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03 October 2022 - NW3187

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)On what date did she attend the last meeting of any structure outside the Government in order to receive recommendations on the deployment of personnel in her department and/or entities reporting to her; (2) whether any appointments to her department and/or entities reporting to her were discussed during her attendance at any private forum and/or external structures to the Government; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of appointments that were discussed and recommendations received and (b) other Government matters were discussed during the last meeting of any such forum?

Reply:

I do not discuss my diary and political activities with those deemed not to be relevant on the matter. The member is requested to explain the relevance of the question to my work as a Minister.

03 October 2022 - NW2785

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of (a) all contracts awarded to training and development service providers, (b) the breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years, (c) the number of persons trained, (d) the NQF level of the training attained, (e) the certificates awarded and (f) the amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre; if not, what is the position in this regard: if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Contracts awarded to training and development service providers:

The Department has not awarded any contracts to training and development service providers. When a training and development request is received, a RFQ is issued to Supply Chain Management to obtain quotations which are sourced as per National Treasury requirements for service providers through the Central Supplier Database through National Treasury.

b) The breakdown of costs for training and development services in the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years is tabulated below:

Description

Amount Spent

2021-22 Financial Year

Bursaries

R1 237 000.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R346 820.49

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R567 238.51

Internship

R849 781.68

Total spent

R3 000 840.68

2022-23 Financial Year

Bursaries

R117 791.00

NQF aligned Training and Development

R0.00

Non NQF aligned Training and Development

R390 193.00

Total spent

R507 984.00

c) The number of persons trained:

The number of staff members trained in the Department for:

  • 2021-22 financial year amounts to 185 staff members for NQF and Non-NQF aligned training; and
  • 2022-23 financial year amounts to 34 staff members trained for Non-NQF training from 01 April to 05 September 2022.

d) The NQF level of the training attained is tabulated below

NQF Training and Development Interventions for staff :2021-22

NQF Training and Development

NQF Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

NQF levels 1-3

SHE Representative training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Fire Fighting training

25

NQF levels 1-3

Evacuation Marshal training

25

NQF levels 4-6

Assessor training

1

NQF levels 4-6

Moderator training

1

Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

e) The certificates awarded to staff:

Certificates awarded to staff members for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years are:

NQF, Non-NQF Training and Development Interventions and Qualifications obtained by staff for 2021-22 and 2022-23 financial years

NQF Training and Development

NQF/ Non Level

Intervention

Number of staff members

Certificate as per Programme

None NQF training

Executive Education Programme

2

Certificate as per Qualifications

NQF level 6

BA in Public Administration and Communication Facilitation

1

NQF level 8

BCom Honours: Industrial & Organisational Psychology

1

 

BCom Business Management

1

 

BCom Media Studies

1

 

BCom Integrated Organizational Communication

1

 

B-Tech Project Management

1

 

B-Tech Forensic Investigation

1

 

Postgraduate Diploma Management

2

 

Postgraduate Diploma in Public Administration

1

 

Bachelor of Law

1

NQF level 9

Master’s in Business Leadership

1

 

Master’s in Business Administration

2

 

Masters in Urban Infrastructure Design and Management

1

f) The amounts spent on travel, venues and catering from the cost centre:

The amount spent on travel, venues and catering for:

  • 2021-22 financial cycle amounted to R38 400.00; and
  • 2022-23 financial cycle (01 April to 05 September) amounts to R0.00.

19 September 2022 - NW2783

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the Community Scheme Ombud Service (CSOS), what number (a) of the 1 191 cases that were referred for adjudication in the 2020-21 financial year were resolved, (b) were dismissed by the adjudicator and (c) of the cases that were dismissed by the adjudicator were due to technical shortcomings of the application and not due to the merit of the cases?

Reply:

a) A total of 410 disputes were referred to adjudication of which 109 adjudication orders were issued. Out of 1 191 disputes referred for conciliation, 331 were resolved. All three regions experienced a backlog during the 2020/21 financial year, with the total number of outstanding disputes estimated at 3 335. The backlog was cleared up in the 2021/22 financial year.

The table below depicts the breakdown of the adjudication and conciliation of disputes per region:

 

REGION

REFERRED TO CONCILIATION

CONCILIATED

REFERRED TO ADJUDICATION

ORDERS

Gauteng

557

201

360

99

Kwa-Zulu Natal

 

297

50

16

6

Western Cape

337

80

34

4

TOTAL

1191

331

410

109

b) The performance information in the 2020/2021 financial year did not have a filtering method for adjudications that were dismissed in the 2020/2021 financial year. The SharePoint system incorporated dismissals from the 2021/2022 financial year onwards. Out of the 109 adjudications, the Community Scheme Ombud Service (CSOS) is unable to determine which adjudication orders were for dismissals.

 

c) CSOS does not capture performance information that refers to dismissals for technical reasons. They are categorised as “Dismissals”. The CSOS Assessment and Quality Assurance processes ensures the elimination of dismissals for technicalities.  Furthermore, adjudicators have the investigative powers to probe outstanding aspects of the disputes in order to proceed on the merits of the matter.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 2783 (NW3374E)

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 2 SEPTEMBER 2022

__________________________________________________________

MR J MARITZ

DIRECTOR: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS ENTITIES OVERSIGHT

DATE:

__________________________________________________________

Recommended / not recommended

MS S NGXONGO

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

__________________________________________________________

Approved / not approved

MS MT KUBAYI, MP

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

16 September 2022 - NW3000

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she and/or her Department submitted a policy review document and/or any other government policy document to structures outside of the Government, either to private and/or external structures or structures of any political affiliation during the past five years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will she furnish Mr M S Malatsi with copies of all such documents and (b) what are the reason that the Government documents were provided to each structure?

Reply:

No. The Department’s policy review and development process is informed and guided by the National Policy Development Framework, approved by Cabinet in 2020. The process sets out the following:

(a) A political manifesto of the Governing Party is a public declaration of policy and programmes aimed at improving the lives of citizens. These priorities are further processed through the government for implementation.

(b) The Manifesto of the Governing Party is processed for implementation through the Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF). The MTSF is the government’s strategic plan which reflects commitments made in the election manifesto of the governing party, as well as priorities of the National Development Plan (NDP).

The Framework guides the Department on policy review, policy development, policy authorisation, policy implementation and policy analysis. It sets standards and guiding principles for the entire policy making cycle and clarifies approaches to intra/inter departmental consultation and external stakeholder consultations during policy-making processes. The Framework enlightens the process through which a platform is created for an interaction between the Department and consultation with communities for participatory-based evidence.

In addition, since Housing is a concurrent function, the Department has a structured and systematic policy approval process which includes a multi-sectoral intergovernmental consultation forum in the form of the National Policy Task Team (NPTT). The NPTT comprises of Provinces, Metropolitan Municipalities, South African Local Government Association (SALGA); Human Settlements Entities, Civil Society, Chapter Nine Institutions, i.e. South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC); Commission for Gender Equality (CGE), etc. To establish the envisaged developmental impact, rationale, associated risks, cost estimates and quality standards, the draft policy is subjected to the Socio-Economic Impact Assessment System (SEIAS) exercise at the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME).

If necessary, the draft policy will then be shared with the Chief State Law Advisor for concurrence. Thereafter it will be submitted for approval to a pertinent Ministerial Cluster, Ministers and Members of Executive Councils (MINMEC) and Technical MINMEC forums.

11 July 2022 - NW2037

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to her department’s policy review and proposed new Human Settlements Code, (a) on what date was the first Policy and Legal Expert Team (POLERT) successfully established and (b) what were the terms of office in the specified initiative; (2) what were the POLERT’s terms of reference; (3) what was the outcome of the POLERT’s work; (4) what was the total cost of the POLERT; (5) whether the POLERT has been terminated due to term limits; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) will there be a replacement and (b) what will the goals of that initiative be?

Reply:

1. (a) On the 27th of October 2018, the Department of Human Settlements appointed twenty-seven (27) persons as members of POLERT for a period of two (2), 13 Legal Experts, and 14 Policy Experts.

2. The terms of reference for POLERT were to assist the Department with, inter alia, the following:

a) To review the housing and human settlements macro policies such as the White Paper Housing, 1994, the Comprehensive Plan for the Development of Sustainable Human Settlements, 2004 (otherwise known as the ‘Breaking New Ground’ [BNG], including with International Treaties and Commitments such as the New Urban Agenda, and to further analyse the implications against other approved policies in the human settlements space, and to make recommendations for consideration by the Minister of Human Settlements;

b) To review the housing and human settlements legislation, and existing court judgments (jurisprudence), with a view to analysing the implications thereof and make appropriate recommendations for consideration by the Minister of Human Settlements, and

3. The outcome of the work carried out by POLERT includes, among others: The process of the incremental review of the Draft Housing and Human Settlements White Paper, 2016; Research and literature review, and the development of macro policy frameworks toward a Policy Foundation for Housing and Human Settlements White Paper, including the development of policy programmes for a new Human Settlements Code in at least four (4) critical themed areas - Integrated Planning and Residential Development, Informal Settlements Upgrading, Social Housing Interventions, and Affordable Housing.

These are underpinned by a macro policy framework on Human Settlements Land Assembly, Land Release (Site and Service) as well as the Individual Voucher Subsidy Programme, the programme for the removal of asbestos in homes, diagnostic investigation, and the empowerment of designated groups.

Over and above the initial assignment, some POLERT members were extensively utilised to formulate a Human Settlements response to the outbreak of the Covid-19 pandemic and the subsequent declaration of the State of Disaster and Lockdown for a sector that was hugely impacted upon, as part of the entire construction industry, by the pandemic.

