amongst provinces, (c) who is responsible for the (i) relationship and (ii) communication amongst provinces and (d) how are (i) performance and (ii) targets monitored?

Reply:

  1. - (d) The Matters raised in the question solely fall under the mandate of the provinces. The department is therefore not in the position to provide the required responses as they don’t fall under its areas of competency

12 September 2019 - NW598

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(a) How many tonnes of Rooibos tea were produced in the country in each of the past five years and (b)(i) how many of the total produced tonnes were exported and (ii) at what Rand value?

Reply:

Neither the Department nor Statistics South Africa, the national statistics agency of South Africa collects data on the production or export of Rooibos tea.

The South African Rooibos Council, is an independent organization, which collects information from its stakeholders on the industry. According to the Rooibos Council, South Africa has produced and exported the following amounts of rooibos in each of the last five years:

Produced Rooibos tea during the past 5 past years:

 

Quantity in tonnes

Year

Annual production

Annual export

2014

12 500

7 057

2015

11 500

6 561

2016

12 700

6 417

2017

13 000

7 728

2018

14 000

7 235

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW513

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of agricultural export protocols are outstanding, (b) from which dates have the protocols been outstanding, (c) why is each protocol still outstanding and (d) by what date is each outstanding protocol expected to be finalized?

Reply:

 

 

Response to Parliamentary Question

 

QUESTION NO.:

513/NW1506E

TO:

MINISTER

FROM:

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

SUBJECT:

QUESTION 513/NW1506E FOR WRITTEN REPLY BY MRS A STEYN (DA) TO THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

CLASSIFICATION:

CONFIDENTIAL

An export protocol is located at the end stage of a continuum of activities aimed at securing market access. An export protocol can only be concluded once the trade negotiations are finalised. At any given stage there are trade negotiations with trading partners and these are invariably at different stages of advancement within the market access continuum. Some market access requests for some commodities are at questionnaire (initial) stage, others are at health certification (final) stage. However, there are requests where negotiations have stalled. Trade negotiations on sanitary and phytosanitary matters do not unfold in a straight-line trajectory as there is consistent exchange of notes on scientific and technical facets. Moreover, any projected or assumed pathway or timeframe may be impeded, interrupted or curtailed by a range of factors. The table provided responds to questions 1 (a) (b) (c).

The dates given in this response are dependent vary depending on the complexity of the matter, and therefore the time it takes for the importing country to complete its risk analysis processes. For example the request to export beef to the USA had been going through a “Rule Making Process” of the USA for almost 10 years and was not even concluded when South Africa reported its 2011 Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak in KZN; following this South Africa was told to start the process from beginning.

With negotiations, the department sends a reminder shortly after the initial communication, if there is no response from the trade partner. If after one (or two) reminders there is still no response, the file is closed unless there is an indication of interest from the local industry.

Export Protocols

Country

Commodity Protocol outstanding

From which dates have the protocols been outstanding

(application date)

Why is each protocol still outstanding

By what date is each outstanding protocol expected to be finalised?

QUESTIONNAIRES

Australia

Ruminant semen and embryos

April 2015

Submitted FMD questionnaire response 20 April 2015. Australia has informed us on 23 July 2015 that they will not be able to evaluate the information for the next year, as resources had already been allocated elsewhere. Awaiting a response from Australia

Unknown

Indonesia

Beef

January 2016

Submitted questionnaire response on 29 January 2016. VPH still to submit dossiers on the establishments. Waiting for a response from Indonesia.

Unknown

Israel

Beef

May 2010

Beef questionnaire sent to Israel in May 2010. On 28 October 2015 Israel informed us that information is too old and process will only be restarted if there is interest from Israeli importers. Waiting for confirmation from Israel that there is Israeli interest.

Unknown

Japan

Beef

December 2015

Received questionnaire for completion. However, during prioritisation workshop with industry it was decided that it is an unlikely market, so it is on hold unless re-prioritised.

Unknown

Philippines

Beef

June 2016

Questionnaire in process of being completed.

