Questions and Replies

21 August 2019 - NW65

Profile picture: Sindane, Mr P

Sindane, Mr P to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the names of the ten largest commercial land owners in each province?

Reply:

The Branch Deeds Registration does not have a record of the use of land. However the table below reflects the land owners of the top 10 largest farms, according to its extent per province. Various municipalities are the custodian of the land use.

Province

Property/ Land Owner

Eastern Cape

1. Geyer Hermanus

2. Mun Ikwezi

3. South African National Roads Agency S O C Ltd

4. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

5. Moravian Church In South Africa

6. South African National Roads Agency Ltd

7. Watt Handrie Van Der

8. Roelofse George Frederik

9. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

10. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

Free State

1. Macholo Moramang Simon

2. Plessis Jacoba Johanna Du

3. Die Suid-Afrikaanse Nasionale Padagentskap Ltd

4. South African National Roads Agency Soc Ltd

Mangaung Local Municipality

  1. Zwarts Johannes Jurgens
  1. Oppermansgronde Communal Property Association
  1. Universiteit Van Die O V S
  1. Eskom Holdings Ltd
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa

Gauteng

  1. Joubert Christel Dorothea
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Marine Civil Pty Ltd
  1. Nekiap Prop No 5 Cc
  1. In2food Prop Pty Ltd
  1. Far West Rand Dolomitic Water Assoc
  1. Technicrete I S G Pty Ltd
  1. Chessboard Trade & Invest 67 Pty Ltd
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Afric
  1. Chris Vlok Prop Services Cc

 Kwazulu Natal

  1. Delport Andries Christoffel
  1. Emcakwini Community Trust
  1. The Shawe Family Trust
  1. Wild Dog Estate Pty Ltd
  1. Roman Catholic Church-Dundee
  1. Nodunga Communal Property Association
  1. Stein Walter Mark
  1. Izimbiwa Coal Proprietary Limited
  1. Ingonyama Trust-Trustees
  1. Kuzwayo Witness Bongane

 Mpumalanga

  1. Pretorius Maria Sophia
  1. Capstone 33 Pty Ltd
  1. Paardekop Boerdery Pty Ltd
  1. Welgelegen Communal Prop Assoc
  1. Vos Johannes
  1. Botes Gemma Louise
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Roos Gysbert Johannes
  1. Nic Grobler Familie Trust
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd

 North West

  1. Linda Trust
  1. Pieter Ernst Familie Trust
  1. Wolverand Trust
  1. Hennie Pieters Trust
  1. Botha Theunis Louis
  1. Rietfontein Trust
  1. Bluebird Farm Pty Ltd
  1. Hennie Pieters Trust
  1. Klipkop Boerdery Familie Trust
  1. Martha Theunissen Trust

 Limpopo

  1. Limpopo Landowners Pty Ltd
  1. Tygerfontein Beleggings Cc
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. Tokmar Familie Trust
  1. Boukrag Eiendomsbeleggings Pty Ltd
  1. Schut 4 Now Pty Ltd
  1. Boschplaats Boerdery Pty Ltd
  1. Lema O Phele Group A Trust
  1. Lema O Phele Group A Trust
  1. Kruger Petrus Jacobus

 Northern Cape

  1. Duikerfontein Trust
  1. Gemeenskap Van Richtersveld
  1. Gemeenskap Van Concordia
  1. Frances Baard Distriksmunisipaliteit
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. Nasionale Regering Van Die Republiek Van Suid Afri
  1. National Government Of The Republic Of South Africa
  1. Riemvasmaak Gemeenskapsontwikkelingstrust
  1. Richtersveld Sida Hub Communal Prop Association
  1. Gemeenskap Van Komaggas

 Western Cape

  1. Wit Maria Dorathea De
  1. Garden Route Gateway Plaza Pty Ltd
  1. Brand Adri Ronel
  1. Plessis Jacobus Lodewicus Du
  1. Garden Of Eden District Pty Ltd
  1. Republiek Van Suid-Afrika
  1. South African National Roads Agency Ltd
  1. Sanbona Game Reserve Pty Ltd
  1. Hoon Trust
  1. Gemeenskap Van Ebenezer

20 August 2019 - NW364

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019 – 22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? NW 1336E

Reply:

(a) The major responsibilities of the Ministry of International Relations and Cooperation is managing South Africa’s relations with the International World. This includes bilateral relations with countries across the globe, also engaging in the various multi-lateral institutions that deal with issues ranging from Peace and Security, Human Rights, Environmental Protection, Nuclear Non -Proliferation and Trade and Development. This means that over the course of MTEF, the

(i) Ministry inclusive of the Minister and

(ii) two Deputy Ministers would need to undertake various trips, to deal with Issues emanating from the bilateral and multi-lateral environments.

Some of the trips are standard, for an example we know that on annual basis, the South African President supported by the Minister of International Relations would be expected to travel to the United Nations, for the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA).So of course these kinds of trips we can pencil in and plan for well in advance. However, many of the trips arise from specific required interventions in the arena. Therefore it is not possible to provide a detailed schedule of trips on the MTEF as required by this question.

What I can undertake is to ensure that there are no trips that are undertaken when they are not necessary or relevant. I can also undertake that we would ensure that delegation sizes are not larger than what is needed to conclude diplomatic engagements successfully. I can undertake to ensure to keep the Ministry’s and the Department’s travel within the budget outlined in the MTEF. This may be difficult as South Africa has been asked as to serve as the Chair of the African Union during the year 2020. This will require additional funds which are not provided for on the MTEF. The Department will engage with National Treasury on this matter urgently.

20 August 2019 - NW250

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What is the current status of each of the AgriParks; (2) (a) what amount has been (i) budgeted for each park and (ii) spent on it to date and (b) which parks have been completed; (3) whether any outstanding payments is owed to contractors; if so, (a) what amount and (b) to which projects?

Reply:

(1) Of the proposed 44 Agri-Parks, none have been fully completed. Please refer to Annexure A for a list of projects under implementation and planning status.

The following 4 Agri-Hubs are partially operational:

  • Nchora: EC;
  • Springbokpan: NW;
  • Witzenberg : WC; and
  • Mkhulu Agri-Hub: MP.

The following 23 Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) are partially operational:

  • Qamata-Bilatye - FPSU (EC);
  • Emalahleni – FPSU (EC);
  • Makholokoeng – FPSU (FS);
  • Sediba FPSU (Mangaung, FS);
  • Tarlton – FPSU (GP);
  • Bakkerdals - (Westrand: GP);
  • Ndumo FPSU (KZN);
  • Makhatini FPSU (KZN);
  • Nsuze FPSU (KZN);
  • St Paul FPSU (KZN);
  • Mapela FPSU (LP);
  • Nwanedi FPSU (LP);
  • Tshiombo (LP);
  • Huntington FPSU (MP);
  • Dundonald FPSU (MP);
  • Sybrandskraal FPSU (MP);
  • Heuningsvlei FPSU (NC);
  • Eksteenskuil FPSU (NC);
  • Taung FPSU NW);
  • Ebenaeser FPSU (WC);
  • Napier FPSU (WC);
  • Suurbraak PFSU (WC); and
  • Haarlem FPSU (WC)

(2) (a),(i),(ii) Please refer to Annexure B.

(b) There is no fully completed Agri-Park to date.

(3) (a) Invoices are paid as per job completed/ satisfied.

(b) Please refer to Annexure A for projects still under implementation or retention and still to be paid.

20 August 2019 - NW119

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What number of incomplete sale purchase agreements for land claims are currently on the books of the State; (2) in what number of land claims did sellers agree to sell land to the State, which the State did not offer to purchase (a) in each of the past five financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; (3) what is the average turnaround time for the State within which to purchase land from willing sellers?

Reply:

(1) 42

(2) (a) 85 (This figure refers to only 2018/19 financial year as the Commission had previously not categorised the capturing of offers according to land purchases and financial compensation.

(b) 32 from April 2019 to date.

(3) There is no average turn-around time since the process involves valuation (by OVG), and purchase price negotiations with land owners.

19 August 2019 - NW432

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Mazzone, Ms NW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether a bailout and/or additional guarantees are under consideration for Denel; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons for the bailout and/or additional guarantees and (b) is the amount under consideration; (2) Whether Denel intends to expand its operations beyond weaponry; if so, (a) what are the reasons for the expansion in its operations and (b into which industry will it expand its operations; (3) Whether the expansion of its operations will require any additional financial support from the State; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? CW46E

Reply:

The answers for the SOEs in my portfolio are as follows:

1. An application for funding to be allocated to Denel from the contingency reserve announced by the Minister of Finance during the 2019 Budget Speech has been made, with additional funding requested over the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF).

(a) Denel requires recapitalisation because of the liquidity challenges it faces.

(b) The amount of the total recapitalisation is still being considered by Government.

(2)(a) & (b) As per the South African Defence Review (2015), Denel is a national security asset, with the primary purpose of designing, developing, manufacturing and supporting defence matériel. In addition, Denel is charged with:

    • The custodianship of assigned sovereign or strategic defence capabilities, technologies and abilities, inclusive of those that may be at risk, the loss of which would threaten South Africa’s required defence capability.
    • The design, development, manufacture and support of important capabilities.

Denel is busy with the implementation of a turnaround plan.  The strategy was approved by the Board of Directors in February 2019 and is aligned with the expectations of the shareholder.  The immediate focus will be on disposing of non-core assets on an urgent basis and establishing strategic equity partnerships across the various divisions of the company.