4. The initial operational budget that was set aside for POLERT was R4 million for a period of two (2) years. An amount of R3 530 416, 40 was paid to POLERT members, with an additional amount of R187 520,00 for traveling costs. In all, a total of R3 717 936,40 was expended on POLERT.

5. Yes, POLERT has been terminated due to term limits. The initial contract period was two (2) years, after which an extension for a period of one (1) year was granted until the end of October 2021. Currently, there are no POLERT members and there are no contractual appointments under POLERT. (a) Yes, there will be a replacement and a procurement process to this effect has commenced (b) the goal will be to conclude the development of a Human Settlements Policy Foundation i.e. the White Paper on Human Settlements as well as the new Human Settlements Code.

08 July 2022 - NW2400

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) On what date did her department receive the application for funds from the Emergency Housing Programme Grant for flood relief in KwaZulu-Natal from the (i) KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Government and (ii) eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and (b) what are the details of the (i) amounts disbursed and (ii) dates thereof?

Reply:

(a) The final consolidated application from both KwaZulu-Natal Department of Human Settlements and eThekwini Metropolitan municipality to access funds from the Provincial Emergency Housing Grant to provide 4983 Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) was received by the Department of Human Settlements on 5 May 2022.

(b) Due to the limited annual allocation for 2022/23 of funds in the Provincial Emergency Housing Grant (R325,8 million) and Municipal Emergency Housing Grant (R175,4 million) both the province and eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality were advised to reprioritise funding from the Human Settlements Development Grant and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant. Concurrently, eThekwini Metropolitan municipality was requested to reprioritise the Urban Settlements Development Grant and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant. These requests were meant to ensure that both the Province and eThekwini Metropolitan municipality is able to expeditiously assist floods victims whilst the application is being processed.

(i)The application was approved by this Department for the provision of 4983 Temporary Residential Units at a cost of R342 million. However, National Treasury could only approve an amount of R325,8 million which is the entire 2022/23 annual allocation of the Provincial Emergency Housing Grant. Furthermore, as the 2022 Division of Revenue Bill (DoRB) is not presently enacted, only R140.003 million could be transferred as the first tranche, in compliance with section 27 of the 2021 Division of Revenue Act. The second tranche can be made after the 2022 DoRB has been enacted.

(ii)The first tranche was disbursed to the Province on 17 June 2022.

08 July 2022 - NW1900

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What remedial assistance will be provided to beneficiaries of the Breaking New Ground houses that were destroyed during the KwaZulu-Natal floods and (b) on what date is it envisaged that such assistance will be provided?

Reply:

In terms of the provisions of the Constitution, policy, and legislation, the KwaZulu-Natal Department of Human Settlements (KZNDHS) is responsible for the planning and implementation of housing and human settlements programmes in the KwaZulu-Natal Province. This includes the Human Settlements Emergency Housing Programme. The Province has advised that they have commenced with the construction of Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) for households whose homes have been damaged or destroyed by the floods which occurred during the course of April 2022. The households are currently being accommodated and housed with neighbours and/or in halls and/or churches and/or tents.

The Department is planning in the immediate future to construct approximately one thousand eight hundred and ten (1810) temporary residential units. One hundred and eight (108) temporary residential units (TRUs) have been completed for families affected by floods in various District Municipalities including eThekwini Metro.

The target is to complete all the 1810 Temporary Residential Areas (TRAs) within a period of three months (May to July 2022), however, it should be noted that the set timeframes will depend on a number of operational and technical variables which include obtaining suitable land for displaced families, the necessary planning and environmental approvals, availability of materials to construct the temporary residential units (TRUs) and so on.

KwaZulu-Natal Department of Human Settlements in conjunction with eThekwini and the National Department of Human Settlements developed a long-term or permanent solution to assist flood victims. To date, a total of 199 Serviced Sites located within eThekwini Metro have been identified and a verification process, as well as site visits, have been completed. A total of 65 sites have been identified as developable and will be suitable for development as a permanent solution. The 65 sites vary in size, ranging from 300sqm-2800sqm, therefore more than one unit can be constructed. The Department also identified various land parcels to provide permanent accommodation.

 

08 July 2022 - NW2425

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

On what date is it envisaged that her department will provide adequate housing for the community of Clarens in Thabo Mofutsanyana District Municipality in the Free State, which has been promised housing since 2007?

Reply:

Based on information provided by the Dihlabeng Local Municipality is currently finalizing various township establishment projects in Clarens, whereafter the sites will be made available to qualifying and approved households.

06 July 2022 - NW2426

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

On what date is it envisaged that the housing project of Phumelela in the Free State, will be completed by her department as they have been standing incomplete for a while without roofs and some with foundations only?

Reply:

The Free State Department of Human Settlements has completed the process of procuring a replacement contractor to complete the work in Thembelihle Ext 4 in Vrede. It is expected that the new contractor will be on site in or about July 2022.

05 July 2022 - NW2399

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the details in respect of the (a) names, (b) salaries, (c) date of commencement of service, (d) terms of references and (e) performance outcomes of all members of the Human Settlements War Room that she announced during the delivery of her department’s 2022 Budget Vote?

Reply:

(a), (b) and (c) are reflected in the table below:

No:

(a) names

(b) salaries

(c) date of commencement of service?

Contract duration

 

Mr. Dan Metlana Gorbachev Mashitisho (Chairperson)

Qualifications:

  • BA Legal
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Management (PDM)
  • Postgraduate Diploma in Labour Law (PDL)
  • Master of Business Administration

Remunerated at R 5260 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

21 March 2022

12 months

 

Dr. Mmaphaka Ephraim Tau

Qualifications:

  • PhD in Development and Management
  • Magister in Disaster Management
  • Masters in Development Studies
  • Honours in Development Studies
  • Higher Education Diploma
  • Bachelor of Arts

Remunerated at R 4317 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

01 May 2022

12 months

 

Mr. Abongile Dyariwe

Qualifications:

  • MSc Degree (Built Environment (Project Management)
  • Advanced Programme in Sourcing and Supply Chain Management
  • Advanced Diploma (PM Ideas) Advanced Project Management
  • BTech Degree: (CPUT) Civil Engineering (Urban Engineering)
  • National Diploma: (CPUT) Civil Engineering

Remunerated at R 4317 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

01 May 2022

12 months

 

Mr. Job Katlego

Ditshego

Qualifications:

  • B-Tech: Civil Engineering (Transportation)
  • National Diploma: Civil Engineering

Remunerated at R 4317 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

01 May 2022

12 months

 

Mr. Kwena Maphoto

Qualifications:

  • National Higher Diploma (Civil Engineering)
  • Baccalareus Technologiae: Engineering (Civil)

Remunerated at R 4317 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

01 May 2022

12 months

 

Ms Patience Ntombifikile

Ndlovu

Qualifications:

  • B.Soc.Sc degree
  • BA (Hons)
  • Masters in Urban & Regional Planning
  • Specialist Project Management Programme NQF 6

Remunerated at R 4317 per day for a maximum period not exceeding 20 days per month

01 May 2022

12 months

(d) The terms of reference for the War Room provides for delivery objective on human settlements sector, aimed at improving inter-governmental relations across the human settlements sector, addressing service delivery challenges and fast-tracking the implementation of matters raised in provincial visits; as well as overall human settlements service delivery.

(e) The War Room was established in May 2022; the performance outcomes will be provided as the work continues in various strategic interventions.

04 July 2022 - NW1978

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Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Human Settlements:

Whether with reference to the letter sent to her on 5 April 2022, in which she was requested to intervene and investigate into Forestdale Housing Project in Endumeni Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal which is in a complete mess, she has attended to the problem; if not, what are the reasons that she undermined the importance of adequate housing provided for in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what was the outcome?

Reply:

a) I only received the aforementioned letter on 21 June 2022. However the National Department of Human Settlements together with the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements have intervened after several concerns were raised in respect of the allocation of houses in Endumeni Municipality in 2017. A court application was lodged wherein the provincial department was cited as a respondent in the notice of a motion that was served on the 18th of March 2017. The Province has continued to monitor the project at Endumeni Municipality as per the directive of the court.

b) The Dlamini Forestdale Housing Project is progressing well, and it is set to yield two hundred and sixty-one (261) units in Endumeni Local Municipality. Two hundred and thirty-four (234) beneficiaries have already been allocated occupation of houses. Both water and bulk infrastructure services are in place and the Metropolitan Municipality is currently seized with the connection for electricity supply provision.

c) Occupying these houses. There are water and sewer services. The city is busy doing the connection of electricity.

04 July 2022 - NW2081

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date is it envisaged that asbestos houses will be eradicated in the communities of (a) Diplankeng village in the Greater Taung Local Municipality, Pampierstad in Northern cape and (b) Promosa in the JB Marks Local Municipality where residents have been staying in old apartheid houses with asbestos roofing, with some even having all asbestos structures which is a serious health hazard that has already claimed may lives?

Reply:

A) The Northern Cape Provincial Department of Human Settlements has advised that it conducted an asbestos use in houses assessment in 2015. The estimated cost of removal, at the time, highlighted that it would cost over one billion (R1bn) rands to remove and replace. The Province is currently updating the assessment report and packaging an asbestos removal plan including a project pipeline for implementation in the 2023/24 financial year. The asbestos houses in Pampierstad will be prioritized once the assessment report and plan have been completed, and implemented

B) The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements will be requested to assess the existence of asbestos in homes Promosa in the Marks and Greater Taung Local Municipal jurisdiction. The North West Departmental Planning Unit is currently consulting with all the affected municipalities in the province to prepare a plan for eradication.

