Questions and Replies

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16 April 2021 - NW819

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).What are the terms of the NAC Grant Management Policy if an applicant still has an active project and/or file; (2). whether the applicants have received the final funding; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. According to NAC policy and procedures, applicants with active files are not eligible to be funded. They are declined at assessment stage on the basis of having active files or expired files. However, if a narrative report has been sent with financial reports, and compliance documents such as a valid tax clearance certificate, evidence of work done, the new application will be considered according to its own merit. In the event of expiry, three -year cool off period is observed before any application is considered.

2. Applicants only receive the final pay out of funding once they have provided satisfactory reports (narrative and financial reports depending on amounts granted) with valid tax compliance status as per the signed funding agreement. Where applicants have failed to comply with reporting processes, then their projects are expired based on failure to comply within specified time periods. There are five organizations funded under AOSF 2019–2021 that were expired immediately; due to falsification of information, attached as Annexure 4.

15 April 2021 - NW928

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What will happen to artists who apply for the R6 600 funding when their applications are not successful, (b) will they qualify for the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme which has a R350 million budget and (c) where can artists check to see if their applications were successful or not?

Reply:

(a). The R6 600 was applicable to the 2nd Wave of relief funding. Unsuccessful applicants get informed accordingly, however, there was subsequently a 3rd Wave relief funding cycle to which the same artists were not prohibited from applying.

(b). The Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme is focused on job creation opportunities as well as job retention as opposed to the individual requests that were applicable to the relief of R 6 600 of the second wave. Any artist’s formations and organisations were allowed, in accordance with the prescribed criteria, to apply for the (PESP)

(c). The 2nd Wave was administered through the NAC and BASA and each entity provided responses to the applicants and where there were enquiries for the R6 600, there was a contact person and details for BASA sipho@basa.co.za and 066 314 3374 whilst at NAC it was Dsacrelief@nac.org.za

15 April 2021 - NW959

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details for (a) each (i) town and (ii) city that has had their name changed since 1994, (b) the timeframe taken for each name change and (c) the amount each name change cost?

Reply:

(a). (i)(ii). Attached is the list of all towns and cities whose names have been changed since 1994.

(b). The timeframes for names standardisation vary from province to province but is estimated at nine months for each name. This estimated period includes the consultation period by the Provincial Geographical Names Committees, the sitting of the South African Geographical Names Council, and the gazetting of the names by the Government Printers.

(c) The costs for geographical names standardisation are budgeted for both at the provincial and national Departments responsible for Sport, Arts and Culture.

 

NO

NEW NAMNEW NAME

PREVIOUS NAME OR STATUS CHANGE.

PROVINCE

FEATURE

DATE GAZETTED

 

Gqeberha

Change of name from Port Elizabeth

Eastern Cape

City

2021/02/22

 

Kariega

Change of name from Uitenhage

Eastern Cape

City

2021/02/22

 

Ntabozuko

Change of name from Berlin

Eastern Cape

Town

2021/02/22

 

Nqanqarhu

Change of name from MaClear Town

Eastern Cape

Town

2021/02/22

 

Makhanda

change of

name from

Grahamstown

Eastern

Cape.

Town

2018/06/29

 

eMthonjaneni

Change of

name Melomoth

KZN

Town

2017/12/15

 

Cacadu

Change of name from Lady Frere

Eastern Cape

Town

2016/02/09

 

Komani

change of name from Queenstown

Eastern Cape

Town

2016/02/09

 

Khowa

change of name from Elliot

Eastern Cape

Town

2016/02/09

 

KwaBhaca

change of name from Mount Frere

Eastern Cape

Town

2016/02/09

 

Dikeni

change of name from Alice

Eastern Cape

Town, Post Office and Railway Station

2016/06/17

 

Qumrhra

correction of spelling from Komga

Eastern Cape

Town

2015/05/15

 

Maletswai

Change of name from Aliwal North

Eastern Cape

Town

2015/09/11

 

James Calata

Change of name from Jamestown

Eastern Cape

Town

2015/09/11

 

Hlohlolwane

change of name from Clocolan

Free State

Town

2015/12/09

 

Makhado

change of name from Louis Trichardt

Limpopo

Town

2014/11/25

 

Nthorwane

change of name Greylingstad

Mpumalanga

Town

2013/03/28

 

Thaba-Kgwali

change of name from Grootvlei

Mpumalanga

Town

2013/03/28

 

Mbizana

Correction of spelling from Bhizana

Eastern Cape

Town, River and Post Office in the Mhlonto Municipality in the Eastern Cape

2013/08/08

 

eMuziwezinto

correction of spelling from Mzinto

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2013/10/02

 

Mamafubedu

change of name from Petrus Steyn

Free State

Town

2012/11/02

 

Makhado

change of name from Louis Trichardt

Limpopo

Town

2011/10/14

 

eMkhuze

correction of spelling from Mkuze

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2011/10/07

 

Nokakgolo

new name

Free State

Town

2011/10/07

 

eMdloti

correction of spelling from Town Umdloti

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2010/10/01

 

eManzimtoti

correction of spelling Town

from Amanzimtotl

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2010/10/01

 

KwaKhangela

correction of spelling from Congella

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2010/10/01

 

Tshwane

registration of a Town in Gauteng

Municipal Council name as a

geographical feature

Gauteng

City

2010/01/29

 

eMkhondo

change of name from Town in Mpumalanga

Piet Ritief

Mpumalanga

Town

2010/01/29

 

eManzana

eManzana (Change of name

from

A town in Badplaas in Mpumalanga

8adplaas)

Change of name from A town in Badplaas in Mpumalanga

adplaas

Mpumalanga

Town

2009/09/18

 

Bhisho

Correction of spelling from Bisho

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Boardwalk Meander

Registration of new settlement

Free State

Town

2006/07/27

 

Centane

Correction of spelling from Kantane

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Dutywa

Correction of Spelling from Idutywa

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Early Dawn

Registration of new settlement

North West

Town

2006/07/27

 

EMalahleni

Formerly Witbank

Mpumalanga

Town

2006/07/27

 

Emshinini

Formerly Lydenburg

Mpumalanga

Town

2006/07/27

 

Hammanskraal West

Registration of existing settlement

Free State

Town

2006/07/27

 

Khumula Estate

Registration of new settlement

Mpumalanga

Town

2005/05/01

 

KwaDukuza

change of name from Stanger

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2006/07/27

 

Lakeside Estates

Registration of new settlement

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Malalane

correction of spelling from Malelane

Mpumalanga

Town

2006/07/27

 

Midstream Estate

Correction of spelling

Gauteng

Town

2006/07/27

 

Modjadjiskloof

Change of name from

Duiwelskloof

Limpopo

Town

2006/07/27

 

Mookgophong

Former Naboomspruit

Limpopo

Town

2006/07/27

 

Mthatha

Correction of Spelling from Mtata

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Mvane

Correction of Spelling from Imvani

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Ngcobo

Correction of Spelling from Engcobo

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Ngqamakhwe

Correction of Spelling from Nqamakwe

Eastern Cape

Town

2006/07/27

 

Orlando Ekhaya

Registration of existing settlement

Gauteng

Town

2006/06/30

 

Wigwam

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2004/04/08

 

Magobe Extension 1

Registration of existing settlement

Northern Cape

Town

2005/02/25

 

Ntabankulu

Correction of Spelling from Tabankulu

Eastern Cape

Town

2005/02/25

 

Pirintsho

Correction of Spelling from Pirintsu

Eastern Cape

Town

2005/07/01

 

Riverside Township

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Town

2005/07/01

 

Summerfields

Change of name from Crystal Park Ext 17

Gauteng

Town

2005/05/27

 

Lethabong

Formerly Hartbeesfontein

North West

Town

2004/05/28

 

Thembani

Registration of existing settlement

Eastern Cape

Town

2004/10/01

 

Umhlanga Gateway

Not indicated on the gazette

KwaZulu-Natal

Town

2003/06/06

 

Lephalale

Ellisras

Limpopo

Town

2002/05/01

 

Modimolle

Formerly Nylstroom

Limpopo

Town

2002/05/01

 

Bela-Bela

Change of name from Warmbaths

Limpopo

Town

2002/06/14

 

Mogwadi

Dendron

Limpopo

Town

2002/10/01

 

Mokopane

Formerly Potgietersrus

Limpopo

Town

2002/05/01

 

Ormonde View

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Town

2002/11/08

 

Musina

Formerly Messina

Limpopo

Town

2002/05/01

 

Polokwane

Formerly Pietersburg

Limpopo

Town

2002/05/01

 

Boardwalk Manor

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Residential Town

2001/04/09

 

Boshoek

Registration of existing setllement

North West

Town

2001/04/09

 

Isisekelo

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Town

2001/10/29

 

N12 Highway Park

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Town

2001/02/16

 

Ditshoka

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Freedom Park

 

Registration of new settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Reagile

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Nkaikela

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Mmaleupa

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Mantsie

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Kgosing

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Go-Nkwe

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Goedgevonden

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Ga-Seane

Registration of existing settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Freedom Park

Registration of new settlement

North West

Town

2001/11/16

 

Chief A Luthuli Park

Registration of new settlement

Gauteng

Town

2000/09/22

15 April 2021 - NW965

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a list of names of (a) all the persons who have been paid from the National Arts Council (NAC) relief funding on Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP) and (b) the amount that was paid for each first, second and third stream PESP; (2). whether stream 1 is now completed; if not, why not; if so, (a) who was paid and (b) what amount was paid in each case; (3). whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a (a) list of names of persons who have been contracted on stream 2 and (b) full list of the persons who are (i) announced and (ii) not yet announced; if not, why not; if so, what are the further

Reply:

(1). Yes, the list has been attached with the above details as requested.

(2). Stream 1, is not yet completed as it was also affected by the guiding figure of R10 800 across the board. The list of beneficiaries that have been paid thus far is also attached. The value of Stream 1 is R 23 896 665, 76.

(3). Contracting process is in progress for stream 2 beneficiaries. The NAC continues to engage those that received addendum contracts to sign in order to finalise the payment processes. All the beneficiaries that are approved have received their grant notification letters. The process announcing approved applicants is finalised and all names of fully compliant applicants are published on the NAC website.

 

15 April 2021 - NW966

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with a full list of all 1 300 recipients of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme of the National Arts Council relief funding; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (2). on what date will (a) payments be finalised for all those who have signed their contracts, (b) payments and contracts be finalised for all those still waiting for contracts, (c) payments, contracts and letters be finalised for all those who are still under review and (d) those who have been rejected be notified; (3) what are the reason that there was no proper consultation from the sector; (4) what are the relevant (a) details and (b) reasons for the protest by creatives, who waited for answers for the whole day at the National Arts Council offices?

Reply:

(1). Yes, the list has been attached with the above details as requested.

(2). (a). The NAC has committed itself to resolve the process speedily.

(b). the entity has been hard at work to conclude the contracting process and paying the beneficiaries.

(c)(d). All applicants that have been approved are notified and no pending decision for the outstanding applicants except to send them decline letter which will be finalised soon.

(3). The NAC consulted with the sector as follows:

  • 23 February 2021, 5 March 2021, 12 March 2021, and on the 19 March 2021

4. (a)(b). The NAC Council took a decision to revise the guiding figures for stream and stream that saw the initial approved amount cut by over 56 per cent. Those that were affected by the decision challenged the decision that resulted in the sit in at the NAC.

The Department met with protesting artists and we are looking at various interventions to address the matter of the shortfall. We will make the necessary updates as we make progress on the matter.

15 April 2021 - NW967

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1)(a) What is the total budget allocated to the established Ministerial Advisory Team (MAT) in the 2021-22 financial year and (b) where will the budget come from; (2) whether he consulted other sectors in the industry before appointing the MAT; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what was the reason (a) for establishing the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) and (b)(i) that there is no budget for the CCIFSA and (ii) the MAT was appointed to do what CCIFSA should be doing?

Reply:

(1)(a).The total budget allocated to the established Ministerial Advisory Team (MAT) amounts to three million (R3 million)

(b). The budget is sourced from the Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) Goods and Services allocations.

(2). Yes, the sectors in the industry were consulted during several meeting at Freedom Park addressing the challenges faced by the sector.

(3) CCIFSA was established to address challenges of fragmentation in the arts and culture sector. The Department only provided the necessary support for the establishment. CCIFSA is therefore an industry body that was established to lead activism in cultural and creative policy development, and to guarantee coherent implementation of developmental programs. For this, CCIFSA is a structure that is independent from the DSAC and government.

(b)(i). The Department has provided financial support to CCIFSA in the past years, including in this financial year. Given our mandate, it is only reasonable to continue supporting CCIFSA for the benefit of the sector.

