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08 April 2024 - NW827

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

In light of the torrential rains and floods that affected the province of KwaZulu-Natal in 2021, (a) how many households (i) were affected, (b) needed urgent attention, (ii) have since been rebuilt by her department and (b) how many of the affected houses are owned by indigent individuals in the district of uThukela?

Reply:

a) (i) According to the report from the KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements (KZN-DHS), there were no torrential rains and floods in KwaZulu-Natal in 2021.

b) Not applicable

(ii)Not applicable

c) Not applicable

08 April 2024 - NW746

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether there are still projects of Reconstruction and Development Programme houses that remain unfinished to date; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the reasons behind the delays, (b)(i) time frames have been put in place to complete the specified projects and (ii) total amount required for the completion and (c) are the relevant details regarding the stages of completion?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements still has a number of incomplete/blocked projects in relation to the BNG houses that were formerly known as the RDPs. These incomplete projects spread across all nine provinces. However, there has been a significant improvement in unblocking these projects.

(a)(i)

Provinces have cited a number of contributory factors to the delays in completing the blocked projects that they are expected to finalise. Some of the reasons mentioned by provinces are as follows:

  • Lack of bulk infrastructure in most of the areas where blocked projects are located.
  • Difficult terrains leading to double handling fees on the contractor’s side.
  • The structural assessments conducted by NHBRC on incomplete projects takes too long in some instances.
  • Scattered nature of projects and etc

Considering that these projects have been left incomplete for too long, they are usually exposed harsh weather conditions for years on the ground and provinces are expected to conduct structural tests before the reconstruction of the incomplete units. The structural assessment is the prerequisite which will determine the structural integrity for each structure on the ground. This will assist in determining the cost of the projects particularly where there are existing structures.

(b)(i)

During my visit to Free State Province in 2021, I discovered a number of incomplete/blocked that were not being prioritised for completion. As the responsible Minister of the portfolio, I issued a directive to all provinces to complete the unfinished/blocked projects within a period of three years starting from financial year 2022/23, 2023/24 and 2024/25.

(b)(ii)

There is no dedicated funding that is allocated to provinces to complete the blocked projects. These projects are funded through their allocations on Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and they are at different milestones.

Considering that NHBRC is still conducting structural assessments in other areas, it will not be possible to provide an exact amount required to complete these projects as the expected expenditure is informed by the final structural assessment reports.

(c)

During 2022, as a sector we were able to identify three thousand four hundred and forty-five (3445) and to date, provinces have since completed three thousand one hundred and fifty (3150) projects.

02 April 2024 - NW435

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Herron, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

1. Given that the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, announced in January 2024 that R1 billion has been allocated to build 4 000 Houses in the Northern Cape,(a) What is the breakdown of the R1 billion allocation, (b) In which municipalities will her department build the specified houses, (c) What total number of houses will her department build in specified municipality and (d) What housing typology such as Breaking New Ground, Social housing and First Home Finance, Subsidy Assistance housing will be built in each development. 2. What preparation for the projects has been completed. 3. (a) by what date will the project(s) start and (b) What are the relevant details for each location of the R1 billion housing project; 4. By what date will the 4,000 housing be fully completed and occupied?

Reply:

1. (a) What is the breakdown of the R1 billion allocation

According to the Northern Cape Department of Human Settlements, the breakdown of the R1 billion (R600 million funded by DBSA loan and R400 million funded by the province) will yield 4 168 units from 67 projects which will be delivered in two phases across 15 municipalities listed below.

(b) In which municipalities will her department build the specified houses

The Northern Cape Department of Human Settlements will construct houses in the following fifteen (15) municipalities houses: (1) !Kheis (2) Dawid Kruiper (3) Emthanjeni (4) Hantam (5) Joe Morolong (6) Kamiesberg (7) Khaima (8) Namakhoi (9) Phokwane (10) Richtersveld (11) Siyancuma (12) Sol Plaatje (13) Thembelihle (14) Ubuntu and (15) Umsobomvu

(c) What total number of houses will her department build in each specific municipality -

The Northern Cape Department of Human Settlements will construct the houses in two phases as follows:

Phase one of the project comprises the construction of 2,500 housing units at a total budget of R600 million in 14 local municipalities in the Northern Cape Province.

The municipalities with majority of the houses are the Joe Morolong Local Municipality, which has 560 houses, Dawid Kruiper Local Municipality, which has 450 houses, and Sol Plaatjie, which has 383 houses. The remaining houses will be delivered by the following local municipalities: 180 houses in Khaima; 150 houses in Siyancuma; 143 houses in Namakhoi; 130 houses in Hantam; 120 houses in Kamiesberg; 108 houses in Thembelihle; 71 houses in Phokwane; 50 houses in Keis; 55 houses in Richtersveld; 50 houses in Umsobomvu; and 5 houses in Emthanjebi.

Table 1: Local Municipalities, Targets and Budgets for Phase One

Phase two of the project constitutes eight local municipalities in the Northern Cape Province which will deliver 1 668 houses estimated to cost R400 million.

The municipalities with most houses include Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality which has 665 houses, Joe Morolong which has 350 houses, and Phokwane which has 246 houses. The local municipalities that will deliver the remaining houses include: 110 houses in Siyancuma; 107 houses in Emthanjebi; 100 houses in Thembelihle; 50 houses in Umsobomvu; and 40 houses in Ubuntu.

Table 2: Local Municipalities, Targets and Budgets for Phase Two

(d) What housing typology, such as Breaking New Ground (BNG), Social Housing, and First Home Finance & Subsidy Assistance housing will be built in each development;

The Integrated Residential Development Programme, which will provide BNG units, and the Rural Housing Programme, which will provide rural dwelling units, are the two housing programmes that will provide the two sets of housing typologies. BNG units will also be delivered in brownfields and existing settlements in the designated municipalities.

2. What preparations for the project(s) has been completed;

With respect to Phase one (R600 million) funded by the DBSA loan, all project preparation, township establishment processes, installation of basic services and servicing of sites are complete. For Phase two (R400 miilion) funded by the province, the planning processes are in progress. The construction of Phase two projects are expected to commence once Phase one is complete.

3. (a) by what date will the project(s) start

Phase one of the project will commence on 1 April 2024 and is estimated to be completed by 31 March 2025. Phase two of the project will commence upon the completion of Phase one.

(b) what are the relevant details for each location of the R1 billion housing project;

There are 67 projects in total located in the 15 municipalities as listed in tables one and two above.

4. By what date will the 4,000 housing units be fully completed and occupied?

Phase one which comprises 2500 houses is estimate to be complete by 31 March 2025. These units will be progressively occupied by qualifying beneficiaries as when they are ready. Phase two comprises 1668 houses and will commence once Phase one is complete.

28 March 2024 - NW710

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she will furnish Mr Malatsi with a (a) list and (b) full description of all events planned by her department to take place before 29 May in celebration of the 30 years of democracy in the Republic, including the (i) projected total cost or expenditure of each event and (ii) breakdown thereof in terms of expenditure for (aa) catering, (bb) entertainment, (cc) venue hire, (dd) transport and (ee) accommodation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The department doesn’t have any activities planned between now and 29 May 2024 to celebrate 30yrs of democracy. (a) N/A (b)N/A (i) N/A, (ii)N/A (aa) N/A (bb) N/A (cc) N/A (dd) N/A (ee) N/A.

25 March 2024 - NW398

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

How many houses has her department built since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

The Department of Human Settlements manage to build two hundred and forty-five, five hundred and eighty-seven (245 587) houses since 1 January 2019 to date (which is only for quarter one to quarter three of the current financial year. These houses were built throughout the nine provinces as per the breakdown on the below table.

Province

18/19

(Q4)

19/20

20/21

21/22

22/23

23/24

(Q1-Q3)

Total

EC

1 126

8 757

5 427

6 833

5 550

3 455

31 148

FS

761

2 290

1 890

1 647

311

188

7 087

GP

2 593

12 153

9 495

7 354

6 982

4 803

43 380

KZN

4 743

15 737

10 315

12 033

9 325

7 593

59 746

LP

3 954

8 135

4 518

4 269

4 808

6 200

31 884

MP

250

6 710

4 522

2 955

1 900

1 300

17 637

NC

96

620

221

591

173

84

1 785

NW

1 653

6 739

2 847

2 734

3 918

2 768

20 659

WC

3 007

8 184

6 354

6 200

5 665

2 851

32 261

Total

18 183

69 325

45 589

44 616

38 632

29 424

245 587

20 March 2024 - NW600

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Malatsi, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 89 on 20 February 2023, what are the details of the (a) make, (b) model, (c) Year of manufacture, (d) date of purchase and (e) purchase price paid for each vehicle purchased by her department for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since 8 May 2019?

Reply:

1. The Department of Human Settlements purchased the following vehicles, since 8 May 2019:

(a) AUDI.

(b) Q5 40 TDI.

(c) 2022.

(d) (i) Minister, none.

(ii) the Deputy Minister, 27 July 2022 and

(e) Purchase price for:

(i) Minister, none.

(ii) the Deputy Minister, R 795 280.97.

07 March 2024 - NW365

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What specific measurements has her department put in place to ensure that houses built by the Government for persons living with disabilities, particularly those who are wheelchair-bound, are indeed adapted to cater for their needs?

Reply:

The Department issued the National Norms and Standards for the Creation of Serviced Stands, the Construction of Stand Alone and Higher Density Semi-Detached and Three Storey Walk-up Residential Dwellings which are financed through National Housing Programmes. Part of the norms and standards cater for persons living with disabilities, including persons who use wheelchairs. As a minimum, the standards prescribe that a subsidised house for a person living with disabilities must be forty-five square meters (45m2) in gross floor area as size. Additionally, an increased space must be allocated for the bathroom to enable ease of mobility, while accommodating specialised items such as handrails. Other items that cater for persons living with disability include:

  • Access to the house: 12 square metres (12m2)of paving and ramp at the doorway
  • Grab rails and lever action taps in the bathroom (enlargement of the area can be done at the expense of the rest of the house)
  • Visual doorbell indicators

The above-listed provisions serve to cater for people using walking aids, wheelchair-partial usage and persons who are partially or profoundly deaf.

It is important to note that the policy also permits that in instances wherein a member of a beneficiary's household is disabled, a variation to the subsidy amount is made available to cater for them.