Upon conclusion of the consultations, a verification process will be undertaken to determine the exact numbers affected and the budget requirements thereof. Upon completing the processes, the budgeting in the business plan and development of an implementation plan for the balance of the MTSF 2022/23 period.

01 July 2022 - NW2308

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Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)What are the details of all the housing contractors who have entered into business with Government in the past five financial years (2) Whether any of the contractors defaulted in the completion of any projects; if not what is the position in this regard. If so, what (a) number and (b) are the recorded reasons?

Reply:

1. The implementation of housing delivery as well as appointment of contractors is the function of the provinces. The list of contractors has been requested and obtained from the provinces since they are responsible for appointment and contract management.

The details of all the housing contractors who have entered into business with Government in the past five financial years in all provinces are as follows:

A total of 2 970 contractors have entered into business with Provinces. The details of those contractors per province are attached as Annexure A.

2. (a) 95 contractors defaulted in the completion of the projects; contractors that have not defaulted have completed or are still constructing the projects that are not yet complete.

(b) Reasons for defaulting include:

  • Poor performance by the contractor;
  • Lack of bulk infrastructure;
  • Contractor Cash flow challenges;
  • Untraceable beneficiaries;
  • Legal land requirements;
  • Replacements of beneficiaries;
  • Change of local authorities;
  • Scarcity and price escalation of building material;
  • Project surrendered due to cost escalation;
  • Covid-19 challenges;
  • Unbuildable sites and missing beneficiaries;
  • Delays with beneficiary administration;
  • Social issues;
  • Change of local authorities;
  • Delays in Water Licence (WULA) approval and variation order delays.

The details of defaulting contractors per province are attached as Annexure A.

PROVINCE

(1) NUMBER OF CONTRACTORS

(2a) NUMBERS

OF DEFAULTERS

(2b) SUMMARY OF REASONS

EC

818

4

Poor performance and cash follow constrains

FS

123

0

No defaulters reported by the Province

GP

97

3

Poor performance

KZN

652

62

Poor performance; Bulk infrastructure; Cash flow; Untraceable beneficiaries; Legal land requirements; Replacements of beneficiaries; Change of local authorities; Scarcity and price escalation of building material; Project surrendered due to cost escalation; Covid-19 challenges; Unbuildable sites and missing beneficiaries; Delays with beneficiary administration; Social issues; Change of local authorities; Delays in Water Licence (WULA) approval and Variation order delays

LP

400

14

Poor performance

MP

182

5

Contractors failed to commence with the work after site hand over and poor performance

NC

66

0

No defaulters reported by the Province

NW

285

0

No defaulters reported by the Province

WC

347

7

Poor performance and cash flow challenges

TOTAL

2 970

95

 

30 June 2022 - NW2398

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 835 on 22 April 2022, what was the outcome of the disciplinary process of the National Home Builders Registration Council against the Aventino Group Pty (Ltd)?

Reply:

The NHBRC has finalised its investigation and concluded that it is unable to take disciplinary steps against this home builder based on the investigations conducted by the SIU and its internal resources. The NHBRC lacks jurisdiction on the matter as the Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) in question are not “homes” as defined in the Housing Consumer Protection Measures Act, 1998 (Act No. 95 of 1998).

20 June 2022 - NW1959

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Given that trustees and not managing agents, manage sectional title schemes and that managing agent have a conflict of interest and are consequently unable to represent the best interest of owners, how will she ensure that owners, via their trustees, are given direct representation on the Sectional Titles Schemes Managing Advisory Council in terms of section 18(2)(c) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011?

Reply:

The body corporate is represented by all the owners of a sectional title scheme. Regulation 5(3) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 provides for the election of trustees by the body corporate. The trustees exercise the body corporate’s powers and functions assigned and delegated to them in terms of section 7(1) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011.

Body corporates are not obligated to appoint a managing agent but may do so to perform the functions and exercise the powers that would otherwise be performed by the trustees in terms of Regulation 28(1) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011. The appointment of a managing agent is not imposed upon a body corporate but elected by the body corporate. As such, a body corporate has the right to challenge a managing agent through the available legislative mechanisms should it be of the view that its rights have been infringed through misconduct by the managing agent.

In appointing the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Advisory Council, the skills, knowledge and experience of the candidates in the management of a range of types of schemes will be taken into account. This includes trustees or owners who have skills, knowledge and experience in the management of schemes.

20 June 2022 - NW2036

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1).What total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units are planned for delivery in each province in the 2022-23 financial year in accordance with the Provincial Housing Plans; (2) What total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units are planned for delivery in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year in accordance with the Provincial Housing Plan; (3) What total amount in Human Settlements Development Grant funding has been allocated by her department to each (a) province and (b) metropolitan municipality for the specified financial year?

Reply:

  1. All plans are reflected in all Annual Performance Plans as tabled in various legislatures and available on websites with the targets
  2. Plans for the Metropolitan municipalities will be shared once councils have approved them. These are developed by Provincial departments.
  3. All the Human Settlements Development Grant allocation is reflected on the Annual Performance Plan.

20 June 2022 - NW2064

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount in revenue has been lost by her department in purchasing land from white farmers to enable municipalities to provide land to build houses, particulary for displaced and evicted farm dwellers, who are pushed by farmers to the township and deprived buriel lands?

Reply:

Matters related to the eviction of farm dwellers including land purchase and accommodation thereof is a function of the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development.  The Human Settlements National and Provincial Departments provide support to farm dwellers as provided for by the Housing Code in terms of the Farm Residents Subsidy which covers the following:-

 

a) A flexible approach to cater to the variety of farm residents’ housing needs across the country;

b) The provision of secure tenure to farm workers;

c) The promotion of healthy and safe living environments;

d) The empowerment of farm residents’ (and in particular women) to participate in the provision of their own housing needs, as appropriate in the particular farming situation;

e) Where possible, promoting access to social and economic amenities;

f) Promoting access to economic opportunities not related to farming (particular when seasonal farm work is not available) (particularly when seasonal farm work is not available) for households where appropriate;

g) The encouragement of sustainable spatial settlement patterns and discouraging the development of farm residents housing that places an additional service delivery burden on municipalities;

h) The use of local labour and the development of skills in both developing and maintaining farm resident settlements; and

i) The upgrading of existing farm resident housing and improving the security of tenure where feasible and practicable

Total funds spent between 2020/21 - 2021/22 financial year by the Provincial Departments on housing programmes is shown below:

20 June 2022 - NW2129

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount did her department spend on (a) travel, (b) flights, (c) accommodation, (d) catering and (e) flowers whilst Ms Lindiwe Sisulu was Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation in the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii)2020-21 financial years?

Reply:

The following breakdown is the departmental expenditure incurred during the tenure of the previous Minister:

a) Expenditure on travel for;                                    (i) 2018-19 of R 68 531 385.59

                                                                            (ii) 2019-20 of R 68 211 236.86

                                                                            (iii) 2020-21of R 25 015 936.36

b) Expenditure on flights for;                                   (i) 2018-19 of R 26 230 031.61

                                                                            (ii)2019-20 of R 28 611 599.32

                                                                             (iii) 2020-21 of R 6 421 952.02

c) Expenditure on accommodation for;                      (i) 2018-19 of R 11 365 036.35

                                                                              ii) 2019-20 of R 13 115 787.37

                                                                              (iii) 2020-21 of R 4 103 731.22

d) Expenditure on catering for;                                   (i) 2018-19 of R 7 775 699.57

                                                                               (ii) 2019-20 of R 18 788 746.96

                                                                                (iii) 2020-21of R 11 386 717.55

e) Expenditure on flowers for;                                      (i) 2018-19 of R 18 245.16

                                                                                (ii) 2019-20 of R 4 200.00

                                                                                 (iii) 2020-21 of R 12 558.40

20 June 2022 - NW2103

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the details of (a) all contracts awarded by the (i) KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements and (ii) eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality using funds from her department in response to the KwaZulu-Natal flood disaster to date and (b) the (i) names of the companies and/or service providers who were awarded the contracts and (ii) values of each contract?

Reply:

Based on the report submitted by the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements as of 30 May 2022, the required information is as follows:

Table

Description automatically generated

20 June 2022 - NW1960

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Given that the Chief Ombudsman will be the chairperson of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Advisory Council in terms of section 18(2)(c) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 and the Council may be required to promote legislative amendments that restrict the powers of the Ombudsman Service, how will she ensure that the Chief Ombudsman, and by extension, the Ombudsman Service, do not exercise undue influence on the Advisory Council.

Reply:

The Chief Ombud will be required to recuse himself or herself from the discussion of matters that may cause a conflict of interest. Section 18(3) of the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 provides for the appointment of a deputy chairperson. Such matters will therefore be dealt with under the leadership of the deputy chairperson.

20 June 2022 - NW1914

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What total number of housing opportunities were delivered and/or completed nationally, in terms of the Housing Code, in the 2021-22 financial year; (2) what total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each province in the specified financial year; (3) what total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year?

Reply:

NOTE: The performance figures in this reply have not yet been audited.

1. The total number of housing opportunities delivered and/or completed nationally, in terms of the Housing Code, in the 2021-22 financial year is 46 489 serviced sites and 44 471 housing units.  The serviced sites and housing units are not added to avoid double counting as housing units are constructed on serviced sites.