(ii) MAT was established not to replace CCIFSA but to assist with the current challenges faced by the sector as a result of COVID-19 impact on the sector. The new challenges warrant new or different approaches to ensure stability and sustainability in the sector; MAT will approach these challenges by employing five (5) work streams to ensure that practitioners are taken care of during the pandemic, as we are not sure as to when the world will return to the usual normal. CCIFSA is part of MAT, responsible for one of the five work streams, namely Wellness Programme working closely with DSAC and service providers to develop well-structured communication between practitioners and implementers of desired services.

15 April 2021 - NW986

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)What total number of (a)(i) board members and (ii) staff members have been suspended from SA Basketball since 1 January 2016 and (b) the suspended board members and staff members are still receiving salaries and benefits respectively; (2) what is the total (a) amount and (b) breakdown of the amount that each suspended (i) board member and (ii) staff member received in each month and/or in each year since 1 January 2016?

Reply:

S.A. Basketball in its response indicated that:-

1)(a)(i) and (b) There were no Board Members suspended since 1 January 2016.

(ii) One staff member (National Administrator).

2) (a)(b)(ii) an amount of R78, 442, 29 was paid to the Administrator whilst on suspension.

15 April 2021 - NW987

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 2112 on 12 October 2020, what total amount has the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee spent on High Performance of Sport, Preparation and Delivery of Team South Africa to multi-coded international events in each financial year since its inception to date?

Reply:

I have written to SASCOC impressing upon them their obligation to respond to questions posed by Members of Parliament and to respond on time. Still waiting for their response.

15 April 2021 - NW988

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Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 2113 on 12 October 2020, (a) what total amount has the SA Sports Trust spent on providing (i) sporting infrastructure, (ii) kit, (iii) equipment and (iv) programmes aimed at developing the young persons of the Republic in each financial year since its inception and (b) in each case, which sporting codes were the beneficiaries and/or recipients?

Reply:

The table below outlines the total amount spent in the past five years (2015-2019) and the sporting codes that benefitted

Item

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

Codes that benefited

i) Infrastructure

R24 488 888,72

R19 813 800,00

R8 680 520,26

R20 300 000,00

R8 696 310,00

Soccer, netball, tennis, volleyball, basketball, cricket, table tennis, tennis and general gym

ii) and (iii) Kit and equipment

R4 970 166,64

R680 100,00

R840 506,61

R648 976,50

R163 630,00

Various codes

iv) Programmes

R425 000,00

R350 000,00

R1 265 000,00

R550 150,00

R608 628,26

Soccer and cycling

TOTAL

R29 884 055,36

R20 843 900,00

R10 786 026,87

R21 499 126,50

R9 468 568,26

 

15 April 2021 - NW989

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 954 on 8 June 2020, the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) received a copy of the Pullinger Report; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did SASCOC consider the specified report and (b) what findings were (i) implemented and (ii) not implemented?

Reply:

The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee in its response indicated the following;

1(a) SASCOC appointed Advocate Pullinger in October 2012 and the copy of the Pullinger Report was received on 10 July 2015.

2(b)(i) (ii) Findings and recommendations were not implemented as the organisation had to first follow its Dispute Resolution Mechanism process by engaging all parties involved. SASCOC provided the report to the concerned National Federation and tried to mediate for an amicable way forward which did not materialise. The dispute was then referred to the Department of Sport and Recreation South Africa for guidance and intervention as per the Sport Act. Subsequent to the release of the Ministerial Inquiry report and the listed recommendations, SASCOC had to consider the recommendations and agree with the Minister about the implementation of the report. One of the recommendations listed was the Pullinger Report which SASCOC had to reconsider. SASCOC then had a meeting with the Department and in particular to this matter, it was clear after the engagements that this dispute needed to go back to SASCOC to resolve because it’s the organisation that appointed the Advocate to investigate the matter and provide recommendation to the Board after a number of remedies were considered in addressing the dispute. This is one of the recommendations being attended to through the Compliance Task Team.

15 April 2021 - NW990

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Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with regard to his reply to question 1613 on 29 July 2020, (a) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee and (b) any national federation pays any amounts to sponsorship consultants; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (i) are the names of the consultants, (ii) total amount is paid to each specified consultant each month, (iii) is the total amount paid to the consultant by each specified entity and (iv) is the monetary value of the sponsorship that each consultant has secured since their appointment(s)?

Reply:

a) The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) indicated that the organisation does not currently pay any amounts to any sponsorship consultants. SASCOC further indicated that;

i) During the period 23 August 2018 to 30 September 2019 SASCOC engaged the sponsorship services of Mr Qondisa Ngwenya.

(ii) The monthly retainer related to this sponsorship arrangement during this period was R45,000. (iii) The retainer was subsequently stopped with the sponsorship contract since being rescinded. (iv) There were no sponsorship raised during this period.

(b) The Sports Trust indicated that as a non-profit organisation, The Sports Trust does not employ or make use of the services of sponsorship agents/consultants to assist with the procurement of sponsorship properties. The in-house, full time employees approach corporates ongoing as part of our normal and daily operations

(c) Below is the a table with information Federations that responded;

Federation Name

(i) organisation pays any amounts to sponsorship consultants

(i) Name of consultants

(ii) total amount paid to each specified consultant each month

(ii) total amount paid to the consultant

(iv) the monetary value of the sponsorship that each consultant has secured since their appointment (s

South African Golf Association

Golf RSA (Women’s Golf South Africa and the South African Golf Association) does not have any contracts with any sponsorship consultants and as such have not paid any fees to consultants

       

Cycling South Africa

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Baseball Union

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Surfing South Africa

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Canoeing South Africa

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Amateur Fencing Association

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Ice Hockey Association

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Powerlifting Federation

None

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

15 April 2021 - NW991

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 1531 on 29 July 2020, what is the (a) name of each athlete in the Operational Excellence Courses Programme of his department and (b) average monthly amount paid to an athlete for participating in the specified programme?

Reply:

a) and b) The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee provided the following information;

The OPEX programme ended in November 2019 after the last World Championships. Below is a list of the athletes that benefited for the 2019 season, the athlete allocations were between R75000-00 to R300000-00 for a 10 month period. We have not had an OPEX programme operating in 2020.

OLYMPIC OPEX ALLOCATION 2019

 

Athlete Name

Sport

Wayde van Niekerk

Athletics

Caster Semenya

Athletics

Luvo Manyonga

Athletics

Akani Simbine

Athletics

Ruswahl Samaai

Athletics

Chad le Clos

Swimming

Ashleigh Pasio

Cycling

Henri Schoeman

Triathlon

Richard Murray

Triathlon

Kirsten Mcann

Rowing

Alan Hatherly

Cycling

John Smith

Rowing

Lawrence Brittain

Rowing

David Hunt

Rowing

Jake Green

Rowing

Tatjana Schoenmaker

Swimming

Mona Pretorius

Weightlifting

Sunette Viljoen

Athletics

Lebogang Shange

Athletics

   

PARALYMPIC OPEX ALLOCATION 2019

 

Athlete Name

Sport

Anrune Liebenberg

Para Athletics

Charl du Toit

Para Athletics

Dyan Buis

Para Athletics

Jonathan Ntutu

Para Athletics

Reinhardt Hamman

Para Athletics

Tyrone Pillay

Para Athletics

Zanele Situ

Para Athletics

Hilton Langenhoven

Para Athletics

Louzanne Coetzee

Para Athletics

Nompumelelo Mhlongo

Para Athletics

Union Sekailwe

Para Athletics

Hendri Herbst

Para Swimmig

Khothatso Montjane

Wheelchair Tennis

Lucas Sithole

Wheelchair Tennis

Liezel Gouws

Para Athletics

Ernst van Dyk

Para Athletics

Johanna Pretorius

Para Athletics

Pieter du Preez

Para Cycling

Christiaan Sadie

Para Swimming

Hendrik van der Merwe

Para Swimming

Gert van Heerden

Para Swimming

Theo Cogill

Para Table Tennis

Goldy Fuchs

Para Cycling

15 April 2021 - NW992

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 2109 on 12 October 2020, (a) which travel agency qualified to run the Olympic hospitality programmes including selling packages to supporters for air tickets, event tickets and accommodation, (b) what are the criteria for selecting a qualifying agency, (c) on what date was the tender advertised and (d) what is the estimated monetary value of the contract in each financial year?NW1160

Reply:

a) Tourvest Destination Management a division of Tourvest Holdings (Pty) Ltd is the appointed authorised ticket reseller (ATR) for the 2020 Olympic Games.

b) Service providers apply directly for qualification to the IOC and enter directly with them as an ATR for the Olympic Games. The qualification criteria is managed by the IOC.

An ATR that has received clearance from the IOC then engages the NOC. In addition to Tourvest, SASCOC was also approached by Fly Now Travel Agency. Flynow eventually withdrew as an ATR for the 2020 Olympic Games. Tourvest has since been appointed.

b) Due to the qualification process, there was no tender put out by SASCOC. The IOC managed the process.

c) The value of the contract is based on the application by the ATR for tickets for onward selling.

This application is not guaranteed and the IOC reserves the right to allocate tickets on a country bases. ATR’s also have to provide a financial guarantee for any tickets allocated by the IOC. The value of the tickets applied for by Tourvest is R1m. This may change depending on the final allocation by the IOC.

15 April 2021 - NW993

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1173 on 22 June 2020, any money was transferred as a loan from the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee to the Commonwealth Bid Committee; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total amount was transferred, (b) on what date, (c) what was the purpose and conditions of the loan and (d) on what date was the money repaid?

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that no money was transferred from SASCOC to the Commonwealth Bid Committee. All expenses incurred in the bid process for the Commonwealth Games was paid directly by SASCOC.

15 April 2021 - NW994

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 1175 on 22 June 2020, what amount has the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee paid for each anniversary dinner and/or celebration in each of the past 10 financial years? NW1162

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee indicated that there has been only one anniversary dinner in the past 10 years in 2014 that cost R631, 293.20

15 April 2021 - NW996

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 955 on 8 June 2020, what (a) total amount has the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) spent on legal fees over the past 10 years on each court case, (b) was the nature of each specified case, (c) total amount was budgeted for legal costs in each year and (d) amount did SASCOC overspend on their legal budget in each year?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee provided the following response;

Norton Rose Fulbright

 

31/03/2017

7,226,093.95

Matters relating to dismissed employees as well as to another staff CCMA matter.

31/03/2018

2,385,177.49

 

31/03/2019

2,738,045.79

 

31/03/2020

323,762.39

 
 

12,673,079.62

 
     

TWB

 

31/03/2017

R1,036,194.93

Defending claims from athletes and dealing with Arbitration involving National Federations

31/03/2018

R655,686.76

 

31/03/2019

R2,862,178.05

 

31/03/2020

R693,300.55

 
 

R5,247,360.29

 
     

Spoor * Fisher

 

31/03/2011

R27,319.30

Trade mark copyright matters as per IOC requirements

31/03/2012

R21,904.42

 

31/03/2013

R831,048.43

 

31/03/2014

R403,891.87

 

31/03/2015

R175,941.16

 

31/03/2016

R810,837.92

 

31/03/2017

R165,364.68

 

31/03/2018

R23,367.61

 

31/03/2019

R215,674.74

 

31/03/2020

R83,541.94

 
 

R2,758,892.07

   

(c) and (d) SASCOC indicated that the organisation does not specifically budget for legal fees, as this is an unfunded mandate. Any legal fees incurred in normal operational and administrative matters are budgeted for within that specific cost centre.

15 April 2021 - NW997

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 956 on 8 June 2020, what are the reasons that the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee website is out of date?

Reply:

SASCOC indicated that the website is currently up to date. Further indicated that the organization went through a process of building a new website and it might have been during this transition phase from the old to the new that may have resulted in the website seemingly out of date

15 April 2021 - NW998

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 960 on 8 June 2020, what amount in funding did each national sports federation receive from (a) the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the Department of Sport and Recreation, (c) the National Lottery, (d) the SA Sports Trust and (e) any other organisation in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

(a)(b) (c) (i) (ii) and (iii) Breakdown is provided in the table below;

Federation Name

SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee

Department of Sports and Recreation

National Lottery

The Sport Trust

Other

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Athletics SA

-

-

-

2,000,000

2,000,000

7,800,000

14,260,400

9,111,600.