Furthermore, the policy allows that if a person who has already owned a subsidised property becomes disabled, or if any of his or her dependents become disabled, the Provincial Department concerned may award the beneficiary an increase in the subsidy amount by a maximum amount in line with the classification/category of disability. This addition to the subsidy amount is determined taking into account the severity of a person’s disability and the cost of providing assistance measures to cater for the specific disability.

Similarly, the Department has introduced a Special Housing Needs Subsidy Programme to provide group housing to persons with special housing needs and for people suffering from various other disabilities who require assisted housing. This programme is being implemented in partnership with the Department of Social Development.

In 2023, the Department pronounced on the revision of the quantum which included the installation of burglar bars in their houses to ensure their security.

06 March 2024 - NW39

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether there are systemic issues and/or broader challenges in the implementation of the plan to construct 1 million houses in Stjwetla; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures have been taken to address the challenges to ensure the timely delivery of housing, not only in Alexandra, but also nationwide. 2) In light of the above the collaboration with stakeholders in Stjwetla, how does her department intend to extend its engagement to the national level, fostering collaboration with various political parties, community leaders and advocacy groups, to create a comprehensive strategy for addressing housing issues whilst ensuring transparency and avoiding similar delays in other regions of the Republic?

Reply:

  1. The government never announced any programme to implement 1 million houses in Stwetla. Further. the land in which the Stjwetla Informal Settlement is located is not suitable for human habitation. However, there are portions of land parcels in Frankenstein and Linksfield areas where the City of Johannesburg is finalising plans with various stakeholders to build approximately 40,000 (forty thousand) houses to cater, including those in the Stjwetla informal settlement households.
  2. The City of Joburg is engaging with the residents through the ward councillor, and the leadership in the affected areas in and around Stjwetla. The City of Joburg has through the appointed consultants also established a broad Social Facilitation, Communications and Stakeholder Plan to foster collaboration among all key stakeholders including but not limited to all spheres of government, various affected communities through their community leaders and advocacy groups.

05 March 2024 - NW339

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the full details of all (a) sponsorships. (b) donations and (c) financial transfers provided for lawfare and/or any other purpose to (i) her, (ii) her department and (iii) officials of her department by any (aa) Qatari, (bb) Iranian and/or (cc) Russian organ of state, organisation and/or resident since 1 January 2021 up to the latest date in 2024 for which information is available??

Reply:

The Minister, her department and officials of her department did not receive any sponsorships, donations and or financial transfers by any Qatari, Iranian and or Russian organ of state.

26 February 2024 - NW35

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What measures (a) have been put in place to address the threat of sinkholes to human lives when constructing houses in dolomitic areas and (b) are implemented to ensure the safety and well-being of residents inhabiting the houses in the specified areas?

Reply:

a) The South African National Standards (SANS) 1936-1: Development of Dolomite Land, which was developed by South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) sets out requirements for the development of dolomitic land. The SANS 1936-1thus ensures that people live and work in an environment that is understood by society to be acceptably safe, where loss of assets is within tolerable limits, and where cost-effective and sustainable land usage is achieved. The said standards are applicable to all the three spheres of government to avoid hazards associated with dolomite, especially in areas where the building of residential properties should be prohibited to eliminate the loss of life. In areas where the building of residential units is permitted, mitigation measures are put in place in the form of land use permitted in the Municipal Zoning Scheme. With this consideration, the Department provides guidance through the National Housing Code of 2009, which is based on the classification identified in SANS 1936-1: Development of Dolomite Land. Additionally, site rehabilitation measures have been introduced to ensure that houses are built on stable ground and the appropriate foundation is put in place. Moreover, the National Housing Code of 2009 entails maps of various provinces which designate dolomitic areas, to ensure that careful consideration is given during development, and that appropriate studies are conducted before actual construction can occur, to ensure safe environments.

b) To ensure the safety and well-being of citizens located in the dolomitic areas, a stringent process is followed. Part of this process is that prior to any housing project development, a feasibility study has to be undertaken to ascertain that the land can be developed. Once the feasibility study has been undertaken, a Geotech study is conducted to gather the physical characteristics of the soil and rocks on a site to ensure that if dolomitic rock is found, the site is rehabilitated where necessary, and proper foundations are designed. For projects that are developed in the dolomitic areas, conventional foundations such as strip or spot footings are often used in the building of houses where the risk of sinkhole forming is found to be adequate. Moreover, compacted soil mattresses that serve as a flexible reinforcement are used to strengthen structures on areas underlain by dolomite. In areas where sinkhole formation poses an immediate danger to the inhabitants of houses, the relevant municipalities (in consultation with the provincial departments of human settlements and all relevant stakeholders) are to consider the upgrading of aging or affected infrastructure or the identification and preparation of well-located and suitable land for the resettlement of affected households. The National Department of Human Settlements monitors compliance with technical specifications through analysis of business plans of Provinces and Metros, wherein the geotechnical reports should form part of the supporting evidence prior to development in dolomitic areas.

26 February 2024 - NW78

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the details of the (a) impact of the task team that was set up to deal with procurement challenges in each province since its establishment and (b) steps that she intends to take to address the lack of impact of the task team?

Reply:

(a) & (b). Only one Team was established and deployed in the Free State Province to assist in addressing the procurement challenges. The Team has made a remarkable positive impact in turning around the procurement challenges in the province, with an expenditure rate of above 70% that has been achieved as of February 2024.

The Department did not establish any other similar teams in other Provinces.

26 February 2024 - NW76

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has any plans in place regarding the state of the Free State province since the interventions her department has implemented are not reflecting any improvement in performance, particularly relating to the province’s delivery of housing units, which was at 3% in Quarter 2 of the 2023-24 financial year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the plans?

Reply:

The National Department of Human Settlements has indeed taken proactive measures to address the challenges faced by the Free State Province, particularly regarding the delivery of housing units. The Department’s key interventions included:

  • Firstly we seconded an experienced individual who has previously worked with the National Department, to capacitate the Provincial Department’s Supply Chain Management Unit. This individual's expertise and experience have significantly contributed to improving operational efficiency within the Department.
  • Secondly, also seconding a Project Management Unit official to provide additional support and guidance to the Provincial Department. This collaborative approach has enabled the efficient coordination and execution of housing projects, thereby enhancing overall project delivery.
  • In addition to these interventions, the province has also made significant investments in planning activities, laying the groundwork for future housing developments.

The interventions implemented thus far have yielded promising results and ongoing efforts will continue to drive progress and ensure the provision of adequate housing opportunities for residents of the province. National Department of Human Settlements remains committed to supporting the Free State Province in addressing its housing delivery challenges and improving its performance outcomes.

23 February 2024 - NW131

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Considering that the President, Mr. M C Ramaphosa, has recently announced that R1 billion has been allocated to build approximately 4,000 houses across municipalities in the Northern Cape Province, how will her department ensure that, the specified project does not impact housing provisions in the rest of the Republic, especially considering the large housing backlog?

Reply:

The Northern Cape Province approached the Development Bank of Southern Africa (the Lender) to finance the acceleration of the human settlement’s development programme. The borrowing is pursued in line with the provisions of section 3 (6) of the Borrowing Act and the current Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) through a pledge of the indicative Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) for the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) 2025 to 2027 as detailed below:

The R1 billion allocated to build approximately 4,000 houses across municipalities in the Northern Cape Province, as announced by the President will not impact the housing provisions in the rest of the Republic.

23 February 2024 - NW36

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Manyi, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What (i) risk assessment and (ii) mitigation strategies are employed by her department when approving housing projects in dolomitic areas, considering the real dangers associated with sinkholes, (b) how are the specified measures communicated to the affected communities, (c) what specific regulatory frameworks and building codes does she enforce to ensure that construction practices prioritise the safety of residents and (d) how does her department collaborate with local authorities to enforce and monitor compliance in the high-risk regions?

21 February 2024 - NW75

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Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether, given the fact that, in the 202021 financial year, her department purchased an Eskom building to the value of R16 million to address social housing needs in the Sol Plaatjie Local Municipality, her department did a cost analysis to convert the building into social housing; if not, why not; if so, what (a) was the projected cost and (b) is the current cost analysis; (2) whether, considering that the Government already owns a number of unused and vandalised state buildings, she has found that it makes sense to add more property to the list as opposed to using buildings that the Government already owns; if not, why not; if so, on what basis?

Reply:

1. According to the Northern Cape Provincial Department responsible for Human Settlements the department acquired the Eskom building through the Housing Development Agency (HDA) for the reported R 16 million.

(a) A projected cost analysis was prepared by LESEDI Technical Engineering CONSULTING (PTY) LTD for the HDA in August 2021 and the cost for the project conversion was estimated at R120 million.

(b) A current cost analysis has not been done.

2. A signed inter-ministerial agreement between the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) and the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) affords the NDHS and its entities the first right of refusal from DPE to acquire disposable assets before availing them to the open market. The HDA as an Enabling Agent of the NDHS is tasked to acquire some of the properties availed by ESKOM for the purposes of provision of sustainable and affordable housing to communities. The HDA has identified a gap in the market for student accommodation in the various tertiary institutions in and around Kimberley. The HDA has therefore targeted the Eskom Towers building in Kimberley, for acquisition and redevelopment into student accommodation.

Student accommodation is renowned for being one of the less volatile asset classes thus providing investors an opportunity to plough funds with high prediction-confidence. The positive social-economic impact of this development besides job creation and an added revenue stream for the municipality has been an indication that investment in the ESKOM building is an advantage for development by the government.

21 February 2024 - NW44

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Makamba-Botya, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What is the reason for the delay by her department in completing the housing project in uThukela Region in Alfred Duma Local Municipality, Ward 9, which started in 2018 and stands incomplete to this day?

Reply:

The KZN Provincial Department of Human Settlements indicates that there are two factors that contributed to the delays of the Umbulwane Area H Housing Project-

(i) STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

In November 2018 to February 2019 severe weather patterns led to the Umbulwane area experiencing extended heavy rainfall, which resulted in the existing stormwater arrangements not able to limit/mitigate the extensive flooding of portions of the project, impacting on several houses under construction. The KZN NHBRC immediately stopped the construction activities until an appropriate and sustainable solution was found.

Following the tabling of the investigations that were conducted by both the NHBRC as well as the Project Engineer, meetings were held with all the stakeholders to discuss the findings and provide suitable and sustainable solutions in order to urgently implement and unblock the project. The Implementing Agent and the Project Engineers subsequently provided the remedial and upgrading requirements along with the maintenance plan.