Nevertheless, Denel is constantly exploring economically viable new revenue streams as part of its profitable growth strategy as well as new technologies to grow its business and technology base. These include both technologies adjacent to its current product portfolio technologies and new “green fields” technologies. Denel continues to and intends to further grow its collaboration with local and international Universities and research institutes. Some of the technology and expansion areas being explored include security and cyber technology solutions, system of system level integration capabilities, advanced software solutions and an enhanced offering to the South African Police Service.

Denel is one of the few, if not the only, level 5 System integration capability for Military solutions in South Africa. Denel intends to play an active role in 4th Industrial revolution solutions in South Africa.

(3) Denel’s expansion into new technology areas will be funded through a combination of self-funding projects and R&D investments. No specific additional State funding is foreseen for this technology expansion.

19 August 2019 - NW417

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether a certain company (name furnished) was awarded any tender to provide construction services for bulk water supply in Fort Beaufort; if so, what (a) are the details of the services contracted, (b) was the value of the tender and (c) amount was actually paid to the specified company; (2) whether she has found that the services for which the contract was awarded was completed successfully; if not, (a) why not and (b) was the company blacklisted from providing any further services to the Government as a result of the failure to complete the contracted services; if so, what is the current status of the construction work; (3) whether any penalties were imposed for non-completion of the contracted work; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Water and Sanitation has advised me that it does not have direct contractual obligations with the company referred to by the Honourable Member. However, the Amatole District Municipality; which has been funded by the department through the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) & Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for Water Infrastructure and Sanitation Projects; is the Water Service Authority that engaged the services of the company.

(2) & (3) I will look into the matter now that it has been brought my attention.

19 August 2019 - NW376

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Ministry is required to undertake international travel to carry out the core mandate on trade, industry and competition. These will normally focus on areas such as export promotion, investment promotion and showcasing South African products and companies, participation at Summits with economic partners, participation in international trade negotiations, attendance at multilateral economic engagements and bilateral relations missions and promoting economic South Africa’s interests.

At the request of the President, the Minister and Deputy Ministers may be requested to attend to international engagements and accompany the President and/or Deputy President on State and Working visits abroad, in accordance with the protocols normally followed by national states.

International travel is not planned three years in advance. Costs pertaining to international travel is provided in the Annual Reports for the specific year concerned. Attendance by officials will depend on the nature of the national economic interests being pursued during a given visit and the nature of the events and engagements.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW31

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Labour to question 1995 on 20 August 2018, will he furnish Mr M Waters with all the full reports promised in that reply?

Reply:

No, because of the provisions of section 36 (Disclosure of Information) Occupational Health and Safety Act 85 of 1993 (“The Act”), which prohibits disclosure of any information concerning the affairs of any other person obtained in carrying out any function in terms of the Act.

 

19 August 2019 - NW395

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

(1) (a) What amount has been spent to date on the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme run by his department, (b) what concessions by provincial or local governments for businesses that have invested in the parks have been secured to date, (c) what incentives are available for businesses that (i) are conducted in the parks and (ii) want to invest in the parks, (d) what investment promotion is done by his department for businesses in the parks, (e) what support does his department provide to businesses that have invested in or plan to invest in the parks and (f)(i) what new businesses have invested in the parks since the programme began and (ii) to what value; (2) whether there is a business plan available for the programme; if not, why not; if so, will he provide Mr D W Macpherson with a copy of the business plan? NW1367E

Reply:

I am advised by the Department that the industrial parks initiative will be scaled up, based on work that has been done to date; and I have been furnished with the information that follows:

To date (until 31 March 2019) the Department of Trade and Industry (the dti) has spent R 511 million on the Industrial Parks Revitalisation Programme.

No concessions have been made available from provincial or local government as yet.

The Revitalisation Programme was instituted because of insufficient resources available at local and provincial government to maintain the Industrial Parks. the dti has been facilitating annual symposia involving all the Industrial Parks as well as the local municipalities and provincial representatives, to strengthen collaboration across the different spheres of government, including the development of future funding models for the sustainability of the Industrial parks. Concessions and other forms of support from local and provincial governments are envisaged to form part of the funding models. However modalities for such funding still requires appropriate consultation.

There are no special incentives available to business in Industrial Parks, other than the suite of incentives available to businesses through the dti. A number of workshops have been hosted by the dti in Industrial Park to raise awareness of these incentives. The Department is also considering the viability of extending some of the incentives available to investors in the Special Economic Zones to existing and potential investors in Industrial Parks.

Investment promotion for the Industrial Parks falls under the investment promotion drives for Special Economic Zones, as well as the investment promotion services provided by the dti in general. The Department is currently developing an investor handbook for the various Industrial Parks, and an investment promotion trip has been planned to parts of Asia for October 2019.

Support is provided to businesses in Industrial Parks by Invest SA. This complements the work done by various provincial agencies.

the dti has also initiated the Resource Efficiency and Cleaner Production Programme whose objective is to optimize the use of water and energy and thus improve the competitiveness of the businesses in Industrial Parks.

An exercise is currently underway to obtain a list of the new businesses that have invested in the Industrial Parks. This will be made available when completed.

The revitalization of the Industrial Parks was initiated following a call by the President to address the infrastructure needs of the rural and township industrial economy. The implementation of the programme was informed by a scoping exercise in 2015 which was followed by a detailed assessment conducted in 2016. Funding is awarded to applicants based on successful applications by the respective Industrial Parks. In this context therefore, no business plan has been drawn up at national level to support the industrial parks, as each park has to operate with its own business plan and this has in the past been associated with provincial and local government. The dti initiatives have been aimed at improving existing industrial parks. However, as the Department increases its level of support for industrial parks, it will be necessary to ensure that the business plans for individual parks are improved, so that the social and industrial return increases.

The program is a developmental initiative with the objective of decentralizing industrialization and improving the industrial capacity of the rural and township economy.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW241

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a)How often does Eskom inspect electricity pylon; (b) What number of inspectors does Eskom currently have; (c) What number of pylons are there in the Republic and (d) What preventative maintenance is being done on the power lines and pylons?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a) The frequency of inspections of pylons varies between 3 monthly to 10 yearly, depending on the categorisation of the infrastructure.

(b) Eskom currently has 7281 inspectors.

(c) Eskom has a total of 11 599 773 pylons across the country.

(d) Eskom conducts extensive condition monitoring time based maintenance on pylons, and powerlines according to prescribed maintenance standards. Preventative maintenance includes:

  • Vegetation management - monitor vegetation under or near the powerlines to ensure that safety clearances are not compromised.
  • Visual aerial inspections and ground patrol - determine the physical integrity of towers, stays, foundations, insulators, conductors, shield wires and fibre optic system.

19 August 2019 - NW175

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Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

Whether the Government subsidises in any way the (a) import and/or (b) production of electric vehicles; if not, why not in each case; if so, in each case, what (i) are the relevant details, (ii) number of companies involved in the import or production of electric vehicles receive such subsidies and (iii) is the current volume of electric vehicles (aa) produced locally and (bb) imported?

Reply:

Support for the importation and production of motor vehicles, under which electric vehicles would ordinarily fall, is covered under the Automotive Production and Development Program (APDP).

Under the APDP, light motor vehicles including electric vehicles can be imported into the country with the use of rebate credit certificates earned. Such certificates allow the importer to offset import duties, where the importer assembles vehicles locally. This incentivizes the development and expansion of vehicle production in South Africa.

The Department advises that fewer than 1 000 electric vehicles have been imported to date; and no auto manufacturer currently assembles electric or hybrid vehicles in South Africa.

I am in discussion with the automobile sector in South Africa regarding the production of electric or hybrid vehicles locally. We are keen to ensure that South Africa develops production capacity in what is anticipated to be a growing part of the car market. On conclusion of the discussions, a formal statement will be made.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW421

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry

What (a) has he found to be the causes of the Republic’s decline in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business Report from position 32 in 2009 to position 82 in 2019 and (b) steps has his department taken to ensure that the Republic turns around its continued decline?

Reply:

The rankings of countries in the World Bank’s Ease of Doing Business are a relative measure in that it measures a country’s performance relative to the number of regulatory changes that other countries have undertaken. Johannesburg is used as the proxy for South Africa.

While South Africa has undertaken some reforms over the past decade, its ranking declined over the period. As the World Bank Survey at times affect investor perceptions of a country, there has been a focus on country improvement in the rankings. More importantly, some of the indicators used in the Survey coincides with our own domestic goals to make it easier for small and medium businesses to start up and stay in business.

President Ramaphosa announced South Africa’s commitment to improving its investment climate and ease of doing business, and set a target to be in top 50 of the Ease of Doing Business Rankings. This goal was set in order to make South Africa an attractive investment destination. the dti through InvestSA signed a co-operation agreement with the World Bank on the 11th March 2019 to address issues of investment climate reform over the next 2-3 years.

The national reform effort is being carried out collaboratively with relevant government departments, agencies and the private sector.

In order to operationalise the national reform initiative, Invest SA with the technical support of the World Bank prioritised five of the ten indicators based on the Doing Business report. The prioritised indicators are: (i) Starting a Business; (ii) Registering Property; (iii) Paying Taxes; (iv) Trading Across Borders and (v) Dealing with Construction Permits.