             

Basketball South Africa

-

-

-

     

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Chess South Africa

-

-

-

1 800 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Cricket South Africa

-

-

-

2 000 000

4 000 000

5 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Jukskei South Africa

-

-

-

950 000

950 000

950 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Netball South Africa

-

-

-

3 800 000

4 000 000

7 833 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Softball South Africa

-

-

-

2 000 000

3 000 000

13 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Football Association

-

-

-

-

2 000 000

2 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Gymnastics Federation

-

-

-

2 000 000

2 000 000

2 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Hockey Association

-

-

93 272.94

12 840 000

4 000 000

4 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African National Amateur Boxing Organisation

-

-

-

1 200 000

1 200 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Rugby Union

359 425.43

109 865.70

197 087.47

3 000 000

6,000,000

5,000,000

     

130 000

40 000

       

South African Golf Association

-

-

-

1 200 000

1 200 000

1 200 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA Sports Association for the Physically Disabled

-

-

-

1 200 000

1 200 000

1 200 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Table Tennis Board

     

2 000 000

2 000 000

2 000 000

5 500 000

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Swimming South Africa

2 000 000

2 000 000

1 900 000

2 000 000

2 000 000

2 000 000

 

500 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Federation

SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Rand)

Department of Sports and Recreation (Rand)

National Lottery (Rand)

The Sport Trust (Rand)

Other (Rand)

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Tennis South Africa

-

-

-

2 199 000

2 000 000

3 500 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Volleyball South Africa

-

-

-

2 000 000

13 000 000

4 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Bowls South Africa

-

-

-

500 000

750 000

525 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Cycling South Africa

-

-

-

600 000

750 000

525 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Federation of Dance Sport South Africa

-

-

-

500 000

750 000

525 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Judo South Africa

-

-

-

700 000

850 000

595 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Rowing South Africa

-

-

-

800 000

1 200 000

1 600 000

768 000

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

SA Association for the Intellectually Impaired (SAAII)

-

-

-

750 000

750 000

525 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Baseball Union

-

-

-

550 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

     

South African Deaf Sports Federation

795 000

   

750 000

750 000

525 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

257 500

150 000

694 000

South African Equestrian Council

-

-

-

-

550 000

385 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

     

Darts South Africa

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

     

South African National Archery Association

-

-

-

500 000

600 000

525 000

1 422 517

-

-

-

-

-

-

500 000

250 000

SA Shooting Sport Federation

-

-

-

550 000

600 000

420 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Sport Anglers & Casting Confederation

-

-

-

500 000

550 000

385 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Squash South Africa

-

-

-

600 000

650 000

455 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Transplant Sport Association

-

-

-

450 000

600 000

420 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Surfing South Africa

-

-

-

650 000

700 000

490 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Aero Club of South

Africa

-

-

-

450 000

-

300 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Federation

SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Rand)

Department of Sports and Recreation (Rand)

National Lottery (Rand)

The Sport Trust (Rand)

Other (Rand)

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Badminton South Africa

-

-

-

500 000

550 000

330 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Canoeing South Africa

6 357

88 420

8 990

600 000

650 000

890 000

-

-

250 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

Karate South Africa

-

-

-

550 000

600 000

360 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Lifesaving South Africa

-

-

-

550 000

600 000

600 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Masters Sport South Africa

-

-

-

200 000

270 000

180 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Motorsport South Africa

-

-

-

550 000

600 000

360 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Ringball Association of South Africa

-

-

-

450 000

500 000

300 000

-

-

400 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

Roller Sport South Africa

-

-

-

500 000

600 000

600 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Snow Sports South Africa

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Amateur Fencing Association

-

-

-

450 000

500 000

300 000

500 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Confederation of Cue Sport

-

-

-

450 000

780 000

918 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Figure Skating Association

-

-

-

450 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

339 290.

296 376.

350 160

S A Fitness Sport Aerobics Federation

-

-

-

450 000

500 000

300 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Handball Federation

-

-

-

700 000

-

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Ice Hockey Association

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Korfball Federation

-

-

-

     

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

New Love Life

-

-

-

38 508 000

40 433 000

42 788 00

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Federation Name

SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (Rand)

Department of Sports and Recreation

(Rand)

National Lottery (Rand)

The Sport Trust ( Rand)

Other (Rand)

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2016/17

2017/18

 

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

South African Orienteering Federation

-

-

-

300 000

-

240 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Powerlifting Federation

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Body Building Federation

     

200 000

550 000

390 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Sailing

 

120 143.00

238 170

450 000

500 000

300 000

137 395.00

               

South African Taekwondo Federation

-

-

-

200 000

450 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Tug-of War Federation

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Water Ski Federation

-

-

-

400 000

450 000

270 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Weightlifting Federation

-

-

-

500 000

600 000

360 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

South African Wrestling Federation

-

-

-

500 000

600 000

360 000

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

Triathlon South Africa

-

-

-

450 000

600 000

-

-

3 500 000

-

-

-

       

Underwater Sport South Africa

-

-

-

450 000

500 000

300 000

-

 

-

-

-

       

University Sport South Africa

-

-

-

600 000

700 000

420 000

-

2 000 000

-

-

-

 

967 951

1 950 408

942 143

Mountain Club of South Africa

-

-

-

400 000

400 000

400 000

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

Sport for Social Change Network

-

-

-

1 100 000

1 610 000

4 200 000

-

-

-

-

-

10 000 000

-

-

-

Gary Kirsten Foundation

-

-

-

1 000 000

 

1 000 000

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

Sport Coaches Outreach

-

-

-

8 000 000

12 244 000

8 500 000

50 000

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

15 April 2021 - NW926

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)(a)(i). How does mentorship at the National Arts Council work and (ii) on what bases are they linked to funded projects and/or applications for funding, (b)(i) what procurement process was followed to appoint mentors and (ii) in cases where mentors were nominated, what does the process entail and how does it correlate with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, (c)(i) what amount of the allocated funding that is applied for, do mentors receive and (ii) where does this reflect on the record and (d) what (i) total number of applicants completed their projects without assistance from their mentors and (ii) what happens to the money deducted and allocated towards mentors where they are not assisting the applicants; (2). whether the money goes to the applicant and/or to the Surplus Fund and then distributed via the Surplus Policy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to NAC:

(1)(a)(i). In 2019, the National Arts Council initiated a mentorship programme for specific approved beneficiaries. However, the programme did not proceed as there was no policy developed for it.

(ii) The mentorship was proposed for projects in marginalised and rural areas that needed support in implementing projects. The amount was meant to be 25% of identified projects’ allocation.

(b)(i) There was no procurement process followed as the programme did not continue.

(ii) There were no mentors nominated

(c)(i) None as the programme did not proceed, mentorship fees were not allocated.

(ii) Nothing is reflected as there were no payments done to mentors

(d) Ten (10)

(ii) The money is still in the NAC’s account

(2). The money remaining will be allocated to funding of bursaries and projects through an open call for funding.

15 April 2021 - NW895

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What amount was donated to (i) his department and (ii) the National Arts Council for COVID-19 relief funds, (b) on what date was the money donated and (c) what are the details of its distribution?

Reply:

(a)(i). The Department of Sport, Arts and Culture was allocated R665 million of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Programme (PESP).

(ii). Out the allocation, the National Arts Council (NAC) was allocated R300 Million to implement the PESP focusing on job retention and job creation to the arts, culture and heritage sector. 

  • R200 million was allocated for job creation 
  • R100 million was allocated for job retention 
  • 5 % (per cent) of the total allocation was set aside for administration 

(b). The call was made on 31 October 2020 and closed on 27 November 2020, the contract was signed by on 3 November and payment effected on 30 November 2020.  

(c). Ddetails of the distribution are attached in ANNEXURE B with a list of over 1200 beneficiaries. 

15 April 2021 - NW878

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With regard to COVID-19 relief funding, what total (a)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the first phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the first phase, (b)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the second phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the second phase and (c)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the third phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the third phase?

Reply:

PHASE ONE

a) (i) R80 044 284,14 was paid to beneficiaries

(ii) 4166 (including 319 from Sport sector) received funding

PHASE TWO

(i) R 5 543 800 was paid to beneficiaries including the partnership between

DSAC/DSBD.

(ii) 4110 (including 88 from Sport sector) beneficiaries received funding.

PHASE THREE

c) (i) No beneficiaries have been paid yet in the third phase.

(ii). Still to be determined

15 April 2021 - NW818

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. with reference to the Arts Organisation Support Funding, he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a list of all applications for projects funding in terms of the (a) names of applicants, (b) amounts approved and (c) date on which funding of each project (i) started and (ii) expired from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2020; 2. What (a) number of applications are still active and (b) is the name of each applicant; 3. Whether any of the applicants had successfully reapplied in 2020, but still have active projects, if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, (a) what is the (i) name of each applicant and (ii) amount of funding allocated and (b) has any payment been made? NW977E

Reply:

1. The following are the projects financially supported in the year under review.

LIST OF CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT PROJECTS FUNDED DURING 2020/21

   

#

Name & surname

Date of Approval

Budget

Duration of the Project

Active/Non Active

1

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300.000

Not yet started

Non-Active

2

Mr Molaodi Sekake

18/05/2020

R100.000

18/03/2021 – 30/09/2021

Active

3

Ms Rosemary Gray

18/05/2020

R100 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

4

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

5

Mr Mandlakayise Dube

18/05/2020

R350 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

6

Ms Fikile Hlatshwayo

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

7

Mr Mothobi Mutloatse

18/05/2020

R380 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

8

Mr Reedwaan Vally / New Africa Books

18/05/2020

R1,100 000

20/09/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

9

Congress Mahlangu and Andre Marais / Reading Incubator SOECA

18/05/2020

R1 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

10

South African Book Development Council (SABDC)

18/05/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R 2 500 000

20/12/2020 – 25/02/2021

Active

11

Nonhlanhla Matshazi / Londilox

18/05/2020

R2 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

12

South African Literary Awards (Raks Seakhoa)

13/03/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R1 500 000

20/12/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

13

Roshnie Moonsammy (Afro Arts SA) / African Women Writers Network project

13/03/2020

Has received funding in the period under review

R750 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

14

UKZN Time of the Writer Festival

13/03/2020

R800 000

01/07/2020 – 31/12/2020

Active

15

KZN Music Imbizo

24/08/2020

R1060,000

31/03/2021

Completed

16

Crown Gospel Awards

22/08/2020

R2000,000

31/03/2021

Active

17

Africa Rising International Film Festival (Streamed)

25/06/2019

R1,200,000

03/2019 – 05/2021 (2 yrs)

Active

18

Fashion Industry Awards (online launch)

01/09/2020

R500,000

15/02/2021

Active

19

Groovafest

17/12/2020

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

20

Fashion Heritage Social Entrepreneur capacity building (online program)

01/09/2020

R1000 000

31/03/2021

Active

21

Content Creation/Innovative Hubs (Animation)

 

R 3 000 000

Not Started

Non Active

23

Emerging Creatives capacity building program (virtual & steamed)

22/09/2020

R1190 000

31/03/2021

Active

24

Dr Wally Serote Reading Incubator

 

R 1 000 000

 

Active

25

BOM Music Development Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 00

 

Completed

26

Playhouse company Incubator

 

R1 000 000

 

Active

27

Arts in Motion Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 000

 

Completed

28

Arts Cape Incubator

 

R1 000 000

Not started

Non Active

29

Reading Incubator & Athlone Hub

 

R 700 000

 

Active

30

Training program (Amambazo Mobile Academy)

16/07/2018

R12 million

30/06/2021

Non Active

31

INDONI SA

 

R10 milliom

Not Strated

Non Active

32

Covid Book and Women Network

-

R840 000

Not sarted

Non Active

33

South African Roadies Association (SARA) International Relations

21/12/2020

R1,265,000

31/03/2023

Active

34

CCIFSA

08/05/2020

R2.5millin

31/03/2021

Active

36

Northern Cape Provincial CADP

 

0.00

 

Active

37

Eastern Cape Provincial CADP

26/02/2020

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

38

Western Cape CADP

09/03/2021

450,000

31.04/2021

Active

39

Limpopo Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

41

North West CADP

08/03/2020

300,000

30/04/2021

Active

42

Gauteng Provincial CADP

10/03/2020

300,000

31/03/2021

Active

43

Mpumalanga Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

44

Free State Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Acrive

45

KZN Provincial CADP

26/02/2021

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

47

National Arts Festival

 

R3,5 million

 

Completed

48

Mai Mai

17/11/2020

R2. million

31/03/2021

Active

49

South African National Book Development Policy Consultative Session (s)

-

R1 300 000

Not started

Non Active

50

Downtown Studios

15/06/2020

R6 million

31/03/2020

Active

51

District Six

-

R3 million

Not started

Non Active

52

African Book Design Fair

-

R300 000

Not Started

Non Active

53

Spoken Word Youth Performance Poetry ( Hear my Voice)

 

R500 000

 

Active

54

Public Art project in Tembisa, Gauteng

30/06/2020

R250,000

31/03/2020

Active

55

Public Art project at Emakhazeni, Mpumalanga

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2020

Active

56

SAMIC Conference

-

R604 000

Not Started

Non Active

57

Public Art project at Salt River, Western Cape

30/06/2020

R400,000

31/03/2021

Active

58

Public Art project at Eluthuthu, Eastern Cape

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

59

Gateways Public Art at Several Municipalities

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

60

KZN_ Wushini

 

R400 000

Not started

Non Active

61

LP_TLZ Development Projects

 

R400 000

Not stared

Non Active

62

MPUMALANGA_ Emthojeni

   

Not started

Non Active

65

Writers Guild of South Africa

October 19

R700 000

2019 -2021

Active

66

Siters Working in Film and TV

0ctober 2019

R246 000

2019 -2021

Active

67

South African Guild of Actors

19/07/2019

R300 000

31/03/2021

Active

68

South African Screen Federation (SASFED

19/07/2-19

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

69

Independent Black Filmmakers Collective (IBFC)

1+9/07/2019

R964 750

31/03/2021

Active

70

South African Arts & Culture Youth Forum (SAACYF)

03=09=2019

R1,7 million

31/03/2020

Completed

71

Open Design Afrika

02/09/2020

R300 000

31/03/2021

Completed

72

The Village Knockout Foundation

22/11/2021

R516 850

31/03/2021

Active

73.