2. The total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units delivered and/or completed in each province in the specified financial year is as follows:

(a) 

Province

2021/22 FY

 

Serviced sites

Eastern Cape

5 731

Free State

8 150

Gauteng

11 599

KwaZulu-Natal

2 380

Limpopo

2 525

Mpumalanga

3 907

Northern Cape

2 542

North West

6 723

Western Cape

2 932

Total

46 489

 

(b)

Province

2021/22 FY

 

Housing units

Eastern Cape

6 780

Free State

1 426

Gauteng

7 331

KwaZulu-Natal

11 803

Limpopo

4 928

Mpumalanga

2 961

Northern Cape

591

North West

2 734

Western Cape

5 917

Total

44 471

3. The total number of (a) serviced sites and (b) housing units were delivered and/or completed in each metropolitan municipality in the specified financial year is as follows:

a) 

Metropolitan Municipality

2021/22  up to Q3

 

Serviced sites

Buffalo City

220

Nelson Mandela Bay

0

Mangaung

0

City of Ekurhuleni

1 340

City of Johannesburg

0

City of Tshwane

0

Ethekwini

0

City of Cape Town

1 077

Total

2 637

b) Metropolitan Municipalities do not deliver housing units as it is a Provincial function.

 

17 June 2022 - NW1958

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether, given that 11 years have now passed since the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act No. 8 of 2011, was gazetted in terms of which the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Advisory Council was formally established, she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the timelines for the actual, real-world establishment of the Council as provided for in section 18 of the Act.

Reply:

The appointment of the Sectional Title Schemes Management Advisory Council is in progress and should be finalised by 15 July 2022.

15 June 2022 - NW1819

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What criteria will be used to identify families who have been affected and lost their homes in floods in KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape in order for them to be prioritised for housing allocation?

Reply:

Below is the prioritization approach that will be used by the KwaZulu- Natal and Eastern Cape Provinces in response to the recent disasters:

  • Families with deceased members living in shelters/mass care centers;
  • Families in shelters with nowhere to go;
  • The elderly and vulnerable groups;
  • Families that have land but no shelter;

15 June 2022 - NW1899

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What total amount has been allocated to the KwaZulu-Natal flood response efforts from the budgets of the (i) 2021-22 and (ii) 2022-23 financial years, (b) from which specific cost centres has the money been sourced and (c) what (i) are the names of all contractors that have been awarded contracts for the building of temporary relocation units (TRUs) and (ii)(aa) is the total number of TRUs that will be provided in response to the KwaZulu-Natal floods and (bb) are their locations and (iii) is the date by which the TRUs will be completed?

Reply:

The KwaZulu-Natal Department of Human Settlements (KZNDHS) has during the 2021/2022 financial year, applied for the Provincial Emergency Housing Grant amounting to R102 590 072. This was spent on the construction of 1 592 Temporary Residential Units (TRUs).

For the 2022/23 financial year and in response to the April disaster the National Department transferred R992 million (R733 HSDG and R189 ISUPG) from the current year allocations. The Province reported that out of the transferred funds, it prioritised R515.9 million (HSDG=R367 and ISUPG=R148.96) to respond to the disaster.

The name of the contractors awarded to construct Temporary Residential Units in the Province are:

  1. Stedone Developments
  2. Stefa Construction
  3. Zingaka Mvelo Projects
  4. Chushisanani Mzansi
  5. Isiboniso Project Management
  6. RH Construction
  7. Uphenyo Trading; and
  8. Miands Trading Business Services

A total of 4 983 Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) will be provided to households affected by recent floods in the Province. The TRUs will be supplied to all families affected by floods across 10 Districts, including the most affected Districts and the Metro (i.e eThekhwini Metro, Ugu and ILembe).

The Province together with other stakeholders are planning to complete the process of accommodating households affected by floods as soon as possible, however, this will also depend on the availability of materials from suppliers, site accessibility for material transportation to rural areas, and the identification and planning process on alternative sites.

14 June 2022 - NW1653

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) With reference to the Community Schemes Ombud Service (CSOS) Act, Act 9 of 2011, (a) on what date was the Advisory Council of the CSOS established, (b) what (i) are the names of the members, (ii) are the dates of service and (iii) is the total remuneration amount of each member and (c) where are the minutes of deliberations from establishment to date; (2) Whether an Advisory Council has been established; if not, what are the reasons that it has not been established; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) & (2) The appointment of the CSOS Board was prioritised to ensure organisational stability and strategic focus and alignment to the priorities of government.

The appointment of the Sectional Title Schemes Management Advisory Council is in progress and should be finalised by 15 July 2022.

09 June 2022 - NW1826

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date will her department provide housing to the community of Ward 5 at Lomanyaneng in Mahikeng which has been promised houses by the Mahikeng Local Municipality since 2015? NW2159E

Reply:

The Provincial Department is planning to deliver 600 units in the Mahikeng Local Municipality. The Department will through its planning process engage with Mafikeng Local Municipality to advise the Municipality to consider Ward 5 in its list of priorities of housing allocation during this current financial year adjustment period alternatively during the 2023/2024 financial year.

 

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF PROVINCES

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NO:1826

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 13 May 2022

N BUTHELEZI

ACTING DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: AFFORDABLE RENTAL AND SOCIAL HOUSING

DATE:

MS TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL: HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

Approved/Not approved

Ms MT KUBAYI, (MP)

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

06 June 2022 - NW1901

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) are the details of all housing contractors that have been blacklisted in KwaZulu-Natal in the period 1 January 2016 to date for delivering sub-standard housing and/or as a result of not fulfilling their contractual obligations, (b) is the total number of contractors that have been blacklisted and (c) are the identity numbers of their directors?

Reply:

a) There are no contractors that have been blacklisted in KwaZulu-Natal in the period 1 January 2016 to date for delivering sub-standard houses and/or as a result of not fulfilling their contractual obligations. However, the Province’s overall list of restricted contractors can be accessed on the National Treasury website (www.treasury.gov.za//restricted suppliers

b) No contractors were blacklisted during the period under review.

c) Not Applicable

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

QUESTION FOR WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 1901

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 13 MAY 2022

L BELE

ACTING CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

DATE:

Recommended/ not recommended

M S TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL:

DATE:

______________________________________________________________________

Approved/ Not approved

MS M T KUBAYI, MP

MINISTER FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

06 June 2022 - NW1790

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total number of (a) Breaking New Ground houses, (b) Social Housing Opportunities, (c) Informal Settlement Upgrades, (d) Finance-Linked Individual Subsidy Programme opportunities and (e) title deeds did her department deliver in each province for the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

a) The total number of Breaking New Ground houses delivered in each province for the 2020-21 financial year.

Province

2020/21 FY

 

Houses delivered

Eastern Cape

5 427

Free State

1 890

Gauteng

9 495

KwaZulu-Natal

10 315

Limpopo

4 518

Mpumalanga

4 522

Northern Cape

221

North West

2 847

Western Cape

6 354

Total

45 589

b) The total number of Social Housing Opportunities delivered in each province for the 2020-21 financial year.

Community Residential Units (CRU’s)

Province

2020/21 FY

 

CRUs

Eastern Cape

0

Free State

602

Gauteng

0

KwaZulu-Natal

404

Limpopo

0

Mpumalanga

0

Northern Cape

0

North West

0

Western Cape

0

Total

1006

Social Housing Programme

Province

2020/21 FY

 

Social Housing units

Eastern Cape

385

Free State

0

Gauteng

1049

KwaZulu-Natal

0

Limpopo

164

Mpumalanga

0

Northern Cape

0

North West

0

Western Cape

258

Total

1856

c) The total number of Informal Settlement Upgrades delivered in each province for the 2020-21 financial year.

Province

2020/21 FY

 

Informal Settlements Upgrading Plans developed (constitute Phase 1)

Eastern Cape

42

Free State

19

Gauteng

46

KwaZulu-Natal

30

Limpopo

16

Mpumalanga

24

Northern Cape

74

North West

30

Western Cape

12

Total

293

d) The total number of Finance-Linked Individual Subsidy Programme (FLISP) opportunities delivered in each province for the 2020-21 financial year.

Province

2020/21 FY

 

FLISP

Eastern Cape

71

Free State

150

Gauteng

46

KwaZulu-Natal

313

Limpopo

32

Mpumalanga

39

Northern Cape

17

North West

131

Western Cape

1 176

Total

1 975

NHFC

1 186

Grand Total

3 161

e) The total number of title deeds delivered in each province for the 2020-21 financial year.

Province

2020/21 FY

 

Pre 1994

Post 1994

Current and New developments

Eastern Cape

234

658

-

Free State

51

2 911

1 171

Gauteng

32

2 303

1 178

KwaZulu-Natal

442

1 187

1 650

Limpopo

3

620

436

Mpumalanga

196

579

1 036

Northern Cape

178

253

12

North West

30

507

-

Western Cape

88

1 025

 

Total

1 254

10 043

5 483

03 June 2022 - NW1539

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What immediate plans have been put in place by her Department for housing allocations for the victims of floods in Kwazulu-Natal who have lost their homes and; b) Are there plans in place to work with the Department of Public Works and infrastructure for the allocation of land to build houses for the victims?

Reply:

In terms of the provisions of the Constitution, policy and legislation, the Kwazulu Natal Department of Human Settlements (KZNDHS) is responsible for the planning and implementation of housing and human settlements programmes in the KwaZulu-Natal Province. This includes the Human Settlements Emergency Housing Programme. The KZNDHS have advised that they have commenced with the process of providing temporary residential units (TRUs) for households whose homes have been damaged or destroyed by the floods which occurred during the course of April 2022. The households are currently being accommodated and housed with neighbours and/or in halls and/or churches and/or tents..