(II) BULK SERVICES

During the installation of the bulk services, an application from the District Municipality, via the Alfred Duma Local Municipality citing that they did not have the funds to install bulk water and sewer arrangements. The KZN Department realised that if these issues were left unresolved, the structures on the ground would be subjected to vandalism and illegal occupation.

The KZN Department then made funds available to resolve both the storm water management issues, as well as the bulk connection services to allow the project to proceed.

The KZN Department took on the responsibility that should have been taken by the uThukela District Municipality (Bulk services) as well as the responsibility that should have been performed by the Alfred Duma Local Municipality (Storm water management) to unblock all challenges causing the project to be stalled. The Implementing Agent is anticipated to return to site and resume construction activities by 15 March 2024 and complete the project by March 2026.

The status of project the is as follows:

Internal Services

Water Reticulation : 100%

Sewer Reticulation : 100%

Storm water control : 100%

Internal Roads : 100%

Sewer Pump Station: 95%

Top structures

Slabs : 400

Walls : 145

Roofs : 105

 

21 February 2024 - NW14

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Considering the displacement caused by the floods in KwaZulu-Natal in April 2022 and the Usindiso building fire in Gauteng, (a) what disaster management measures has her department put in place in terms of housing for displaced persons and (b) how has she ensured that such measures are implementable across all provinces, especially considering the severe lack of (i) resources and (ii) infrastructure in some provinces?

Reply:

a) Before the 2023/24 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) has been allocating disaster response funds (on application) to provinces and municipalities that were affected by disaster incidences such as floods, gale force winds and fires through the Provincial Emergency Housing Grant (PEHG) and Municipal Emergency Housing Grant (MEHG) respectively.

As a result of the April 2022 floods in KwaZulu Natal, the province was allocated a budget of R342 133 000 through the PEHG, for the provision of Temporary Emergency Accommodation (TEA) that enabled more than 3 000 displaced households to be removed from mass care centres (community halls, churches, and schools) to various lodges and flats within eThekwini municipality. In addition, these funds were also utilised by the province for the construction of Temporary Residential Units (TRUs), whilst a permanent housing solution such as the construction of BNGs, is sought by the KZN Department of Human Settlements (KZN-DHS). The Eastern Cape Province was allocated a budget of R84 109 000 through the PEHG, for the provision of 225 Temporary Residential Units to displaced households.

As of the 1st of April 2023, the NDHS discontinued the PEHG and MEHG to formulate an Emergency Housing Response Fund (EHRF) that is administered and implemented directly by NDHS.

The Human Settlements Department under the City of Johannesburg (CoJ) played an active role in the provision of emergency accommodation for the victims of the fire incident that occurred at the Usindiso building. The CoJ’s Human Settlements Department established a Transitional Relocation Area (Shalizile Denver TRA) where the victims were relocated to. Services such as water supply, sanitation, area lighting and refuse removal are provided. The costs relating to the construction of the corrugated structures amount to R3 648 640.00 in Shalizile Denver TRA.

bI The National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) put in place the following emergency housing interventions that will enable displaced disaster victims to be provided with decent shelter during disasters:

  • A 3-year panel of contractors has been established for the construction of Temporary Residential Units (TRUs) on an as-and-when-required basis until the year 2026.
  • The Housing Development Agency (HDA) has been tasked with the responsibility of acquiring suitable land parcels and state-owned buildings that will be utilised immediately as Temporary Emergency Accommodation (TEA) during disasters, whilst TRUs are being constructed. This responsibility is in line with their core mandate prescribed by the Housing Development Agency Act No. 23 of 2008.
  • The National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) has been tasked with the responsibility of conducting structural assessments and remedial plans for formal houses that were damaged by the floods, winds, and fires, as per their mandate prescribed on the Housing Consumers Protection Measures Act, 1998 (Act No. 95 of 1998).
  • To ensure that such measures are implementable across all provinces, the NDHS has developed Emergency Housing Guidelines that outline the type of disaster interventions that should be provided by the department. The Guidelines also outline the collaborative role of the Provincial and Municipal Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs, DDMCs & MDMCs), in assisting the NDHS to respond effectively and efficiently to disasters.

21 February 2024 - NW40

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Tetyana, Mr Y to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) What (a) measures have been put in place to (i) develop and (ii) implement a comprehensive plan to address the housing crisis in Kya Sands in Johannesburg, considering the urgent need for improved living conditions and infrastructure such as sanitation facilities and drainage systems and (b) specific measures have been taken to ensure that residents are protected from the immediate threat of infectious diseases, given the alarming density of makeshift dwellings and the lack of proper sanitation facilities, especially in the context of the ongoing risks posed by heavy rains and potential flooding?

Reply:

Based on the response or the information provided to my office by City of Johannesburg, it must be noted that in the last two (2) financial years (2021/2022 and 2022/23) the city has embarked on a process of developing the area using Informal Settlements Upgrading Grant (ISUPG). The City appointed a consultant to develop a professional upgrade plan in order to normalise the Kya Sands Informal Settlement into a formal township (i.e. to densify and present a tangible plan for re-development and re-blocking of the settlement).

The plan is categorised as a Category B1 settlement where in-situ upgrading will be utilised. In-situ upgrading means that the settlement will be developed in the same area where it is located as there is enough land and space. Households located in the North-Western sections of the settlement will need to be relocated as they are located within, the 1:100-year flood line.

(b) The Department of Human Settlements within the City of Johannesburg is providing interim basic services such as refuse collection, sanitation and water on a weekly basis.

21 February 2024 - NW77

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the full details of (a) her department’s alternative building technology in relation to implementation across all provinces and (b) the total number of occupied units as a result of the use of the alternative building technology as at the latest date for which information is avaible?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

Project name

Project Location

IBT System utilised

Number of Houses entrolled as IBT

Number of houses constructed and occupied as IBT

Number of houses still to be built on IBT

1. Transhex Mega Projects, BNG/Social/Gap Housing

Western Cape, Worcester

Ikhaya future house Moladi Envirolite

1410

190

1220

2. Umlazi F6, BNG/Social/Gap Housing

KZN, Umlazi

SANJO Fabtech Building system

Change of design in progress for 10 units. Units were initially enrolled as conventional

10 units in progress at various stages

0

3. Fortwest Ext 4&5, BNG/Social/Gap housing

Gauteng Pretoria West

Sanjo Fabtech Building system

500

100 Houses contructed. Not occupied

400 houses

4. Toekomsrus Ext 4, Western Mega Projects, BNG/Social/Gap housing

Gauteng Randfontein

MONL Frames building system

598

360 Houses constructed. 285 houses invaded houses is included in the 360 houses

238 houses

5. Thembisa ext 7

Gauteng Tembisa

Sterling Building systems (Sanjo Fabtech)

500

466 constructed, project on hold

34 houses

6. Delft Housing Project BNG/Social/ Gap housing

Western Cape, Delft New Precinct

Kwikspace Modular Buildings

Vela Building Solutions

1911

1426

485

7. Greenville Housing Project, BNG/Social/ Gap housing

Western Cape, Fisantekraal

Benex Masonry Building system

2956

2659

166 Project under construction – 131 not yet started

8. Belhar Military vets project, BNG/Social/ Gap housing

Western Cape, Belhar

Intastor Profile Modular Roofing system

102

102

0

9. Sicelo Shiceka BNG/Social/ Gap housing

Gauteng, Midvaal

Sterling Buidling System (Sanjo Fabtech)

100

0

0

10. Vosloorus Ext.9 BNG/ Social/Gap housing

Gauteng, Vosloorus

Plaswall Building system

132

0

0

13 February 2024 - NW67

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Whether she will furnish Mr L Mphithi with (a) all documents relating to the process of appointing the director-general of her department and (b)(i) a list and (ii) scores of candidates that were interviewed; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether the newly appointed director-general of her department has any criminal record; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1) No. The information requested is personal information relating to the candidates who applied for the post of Director-General, and it is protected in terms of Section 14 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 (Act No. 108 of 1996) and the Protection of Personal Information Act 4 of 2013.

2) No. The verification from the South African Police Service Criminal Database confirmed no criminal record.

04 January 2024 - NW4169

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has the relevant details of the number of Government Subsidized Houses under construction in each province during the 2013 – 2023 period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Housing Subsidy System (HSS) reveals that since 2013 to date, the Department with the support of Provinces and Municipalities built the houses illustrated in the table below.

 

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

EC

12 646

13 469

13 198

12 491

11 123

9 817

8 757

5 427

6 833

5 550

FS

6 920

5 308

5 322

4 064

3 330

3 695

2 290

1 890

1 647

311

GP

22 352

14 984

14 968

16 003

17 606

9 623

12 153

9 495

7 354

6 982

KZN

29 151

29 312

26 552

22 467

20 290

20 564

15 737

10 315

12 033

9 325

LIM

3 080

2 149

8 476

10 251

9 050

10 513

8 135

4 518

4 269

4 808

MPU

8 126

8 293

9 226

3 670

8 739

8 522

6 710

4 522

2 955

1 900

NC

2 464

2 133

1 337

1 449

809

541

620

221

591

173

NW

9 362

9 206

10 873

9 152

6 552

6 523

6 739

2 847

2 734

3 918

WC

11 835

10 348

10 355

9 793

8 380

7 828

8 184

6 354

6 200

5 665

TOTAL

105 936

95 202

100 307

89 340

85 879

77 626

69 325

45 589

44 616

38 632

02 January 2024 - NW3687

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What is the nature of her department’s new partnership with the Republic of Ghana and (b) What are some of the best practise models followed by the Republic of Ghana concerning the provision of housing that she intends implementing?

Reply:

a) The partnership with the Republic of Ghana is a bilateral relationship that seeks to;

Establish and formalise exchanges on adequate and affordable housing delivery. The Department of Human Settlements has had ongoing exchanges with the Ministry of Works and Housing of the Republic of Ghana, mostly at international meetings, advancing the creation of sustainable human settlements.

The partnership also becomes a platform to facilitate the establishment of networks between sector actors outside of government to forge public-private collaboration that will enable the delivery of affordable housing. Moreover, the platform was instrumental for bringing together business entities to respond to the growing need for human settlements infrastructure that is required at scale and pace, in response to the trends of rapid urbanisation.