Unknown

Singapore

Beef

April 2015

Singapore has indicated that they cannot allow importation from a country without negligible risk status for BSE. In January 2019, Singapore sent updated import requirements for BSE undetermined risk status countries. Singapore has expressed an interest in an inspection visit. However, South Africa has lost its OIE recognised Foot and Mouth Disease status and therefore, South Africa cannot host Singapore for the export of beef until the FMD free status has been regained.

Unknown

 

Lamb

 

Questionnaire was received. Was not prioritised at workshop with industry.

Unknown

Sri Lanka

Beef

August 2015

Sri Lanka indicated that they cannot import from a country without BSE negligible risk.

Unknown

Taiwan

Beef

July 2014

Sent information to Taiwan regarding the South Africa BSE status to check whether they would consider importing beef. Awaiting a response.

Unknown

Thailand

Beef

July 2017

Sent information on the FMD and BSE status of South Africa on 27 July 2017. Still awaiting a response.

Unknown

Vietnam

Beef

March 2015

Completed questionnaire submitted on 7 June 2016. Further information was requested which was sent on 17 March 2017. Awaiting a response.

Unknown

INSPECTION VISITS

Russia

Beef and mutton

March 2015

Inspection visit took place in March 2015. Inspection report indicated many concerns. South Africa cannot comply with Russia’s import requirements.

Unknown

Saudi Arabia

Beef and mutton

July 2016

Questionnaire response was submitted on 15 July 2016. An amended format of the questionnaire was requested. This was completed in 2017. Inspection visit to be arranged. Proposed dates for March 2017. The inspection visit had to be delayed due to lack of human resources. Thereafter, South Africa lost its Foot and Mouth Disease free status

Unknown

VETERINARY HEALTH CERTIFICATE NEGOTIATIONS

Malaysia

Beef

September 2014

Inspection visit took place in October 2017. A VHC was prepared according to the requirements received from the Malaysia Veterinary Authority and is awaiting inputs from management. VHC must then be circulated to the Provincial Veterinary Services and can then be proposed to Malaysia for negotiation.

Unknown

Brazil

Bovine semen and embryos and ovine semen

June 2016

Proposed veterinary health certificates were submitted to Brazil for negotiation in 2017. A response requesting amendments was received on 22 March 2018. Preparing the amendments.

Expect to send amended VHCs to Brazil by the end of 2019.

Argentina

Bovine semen and embryos

March 2018

Proposed veterinary health certificates on 16 July 2018. Received a request for amendments on 2 August 2018. Preparing the amendments.

Expect to send amended VHCs to Argentina by the end of 2019.

MARKET ACCESS NEGOTIATIONS FOR PLANT AND PLANT PRODUCTS

China

Pears

2008

The draft Protocol was received from the General Administration of Customs of the People’s Republic of China on 26 July 2019 and is being evaluated; upon confirmation of the whether South Africa is in a position to comply with the protocol, it will be taken through a consultation process with Industry.

Unknown

China

Soyabean

14 February 2019

Additional information on certain pests of concern had been requested by China; South Africa is currently compiling the required additional technical information.

Unknown

Japan

Avocado

17 December 2014

The draft Protocol and annexes with comments from MAFF were received in April 2019; feedback is being finalised.

Possibly by the end of September 2019, depending on when the response is completed and sent , and on feedback from Japan

Mexico

Table grapes

February 2006

Research on pest surveillance still needs to be conducted as requested by Mexico for one of the quarantine pests which occurs in the Table grape production areas of SA.

Unknown

Philippines

Citrus

August 2008

Feedback on the draft Pest Risk Analysis (PRA) report, draft phytosanitary requirements and proposed mitigation treatment measures for citrus fruits was provided to the Philippines on 11 July 2019.

Unknown

Taiwan

Avocado

November 2015

Additional information on certain pests of concern had been requested by The Taiwanese National Plant Protection Organization (NPPO) Bureau of Animal and Plant Inspection and Quarantine (BAPHIQ); the relevant technical experts in SA are currently collating the information.

Unknown

Thailand

Apples

05 August 2016

Feedback on the pest list of Apples from South Africa to be exported to the Kingdom of Thailand had been communicated to Thailand on 24 May 2019.