Marang Youth Development

22/11/2021

R600 000

31/03/2021

Active

74.

Somelezi Development & Project

22/11/2021

R638 000

31/03/2021

Active

75.

The Filed Band Foundation

22/11/2021

R700 000

31/03/2021

Active

76

Sizovelela Community Development

22/11/2021

R572 000

31/03/2021

Active

77.

Make It Happen (NPO)

22/11/2021

R500 000

31/03/2021

Active

78.

Unity and Cultural Diversity Council (NPO)

22/11/2021

R554 000

31/03/2021

Active

79.

Steelpan and Marimba Youth Development

03/02/2021

R590 000

31/03/2021

completed

80.

Ndwanenhle Rural Development

15/12/2020

R583 150

31/03/2021

Completed

2 . (a) 44 applications / projects are still active and the (b) names are reflected in the table above

15 April 2021 - NW927

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(Given that his department donated funds for COVID-19 relief where applicants were promised to receive three payments of R2 200 over three months, totalling an amount of R6 600, what (a) total amount was made available for the COVID-19 Relief Fund by his department, (b)(i) were the dates for applications and (ii) number of applicants applied and (c) are the (i) names of the beneficiaries, (ii) dates of application for the funding and (iii) relevant details of the payments made in each case?

Reply:

The R6 600 was applicable in the 2ND Wave of Covid-19 Relief funding cycle and was never broken down over three months.

a) Total amount made available was R20 million split equally between BASA and NAC.

b) (i) The applications opened on 17 August 2020 and closed on 11th September 2020.

(ii) 2809 applications were received.

c) (i) See attached list

(ii) All applicants applied within the window period of 17 August 2020 to 11th September 2020.

(iii) So far, 582 approved applicants were each paid R6 600.

 

15 April 2021 - NW879

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With regard to the The Silapha Wellness Intervention Programme, (a) what total amount has been set aside for the total cost of the specified project, (b) which service providers were appointed, (c) what supply chain management processes were followed to make the appointments, (d) what are the details of how the artist will benefit, (e) what total amount was budgeted and/or was used for refreshment, transport, venue during the launch of the awareness programme, (f) who were the guest speakers, (g) what are the details of who was invited at the launch, including a list of invitees and the register of attendance and (h) what total number of artists attended the launch?

Reply:

1. The Department appointed Indingliz Advertising and Marketing for the service.

(b) It was appointed for a three year period to the total amount of R 14 912 901.00 vat inclusive.

(c) The supply chain management tender processes was followed.

(d) Artists will benefit through a platform for accessing assistance and professional

services for dealing with matters related to lifestyle management, financial management, mental health management, substance abuse management and legal advice. This in attempt to extend the strategies that the Department is continuously employing to provide a holistic conducive environment within which the arts and its practitioners must thrive.

(e) The amount used for refreshments, transport and venue during the launch is R60 592.50 as per the itemized billing from the appointed service provider. The Venue came at no cost.

(f) The guest speakers were 1. Ms Lilian Dube 2. Adv.Nakedi Ribane 3. Mr Jack Devnarain 4. Ms Gigi Lamayne 5. Mr Gaby Le Roux 6. Ms Joy Mbewana 7. Ms Mathapelo Voster 8. Ms Shudufhadzo Musida (pre recorded) 9. Advocate Steve Kekana.

(g) List of invitees to the lauch is as follows Media (provide detail) Panelist (as above) List of invitees attached.

(h) The attendance was controlled and confined to the covid-19 regulations for level 3 social gatherings as a result, reliance was on virtual viewing of the live stream. Physically, 73 people including artists attended the launch (lists and attendance register attached).

ILAPHA WELLNESS INTERVENTION PROGRAMME LAUNCH

NAME

SURNAME

MEDIA HOUSE

STAKEHOLDER

EMAIL

CONTACT NUMBER

SIGNATURE

Gabi

LeRoux

Panelist

       

Steve

Kekana

Panelist

       

Tshepiso

Mahlangu

Humbledrop productions

 

humbledrop@agmail.com

084 215 1742

 

Lilian

Dube

Panelist

       

Nozipho

Dlamini

Sisterhood

   

082 966 6500

 

Joy

Mbewana

Panelist

       

Natacia

Pakarnist

Interpreter

   

079 848 5281

 

Gigi

La Mayne

Panelist

   

078 129 7480

 

Natacia

Manni

     

067 125 6450

 

Nakedi

Ribane

     

082 789 2163

 

Dimakatso

       

084 324 3957

 

Mandla

Maeko

Seniorgroup

   

074 754 4477

 

Vuyi

Mothlabane

indingilizi

   

063 877 5697

 

Madimetja

Moleba

DSAC

   

066 301 4675

 

Jack

Devaeain

SAGA

   

082 467 8925

 

Mandla

Ntlatlane

NTLAKS

   

076 478 9972

 

Victor

Malaza

Indingilizi

       

Xenia

Malaza

Indingilizi

       

Cetshwayo

Ntuli

Indingillizi

       

Mavis

Chauke

Indingilizi

       

Dikeleli

Chabalala

Indingilizi

       

Tholakele

Temane

         

Frennie

Shivambu

Gallo images

       

Kgalalelo

`Tlhoaele

     

068 5842050

 

Joseph

Nkhumise

Steve Kekana Foundation

   

071 419 5743

 

Thulani

Mahlangu

Steve Kekana Foundation

   

082 081 2972

 

Bongane

Mkhatshwa

Breath of art

   

082 051 828

 

Thabo

Nkosi

Breath of Art

   

079 040 3702

 

Esau

Dlamini

Soweto TV

       

Sandile

Zikalala

Soweto TV

       

Dumsani

Mbatha

Soweto TV

       

IPELENG

MTWA

Ditshego Media

   

0115133244

 

Thuto

Ditshego

Ditshego media

   

0115133244

 

Zama

Mkhize

Gigi Lamaynes crew

   

072 496 1305

 

Tholakele

Temane

Indingilizi

       

Dikeledi

Ledwaba

Indingilizi

       

Lorraine

Mataboge

Magakwa Youth Developer

       

Joseph

Komani

Act café

   

067 794 8882

 

Mapule

Rafuthu

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Masike

Lesego

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Otshepeng

Mozima

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Lebogang

Basiretsi

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Boipelo

Dibopu

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Mogomotsi

Seabelo

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Lot

Modise

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tebogo

Mahaba

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tshegofatso

Mpete

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tshegofatso

Kgosinkwe

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Victoria

Muelose

Makakwa Youth Dev

           

Kabelo

Mpete

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Paris

Manalo

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Stanley

Letebele

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Vincent

Stephen

PRIDA ART

       

Lesego

Mogole

Prida Art

       

SILAPHA WELLNESS INTERVENTION PROGRAMME LAUNCH

NAME

SURNAME

MEDIA HOUSE

STAKEHOLDER

EMAIL

CONTACT NUMBER

SIGNATURE

Gabi

LeRoux

Panelist

       

Steve

Kekana

Panelist

       

Tshepiso

Mahlangu

Humbledrop productions

 

humbledrop@agmail.com

084 215 1742

 

Lilian

Dube

Panelist

       

Nozipho

Dlamini

Sisterhood

   

082 966 6500

 

Joy

Mbewana

Panelist

       

Natacia

Pakarnist

Interpreter

   

079 848 5281

 

Gigi

La Mayne

Panelist

   

078 129 7480

 

Natacia

Manni

     

067 125 6450

 

Nakedi

Ribane

     

082 789 2163

 

Dimakatso

       

084 324 3957

 

Mandla

Maeko

Seniorgroup

   

074 754 4477

 

Vuyi

Mothlabane

indingilizi

   

063 877 5697

 

Madimetja

Moleba

DSAC

   

066 301 4675

 

Jack

Devaeain

SAGA

   

082 467 8925

 

Mandla

Ntlatlane

NTLAKS

   

076 478 9972

 

Victor

Malaza

Indingilizi

       

Xenia

Malaza

Indingilizi

       

Cetshwayo

Ntuli

Indingillizi

       

Mavis

Chauke

Indingilizi

       

Dikeleli

Chabalala

Indingilizi

       

Tholakele

Temane

         

Frennie

Shivambu

Gallo images

       

Kgalalelo

`Tlhoaele

     

068 5842050

 

Joseph

Nkhumise

Steve Kekana Foundation

   

071 419 5743

 

Thulani

Mahlangu

Steve Kekana Foundation

   

082 081 2972

 

Bongane

Mkhatshwa

Breath of art

   

082 051 828

 

Thabo

Nkosi

Breath of Art

   

079 040 3702

 

Esau

Dlamini

Soweto TV

       

Sandile

Zikalala

Soweto TV

       

Dumsani

Mbatha

Soweto TV

       

IPELENG

MTWA

Ditshego Media

   

0115133244

 

Thuto

Ditshego

Ditshego media

   

0115133244

 

Zama

Mkhize

Gigi Lamaynes crew

   

072 496 1305

 

Tholakele

Temane

Indingilizi

       

Dikeledi

Ledwaba

Indingilizi

       

Lorraine

Mataboge

Magakwa Youth Developer

       

Joseph

Komani

Act café

   

067 794 8882

 

Mapule

Rafuthu

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Masike

Lesego

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Otshepeng

Mozima

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Lebogang

Basiretsi

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Boipelo

Dibopu

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Mogomotsi

Seabelo

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Lot

Modise

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tebogo

Mahaba

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tshegofatso

Mpete

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Tshegofatso

Kgosinkwe

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Victoria

Muelose

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Kabelo

Mpete

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Paris

Manalo

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Stanley

Letebele

Makakwa Youth Dev

       

Vincent

Stephen

PRIDA ART

       

Lesego

Mogole

Prida Art

       

08 April 2021 - NW435

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, in view of the sit-in by two South African artists at the Southern African Music Rights Organisation (SAMRO) on 19 and 20 February 2021 to highlight the alleged thievery and mismanagement of the money of especially black South African musicians by unscrupulous collecting societies, his department has taken any steps to deal with the alleged theft of monies belonging to artists by SAMRO; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The issue of mismanagement of royalties by collecting societies has been in the public domain for quite some time and recommendations were made for government to enact strong legislations that will compel all societies to properly account to their members and to government. The current situation is that only needle-time collecting societies are required to account not only to their members but also to the Companies & Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) on how they distribute royalties collected. Unfortunately, SAMRO does form part of these collecting societies, as it does not collect for needle time. The current process of amending the Copyright Act is aimed at, inter alia, providing a comprehensive approach towards addressing these issues. As a matter of facts, the proposed pieces of legislation (Copyright reformed legislation makes provision that all collecting societies are legally obliged to properly account to both their members and to the CIPC. We believe that the once the Bills which are currently in Parliament for further review are enacted, the situation will surely improve.

While the above process is unfolding, it is possible for members of the collecting societies to use other avenues such as the provisions that are in the Companies Act of 2008 to ensure that the Directors of these companies are held accountable for proper management of the company. Based on the provision of the Act, members can also submit their complaints to the CIPC on matters relating any alleged breach of fiduciary duties.