Specific reforms for each of the prioritisation indicators have been identified. These indicators were selected on the basis of their comparative low ranking in the World Bank’s Survey as well as usefulness to local entrepreneurs. Technical Working Groups have been established on these indicators and comprise of members from both business and government, for the following indicators:

  • Enforcing of contracts
  • Getting access to electricity
  • Resolving insolvency
  • Getting credit
  • Protection of minority shareholders

A road map has been developed with short term reform action plans (6-8 months) and medium to long term (18-24) months.

the dti together with National Treasury have been working with the World Bank and the private sector to increase the pool of respondents and have hosted workshops to familiarise respondents with the survey questionnaire as it is detailed and requires an understanding of the case study and the core assumptions related to the methodology.

We are further pioneering E-Government Services and to improve the process to starting a business.

Government is expected to go live with a business portal by October 2019. The new business portal will allow domestic firms to get company registration, domain name registration, B-BBEE certificate and SARS registration online at the same time. In addition, Invest SA is working with UIF and the Compensation Fund to integrate these processes into a single online platform which will be a first for South Africa.

Annex: How the World Bank Doing Business survey rank is measured

The annual World Bank Doing Business survey measures Johannesburg as the proxy city for SA and it surveys private sector practitioners responsible for engaging in business regulatory procedures in each of the 10 indicators measured in the Johannesburg geographic area (SA’s largest city in terms of population density).

The Doing Business report presents results for two aggregate measures: the distance to frontier score and the ease of doing business ranking, which is based on the distance to frontier score.

The ease of doing business ranking, ranks economies against each other in terms of reforms implemented; the distance to frontier (DTF) score benchmarks economies with respect to regulatory best practice, showing the absolute distance to the best performing economy on each Doing Business indicator. When compared across years, the distance to frontier score shows how much the regulatory environment for local entrepreneurs in an economy has changed over time in absolute terms, while the ease of doing business ranking only shows how much the regulatory environment has changed relative to that in other economies.

More information on South Africa’s ease of doing business scores may be found in the latest World Bank Doing Business 2019 report: https://www.worldbank.org/content/dam/doingBusiness/media/Annual-Reports/English/DB2019-report_web-version.pdf.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW11

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether, with reference to his interventions by appointing senior managers that have subsequently resigned, he has found that the rot within the state-owned entities runs too deep for it to be reclaimed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) Whether he intends to introduce public-private partnerships; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)

(a)

As a matter of clarity, the Minister, with the concurrence of Cabinet, appoints the Board of Directors of the State-Owned Companies (SOCs). He appoints the CEOs and CFOs on the recommendations of the Boards. Only where Boards seek the Minister’s concurrence on appointments of other Executives at subsidiary level, does the Minister express a view. There are various reasons for resignations at the SOCs, such as end of contract terms, personal reasons and the difficulties posed by the damage caused in the institutions.

 

(b)

The rot within SOCs is deep but can be overcome. This is demonstrated by among others, the following achievements that have been registered under the leadership of the current boards:

 

 

 

(i) Eskom

  • McKinsey repaid R902 million against a civil claim Eskom instituted against the company.
  • Eskom successfully pursued the recovery of R600 million that was illegally paid to Trillian. A full bench of the Gauteng High Court ordered that the funds be returned to Eskom to be used for the benefit of the country’s citizenry.
  • SIU is currently in court on behalf of Eskom to set aside the Tegeta Brakfontein coal supply agreement to the value of R2.7bn.

 

 

 

(ii) Transnet

  • China South Rail (CSR) repaid R618 million to Transnet in relation to an irregular prepayment for locomotive maintenance.
  • Civil claims have been lodged against former Executives to recover losses that were incurred as a result of their irregular conduct.

 

 

 

(iii) State Capture Inquiry

  • The Minister, the Chairs of the Boards of Eskom and Transnet and an executive within the DPE have led evidence at the Commission in order to shed light on events that led to some of the challenges that trace their lineage to State Capture and how the department is working hard to root corruption out of all SOCs.  
  • Eskom: The current Board, led by the Chairperson Mr Jabu Mabuza, led evidence at the Commission.
  • Transnet:  The current Board, led by the Chairperson Dr Popo Molefe, numerous executives and senior managers led evidence covering the Locomotive deals (95, 100 & 1064) and supporting contracts, such as advisory services; loan transaction services; consulting; funding; and Treasury functions. 
  • Denel: Submissions were made to the Commission and the Board is waiting to lead evidence. Former officials have already led evidence that shed light on some of the irregular conduct that has resulted in the challenges the company is currently facing. 
  • SAFCOL: Officials will be leading evidence in due course.
  • SAA: Among others, previous Ministers, the former Chairperson of the Board (Cheryl Carolus) and former CFO and CEO (currently acting CEO of SAX) have appeared and/or will be appearing before the Commission to give evidence.
  • Alexkor: Commission is investigating matters and the Board is fully cooperating with the investigators. 

 

(c)

The progress highlighted above and the preparedness of the current leaders in each SOC demonstrated that:

  • there is a plan in place in each SOC to root out corruption;
  • each Board, supported by other officials is heavily seized with executing the plan;
  • the plans are beginning to yield tangible results; and

However, to be frank, overcoming the full impact of State Capture and corruption requires vigorous effort and courage from Boards and Management.

 

(2)

SOCs within DPE portfolio are experiencing financial difficulties. The process to turn-around SOCs is ongoing. This will culminate in the review of the operating models of the SOCs. Furthermore, in some SOCs Strategic Equity Partners (SEPs) will be brought in to partner with SOCs in improving some operations. In that vein, SOCs will provide the Minister with proposals on areas where private partnership are required. Denel has a few examples of this kind of partnerships

19 August 2019 - NW348

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

Whether he will (a) extend, (b) enforce and (c) ensure that the minimum wage is implemented in the Expanded Public Works Programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The workers under the Expanded Public Workers Programme are already included within the scope of the National Minimum Wage Act albeit at a lower tier/percentage of the NMW as is the case for domestic and farm workers. The minimum wage for these workers has been set at R11 per hour or 55% of the national minimum wage as contemplated in item 2 (c ) of Schedule 1 of the Act, taking into account the ability of the State to fund these work opportunities, retain the number of participants and provide some level of income security as an integral part of the Governments plans to address poverty alleviation. Section 4 (3) of the Act provides that the minimum wage in respect of these workers will be increased proportionally to any adjustment of the national minimum wage

Just as any other piece of labour legislation it is the employer’s responsibility to implement and comply with it. The Department is enforcing the NMW in all its facets.

 

19 August 2019 - NW260

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

With regard to case numbers Moffatview ref nr CAS 4/4/2019, Orlando ref nr CAS 513/04/2019 and Orlando ref nr CAS 551/04/2018, (a) what has he found to be the reasons for the prosecution process to have taken so long, (b) why were some of the cases withdrawn without informing the complainants and (c) by what date will the remaining cases be going to court?

Reply:

As the cases referred to relate to alleged crimes in which the Hon TW Mhlongo or his brother Mr L Mhlongo is the complainant or at least personally involved, it is requested that the Hon TW Mhlongo take the matters up directly with the SAPS or the NPA and not make use of Parliamentary Questions to deal with personal matters

19 August 2019 - NW422

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Cuthbert, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) are the details of the process that needs to be followed by a new employer to register with the Compensation Fund, (b) number of days on average does it take to process an application to register with the Compensation Fund and (c) are the reasons for any delays in the registration process?

Reply:

a) There is an Employer Registration Form. This is referred to as W. AS.2 Form. An employer who wishes to register with the Compensation Fund must duly complete this form. There are documents that must accompany a correctly completed W. AS. 2 Form. These documents vary depending to the business type. In case of companies and close corporations the registration form must be accompanied by Companies Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) issued registration certificate, the certified Identity Documents (IDs) of Owners and certified copies of IDs of Directors.

In case of Sole Proprietors, Partners in Partnership must attach copy of Partnership Agreement and certified copies of all Partners IDs.

Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) must attach copies of NPO Registration Certificate issued by the Department of Social Development and certified copies of IDs of the responsible persons.

In case of Trusts, the Registration Form must be supported by an Appointment Letter issued by Magistrate Office and certified copies of all Trustees IDs.

Compensation Fund has the online platform option, Employers may go to https://www.cf-filing.co.za to register

b) It takes an average of 10 days to finalise a manual new registration form which have complete information from the date the complete documents were received by the Processing Office.

It takes on average one calendar day to finalise a new registration through the online compensation filling platform.

c) The following are reasons causing unnecessary delays on finalising the new Employer Registration:

1. Multiple entries for manually submitted registration forms, such as Compensation Fund (CF) Call Centre, Labour Centres and Provincial Offices which all expected to forward the received documents over to the Processing Centre in the CF Head Quarters (HQ) in Pretoria.

2. Employers failing to provide complete documents and/or information required in the registration form as listed in (a) above.

3. A duplicate registration by employer to avoid paying for outstanding assessment

4. Employer declaring their industry classified code that is inconsistent with the actual industry they are operating in in order to reduce the levies payable.

19 August 2019 - NW363

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputies planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

a) Honourable Member, I undertake international travel at the request of the President, or in response to an invitation received from an international organisation or my counterparts, or when there is a strategic international event that addresses human settlements and/or water and sanitation issues. Therefore, it is not easy at this stage to predict a number of international trips be undertaken as per the Honourable Member’s question.

b) Falls away.

c) Falls away.

19 August 2019 - NW396

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Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of the Trade and Industry

What was the total cost for the investigations, including legal fees and travel with respect to case (a) 2/3/2018, (b) 3/3/2018, (c) 4/3/2018, (d) 5/3/2018 and (e) 6/3/2018 investigated by the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (BBBEE) commission into fraudulent BEE certificates by certain companies (names furnished)?