Unknown

South Korea

Table grapes

September 2011

Additional information on specific risk management measures on listed quarantine pests of concern had been requested by the Republic of Korea in March 2019; research/ surveillance still need to be conducted in SA.

Unknown

USA

Avocado

23 July 2008

Mitigation measures for pests of concern were communicated in a letter of response to the USDA-APHIS on 28 June 2019.

Unknown

USA

Maize/ corn seed

12 June 2012

Additional information on specific risk management measures on listed quarantine pest of concern had been communicated on 17 May 2018; feedback is awaited from the USA.

Unknown

12 September 2019 - NW689

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken, (b) on what date did the specified investigations commence, (c) who is undertaking the investigations, (d) what are the costs of the investigations so far, (e) by what date will a final report in this regard be finalised and (f) why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person?

Reply:

(A) What investigations into the suspension of a certain person (details furnished) have been undertaken

A forensic investigation was instituted following allegations of impropriety made against the person received through the SA Tourism whistle-blowing hotline and protected disclosure.

(B) On what date did the specified investigations commence

6 May 2019

(C) Who is undertaking the investigations

Bowmans’ Forensic Investigations

(D) What are the costs of the investigations so far

The costs will be communicated in due course once process is concluded

(E) By what date will a final report in this regard be finalised

As Minister I gave concurrence to the request from board on the 15 July 2019

(F) Why have no charges been laid to date against the specified person

The specified person has been charged. An internal disciplinary enquiry is set-down for 5 – 10 days in the month of September 2019.

12 September 2019 - NW750

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

  1. The Department of Public Service and Administration did not host any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate.
  2. N/A

12 September 2019 - NW289

Profile picture: Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T

Mpambo-Sibhukwana, Ms T to ask the Minister of State Security:

What (a) total amount is budgeted for the private office for the 2019-2020 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level , job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) The total amount budgeted for the Ministry for the 2019-2020 financial year is R 47 081 363.09.

(b) It should be observed that the SSA may be held accountable on such matters by the Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence (JSCI), the Inspector-General and the Auditor-General.

Approved/Not Approved

Reply to the Parliamentary Question 289 to the Minister of State Security

12 September 2019 - NW599

Profile picture: Langa, Mr TM

Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Which South African companies with manufacturing capacity in the Republic are able to produce (a) train carriages and (b) train lines?

Reply:

A number of companies, both domestic and foreign-owned, have local manufacturing or related factories in South Africa. The following are some of the key local companies that assemble; refurbish; and/ or maintain locomotives, wagons and passenger trains:

  1. Transnet Engineering (TE) manufactures, refurbishes and maintains all classes of rail rolling stock at its various facilities across South Africa.2
  2. Gibela Rail Consortium is manufacturing the new trains for the Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa (PRASA) at their facility in Dunnottar, Nigel.
  3. Alstom Ubunye is previously known as Union Carriage and Wagon (UCW). They have capacity to manufacture and refurbish both locomotives and passenger coaches.
  4. TMH Africa is previously known as DCD Rolling Stock plant. This facility has the capacity to do the assembly, maintenance and modernisation of locomotives and wagons.
  5. Naledi Rail Engineering (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for PRASA at their facility in Germiston.
  6. Wictra Holdings (Pty) Ltd has the capacity to refurbish passenger coaches for the PRASA and locomotives at their facilities in Cape Town (Brackenfell) and Boksburg (Dunswart).
  7. Traxtion Sheltam is involved in locomotive rebuild and overhaul at their facility in Rosslyn.
  8. African Rail and Traction Services (Pty) Ltd – the previous Grindrod facility – is involved in the repair, reconditioning and upgrading of locomotives and track-mobiles at their facility in Pretoria West.
  9. Amsted Rail (formerly owned by SCAW Metal) based in Boksburg produces cast wheels for the domestic rail industry
  10. Highveld Structural Steel produces rail-lines currently supplying to the mining industry.

There is a further number of companies in the supply chain at various levels that support the above mentioned companies with sub-systems; components; materials and associated services.