Despite all this, and noting the obligation that we have as a Department which demands that we protect our artists, the office of the DG has met with the management of all the collecting societies on 2 March 2021, this include SAMRO. There are a number of issues that were discussed, including the increase and usage of modern technology to management royalty collection and distribution; frequent distributions of royalties to ensure that artists access their income as soon as possible; commitment on the tracking and tracing system for unclaimed royalties - using various media platforms to reach out to those whom their royalties remained unclaimed. Of great importance, we have also agreed on the development and creation of government and corporate partnership programs to educate artists and the heirs about their works as managed by these collecting societies, this having noted that most of the artists are not aware of who exactly collects for what in all applicable musical rights. The actual plans surrounding the partnership programs will be unveiled as soon as the details become available.

08 April 2021 - NW425

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, in view of the concerns that the Garlandale Black River Heritage has raised, What (a) total number of mining plants were visited by health and safety labour inspectors during the period 1 January 2018 and 31 December 2020 and (b) were the overall findings about health and safety protocols on mines?

Reply:

I have not been informed of the concerns raised by the Garlande Black Heritage, I will therefore not be in a position to respond whether the mining plants were visited by the health and safety labour inspectors.

19 March 2021 - NW270

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) are the relevant details of his department’s plan for distributing the relief grant to artists and (b) have been the major stumbling blocks towards ensuring that the relief grant reaches as many artists as possible?

Reply:

A). The department had reprioritized funds and set aside R150 million towards relief efforts for arts practitioners. The disbursement of these funds was implemented through calls for applications. To date, three phases of call outs have been made, with the third one still in process. It is anticipated that no less than 9000 artists would have benefitted from the interventions.

b). The challenges experienced have mainly centred around verification of applicants by different state structures that are offering similar benefits in order to avoid double dipping to ensure the limited funds reach as many beneficiaries as possible.

19 March 2021 - NW686

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract? (NW804E)

Reply:

a) Yes my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below:-

(i)Name

(ii)Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv)Duration

Pristo Response Trading

Provision of a twenty-four hour security service at four Departmental sites.

R43 071 939.83

Three years – 29 June 2018 – 30 May 2021.

       

Cardura Security

Provision of a twenty four hour security service at Regent Place.

R4 176 000.00

Three years –

1 March 2019 – 28 February 2022.

       

(b). Yes Entities under my Department makes use of private security firms as outlined below-:

i) ENTITY

ii) NAME OF FIRM

iii) PURPOSE OF CONTRACT

iv) VALUE

v) DURATION

Iziko Museums of South Africa

Fidelity Security Services

Guarding services at the various Museums.

R113 168.54 per month

Month to month basis

 

ADT

Alarm monitoring and response services at buildings occupied by Iziko Museums.

R15 371.86 per month

Month to month basis

A tender for the services has been concluded and an agreement will be signed between the preferred service provider and Iziko Museums.

Ditsong Museums of South Africa

Senegal Security CC.

To meet all requirements of DMSA in terms of physical security access control. The purpose

of access control is to prevent the unauthorized access and egress of persons/vehicles and

the bringing in of any dangerous objects onto DMSA premises in order to safeguard the

people, the property, assets and buildings.

R 49 185 196

Thirty-Six (36) Months with effective from 1 November 2019.

Afikaanse Taalmuseum en monument

Drakenstein Security Services and CCTV Room (Pty) Ltd

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 985 688

3 years

Expired on 31 December 2020

 

Baruch Security Services

Security guards for the Taalmonument and Amphitheatre for night shift

R 1 336 209

3 years

Active from 1 January 2021

Freedom Park

Elihle/Titanium Security Services

General access control and guarding services

R 12 755 026.

3 years (effective from 01 December 2019 to 30 November 2022

Kwazulu Natal Museum

Delta Force Security

To provide security at the Old St Anne’s Hospital property. The property is the site earmarked for the new KZN Museum building. Outsourced security is required while the project is at the planning and design stage. Security arrangements will change as soon as the site is handed over to a building contractor.

R9 016.00 per month.

Month to month contract.

National Museum

National security

Provision of armed response, monitoring of emergency services and annual maintenance

R 392 462.34

5 years

1 August 2019 to 31 August 2024

 

Stallion

Guarding services for the museum

R 1 765 060.16

3 years

1 February 2021 to 31 January 2024

Nelson Mandela Museum

Tyeks Security Services

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control in the museum

R 8 000 018.07

 

3 year fixed contract

uMsunduzi museum

Siyejabula Security Solution cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place

R 1 270 980.00

3 years

 

ADT

To provide Alarm monitoring and armed response.

  R69 386.37.

24 Months

 

Sizowakha Security and Cleaning Services cc

To provide security guard services in order to maintain security on site, and ensure access control is in place.

R1 113 133,41

3 years

War Museum of the Boer-Republic

Fidelity Security Services

To provide 24-hour guard on ground and guard in the museum when open

R 356 524.68

7 Months

William Humphreys Art Gallery

Gate to Door Security

To monitor the building

R 70 392.00

2 years

Luthuli Museum

Siyajabula Security Services

To provide security to the organisation

R 1,474,483.32

3 years

Robben Island Museum

G4S Security Services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501, including Cash Collection

R10 291 783.49

2 years

 

Khuselani Security & Risk Management

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

5 years

 

Prosec security services

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R19 673 535.09

2 years 9 months

 

City security cc

Rendering of Security Services in safe guarding Robben Island Museum's properties and assets in Murray's Harbour, Nelson Mandela Gateway, Jetty 1 and Quay 501.

R15 022 224.00

3 years

         

South African Heritage Resources Agency

ADT

Alarm installation, monitoring and armed response to Paarl office and buildings

R 3 030.00 p/m

Month to month

 

BC security solutions

Farm patrol

R 456 000.00

24 months

 

Security SA

On-site physical security for securing of vulnerable building structures

R504 576.00

12 months

 

Qamata Trading projects

Security services at Old Resi-dency in King Williams Town

R 414 000,00

24 months

 

Suidpunt Sekuriteit

Alarm installation and moni-toring of Struisbaai units

R 321.00/Per month

Month to month

 

Bokwe’s security services

Service Provider to provide physical security services at SAHRA Head Office

R778 073,76

36 months

South African Institute

for Drug Free Sport

No private security appointed

The South African Drug Free Sport Institution has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

Pansalb

No private security appointed

The language Board does not use private security the Landlord provide for the service

N/A

N/A

Boxing South Africa

No private security appointed

The Boxing South Africa has no private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

AMAZWI South

Museum of Literature

Hi-Tec Security

Monitoring of intruder security system, armed response and Monitoring of fire alarms

Approximately R50 000.00 per year.

Ongoing contract

NLSA

Eldna security services

Provision of security services at Pretoria campus

R 7 583,263.30

3 years

 

Eldna security services

Provision of services at Cape Town campus

R 5, 690,038.44

3 years

South African Library for the Blind

The Library do not have private security at its premises

N/A

N/A

N/A

National Arts Council

Khokhotiva General Services (Pty) Ltd

To provide 24 Hour Protection Service at the council

R398 600,00

12 Months

National Film video and Foundation

Satenga Security Services (Pty) Ltd

The company provides security services which include monitoring access control into the premises where the NFVF rents office space.

R321 540.00

12 Months

National Heritage

The Council do not have private security at its premises the landlord provide for that service

N/A

N/A

N/A

PACOFS

Ignite security

Provision of security services. 

R4 640 400 for a period of three (3) years

3 years

South African State Theatre

Cardura Trading Enterprise

Security provision

R13,634,348.13

36 months

The Playhouse Company

Excellerate Services (Pty) Ltd

To safeguard employees, patrons, service providers, movable assets and property at The Playhouse Company buildings.

R 9 926 139 for the 3 year contract

3 years

ARTSCAPE

Afri Guard (Pty) Ltd

To provide security at the premises

R 12 186 334.08

3 years

The Market Theatre Foundation

Rise Security

To provide general security for the premises

R6 312 017.66

3 years

 

Fidelity ADT

To provide with armed response to the premises

R81 900.00

3 years

19 March 2021 - NW650

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

NATIONAL ASSEMBL1. (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; 2. on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; 3. whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? QUESTION NO. 650-2021 FOR WRITTEN REPLY INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.06- 2021: Date of publication – 05 March 2021 “Mrs V van Dyk (DA): to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture” (a). How long has the Bertram House been closed, (b) what are the reasons for the closure and (c) on what date will it reopen; on what date will the marks on the Koopmans De Wet House indicating water leaks since October 2020 be attended to; whether there has been proper inspection to see if there are indeed leaks; if not, why not; if so, (a) who conducted the inspection and (b) on what date? NW768E REPLY: (1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015. (b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff. (c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021. (2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak. (3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise. (b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

Reply:

(1).(a). Iziko Bertram House (IBH) has been closed since August 2015.

(b). The closure was as a result of a health and safety hazard, where part of a ceiling dislodged making it unsafe for the public and staff.

(c). It is scheduled to reopen Iziko Bertram House in April 2021.

(2). The marks on the wall is as a result of a roof leak. In terms of the DPWI Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 5.2; repair work to roofs and waterproofing must be attended to by the DPWI. The DPWI conducted inspections and scheduled a Contractor for week of 15 March 2021 to attend to the leak.

(3)(a). An inspection was conducted by Architects with heritage expertise.

(b). On 7 and 21 October 2020 the Iziko Security Health and Safety Officer conducted the inspection and the Architects conducted inspections on 12 and 13 November 2020.

19 March 2021 - NW648

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1.(a). Who is supposed to maintain the Rust en Vreugd gardens and (b) how regularly is the maintenance done; 2. whether there are any window panes missing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will the window panes be fixed? NW766E

Reply:

1.(a). Iziko Museums maintain the gardens

(b). Iziko’s Maintenance team attends to daily garden maintenance. A Service Provider specialising in tree felling is scheduled quarterly to cut the trees.

2. There is one window pane missing at a height of more than 4 metres at Iziko Rust en Vreugd (IR&V). In terms of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure Guidelines for Day to Day Maintenance paragraph 4.3, any infrastructural services/ work three metres above the ground cannot be executed by the User Department. A Contractor is being appointed to perform repair and maintenance of the exterior of IR&V, so the broken window pane will be repaired as part of the project. The Contractor will be appointed by the end April 2021.

19 March 2021 - NW649

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What is the total number of the Iziko Museum (a) board members who have actual knowledge and qualifications in arts and (b) buildings that have reopened after they were closed following the COVID-19 lockdown? NW767E

Reply:

a) nAdvocate Rod Solomons – Advocate focussing on constitutional; human rights; corporate governance and corporate matters. Previous Head of Department of Cultural Affairs and Sport in the Western Cape that included being in charge of museums, he was instrumental in forming various public entities in the arts & culture sector; served on the National Film & Video Foundation council.

Advocate Judith Leshabane – Advocate focussing on labour relations, human rights issues, policy, contracts and refugees. Chairperson of the National Museum in Bloemfontein Council.

Mr Dumisani Dlamini – Chartered Accountant and previous CFO of the National Arts Council and current CFO of SANPARKS and appointed to the Accounting Standards Board. Expertise in governance, turnaround strategies, risk management, financial management, asset management and tourism.

Professor Pitika Ntuli – 2 Post Graduate Degrees in Fine Arts, he is an accomplished expert in the arts and culture arena and served on various bodies and structures in this field

Mr Krishna Govender – Chartered Accountant; he was previous a CFO of Supersport, expertise in strategy, business process improvement, financial modelling and policy reviews and process-engineering.

Ms Sijabulile Makhathini – Chartered Accountant; expertise in governance, risk management, financial management.

Ms Magdalene Moonsamy – Lawyer; Deputy Chairperson of the African Peer Review Mechanism and previous Chief Operations Officer of the National Youth Development Agency.

Mr Popo Masilo – Lawyer; Chairperson of the William Humphreys Art Gallery, Kimberly.

b) 10

19 March 2021 - NW639

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the name change process of Port Elizabeth, King William’s Town, Uitenhage and MaClear in the Eastern Cape, what is the total projected cost on (a) national, (b) provincial and (c) municipal level to implement the name changes to (i) Gqeberha, (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu respectively; 2. whether provision has been made for the specified name changes in the respective budgets on the three levels of government; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; 3. whether any impact study was conducted on the cost of the name changes for local businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a). No cost is projected at the national level to implement the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively. The Department has a national programme to transform South Africa’s heritage landscape through the transformation of colonial and apartheid symbolism reflected in statues, monuments and place names all over South Africa.

The cost of this national programme is budgeted for within the departmental allocations from the national fiscus. There are no extra funds allocated to any sphere of government to fund these name changes specifically.

(b). The provincial government in the Eastern Cape funds the programme of the transformation of its naming landscape from its share of the provincial treasury allocations, including implementing the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii)Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively.

(c) Municipal authorities responsible for implementing the name changes to (i) Gqeberha (ii) Qonce, (iii) Kariega and (iv) Nqanqarhu, respectively will fund activities relating to the changed names from their existing budget allocations.