The Minister of Human Settlements undertook to advance the cordial relations between the two countries to deepen exchanges in respect to approaches in the provision of adequate housing and undertook an official visit in this regard during October 2023.

b) Some of the best practice models witnessed in Ghana include, but are not limited to;

  • Employer assisted housing, through which public-private partnerships are developed (government and a private companies/ employers) with the view to build houses for a predetermined category of employees who would ordinarily not be able to build houses for themselves.
  • Blended finance from government and private sector sources to raise capital in a complimentary manner in order to fund joint business ventures.
  • Property practitioner regulations and management, which regulates the affairs of all property practitioners, spells out the obligations of the property practitioners towards housing consumers and strives to maintain professional standards in the property practitioners’ sector.

These areas will be explored through further knowledge exchanges between the two countries.

02 January 2024 - NW4144

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she is responsible for regulating the stay of persons in temporary shelters; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with regard to the temporary shelter that collapsed in Ntsitho Village, Ward 3 of Instika Yethu Local Municipality on 17 November 2023, what (a) are the time frames that her department puts in place for persons to leave and/or stay in a temporary shelter and (b) urgent assistance has been provided to help the persons who have been affected?

Reply:

(a) A temporary shelter should ideally not be occupied for more than 24 months. The National Department will develop policy guidelines in conjunction with the sector to determine the maximum time a household could be housed in a temporary shelter

(b) With reference to shelter that collapsed in Ntsitho Village, Ward 3 of Instika Yethu Local Municipality, the National Department did a physical verification of the affected household on 06 December 2023. The appointed service provider has been issued with a request to construct a new TRU with concrete foundation for the affected household.

.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER

QUESTION NUMBER: 4144

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 01 DECEMBER 2023

K DITSHEGO

ACTING DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: INFORMAL SETTLEMENTS UPGRADING AND EMERGENCY HOUSING

DATE:

Recommended/not recommended

N DUMALISILE

ACTING DIRECTOR-GENERAL:

DATE:

____________________________________________________________

Approved/Not approved

M.T KUBAYI, MP

MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

DATE:

02 January 2024 - NW4143

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to her reply to question 3267 on the 13 November 2023, what (a) total number of projects were implemented for the 770 blocked projects to remain and (b) percentage constitutes the 770 blocked projects; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms M Makesini with relevant detailed report of all the 770 blocked projects, including the regions where the specified projects are allocated?

Reply:

1. (a) The Free State Provincial Department of Human Settlements included 96 blocked projects in the current business plan of 2023/24 financial year. Out of the 770 projects that have been reported as blocked, 96 of them have been targeted for implementation in the current financial year. The projects are currently at various stages of implementation. The completion of these projects will differ from one project to another based on the complexities of each one.

(b) This financial year alone, the province targeted to implement 96 out of 770 projects, which constitutes 12 percent of the blocked projects.

2. The list of blocked Projects is attached .

02 January 2024 - NW4091

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Loate, Mr T to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Whether, with reference to the commitment by Government provide access adequate housing to all through the implementation of programmes and projects that support the creation of adequate housing in quality living environments, her department is in involved (a) in the development of and (b) channelling of investments to smart cities and/or Corridors of Freedom; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether, in pursuit of the creation of adequate housing in quality living environments for all, she intends to intervene to ensure (a) the discontinuation of the channeling of investments to corridors in the city centre by the City of Johannesburg, (b) the City of Tshwane seeks development in the rural areas verging where the smart city near Lanseria Airport is proposed and (c) the capacitation of Mogale City, which lacks capacity on the one hand and is crammed in by the Cradle of Humankind's World Heritage Site on the other (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are (i) the relevant details and (ii) time frames in this regard; (3) (a) how is her department planning to overcome the very serious problem of split jurisdictions and (b) what is the (i) timetable and (i) budget

Reply:

(1)(a) Section 14 of the Constitution states that the National and Provincial Departments of Human Settlements have a concurrent function of housing, necessitating strong collaboration between the three sectors in the planning and execution of human settlement development.

Hence, the Department collaborates with the Provinces, Municipalities, and pertinent sector Departments in the planning and development of Smart Cities.

(b) In accordance with the Division of Revenue Act (DORA), the Minister annually allocates funds to Provinces and Metropolitan Municipalities for the execution of National Housing Programs. The grants are allocated to the Provinces and transferred in line with the approved , who are mandated by DORA to submit grant business plans. The Provinces together with the affected municipalities will identify the human settlements projects in Smart Cities that require funding. These projects must be in line with the relevant policy and programme prescripts in the Human Settlements Code, 2009. This is the setting in which investments in smart cities are directed.

(2)(a) The Department monitors the grants it makes to the Province and the Metros in terms of performance. According to the terms of the Division of Revenue Act (DoRA), Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), and Municipal Finance Management Act (MFMA), performance analyses are conducted on a monthly and quarterly basis and submitted to the National Treasury in accordance with the applicable guidelines. The National Department conducts several performance accountability sessions, such as quarterly performance reviews and MinMec meetings, and regularly communicates the performance challenges identified as impacting the Province and the Metros.

There are also structured visits undertaken by the National Department to verify reported performance and in certain circumstances,the verification visits are undertaken as and when the need arises. Letters of non-compliance are routinely addressed to the Province or Municipality that contravened the guidelines, and the Department does step in when either one of them contravenes the provisions of the Division of Revenue Act.

(b) By declaring the Lanseria Smart City area as a region in terms of the Spatial Planning and Land Use Management Act (SPLUMA), 2013 (Act No. 16 of 2013), all three spheres of government are required to develop a Regional Spatial Development Framework (RSDF). This means that, in accordance with Section 19(d) of the Act, all three spheres of government must work together to create a Regional Spatial Development Framework (RSDF) that outlines the intended land use patterns in the area. The City of Tshwane must guarantee spatial integration, especially rural-urban integration, to accomplish this.

(c) The Mogale City is an Intermediate City and is earmarked for housing accreditation. The Provincial Department of Human Settlements will thus ensure the capacitation of the municipality as part of the process of accrediting the Mogale City.

(3) Section 18 of the SPLUMA defines a region as “A circumscribed geographical area characterized by distinctive economic, social, or natural features which may or may not correspond to the administrative boundary of a province or provinces or a municipality or municipalities”. To address the issue of divided jurisdictions and to implement national land use policies or priorities in any geographic area, the Department will collaborate with the Gauteng Province and municipalities to pursue the declaration of the Lanseria Smart Development as a region and the timetable and budget will be determined

20 December 2023 - NW3885

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) urgent steps have been taken regarding the beneficiaries who have been on the national housing list from the late 1990s and early 2000s and have to date not been allocated houses and (b) are the reasons that there have been so many delays in allocating housing to such beneficiaries?

Reply:

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Provincial Departments had their own waiting lists that were not digitised and were held in various offices.

a) Steps taken:

  1. The National Department has developed the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) which is utilized at provincial and municipal level to enable citizens to register their need for adequate shelter.
  2. The Provincial Departments use the NHNR to identify potential beneficiaries to ensure that the allocation process is fair and transparent, and that queue jumping is eliminated.
  3. The identification process uses a prioritisation criterion for beneficiary selection to reserve the subsidised units for the most vulnerable. The priority cohort includes:
  • Elderly beneficiaries (60 years and older).
  • People living with medically certified disabilities.
  • Beneficiaries who are on the National Housing Needs Register for the longest period (15 years and longer).
  • Backyard dwellers (only for new/Greenfield projects).
  • Approved Military Veterans.

b) Delays can be alluded to the following:

  1. There have been several budget cuts over the past years due to the shrinking fiscus which has led to the reduction of completed housing units, meaning that a lesser number of beneficiaries stand to benefit from the housing projects.
  2. In some cases, households move from one area to another, therefore when a project is completed, the initially registered households become untraceable.
  3. In some Municipalities, Councillors are still hesitant in the utilisation of the NHNR for allocation purposes- This is a matter that we are addressing through our Councillor Induction Training that is rolled out throughout the country and delivered by our Capacity Building Unit.
  4. Some people assume that after completing the NHNR, they have applied for an actual housing opportunity, whereas the application process begins with filling in the subsidy application form which is issued by the Province or Municipality when a project is going to be built close to your place of residence- In response to this challenge, we conduct consumer education in collaborate with Provinces and Municipalities.

20 December 2023 - NW4027

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has any functional measures in place to combat intimidation and abuse faced by the municipal workers who report and attempt to report corruption and maladministration in municipalities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Case Management Register for the past 3 financial years, including the current financial year the Department did not receive complaints or allegations from municipal officials relating to fraud, corruption and maladministration.

Municipal officials can report allegations of housing fraud and corruption by making use of the following reporting mechanisms:

  • DHS Special Investigations Directorate: 012 421 1503/1416/1535
  • DHS Call Centre: 0800 146 873
  • DHS Reception/Call Centre walk in reporting at 240 Justice Mahomed Street, Sunnyside, Pretoria
  • National Anti-Corruption Hotline: 0800 701 701
  • The Presidential Hotline: 17737

.

20 December 2023 - NW4170

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has records of the number of (a) women, (b) youth and (c) previously homeless people who have been offered subsidized housing during 2019 – 2023 period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to information received from Provinces, the department received applications for housing assistance across provinces. Applications are selected and approved based on the government criteria from Municipalities for allocations on what is available for beneficiaries.

The list below provides information of Women, Youth headed households and previously homeless people who have been living in informal settlements with no proper houses.

EASTERN CAPE for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

236,391 units

Youth

23,328 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing was recorded under this category

FREE STATE reported.

Women

116,363 units

Youth

3,235 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing reported under this category.

GAUTENG for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

10,848 units

Youth

3,359 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing reported under the category

KWAZULU NATAL for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

32,344 units

Youth

6,381 units

Previously Homeless People

49,574 units

LIMPOPO reported.

Women

11,898 units

Youth

4,813 units

Previously Homeless People

There is no information on that.

MPUMALANGA for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

9,407 units

Youth

127,988 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing reported under the category

NORTHERN CAPE for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

31,600 units

Youth

1,444 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing reported under the category

NORTH-WEST reported.

Women

173,900 units

Youth

16,648 units

Previously Homeless People

There is no information on that.

WESTERN CAPE for the period, delivered and recorded.