The KZNDHS Department was at the final procurement phase the temporal residential units as follows: 200 units for Ugu District municiplality, 200 units for iLembe districts and 600 units for eThekwini, respectively. To date approximately twenty five (25) temporary residential units (TRUs) have been completed and allocated to families affected by floods, in the various Municipalities in the Province. The procurement of the balance of the temporal residential units will be finalised during May 2022.

The KZNDHS are providing the TRU’s to those families whose homes have been totally destroyed and damaged to the extent that they are unfit for human habitation. As of 25 April 2022, the estimated number of totally destroyed houses was determined to be 4478. Where a home has been partially damaged and can be repaired in the immediate short term, the KZNDHS are providing vouchers for material to be sourced, for the homes to be repaired.

Furthermore, post the disaster the KZNDHS has identified public owned land parcels, focusing on Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) land and property. In addition provincial and municipal vacant and suitable land is also being identified by the province and various municipalities to support the flood disaster mitigation and intervention measures. The process to identify DPWI land suitable for human settlements is on-going. In addition to identification of land parcels, geophysical constraints assessments are undertaken to identify factors such as slope, 1 in 100-year flood plain, intersection by river/streams and/or wetlands as well as whether the land is Critical Biodiversity Area (CBA), Ecological Support Area (ESA) or in Protected Area.

25 May 2022 - NW1501

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the apartheid era migrant labour hostels, what (a) total number of privately-owned hostels (i) have been abandoned and/or (ii) are no longer managed and/or maintained by their private owners and (b) does her department intend to do with the privately-owned hostels?

Reply:

(a) Government has no legal authority/jurisdiction over privately owned hostels and as such information/statistics required is not held by any sphere of government, instead, the government’s authority is limited only in respect of public hostels which are owned by provincial human settlements departments or municipalities.

(b) The Department is currently consulting stakeholders to solicit inputs for the regulations that must inform norms and standards that will apply to privately and publicly-owned rental accommodation.

25 May 2022 - NW1356

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the Vrede area and the eMawageni informal settlement in the Phumelela Local Municipality which are prone to flooding, lacks basic utilities and have been disregarded by the authorities for decades, what steps has her department taken to ensure that the families are placed in well-equipped human settlements with schools, clinics and reliable transportation?

Reply:

A feasibility study completed by Phumelela Local Municipality in Mavageng informal settlement in Vrede indicated that the area is prone to a hundred year flood-line and therefore inhabitable. The municipality advised the residents of Mavageng informal settlement that they would be relocated to Thembalihle Ext 14. There was resistance from the residents and therefore could not be relocated. Thembalihle Ext 14 has since been fully allocated to other beneficiaries.

The municipality has since resolved to make provision for these residents to be allocated sites in an approved township named Thembalihle Ext 8 which consists of 1400 erven allocated as follows:

Zoning

Number of Erven

Residential

1310

Business

5

Church

7

Light Industrial

14

Crèche

5

School

3

Public Open Space

18

Street

13

Total

1400

The municipality is yet to consult the occupants with this alternative relocation site. It is important to also note that the alternative Ext. 8 currently does not have municipal engineering services however, in this financial year (i.e., 2022/23) the Free State Department of Human Settlements has been made provision for the reticulation of this area. A project has been registered in this regard with the registration number F21080058/1 and is included in the 2022/23 FS Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant’s Business Plan.

24 May 2022 - NW1504

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Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Given the recent fires in Joe Slovo informal settlements in Langa, which is an annual occurrence over the past 10 years in the City of Cape Town, what total number of informal settlements are recorded in the City of Cape Town Metropolitan Municipality; (2) what steps has her department taken to upgrade informal settlements in the past 10 years; (3) whether her department allocated any monies for the upgrade of informal settlements in the City of Cape Town in the past 10 years; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) reason that the settlements have not been upgraded and (b) plan of her department to deal with the crisis of informal settlements and backyard dwellers in Cape Town?

Reply:

1. The total number of Informal Settlements:

TYPES - AREAS OF INFORMALITY

SETTLEMENTS

STRUCTURES

Backyarder Settlement

31

1 419

Informal Settlement

497

201 151

IDA/TRA/ Re-blocked

33

12 361

Rental Stock Settlements

71

9 478

Small Farmers/ Rural Settlement

17

2 863

New settlements (i.e. Land invasions March 2020 to October 2021)

186

59 192

TOTAL

835

286 464

The data is collected form aerial photography or drone footage with individual structure counts, physical surveys in some instances and solid waste door to door survey information. Data is updated on an annual basis.

2. The analysis of each settlement resulted in the most likely development pathway for that specific settlement. The steps taken can be one of the following options:

Basic Access Improvement: Rolling out of basic access frameworks (i.e. improved roads & pedestrian movement) as part of the basic service package to informal settlements.

De-densification: Settlements which will be required to be de-densified prior to any in-situ (UISP or Superblock) development can be implemented. Basic services provided in interim.

Superblock: Provide formal access roads with formal services infrastructure but no individual serviced sites and only shared services – no or minimal relocation initially required. Settlement is suitable for a superblock approach which can comprise of residential blocks of approximately 90m x 30m with the provision of shared water (1:25 ratio) and sanitation (1:5 ratio), door-to-door waste collection and individual electrification. All roads, storm water and pedestrian access ways to be developed to an “A-Grade” standard.

UISP: Provide every household in informal settlement with own individual serviced site when upgrading to formality – no top structures provided and no or limited relocation required. Settlements which will be developed as a UISP type of project with individual erven with each erf having its own water and sanitation points (1:1 ratio), waste collection, formal roads, storm water management and electrification.

Re-blocked & Enhanced Re-blocking: Settlements which can potentially be Re-blocked where it meets the density and settlement size criteria. Those settlements where the city has established and confirmed the interest and willingness from the community to participate and support a re-blocking type of project.

Managed Settlement Programme: Greenfield site prepared for rapid occupation with shared services initially but with potential to upgrade to individual serviced sites over time & owner construction of top structure.

Total Relocation: Certain settlements will be required to be relocated in totality due to various factors such as location in areas prone to flooding, under power lines in road reserves and located on landfill sites. The locational risk factors of the settlement require relocation to a safer environment. Basic services is provided in interim.

3. Yes, the following budget allocations were received for the upgrading of informal settlements:

FINANCIAL YEAR

BUDGET

2021/22

R316 521 045

2020/21

R242 535 817

2019/20

R204 423 506

2018/19

R159 409 166

2017/18

R194 899 707

2016/17

R117 546 392

2015/16

R58 600 165

2014/15

R85 917 567

2013/14

R97 658 338

2012/13

R27 654 000

a) The funding received for the upgrading of informal settlements were utilised for settlements where planning approvals were obtained, de-densification could be achieved for in-situ upgrading as per the UISP approach. Not all settlements are suitable for upgrading and a vast number is inappropriately located e.g. in rail reserve, over bulk infrastructure line, under ESKOM power lines or in flood prone locations. These types of settlements will need to be relocated in totality. The other factor is to find well located land suitable for residential development which is not necessarily located on the outskirts of the city far away from any job opportunity of social facility.

b) The growth in informality is part of the urbanisation process taking place across all urban centres in the country. The growth in the demand for housing in the City of Cape Town outstrip the production of housing opportunities by the city, province and the private sector. Lastly the negative economic conditions, such as the increase in job losses under Covid 19 the country has been experiencing has led to more people not being in a position to pay rent for formal or informal locations and thus resulting in growth of informal settlements.

23 May 2022 - NW1398

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to the weak structures which were highlighted by the recent floods on Kwazulu-Natal, what measures have been put in place to ensure that people are not made to live in weak, dangerous structures called homes?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements ensures quality control by insisting that all housing projects be enrolled with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) which is a regulatory body of home building industry that was established in 1998 in accordance with the provisions of the Housing Consumers Protection Measures Act, 1998 (Act No. 95 of 1998). Its mandate is to protect the interests of housing consumers and to ensure that builders comply with the prescribed building industry standards. This enrolment protects housing consumers from any unscrupulous home builders who deliver substandard houses, shoddy workmanship and poor quality products.

It should also be noted that floods in the Province not only affected Breaking New Ground homes but also other forms of homes and houses including high-income residential units and general infrastructure as a consequence of prolonged high rainfall.

23 May 2022 - NW1559

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What intervention measures have been put in place to provide housing to the community of Ward 6 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality that has been waiting to be allocated housing since the contractor left without completing building their houses in 2018?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements technical team has completed the quantification of all the houses so that it can extend the scope of the developer to complete all the incomplete houses before the end of of the current financial year.

23 May 2022 - NW1500

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the apartheid era migrant labour hostels, what is the (a) name and (b) location of each (i) state and/or state-owned hostel, (ii) city owned hostel, (iii) privately owned hostel and (iv) so called grey hostel that was privately built on public land; (2) Whether her department regards grey hostels as public housing; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of how her department intends to utilise such hostels?

Reply:

1. The table below which are categorized per province provide the details in respect of question 1 (a) (b) (i) &(ii)

1. NORTHERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Dingaan Hostel

Northern Cape

Sol Plaatje Municipality

 

  2. EASTERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

 

NIL

 

 

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

 

 

 

​   3. MPUMALANGA

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

KwaGuqa Phase 1

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

2.

KwaGuqa Phase 2

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

3.