19 March 2021 - NW638

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Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the name changes of Port Elizabeth to Gqeberha, King William’s Town to Qonce, Uitenhage to Kariega and MaClear Town to Nqanqarhu, what (a) total number of representations and/or comments were received by (i) the Geographical Name Change Committee tasked with the name change process and (ii) his Office following the advertisements of the name changes as required by legislation during the different stages of the process, (b) number of the specified comments were (i) in favour of and (ii) against the specified changes and (c) are the reasons that the comments against the name changes were not taken into account?

Reply:

(1) The Eastern Cape Provincial Geographical Names Committee conducted public hearings as followings:

  1. Raymond Mhlaba Sport Centre on 13 November 2018
  2. Port Elizabeth City Hall 14 November 2018
  3. Uitenhage Town Hall 20 November 2018
  4. Chatty Community Hall 21 November 2018
  5. Nangoza Jebe Hall 22 November 2018
  6. Maclear Town Hall 27 February 2019
  7. King Williamstown Town Hall 19 November 2019
  8. Berlin Town Hall 21 November 2019
  9. East London City Hall 26 November 2019.

During these public consultations the name Nelson Mandela and Bhayi were also proposed for Port Elizabeth. However, the name Bhayi was disqualified as it was argued that it was just a translation of the word Baai. The name Nelson Mandela was disqualified as it was argued that it was overused in South Africa and the President Mandela never resided in the city. The counting of objections was never carried out as the sessions were not treated as referenda.

(1 and 11) The department has received twelve objections at the time this reply was being written from the public following the gazetting of the name changes on the 22nd of February 2021.

(b) on the number of comments for and against the name change. Section 10 of the South African Geographical Names Act 118 of 1998 provides for objections to the gazetted names but not for those who support the name changes hence no details of those who support the name changes were collected.

(c) As stated above the reasons given for the disqualification of the name Nelson Mandela was that the name was overused in South Africa and that President Mandela never lived in Port Elizabeth. The name Bhayi was disqualified because it was argued that the name Bhayi is a translation of the Afrikaans word Baai referring to any bay.

 

19 March 2021 - NW585

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether he will furnish Mr T W Mhlongo with the audited financial statements of Volleyball South Africa for the 2014-15 financial year; if not, why not; if so, (2). Whether his department has a stable relationship with Volleyball South Africa; if not, why not, if so, what are the relevant details of the relationship?

Reply:

Volleyball South Africa in its response provided us with the following;

1). Yes, the Audited Financial Statements for Volleyball South Africa for 2014 – 2015 financial year is attached.

2). Yes, the Department has a stable relationship with Volleyball South Africa. Through the support provided by the Department, Volleyball’s focus has been providing opportunities for participation in Volleyball in rural, local, district, provincial and national levels. The specific focus areas have been in the following:

a) Development of administrators, coaches and referees. (Indoor and Beach Volleyball)

b) Developing women’s’ participation at all levels of volleyball. (Indoor and Beach Volleyball)

c) Developing volleyball for people with disabilities.

d) Developing and encouraging youth participation.

19 March 2021 - NW523

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2).whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. (a). Yes, the Department had staff who undertook Remunerative Work Outside the Public Sector.

(b)(i) and (ii) Approval for Remunerative Work is valid for a period of 12 months; awareness is conducted that no work should be done without the approval of the Executive Authority, in line with the Public Service Code of Conduct, and Public Service Regulations of 2016. The CIPC database is checked to identify all companies aligned to officials via their identity number. The Central Database at National Treasury (CDNT) is checked for active companies aligned to officials.

(b)(i)

Financial Year

Total

2014-15

0

2015-16

1

2016-17

8

2017-18

15

2018-19

11

2019-20

19

(b)(ii)

Financial Year

Job Category

a) 2015-16[01 April 2015-30 March 2016]

Director: Heraldry

2015-16 Total [1]

a) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Admin Clerk

b) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Design

c) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Executive Liaison/ Support

d) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director: Preservation

e) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Director: Cultural Development

f) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Director: Terminology Coordination

g) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

ASD: EAP

h) 2016-17[01 April 2016-30 March 2017]

Deputy Director Touring Ventures-MGE

2016-17 Total [8]

a) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director- Heritage Promotion [ Ex-DAC employee]

b) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director Corp Service[DDG's Office] - [Ex-DAC]

c) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

d) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Administration Officer

e) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director- Language Planning

f) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director - Language Planning

g) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director- Institutional Policy

h) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Assist Director- Employee Wellness

i) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director - Finance Admin [ Ex-DAC]

j) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Director: Terminology Coordination

k) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Principal Archivist [ ASD]

l) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Ambassador International Relations - EX- DAC

m) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Registration Clerk

n) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Ministry- Consultant [Ex-DAC]

o) 2017-18[01 April 2017 -31 March 2018]

Deputy Director - Cult Development

2017-18 Total [15]

a) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Bureau of Heraldry

b) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Admin Officer

c) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Terminology Coordination

d) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Registration Clerk

e) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Internal Audit

f) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director: Corporate Services Support

g) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

h) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Cultural Development

i) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Principal Archivist

j) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Deputy Director: ACPD

k) 2018-19 [01 April 2018-30 March 2019]

Director: Language Planning

2018-19 Total [11]

Financial Year

Job Category

a) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

b) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

c) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Admin Officer

d) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

e) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

f) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Preservation

g) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

h) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Chief Language Practitioner

i) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Language Practitioner

j) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director : Craft

k) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director Human Resource Development

l) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Principal Archivist

m) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director : Language Planning

n) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director: Terminology Coordination

o) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Assistant Director Employee wellness

p) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Director Cultural Development

q) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Infrastructure Support

r) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Registration Clerk

s) 2019-20[01 April 2019-30 March 2020]

Deputy Director: Forensic Audit

2019-20 Total [19]

(2). Yes, approval was granted for all listed officials.

(a). The policy requires that written approval is granted by the Executive Authority.

(b). The immediate superior reviews and endorses the approval, the application is referred to the Ethics Committee, recommendation to approve are sent to the Accounting Officer, who then provides final recommendation to the Executive Authority.

(c). One, the matter was resolved.

(d). The official resigned as a Director of the company, after a letter to institute disciplinary action was issued to her.

19 March 2021 - NW465

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). On what date last has each building under the care of the Iziko Museums of South Africa been painted and (b) how regularly does the five-year plan suggest that the specified buildings should be painted?

Reply:

a) The exterior of the Iziko Koopmans de Wet Museum was painted in 2010, the Iziko Slave Lodge was painted in February 2020 and the façade of the Bo-Kaap Museum was painted in October 2020. The Custodian (DPWI) of state-owned buildings funded only the painting of the exterior of the Iziko Slave Lodge and did not fund the painting of any other buildings over the past ten years.

b) The Five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan states that the paint and decorative finishes of the external walls require a complete repaint every five years. The external woodwork should be repainted every three to five years.

19 March 2021 - NW464

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What total number of curatorial positions in the various collections are vacant at present at the Iziko Museums of South Africa and (b)(i) how long have the specified positions been vacant and (ii) what has he found to be the reason(s) for this?

Reply:

a) There are 20 curatorial positions. There are 5 vacancies

b) (i) One position since 2016 and four since 2020 to date

(ii) There have been retirements and resignations. The institution was in the process of filling some of these positions with the limited funding it had but the global pandemic struck and financial austerity measures were imposed by National Treasury. This has severely affected the recruitment of staff at the Iziko Museums of South Africa.

19 March 2021 - NW463

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

In light of the Annual Report of the Iziko Museums of South Africa (Iziko) wherein it was stated that R9,5 million was spent on plans from an architectural firm to provide Iziko with five-year plans, (a) on what date was the specified amount paid and (b) what annual amount was spent on the buildings under Iziko`s care since the specified date?

Reply:

a) Payments were made according to the project plan in the contract with the appointed Architectural firm from 2016/2017 financial year to date.

b) Since 2016/2017 the Iziko Museums of South Africa spent R2 004 651 on day to day maintenance. Iziko has spent R 7 996 395 on the Conservation Maintenance plan to date.

19 March 2021 - NW436

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he has taken any steps to deal with the alleged racism in South African cricket since the revelations by a certain person (name furnished) on the manner that he was treated while playing for the South African national team; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, I have engaged Cricket South Africa on the alleged racism in South African cricket. To this end Cricket South Africa has indicated that it is taking restorative steps towards ensuring that all issues of discrimination brought up by former cricket players will indeed be attended to.

The Interim Board of Cricket South Africa has endorsed the rollout programme of the Social Justice and Nation Building Project and Mr. Makhaya Ntini remains an integral part of the rollout of this programme and the specific issues that he raised will be handled as part of the processes of the office of the ombudsperson.

Once ready, the Social Justice and Nation Building Project rollout process will begin with public hearings, which will culminate to a report and action plan by the Independent Cricket Ombudsman.

19 March 2021 - NW328

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee intends to send any officials to the Tokyo Olympics; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total number of officials, (b) are their names and positions in each case and (c) will be the cost to send each specified official, including (i) flight costs, (ii) accommodation costs and (iii) any other specified costs; (2). Whether any of the specified athletes will be subsidising any official; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, which officials will be subsidised?

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in its response indicated the following;

1). As per the IOC/Tokyo accreditation guidelines, officials (management, coaches, mechanics, grooms, doctors, physiotherapists and administrators) form part of the overall team and are essential to ensure athlete performance.

(a). SASCOC will only know the final number of officials once all athletes and teams have qualified.

(b). The names and positions of the officials will only be known by mid-June 2021 at final team announcement.

(c). All countries receive a travel grant from Tokyo to cover all team members (athletes and officials). All team members stay at an Athlete Games Village at no cost. This includes full board and lodging.

2). Athletes will not be subsiding any official that is part of Team SA. Officials are part of Team South Africa as part of support to the athletes. As per IOC/IF Guidelines all teams, need support of management, coaches and medical to enable athletes to focus on their optimal performance.

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee provided the tables below illustrating the breakdown of athletes and officials.

 

19 March 2021 - NW327

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether any (a) sports teams and/or (b) individuals participating in the Tokyo Olympic Games will have to pay fully and/or partially for the cost to participate in the games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) to which teams and/or athletes does this pertain, (ii) what number of persons are affected, (iii) what are the reasons that the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee will not be covering the full cost for each team and/or individual to participate and (iv) what is the breakdown of the costs for each team and/or individual, including (aa) flights, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other specified costs? NW331

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in its response indicated the following;

a). No, sports teams and/or individuals as members of Team South Africa participating in the Tokyo Olympic Games will not have to pay fully and/or partially for the cost to participate in the games.

(i)(ii).The position in this regard is that the SASCOC mandate is to deliver Team South Africa to multi-coded games and therefore funding must be sourced to cover the cost for Team delivery. SASCOC is working hard to secure the necessary funding to deliver the team to Tokyo.

(iii). However, if SASCOC is not successful in raising all the required funding to deliver the team to Tokyo the SASCOC General Assembly, at its AGM on 23 November 2019 resolved that should SASCOC not raise all the required funding, the participating National Federations will raise the necessary funding to assist SASCOC to deliver Team South Africa to Tokyo.

(iv). The budget is being reworked based on sponsors being signed and other potential funders so a cost per team member should be available mid-March 2021.

 

19 March 2021 - NW299

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to the Iziko Museum, on what date (a) will the electrical and other problems of the Old Town House be fixed and (b) will the building be reopened to the public; (2).(a). who is the person responsible for maintenance of the specified house and (b) what are the reasons that it has not been done; (3). whether there is a timeline to finish the upgrading; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a). The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the custodian in terms of section 4 of the Government Immovable Asset Management Act (GIAMA), 2007 (Act no. 19 of 2007 and in terms of the Day to Day Maintenance Guidelines must pay “for services which falls within the scope of the Day to Day Maintenance Services obliged for an amount exceeding R100 000”, this amount was previously R30 000.

In terms of GIAMA, the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) is the user and is required to fund day to day maintenance of R100 000 and less for buildings, including Iziko Old Townhouse (IOTH), occupied by Iziko Museums, one of its public entities. So when there were two electrical fires at IOTH that caused the closure of the building, Iziko Museums immediately attended to the repairs required which amounted to about R55 000.00 and due to the age of the building also commissioned an Architect to inspect and estimate the scope of work further electrical work required. The assessment was that the electrical wiring needed to be replaced as it was a fire hazard. DPWI was informed accordingly.

An Architect with heritage experience was appointed to manage the repair and maintenance project to address safety issues to ensure that the IOTH infrastructure is compliant with health and safety requirements.