Women

170,171 units

Youth

12,074 units

Previously Homeless People

Nothing reported under the category

14 December 2023 - NW3697

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Semenya, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Considering that every government department is required to contribute to social and economic transformation through job creation and allocating a share of its budget to historically disadvantaged individuals, including the most vulnerable members of our society such as women, young persons, military veterans and people with disabilities, what (a) actions has her department taken to help create jobs and spend resources on procurement for black persons and vulnerable groups and (b) are the details of the achievements of the specified categories of disadvantaged populations since 2019?

Reply:

(a) Actions taken by the National Department of Human Settlements to help create jobs and spend resources on procurement for black persons and vulnerable groups.

On 27 January 2022, Cabinet recommended that, all sector departments and State entities should prioritise mass employment. In response to this call, in February 2022, the Department issued a Circular to the Heads of Provincial Departments of Human Settlements and Chief Executive Officers of Human Settlements entities, advising them on the requirement to prioritise the Mass Employment Programme in their respective Annual Performance Plans.

At National Department Level:

  • In terms of procurement spending allocation, the national Department of Human Settlements is targeting the procurement of goods and services from Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment (B-BBEE) Level 1 to 4 firms. The B-BBEE Level 1-4 firms are mainly small-medium- and micro-enterprises (SMMEs). It must however be noted that due to the nature of competition and services required, it is not always practical to purchase goods and services from the targeted B-BBEE levels.
  • The Department’s procurement is done in terms of the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act in terms of which for procurement less than R50 million, bids are scored a maximum of 20 points for Historically Disadvantaged Individuals while for procurement of more than R50 million the maximum score is 10 points.

(b) The department’s contribution to social and economic transformation through job creation and allocating a share of its budget to historically disadvantaged individuals was done through the procurement process as follows:

  • For 2019/20 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements procured forty five percent (45%) of goods and services from suppliers and service providers who are on B-BBEE Level 1-4. The procurement allocation is shown below:
     

2019/20

TOTAL SPENT

R 130 728 311,00

%

Women-Owned Enterprises

R 30 263 319,21

23,15%

Young Persons Owned Enterprises

R 10 998 341,15

8,41%

Military Veterans

R 455 156,07

0,35%

People with Disabilities Owned Enterprises

R 1 146 564,90

0,88%

 

R 42 863 381,33

 

Level 1

R 51 841 046,61

39,66%

Level 2

R 3 644 208,69

2,79%

Level 3

R 2 600 000,00

1,99%

Level 4

R 836 187,50

0,64%

 

  R58 921 442,80

 45,07%

  • For 2020/21 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements procured forty two percent (42%) of goods and services from suppliers and service providers who are on B-BBEE Level 1-4. The procurement allocation is shown below:

2020/21

TOTAL SPENT

R118.901.737,52

%

Women-Owned Enterprises

R15.218.642,06

12,80%

Young Persons Owned Enterprises

R6.676.519,21

5,60%

Military Veterans

R22.570,00

0,02%

People with Disabilities Owned Enterprises

R252.611,25

0,21%

 

R22 170342.52

18,6%

Level 1

R36.816.605,46

30,96%

Level 2

R3.828.546,14

3,22%

Level 3

R2.569.319,93

2,16%

Level 4

R6.569.319,93

5,52%

 

R49 783 791,46

41,9%

  • For 2021/22 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements procured over fifty five percent (55%) of goods and services from suppliers and service providers that were on B-BBEE Level 1-4. The procurement allocation is shown below:

2021/22

TOTAL SPENT

R111.024.641,19

%

Women Owned Enterprises

R26.683.931,58

24,03%

Young Persons Owned Enterprises

R18.926.372,73

17,04%

Military Veterans

R0

0,00%

People with Disabilities Owned Enterprises

R1.555.614,17

1,40%

 

R47 165 918,48

42,5%

Level 1

39.381.810,68

35,47%

Level 2

14.753.893,24

13,29%

Level 3

3.914.289,44

3,53%

Level 4

2.938.823,60

2,65%

 

R60 988 816,96

54,9%

  • For 2022/23 financial year, the National Department of Human Settlements procured ninety seven percent (97,68%) of goods and services from suppliers and service providers who are on B-BBEE level 1-4. The procurement allocation is shown below:

2022/23

TOTAL SPENT

R134.338.215,89

%

Women Owned Enterprises

R50.739.311,49

38%

Young Persons Owned Enterprises

R75.168.797,70

55,95%

Military Veterans

R0

0,00%

People with Disabilities Owned Enterprises

R535.252,00

1,05%

 

R126 443 961,19

94,1%

Level 1

50.147.760,18

37,33%

Level 2

69.859.296,11

52,00%

Level 3

6.170.453,66

4,59%

Level 4

5.055.854,34

3,76%

 

R131 233 364,29

97,68%

  • For 2023/24 financial year April to August 2023, the National Department of Human Settlements procured ninety nine percent (99.45%) of goods and services from suppliers and service providers who are on B-BBEE level 1-4.

The procurement allocation is shown below:

2023/24 April - August

TOTAL SPENT

R35.653.241,02

%

Women Owned Enterprises

R23.787.507,04

66,72%

Young Persons Owned Enterprises

R18.066.659,29

50,67%

Military Veterans

R0

0,00%

People with Disabilities Owned Enterprises

R71.317,46

0,20%

Level 1

R31.657.270,38

88,79%

Level 2

R3.674.984,78

10,31%

Level 3

R0

0,00%

Level 4

R123.675,86

0,35%

 

R35 455 931,02

99,45%

(b) Details of sector achievements of the specified categories of disadvantaged populations since 2019

  • The National Department further coordinates sector-wide information on employment and training, which is subsequently on a quarterly basis consolidated and reported on mass employment and training issues.
  • The Human Settlements subsidy programme is broad, as it caters for both rural and urban communities which township communities. As such, value chain opportunities particularly for business owned entities such as Contractors, Material Suppliers, Professional Resource Teams are spread across the various Subsidy Programmes.
  • Since 1 April 2022 of the lapsed 2022/23 financial year up to the end of Q1 of the current 2023/24 financial year, a total of 259 275 job opportunities have been created within the sector. These figures are however not audited.

(b)(i) Military Veterans: During 2021/22:

  • KwaZulu-Natal: The Province was supported to train thirty (30) Military Veterans companies, jointly with the National Home Builders Registration Council (NHBRC), on construction and related fields. After completion of training, successful companies were assisted with the NHBRC registrations. Prior to this, KZN had appointed a Military Veteran’s company in 2016 to build houses for Military Veterans. The same company was also provided with technical and administrative training to ensure that they deliver, however the Province had to appoint three additional contractors in 2022/23 Financial Year to scale up performance.
  • Eastern Cape: The Province was supported in the establishment of a Military Veterans Cooperative called Matrosov, which works closely with the contractor to build Military Veterans houses in the Chatty 491 Project in Port Elizabeth. A Military Veteran was also appointed as the CLO and some of the Military Veterans were responsible to provide security to the project.

b)(ii) Provinces and Metros on Human Settlements Conditional Grants

  • The National Department continuously encourages Provinces and Metros to annually set aside and allocate at least 40% of their annual conditional grants allocations to business entities/ companies owned by designated groups, with specific reference to three grants, the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG), Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant (ISUPG), and the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) 2021-2022.
  • Provinces and Metros are continuously supported to ensure transformation in this regard, including on prioritizing allocation of human settlements projects to business entities of designated groups. The National Department monitors Provinces’ and Metros’ compliance in this regard, with the performance information consolidated, analyzed and reported on, on a quarterly basis.
  • The sector performance in job creation through awarding of contracts for human settlements projects to designated and vulnerable groups since 2019 to 2023, as submitted by Provinces, Meros and Human Settlements Entities, is as outlined below. These figures are however not audited.

Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG)

  • For 2021-22 financial year, R2 billion was allocated to businesses of designated groups, yielding 46% achievement of the 40% set aside.
  • For 2022-23 financial year, R3.4 billion was allocated.
  • For 2023-24 financial year, since April-June 2023, R1 136 861 has been allocated.

Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG)

  • For 2021-22 financial year, R1.4 billion was allocated for companies of designated groups, yielding 36% achievement of the 40% set aside.
  • For 2022-23 financial year, R1 164 345 million was allocated, which included April-June 2023, which is the last quarter of the Metros financial year, with R30 494 spent.

Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant (ISUPG)

  • For 2021-22 financial year, R1 million was allocated to companies of designated groups, yielding 36% achievement of the 40% set aside.
  • For 2022-23 financial year, R2 million was allocated.
  • For the current 2023-24 financial year, since April-June 2023, R98 346 has been allocated.

On an annual basis, Provinces and Metros have collectively allocated o:

  • In 2021/22, R3.5 billion was allocated to companies owned by designated groups.
  • In 2022/23, R3.7 billion was allocated.
  • In 2023/24, R1 235 207 has been allocated.

b)(iii) Human Settlements Entities

National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC) 2021-2022

  • The National Housing Finance Corporation (NHFC) plays a major role in creating an enabling environment through provision of housing construction finance and enterprise development.
  • For 2021/22 FY: The entity’s value of disbursements for business entities of designated groups was R284 million. 123 SMME’s were supported through the Enterprise Development Programme. R90.3m worth work packages for SMMEs were issued. Out of SMME’s that participated, 42 are women owned entities and 15 include youth owned entities through the NHFC interventions. In total, R374 million was set aside by NHFC.
  • For 2022/23 FY: NHFC allocated R274 million through the value of disbursements for Designated Groups. The value of disbursements targeted towards B-BBEE compliant companies - Level 4, 3, 2, 1 Contributor (R'm) was R669 million. The value of disbursements targeted towards black owned entities (R'm). Moreover, women were the most beneficiaries of the First Home Finance (erstwhile FLISP) subsidies that were approved and disbursed. In total, NHFC allocated R1.186 billion.

Social Housing Regulatory Authority 2021-2022

  • For 2021/22 FY: The 2021/22 training programme covering a wide range of topics in relation to the programme, saw over 1 201 participants enlisted, of which 572 of attendees were female, 395 youth and 11 were persons living with disabilities. Various awareness sessions were also held focusing on designated groups to ensure their participation in the future social housing development. The existing body of knowledge and information has been formally constituted into materials and toolkits and such unpacked for broader audiences. SHRA spent 81% of its budget on majority owned black business. 93% of the capital grant award were made to majority black owned and controlled businesses.
  • For 2022/23 FY: Procurement spent for designated groups women (40%), youth (20%) PWDs (5%). On procurement spent for women was 48.49% and youth 3.42%, with nil expenditure on PWDs. Construction Procurement Spent for designated groups through the Capital Consolidated Grant (CCG) women (40%) yielding (48.9%) and youth (20%) yielding 6.39%, again with nil expenditure on PWDs. Construction Spent for designated groups through Institutional Investment Grant (IIG) target of (40%) yielding 41%. Construction Spent for Black Owned through CCG target of (70%) yielding 70%.