Reply:

I am advised by the B-BBEE Commission and the Director-General for Trade and Industry that no costs that are separately-accounted for were incurred for the investigations on the above mentioned cases.

They advised further that the cases were investigated internally by the investigator who was already on the payroll, no legal fees were incurred as no external advisors were used and no separately accounted-for travel costs were incurred as the pool car of the dti was used to conduct site visits and to serve documents.

-END-

19 August 2019 - NW358

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Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case? [

Reply:

Annually, there are several standard meetings which the Ministry is obliged to attend. These include the Arlac Governing Council, SADC Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, G20 Labour and Employment Ministerial Meetings, BRICS Labour and Employment Ministerial Meeting (LEMM), ILO Governing Body and International Labour Conference, possible BI-National Commissions held at Head of State level and whose programme is determined by Dirco and departmental bilateral engagements which are determined on an ongoing basis.

Apart from the ILO meetings which are permanently held in Geneva, venues for other meetings are determined by the rotating hosts and this information is only available as the hosts take over the Presidency. The rotating Presidency of these meetings makes it difficult to deduce any costs associated with attendance until the venue and hosting city is decided and communicated.

For example, Saudi Arabia will host the 2019 G20 and the venue of the LEMM is unknown till possibly next year March. Russia will take over the Presidency of BRICS; similarly, the venue of the LEMM will be communicated sometime next year. For the Geneva meetings, the costs of accommodation are negotiated annually via our Embassy and this normally takes place towards the end of the year.

It should also be noted that attendance of Departmental delegations to these meetings is determined by agenda issues for consideration. As such, it is currently impossible to determine the number of delegates nor associated costs.

Further it should be noted that there are obligatory statutory requirements to cover the costs of participation of the business and labour constituencies to some of these meetings. Again, the numbers are determined by the technical issues under consideration.

 

16 August 2019 - NW367

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and ( c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i)(ii) (b )(i)(ii)(iii)(iv) ( c )(i)(ii)(iii)

There are no planned official international trips by Minister and his Deputy to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework.



Reply to question 367 recommended I not recommended

GENERAL

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)

Date:

Reply to question 367 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date
: 2019-08-15

16 August 2019 - NW92

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Sindane, Mr P to ask the MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

Whether his department has ever conducted a feasibility study into the possibility of the Republic procuring 100% of food consumed locally; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings of the study? NW105OE

Reply:

Since 1994, neither the Department nor its entities have conducted a study into the possibility of procuring 100% of food consumed locally.

There was no compelling reason for undertaking such a study. However, the Department undertakes studies on food security levels, agricultural production trends, and agricultural trade patterns. In circumstances where there is comparative disadvantage and domestic consumption exceeds production such as in the case of wheat, the country imports the balance.

15 August 2019 - NW370

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De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Minister and Deputy Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure may travel on official visits abroad if these are essential, in the national interest and with due regard to the availability of Departmental funds. International trips are planned on a case by case basis and when the need arises for them to travel on official business abroad. At this point in time there are no planned official visits abroad in the 2019 – 2022 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) for the Minister and the Deputy Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure.

(a)(i) and (ii), (b) (i), (ii), (iii) and (iv) and (c) (i), (ii) and (iii) Fall away.

 

15 August 2019 - NW407

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What is the total (a) number and (b) extent of all state-owned land parcels under the custodianship of her department that was lost to illegal land invasions (i) in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019? NW1379E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

The recorded total number and extent of state owned land parcels under the custodianship of Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) which are illegally invaded are as follows:

(a), (b),(i), (aa)

(a), (b), (i), (bb)

(a), (b), (i) (cc)

(a), (b), (ii)

2016/17 Financial Year

2017/18 Financial Year

2018/19 Financial Year

1 April 2019

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha

No. of Properties

Extent (Ha)

38

3554,16

4

705,21

8

715,61

6

1331,64

15 August 2019 - NW342

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What monetary amount was invested or spent by the Expanded Public Works Programme to assist entities within the Department of Arts and Culture in each province in the past five years, (b) what (i) projects were funded and (ii) is the breakdown of the total amount invested or spent in terms of what projects were funded and (c) what number of jobs were created?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) No funding was provided by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) in assisting the Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) entities to create the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) work opportunities in the past five years (2014/15 – 2018/19) in any province.

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the overall coordinating department for Government’s Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP). The EPWP is comprised of four (4) sectors, namely: Social; Environment and Culture; Infrastructure and Non-State Sectors. Each of the sectors are coordinated by specific national Lead Sector Departments as per the Cabinet approval. The Department of Arts and Culture (DAC) is one of the departments within the Environment and Culture Sector (E&C) which is coordinated by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries.

15 August 2019 - NW204

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) her department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to her and (b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

(a)

(i) Response in respect of the Department:

Department

Number of Vacancies

(b) What date will the vacancy/vacancies be filled

Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI)

95

DPWI Main Vote has advertised 29 positions to be filled within the next six months (starting from July 2019

Proper Management Trading Entity (PMTE)

450

PMTE has advertised 234 positions and will be filled within the next six months

TOTAL: DPWI & PMTE

545

 

(ii) In respect of provincial Department responsible for Public Works:

Name of Province

(a)(ii) What is the total number of vacancies each of the provincial departments reporting to her

(b) by what date will the specified vacancies be filled

Gauteng

There are 370 vacant positions

The Department as guided by the Provincial Budget Committee (PBC) has implemented cost containment measures to ensure that there is no/minimal overspending on the compensation budget. To this end the Department has implemented a decision to “Prioritise the Filling of only identified Critical Vacant Positions”, if not filled, will result in the collapse of operations. It also be noted that the Department is currently finalising its Strategic Plan and this has prompted the “review of the organisational structure” in line with the new mandate and service delivery targets.

KwaZulu Natal

There are 181 vacant positions

It is envisaged that these vacant posts will be filled within the next 8 months.

Limpopo

There are 465 vacant posts in its establishment which is 15% vacancy rate.

The department is planning to fill the 84 posts out of the 465 posts during the 2019/ 20 financial year as approved by the Provincial Personnel Management committee and Treasury.

The remaining posts will be filled when the process of reviewing the structure is completed as directed by the Provincial Treasury

North West

There are 371 vacant positions

The anticipated date to fill the vacancies will be 31 March 2020

Mpumalanga

The Executive Council resolved to implement a Moratorium on filling of vacant positions in the Provincial Administration with effect from February 2015 to date in an effort to reduce the provincial wage bill. All provincial departments were directed to rationalise functions and this process has led to the identification of 64 critical technical posts for the Building Infrastructure Programme.

  • The posts have been submitted to the Executive Council for consideration;
  • The department will fill these posts within 6 months should approval be granted by the Executive Council.

Western Cape

There are currently 95 vacant, established posts, out of a total of 449 posts in the Public Works Infrastructure domain. 

 

Of these vacancies, 67 are currently in a recruitment process, while one (1) post was funded to facilitate appointment in an acting capacity.  The remaining 28 (6%) vacancies are unfunded, and due to COE upper limits.

Based on standard recruitment time of 90 days, it is expected that these recruitment processes will be concluded by end of September 2019, and given the required notice periods, that the candidates will be able to assume duty by October/November 2019

Eastern Cape

As per the 2019/20 approved Annual Recruitment Plan this provincial department has 150 vacant funded posts (vacant).

The department intends is to ensure that all the posts are filled by 30 November 2019.

Northern Cape

There are 99 vacant positions

The posts will be filled by February 2021.

Free State

In terms of the approved Annual Performance Plan the province has 60 vacant funded posts;

The posts were planned for filling in this financial year, in accordance with HR Planning processes aligned to the appropriate compensation budget.

15 August 2019 - NW324

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to the state of the nation address by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa on 20 June 2019 and the targets set for tourism, (a) what measures are put in place by her department to meet the targets for tourism, (b) what are the (i) timelines, (ii) time frames and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) who will be responsible to ensure that the targets are met, (d) how will the targets be measured and monitored and (e) who will measure and monitor the targets?

Reply:

a) What measures are put in place to meet targets for tourism as per the SoNA on 20 June 2019?

Work on breaking down the 21 million international tourists by 2030 target provided by the President has produced a target of 14.5 million international tourist arrivals by the end of 2024. Engagement with the private sector and other stakeholders is already underway in order to increase market penetration of identified critical growth markets such as China, India, Nigeria and Russia. There is also ongoing work that relates to defending our current strong inbound markets while increasing market penetration in markets that we have identified as strategic in meeting the target provided by the President. Constant engagement is being maintained on matters relating to online Visa applications and Visa wavers with the department of Home Affairs.

The Department of Tourism and SAT are in the process of institutionalizing the achievement of the 21 million international tourists by 2030 through the incorporation of the 2024 annual international tourist arrivals of 15 million in the five-year strategic plan and the annual targets.

Measures also include ongoing engagement with the private sector, other government department and other stakeholders in their respective roles in achieving the target set by the President given the supply side and demand side conditions and interventions that need to prevail in order for the target set by the President in the June 2019 State of the Nation Address to be achieved.The targets will form part of the Strategic Plan 2020/21 – 2025/26 of the Department and SA Tourism.

b) What are the:

(i) Time lines

The time lines will be included in the 5-year Strategic Plans that are currently being finalized and will then be broken down into annual targets and then incorporated in the Annual Performance Plans.

(ii) Time frames

The targets will be broken down into years and within each year, into quarters.