KwaGuqa Phase 3)

Emalahleni

Emalahleni Local Municipality

4.

Emthonjeni Phase 1

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

5.

Emthonjeni Phase 2

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

6.

Emgwenya

Emakhazeni

Emakhazeni Local Municipality

4. GAUTENG

No.

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Diepkloof Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

2.

Jabulani Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

3.

Orlando West Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

4.

Dube Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

5.

Meadowlands Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

6.

Nancefield Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

7.

Lifateng Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

8.

Mapetla Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

9.

Dobsonville / Simphiwe Hostel

Johannesburg

City of Johannesburg

10.

Rethabile LTA Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

11.

Van Beek Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

12.

Anthea Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

13.

City Deep Hostel

Gauteng

 

14.

M2 Nobuhle Women Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

15.

M1 Madala Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

16.

Helen Joseph Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

17.

Jeppe Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

18.

Denver Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

19.

George Goch Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

20.

MBA Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

21.

Murry and Roberts Hostel

Gauteng

Gauteng Department of Human Settlement

22.

City Deep Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

23.

Mai Mai Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

24.

Stan Hop Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

25.

Rosherville Hostel

Gauteng

City of Johannesburg

26.

Kagiso Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

27.

Green Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

28.

Munsieville Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

29.

Boiketlo Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

30.

Lanmen Hostel

West Rand

Mogale City

31.

Mohlakeng Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

32.

Mohlakeng Madala Old Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

33.

Bekkersdal Hostel

Johannesburg

Rand West City

34.

Khutsong Hostel

West Rand

Merafong City

35.

Foschville Hostel

West Rand

Merafong City

36.

Ratanda Hostel – Protea Street

Gauteng

Lesedi Municipality

37.

Ratanda Hostel – Shalimah Ridge

Gauteng

Lesedi Municipality

38.

Boipatong Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

39.

Sebokeng Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

40.

Kwa-Masiza Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

41.

Sharpville Hostel

Gauteng

Emfuleni Municipality

42.

Saulsville Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

43.

Mamelodi Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

44.

Soshanguve Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

45.

Refilwe

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

46.

Kudube Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane metro

47.

Zithobeni Hostel

Tshwane

Tshwane Metro

48.

Sethokga Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

49.

Mazibuko Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

50.

Nguni Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

51.

Sotho Hostel

Ekurhululeni

Ekurhuleni Metro

52.

Kwa-Thema Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

53.

Wattville Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

54.

Daveyton Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

55.

Thokoza Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

56.

Vusumuzi Hostel / Essellen Park Site

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

57.

Kwesine Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

58.

Buyafuthi Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

59.

Enhlanzeni Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

60.

LTA / Granaker Hostel

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

61.

NCP

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

62.

Park President

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

63.

Peter Faber

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

64.

Police Barracks

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

65.

Selcast

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

66.

Masisulu

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

67.

Clover

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

68.

Dukathole

Ekurhuleni

Ekurhuleni Metro

5. FREE STATE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Masimong 4 Estate

Free State

Matjhabeng LM

2.

Merriespruit 3

Free State

Matjhabeng LM

3.

Zamdela Hostel 4

Free State

Metsimaholo LM

6. KWAZULU NATAL

 

NAME OF THE HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

S J Smith

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

2.

Dalton road

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

3.

Kwamashu

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

4.

Jacobs

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

5.

Glebelands

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

6.

Umlazi “t”/17

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

7.

Kwamakhutha

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

8.

Klaarwater

EThekwini

EThekwini Municipality

9.

East Street

KZN

Provincial Department of Human Settlements

10.

Ikwezi

KZN

Provincial Department of Human Settlements

11.

Enseleni

uMhlathuze

City of uMhlathuze

12.

Esikhaleni (bhambatha)

uMhlathuze

City of uMhlathuze

13.

Enhlalakahle

Umvoti

Umvoti Local Municipality

14.

nkongolwane

KZN

Abaqulusi Local Municipality

15.

Steadville

eMnambithi

eMnambithi Local Municipality

16.

Kwadabeka

KZN

EThekwini Municipality

17.

Thokoza women

KZN

EThekwini Municipality

18.

Shakaville men’s

KwaDukuza

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

19.

Shakaville women’s

KwaDukuza

KwaDukuza Local Municipality

20.

Sibongile

KZN

Endumeni Local Municipality

21.

Sithembile

KZN

Endumeni Local Municipality

22.

nkanyezi

eManambithi

eManambithi Local Municipality

23.

Bhekuzulu

KZN

Abaqulusi Local Municpality

7. WESTERN CAPE

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Worcester, Russel Skema 22

Breede Valley

Breede Valley Municipality

2.

Paarl, Paarl Mbekweni B & C Hostels

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality

3.

Paarl (East), Dube Village Houses (Hostel

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality,

4.

Paarl, White City Hostels

Drakenstein

Drakenstein Municipality,

5.

Nduli, Ceres, V3

Witzenberg

Witzenberg Municipality,

6.

Zwelihle, Zwelihle, Shandu street

Overstrand

Overstrand Municipality,

7.

Caledon, Santa, Caledon

Theewaterskloof

Theewaterskloof Municipality

8.

Caledon, Kromco, Caledon - Botrivier

Western Cape

Provincial Government

9.

Grabouw, Hillside,

Theewaterskloof

National Public Works

10.

Grabouw, Waterwese,

Theewaterskloof

Water Affairs & Forestry

11.

Velddrif, Hostel Project

Western Cape

Berg River Municipality,

12.

Clanwilliam, Scheme House,

Cape Town

Cederberg Municipality,

13.

George, Rosemore Units for the aged,

George

George Municipality,

14.

Nelspoort, Nursing House,

Beaufort West

Beaufort West Municipality,

15.

Langa Old Flats

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro,

16.

Langa New Flats,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro,

17.

Blue Line Hostel, Zone 1-16, Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

18.

Dura Hostels, Zones 2 & 16,Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

19.

Cape Foundary, Zone 2,Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

20.

North Barracks Hostels,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

21.

Zones:1,2,17,18,19,20,23,24 &26

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

22.

LTA Hostels,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

23.

Police Quarters, Zone 2 & 5, Langa

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

24.

Cape Metro, Zone 2

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

25.

Wespico, Zone 2

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

26.

Nyanga: J - Section,

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

27.

R.J Southey Hostel, NY 61, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

28.

Simcor Hostel , NY 61, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

29.

Martin and East, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

30.

Lupini and Tate, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

31.

R.H Morris, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

32.

Stocks & Stocks, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

33.

Wonder Coat, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

34.

Renown, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

35.

Gorrie and Findlay, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

36.

Gordon Verhoef and Krause, NY 64, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

37.

Lingelihle Hostel, NY 110, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

38.

Cape Oil, NY 121, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

39.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76 (Block 7), Block G29 1-28, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

40.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76, NY 61, NY 64 and NY 67 (Block5), (Block G1-18 and 488), Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

41.

Guguletu Hostel NY 76, NY 61, NY 64 and NY 67 (Block5), (Block G1-18 and 488), Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

42.

Guguletu 64(Block3)Block G23-25,27 A & B, 28 A & B, 32, 49 and 50, Guguletu

Cape Town

Cape Town Metro

8.NORTH WEST

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Dube Hostel

Tlokwe

Information is not available.

2.

Mafikeng Rental TBA

Mafikeng

Information not available.

3.

Jouberton Hostel

Matlosana

Information is not available.

9. LIMPOPO

 

NAME OF HOSTEL

LOCATION

OWNER

1.

Tshikota Hostel

Makhado

Information is not available.

2.

Talana Hostel

Greater Tzaneen

Information is not available.

3.

Seshego Hostel

Polokwane

Information is not available.

4.

Marapong Hostel

Polokwane

Information is not available.

1. (a) (b) (iii) it must be noted that currently, the government does not have any legal authority/jurisdiction over privately owned hostels, and as such details required for this question are not held by any domain of government.

1. (a) (b) (iv), it must also be noted that government has no legal authority/jurisdiction over private hostels which have been built on public land (grey hostels), and as such details required for this question are not held by any domain of government.

2. The department does not regard grey hostels as public housing. The reason is, that such hostels are not subsidized by government funds and are owned by the private sector although some may be on government land. The private owners can sell to the government and or enter into partnership with the government such that these hostels can be used as part of other housing programmes that are meant for public housing.

23 May 2022 - NW1400

Profile picture: Matumba, Mr A

Matumba, Mr A to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What plans have been put in place to relocate persons living in hostels to a decent residential area in order to restore their dignity and discontinue the legacy of apartheid which placed black persons in crowded inhumane environments?

Reply:

The Department has a programme called the Community Residential Units (CRU) which provides grant funding to provinces and municipalities for the upgrading, conversion, or complete redevelopment of existing government owned rental stock, including hostels. It is a 100% subsidy funded programme that targets low income persons and households earning below R3 500 per month who are unable to access existing formal private rental options. The CRU programme provides family oriented accommodation typologies which usually comprises of separate bedrooms and living areas as opposed to previous hostels which were designed with the intention of housing single sex migrant labourers. The programme is available to all provinces and municipalities with hostels that are publicly owned.

23 May 2022 - NW1367

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date does she envisage that her Department will provide housing to the community of ward 8 in Kagisano-Molopo Local municipality, following empty promises that were made to the residents by the specified municipality in 2016?

Reply:

The Department including the North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements, is not aware of such a commitment made by the municipality. However, the Department will engage communities, and municipalities in order to undertake the necessary pre-planning and detailed planning processes, construct houses and thereafter allocate to qualifying beneficiaries.