Housing Development Agency (HDA)

  • For 2021/22 FY: Procurement spend for designated groups women (40%), yielding 8.12% youth (20%) yielding 2.92% PWDs (5%) yielding 0.53%. Procurement spend targeted at businesses owned by BBBEE level 1-4 (60%) yielding 70.7%.
  • For 2022/23 FY: Procurement spend for designated groups women (40%), yielding 52% youth (20%) yielding 23% and PWDs (5%) yielding 5.56%.

National Homebuilders’ Registration Council (NHBRC)

  • For 2021/22 NHBRC through the Social Transformation and Empowerment Programme (STEP) trained 9154 individuals on various technical skills. 61% of the total number of individuals trained are women. BEE spend target of 65% yielding 73.72%.
  • For 2022/23 FY: NHBRC through the Social Transformation and Empowerment Programme (STEP) trained 8517 cohort of women, youth, people with disabilities and Military Veterans through the contractor training and development as well as the technical skills programme. Procurement spent for designated groups women (40%), yielding 43.24% youth (20%) yielding 34.08% and PWDs (5%) yielding 0.23%.

Community Schemes Ombuds Services (CSOS)

  • For 2021/22 FY: CSOS conducted 73 training and awareness raising sessions against a target of 18. CSOS spend 77.05% of its overall budget on BBBEE level 1-2 (R42. 374 million) and BBBEE level 3-8 (R9.340 million) black owned or controlled companies and non-compliant R5.707 million). Collectively, the procurement spent is R 58,851 Rm.
  • For 2022/23 FY: CSOS procurement spent for women owned entities for the target of (40%) yielding 41.5%, youth (20%) 9.1%.

Property Practitioner Regulatory Authority (PPRA) 2021-2022

  • For 2021/22 FY: The PPRA was able to reach over 5000 through workshops and awareness raising physically and through virtual platforms. PPRA mobilized 2000 interns, predominantly youth through the Services Seta funding
  • For 2022/23 FY: The PPRA introduced and reviewed number of transformation and empowerment programmes which includes amongst others, the Principalisation (Incubation) Programme; Regularisation Programme, Consumer Awareness Programme, Work Readiness Programme, Internship Programme – ‘one learner, one property practitioner”.

11 December 2023 - NW4057

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What plans are in place to address the performance of her department about the issuing of Title Deeds throughout the Republic.

Reply:

The Human Settlements MinMec resolved on 15 September 2023 to launch Title Deed Fridays, a campaign dedicated to the issuing of title deeds to beneficiaries of state-subsidised housing by politicians and administrators at the national, provincial and local levels.

The Ministry and Department of Human Settlements keeps track of the number of title deeds on hand, title deeds handed over to municipalities and the number of title deeds handed over to beneficiaries. This information is solicited from provincial departments regularly to ensure that we are able to track progress against updated information.

11 December 2023 - NW3379

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has details of the number of informal settlements that have been eradicated in the past financial year; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the figures in each municipality, (b) where were the occupants of informal settlements moved to and (c) what was the total expenditure incurred by her department to (i) eradicate the informal settlements and (ii) relocate the occupants?

Reply:

Background:

The Department has a policy for the upgrading of informal settlements. The policy underpins the programme on informal settlements upgrading, and its key objective is to facilitate a structured in-situ upgrading of informal settlements. Furthermore, the programme seeks to promote the development of a healthy and secure living environment by facilitating the provision of affordable and sustainable basic municipal engineering infrastructure to the residents.

A further consideration is that the upgrading of informal settlements should enable futuristic growth while recognising and formalising tenure rights of residents, allowing community empowerment, promoting social and economic integration as well as building social capital through a participative process that addresses the broader social needs of communities.

The Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant (ISUPG) is meant to provide both interim and permanent basic services such as water, sanitation, gravel roads and other basic services.

Table 1: Phases and Outputs of the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant.

Phase

Description

Outputs/Deliverables

1

Conducting Social Facilitation & Pre-Feasibility Studies

Social Compacts and Preliminary Design Reports.

2

Land Acquisition, Formalisation & Detailed Engineering Designs

Registered land parcels, Proclaimed Townships Register and Engineering Designs.

3

Constructing Permanent Bulk Infrastructure & Municipal Engineering Services

Permanent Water, Sanitation, Electricity, Roads Infrastructure and Serviced Sites.

a) & b) According to the information received from the following Provinces:

No.

Province

Municipalities

Projects

Phases of upgrading

Relocation /

In-situ

       

Projects upgraded to Phase 1

Projects upgraded to Phase 2

Projects upgraded to Phase 3

 
 

Eastern Cape

Mbizana

Mbizana Highlands, Mbizana Downtown

Not applicable

5

Not applicable

Projects still under planning (land-scoping, township layout plan).

   

Amahlathi

Stutterheim Upper Izele, Cathcart Daliwe, Stutterheim Bongolethu

       
 

Free State

Matjhabeng

Roma, DND, Virginia Moleding Unit 3 & 7

Not applicable

Not applicable

4

In-situ

 

Gauteng

Midvaal

Boitumelo, KwaBrown, Skansdam, Sicelo Shiceka Ext. 5

Not applicable

11

Not applicable

Projects still under planning (surveying and registration of households)

   

Emfuleni

Bophelong (Chris Hani), Tshepiso North Ext. 3, Boitumelo Informal Settlement

       
   

Mogale City

Vaalbanl, Oriental Hills, Smokedown, Weltevreden Festive

       
 

KwaZulu Natal

Newcastle

Johnstown, Blaauboschlaagte and Cavan

Not applicable

Not applicable

4

In-situ

   

Kwadukuza

Madudumbe, Etete, Sihle Phakathi

       
   

eThekwini

Etafuleni

       
 

Limpopo

Feta Kgomo Tubatse

Burgersfort Ext. 71 & 72

Not applicable

Not applicable

6

In-situ

   

Elias Motsoaledi

Masakaneng and Rossenekraal

       
   

Modimolle

Alma and Vaalwater

       
 

Mpumalanga

Ehlanzeni

Harmony Hill Ext. 2, Mashishing Ext. 9 and 10 and Komatipoort

Not applicable

Not applicable

10

In-situ

   

Nkangala

Hlalanikahle Ext. 3 section C & L, Siyabonga Phola and Plot 86-88, Nooitgedaght 300 JS

       
   

Gert Sibande

Kinross Ext. 33, Lebogang Ext. 27, Nyibe/ New Ermelo

       
 

North-West

Madibeng

Buffelsfontein and Mooinooi Mamba Ext 13

Not applicable

Not applicable

4

In-situ

   

Rustenburg

Boitekong Ext16

       
   

Naledi

Naledi Ext 29

       
 

Northern Cape

Sol Plaatjie Municipality

Lerato Park 5, 6, 7, 8 and Ivory Park.

Not applicable

Not applicable

5

Relocation

 

Western Cape

Drakenstein

Schoongezicht

Not applicable

Not applicable

4

In-situ

   

Overstrand

Gansbaai Masakhane

       
   

Knysna

Hlalani and Vision

       

(c) The National Department of Human Settlements received a total of R4 419 331 billion including a rollover of R298 242 million from the 2021/2022 financial year. At the end of 2022/23 financial a total of R3 930 757 billion was spent.

The National Department is currently verifying the information from Metros and once the verification process is finalised the information will also be shared with the Member.

11 December 2023 - NW3677

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What are the full relevant details of the measures that her department has taken to address the widespread challenges associated with the high number of abandoned housing projects due to the non-performance of contractors?

Reply:

Following her assignment to the human settlements portfolio in 2021, Minister Kubayi declared the unblocking of human settlements projects as part of her apex priorities as these deny qualifying households their right to adequate housing and dignity. Thereafter the Minister directed her department and its sector partners (Provinces and Municipalities) to unblock all blocked or abandoned projects over a period of three financial years, namely, 2022/23 – 2024/25.

Subsequently, all provinces collectively identified a total of 320 blocked and incomplete projects which were placed in their 2023/24 Business Plans and later approved by the Minister with the requisite budget.

The human settlements sector defines a blocked and incomplete project as; A project where no progress delivery has been made for a period of 12 months following the first payment to the contractor. Blocked and incomplete projects include serviced sites and houses at different levels of construction namely, slab level, wall-plate level, roof level, etc.

The most common factors that lead to the blocking of human settlements projects are illegal land occupations, geotechnical variations, construction mafias, community unrest, the escalation of material costs, the lack of bulk infrastructure and link services including poor performance by contractors (some of whom would have abandoned sites).

The Department continues to monitor and support the progress of provinces on the unblocking of blocked and incomplete human settlements projects through physical site visits and the Provincial, Municipal and Human Settlements Entities Performance Reviews that are held each quarter.

In addition to the above, the Department has encouraged all sector partners to;

  • Create mechanisms through which they will develop, empower and support small, medium and micro enterprises.
  • Strengthen their Service Level Agreements (SLAs) and contracts to enforce penalties and consequences against non-performing contractors and;
  • Terminate the contacts of non-performing contractors as a last resort.

11 December 2023 - NW3696

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Tseki, Mr MA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether the memorandum of understanding between the National Housing Finance Corporation and the Department of Public Services and Administration has been signed regarding the Government Housing Scheme, which will make non-mortgage financing available to lower income government employees and give them access to First Home Finance to purchase houses in both urban and rural locations; if not, why not; if so, what total number of government employees are anticipated to gain from the revised First Home Finance policy?

Reply:

a) Whether the memorandum of understanding between the National Housing Finance Corporation and the Department of Public Services and Administration has been signed regarding the Government Housing Scheme, which will make non-mortgage financing available to lower income government employees and give them access to First Home Finance to purchase houses in both urban and rural locations.