(iii) Deadlines

The deadlines for achieving the targets will be aligned to the Strategic Plan and the National Development Plan.

c) Who will be responsible?

The responsibilities will be determined as the Programmes in the Strategic Plan is finalised.

d) How will the targets be measures and monitored?

Performance is measured through the tourist arrivals statistics as reported monthly by Statistics SA through the report P0351 Tourism & Migration and SA Tourism’s monthly departure and domestic surveys.

  • Monthly EXCO meetings where each executive provides a monthly update on the implementation of the APP;
  • Organisational Performance Reviews held quarterly chaired by the CEO;
  • Quarterly Performance Reports which show the performance of SA Tourism against its APP targets and are reviewed by Board and the Department of Tourism.

e) Who will measure and monitor the targets?

    Answered in point (d) above

15 August 2019 - NW300

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) number of workers in the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) are currently employed in the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality, (b) is the duration of the workers’ employment, (c) is the monthly stipend paid to each worker and (d) method is used to appoint the EPWP workers?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

a) In the 2018/19 financial year, a total of 183 work opportunities were reported by the Walter Sisulu Local Municipality. The work opportunities reported were from the Environment and Culture and the Infrastructure Sector projects.

b) The average duration of work opportunities that were created in the municipality is 84 days.

c) The monthly wages paid to each worker differs from project to project. The minimum daily wage paid to participants in the municipality was R90 per day, whilst the maximum daily wage was R150 per day.

d) The suitable method of recruitment is determined by the public body responsible for the implementation of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) Projects. However, there are guidelines on recruitment available, developed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, which public bodies must follow to ensure fair, transparent and equitable recruitment of participants.

15 August 2019 - NW205

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

In view of the fact that a responsibility for infrastructure has been added to her portfolio, how will she ensure that the mandate of her department, in terms of development and economic growth, is intertwined to rejuvenate the economy and that it works with the construction industry to create jobs?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) and government will act as a catalyst for the private sector and the construction industry to grow and create jobs while transforming the industry.

An infrastructure investment fund of R100 billion has been established as a commitment from Government. It is Government’s hope that the private sector will come on board to contribute towards a “crowd-funding” effect. To improve Infrastructure in our country we will need the help of all sectors in society especially the private sector.

As part of the reconfiguration of Government, over and above the historic role of the Department of Public Works, the function of infrastructure co-ordination was assigned to my Department which is now called the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI).

In addition to this function, the Department has been assigned the responsibility to coordinate the Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS) – a function previously performed by the National Treasury as well as the transfer of the Presidential Infrastructure Coordinating Commission (PICC), previously performed by the former Department of Economic Development.

15 August 2019 - NW285

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Minister de Lille was appointed on 27 May 2019.

(a) The Private Office of the Minister includes the salary of the Minister plus her 2 advisors, totalling R17 144 000

(b) (i) to (v). Please refer to table below

Job Title

Salary Level

Total Remuneration

Qualifications

Job Description

Start date

Chief of Staff

14

R1 251 183

Bachelor of Arts in Human and Social Sciences

To manage, provide strategic and administrative direction within the office of the executing authority of the Department of Public Works

12 June 2019

Administrative Secretary

13

R1 057 326

Diploma in Education

Performer’s Diploma in Speech and Drama

Manage the administrative activities within the office of the Executing Authority

15 July 2019

Private/ Appointments Secretary

13

R1 057 326

Bachelor of Commerce in Human Resources

To effectively assist in managing the flow of information in and out of the Minister’s office and also assist in managing the Minister’s office diary at Head Office.

11 July 2019

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

13

R1 057 326

Bachelor of Arts Honours in Journalism, Bachelor of Arts in Media Studies and History

To offer Cabinet/ Parliamentary Support to the Department of Public Works including the Ministry, the Head of the Department and their Entities as well as enhancing Stakeholder Relations significance to the Department.

29 July 2019

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

11

R733 257

Senior Certificate

National Diploma, Journalism

To offer Cabinet/ Parliamentary Support to the Department of Public Works including the Ministry, the Head of the Department and their Entities as well as enhancing Stakeholder Relations significance to the Department.

22 July 2019

Community Outreach Officer

11

R733 257

Diploma in Public Administration and Local Government

To effectively coordinate liaison/ interaction between the minister’s office, stakeholders and the community.

8 July 2019

Assistant Appointments Secretary

09

R376 596

Senior Certificate with 5 years’ experience in administration

To effectively assist in managing the flow of information in and out of the Minister’s office and also assist in managing the Minister’s office diary at Head Office.

3 July 2019

Registry Clerk

07

R257 508

NQF Level 4 certificate in Office Administration

To provide registry services and administrative related services

22 July 2019

Secretary/ Receptionist (Cape town)

07

R257 508

Performer’s’ Diploma in Speech and Drama

To provide reception and secretarial services to the Office of the Minister.

21 June 2019

Secretary/ Receptionist (Pretoria)

07

R257 508

Bachelor of Arts in Politics

To provide reception and secretarial services to the Office of the Minister.

24 June 2019

15 August 2019 - NW408

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Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What (a) specific upgrades and/or changes have been made to the office of each (i) Minister and (ii) Deputy Minister since 29 May 2019 and (b) what amount did the upgrades and/or changes cost in each case?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

No upgrades or changes were made by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure to any of the offices of the Ministers and Deputy Ministers since 29 May 2019 to date.

(a) (i), (ii) and (b) Fall away.

15 August 2019 - NW203

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case? NW1161E

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works & Infrastructure:

a) The total number of government employees in the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure on long period incapacity leave are 20

b) The total cost in terms of salary is R2 253 929.80 on average and it is R 112 696.49 per case

15 August 2019 - NW369

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Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The Information requested by the Honourable member is not yet available, as decision has not yet been made.

14 August 2019 - NW335

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

What (a) number of closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras (i) are installed and (ii) are not in working order at each train station in each province and {b) are the reasons in respect of those cameras that are not working?

Reply:

(a)(i){ii) and (b)

The South African Police Service (SAPS) has not installed any closed circuit television (CCTV) cameras at train stations. The Minister of Transport will be in a better position to respond to this question.
 

Reply to question 335 recommended
LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/01

Reply to question 335 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW263

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Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Police

Whether he has a specific plan in place to deploy police officers in schools to provide the necessary assistance to learners and teachers, given the recent scourge of violence and killings at schools?

Reply:

The South African Police Service (SAPS) does not have a plan to deploy static police officers at schools. However, the SAPS does have School Safety Officers, who are linked to schools.

The SAPS reacts to incidents, reported at schools and conducts operations in response to information received about schools. As part of the daily functions of the SAPS, frontline members conduct daily patrols at schools.

Annually, the SAPS, in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education, identifies problematic schools for the implementation of the School Safety Programme. The SAPS also conducts maintenance programmes at the schools where the School Safety Programme was previously implemented.
 

Reply to question 263 recommended/not recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/01

Reply to question 263 approved

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW382

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

What was the total budget allocation to (a) the provincial departments of safety and security and (b) support Community Police Fora and Neighbourhood Watch programmes in each province in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18, (v) 2018-19 and (vi) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

(a}(b)(i) to (vi)

The provincial departments responsible for safety and security are funded from the Division of Revenue Act, which directs funding to Provincial Governments. The SAPS is, therefore, not in a position to provide this information.
 

Reply to question 382 recommended/not recommended
GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/07

Reply to question 382 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW333

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Maj Gen O S Terblanche (DA) to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of police stations are maintained at train stations, (b) at which train stations are the specified police stations situated and ( c) what number of officers are stationed at each police station?

Reply:

(a) The Rapid Rail Police is a unit and therefore, no police stations are maintained within the Rapid Rail Police environment.

(b) None.

(c) None, Rapid Rail Police is a unit and therefore, no police stations are maintained within the Rapid Rail Police environment.
 

Reply for question 333 recommended/not recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/07

Reply to question 333 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW219

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

(1) (a) What number of (i) rural and (ii) rural-urban police stations are there in each province and (b) what are their names and locations; (2) what is the (a) ratio of police officer to population for each of these rural and rural-urban precincts and (b) geographical size of each of the specified precincts; (3) what number of (a) vehicles (i) are there at each station and (ii) are undergoing maintenance at each station and (b) mounted units are there at each station?

Reply:

There are currently a total of 1 151 police stations nationally, of which (i) 436 are rural and (ii) 454 are rural-urban (mix).

(1 )(a)(i)(ii), (b) and (2)(b)

The names and location of the rural and rural-urban police stations, as well as the geographical size, are attached as Annexure A.

(2)(a) Ratio: Police-Population:

• The National ratio of police officers to population, is 1 :375 (Source: SAPS Annual Report - 2018/2019)

• This norm is applied across the provinces and relative to the functions performed by police stations.

• The breakdown of the ratio of police officers to population, at police stations in each province, is currently being addressed and finalised through a study, taking into consideration the specialised units, geographically placed as force multipliers.

(3)(a)(i) and (ii)
The vehicles that were at each police station and those that were undergoing maintenance at each police station, as at 16 July 2019, are reflected in the tables below:

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW219-2019-08-14_Continued.pdf

14 August 2019 - NW243

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With reference to his reply to question 3778 on 15 January 2019, what (a) is the name of the officer commonly called Gold Tooth, (b) where is he currently stationed and (c) what promotions has the specified officer received since the Carte Blanche expose; (2) what (a) specific action was taken against Constable Mapatlare and (b) is Constable Mapatlare's responsibilities at the Ekurhuleni North Cluster offices?