20 May 2022 - NW1582

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Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract , what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

a) The Department has not concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

b) None of the Human Settlement Entities have concluded commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or any entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017.

20 May 2022 - NW1711

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date will her department allocate houses to the community of Ward 33 in the Moses Kotane Local Municipality which has been waiting for their subsidised houses since 2018?

Reply:

The North West Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that it is currently seized with the installation of engineering services. Once completed, housing construction will commence and thereafter qualifying beneficiaries will be allocated houses as soon as construction is completed.

18 May 2022 - NW1406

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)What (a) are the reasons that the Reconstruction and Development Project which was initiated by her department in 2009-10 financial year at Tiyani and/or Magoro Village in the Collins Chabane Local Municipality has been abandoned and (b) total amount of the allocated budget was spent by her department?

Reply:

1. (a) The total number of units allocated to Tiyani/Magoro Village in Collins Chabane Local Municipality was 77. The number of units completed is 76 and the remaining one unit is at a wall plate level. The contractor is currently at a final stage for completion and the project is not abandoned.

(b) The total budget allocated was R 6,366,849.92. The total budget spent by the Department is R 6,317,529.47. The remaining amount of R49,320.45 will be paid after the completion of the outstanding unit.

09 May 2022 - NW1341

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With regard to the apartheid era migrant labour hostels, what total number of (a) persons currently reside in (i) public, (ii) private and/or (iii) grey hostels and (b) hostel complexes (i) remain unrefurbished and/or (ii) are transformed into family units in each metropolitan area; (2) Whether any other hostels, not included in the above three categories, remain unrefurbished and/or untransformed; if not; what is the position in this regard; if, (a) how does her department intend to transform each of the specified hostels into family units and (b) by what date does she envisage each planned transformation will be completed?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) (ii) (iii) The hostel environment together with the nomadic nature of occupants have proven to be a difficult task for municipalities as managing agents to keep track of the number of persons occupying units. Illegal invasions together with sub-letting has exacerbated this problem to such an extent that most legal lease holders cannot be found. Provincial departments together with their respective municipalities are only responsible for government-owned rental accommodation and as such are not responsible for private rental accommodation or grey hostels (which include a component of private ownership).

(b)(i) (ii) The following table illustrates the hostels that have been transformed into family units as well as those which have not been refurbished in each metropolitan area:

Province

Metropolitan Area

Number of hostels not refurbished

Number of hostels transformed into family units

Gauteng

Ekurhuleni Metro

20

1

 

Johannesburg Metro

14

8

 

Tshwane Metro

3

2

Western Cape

City of Cape Town

5

1

KZN

eThekwini Metro

11

9

Free State

Mangaung Metro

No public hostels

Eastern Cape

Buffalo City Metro

No public hostels

 

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro

No public hostels

2. Hostels are grouped into three categories only, that is: public, private and grey hostels.

(a) The Department is only responsible for public sector hostels and is currently transforming hostels into family units using the Community Residential Units (CRU) programme. The programme provides grant funding to provinces and municipalities for the upgrading, conversion, or complete redevelopment of existing government owned rental stock, including hostels.

(b) Due to the vast size of hostels and limited budget, all hostel projects are undertaken in phases and planned over a span of 10 to 30 years, therefore it is very difficult to put the exact date for the completion of the transformation of the hostels into family units.

25 April 2022 - NW610

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date will the Reconstruction and Development Programme houses in ward 6 in Mamusa Local Municipality that were started in 2015, but left incomplete be completed?

Reply:

According to the response received from the Provincial Department of Human Settlements, It is anticipated that the houses will be concluded by 31 December 2022. However, it must be mentioned that since the inception of the project, two contractors have been appointed, one in 2015 and the second one in 2017, both abandoned the project. The project currently has the following milestones:

  • 121 Foundations,
  • 79 Wall plates and
  • 10 Completed units

The Department has since allocated its internal Inspectors, NHBRC, and the Planning Unit through the assistance and appointment of a Quantity Surveyor to further ascertain the milestones on the ground and determine the costs before the appointment of another contractor.

19 April 2022 - NW1069

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Given that 29 informal settlements were identified throughout the Republic for her department’s Transitional Residential Housing Units and De-densification directive, (a) which of the 29 informal settlements were not de-densified and provided with transitional residential housing units as per the directive and (b) what is the reason that the directive was not implemented in each specified settlement. (2) whether the informal settlements are still, as initially identified, a priority for de-densification; if not, what communication and/or engagement with the residents have taken place to inform them of the reasons for the failure to implement the Transitional Residential Housing Units and De-densification directive; if so, by what date will the specified directive be implemented in each informal settlement where it has not been implemented. (3) whether any additional settlements have been identified since the first 29 informal settlements were identified; if not, why not; if so, (a) which informal settlements and (b) what progress has been made with each specified settlement?

Reply:

1. According information provided by provinces:

1(a) and (b)

Province

a) Settlements not de-densified and provided with TRUs

b) Reasons that the de-densification was not implemented

Gauteng

(7 projects)

3 projects were not de-densified.

1 project was in the process of constructing 1500 TRUs

2 projects constructed the TRUs where 454 and 62 TRUs were completed

1 project of families being relocated to finished units was completed

IPs expired and projects were handed back to the City of Johannesburg

SMME’s demanded the appointed contractors to sub-contract 100% of the work which rendered the project financially non-viable for the appointed contractors.

Limpopo

(5 projects)

1 project was suspended by COGHSTA

1 project completed 40 TRUs

3 projects were completed for augmentation of services

Project was suspended because of challenges around the other TRU project

Northwest

(2 projects)

1 project was not completed

1 project was for augmentation of services

Could not secure suitable land

Eastern Cape

(3 projects)

1 project completed 465 TRUs

1 project completed 1088 serviced sites

1 project completed augmentation of basic services

N/A

Western Cape

(3 projects)

3 projects were not de-densified

N/A

Northern Cape

(3 projects)

3 projects were completed for augmentation of services

N/A

KZN

(2 projects)

1 project of relocation into permanent units was completed

1 project of augmentation of basic services was completed

N/A

Free State

(3 projects)

3 projects of augmentation of basic services were completed

N/A

Mpumalanga

(1 project)

1 project of augmentation of basic services was completed

N/A

(2) The engagement with the community is an ongoing process, the Municipalities, Provinces and the HDA are looking at alternative ways to ensure the de-densification of the informal settlements under the UISP programme.

(3) No additional settlements have been identified under the COVID 19 interventions, but informal settlements are dealt with under the Informal Settlement Upgrading Programme.

07 April 2022 - NW996

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) On what date did Ms Bathabile Dlamini cease to be employed as the Chairperson of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority and (b) what was the total remuneration paid to the specified person from the date of employment until the employment was terminated?

Reply:

a) Council Members of the Social Housing Regulatory Authority are not employees of the entity but are appointed in terms of Section 9(2) of the Social Housing Act, 16 of 2008.

b)n Ms Dlamini was appointed as a Member of Council from 28 October 2019 to 25 November 2021.

c)  According to the SHRA audited annual reports, the 2019/20 and 2020/21 following remuneration was paid to Ms Dlamini:

2019/20 - R 77 031.00

2020/21 - R 108 871.00

d) The 2021/22 the audited amounts are not yet available

06 April 2022 - NW836

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)What has she found are the legal and material impacts of the Protection of Personal Information Act, Act 4 of 2013 (POPI) on the Sectional Titles Schemes Management Act, Act 8 of 2011 (STSMA), and Regulations; (2) whether the Community Schemes Ombud Service received any legal opinions on the matter; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with a copy of such legal opinions; (3) whether any adjudicators have received training on any material impacts of the POPI Act; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is being done to ensure that management agencies and boards (i) still have access to all relevant member information and (ii) are able to disseminate this information openly and transparently as before and (b) steps should home owners take to access contact information for members of their respective schemes and body corporates?

Reply:

1. The purpose of the Protection of Personal Information Act (POPI) Act, is to protect data subjects (internal and external stakeholders of the Community Schemes Ombud Service) from security breaches such as unauthorised dissemination of personal information belonging to or relating to data subjects, amongst others. The POPI Act achieves this goal by outlining 8 principles which data processors, such as the Community Schemes Ombud Service and scheme executives, must adhere to when collecting, processing, storing and deleting personal information belonging to internal and external stakeholders. Like most entities, the POPI Act has changed the manner in which the Community Schemes Ombud Service and scheme executives engage with personal information. Some of the legal and material impacts introduced by the POPI Act and experienced by the Community Schemes Ombud Service include:

(a) At an operational level, amending the agreements concluded with third party service providers and ensuring that they are bound by the responsibilities and principles of the POPI Act when processing information given for purposes of delivering or providing services to the Community Schemes Ombud Service. All entities regulated by the POPI Act are required to have similar provisions which give effect to the POPI principle in their contracts with third parties such as managing agents.

(b) The development and implementation of the entity’s POPI Compliance Framework which consists of the POPI Policy, Manual, Breach Incident Policy, Flow Charts and Risk Register. In addition, the Community Schemes Ombud Service procured the services of an expert service provider to facilitate training sessions for all business units and staff of the Community Schemes Ombud Service on the compliance requirements.

(c) Adoption of data protection standards aimed at ensuring that personal information is collected, processed, and stored lawfully.

(d) In relation to all community schemes, the 8 principles governing the collection, storing, and processing of personal information belonging to members of a community scheme are also applicable. Community Schemes should only collect personal information necessary for the purpose for collection and further put in place measures which protect such personal information belonging to members and their visitors from unauthorised disclosure or theft. Failure to do so will result in the imposition of fines or other enforcement steps taken by the Information Regulator. Accordingly, all entities need to invest in the resources they have identified to ensure that the principles of the POPI Act are upheld.