Yes, the National Housing Finance Corporation and the Department of Public Services and Administration signed the Memorandum of Understanding in November 2021. The Primary objectives of the MoU are to:

  • Establish a relationship that will enable qualifying government employees’ access to First Home Finance subsidies.
  • Strengthen the contribution of First Home Finance towards leveraging increased home loans to government employees.
  • Increase home ownership among government employees.
  • Ensure a co-ordinated approach in marketing First Home Finance to government employees.
  • Establish the basis of interaction between the parties.

The MOU does allow Government Employee Housing Scheme (GEHS) members to access First Home Finance subsidy with non-mortgage products to purchase or build homes in both urban and rural areas.

b) If so, what total number of government employees are anticipated to gain from the revised First Home Finance policy?

According to the June GEHS report, as at the end of June there were 204 650 potentially qualifying employees. This number reduced from 319 440 as at the end of March 2023, because of salary adjustment that became effective on 1 April 2023 that resulted in a number of employees in Salary Level 7 and upwards earning a gross income above R22 000 per month; and therefore, ineligible for First Home Finance subsidy. This number reflects total employees in Salary Levels 1 up to 6 because their monthly gross income falls within the R22 000 upper limit for First Home Finance.

The MOU signed between the DPSA and the NHFC was on the implementation of FLISP, which was later rebranded to First Home Finance. The MOU was signed based on the then draft revised FLISP Policy and is being implemented.

The aspect that includes the NHFC, DPSA, NDHS and NT pertains to the NHFC assuming a bigger role of providing certain GEHS services for the benefit of government employees is still in the process.

11 December 2023 - NW3886

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether, according to the recovery plan summary of the Free State presented by the Public Protector the Portfolio Committee on Human Settlements, which outlines the progress of the Township Establishment projects known as Greenfields development, the specified project is making progress, if not, what is the position in this regard: if so what (a) are the reasons that the expenditure is zero, (b) is the name of the contractor responsible for the project , (c) is the current progress percentage of the project and (d) is the name of each area that the project is operating in?

Reply:

There is no Free State RecoveryPlan by Public Protector that am I aware of.

11 December 2023 - NW3976

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether (a) she, (b) the Deputy Minister and (c) any other official in her department attended the Rugby World Cup final in France in October 2023, if not what is the position in this regard; if so what (i) are the relevant details of each person in her department who attended the Rugby World Cup, (ii) is the total number of such persons and (iii) were the total costs of (aa) travel, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other related costs that were incurred by her department as a result of the trip(s)?

Reply:

a) The Minister, (b) the Deputy Minister and (c) the departmental officials did not attend the Rugby World cup final in France in October.

11 December 2023 - NW4058

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Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she will advise on the progress of the (a) management of the housing beneficiary list and (b) integrated National and/or Provincial lists; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) How does she envisage the management of the housing lists in the interim?

Reply:

In the late 1990s and early 2000s, Provincial Departments had their own waiting lists that were not digitised and were held in various offices.

1) Progress:

a) The National Department has developed the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR) which is utilized at provincial and municipal level to enable citizens to register their need for adequate shelter. The Provincial Departments use the NHNR to identify potential beneficiaries to ensure that the allocation process is fair and transparent.

b) The NHNR contains the integrated National and/or Provincial lists of households/ individuals that must go through the application process to become eligible beneficiaries.

2) Housing lists are captured on the NHNR, which has identified weakness. There are still allegations of beneficiary list manipulation. We are in a process to have a digital platform that reduces the risk of manipulation, that is transparent and increases accountability

08 December 2023 - NW3429

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(a) What is the total number of housing projects that her department abandoned in the North West, (b) for how long have the projects been abandoned, (c) what are the details of the responsible contractors and (d)(i) what plans and timeframes have been put in place to complete all incomplete housing projects of her department in the North West and (ii) at what costs per project?

Reply:

According to information received from the North-West Provincial Department of Human Settlements;

a) They have a total of 41 blocked and incomplete projects. A blocked or incomplete project is defined as: A project where no delivery progress has been made for a period of 12 months following the first payment to the contractor. The blocked or incomplete projects include serviced sites and houses at different levels of construction namely, slab level, wall-plate level, roof level, etc. Projects are usually blocked and incomplete due to illegal land occupations, extortion by the construction mafia, community unrest, the lack of bulk infrastructure, poor performance by contractors (some of whom would have abandoned sites) etc.

b) The majority of the reported projects became blocked and incomplete in the 2005/2006 financial year.

c) Please refer to the column marked “Developer” on the enclosed presentation from the North-West Provincial Department of Human Settlements.

(d)(i) It is anticipated that the 41 blocked and incomplete projects will be implemented in the 2023 / 2024 and 2024/25 financial years as some are planned over multiple years.

(d)(ii) The projected costs for each project are in the attached the presentation.

08 December 2023 - NW3763

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1)Following the total pre-payment of R23 million by the Housing Development Agency in December 2021 to Thoba Mkangisa & Associates, KSMD Engineering Consultants, MIB Infrastructure and Development and Siyeza Consulting Engineers (Pty) Ltd, for providing professional engineering consultation services on upgrading informal settlements of over 30 000 households in seven district municipalities in the Eastern Cape, (a) what necessitated the advanced payments to the specified companies when they were only appointed on 30 November 2021 and accepted such appointments on 15 December 2021, on the same day they submitted invoices; (2) Whether actions were taken against employees who approved the advance payments; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) According to the information provided to my office by the Housing Development Agency (HDA), the companies were appointed and contracted by the HDA in accordance with the prescribed supply chain regulations to provide professional technical consulting services for the Informal Settlements Upgrading Programme in the Eastern Cape.

Upon completion of the procurement processes, the Professional Technical Consultants (PRTs) were given instructions to carry out work in accordance with the approved terms of reference, and a virtual inception meeting was held on 30th November 2021.

It is important to note that the professional contracts between the HDA and the companies do not include provisions for any pre-payment. Therefore, any payments made by the HDA to these companies, as claimed by the Honourable Member, were made in accordance with Part C3 of the terms of reference, as per the contracted scope of works. This section clearly outlines the payment milestones, duration, and payment schedules associated with the deliverables being claimed.

The Agency vehemently denies any allegations of pre-payments and unequivocally asserts full compliance with the prescribed procedures and contractual obligations while disbursing payments to the aforementioned companies.

(2) No action was required against the employees.

05 December 2023 - NW3762

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Pambo, Mr V to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether she intends commissioning an investigation into funding of the Housing Development Agency (HDA) Eastern Cape Branch, that was provided by certain officials to a political campaign by unlawfully appointing service providers at HDA; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

I do not know of any funding of the Housing Development Agency Eastern Cape Branch. I have no knowledge of any political campaign funded by officials as alleged in the member’s question.

05 December 2023 - NW3272

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Mhlongo, Ms N to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether, with reference to the 134 million that was erroneously transferred to the Bojanala Platinum District Municipality in 2019, which was meant for a human settlements development grant for the Rustenburg Municipality, the specified project has now been funded; if not, how long must the persons on the housing list who were supposed to benefit from the project wait before the project is funded again; if so, what progress has been made with the project?

Reply:

According to the information received from the North West Department of Human Settlements, the Bojanala Platinum District Municipality returned the erroneously transferred funds back to the North West Department of Human Settlements. The Boitekong Cluster Project is currently funded by the province under two grants, namely the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) for bulk infrastructure and top structure as well as the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grant (ISUP) for planning and servicing. A tripartite Agreement has since been signed between the National Department of Human Settlements, the Province and the Rustenburg Municipality on the implementation of the project. Further to this, the province has also signed an Implementation Protocol with the Rustenburg Municipality, where the province has appointed contractors in the third quarter to construct 1849 houses on serviced sites, while the Municipality has appointed professional service providers.

05 December 2023 - NW3260

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

In light of the incomplete housing projects in rural Municipalities such as (a) Ngqushwa Local Municipality and (b) Emalahleni Local Municipality in the Eastern Cape, what steps of intervention has she taken to ensure that such projects are completed?

Reply:

a) In 2021, the National Department of Human Settlements and its sector partners (Provinces and Municipalities) took a decision to unblock all blocked projects over a period of three financial years, namely, 2022/23 – 2024/25. A blocked or incomplete project is defined as: A project where no delivery progress has been made for a period of 12 months following the first payment to the contractor. The blocked or incomplete projects include serviced sites and houses at different levels of construction namely, slab level, wall-plate level, roof level, etc.

Factors that usually lead to human settlements projects being blocked are;

  • illegal land occupations,
  • geotechnical variations,
  • construction mafias,
  • community unrest,
  • poor performance by contractors (some of whom would have abandoned sites),
  • the lack of bulk infrastructure and link services,

As at April 2023, the Eastern Cape Province had identified 79 blocked and incomplete projects. From the 79 projects, a total of 11 have been unblocked and the balance is 68.

From the 68 remaining blocked and incomplete projects, the Ngqushwa and Emalahleni Local Municipalities both account for 2 projects in the approved 2023/24 Business Plan of the Eastern Cape Province- See table below

Table 1: Blocked Projects in the 2023 /2024 Business Plan to be unblocked

No.

Project Name

DM

LM

 

Peddie - Mphekweni 500 subs

Amathole

Ngqushwa

 

Lady Frere 715

Chris Hani

Emalahleni

22 November 2023 - NW3259

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Marais, Ms P to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

By what date does she envisage that asbestos roofs will be removed in areas such as Heidedal in Bloemfontein, where budgets were allocated to repair the specified houses, yet to date such roofing still exist and pose a health risk to residents?

Reply:

The Free State Department of Human Settlements has already appointed the Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) as an implementing agent to undertake the revitalization of asbestos roofs for all asbestos roofed units that were identified during a survey that was conducted in 2015. A total of ten (10) Professional Service Providers (PSPs) have been appointed. The removal and replacement of roofs commenced in August 2023, and all the appointed PSPs have already been assigned work and will be able to cover the entire province. The process is scheduled as a multiyear project. Bloemfontein is also covered in the scope of work.

13 November 2023 - NW3267

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) (i) is the total number of incomplete housing projects in the Free State and (ii) time frames have been put in place to complete such projects and (b) are the relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

a) (i) According to the information received from the Free State Province, there are approximately 770 blocked projects.

(ii) The anticipation timeframe to complete the incomplete projects is 2024/25 financial year.

b) In terms of the current Business Plan for the 2023/24 financial year, the province planned to address 98 incomplete projects across all districts. The national Department of Human Settlements will work closely with the Province to monitor the delivery of the houses on a quarterly basis.