 

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW509

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What is the total number of BMW 3 Series vehicles purchased by his department in July 2019, (b) who authorised the purchase of the vehicles in each department, (c) what was the total purchase price of each vehicle and (d) for (i) what purpose and (ii) whom was each vehicle purchased? (2) Whether his department secured any discounted purchase prices for the specified vehicles; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? (3) Whether he has found that the purchase of the specified vehicles complied with the National Treasury’s cost containment measures?

Reply:

(1) (a) None

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d)(i) Not applicable

(d)(ii) Not applicable

(2) Not applicable

(3) Not applicable

12 September 2019 - NW722

Profile picture: Kruger, Mr HC

Kruger, Mr HC to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether his department has invested or intends to invest money in the Highveld Industrial Park near Emalahleni in Mpumalanga; if so, (a) what amount (i) was spent in the previous financial year and (ii) does his department intend to spend in the next financial year, (b) what number of (i) new businesses are assisted and (ii) new jobs are created in the project and (c) what (i) development and (ii) support measures is his department planning for entrepreneurs who are interested to start-up businesses in the industrial park? NW1767E

Reply:

 

The departments of Trade and Industry and Economic Development have not invested money in the Highveld Industrial Park. The Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) provided loan funding to the structural steel mill located at Highveld Industrial Park during Business Rescue.

The Industrial Park currently has 51 tenants and 1 141 are jobs created.

Government through the IDC, sefa and the various incentive schemes on offer will consider suitable support upon request from individual businesses planning to locate or those that are located at the industrial park.

-END-

12 September 2019 - NW525

Profile picture: Mabhena, Mr TB

Mabhena, Mr TB to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)(a) What (i) is the current status of the construction project of the Vereeniging taxi rank, (ii) amount has the Passenger Rail Agency of SA (PRASA) paid to contractors to date and (iii) is the scope of the work contracted and (b) when was payment last made by PRASA to any contractors; (2) Whether the contractors delivered the services agreed upon; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1519E

Reply:

  1. (a) (i) The work is currently suspended due to contractual disputes between

Gauteng Provincial Department of Roads and Transport and the contractor. In September 2018 progress was measured at 83%.

(ii) The amount spent to date by PRASA on the consultants is R13,508,685-00.

(iii) The scope of the work contracted is for designs and construction

supervision, as well as occupational health and safety monitoring for the intermodal facility.

(b) Payment was last made on 27 April 2017.

(2). The contractor did not complete the work and as such, the work were suspended pending the way forward by the Gauteng Provincial Department of Roads and Transport.

12 September 2019 - NW494

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the MINISTER OF PUBLIC SERVICE AND ADMINISTRATION

What (a) number of public service employees are currently employed in each (i) national government, (ii) provincial government, (iii) local government and (iv) state-owned entity and (b) number of the specified public service employees are appointed in the (i) senior and (ii) middle management levels?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Public Service and Administration can only provide information on employees who are appointed on PERSAL. The information provided in the tables below excludes the Defence Force and the State Security Agency that do not make use of the PERSAL system. Information pertaining to local government and state own entities should be sourced from the Department of Cooperative Governance and the relevant oversight Departments for the state owned entities. Information on the number of appointments in the National and Provincial spheres is provided in the tables below:

  1. (i) and (ii) Table 1: All appointments in National and Provincial spheres

Sphere

Number of appointments (Including periodic and abnormal)

National

375 662

Provincial

1 018 788

Total

1 394 450

  1. (i) and (ii) Table 2: Appointments in the MMS and SMS in National and Provincial spheres

Sphere

Number

 

MMS

SMS

National

9554

5643

Provincial

8322

4131

Total

17 876

9 774

11 September 2019 - NO91

Profile picture: Malomane, Ms VP

Malomane, Ms VP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details of the sustainable and long-term solutions that will be implemented to ensure that the SA Broadcasting Corporation broadcasts the Premier Soccer League matches (details furnished)?

Reply:

The broadcast of sports events is regulated by the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations. In December 2018, The Independent Communications Authority (ICASA) published the draft Broadcast Services Regulations to amend Broadcast Services Regulations of 2010.

In order to ensure a long-term sustainable broadcast solution regarding sport broadcast rights, ICASA in consultation with Department of Communications and Digital Technologies conducted public hearings so that it can undertake amendments to the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations of 2010 and concluded the public hearings process in May 2019.

The process of further consultation, analysing and finalising the inputs is still in progress.

As provided by the Act, ICASA will communicate with the two Ministries Sports, Arts and Culture and Communications and Digital Technologies prior to publishing the final regulations.

11 September 2019 - NO90

Profile picture: Adams, Ms R C

Adams, Ms R C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What strategic mechanisms has his department put in place to ensure that the critical analysis noted by the Eminent Persons Group Transformation Status Dashboard (details furnished) is conducted in order to inform the effective and efficient creation of an enabling environment for the thriving participation of women in sport?

Reply:

DSAC has prioritised the Code Specific training as approved by the International Federations and the National Federations for Women and the effects thereof will be visible as from 2020. As a result, rugby, football and cricket’s national women teams at an under 15 and under 17 levels have shown an increase in all provinces as did the number of women coaches and referees.

Following the 2017/18 EPG report in which women‘s position in sport was compared to that of men in 19 sports in Dashboard format, this indicate that funding continues to be a challenge in women sport, the EPG is in the process of compiling a dashboard on women’s position in the 19 sports codes on its own. This will bring sharper focus and a basis for comparison of women in sport annually.

The National Federations that are part of the Eminent Person Group Report (EPG) are required to outline the programmes aimed at addressing the key findings / shortcomings as identified in the EPG Report. These programmes form part of the Business Plans that are submitted for the release of annual funding.

In addition, the Federations sign the Agreements wherein they commit to the self-set targets (Barometer targets). These targets form the basis of continuous engagements on the performance of the identified National Federations.

11 September 2019 - NO95

Profile picture: Dlulane, Ms BN

Dlulane, Ms BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What were the key recommendations addressing socioeconomic transformation that came from the inaugural national film summit that was held earlier this year under the theme Transformation and innovation in the South African film/audio visual industry in the fourth industrial revolution; are we geared for change? and (b) what are the timeframes for implementing the recommendations?

Reply:

The following outlines the Key summary of instruments/ recommendation addressing socio-economic transformation that were identified at the Film/Audio-visual Summit:-

  1. Establishment of a Transformation Charter/Sector Codes & Bargaining Council: to encourage Ownership, preferential procurement, Supplier development, Enterprise development for impact on socio-economic development. The Bargaining Council: will address the status of contract worker, labour issues, social security and standards.
  2. Sign a work place Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Code of Good Practise pledge to encourage standard of good practice within film & audio-visual production companies.
  3. Policy, legislation review with attention to the Intellectual Property (IP) regime: to conduct a socio-economic impact study on the Copyright Amendment Bill.
  4. Mobile Economy opportunities: together with the partner department DOCT establishment and support of Innovation, Digital Content hubs; support the initiatives that will gear up South Africa for the 4th Industrial Revolution, in particular Animation training to stimulate content creation activities.
  5. Advocacy and Consultation: to support existing key industry organisations for strategic partnership in pursuing advocacy role, continuous consultation on issues affecting the industry through an Industry Reference Group.
  6. Establishment of Film/Audio-visual Fund: we will submit a motivation to SARS to collapse Sections 12 (o) and 12 (J) to encourage and stimulate private sector investment into the film/audio-visual industry,
  7. Private Sector investment stimulation: Submit a business case to National Treasury motivating for a budget increase – maybe the DTI Film Incentives budget can be managed by DSAC and the NFVF for the creation of the Film Production Fund that will support more African co-productions and Animation productions.
  8. Marketing & Distribution support: encourage preferential scheduling for local films and co-productions amongst local companies. Incentivise Sales agencies, subsidise marketing and distribution for theatrical releases.
  9. Skills & Infrastructure support: to engage TVET Colleges in creating centres of audio-visual specialisation in all the value chain. Support: Mentorship, film training initiatives, technical skills, film literacy and appreciation.