(b). The building will be reopened to the public once the building has been declared compliant in terms of health and safety requirements.

2(a). As indicated in paragraph (1)(a) above, the Minister of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has been appointed as the custodian of the immovable assets which vest in the national sphere of government and is thus the caretaker of the state-owned building IOTH in terms of GIAMA. In terms of the Day to Day Maintenance Guidelines, DPWI is responsible for all work exceeding R100 000 and as the user, DSAC is responsible for all work costing R100 000 and the Department has delegated this responsibility to Iziko Museums.

(b). This work exceeds R100 000, so this question should be posed to the Minister of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) who is appointed as custodian of state-owned buildings and, in terms of GIAMA section 4(2), is the caretaker of state-owned buildings such as the IOTH and thus responsible for repairs and maintenance of R100 000 and more and specifically those projects related to health and safety.

(3). As indicated in paragraph (1)(a) above, the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture is not the custodian of state-owned buildings and as user is only required to fund repairs and maintenance projects of R100 000 and below, but DSAC has nevertheless previously allocated R9.51million to develop a five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan for the nine state-owned buildings occupied by Iziko Museums so Architects developed the following documents for each of the nine buildings:

  • As-Built Drawings;
  • An Existing Building Condition Report;
  • A Conservation Management Plan; and
  • A five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan.

In terms of the South African National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act No. 25 of 1999), all heritage buildings must be managed in terms of a Conservation and Maintenance Plan (CMP) to protect the heritage resource. The CMP for the nine buildings submitted to the provincial authority Heritage Western Cape (HWC) for approval, but only eight were approved as the CMP for one building had been mislaid.

Although not required, DSAC also allocated R1 509 248, 00 for the repair and maintenance of buildings occupied by Iziko Museums. A Project Manager with architectural and heritage experience was appointed and applications for repair and renovation permits were submitted to HWC in terms of the South African National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act No. 25 of 1999).

A project implementation plan was developed and the project brief for the tender to appoint a Contractor to carry out repair and renovation, including painting services, at IOTH and other buildings occupied by Iziko. The Contractor for the repair and renovation and painting services for buildings occupied by Iziko Museums, including IOTH, will be appointed by 30 April 2021.

As DPWI did not allocate funding for this health and safety project, DSAC also allocated the amount of R4 395 212 for the electrical wiring that must be replaced at IOTH as it was a fire hazard.

Although HWC had approved a permit for repair and maintenance as well as the CMP for IOTH, Iziko Museums was informed that a further permit application is required for the electrical repairs. The tender documentation to appoint a Contractor to do the electrical repairs has been prepared, but it cannot be advertised until the permit approval is received as there might be further stipulations from HWC that would need to be incorporated in the scope of work, as was the case with the permit applications for painting the buildings.

HWC issued permits for the repair and renovation of IOTH as well as other buildings occupied by Iziko more than a year after Iziko Museums had submitted the applications, so timelines are dependent on how long HWC will take to issue a permit for electrical work to be carried out at IOTH.

19 March 2021 - NW298

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

With reference to the Iziko Museum, (a) how long has the Michaelis Collection been stored, (b) where is it stored and (c) what is it worth?

Reply:

(a). The Collection has been in storage since 31 December 2015.

(b). The Michaelis Collection is stored in the Iziko storerooms for security reasons.

(c). For security reasons, the Iziko Museums would not like to disclose the value of the said Collections.

19 March 2021 - NW297

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

(1). With reference to the Iziko Museum, (a) what are the relevant details of the Court Yard project, (b) on what date was the project approved, (c) what was the budget allocation, (d) what work needed to be done, (e) on what date was it supposed to be completed and (f) what is the total amount that has been spent; (2). whether the project (a) has been completed and (b) is currently in use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1). (a).

Project Name : COURTYARD PROJECT

Public Entity : IZIKO SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

Location : The Company Gardens, Queen Victoria Street, Cape Town, Western Cape.

The Museum building complex is sited within the Company Gardens and comprises several interlinked buildings which range from the historically significant, main entrance building, (Block A), through the various infill additions and extensions to the early 1980’s, heavily serviced, late brutalist Courtyard Building, (Block C).

Work under this contract extends throughout this complex and involves specialised heritage work in the oldest building on the entrance side, incorporates work to some of the earlier interlinking buildings previously altered and extended, includes work to the high ceilinged Whale Well. The work focusses mainly on the mountain side Courtyard Building (Block C) which is extensively updated, upgraded, structurally strengthened and extended with construction of five floors on piled foundations within the internal courtyard carrying new sixth and seventh floors which cantilever over the original building.

Project Description, scope and objectives:

The project was undertaken to increase the research collections’ storage capacity, to update safety services and to expand the visitor experience.

Alterations and additions were undertaken to update, extend and complement existing museum facilities, including those for the receiving, preparation, research, safe keeping, conservation and select display of scientific natural history specimens. Considerable additional specialized protected storage has been provided, much with close climate control. Also provided are new education and conference facilities, laboratories and management facilities. All services within Blocks C and D have been updated and fire safety in particular has been significantly improved with the range of fire suppression systems implemented including water, foam and inert gas systems. Electronic access control, monitoring and low UV energy efficient lighting is provided.

Work comprised alterations and restoration of various areas within the historic buildings (comprising Blocks A and B) of the Museum Complex; installation of digital display lighting and construction of a new plant room at roof level within the Whale Well (Block B); stripping, alterations and extensive reconstruction of the 1980’s research and collection building, (Block C) and the construction within its courtyard of a new five storey infill structure on extensive piled foundations.

This infill structure supports the new sixth floor which cantilevers over the existing building and houses a multi-purpose, sub-divisible conference facility with breakaway and entertainment areas and a full catering kitchen. Above this the new top, seventh floor accommodates meeting rooms and the executive offices of the eleven national museums in Cape Town, Iziko Museums of South Africa.

Block D, (the building with its two courtyards, which link Block C and the Planetarium) is extensively reconfigured for education facilities and offices, with one light well repurposed as a usable, planted courtyard and the other courtyard roofed, provided with Amphitheatre style seating and integrated with the adjacent classrooms and meeting areas.

New fire protection services installed as part of the works include fail-safe pumped water storage, gas, foam and sprinkler fire suppression systems; energy efficient reverse-cycle heating, ventilation and air conditioning; interactive digital touch-screen displays, two new passenger lifts and a new goods lift; computerised bio-metric access control, digital security cameras, a stand by generator and new electrical, security and alarm infrastructure. Low energy consumption lighting with minimal damaging ultra-violet light output has been installed.

Facilities includes:

  • specialised storage and conservation facilities for specimens preserved in volatile, flammable and hazardous substances which make extensive use of mobile racking to maximise efficiency, and
  • specialised, separate safe marine mammal and terrestrial vertebrates wet dissection areas with purpose made tables incorporating down draft extraction for health and safety reasons, served by a travelling mono-rail crane which links to new cold and freezer rooms, the high hazard tank storage facility and vehicle loading docks,
  • the fossil specimen preparation laboratory,
  • taxidermy, maceration and specimen preparation areas,
  • workshop, display preparation, spray-room and associated design facilities,
  • conference facilities, breakaway rooms, catering facilities and support functions,
  • education facilities and classrooms, including roofing and internalising a courtyard for teaching purposes,
  • removal of redundant facilities and structure to provide additional display and teaching facilities in Blocks A and B,
  • the executive, finance and administration offices,
  • the research and special collections library,
  • the bio-diversity teaching and demonstration laboratory,
  • scanning electric microscope room and digital X-ray room.

Inert gas, foam or water fire suppression systems, appropriate to the various collections protect these areas and two on-site water storage tanks on piled foundations with autonomous pumps ensure adequate supply, independent of external power or water to separate fire hydrant, hose reel and sprinkler systems. Ground water has been tapped for reticulated for irrigation purposes.

(b). The project was approved on the 20th May 2005 (as per Procurement Instruction document)

(c). The budget allocated was R 339 303 043.19

(d). The work needed to be done was specialised storage and the other facilities noted above were required, obsolete infrastructure and services needed to be updated, fire and general safety and security improved and the structure of the building strengthened as this was showing stress cracks and signs of overloading before any new facilities were added. Some inappropriate modifications to the buildings needed to be removed, original spaces reinstated and their building fabric restored.

Inadequate fire suppression systems in Blocks C and D needed upgrading and replacement with energy efficient systems.

(e). The Original Practical Completion Date was 30 June 2014

Contract Commencement Date and duration: 29 June 2012. (24 months) Site Handover Date: 14 January 2013 (Award delayed due to adjudication process & non-availability of site).

(f). The total amount that has been spent including professional fees is R 319 403 705, 55

2.(a). The project/works reached the stage of practical completion in terms of the building contract on 14 August 2020 when the last few areas of the works were handed over to the User Department. The contractor is currently attending to snags prior to achievement of the contractual stage of Works Completion, anticipated to be achieved by end March 2021 with Final Completion early in July 2021.

(b). Yes, it is currently in use

05 March 2021 - NW201

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

With regard to his reply to question 2639 on 26 November 2020, regarding questions (a) 2109, (b) 2112 and (c) 2113, on what date is it envisaged that he will furnish Mr G R Krumbock with the requested information?

Reply:

(a). QUESTION No. 2109

Question no.2109 was responded to on

(b). QUESTION No. 2112-2020

In response to this question the South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) indicated that due to staff still working remotely, they will need more days to collate the information. They further indicated that they would only be able to retrieve information for the past 5 years.

We have contacted SASCOC to impress upon them to respond to this question we have not received any responses

(c). QUESTION No. 2113-2020

What (a) total amount has the SA Sports Trust spent on providing (i) sporting infrastructure, (ii) kit, (iii) equipment and (iv) programmes aimed at developing the young persons of the Republic in each financial year since its inception and (b) in each case, which sporting codes were the beneficiaries and/or recipients?

REPLY

Question no. 2113 was responded to.

05 March 2021 - NW380

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2223 on 30 October 2020, he will furnish Mr M Waters with the full audited reports since the inception of the FIFA 2010 World Cup Legacy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The South African Football Association (SAFA) in its response indicated that they are not in the office and would only be able to provide information on their return.

05 March 2021 - NW237

Profile picture: Luthuli, Mr BN

Luthuli, Mr BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

1. Whether his Department has conducted a study to establish how the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the suffering of the arts sector; If not, why not; if so, what are the details of the extent of the suffering as identified by his department; 2. What are the full relevant details of the beneficiaries of his department’s relief fund to date? NW204E

Reply:

  1. Yes, The South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) undertook a study in the early stages of the lockdown, which was completed in May 2020, that include an online survey and an econometric analysis.

The Impact?

Approximately 600 completed surveys were received, and the survey distinguished between:

  1. formal (65%) and informal businesses (35%)
  2. employers (with employees) (38%) and freelancers (with no permanent employees)) 62%)
  3. those who operate mainly face-to-face (31%) and those who do not operate face-to-face (69%)

Survey Responses by Domain

Domain

Percentage

Cultural & Natural Heritage

3%

Performance & Celebration

28%

Visual Arts & Crafts

16%

Books and Press

5%

Audio-Visual & Interactive Media

31%

Design & Creative Services

10%

Support Activities

6%

Formal sector operators seem to have experienced a higher proportion of cancellations of scheduled work than freelancers, possibly because of their longer-term planning horizons. Similarly, employers were more likely to have had scheduled work cancelled than freelancers. While those operating in a mostly not face-to-face mode initially experienced more cancellations (68%) than those operating mostly face-to-face, there were a greater proportion of face-to-face operations that experienced cancellations in future months.

Some respondents indicated that they were using the time productively to invest in the future of their businesses, which included:

  • Moving business activities, such as meetings and production, online (35%)
  • Arranging for greater flexibility to work from home (26%)
  • Agreeing with clients to postpone (but not cancel) work until a future date (34%)
  • Working on aspects of production (such as archiving, administration, developing creative ideas) that could be done without face-to-face interaction (36.5%)
  • Building up a stock of the goods we produce, to be sold at a later date (7%)
  • Using the time to up-skill or train myself and/or my employees (32%).

Less sustainable strategies involved short-term access to finance, which included:

  • Using up reserves or savings (40%)
  • Applying for a new loan, or an extension of a current loan (13%)
  • Getting support (money or other services) from friends and family (20.5%).

Other strategies being used were:

  • Moving business activities online, including production, distribution and sales, investing in skills, equipment and software that allows them to do this: “working on my website to strengthen my market image and presence”. There is, however, acknowledgement that online work limits access to poorer and rural communities.
  • General cost-cutting and reducing overheads wherever possible: “downscaling our business”
  • Diversifying into new or additional areas of business and exploring new markets: “Looking for new customers, and pivoting my business to add another income stream”.
  • Working on proposals and pitching new work to existing and new clients: “Trying to pitch work to existing clients which can be done online”.