31 October 2023 - NW3156

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Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Ms S.A Buthelezi (IFP) to Minister of Human Settlements

For each province, (a) what total number of new housing projects have been established, (b) what is the name of each specified housing project, (c) what total amount has been spent on each housing project and (d) in which municipalities are such housing projects located?

Reply:

a) The total number of new projects across all provinces for the period 2022/23 financial year to date:

PROVINCE

Number

Eastern Cape

12

Free State

7

Gauteng

73

KwaZulu-Natal

94

Limpopo

184

Mpumalanga

133

Northern Cape

10

North West

8

Western Cape

33

TOTAL

554

b) Name of each specific housing project is attached as Annexure 1.

c) Amount spent on each housing project is attached as Annexure 1.

d) Municipalities where the housing projects are located are attached as Annexure 1.

30 October 2023 - NW3243

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

With reference to temporary housing projects that have been initiated by the Buffalo City Metropolitan Municipality (a) what is the total number of temporary relocation units (TRUs) that have been constructed in each temporary housing project, (b) what is the total cost of the specified TRUs and (c) who are the suppliers of the specified TRUs?

Reply:

(a)The total number of Temporary Relocation Units (TRUs) that have been constructed in each temporary housing project is 774. The breakdown of the project is as follows:

 

Housing Project

Number of TRUs constructed

Total cost of TRUs

Suppliers of TRUs

Mdantsane – Erven 81,82, 87 & 88

462 units

R29 771 742.00

The Provincial Department of Human Settlements appointed the Housing Development Agency (HDA) as the implementing agent.

The contractor appointed for the project is NJR Construction and the consultant is M Kona Consultants.

Fynbos TRUs

147 units

R7 728 000.00 (inclusive of VAT)

The first quotation received from Vitsha PM Consultants

R6 325 000.00 (VAT inclusive)

The second quotation received from SQT Construction and Civils

The Provincial Department of Human Settlements appointed Vitsha PM Consultants and SQT Construction and Civils.

Duncan Village (fire victims)

165 units

R9 031 375.65 (inclusive of VAT)

Sekhekhaya Enterprise was appointed by the Provincial Department of Human Settlements.

13 October 2023 - NW2972

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Mogale, Mr T to ask the MINISTER OF HUMAN SETTLEMENTS

(1)(a) On what date will she pay an oversight visit to the Thembelihle housing project in Ward 58, Tshwane, which her department has erected without electrical services or any source of power provided for over a year, in order to get first-hand information on what is happening, (b) what are the reasons that the situation in Thembelihle has been allowed to reach the level in which it is and (c) what role has her department played in resolving the problems in Thembelihle; (2) whether she has found that the intervention measures that her department has put in place are appropriate and will resolve the challenges; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Date for oversight visit for Thembelihle Housing project has not been determined. Information about the oversight visit will be made available once it has been determined.

Thembelihle Project is one of the completed and tenanted social housing projects and was completed with all services including electrical services. The services were only disconnected by the City of Tshwane Metropolitan Municipality due to default in payments of services as a result of rental boycott by residents.

(b)The primary reason for the current situation at Thembelihle is a result of the rental boycott that has been ongoing for over 5 years. The consequences of rental boycotts are the suspension of municipal services, lack of maintenance and non payment and default by the delivery agents on their senior debt covenants. All these factors ultimately expose any project to illegal invasion and hijacking thus posing a real threat to the sector’s stability.

(c) It must be restated that rent payment is a non- negotiable for sustainable social rental programme. Until now the approach by the Department has been to avoid evictions but to engage the tenants to start paying for their stay at Thembelihle. The evictions are only considered as a measure of last resort.

(2). On the 19 September 2023 the board of Yeast City Housing, the Social Housing Institution responsible for the management of Thembelihle, convened an urgent board meeting to consider amongst other matters the low levels of rent collection, the financial stability of the project, the possibility for business rescue and finding ways of restoring municipality services.

It must be noted that recently there has been a change of management at Thembelihle to try and turn around the current situation. The new management must be supported and given space to attempt to rescue the situation. A comprehensive report will be made available by the SHRA and Yeast City Housing which will allow for a more focused intervention.

13 October 2023 - NW3118

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What measures has she put in place to ensure that time frames set for clearing the housing backlog are met, particularly in the rural parts of the Republic?

Reply:

The following measures have been put in place to ensure that the time frames for clearing the housing backlog are met, particularly in the rural parts of the Republic:

  • The Department has a multi-year development plan that outlines projects that are going to be funded and implemented over a number of years. The multi-year development plan is a bottom-up plan, which is informed by the need for housing that is identified at the local municipality ward level, escalated to a consolidated local, district municipalities and finally provincial level. The plans cover projects that respond to the housing needs in both urban and rural areas. The multi-year development plan gets disaggregated into annual business plans with clear timelines to achieve the project deliverables and budgets to fund the projects.
  • The Department funds the Provincial annual business plans through the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grants (ISUPG) to fund the development of human settlements projects and upgrade informal settlements.

The Department also funds the Metropolitan Municipalities’ annual business plans through the Urban Settlements Development Grant (USDG) and the Informal Settlements Upgrading Partnership Grants (ISUPG) to fund the development of human settlements projects and upgrade informal settlements.

  • To ensure that the plans are implemented within the set time frames and allocated budgets, the Department conducts ongoing monitoring and oversight in all projects under implementation.

13 October 2023 - NW2874

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Makesini, Ms M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

What (a) progress has been made in the construction of Talana Hostel in Tzaneen, Limpopo Province and (b) are the main reasons for the delays in completing the Hostel?

Reply:

a) As advised by the Limpopo Department of Co-operative Governance, Human Settlements and Traditional Affairs (COGHSTA), the Talana Hostel has been identified as a priority for upgrading. The planning, design and packaging phase was recently concluded for the hostel.

It consists of fifty-five (55) residential block units with residents comprising of families and individuals- The hostel is highly overcrowded.

It is envisaged that the old/ existing hostel blocks as well as the informal houses erected on the site will be demolished and redeveloped into three-storey medium density walk-up buildings comprising of one and two-bedroomed units. The upgrades will be effected via the Community Residential Units programme.

b) There is no delay in the upgrading of the hostel. The planning phase has just been concluded and the province is in the process of procuring an implementation agent that will take the project further in preparation for the construction upgrade.

22 September 2023 - NW2698

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

(1) Whether her Department has a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with the Nelson Mandela University; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether she will furnish Mr L Mphiti with a copy of the MoU; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether the MoU involves job opportunities for the students enrolled in a course sponsored by her Department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) and the then Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University (NMMU) currently known as NMU, entered into a Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) on 6 November 2012. The signed MoA provided for the establishment of a Chair of Education in Human Settlements Development Management. The established Chair of Education in Human Settlements Management was responsible, amongst other things, for the design and delivery of a unique professional degree known as the Bachelor of Human Settlements Development Degree. This degree is an undergraduate 4-year integrated multidisciplinary qualification with a focus on human settlements issues. (See Annexure A- MoA)

The partnership was extended for a further two years and an addendum was added to the original Agreement. The addendum extended the scope of the NMMU Chair of Education in Human Settlements and focused on the Capacity Development programme for the Human Settlements Portfolio Committee. (See Annexure B – Addendum).

2. A copy of the MoA and related addendum to the Agreement are attached as Annexure A and B in this response.

3. The expired MoA did not include the provision of job opportunities for the enrolled students that were recipients of the Departmental bursary, because the NDHS already had a Scholarship Implementation Unit that was responsible to facilitate the placement of graduates with Provincial Departments of Human Settlements and Metropolitan Municipalities. The immediate placement of students became a challenge due to the reduction in compensation of employees’ budgets in the different spheres of government, and the impact of COVID 19 on the operational budgets of the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements and the Metropolitan Municipalities.

22 September 2023 - NW2557

Profile picture: Khumalo, Dr NV

Khumalo, Dr NV to ask the Minister of Human Settlements

Whether her department has taken any steps to assist Provinces to spend housing grants fully to prevent their withdrawal due to underspending; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Admittedly, the Provincial Departments of Human Settlements have been, and some are still experiencing numerous delivery challenges including spending the Human Settlements Grants fully, however, there are various interventions to improve and stabilise the performance of these Provinces.

The Department has taken the following key steps to improve performance:

  • Planning
    • More emphasizes has been placed on the business planning processes.
    • For the financial year under review, the approval of the business plans was done after the financial year had begun due to vigorous processes that were done and various consultations with the provinces including MINMEC.
    • Before the approval of the plans and the transfer of grants, Provinces were requested to submit and sign-off that projects included in their business plans were ready for implementation.
    • Included and as part of the business plans submitted by Provinces were the Projects Readiness Matrix and the Procurement Plans.
  • Monitoring and Mitigating on Provinces Performance
    • Provinces are monitored in line with the Division of Revenue Act (DoRA) provisions to report and account monthly and quarterly on their financial and non-financial performance against their annual allocations. This performance is continuously monitored and analyzed,
    • There are quarterly contact sessions that are held with Provinces to discuss the performance and the projects under implementation.
    • Different Forums, including MinMEC, which is a forum chaired by the Minister are held regularly to discuss the performance and to share ideas on how to improve performance by learning from others (Provinces and Metro Municipalities).
    • The Department has appointed Engineers (additional to the establishment) as Project Managers to support project level monitoring.
    • Specialists have been seconded to Provinces and Metros with performance challenges for specialized interventions, and this includes Free State and Mangaung.
    • War Rooms and Task Teams have also been appointed for immediate identification of emerging problems, stakeholder consultation and mitigations across all government levels and identified communities.
    • The Department has appointed a panel of 120 specialists in the built environment- This Panel is in the Department’s database. Services will be sourced from the panel as and when the need arises.
    • By the 5th month of the financial year, Provinces with observed poor performance are advised to submit their Recovery Plans, which are interrogated through intensive consultations with affected Provinces to confirm if these mitigation plans will indeed positively turn around and improve poor performance.
    • One-on-one attention is given to Provinces that need intervention.
  • On Policy Changes
    • The subsidy quantum was also increased by 29.7% for the 2023/24 financial year, mainly to address the increasing building costs. The adjustment seeks to ensure that contractors accelerate the delivery pace, that contractors do not abandon commenced projects due to unaffordable building costs; and to ensure that the quality of houses handed over to beneficiaries do not deteriorate.