Reply:

(1)(a) The name of the police officer, who is commonly referred to as Gold Tooth, is Constable OM Mapatlare.

(1)(b) He is currently stationed at the Ekurhuleni North Cluster.

(1)(c) He was not promoted, since the Carte Blanche expose.

(2)(a) A departmental case was opened against Constable Mapatlare and was withdrawn, due to the fact that the complainant had immigrated to the United Kingdom.

(2)(b) Constable Mapatlare is working at the Operational Command Centre, performing crime prevention duties.

Reply to question 243 recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/01

Reply to question 243 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW431

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Terblanche, Mr OS to ask the Minister of Police

Whether (a) foot patrols and (b) vehicle patrols are still approaches used by the SA Police Service to prevent crime in residential and other areas; if not, why not; if so, (i) to what extent are office-bound police officers utilised to render this important service and (ii) what number of hours per month are office-bound officers expected to be involved in active crime prevention actions?

Reply:

(a) Yes, foot patrols are still being used by the South African Police Service (SAPS), to prevent crime in areas such as shopping malls, complexes, railway stations, beaches, parks and holiday resorts, as determined by the crime threat and pattern analysis.

(b) Yes, vehicle patrols are still being used by the SAPS, to prevent crime in areas identified as high crime hotspots, as determined by the crime threat and pattern analysis, including sectors in police station precincts.

(i) Office-bound 'police officers are utilised to conduct crime prevention operations, to increase the number of personnel, during weekly, monthly and targeted disruptive operations, as determined by the crime threat and pattern analysis and as, per the initiative of station commanders.

(ii) In view of the above, there are no stipulated hours for office-bound police officers to conduct crime prevention duties.
 

Reply to question 431 recommended/not recommended

GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/07

Reply to question 431 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW328

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) What was the outcome of the arrest of an undocumented Nigerian male with the assistance of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department on 2 July 2019 for being in possession of a large quantity of illegal drugs, given that the suspect was an undocumented person; (2) on what grounds was the suspect released from police custody on 3 July 2019; (3) whether the Bedfordview Police Station followed all necessary processes in the processing of CAS 07/07/2019; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he has found that any police officer stationed at the specified police station was involved in the alleged irregular early release of the suspect; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) steps will be taken in this regard? NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR WRITTEN REPLY QUESTION 328 DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 JULY 2019 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 6-2019! 328. Mrs M O Clarke (DA) to ask the Minister of Police:(1) What was the outcome of the arrest of an undocumented Nigerian male with the assistance of the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Police Department on 2 July 2019 for being in possession of a large quantity of illegal drugs, given that the suspect was an undocumented person;(2) on what grounds was the suspect released from police custody on 3 July 2019;(3) whether the Bedfordview Police Station followed all necessary processes in the processing of CAS 07/07/2019; if so, what are the relevant details;(4) whether he has found that any police officer stationed at the specified police station was involved in the alleged irregular early release of the suspect; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) steps will be taken in this regard?NW1295EREPLY:( 1) The suspect was detained at the Bedfordview Police Station for investigation. (2) The suspect was released on bail. (3) No, the necessary processes were not followed. The suspect's address was never verified and it was found that his passport had expired, in 2016. (4)(a) Yes, a Sergeant at the police station. (4)(b) A departmental investigation into the matter was initiated, as per DR 25/07/2019 and a criminal case of defeating the ends of justice was opened, as per Bedfordview, CAS 27/07/2019.Reply to question 328 recommendedLIEUTENANT GENERAL NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE KJ SITOLE (SOEG)Date: 2019/08/01Reply to question 328 approved GENERAL BH CELE (MP)MINISTER OF POLICEDate: 13/08/2019

Reply:

( 1) The suspect was detained at the Bedfordview Police Station for investigation.


(2) The suspect was released on bail.


(3) No, the necessary processes were not followed. The suspect's address was never verified and it was found that his passport had expired, in 2016.


(4)(a) Yes, a Sergeant at the police station.

(4)(b) A departmental investigation into the matter was initiated, as per DR 25/07/2019 and a criminal case of defeating the ends of justice was opened, as per Bedfordview, CAS 27/07/2019.


Reply to question 328 recommended

LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/01

Reply to question 328 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW128

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Small Business Development

With reference to the reply of the former Minister of Small Business Development to question 3767 on 21 December 2018, what (a) is the current total Rand value of each government department’s backlog for paying service providers within 30 days in compliance with the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, and (b) steps will her department take to address the specified backlogs?”

Reply:

a) The National Treasury does not differentiate between large and SMME in its report of non-compliance with payment of suppliers.

According to the National Treasury 2018/19 Annual Report - the total Rand value of invoices older than 30 days and not paid by national Departments at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year amounted to R 634 million with the following Departments leading:

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation = R492 million or 78% of the total Rand value;
  • The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries = R99 million or 16% of the total Rand value; and
  • The South African Police Services = R24 million or 4% of the total Rand value.

The total Rand value of invoice older than 30 days that are not paid by Provincial Departments for the 2018/19 financial year amounted to R 6.5 billion with the following Departments leading:

  • Gauteng Provincial Treasury = R2.6 billion or 40% of the total Rand value; and
  • Eastern Cape Provincial Treasury = R2.1 billion or 32% of the total Rand value.

(b) Steps the Department will implement to address the gap:

(i) The Department is working on a database for SMMEs that will be linked to the Central Supplier Database (CSD) of the National Treasury. When the systems are integrated, the Department will be able to know the amount owed to SMMEs.

(ii) sefa is the largest funder of SMMEs who are not paid and this in turn impacts on the sefa impairment ratio. The Department has requested the National Treasury to authorise cession agreement for sefa and when the cessions for sefa and other Development Finance Institutions (DFIs) are implemented, the DFIs will support SMMEs to collect invoices owed to them.

(iii) In addition, in instances where Departments owing a lot of money to SMMEs, the Department will be engaging with the National Treasury to top-slice from their budgets and enable the National Treasury and various Departments to pay the SMMEs directly.

(iv) The Department is also introducing an application for SMMEs to lodge disputes on their outstanding unpaid invoices.

 

NW1089E

14 August 2019 - NW180

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Police

On what date will (a) additional vehicles be supplied at the Booysens Police Station in Johannesburg, (b) the current vacancies be filled and (c) additional bullet-proof vests be provided? NW1138E

Reply:

(a) One vehicle will be supplied to the Booysens Police Station, by 30 July 2019.

(b) The Booysens Police Station is overstaffed, by 16 personnel. The staff establishment, is 263 and the current personnel strength, is 279.

(c) No application for additional bullet-proof vests was received from the Booysens Police Station, in 2018/2019. All the SAP-members are in possession of serviceable bullet-proof vests. In addition, there is a surplus stock of 1 O serviceable bullet-proof vests, which are kept in the store room.
Currently, the Booysens Police Station does not have any shortages of bulletproof vests.
 

Reply to question 180 recommended
LIEUTENANT GENERAL

NATIONAL COMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE (SOEG)
Date: 2019/08/01

Reply to question 180 approved


GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 13/08/2019

14 August 2019 - NW184

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Police

(1) With regard to each police station within the boundaries of the City of Ekurhuleni, (a) what number of SA Police Service (SAPS) vehicles from each police station are currently in workshops for repair, (b) for what period has each specified vehicle been at each workshop and (c) what are the reasons that each vehicle is at the workshop; (2) what has he found to be the reason for the delay when vehicles remain longer than two weeks at the workshop; (3) (a) what number of (i) contractors are currently approved as SAPS workshops and (ii) contracts still need to be renewed and (b) by what date will the renewal of the contracts be finalised; (4) how long has he found does it take to replace a battery or windscreen before the vehicle is put back onto active duty? NW1142E

Reply:


(1)(a)(b) and (c)

No

Names of Police Stations

(a)
Number of Vehicles in Workshop

(b)
Number of Days in Workshop

(c)

Reason

1

Alberton

13

3 to 145 days

Mechanical repairs

2

Benoni

21

2 to 195 days

Mechanical repairs and panel beating

3

Boksburg North

9

2 to 127 days

Mechanical repairs

4

Boksburg

6

40 to 181 days

Mechanical repairs and panel beating

5

Brakpan

9

40 to 123 days

Mechanical repairs and panel beating

6

Crystal Park

4

4 to 35 days

Mechanical repairs and panel beating

7

Daveyton

6

23 to 80 days

Mechanical repairs and panel beating_

8

Dawn Park

6

5 to 107 days

Mechanical repairs

9

Etwatwa

15

2 to 161 days

Mechanical repairs


Find here: (1)(a)(b) and (c) continues

 

14 August 2019 - NW297

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Police

(a) What number of (i) SA Police Service (SAPS) reservists are there in each province for each cluster and (ii) applications to become an SAPS reservist were received in the past five financial years, (b) how long does it take, on average, from the time that an application to become a police reservist is received until an applicant becomes a reservist and (c) what (i) practical steps is the SAPS taking to boost dwindling reservist numbers and (ii) number of SAPS reservists are currently in training in each province?