Using the information on the characteristics of each domain a vulnerability score, out of 10, was developed for each domain, where a higher number indicates greater vulnerability

Vulnerability Score by Domain

Domain

Freelance

Mostly F2F

Informal

Weighted vulnerability score out of 10 (ranking)

Cultural & Natural Heritage

35.0%

85.7%

10.5%

5.55 (4)

Performance & Celebration

67.5%

95.2%

36.9%

7.52 (1)

Visual Arts & Crafts

72.5%

50.0%

47.8%

5.63 (3)

Books and Press

56.7%

26.7%

33.1%

3.70(6)

Audio-Visual & Interactive Media

63.7%

71.7%

33.5%

6.17 (2)

Design & Creatives Services

56.9%

30.0%

34.5%

3.90(5)

TOTAL

62.4%

68.6%

34.9%

6.00

Using an input output table developed to include the CCIs the average impact of the Covid-19 shutdown per domain for 2020 (Gross Domestic Product in billions of rand and percentage impact on the sector itself):

  • Cultural & Natural Heritage    -R1,156 (-44,8%)
  • Performance & Celebration   -R2,806 (-55,6%)
  • Visual Arts & Crafts               -R2,173 (-44,5%)
  • Books and Press                   -R8,262 (-36,1%)
  • Audio-Visual & Interactive Media  -R10,394 (44,7%)
  • Design & Creatives Services -R18,523 (-35,1%)

Two domains: the book and press and the designing creative services domains had the least impact and many authors and designers could continue working during Covid lockdown. On the other hand, the Performance and Celebration domain is most vulnerable (because of the high proportion of freelance and face-to-face production).

What, if anything were the positives?

Generally, the sector was forced to become more innovative in order to survive. One of the positive outcomes of the lockdown has been the increased use of information and communication technology (ICT). This has been particularly useful for enterprises and freelancers that have the equipment and the skills necessary to exploit these technologies. Unfortunately, many creatives, particularly in rural areas, could not access or use ICTs. Nevertheless, the use of these technologies has speeded up the 4th Industrial Revolution and will have positive consequences in the long-term for the South African creative economy. Creative are using the time to up-skill and acquired new skills.

2. The department have rolled out Covid 19 relief initiatives and invited practitioners to apply to date 4971arts practitioners have benefitted from these initiatives.

\

05 March 2021 - NW226

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE

(1) Whether with reference to his department’s first phase and second phase relief funding; his department conducted an audit of the R150 million relief funding; if not why not; if so what are the relevant details, (2) a) who was appointed to audit the relief fund books, (b) what was the reasons that his department did not appoint an independent audit company, (c) what total amount was given to the sports trust to administer on behalf of his department and (d) has he found the appointments of the sports trust to be fair; (3) whether all the relevant procedures, processes and regulations in appointing the sports trust were followed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so what are the terms of reference of the trust?

Reply:

1. So far, only the first phase has been audited. The rollout of the entire R150 million has not been concluded and it is expected that the next phases will also be audited when concluded.

2. (a) The Audit was conducted by both Internal Audit of DSAC and the Auditor General. Both audit outcome reports have been issued to the accounting officer of the department.

(b)  The department was content with the Auditor General process, who is  

  independent from the Department.

(c). The total amount transferred to the Sport Trust for Relief Funding is R9.4m as per National Treasury approval.

(d).  Yes, there has not been any indication that the appointment of the Sports Trust was in anyway unfair. The Sports Trust is a Non-Profit Organization   that partners the Department on the delivery of sport and recreation initiatives and has proven to be efficient and effective.

3.        Yes, the relevant procedures, processes and regulations were followed.  Before appointing the Sports Trust to assist in managing payments to the beneficiaries, the Department obtained approval from the National Treasury.

05 March 2021 - NW202

Profile picture: Krumbock, Mr GR

Krumbock, Mr GR to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

With reference to his reply to question 2566 on 26 November 2020, regarding questions 954, 955, 956, 960, 1173, and 1175 on what date is it envisaged that he will furnish Mr. Krumbock with the requested information?

Reply:

Question 954, 955, 956, 960, and 1173 were responded to and feedback on question no.1175 from SASCOC is still pending and a reminder for urgent response has been sent.

National Assembly.

Recommended.

QUESTION No. 226-2021

FOR WRITTE REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.1-2021, DATE OF PUBLICATION 11 FEBRUARY 2021:

Mr TW Mhlongo (DA): TO ASK THE MINISTER OF SPORT, ARTS AND CULTURE:

(1) Whether with reference to his department’s first phase and second phase relief funding; his department conducted an audit of the R150 million relief funding; if not why not; if so what are the relevant details,

(2) a) who was appointed to audit the relief fund books, (b) what was the reasons that his department did not appoint an independent audit company, (c) what total amount was given to the sports trust to administer on behalf of his department and (d) has he found the appointments of the sports trust to be fair;

(3) whether all the relevant procedures, processes and regulations in appointing the sports trust were followed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so what are the terms of reference of the trust? NW 229E

REPLY

  1. So far, only the first phase has been audited. The rollout of the entire R150 million has not been concluded and it is expected that the next phases will also be audited when concluded.

2. (a) The Audit was conducted by both Internal Audit of DSAC and the Auditor General. Both audit outcome reports have been issued to the accounting officer of the department.

(b) The department was content with the Auditor General process, who is

independent from the Department.

(c). The total amount transferred to the Sport Trust for Relief Funding is R9.4m as per National Treasury approval.

(d). Yes, there has not been any indication that the appointment of the Sports Trust was in anyway unfair. The Sports Trust is a Non-Profit Organization that partners the Department on the delivery of sport and recreation initiatives and has proven to be efficient and effective.

3. Yes, the relevant procedures, processes and regulations were followed. Before appointing the Sports Trust to assist in managing payments to the beneficiaries, the Department obtained approval from the National Treasury.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION No. 237-2021

FOR WRITTE REPLY

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.1-2021, DATE OF PUBLICATION 11 FEBRUARY 2021:

“Inkosi B N Luthuli (IFP): to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

  1. Whether his Department has conducted a study to establish how the Covid-19 pandemic has exacerbated the suffering of the arts sector; If not, why not; if so, what are the details of the extent of the suffering as identified by his department;

 

2. What are the full relevant details of the beneficiaries of his department’s relief fund to date? NW204E

REPLY

  1. Yes, The South African Cultural Observatory (SACO) undertook a study in the early stages of the lockdown, which was completed in May 2020, that include an online survey and an econometric analysis.

The Impact?

Approximately 600 completed surveys were received, and the survey distinguished between:

  1. formal (65%) and informal businesses (35%)
  2. employers (with employees) (38%) and freelancers (with no permanent employees)) 62%)
  3. those who operate mainly face-to-face (31%) and those who do not operate face-to-face (69%)

Survey Responses by Domain

Domain

Percentage

Cultural & Natural Heritage

3%

Performance & Celebration

28%

Visual Arts & Crafts

16%

Books and Press

5%

Audio-Visual & Interactive Media

31%

Design & Creative Services

10%

Support Activities

6%

Formal sector operators seem to have experienced a higher proportion of cancellations of scheduled work than freelancers, possibly because of their longer-term planning horizons. Similarly, employers were more likely to have had scheduled work cancelled than freelancers. While those operating in a mostly not face-to-face mode initially experienced more cancellations (68%) than those operating mostly face-to-face, there were a greater proportion of face-to-face operations that experienced cancellations in future months.

Some respondents indicated that they were using the time productively to invest in the future of their businesses, which included:

  • Moving business activities, such as meetings and production, online (35%)
  • Arranging for greater flexibility to work from home (26%)
  • Agreeing with clients to postpone (but not cancel) work until a future date (34%)
  • Working on aspects of production (such as archiving, administration, developing creative ideas) that could be done without face-to-face interaction (36.5%)
  • Building up a stock of the goods we produce, to be sold at a later date (7%)
  • Using the time to up-skill or train myself and/or my employees (32%).

Less sustainable strategies involved short-term access to finance, which included:

  • Using up reserves or savings (40%)
  • Applying for a new loan, or an extension of a current loan (13%)
  • Getting support (money or other services) from friends and family (20.5%).

Other strategies being used were:

  • Moving business activities online, including production, distribution and sales, investing in skills, equipment and software that allows them to do this: “working on my website to strengthen my market image and presence”. There is, however, acknowledgement that online work limits access to poorer and rural communities.
  • General cost-cutting and reducing overheads wherever possible: “downscaling our business”
  • Diversifying into new or additional areas of business and exploring new markets: “Looking for new customers, and pivoting my business to add another income stream”.
  • Working on proposals and pitching new work to existing and new clients: “Trying to pitch work to existing clients which can be done online”.

Using the information on the characteristics of each domain a vulnerability score, out of 10, was developed for each domain, where a higher number indicates greater vulnerability

Vulnerability Score by Domain

Domain

Freelance

Mostly F2F

Informal

Weighted vulnerability score out of 10 (ranking)

Cultural & Natural Heritage

35.0%

85.7%

10.5%

5.55 (4)

Performance & Celebration

67.5%

95.2%

36.9%

7.52 (1)

Visual Arts & Crafts

72.5%

50.0%

47.8%

5.63 (3)

Books and Press

56.7%

26.7%

33.1%

3.70(6)

Audio-Visual & Interactive Media

63.7%

71.7%

33.5%

6.17 (2)

Design & Creatives Services

56.9%

30.0%

34.5%

3.90(5)

TOTAL

62.4%

68.6%

34.9%

6.00

Using an input output table developed to include the CCIs the average impact of the Covid-19 shutdown per domain for 2020 (Gross Domestic Product in billions of rand and percentage impact on the sector itself):

  • Cultural & Natural Heritage -R1,156 (-44,8%)
  • Performance & Celebration -R2,806 (-55,6%)
  • Visual Arts & Crafts -R2,173 (-44,5%)
  • Books and Press -R8,262 (-36,1%)
  • Audio-Visual & Interactive Media -R10,394 (44,7%)
  • Design & Creatives Services -R18,523 (-35,1%)

Two domains: the book and press and the designing creative services domains had the least impact and many authors and designers could continue working during Covid lockdown. On the other hand, the Performance and Celebration domain is most vulnerable (because of the high proportion of freelance and face-to-face production).

What, if anything were the positives?

Generally, the sector was forced to become more innovative in order to survive. One of the positive outcomes of the lockdown has been the increased use of information and communication technology (ICT). This has been particularly useful for enterprises and freelancers that have the equipment and the skills necessary to exploit these technologies. Unfortunately, many creatives, particularly in rural areas, could not access or use ICTs. Nevertheless, the use of these technologies has speeded up the 4th Industrial Revolution and will have positive consequences in the long-term for the South African creative economy. Creative are using the time to up-skill and acquired new skills.

  1. The department have rolled out Covid 19 relief initiatives and invited practitioners to apply to date 4971arts practitioners have benefitted from these initiatives.

\

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION No. 378-2021

FOR WRITTE REPLY

378. Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

Whether the SA Football Association (SAFA) received any monies, in the form of a loan and/or any other category, from the Fédération Internationale de Football Association 2010 Legacy Trust; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the total amount of money that was received by SAFA, (b) was the money used for and (c) total amount has been paid back? NW384E

REPLY

The South African Football Association (SAFA) in its response indicated that they are not in the office and would only be able to provide information on their return.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION No. 379-2021

FOR WRITTE REPLY

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

Whether the SA Football Association has bought any properties; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the physical address of each property, (b) what is the total amount that was paid for each property, (c) in whose name is each property registered and (d) what is each property used for? NW385E

REPLY

The South African Football Association (SAFA) in its response indicated that they are not in the office and would only be able to provide information on their return.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Recommended.

QUESTION No. 380-2021

FOR WRITTE REPLY

380. Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 2223 on 30 October 2020, he will furnish Mr M Waters with the full audited reports since the inception of the FIFA 2010 World Cup Legacy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW386E

REPLY

The South African Football Association (SAFA) in its response indicated that they are not in the office and would only be able to provide information on their return.

05 March 2021 - NW24

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether he had been informed of the break-in at the Museum Africa in Gauteng in November 2020 and the damage done to the music exhibition and art collection after water pipes were broken during the break-in; if not, why not, if so, (a) has he sent persons to assess the cost of the damage and are the plans in place to prevent the same thing from happening again?

Reply:

Unfortunately, I have not been informed of the break-in and the extent of the damage done to the Music exhibition and the art collection that took place at Museum Africa in Gauteng in November 2020. Museum Africa is managed by the City of Johannesburg and not one of our entities.