(b). the implementation of the Summit recommendations has been structured as follows:

Short Term: 2019/2020: Our Department is already addressing three (3) of the above recommendations

Short to Medium Term: 2019/2020–2020/2021-2021/2023

Long Term: 2021/2022 – 2023/2024

11 September 2019 - NO67

Profile picture: van Wyk, Ms A

van Wyk, Ms A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether his department is investigating alleged (a) irregularities that were identified during the verification of the National Arts Council’s (NAC) 2017-18 audit outcomes and misuse of public funds by certain officers of the NAC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a). The audit outcomes of the 2017/2018 financial year did not reflect irregularities for the National Arts Council. The entity was granted clean audit.

(b). My department instructed the Council of the National Arts Council to investigate the allegations against the CEO of the NAC. The investigation was conducted by Gobodo Forensic Investigative Authority that made findings which were concluded through a disciplinary hearing. The final outcome of the hearing received from the independent Chairperson of the hearing was received on 03 April 2019. The CEO was subsequently acquitted on all charges and reported for duty on the 12th April 2019.

11 September 2019 - NO68

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether his department has developed any plans, in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education, to provide training to educators to implement physical training programmes in schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministers of both Sport and Recreation and Basic Education signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2018 committing to the provision of an integrated school sport programme. The MOU identifies various role players who are tasked with delivering physical education and sport in schools. Physical Education is a learning area within the Curriculum of Basic Education.

In line with the integrated strategic framework for Teacher Education and development that has been developed between the Department of Basic Education and Department of Higher Education, teachers are capacitated through Life Orientation subject committees. (national, provincial and district) focussing on Physical Education as a learning area. The Curriculum within the Department of Basic Education identifies training needs and submits to the teacher development unit to facilitate the training of teachers in Physical Education.

The Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant from the Department of Sport and Recreation that is allocated to Provinces makes provision for 38% of the grant to be allocated to the School Sport Programme, annually.

Of the allocated amount, 10% is ring-fenced for training of educators which includes training of coaches in specific codes of sport.

11 September 2019 - NO66

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he has found that the Mzansi Golden Economy programme of his department is achieving its targets; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant detail?

Reply:

The Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) programme was established to make a strategic investment to optimize the economic benefit of the Cultural and Creative sector of South Africa. It was positioned as a valuable capital investment tool to economic growth and job creation.

Its main purpose was to stimulate demand, audience development and consumption, and human capital development, amongst others.

Targets (as can be traced in the ANNUAL REPORTS) were met consistently over the past 5 years. The current target in APP is to create 9000 job opportunities and all effort is made to ensure that this set target is achieved.

MGE has immensely made an impact throughout the country in the arts and culture sector. Through MGE funding a number of Provincial events have been sustained and these events have over the years showcased local talents, contributed in forming collaborations between arts practitioners, created platforms for skills development and increased levels of arts appreciation.

11 September 2019 - NO92

Profile picture: Manganye, Ms J

Manganye, Ms J to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps is his department taking to ensure that physical activity and sports become a vehicle for social cohesion (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Outcome 14 sets out five long-term nation building goals for South Africa. For the sports sector, what is key is the promotion of social cohesion across society through increased interaction across race and class. Therefore, it is without question that the NDP and the sectoral National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) that is aligned to (NDP) recognise sport as a way to foster nation building and social cohesion.

To give expression to the visions of these plans over the medium term, Department of Sports, Arts and Culture intends to:

  • continue broadening the participation base in sport,

The Department will therefore continue to work for transformation in the sports fraternity by ensuring equitable access, development and excellence at all levels of participation, thereby improving social cohesion, nation building and the improving quality of life of all South Africans.

The NSRP reminds us that “no country can expect to achieve and sustain success at the elite level without a strong participation base in the community, because that is the beginning for every champion”. It is therefore not by accident that the greater part of our budget is allocated to the Active Nation Programme. This Programme provides mass participation opportunities for participants from different walks of life.

Being a winning nation has very favourable spinoffs for nation building and social cohesion.

Therefore, the Department’s daily work contributes directly towards the achievement of Social Cohesion. This, because the work of the Department is about bringing people from different sectors, and demographic profiles, together to share common spaces and experiences. To ensure that physical activity and sports becomes a vehicle for social cohesion, the Department does among other things, the following (in no particular order):

  • Consult the sector during its strategic planning to ensure that its plans go beyond just playing.
  • Deliver the Youth Camps in all 9 provinces. The National Youth Camp provides a platform for the youth of our country to interact across race, class and social backgrounds. The youth Camp includes young learners from urban rural, the disabled sector and across race groups. The content of the Youth Camp includes, Leadership skills relating to Social cohesion and Nation building, Community Services, Sport and indigenous games and Entrepreneurial skills.
  • Encourage communities to organise sporting events, leagues and championships – by making available, the Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant to further facilitate the delivery of sport and recreation through partnerships with relevant delivery agents such as provinces.

11 September 2019 - NO93

Profile picture: Modise, Mr PMP

Modise, Mr PMP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the strides made by his department over the past five years as a result of the initiative that addressed societal challenges through a more integrated approach and decisive interventions that included all three tiers of government, what impact will the national convention that is scheduled for this month have on community engagement, social cohesion and nation building?

Reply:

The rationale for the social compact convention comes upon the realisation that no single sector, including government, can single-handedly succeed in the goal of achieving a socially integrated and inclusive society. That is, for South Africa to become a socially integrated and inclusive society, the different sectors in society need to make commitments and hold each other to account.

At the national convention, a broad consensus would be obtained in terms of the letter and the spirit of the social contract on social cohesion and nation building. The social compact or social contract will be an agreement among the different sectors in society, including labour, business, traditional authorities, and the faith based sector, wherein they will collectively and individually commit to concrete and tangible deliverables, all in an effort towards meeting the goal of a socially integrated and inclusive society.

Currently, sector consultations are in progress and a desktop study on compacting is being concluded.

It must be noted here too that the social compact project is not meant to circumvent the broader programme of action of government on social cohesion and nation building i.e. the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). Rather, the programme of action as it relates to Priority 5, is meant to give traction to the social compact project. In other words, government’s commitments, as a sector as they relate to the social compact project, will be extrapolated from government’s commitments in terms of the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). That is, while the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (priority 5) focuses on total effort by government on social cohesion and nation building, the social compact project focuses on total effort at the societal level that includes all sectors of society, not just government. In terms of impact, government is hopeful, since there have been numerous examples of compacting before that went reasonably well. The negotiated settlement and the Constitution of the Republic, for which there was much consensus, are examples of social compacts.

11 September 2019 - NO94

Profile picture: Mamabolo, Mr JP

Mamabolo, Mr JP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

How is his department, in partnership with the National House of Traditional Leaders, planning to deepen society’s understanding about cultural diversity and our heritage with particular reference to his department’s efforts to balance its focus between arts on the one hand and culture on the other hand?

Reply:

The Department of Sports, Arts and Culture and the Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Affairs concluded and signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in 2018. The MOU includes amongst others the following areas

  • Rites of passage including Traditional Initiation
  • Harmful cultural practices
  • Oral history
  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  • Promotion of Indigenous languages
  • Moral Regeneration
  • Resistance and Liberation Heritage
  • Social Cohesion

The two departments are presently developing an implementation protocol with activities and timeframes to be presented to the two Ministers. The Departments are already cooperating on projects such as the documentation and protection of indigenous knowledge through the documentation of the work of Living Human Treasures. Projects such as the restoration of the grave of Chief Maqoma, King Hintsa exhumation and reburial and the construction of the Sarah Bartmann Center of Remembrance and KhoiSan Museum are some of the projects that focus on and promote South Africa’s diverse culture and heritage.

These projects involve both the DTA and traditional leaders. The Department of Sports, Arts and culture is in the process of appointing a panel of experts who will assist with compiling a national register of our rich and diverse indigenous knowledge systems. The panel will also develop another register of IKS needing urgent safeguarding. The Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Leaders will be invited to second a representative to the panel of experts.