Reply:

(a)(i) On 30 June 2019, the number of reservists in each province, per cluster in the South African Police Service (SAPS), was as follows:

Beaufort West Cluster 18

Tygerberg Cluster 51

Cape Town Cluster 57

Da Gamaskop Cluster 57

Blue Downs Cluster 46

Eden Cluster 52

Overberg Cluster 51

Khayelitsha Cluster 72

Milnerton Cluster 44

Mitchells Plain Cluster 96

Nyanga Cluster 65

Winelands Cluster 36

Vredenburg Cluster 32

Vredendal Cluster 25

Worcester Cluster 101

Wynberg Cluster 64

Eastern Cape Clusters Total: 981

Alice Cluster 35

Aliwal North Cluster 63

Butteiworth Cluster 41

Cofimvaba Cluster 6

Cradock Cluster 20

East London Cluster 40

Elliot Cluster 5

Graaff-Reinet Cluster 27

Grahamstown Cluster 16

Humansdorp Cluster 34

King Williams Town 76

Mdantsane Cluster 92

Motheiwell Cluster 69

Mount Ayliff Cluster 74

Mount Fletcher Cluster 34

Mount Road Cluster 59

Mthatha Cluster 95

Port Alfred Cluster 8

Port St Johns Cluster 12

Queenstown Cluster 44

Uitenhage Cluster 131

Northern Cape Clusters Total: 577

Pixley Ka Seme Cluster 174

Frances Baard Cluster 132

John Taolo Gaetsewe 78

Namakwa Cluster 79

Zf Mgcawu Cluster 114


Free State Clusters Total: 530

Bethlehem Cluster 47

Ficksburg Cluster 25

Kroonstad Cluster 13

Mangaung Cluster 63

Park Road Cluster 14

Phuthaditjhaba Cluster 52

Zamdela Cluster 57

Selosesha Cluster 111

Smithfield Cluster 46

Thabong Cluster 38

Trompsburg Cluster 24

Welkom Cluster 40


KwaZulu-Natal Clusters Total: 831

Ethekwini Inner South Cluster 89

Umzinyathi Cluster 11

Ethekwini Central 33

King Cetshwayo Cluster 48

Umgungundlovo North 29

Ethekwini Inner North 85

Harry Gwala Cluster 48

llembe Cluster 43

Umkhanyakude Cluster 32

Uthukela Cluster 23

Amajuba Cluster 55

Ethekwini Outer North 51

Umgungundlovo South 55

Ethekwini Inner - Outer 47

Ugu Cluster 88

Zululand Cluster 60

Ethekwini Outer South 34


North West Clusters Total: 749

Brits Cluster Commander 129

Klerksdorp Cluster 168

Mahikeng Cluster 145

Pudimoe Cluster 91
Rustenburg Cluster 60

Vryburg Cluster 73

Zeerust Cluster 83


Mpumalanga Clusters Total: 976

Acornhoek Cluster 220

Ermelo Cluster 127

Pienaar Cluster 97

Kwamhlanga Cluster 83

Lydenburg Cluster 1

Middelburg Cluster 69

Piet Retief Cluster 36

Secunda Cluster 79

Standerton Cluster 80

Tonga Cluster 102

Witbank Cluster 82


Limpopo Clusters Total: 1179

Bela Bela Cluster 22

Groblersdal Cluster 73

Lebowakgomo Cluster 316

Lephalale Cluster 31

Giyani Cluster 128

Mahwelereng Cluster 57

Makhado Cluster 92

Modimolle Cluster 20

Polokwane Cluster 2

Seshego Cluster 62

Thohoyandou Cluster 192

Tzaneen Cluster 71

Burgersfort Cluster 57

Mankweng Cluster Commander 56


Gauteng Clusters Total: 2278

Johannesburg North Cluster 113

Ekurhuleni Central 132

Tshwane North Cluster 214

Johannesburg East Cluster 99

Johannesburg West Cluster 141

Johannesburg Central Cluster 126

Ekurhuleni West Cluster 158

West Rand Cluster 151

Tshwane East Cluster 77

Soweto West Cluster, 231

Soweto East Cluster 126

Tshwane West Cluster 166

Sedibeng Cluster 231

Ekurhuleni East Cluster 89

Tshwane Central Cluster 72

Ekurhuleni North Cluster 152


(a)(ii) Since the lifting of the moratorium on the recruitment and selection of reservists, in 2016, the recruitment of reservists is a continuous process and up to date, a total of 11 293 applications have been received.

(b) It takes an average of 30 months, from the time that an application is received, until a person is appointed as a reservist. The recruitment and selection process takes an average of six months and the training takes an average of 24 months.

(c)(i) The SAPS lifted the 2009 moratorium on the recruitment of reservists and since 2016, the recruitment and selection of reservists is an ongoing process in order to ensure that the numbers of reservists are continuously increased.

The SAPS has also relaxed some of the appointment requirements, in terms of National Instruction, 3 of 2014, to ensure that the scope is widened to attract a larger pool of candidates. The recruitment drive, for the 2019/2020 financial year, will be announced shortly.

( c )(ii) The number of SAPS reservists, who are currently in training in each province, is as follows:

Eastern Cape 199

Free State 164

Gauteng 370

KwaZulu-Natal 427

Limpopo 234

Mpumalanga 158

North West 109

Northern Cape 74

Western Cape 123

Total: 1 858
 

Reply to question 297 recommended

GENERAL

NATIONAL COMMISSIONER: SOUTH AFRICAN POLICE SERVICE

KJ SITOLE, SOEG
Date: 2019-08-07


Reply to question 297 approved/not approved
 

GENERAL BH CELE (MP)
MINISTER OF POLICE
Date: 2019-08-13

13 August 2019 - NW346

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)Whether his department has any plans in place to retain the services and skills of academics, including academics who have reached retirement age, for the benefit of the Republic in general and for their specialist academic fields in particular; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. The appointment and retention of personnel at universities is the responsibility of each institution.

The majority of universities have a normal retirement age of 65. Most of these also allow post retirement employment for a further 3 years (some contract, and some deferred retirement) in selected cases where the expertise is required and under specific conditions. This post retirement employment is specifically allowed to enable the retention of scarce and critical skills.

However, retaining critical and scarce skills post-retirement age is not a long-term sustainable solution, and efforts have to be made to strengthen the academic staff pipeline to ensure that there are academics who can competently replace those who retire.

The Department of Higher Education and Training is implementing the Staffing South Africa’s Universities’ Framework (SSAUF) as part of its comprehensive University Capacity Development Programme. The SSAUF is intended to support universities to recruit, develop and retain academic staff. A number of key programmes are being implemented:

  • The New Generation of Academics Programme (nGAP) supports universities to appoint and develop new academics in areas of need, including in critical and scarce skills areas. 473 Posts have already been allocated, and going forward, 100 new posts will be allocated every year.
  • The University Staff Doctoral Programme (USD) supports existing academics to achieve doctoral degrees so that they can progress more rapidly along the research and teaching career trajectory. The programme was initiated in 2018, and approximately 200 academics are currently being supported, with a further 60 to be recruited this year.
  • The Future Professors Programme supports promising academics who have shown academic and research leadership potential to participate in a two-year development programme that will enable them to apply for professor positions. The first phase of the programme will recruit three cohorts of 28 academics over three years, with the first cohort being recruited in 2019.
  • The Supplementary Staff Programme enables the recruitment of skilled retired academics to support the implementation of the other SSAUF programmes and other staff development initiatives. These skilled academics are utilised for example, as mentors, or to replace nGAP and USDP scholars when they undertake mobility opportunities away from the university as part of their development programmes.

The Department intends upscaling these programmes as funding becomes available.

2. The Minister has already communicated to the sector on the need to retain critical and scarce skills whilst new capacity is being developed.

.

13 August 2019 - NW361

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Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING:

a) (i) The Minister is planning to undertake three international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

    (ii) The Deputy Minister is planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019/20.

(b) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation.

MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

The 40th UNESCO General Conference determines the policies and work of the Organisation. Participation will be in the high-level meeting on the Global Convention on Higher Education.

5 Officials

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

The Minister has been invited to visit and explore educational cooperation opportunities. The Minister will lead a delegation of senior management from universities as part of strengthening institutional partnerships.

4 Officials

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

The Mauritanian Minister of Higher Education visited South Africa in 2017 and extended an invitation for the Minister to lead a delegation of officials and academics to visit Mauritania to strengthen bilateral relations in higher education.

4 Officials

DEPUTY MINISTER

Destination

Date

Purpose

Delegation

Kazan, Russia

22 - 27 August 2019

To lead the South African delegation to the World Skills 2019 Competition focusing on vocational education skills development and transformation of education systems.

23 Officials

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

To participate in the India-Africa Higher Education and Skills Development Summit. Specific projects for collaboration in the education sector will be discussed.

Spouse and 6 officials

(c) The table below provides a breakdown of the expected costs of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) other expenses.

Destination

Date

Flight

Accommodation

Other Expenses

Paris, France

12 – 16 November 2019

Business Class R25 500

Economy Class R8 100

Suite R12 000

Standard Room R3 500

R1 855 per diem

Nicosia, Cyprus

2020

 

Suite R6 000

Standard Room R3 000

R1 680 per diem

Nouakchott, Mauritania

2020

Business Class R18 450

Economy Class R10 500

Suite R2 300

Standard Room R1 400

R1 395 per diem

Kazan, Russia

22- 27 August 2019

Business Class R28 350

Economy Class R14 300

Suite R3 100

Standard Room R1 400

R4 757 per diem

New Delhi, India

26 - 27 August 2019

R28 000 Business Class

R15 000 Economy Class

Suite R1 750

Standard Room R1 400

R1 200 per diem

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY:

d) The Minister and the Deputy Minister are invited to meetings and conferences internationally by their foreign counterparts, international organizations and by the Presidency among others intermittently. The list of international engagements below reflects only the engagements that both the Minister and Deputy Minister have accepted. The international travel calendar for the outer years is subject to receiving invitations. All international missions require presidential approval prior to traveling.