(2) Since the implementation of the Community Schemes Ombud Service POPI Act Compliance Framework the entity has not experienced any queries or challenges relating to the POPI Act necessitating the sourcing of external legal advice in the form of formal legal opinions from external attorneys. All queries have been from internal business units and legal guidance and support has been provided by the Community Schemes Ombud Service Legal Section.

(3) During 2021, the Community Schemes Ombud Service provided training to all business units, including its adjudicators, on the 8 principles of the POPI Act and its impact on the relevant business unit. Continuous refresher training is also being offered by the Community Schemes Ombud Service Legal Team together with the POPI Act expert service provider as and when requested by the business unit.

(a) & (b) The POPI Act has not changed the type or nature of information which scheme executives, managing agents or body corporates can obtain from their members. The POPI Act has changed the manner, in other words how scheme executives go about in collecting, storing and processing their personal information and as already mentioned above, all community schemes need to do so in accordance with the principles set out in POPI Act.

04 April 2022 - NW852

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Minister and (iii) officials of her department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

1. The Department of Human Settlements has:

(a) An expenditure on catering of R 47 306 107.81 for the period stipulated

(b) An expenditure on entertainment of R 166 708.04 for the period stipulated

(c) An expenditure on accommodation for:

(i) Minister R 1 171 035.97; and including her staff R 5 278 335.85

(ii) Deputy Minister R 849 375.85; and including her staff R 3 182 717.12

(iii) The Department R 23 449 728.33

02 April 2022 - NW732

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Whether her Department has held accountable any officials who were involved in the awarding of the tender for 40 temporary tin shelters in Talana outside Tzaneen in Limpopo, if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In August 2010, Limpopo Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs partnered with the Housing Development Agency (HDA) to, assist the Department with among other things, to ensure accelerated delivery of Sustainable Human Settlements in the Province.

In May/ June 2021, the Limpopo Department of Human Settlements appointed Housing Development Agency (HDA) as the implementing agent for the the construction of Transitional Residential Units (TRUs) following an assessment of the residential situation at Talana Hostel, Tzaneen, where it was evident that the settlement was highly congested and posed a risk of spreading the cvid-19 virus.

The Agency, in turn, appointed the contractor, Aventino Group CC through its procurement processes to carry out the actual work of construction of Transitional Residential Units (TRUs) at a total cost of R15 750 000 for supply and installation of basic engineering services for 142 Transitional Residential Units (TRUs). To date the Agency paid a total amount of R2 577 640 00 after the completion of forty (40) out of 142 TRUs. The money was paid in two (2) tranches) of R1 095 497 on 22 July and R1 482 143 on 24 July as reflected in the bank records of Aventino. The cost per unit, according to the appointment letter, amounted to R64 441 00. Specification for the construction of the TRUs were set out in the scope of work (Terms of Reference). A written contract was entered into between the Housing Development Agency and Aventino.

After the media uproar and public outcry following the official handover of the Transitional Residential Units (TRUs) by the Premier, the Department of Human Settlements requested the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) to conduct an investigation into the TRUs. The findings of the investigation revealed the following,

  1. The defects found in the TRUs are major structural and non-structural defects
  2. The TRUs are not safe and pose a public health and safety hazard to inhabitants and other persons in their vicinity, and
  3. The workmanship is generally poor and doesn’t meet the level of accuracy required in building construction.

Based on the findings of NHBRC investigation, the Housing Development Agency appointed a law firm (ENS) to assist with the internal investigations into allegations against its employees. Subsequently, three (3) officials were placed on precautionary leave and subject to disciplinary process. One of the officials has since resigned from the organization and the other two were issued with final written warnings as part of consequence management.

Furthermore the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (the Hawks) conducted an investigation with regard to this contract/ tender. To date, the Director of Aventino as well as the Housing Development Agency (HDA) Manager who was involved in the awarding of tender were arrested.

Based on the investigation conducted by the hawks and the public protector office, it is confirmed that there were no officials from the Department who were involved in the awarding of tender for 142 temporary Transitional Residential Units (TRUs). The contractor was appointed and paid by the Housing Development Agency. It must be noted that, the Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs had not transferred any funds to Agency for this contract.

01 April 2022 - NW609

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her Department has resolved the problem of expenditure on transfers that were not captured in the funds of segment of the Basic Accounting System; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Department has not experienced problems of not capturing expenditure on transferred funds in the Basic Accounting System (BAS)

Internally, the National Department:

  • Captures all Human Settlements Grant funds to be transferred/ disbursed to both Provinces and Metros on the Basic Accounting System (BAS) as per the monthly Payment Schedules approved by the National Treasury
  • All transfers that could not be effected on scheduled dates were re-scheduled in consultation with the National Treasury. The rescheduling was done immediately when the Basic Accounting System (BAS) would reject captured payments.

On Provinces’ capturing of transferred funds on BAS, the responses from Provinces are as follows:

 

Province

Details

1

Eastern Cape

All of the Province’s Conditional Grants and related expenditure and payments are paid through and captured on BAS, against the relevant segments and are accounted for.

2

Free State

The Province confirmed that expenditure on transfers is recorded against the correct BAS segment types. Monthly reconciliations are performed to ensure accuracy and completeness of transactions.

3

Gauteng:

The Province captures all transfers under the Funds segment on the Basic Accounting System within the SCOA framework.

4

Limpopo

The Province has never had a problem of capturing expenditure of transferred funds on BAS. All incurred expenditures are indicated under the fund segment, whether they are HSDG or ISUPG or PEHG payments.

5

Kwa-Zulu-Natal

The province has never experienced such a problem. All of the Province’s expenditure on BAS are captured against the Fund segment i.e. Human Settlement Development Grant, ISUPG, Voted Funds, etc. There is no expenditure captured without the full 8 segments of BAS.

6

Mpumalanga

The Province does not have expenditure on transfers that is not captured on Basic Accounting System. All incurred expenditure on transfers is recorded on BAS.

7

Northern Cape

All of the Province’s Conditional Grants’ expenditure are transferred through and captured on both the Housing Subsidy System and Basic Accounting System.

8

North West

The Province has not had an instance where expenditure was inappropriately captured for the fund segment in BAS. Loading of budget for grant funding is done specifically under conditional funds allocation in BAS and related expenditure is also reported under same. The only challenge previously experienced was that, budget and related expenditure were reported under incorrect interventions but under the correct fund segment.

9

Western Cape

The Province captures every cent spent on either the HSDG or and ISUPG on BAS and the HSS.

01 April 2022 - NW880

Profile picture: Kopane, Ms SP

Kopane, Ms SP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

a) (i) Nil

(ii) Nil

(aa) Nil

(bb) Nil

b) (i) Nil

(ii) Nil

(iii) Nil

c) Nil

 

 

N LETSHOLONYANE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: CORPORATE SERVICES

DATE:

QUESTION FOR WITTEN REPLY

QUESTION NUMBER: PQ 880 [NW1061E]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 11 MARCH 2022

Recommended/not recommended

M TSHANGANA

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

__________________________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

MS M T KUBAY, MP

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

01 April 2022 - NW608

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her Department has resolved the problem of expenditure on transfers that were not captured in the funds of segment of the Basic Accounting System; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Department has not experienced problems of not capturing expenditure on transferred funds in the Basic Accounting System (BAS)

Internally, the National Department:

  • Captures all Human Settlements Grant funds to be transferred/ disbursed to both Provinces and Metros on the Basic Accounting System (BAS) as per the monthly Payment Schedules approved by the National Treasury
  • All transfers that could not be effected on scheduled dates were re-scheduled in consultation with the National Treasury. The rescheduling was done immediately when the Basic Accounting System (BAS) would reject captured payments.

On Provinces’ capturing of transferred funds on BAS, the responses from Provinces are as follows:

 

Province

Details

1

Eastern Cape

All of the Province’s Conditional Grants and related expenditure and payments are paid through and captured on BAS, against the relevant segments and are accounted for.

2

Free State

The Province confirmed that expenditure on transfers is recorded against the correct BAS segment types. Monthly reconciliations are performed to ensure accuracy and completeness of transactions.

3

Gauteng:

The Province captures all transfers under the Funds segment on the Basic Accounting System within the SCOA framework.

4

Limpopo

The Province has never had a problem of capturing expenditure of transferred funds on BAS. All incurred expenditures are indicated under the fund segment, whether they are HSDG or ISUPG or PEHG payments.

5

Kwa-Zulu-Natal

The province has never experienced such a problem. All of the Province’s expenditure on BAS are captured against the Fund segment i.e. Human Settlement Development Grant, ISUPG, Voted Funds, etc. There is no expenditure captured without the full 8 segments of BAS.

6

Mpumalanga

The Province does not have expenditure on transfers that is not captured on Basic Accounting System. All incurred expenditure on transfers is recorded on BAS.

7

Northern Cape

All of the Province’s Conditional Grants’ expenditure are transferred through and captured on both the Housing Subsidy System and Basic Accounting System.

8

North West

The Province has not had an instance where expenditure was inappropriately captured for the fund segment in BAS. Loading of budget for grant funding is done specifically under conditional funds allocation in BAS and related expenditure is also reported under same. The only challenge previously experienced was that, budget and related expenditure were reported under incorrect interventions but under the correct fund segment.

9

Western Cape

The Province captures every cent spent on either the HSDG or and ISUPG on BAS and the HSS.