(i) The Minister is currently planning to undertake two international travel missions abroad for 2019 – 2020.

(ii) The Deputy Minister is currently planning to undertake one international travel mission abroad for 2019 – 2020.

e) The table below outlines the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation as direct support to the Minister and Deputy Minister, which is tentative until approved by the Minister. For the multilateral engagements, additional Departmental officials will participate for example in senior officials’ meetings preparing the ministerial meetings, but not in a direct supporting role to the Minister and Deputy Minister. For the purpose of this reply the number of officials in the delegations assigned to a direct supporting role to the principals is indicated.

DESTINATION

DATE

PURPOSE

DELEGATION

Minister’s Trips

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

7th Summit of the Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VII).

Africa-Japan Ministerial Dialogue Meeting on Science, Technology and Innovation for the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Meeting is convened on the occasion of the Tokyo International Conference for Africa’s Development (TICAD) – South Africa has played a leadership role in in encouraging a science, technology and innovation focus as part of TICAD. The President also invited the Minister to join his delegation to TICAD.

4 Officials

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October

2019

Carnegie Meeting of Science and Technology Ministers and Science Advisors hosted by the German Minister of Education and Research.

The Carnegie meeting is a prestigious, informal annual gathering bringing together the government science leaders of the G8 (Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Russian Federation, United Kingdom and the United States); the European Commission; as well as Brazil, China, India, Mexico and South Africa. It provides an opportunity for Ministers to discuss and share experiences in an informal setting with regard to science and technology policy as part of their governments’ and the international agendas

1 Official

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

BRICS Science, Technology and Innovation Ministerial Meeting – the meeting is the highest inter-governmental BRICS Forum dedicated to decide on and review BRICS science, technology and innovation partnership initiatives.

2 Officials

f) The table below shows the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

DESTINATION

DATE

FLIGHT

ACCOMMODATION

OTHER EXPENSES

Minister’s Trips:

Yokohama, Japan

27-30 August 2019

Business Class R66 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R8400

Standard Room R3500

R4370 per diem

Dresden, Germany

11-13 October 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R21 000

Suite R11 000

Standard Room R3 000

R5800 per diem

Deputy Minister’s Trips

Campinas, Brazil

19 - 20 September 2019

Business Class R80 000

Economy Class R25 000

Suite R3500

Standard Room R3500

R4164 per diem

13 August 2019 - NW277

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Seitlholo, Mr IS to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a)    Total amount budgeted for the private office of the Minister for the 2019/20 financial year as on 1 April 2019:

  

2019/20 FY (1 APRIL 2019)

 

R'000

Minister’s Compensation of Employees (CoE)

2 529

Minister’s Office CoE

10 725

Ministry Goods and Services

9 536

Grand Total

22 790

(b)(i)    Total remuneration Ministry budget for 2019/20 = R13, 254 million (R2, 529 million + R10, 725 million).

(b)(ii-v) The table below details employees appointed since I took office in May 2019.

(b)(i)

(b)(ii)

(b)(iii)

(b)(iv)

(b)(v)

TOTAL ANNUAL REMUNERATION

SALARY LEVEL

POST JOB TITLE DESCRIPTION

QUALIFICATION

JOB DESCRIPTION

R1 189 338 PER ANNUM PLUS R7035.00 PER MONTH ROLE-PLAYING ALLOWANCE

14

CHIEF OF STAFF: MINISTRY

POST GRADUATE DIPLOMA IN MANAGEMENT (CORPORATE GOVERNANCE)

Annexure A

R1 035 450 PER ANNUM

13

PARLIAMENTARY AND CABINET SUPPORT

B EDUCATION

Annexure B

R936 177 PER ANNUM

11

CABINET AND PARLIAMENTARY OFFICER

B ADMINISTRATION

Annexure C

R178 965 PER ANNUM PLUS R1600.00 PER MONTH ROLE-PLAYING ALLOWANCE

5

DRIVER/MESSENGER

SENIOR CERTIFICATE

Annexure D

END

12 August 2019 - NW413

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Lorimer, Ms K to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) What number of (a) persons were arrested for rhino poaching in each month since 1 January 2018 In the (I) Kruger National Park, (ii) Pilanesberg National Park and (ill) any other national park, (b) the specified persons were employed by the SA National Parks and (c) successful convictions were achieved; (2) what number of (a) white and (b) black rhinos were poached in each of the specified parks In ea~ month since 1 April 2018; (3) whether her department has put a plan In place to ensure the survival of rhino in the Republic;. If so, what are the relevant details? NW1385E

Reply:

(1) (a) Number of persons arrested for rhino poaching from 1 January 2018 to 31July 2019 in:

(i) Kruger National Park: 366 (three hundred and sixty six)

(II) Pilanesberg: 7 (seven)

(iii) any other national park: Mokala National Park, 3.(three)

(b) 15 (fifteen) of the specified persons were employed by SA National Parks

(c) Information on convictions should be sourced from the South African Police Service or National Prosecuting Authority.

 

(2) Number of:

(a) White rhino poached from 1April2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 472 (four hundred and seventy two)

Mokala National Park: 1 (one)

Marakele National Park: 2 (two)

Pilanesberg: 28 (twenty eight)

(b) Black rhino poached from 1Aprll2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 32 (thirty two)
Pilanesberg: 3 (three)


(3) Due to the persistent threat posed by rhino poaching, South Africa developed and Is implementing a holistic, Integrated and multidimensional response, involving various government departments, including the Department of Environmental Affairs, SANParks, the provincial conservation and environmental departments and agencies. the South African Police Service (SAPS). the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI), Customs Division of the South African Revenue Service, the South African National Defence Force, the National Prosecuting Authority, the State Security Agency and other stakeholders such as the private rhino owners, the hunting industry and non-governmental organisations. The Implementation of the 2014

Integrated Management Plan combines the use of technology. extensive antipoaching work as well as the management of the rhino population. This approach also involves extensive international collaboration across our borders to ensure that rhino poachers are brought to book. This approach has seen a moderate decline of 91 (ninety one) Incidents from the same period last year.

Regards


MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW412

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether she has found that long-line shark-fishers operated In marine reserves in the past five years without being stopped by her Department in collaboration with other relevant authorities; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, what (a) are the full relevant details and (b) steps does she intend to take in this regard; (2) what number of (a) white sharks, (b) smooth sharks and (c) any other threatened, endangered and/or protected shark species have been reported (i) caught and (ii) landed by the experimental long-line shark-fishing operators since 01 January 2016; (3) whether she has found any discrepancies in the reporting of the caught shark numbers; if so, what are the relevant details; and (4) what are the details of the future of the long-line shark-fishing Industry?

Reply:

1. Yes.

(a) The Department Intercepted a vessel that was suspected of having illegally operated in the De Hoop Marine Protected Area. The skipper of the vessel was subsequenlty arrested and the catch was confiscated. A criminal case was subsequenlty opened In May 2019 at the Humewood Police Station, Port Elizabeth. The criminal case referred to above involved a vessel that was operating with a Demersal Shark Long-line Catch Permit. The apprehension was collaborative work conducted with other relevant State Security Agencies involving the South African Police Service as well as the National Prosecuting Authority. This case is currently before the courts for prosecution.

(b) While the investigation and criminal proceedings are underway, the Department is In the process of initiating proceedings under Section 28 of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act. No. 18of1998).

2. The Demersal Shark Long-line fishery is not an experimental fishery, but a full commercial fishery that has been regulated separately, and rights have been allocated since 2006.

(a) The numbers of White sharks (i) caught in the demersal shark longline fishery since 2016 was (2) two. The number (ii) landed was (1) one. The first shark caught was released alive, and the most recently caught White Shark In May 2019 has been retained by the Department and will be used as training material in future CITES Appendix II identification Workshops.

(b) The numbers of smoothhound sharks (I) caught and (ii) landed by the demersal longline shark fishery were 17 558 in 2016, 18 298 in 2017, 30112 in 2018 and 11 796 in 2019.

(c) The numbers of other shark species, including threatened, endangered and/or protected shark species (i) O threatened, endangered and/or protected

Find here: (II) other shark species caught and landed by the demersal shark longing fishery were as follows:
 

12 August 2019 - NW437

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Communications

What are the full reasons for her department increasing its advertising budget (a) in the past two financial years and (b) for the 2019-20 financial year?

Reply:

I have been advised by the Departments as follows: -

In respect of the budget allocation for the Department of Telecommunications and Postal Services:

a) The Advertising budget decreased in the 2017/18 financial year; it was mainly for the marketing and promotional items as well as advertising to fill vacant posts. In the 2018/19 financial year, the budget increased mainly for marketing and promotional items due to the Department hosting the BRICS Summit and International Telecoms Union (ITU) World Telecom in September 2019 at the INkosi Albert Luthuli Conversion Centre in Durban.

b) The budget for Advertising decreased in the 2019/20 financial year; the budget is mainly for marketing and promotional items as well as advertising to fill vacant posts.

In respect of the budget allocation for the Department of Communications:

a) Advertising budget increased during the 2017/18 financial year due to advertising done in respect of the Digital Terrestrial Television Project (DTT). During 2018/19 financial year, the budget increased due increased branding and promotional items that were procured.

b) The advertising budget for the 2019/20 financial year increased mainly for awareness campaigns for the DTT Project.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER