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11 November 2019 - NW1260

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

What amount did (a) each provincial department of sports, arts and culture spend on provincial sporting awards in each of the past five financial years and (b) his department spend on national awards in each of the past five years?

Reply:

(a) The following is the expenditure as provided by each of the provincial departments of sports, arts and culture on their provincial sporting awards in each of the past five years:

Province

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

EC

R1 033 978.00

R1 805 920.00

R2 292 018.37

R3 205 969.49

R2 886 217.44

FS

No awards

No awards

R250 000.00

R320 000.00

R778 000.00

GP

R8 500 000.00

R9 503 034.00

R6 935 760.00

R8 999 614.00

R8 992 070.00

KZN

6 000 000.00

4 200 000.00

R 4 000 000.00

R4 560 000.00

R4 953 194.54

LMP

No awards

No awards

R992 695.00

R1 435 750.00

R1 156 470.00

MP

R1500000.00

No awards

No awards

No awards

R1 800 000.00

NW

R949000.00

R1400000.00

R1790000.00

R2307850.00

R2660560.00

NC

Not done

R850 000.00

R920 000.00

R935 000.00

Not done

WC

R521 529.29

R386 289.63

R728 026.06

R523 289.81

R541 416.75

(b) The following is the expenditure on the national sports awards by Sport and Recreation SA for the past five years:

Year 2015

Year 2016

Year 2017

Year 2018

Year 2019

R18 722 023.19

R15 387 606.00

R12 000 000.00

R8 869 803.05

R8 947 608.34

11 November 2019 - NW1415

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). Whether there is an urgent need to fill the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum, (i) with someone from the outside and (ii) in the middle of the current financial year and (b) has the Chief Executive Officer considered the appointment of the HOD as an opportunity to empower black women currently employed in the specified department?

Reply:

a) (i). Yes there was a need and as such the vacancy was advertised internally and externally

(ii). the incumbent has been appointed as the acting HOD

(b). There are two Black staff members who have indicated that they are happy with their development trajectory into their next level which is Museum Scientist and have indicated how the Museum can assist them with their development. The Museum has commenced with a programme to assist Black females to develop themselves especially in the core areas as a Museum scientist.

11 November 2019 - NW1414

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a). What is the salary package of the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum, (b) what grading system was used to determine the salary and (c) how does the salary compare to (i) the rest of the members of the department and (ii) other HODs employed at the museum?

Reply:

(a). The salary package of the position of the Head of Department (HOD) of the Archaeology and Anthropology department at the Bloemfontein National Museum is equivalent to an Assistant Director in the public service and the package is tied to that position.

(b). The Public Service grading system as published

(c)(i). the salary is comparative taking into account the different grades

(ii). the salary is in the same band as other HOD’s and is comparative

11 November 2019 - NW1376

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture

1.Whether his department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did his department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement? (NW2589E)

Reply:

  1. My department has never done business with any of the specified persons, companies or trusts in the past five financial years and since 1 April 2019.

11 November 2019 - NW1265

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What (i) amount was budgeted for the proposed permanent exhibition of antique weaponry at the National Museum in Bloemfontein in the 2019-20 financial year, (ii) portion of the budget has been spent to date, (iii) is the cost for the cases that will contain the weaponry and (iv) is the current status of the progress made in establishing the exhibition, (b) where will the exhibition be situated and (c) by what date will the exhibition be open to the public?

Reply:

(a)(i). No money was budgeted for a permanent antique exhibition of weaponry in the 2019- 20 financial year.

(ii). There was no budget.

(iii). There are no costs.

(iv). The Council approved the exhibition plan which provides that a rifle exhibition can be done at the satellite Museum of the National Museum (First Raadsaal and Wagon Museum) in the financial year 2019/20.

(b). the exhibition will be placed at the satellite Museum of the National Museum (First Raadsaal and Wagon Museum)

(c). the exhibition will be open to the public in this current financial year.

11 November 2019 - NW1264

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture:

(1). Whether the Council and/or Chief Executive Officer of the National Museum in Bloemfontein took a decision to phase out the use of Afrikaans at and by the museum; if not, what are the details of all steps taken by the museum to promote Afrikaans; if so, on what statutory grounds was the use of Afrikaans phased out, given that it is the second most spoken language in the Free State; (2)(a). why is Afrikaans being excluded from the museum’s (i) Culna and (ii) Indago publications and (b) what research was conducted to evaluate the impact of excluding Afrikaans from these publications; (3)(a). what are the details of the museum’s current language policy and (b) has he found that it complies with the provision of the Use of Official Languages Act, Act 12 of 2012, that there must be a choice of three official languages in which the public must be served officially; (4). what steps has the museum taken to (a) promote Sesotho as an indigenous language in the museum and (b) establish Sesotho as a scientific language? NW2476E

Reply:

1. The Council and or Chief Executive Officer of the National Museum in Bloemfontein has not taken any decision to phase out Afrikaans at the museum. Afrikaans is promoted in line with the Language Policy. The Language Policy of the National Museum in Bloemfontein was published in Government Gazette on 31 March 2015, Gazette No. 38670 following proper processes and has been implemented. Below are extracts from the gazette:

4.1. Government reports, documents and official publications intended for public distribution

a. English will be the language used for government reports and documents.

b. English will be the language used for all documents for public distribution.

4.2. Communication with the public

a. The language used when communicating with members of the public, whether for information or official matters, will be in the language that is understood by the majority of the members present, but limited to English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

b. A member of the public who wishes to receive a service from the National Museum in any language other than that in which the service is provided, may request that this be provided in such official language, limited to English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

c. If a member of the public is unable to communicate in the three languages contemplated above, the National Museum will make use of the services of an interpreter, including sign language practitioners, taking cognisance of factors such as time, cost and the availability of an interpreter or sign language practitioner.

d. Such requests must be in writing and received by the National Museum at least seven working days prior to the service being required.

(2)(a) The Language policy of the Museum was gazetted on 31 March 2015 Gazette No. 38670 which deals with Museum publications as detailed above.

(i) Culna is a popular scientific publication of the National Museum which is available in hardcopy and online, www.nationalmuseumpublications.co.za.

(ii) Indago is a scientific journal of the Museum which is accredited by the Department of Higher Education and Training. It is available in hardcopy and online, www.nationalmuseumpublications.co.za

(b) The Museum did not commission a formal study to evaluate the impact of excluding Afrikaans or any of the other official languages from any of the publications. However, the Museum did follow a process and also opened up to a formal comment process. In addition the Museum has access to a cache of research done on publications and languages which assists the Museum.

(3)(a) The Museum’s language policy has been published in government gazette

(b) The Museum’s language policy does provide that the public must be served in 3 languages which are English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

(4)(a) The Museum’s services to the public are conducted in English, Afrikaans and Sesotho.

(b) The Museum has identified Sesotho as a marginalised language and there are plans proposed in the draft Strategic Plan from 20/21 to annually issue a brochure in Sesotho which covers the major scientific research areas of the Museum’s work. Furthermore, the Museum has a mobile Museum which is taken to schools throughout the province and curriculum based lessons are provided in Sesotho where there is a need.

11 November 2019 - NW1263

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

(1). Whether conference attendance and fieldwork of staff members employed by the National Museum in Bloemfontein have been put on hold until a new Head of Department is appointed at the museum; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how will this affect the performance agreements of the staff members; (2). whether the museum conducted an organisational review and job grading in 2018; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the (a) review and (b) outcomes of the review?

Reply:

(1). No conference attendance and fieldwork of staff members were placed on hold.

(2)(a). The Museum commenced with an organisational review process in 2018. Phase 1 has been completed, and Council approved that the Museum will use the DPSA grading. This entailed aligning the defunct Museum Grading System with DPSA grading which was completed and approved by the Council of the Museum.

(b). Treasury has recently approved the use of surplus funds to fund Phase 1 in October 2019

11 November 2019 - NW1262

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

Whether any of the seven staff members of the National Museum in Bloemfontein who were accepted to make presentations at the South African Cultural History Conference held in Simon’s Town in October 2019 attended the conference; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) did the specified museum cover all the costs?

Reply:

(a). Drs. Hendrik Snyders and Marianna Botes of the History Department, and Elmar du Plessis of the Department of Collections attended the National Conference of the SA Society for Cultural History (SASCH) from 18-19 October at the Naval Museum in Simon’s Town, where all three presented papers. The delegates who were approved to attend were from the History and Collections department which conserve the historical collections.

(b). Yes the Museum covered full cost for Dr Botes and Ms Du Plessis and partial cost for Dr Snyders.

11 November 2019 - NW1261

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)(a) On what grounds was the annual fieldwork project 385, Historical Archaeology, at the National Museum in Bloemfontein rejected after the project was included and approved in the 2019-20 annual budget and annual performance agreements, (b) how will the rejection of the project affect the applicant’s performance agreement and (c) what amount of money, resources and time (i) have been spent on the specified project to date and (ii) will be lost as a result of the rejection of the project; (2) whether the decision to reject the project was made by the Chief Executive Officer of the specified museum; if not, was the (a) decision made and/or approved by the Council of the museum and (b) applicant part of the discussions; (3) what are the details of all physical archaeological fieldwork and research that have been conducted at the museum since 1 January 2008, including the persons and/or entities that conducted the fieldwork and research in each case; (4) what (a) steps has his department taken to encourage black women to become researchers and fieldworkers and (b) number of black women are currently actively doing fieldwork in the Republic?

Reply:

(1)(a). The annual fieldwork project 385, Historical Archaeology was not rejected.

(b). the applicant’s performance agreement will not be affected as the above-mentioned project is not aligned to her job description.

(c)(i)(ii). No money, resources or time has been lost on the project 385.

(2). The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) did not make any decision to reject project 385. This was a project which expired in 2011.

(a). The Council of the Museum did not make a decision to reject project 385. This was a project which expired in 2011.

(3). The Museum does not keep consolidated fieldwork records which are more than 10 years old at its premises, the archived records will be retrieved from the National Archives in Pretoria and made available to the Honourable member at a later stage.

(4) The National Museum has set up a committee to investigate the barriers experienced by our Black Female researchers in the archaeological fieldwork.

 

28 October 2019 - NW1152

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether, with reference to the Eminent Persons Group (EPG) on Transformation in Sport, (a) he has found that the transformation measurement tool utilized by the EPG is working after six years in use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2)(a) On what basis did the EPG set a 50% mark for transformation targets, (b) why are the set targets not being reached by other sports federations, (c) what steps does he intend to take with regard to sports federations that fail to achieve the targets, (d) does he intend to withdraw government funding and/or revoke the rights to bid for international tournaments of sports federations that fail to meet the set transformation target of 50% and (e) what plans are in place to deal with federations that reject or resist transformation?

Reply:

(1) In 1994 South African sport was demographically untransformed, a situation that remained unchanged for 17 years because of the absence of policy guidelines. This changed in 2011 with the introduction of the Transformation Charter based on the achievement pre-set, one-size-fits -all federation targets guiding the sport system towards the common objective of an ‘Accessible, Equitable, Sustainable, Demographically Representative and Competitive sport system’.

The implementation of a measurement system from 2011 to 2015 to measure, monitor and report on transformational change in eighteen defined Charter categories from 2011 to 2015, institutionalised the process in most audited federations. In the process an awareness and understanding of the major factors impacting rate and extent of transformation was developed and the validity of the adopted tool proven.

Identification and deeper understanding of the transformation process led to the introduction of the penalty based ‘Barometer’ process in 2015/16 focused on adding to and improving on the initial one-size fit-all target approach. In the Barometer process a federation sets and project forward (10 years) its ‘own’ targets as informed by its own unique circumstances with respect to, among other, its current structural demographic profiles and resource (human capacity, facilities, equipment and finance) situation.

(2) The substantial number of barometer categories in which performance are measured resulted in a 50% pass mark being decided upon as an initial benchmark to measure transformation progress (or lack thereof) on an annual basis.

Most federations are struggling to come to terms with the challenge of projecting forward meaningful transformation targets against the background of the major impacting factors influencing rate and extent of transformation as defined. These factors effect different codes differently and include the impact of population demographic change, a dysfunctional school sport system, inequality of opportunity and the impact of poverty and inequality on equitable access.

More than half of federations have achieved their self-set targets whilst the other half, particularly those with the predominantly White demographics, is making satisfactory progress (some against great odds).

Based on the insight and understanding developed to date all federations have just completed a review of their forward projected targets to 2030 and based on this imposition of penalties for non-achievement of targets will be rigorously pursued in 2019. These penalties will include the withdrawal of government funding and/or revoking of the right to bid for or host international tournaments as per the MoU with SRSA and SASCOC.

Of the 19 federations being audited everyone has advanced to the stage where there is excellent understanding and appreciation for the need for change from a strategic perspective - longer term sustainability and competitiveness. This is a momentous change in prevailing attitudes from 1994 to 2015.

28 October 2019 - NW1080

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether the Government and state-owned entities pay royalties each time the national anthem is (a) sung at inter alia official state events and sporting events, including international sporting events, and/or (b) printed in documents; if so, (i) who (aa) do the rights of the South African national anthem belong to and (bb) receives the royalties and (ii) what total amount has the State paid out to royalties since 1 January 2009?

Reply:

The government and state-owned entities do not pay royalties each time the national anthem – (a) sung at inter alia official state events and sporting events, including international sporting events, and/or (b) Is printed in documents;

(i)(aa). The rights of the South African anthem belongs to the State;

(bb). No one receives nor collects royalties;

(ii). No amount was paid.

28 October 2019 - NW1102

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether he has been informed of the plans of a certain person (name and details furnished), for proposed developments on Robben Island; if so, what are the relevant details; (2)(a) What is the name of each entity that manages Robben Island on behalf of the Government and (b) how often does his department receive reports from the specified entities?

Reply:

  1. The Minister is not aware of any plans for proposed development on Robben Island
  2. (a) There is no entity that manages Robben Island on

behalf of Government

(b) The Department does not receive any reports from any

specified entities.

28 October 2019 - NW1151

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department and/or the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) paid for certain persons (names and details furnished) to attend the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan; if so, what (a)(i) total amount was budgeted for the specified persons to go to Japan and (ii) is the breakdown of all relevant costs incurred, (b) process was followed to select the persons to go to Japan and (c) total amount did his department and/or SAIDS pay towards members of the specified committee; (2) Whether he has found that there is a board member of SAIDS who is also a board member of SuperSport; if so, what are the full names of the board member?

Reply:

(1) No. The Department nor the SA Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS) did not pay for the persons (as per names and details furnished) to attend the 2019 Rugby World Cup in Japan.

(2) No. The Minister has not found that there is a board member of SAIDS who is also a board member of SuperSport.

28 October 2019 - NW1179

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Horn, Mr W to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether his Department incurred any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on May 25 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019; if so, in each case, (i) what costs were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

The Department did incur costs relating to the 2019 Presidential Inauguration.

(i) The total funds related to the Inauguration amounts to R13 904 543.63

(ii) The amount covered the following items:

  • Cultural Programme
  • Artists
  • Logistical support for the Cultural Programme
  • Artistic Director
  • Performance Rights
  • Rehearsals Venue
  • Catering for the Masses and related logistics

(a) The Department did not incur any cost related to the State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2019.

04 October 2019 - NW968

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1). What are the full details of the National Arts Council’s policy in respect of expired grants and surplus funds that was approved in 2015; (2). whether he has found that the policy complies with the prescripts of the National Treasury regulations and the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999; if not, what (a) are the relevant details and (b) steps did he take to intervene in this regard?

Reply:

(1). Expired projects are identified by the Arts Development Officer (ADO) in charge of the programme as stipulated in section 5 of the Expired and Surplus Funds Policy of the National Arts Council, see link below for Annexure 1, for full details and comprehensive outline of the process.

http://pmg-assets.s3-website-eu-west-1.amazonaws.com/RNW968Annexure.pdf

In terms of clause 9 of the policy, the funds may be utilised to support projects and programmes that are designed to transform and grow the sector. These programmes may be identified by the Staff, Panels and Council and/or by means of an open call for applications. However, internal approval process should be followed as specified in the Grant Awarding Manual.

2(a). On realising that the policy in question might be in breach of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 0f 1999 and Treasury regulations, the Department advised the National Arts Council to repeal or review the Policy.

(b). The Policy in question has been reviewed and was presented to the Audit and Risk Committee of the National Arts Council. The revised policy will be submitted to the Council for Council approval in the next Council meeting which will take place in October 2019.

04 October 2019 - NW765

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the reasons that his department no longer has training programmes in place for educators to achieve qualifications in different sport codes like it used to have in the past?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 69. The status is still the same.

04 October 2019 - NW768

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether, with reference to the alleged failure of the Southern African Music Rights Organisation to promote the rights of musicians and song writers of all races (details furnished), he intends to establish a state-owned entity to protect the rights of musicians and song writers of all races; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 84. The status is still the same.

04 October 2019 - NW769

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether, given the low levels of literacy in the Republic, he has plans for a collaboration between the Pan South African Language Board (PanSALB) and the Department of Basic Education to ensure that each child is able to speak, read and write in their mother tongue from as early as Grade 2?

Reply:

The Honourable Member will recall that I responded to this question in September of 2019. It was question No: 85. The status is still the same.

04 October 2019 - NW790

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Cnlture”

(1). (a). What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and and (ii) state-owened entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb)2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2). what amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF ARTS AND ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE

(1) &(2)(i)(ii). The table below, respond to the question on advertising done by my department, it should ne

(2) further noted that my department has not done any outdoor advertising in the said financial years

2016 - 2017

Media Type

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

 

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 497, 040.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

Black-owned

R 244, 427,00

 

Hatchery Communication

BEE level 3

R 439 377.00

 

Communication Firm

Black-owned

R 8 506 226.85

 

Mashemong Communication

Black-owned

R 406 281,80

 

GCIS

Government

R 1,096 840.99

Total

   

R11,190,193.64

2017 - 2018

Media Type

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

Media Buying & Advertising

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 683, 936.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

Black-owned

R 39 100.00

 

Sandile Multimedia Technologies

Black-owned

R213 400.00

 

Kwa Afrika media

Black-owned

R 137, 500.00

 

GCIS

Government

R7 797 658,13

Total

   

R8 871 594,13

2018 - 2019

Media Typ

Supplier

Ownership

Cost

Media Buying & Advertising

Ulutsha Communication

Black-owned

R 2,431,100.00

 

Sagittarius Communication

black-owned

R 390 022,19

 

Kwa Afrika media

black-owned

R 1, 019,000.00

 

GCIS

Government

R 4 536 443,35

Total

   

R8 376 565.54

NAME OF ENTITY

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED MEDIA

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Luthuli Museum

Fikozor Business Enterprise

yes

R1 509 000

R 1 376 000

R 2 181 000

 

RC Hiring

yes

-

-

-

 

Sneriza Business Enterprise

yes

-

-

-

 

Zamadela Events

yes

-

-

-

 

Sgegede and Themane Manyosi Brothers

yes

-

-

-

 

Innovative Concepts

yes

-

-

-

           

Market Theatre

   

R4 011 928,41

R2 000 555,43

R 1 474 538,08

           

SAHRA

 

Yes

R 67 427.00

R 69 455.00

R 70 064.00

ENTITIES ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE

(1)(ii)

(aa), (bb) and (cc)

State Theatre

Izube alternate Advertising

Yes

R 267 034.00

-

-

 

Pallazo Printers

Yes

R 96 670.00

-

-

 

Naked Naartjie

Yes

R 232 903

-

-

 

Leruo Mpumelelo Media

Yes

R 32 400

-

-

 

Azadex PTY Ltd

Yes

R509 840

R 148 519

-

 

EN Action Productions

Yes

R 114 260

-

-

 

JZ Decaux SA PTY Ltd

Yes

R133 950

-

-

 

Spectrum Printers CC

Yes

R673 987,18

R 459 174,23

R 293 700,34

 

Madiba Promotions

Yes

 

R59 451.00

R85 650

 

Art Man

Yes

 

R 97 250

R 50 872

 

Shereno Printers CC

yes

R 21 413

R 96 963

R 198 407,59

 

Phinot Nostalgic Projects

 

-

-

R 136 800

 

Sisa Collection

 

-

-

R 42 525

 

Dzongeni Projects

Yes

-

-

R32 961

 

SABC Radio

Yes

R 498 000

R 285 000

R 316 250

           

ARTSCAPE

   

R 1 495 760,79

R 1 310 661,12

R 1 284 555.69

           

Afrikaans Taal museum

Media 24

Yes

-

-

R 1200.00

 

Frantic Digital

Yes

-

-

R35 290.05

 

Media 24

Yes

-

R 22 369.64

R 26 887.97

 

Radia KC

yes

-

R 2000

R5000

 

Frantic Digital

yes

-

 

R 35 290.05

           

Freedom Park

Ultimate Recruitment

Yes

R132 210

-

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

R 44 924

-

-

 

Adreacht/a Fikelela

yes

R282 684

-

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

R 4 831 00

-

-

 

Basadzi

yes

-

R 82 998

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

-

R 3 500.00

-

 

Human Communication

Yes

-

R 11 500.00

-

 

Tender Bulletin

yes

-

R 5 272.00

-

           

National Arts Council

 

Yes

R 185 897

R218 892

R 360 984

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Heritage Council

Basadzi

Yes

R 44 783.46

   
 

Government printers work

Government

R 2 500.00

-

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

R 63 735.63

-

-

 

Jonti printers

yes

R 8 334.95

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

Government

R 500

-

-

 

Government Printing work

Government

-

R8000.00

-

 

Human Comm

yes

-

R 69 541.73

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

-

R 30 886.70

-

 

Basdazi

yes

-

R 32 719.52

-

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

R 16 294 .52

-

 

Millennium Media

 

-

-

R 558 140.01

 

Government Printing Works

Government

-

-

R 1006.59

 

Human Comms

 

-

-

R 45 406 .31

 

Basadzi

 

-

-

R 23 503.32

 

Indepent newspaper

 

-

-

R127 485.78

 

Jonti tenders

 

-

-

R 12 261.76

           

PanSALB

   

R 8987.76

R 1000.00

R 317 444.40

     

R 20 629.44

R 29 315.33

 
     

R45 297.90

R 621 000.00

 
       

R 496 840.50

 
       

R 32 970.30

 
       

R 230 614.02

 
           

Robben Island Museum

Basadzi

Yes

R 66 881.57

   
 

Human Communications

NO

R 212 736.67

-

-

 

Kone Staffing Solution

yes

R 29 554.78

-

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

-

R 167 919.80

 
 

Human Communications

yes

-

R 195 106.33

-

 

Kone Staffing Solution

yes

-

R 66 469.75

-

 

Basadzi

 

-

-

R 257 314.50

 

Human Communications

 

-

-

R 214 494.77

 

Kone Staffing Solution

 

-

-

R 69 258.44

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

William Humphreys Art Gallery

Independent Newspaper

 

R 3 051.35

-

-

 

Discount Travellers

 

R 1 640.00

 

-

 

Independent Newspaper

-

-

R 7 269.76

-

 

Media 24

-

-

R 3 886.24

-

 

Reflecto signs

-

-

R10 710.30

-

 

Find it Kimberley

-

-

-

R 2 298.85

 

Media 24

-

-

-

R 28 000.00

 

Independent Newspapers

-

-

-

R13 923.68

 

Siyafika Communications

-

-

-

R 46 294.00

           

Ditsong Museums of SA

   

R 248 639

-

-

     

R 443 597

-

-

     

R 990 472

-

-

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

War Museum of the Boer Republic

SPM Brochures

No

R 4 995.00

R 4 9995.00

R 4 995.00

 

Media 24

No

 

R 3 716 86

R 2 081.27

 

Government Printing Works

Government

R500.00

   
           

Msunduzi Museum

 

Yes

R44 947.41

R 28 641

R 134 710

           

Nelson Mandela Museum

Sawubona

SAA

R 20 00.00

-

R 20 000.00

 

Explore Magazine

Yes

R23 950.00

-

-

 

Mzansi Travel magazine

Yes

R 27 950.00

-

-

 

Eastern Cape Coast

 

R 15 000.00

R 15 000.00

R 15 000.00

 

Sky Ways

SA Express

-

-

-

 

Equinox Magazine

Tsogo Sun

-

R39 950.00

R 39 950.00

 

African Safari

-

 

R 26 000.00

 
 

Daily Dispatch

-

 

R 30 000.00

R32 000.00

 

SABC Umhlobo wenene

Government

-

-

280 000.00

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Film Video Foundation

Basazdi

Government Printing Works

yes

Government

R 44 783.46

R 2 500.00

-

-

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

R63 735.63

-

-

 

Jonti Printers

yes

R 8 334.95

-

-

 

Government Printers Works

Government

R 500.00

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

Government

-

R 8000.00

-

 

Human Comm

Yes

-

R 69 541.73

-

 

Independent Newspaper

Yes

-

R 30 886.70

-

 

Basadzi

Yes

-

R 32 719.75

-

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

R 16 294.52

-

 

Millennium Media

 

-

 

R 58 140.01

 

Government Printing works

Government

-

-

R 1006.59

 

Human Comms

yes

-

-

R 25 503.32

 

Basadzi

yes

-

-

R 7 090.19

 

Independent Newspaper

yes

-

-

R127 485.78

 

Jonti Tenders

yes

-

-

R12 261.76

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

KwaZulu Natal Museum

Media 24

 

R 45 109

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

R 2 250

-

-

 

Sign Centre

 

R 18 810

-

-

 

Albert Fall

 

R 5 200

-

-

 

Capital Newspaper

 

R 2 981

-

-

 

DR’s TV Adverts

 

R 7 125

-

-

 

Happy Earth

 

R 1 500

-

-

 

Logo Graphics

 

R 4 104

-

-

 

MUM’s Mail

 

R 29 422

-

-

 

Weslam Agencies

 

R 14 649

-

-

 

Media 24

 

-

R 50 568

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

R27 930

-

 

Sign Centre

 

-

R 27 930

-

 

Albert Falls

 

-

R5 600

-

 

Capital Newspaper

 

-

R20 570

-

 

DR’s TV Adverts

 

-

R 7 410

-

 

YO Entertainment

 

-

R 2 500

-

 

MUM’S Mail

 

-

R5 700

-

 

Logo Graphics

 

-

R16 644

-

 

On Time Embroidery

 

-

R 57 779

-

 

City Printing Works

 

-

R 9 988

-

 

Project Gateway

 

-

R 20 000

-

 

Media 24

 

-

-

R 31 940

 

Facebook

 

-

-

R 6 681

 

City printing Works

 

-

-

R 6 681

 

Project Gateway

 

-

-

R 20 000

 

Happy Earth

 

-

-

R1 500

 

Mum’ Earth

 

-

-

R 19 906

 

City Printing Works

 

-

-

R 19 688

 

Black Snowflake

 

-

-

R 10 000

 

Braby’s

 

-

-

R 16 168

 

Logo Graphics

 

-

-

R 30 581

 

Maritzburg College

 

-

-

R6 950

 

Jum Design’s

 

-

-

R 4 140

 

Portfolio Media

 

-

-

R 9 775

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Library of South Africa

Basadzi Personnel CC

 

R 27 063.99

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

R 7 379.91

-

-

 

Human Communications

 

R 8 244.78

-

-

 

PNET PTY LTD

 

R 21 086.58

-

-

 

Career Junction

 

R 1 700.00

-

-

 

PIXODEL Design Studio

 

R 6 500.00

-

-

 

Brand Inn Printing

 

R 13 350

-

-

 

MINI Print

 

R1 407.90

-

-

 

Thabile Print

 

R 24 795

-

-

 

Blackpage Marketing

 

R 17 450

-

-

 

ABUJONES projects

 

R 8 909 .37

-

-

 

Newsclip Media DEC-IN 0000104594

Non-compliant contributor

R 9 204.97

-

-

 

Lemon and Soda 1st Edition

 

R 6 315.60

-

-

 

Harry’s Printers

 

R 4 277.50

-

-

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

R 5 750

 
 

Career Junction

 

-

R 15 903

 
 

LED Cool PTY LTD

 

-

R 3 600

 
 

Newsclip Media Monitoring

 

-

R 21 518.02

 
 

Deep Design and Marketing

 

-

R 4 050

 
 

Blackpage Marketing

 

-

R 39 750

 
 

Thabile Print

 

-

R 8 208

 
 

Elle Promotions

 

-

R 27 588

 
 

Minit Print Holdings

 

-

R 2 780.46

 
 

BIG O Trading 787

 

-

R 4 332.00

 
 

Novus Group

 

-

-

R 9 444.96

 

News clip Media

 

-

-

R 96 654.46

 

Government Printing Works

 

-

-

R 1 261.00

 

Led Cool Pty Ltd

 

-

-

R 6 800

 

Elle Promotions

 

-

-

R 23 115

 

ARMANI Office Supplies

 

-

-

R19 973.93

 

NAME OF THE COMPANY

BLACK OWNED MEDIA

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Playhouse Company

 

Yes

R 308 940.00

65 202.79

-

 

Government owned (SABC)

 

R79 942.50

R256 081.05

-

           

Iziko Museums

City Life Newspaper

no

R64 013.43

R37 115.67

R118 507.85

 

Astronomical Society

no

R 2 500.00

   
 

Face book Standard Bank

no

R951.60

R70.13

 
 

Google-Standard

no

785.38

-

 
 

Government Printers

State owned

R 1 750.01

R 3 000.00

 
 

Heart 104.9

Radio

R3 266.21

   
 

Independent Newspaper

No

R 41 708.08

R38 102.31

 
 

Media 24

No

R36 776.40

   
 

Telkom SA

State owned

R19 039.14

R 62 700.00

 
 

Times Media

No

8 280.96

   
 

Hunter House

No

 

R19 380.00

 
 

Place Myad

   

R 11 461.11

 
 

Radio Pulpit

Radio

 

R10 025.00

 
 

SABC Good Hope

Radio

 

R 62 700.00

 
 

Tiso Blackstar Group

   

R 21 511.80

 
 

Twitter Standard Bank

   

R 1 717.70

 
 

Voice of the Cape

   

R 4 560. 00

 

(2)(b) (i) (ii) and (c)

NAME OF ENTITY

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Market Theatre

Yes

Yes

AD Outpost

-

R 67 716

-

-

   

Adreach

-

R 28 306,43

-

-

             

State Theatre

Yes

Continental Outdoor

-

R 247 950

R 19 950

 
             

ARTSCAPE

yes

 

-

R 523 605

R 405 581,91

R 345 702.80

             

Afrikaans Taalmuseum

yes

Budget Barners

-

R 484.50

-

-

             
 

yes

Smart Digital Media

-

R 1834

-

-

 

yes

Frantic Digital

-

R 35 290.05

-

R 35 290.05

             

Freedom Park

yes

Adreacht/a Fikelela

-

R282 684

-

-

   

Adreach t/a Fikelela

-

-

R 348 348

-

   

Adreach t/a Fikelela

-

-

-

R351 555

             

NAC

yes

-

Whoodoo Media and Advertising

R 109 291

R190 733

R260 371

 

yes

-

Busi Ntuli Communications

-

-

R99 502

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Heritage Council

 

No

Media 24

R 71 592.00

-

-

   

No

Times Media

R 91 262.70

-

-

   

Government printers

Government Printing Works

R 1 250.00

R500.00

-

   

yes

Lombe Holdings

-

R346 850

-

             
   

yes

NN Concepts

 

R 91 902

 

PANsalb

 

no

Media 24

R 8 987.76

R 496 840.50

R317 444.40

   

Yes

Tiso Black Star

R 65 927.34

R 262 984.32

-

     

Independent Newspaper

-

R 650 315.33

-

   

Government

Government Printing Works

-

R 1000.00

-

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

National Museum

   

Media 24

-

R 16 364.70

-

     

SA art Times

-

R27 500

-

     

Xasha Publishing

-

R 1 653.00

-

     

Moja Media

-

R11 491.20

-

     

Highburry Media

-

R14 250.00

-

     

Moja Media

-

R 11 250.00

-

     

Highburry Media

-

R14 250.00

-

     

BVSA Advertising

-

R 3 650

-

     

SunMedia

-

R 768.00

-

     

Government Printing Work

-

R 2250.00

-

     

Media 24

-

R 28 080.85

-

     

Tiiso Blackstar Group

-

R52 240.00

-

     

The Citizen

-

R 13 200.30

-

     

Independent News Paper

-

R 26 174.40

-

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Ditsong Museums of SA

 

Yes

     

R 243 727.20

             

WAR Museums of the Boer Republic

 

SPM Brochures

       
   

Media 24

   

R 3 716.86

R 2 081.27

   

Government Printing Works

 

R 4 995.00

R4 995.00

R 4 995.00

 

BLACK OWNED

OUTDOOR

ADVERTISING

MEDIA COMPANY

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

Playhouse Company

Yes

   

R273 47.60

   
     

Yes

R 213 459.80

   
     

yes

R468 873.30

R 611 454.64

 
             

Iziko Museums

 

C K Outdoor Advertising

Yes

-

-

R20 700.00

04 October 2019 - NW865

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What (a) action has his department taken to ensure television exposure for sports practiced by women and (b) types of sports practiced by women are being televised; (2) what action has his department taken to make football and rugby more accessible to women’s participation at school, national and provincial level; (3) whether his department sponsors any provincial and/or national women’s sports tournaments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether his department has implemented any developmental programmes to train (a) referees, (b) players and (c) administrators in any type of sports practiced by women in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether his department pays any financial allocations to provincial governments for the promotion of sports practiced by women; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. There is a direct correlation between broadcast coverage and commercial funding of sports codes from the private sector. Without broadcasting hours sports codes have no or little chance to become financially self-sufficient. Financial sustainability required for the survival and development of sporting codes is to a large extent a function of broadcasting coverage. The Department has an on annual basis had discussions with the public Broadcaster and the Pay TV broadcaster to negotiate the coverage of a basket of sport events. On a yearly basis Sport and Recreation SA identifies a code of Sport that is the Federation of the Year. Additional resources are provided to those codes in profiling and growing the sport towards professionalisation. Television broadcast is also negotiated on behalf of those codes. Sport and Recreation SA played a leading role in ensuring that all matches in the Netball Premier League which was initiated in 2013 was televised live with repeated broadcasts every year since inception. The live broadcast of matches in the Premier Hockey League which caters for both men and women. The inaugural Open Boxing League catering for both men and women was televised.

The broadcast of sports events is regulated by the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations. In December 2018, The Independent Communications Authority (ICASA) published the draft Broadcast Services Regulations to amend Broadcast Services Regulations of 2010.

In order to ensure a long-term sustainable broadcast solution regarding sport broadcast rights, ICASA in consultation with Department of Communications and Digital Technologies conducted public hearings so that it can undertake amendments to the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations of 2010 and concluded the public hearings process in May 2019.

As provided by the Act, ICASA will communicate with the two Ministries Sports, Arts and Culture and Communications and Digital Technologies prior to publishing the final regulations, giving the Minister an opportunity to make recommendations.

2(a) The funds that the Department transfers to SAFA are meant primarily for Women’s Football with a portion for Schools Football.

(b) The Department has made special additional allocation to SAFA for the National Women’s League.

(c) In terms of rugby the funds allocated to South African Rugby are specifically meant primarily for Women’s Rugby and the Get into Rugby programme which targets development of Women’s Rugby.

(3) Yes, The funds referred to in question 2 above are used by SAFA and South African Rugby for National Women’s Tournaments.

(4) The National Federations implement the development programme targeting (a) referees (b) players and (c) administrators utilizing the financial support provided by the Department.

(a) This is in line with the National Sport and Recreation Plan which places the responsibility of developing referees, players and administrators on Federations and that of providing an enabling environment and support on the Department.

(b) Within the conditional grant provision is made for building the capacity of people delivering the school sport programme, club development programme, community sport and active recreation and academies. The allocation includes the development of (a) referees (b) players (c) administrators and coaches

(5)

(a) The Provinces are beneficiaries of the Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant. There is no ringfenced amount for Womens participation in Sport, but in terms of the conditions, programmes must cater for men, women, boys, girls, people with disabilities and on rural areas.

(b) In the 5 years up to 2018, 51% of participants in the National School Sport championships were girls. Other programmes like the youth Camps, Golden Games, National Recreation Day have catered for more women and girls than men.

04 October 2019 - NW866

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1)(a) What is (i) number of vacancies that exist in his department and (ii) the breakdown of the specified vacancies and (b) Since what date have the positions been vacant; (2) What are the reasons for the vacancy rate; (3) (a) What number of positions in his department are occupied in an acting capacity and (b) (i) what are the relevant details of the specified positions and (ii) since what date have the positions been occupied in an acting capacity in each case; (4) Whether the vacant positions have been advertised; if so, (a) on what date(s), (b) in what media and (c) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

Since the process of merger of the two departments is at an advance stage, the available vacancies will only be clear once the process of realignment is complete.

04 October 2019 - NW868

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether;there was a dispute between the former Department of Sport and Recreation and the Department of Basic Education regarding the delivery methodology of the National School Sport Championships; if so (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details;(2)  whether the dispute has been resolved; if so, how?

Reply:

1. There was no dispute.

(a) There was a difference of approach to the National school Sport Championship.

(b) Sport and Recreation is focused on the long-term development of the athlete to align the age group and the talent development with the International school Sport Competition (Gymnasiade). The Department of Basic Education and provincial Departments of Education preferred the 3 seasons championships National School Sports Championships.

2. Both Departments continue to deliver the 3 seasons National Championships.

04 October 2019 - NW870

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Does his department conduct surveys on sports tourism to evaluate its impact on the South African economy; if not, why not; if so, (a) how are the impact studies done and (b) what were the outcomes of the surveys for the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years?

Reply:

The Department does not conduct surveys on sports tourism.

Reason: The nature of the survey would require that a broad spectrum of industries such as hospitality, be surveyed to ascertain the reason their clients were in the country (inbound tourism) or in another province (tourism within the country by residents/citizens). However, to ensure that reliable and accurate information is collected, such industries must have recorded their clients’ reasons for the visit. When one goes to a hotel for example, they are not asked the reason for the visit.

While the survey is important, conducting it would require resources that match its broad nature and the acknowledgement that most information may not be readily available.

04 October 2019 - NW875

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1)With regard to the 2019 All Africa Games, (a) on what date did the soccer team (i) depart for Morocco and (ii) pay the registration fee and (b) who paid the registration fees; (2) whether there was a specific resolution regarding not covering any costs related to the alleged irregular entrance of the SA Football Association (SAFA) in the All Africa Games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what were the total costs of (a) participation, (b) accommodation, (c) travel and (d) other logistics for (i) SASCOC and (ii) SAFA?

Reply:

(1) The reply from SASCOC indicated that SASCOC is unclear as to (a) on what date the soccer team (i) departed for Morocco (ii) paid registration fees and (b) who paid the registration fees.

(2) The reply provided by SASCOC to this question is that there was no specific resolution. They indicated that; given that SASCOC, per its agreed to selection criteria, did not permit SAFA to attend the African Games 2019, no costs were paid by SASCOC.

(3) The reply from SASCOC indicates that there were costs for (a) participation (b) accommodation (c) travel (d) other logistics for (i) SASCOC, the costs of which have not yet been finalised. They will host a debrief meeting on 26 September 2019, after which the actual costs will be known.

(ii) Despite requests for information sent to SAFA and follow up reminders the only response received is that they are still in the process of finalising the overall accounts of participation, and that “all funds used were that of SAFA’s exclusively”.

04 October 2019 - NW969

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1). What is the current status of the investigation into the complaints received from the SA Roadies Association (SARA) against the National Arts Council in respect of the alleged failure of the Council to award SARA a grant based on the policy relating to expired grants and surplus funds; (2). whether he instituted any forensic audits to investigate the complaints; if so, (a) who conducted the audits, (b) what were the outcomes of each audit and (c) will he furnish Mrs V van Dyk with copies of the outcomes of the audits; (3). with reference to the alleged fake funding proposal received from the SARA, (a) how was it discovered that the proposal was fake, (b) in whose name was the proposal, (c) who created the proposal and (d) what steps have been taken to address the fake funding proposal. NW2123E

Reply:

1. The two reports submitted by the Business Innovations Group (BIG) and Gobodo Forensic and Investigation Accounting (GIFA) concluded that Mr Nyathela’s allegations were unfounded and that the NAC acted within its policy.

2. Yes, I instituted two investigations,

(a). The audits were conducted by independent firms: Gobodo Forensics and Investigation Group (GIFA)and Business Innovations Group (BIG).

(b). Both the BIG and the GFIA audits concluded that Mr Nyathela’s allegations were unfounded and that the NAC acted within its policy.

(c). Yes, copies of the audit outcomes are available and marked as confidential and not for distribution, but can be furnished to the honourable member upon request.

3.(a). The was no evidence to suggest that the NAC staff members were involved in any irregularities involving the grant funding application submitted by SARA.

04 October 2019 - NW971

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). Whether the National Arts Council recommended the approval of a grant funding proposal to a certain trust (name furnished) in August 2016, which was classified as an expired project; if so, (a) was the funding application submitted directly to the executive committee and the National Arts Council without following the normal funding application process, (b) what amount was requested, (c) was this allocation of funding authorised and (d) what steps have been taken against officials for awarding funding without the application following the normal funding application process; (2). whether the funding to the specified trust was authorised for a period of three years even though the application was only for a year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2125E

Reply:

(1)(a). The proposal in question followed all processes as stipulated in the Grant Awarding Policy signed in May 2016, section 7.6 Flagships and Partnership Funding. The proposal served at both EXCO and Council.

(b).The amount requested was R1 889 285 in total.

(c). Yes, the funding allocation was approved by Council in August 2016.

(d). Due to allegations that processes were not followed, the DAC appointed Gobodo Forensic to investigate the allegations. The findings of the report were tested through a disciplinary process against the CEO and the ADM. Both the CEO and ADM were subsequently exonerated.

(2). The funding allocated was in phases which were estimated to run for three years and disbursement was made against deliverables. The submission which went to Council had a typo indicating the project as 12 months. All supporting documents were labelled as 3 years including the Business Plan.This was tested and confirmed during the CEO’s disciplinary hearing.

04 October 2019 - NW970

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he has identified any governance issues at the National Arts Council (a) in each of the past three financial years and/or (b) since 1 April 2019; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) steps have been taken to address the governance issues?

Reply:

(a). I appointed the Council of the National Arts Council (NAC) on 2 October 2015. The initial term of office of the Council was expected to expire on 31 August 2019. Subsequent to the appointment of the Council of the National Arts Council, the Department received complaints from the members of the Arts sector pertaining to the process followed in appointing the Council. The concerns of the sector related to the two steps of the appointment process that were not followed namely:

  • publishing of the names of the nominated candidates to allow the members of the public comment with regards to the names of the potential Board members of the NAC.
  • publishing of the date (s) of the interviews to enable members of the public participate in the appointment process as provided for in the National Arts Council Act, 1997 (Act No. 56 of 1997).

Subsequent to the concerns raised, I issued an instruction that the process of appointing the Council of the NAC be started afresh. Consequently, indicated my intentions to dissolve the Council of the NAC on 27 May 2016 to give way for the process to appoint a new Council.

To avoid governance vacuum at the National Arts Council, I applied section 49(1) of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA). In terms of section 49(1), if the public entity does not have a controlling body, the CEO is the Accounting Authority for that public entity. Consequently, the CEO of the National Arts Council is the Accounting Authority of the entity until a new Board is appointed.

In December 2017, a new Council was appointed, the new Council is appointed until November 2021.

(b)(i).Since 1 April 2019, the Department has delegated Departmental senior officials to all the entities to provide support to the entities to strengthen governance.

(ii). The Department developed a governance framework which will provide guidance and standardise some of the governance principles for the entities.

The Department has started implementing some of the elements of the governance principles including the induction workshops of all the newly appointed Councils. Further, the Department forged a partnership with the Institute of Directors of South Africa (IODSA) as part of the efforts to professionalise membership to Councils or Boards. This partnership will ensure that all the DAC Council or Board members formally register as Directors of Boards in line with best practice on good governance.

04 October 2019 - NW993

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

1. Whether he has been informed that the Springs Library in Ekurhuleni Metro has been closed for over a year, if so, what has he found to be the reason for the closure of the specified library for an extended period; 2. (a) by what date will the library be reopened and (b) what is the cause of the delay of the reopening; 3. by what date will the necessary repairs to the air-conditioning and other repairs be finalised? NW2145E

Reply:

1. The provision of library and information services to communities is the mandate of the provincial Departments of Sports, Arts and Culture. The library was closed on 2 January 2019 due to flooding which damaged the roof and the floor. Upon further assessment it was discovered that the storm water beneath the library is the problem that damaged the floor, carpets and the shelves.

2. Due to the increased scope of work the initial funding is insufficient and more funding is being sourced. In the interim, a mobile library services are provided to the community. Repairs will commence as soon as funding is made available.

04 October 2019 - NW1043

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the MINISTER OF SPORTS, ARTS AND CULTURE

1. What amount (a) is the current total cost of renovating the Credo Mutwa museum and library in Kuruman, Northern Cape, (b) was (i) for the specific library, house and museum project by (aa) Northern Cape government and (bb) his department and (ii) donated by the National Lotteries commission towards the construction of the Credo Mutwa museum. 2. (a) on what date was the museum and library supposed to be completed and (b) on what date will the project be completed. 3. Whether any investigation was done regarding mismanagement or maladministration of the project, if not, why not, if so, what is the (a) status of the investigation, (b) progress report and (c) case number of the investigation. NW2197E

Reply:

1. My department was not involved in the building of Credo Mutwa Museum and Library. The lead department in the project was the National department of Trade and Industry and the project was funded by National Lotteries Commission. The Northern Cape department of Sport, Arts and Culture was only engaged with the view to the project being handed over to the province upon completion.

04 October 2019 - NW1044

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

1) What total amount of funding was allocated by (a) his Department and (b) the National Lottery to each of sports federations in the Republic for the current financial year. 2) What monitoring mechanisms have been put in place to ensure the funds are used for intended purposes.

Reply:

a) The following is the breakdown of allocations by the Department to sport federations for the 2019 / 2020 financial year;

FEDERATIONS

TOTAL

CATEGORY A

Athletics SA (ASA)

8 800 000,00

Basketball South Africa (Basketball SA)

1 400 000,00

Chess South Africa (CHESSA)

1 700 000,00

Cricket South Africa (CSA)

5 000 000,00

Jukskei South Africa (JSA)

800 000,00

Netball South Africa (NSA)

7 000 000,00

Softball South Africa (SSA)

3 900 000,00

South African Football Association (SAFA)

7 000 000,00

South African Gymnastics Federation (SAGF)

12 000 000,00

South African Hockey Association (SAHA)

1 900 000,00

South African National Amateur Boxing Organisation (SANABO)

1 200 000,00

South African Rugby Union (SARU)

5 000 000,00

SA Sports Association for the Physically Disabled (SASAPD)

1 300 000,00

South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)

1 900 000,00

Swimming South Africa (Swimming SA)

1 900 000,00

Tennis South African (TSA)

2 000 000,00

Volleyball South Africa (VSA)

3 900 000,00

   

CATEGORY B

Bowls South Africa (Bowls SA)

562 500,00

Cycling South Africa (CSA)

562 500,00

Federation of Dance Sport South Africa (Dance SA)

562 500,00

Judo South Africa (Judo SA)

637 500,00

Rowing South Africa (Rowing SA)

750 000,00

SA Association for the Intellectually Impaired (SAAII)

562 500,00

South African Baseball Union (SABU)

562 500,00

South African Deaf Sports Federation (SADSF)

562 500,00

South African Equestrian Council (SAEC)

412 500,00

South African Golf Association (SAGA)

4 300 000,00

South African National Archery Association (SANAA)

562 500,00

SA Shooting Sport Federation (SASSF)

450 000,00

South African Sport Anglers & Casting Confederation (SASACC)

412 500,00

Squash South Africa (Squash SA)

487 500,00

South African Transplant Sport Association (SATSA)

450 000,00

Surfing South Africa (Surfing SA)

525 000,00

CATEGORY C

Aero Club of South Africa (ACSA)

375 000,00

Badminton South Africa (Badminton SA)

412 500,00

Canoeing South Africa (Canoeing SA)

487 500,00

Darts South Africa (DSA)

337 500,00

Karate South Africa (KSA)

450 000,00

Lifesaving South Africa (LSA)

450 000,00

Masters Sport South Africa (MSSA)

150 000,00

Motorsport South Africa (Motorsport SA)

450 000,00

Power Boat South Africa

300 000,00

Ringball Association of South Africa (RASA)

375 000,00

Roller Sport South Africa (RSSA)

525 000,00

Snow Sports South Africa (SSSA)

337 500,00

South African Amateur Fencing Association (SAAFA)

375 000,00

South African Confederation of Cue Sport (SACCS)

562 500,00

South African Figure Skating Association (SAFSA)

375 000,00

S A Fitness Sport Aerobics Federation (SAFSAF)

375 000,00

South African Handball Federation (SAHF)

487 500,00

South African Ice Hockey Association (SAIHA)

375 000,00

South African Korfball Federation (SAKF)

375 000,00

South African Orienteering Federation (SAOF)

300 000,00

South African Powerlifting Federation (SAPF)

337 500,00

South African Body Building Federation

337 500,00

South African Sailing (SAS)

375 000,00

South African Taekwondo Federation (SATF)

337 500,00

South African Tug-of War Federation (SATWF)

337 500,00

South African Water Ski Federation (SAWSF)

337 500,00

South African Weightlifting Federation (SAWF)

450 000,00

South African Wrestling Federation (SAWF)

450 000,00

Triathlon South Africa (Triathlon SA)

450 000,00

Underwater Sport South Africa

375 000,00

University Sport South Africa (USSA)

700 000,00

b) The National Lotteries Commission that the Commission does not make allocations to organizations but provide grants based on the successful applications made by the organizations. The National Lotteries Commission provided the following breakdown in terms of grants the Commission has availed to sports federations in this financial year;

Name of the Federation

Allocated Amount

Tennis South Africa

3 000 000,00

Volleyball South Africa

3 901 961,00

Judo South Africa

175 000,00

South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee

8 000 000,00

Cricket South Africa

3 500 800,00

South African Deaf Sports Federation

1 923 550,00

South African Disabled Golf Association

1 050 000,00

a) Considering the number of sports federations supported by the Department, a sample of sports federations is monitored through visits to identified projects and attendance of selected governance meetings (AGM).

b) The sports bodies also submits the reports to the Department which are used as a tool for assessing whether the funds are used for the intended purposes.

c) In addition, the Department through Internal Audit also conducts audits of sampled sports federations.

d) The National Lotteries Commission indicated that the Commission has provincial footprint in all provinces. Part of the responsibilities of the provincial offices is to conduct monitoring and evaluations function in order to ensure that the National Lotteries Commission yield the envisaged return on the funded project

04 October 2019 - NW1045

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether sustainable club development programmes will be established in communities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? (2) Whether sustainable club development programmes will be established in communities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The Club Development pilot programme focussed on one urban and in rural area, Ethekwini and Vhembe in Kwazulu-Natal and Limpopo respectively. The two provinces have presented their 2018/19 reports and Current progress made to date is as follows:

KWAZULU-NATAL

In 2019 Durban ladies Football Club currently participates in the SASOL National Women’s League.

  • In 2018 Durban Ladies Football Club within the Club Pilot Programme managed to get Lottery Sponsorship worth R200 000.00.
  • In 2018 African Young Tigers Football Club under 19 team was nominated to participate in the football trials conducted by Kaizer Chiefs FC, Orlando Pirates FC and Mamelodi Sundowns FC.
  • In 2018 Summerfield Dynamos Football Club won ABC Motsepe League (provincial League).
  • The clubs are now able to create the database of players, members and coaches due to the Clubsmart training provided through the Pilot programme.
  • The clubs now have the capacity to host tournaments.
  • Communication skills have improved as tthe clubs are able to write proposals to solicit potential sponsors and create a feedback assessment form.

LIMPOPO

  • 38 Clubs in Limpopo will be doing D – Licence Football Coaching Course rendered by the South frican Football Association in December 2019 there are 107 clubs in Limpopo that have attended coaching clinics offered by the South African Football Association
  • 136 participants have been trained as Netball level 1 Umpires
  • 107 athletics clubs in Limpopo have done the following training:

A workshop in Club Administration in the Athletics family Coaches Course – ASA – Level 1 Technical Officials Courses – ASA – Level 1Guidelines on organising Athletics Events Rendered by IAAF and ASA IAAF Crafting of a Constitution to ailing clubs to IAAF (International Association of Athletics Federation) and (ASA) Athletics South Africa Standards

(b) The final consolidated report will be issued in Q4 of 2019 /2020. The Department will analyse the report and share the recommendations with other provinces. The recommendations and analysis will information implementation of the club development programme going forward. Province needs to help in affiliating clubs to the various sports federations and also monitoring them to ensure successful exit strategies,

(2) Since 2006 the department has established clubs in communities where clubs didn’t exist and where they existed the department provided them with necessary support and training. All clubs established in all provinces are supported through the Conditional Grant.

A Workshop with all relevant stakeholders has been planned for the 23rd and 24th October 2019 in Welkom to discuss sustainable club development programmes that will be established in communities.

16 September 2019 - NW867

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) What number of sport academies were (a) directly supported or is budgeted for by his department in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) planned for the 2018-19 financial year; (2) what (a) is the name of each specified sport academy, (b) type of support did each sport academy receive and (c) total amount was allocated to each sport

Reply:

We support the initiative of Sport Academies because our vision is to upskill and professionalise the craft whether be the athlete or the artists.

Financial year

2016-17

2017-18

2018-2019

Number of Sport academy supported

38

39

55

Budget

R41,454,000

R56,064,000

R56,212,840

 

 

Name of the academy

Type

Province

1

Eastern Cape Provincial Academy

Provincial

EC

2

Sarah Baartman District Academy

District

EC

3

Amathole District Academy

District

EC

4

Buffalo City District Academy 

District

EC

5

Chris Hani District Academy

District

EC

6

Joe Gqabi District Academy

District

EC

7

OR Tambo District Academy

District

EC

8

Alfred Nzo District Academy

District

EC

9

Nelson Mandela Metro District Academy

District

EC

10

Free State Provincial Academy of Sport

Provincial

FS

11

Lejweleputswa

District

FS

12

Thabo Mofutsanyana

District

FS

13

Fezile Dabi

District

FS

14

Mangaung metro

District

FS

15

Provincial Academy

Provincial

GP

16

Sedibeng

District

GP

17

West Rand

District

GP

18

Ekurhuleni

District

GP

19

University of Johannesburg (HPC)

District

GP

20

Tshwane

District

GP

21

Prime Sports

Provincial

KZN

22

KZN Canoe Club

District

KZN

23

Football for Life

District

KZN

24

Rugby

District

KZN

25

Midlands

District

KZN

26

Athletics

District

KZN

27

Cricket

District

KZN

28

KZN Provincial Academy

District

KZN

29

Masidlalesonke

District

KZN

30

Club 10

District

KZN

31

Limpopo Academy of Sport

Provincial

LP

32

Capricorn

District

LP

33

Waterbe rg

District

LP

34

Sekhukhune

District

LP

35

Mopani

District

LP

36

Vhembe

District

LP

37

Mpumalanga Sports Academy

Provincial

MP

38

Ehlanzeni

District

MP

39

Nkangala

District

MP

40

Gert Sibande

District

MP

41

NC Academy of Sport

Provincial

NC

42

Namaqua District A

District

NC

43

ZF Mgcawu District

District

NC

44

North West Academy

Provincial

NW

45

DR Ruth SM

District

NW

46

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

District

NW

47

Ngaka Molema M

District

NW

48

Bojanala academy

District

NW

49

Western Cape Sport Academy

Provincial

WC

50

Eden District Academy

District

WC

51

West Coast District Academy

District

WC

52

Cape Winelands District Academy

District

WC

53

Central Karoo District Academy

District

WC

54

Overberg District Academy

District

WC

55

Metro academy

District

WC

 

The Provincial and District Academies are mainly provided with financial support through the Conditional Grant funding. This support is for training, resourcing of Academies, provision of athlete support and provision of support to Sport Focus Schools.

(i) Funding for the Academies Programme is not allocated per sport. It is allocated per Province which in turn further allocate to the Academies within Province.

16 September 2019 - NW869

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether professional scouts are involved in the Rural Sport Development Programme; (2) what number of talented young persons participating in the specified programme, who have been scouted and nurtured, are currently playing at a professional level nationally or internationally since the inception of the Rural Sport Development Programme in 2016; (3) how is the mandate of the Rural Sport Development Programme different than that of the provincial sport federation?

Reply:

(i) Yes. There are professional scouts involved in the Rural Sport Development Programme. They are provided by the Provincial Federations.

(i) A total number of 58 talented young persons have been scouted and nurtured since 2016.

(ii) Below is the information on the level of participation of the talented athletes;

EASTERN CAPE

a) Two Boys and 1 Girl were scouted for Athletics in the 2017 National Rural Sport Championships

b) Four Netball Girls were scouted by Netball South Africa at National Rural Sport Games in 2017

FREE STATE

a) Victor Mlangeni was signed by Mamelodi Sundowns School of excellence trough football trials

b) Twelve football players scouted and attended trials hosted by SAFA School of Excellence

c) Eight Athletes were scouted and attended Free State Athletics Championships

d) Lerato Tshabala Athletics participant was scouted in the Free State Athletics Championships and qualified for National Championships in 1500m

GAUTENG

a) The Football Team from Magaliesburg has been promoted to Sasol League. It should be noted that the Programme in Gauteng has two Traditional Council and three farming communities.

KWA ZULU NATAL

a) The following athletes from Maphumulo Traditional Council, Mongezi Langa (100m and 200m in athletics), Olwethu Manana (400m in athletics) have progressed to participate in the South African Championships. Candice Khumalo (400m in athletics) has progressed to participate at the Provincial Athletics competitions.

b) Mfundo Mchunu from the Maphumulo Traditional Council has signed with Wits Academy.

c) Sambulo Nxumalo and Sandiso Mchunu were selected for provincial U15 Rugby. They are both from Mnqobokazi Traditional Council.

d) Nelisiwe Madonsela and Lindokuhle Chonco have progressed to participate at the Provincial Schools Athletics Championships. They are from Ama Swati Traditional Council.

e) Onelihle Mkhize has progressed to participate at National Schools Championships. She is from Kwa Xolo Traditional Council.

NORTHERN CAPE

a) Three Boys football players were scouted for Schools of excellence in Gauteng

MPUMALANGA

a) One player is now part of the Rugby Pumas Club

NORTH WEST

a) Two Boys football players have been scouted and joined Florida Academy in Gauteng

(i) The Rural Sport Development Programme is a development programme conceptualized and implemented in conjunction with the National Federations and the Provincial Federations as well as other key stakeholders such as the Provincial Departments, National House of Traditional Leaders, Provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders.

16 September 2019 - NW754

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

1. Whether his department hosted any event and or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as guest; 2. whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The department did not host a budget vote event or function. However, the department had an exhibition at the old Assembly Chamber courtyard for a total amount of R198 455. 04

2. The Department did not give out gifts.

16 September 2019 - NW731

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) has a selection policy; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether it is his department or SASCOC that is responsible for funding the participation of Team SA at the African Games that are scheduled to take place in Morocco from 16 to 31 August 2019; (3) What amount was (a) allocated to SASCOC for Team SA to participate in the African Games and (b) requested by SASCOC in this regard? NW1776E

Reply:

1.1 The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) does have a selection policy. It has a General Eligibility and Selection Criteria which was ratified by the SASCOC General Assembly on 9 June 2018.

a) The Department makes direct payment to African Games Organizing Committee (COJAR) for participation fees and allocates an annual allocation to SASCOC part of which is to cover costs towards the African Games.

a) The total amount of R10,963,000 is allocated to SASCOC for the 2019/2020 financial year. This amount is not earmarked for African Games nor split per project. It is SASCOC that determines the split of the amount based on their priorities as per their business plan.

b) There was no specific amount requested by SASCOC for the African Games except that SASCOC indicated that the estimated cost for the African Games was R20,000,000.

16 September 2019 - NW732

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports Arts and Culture

In light of the general feeling from the arts fraternity that the Districts Consultations and Provincial Summits were not well organized (details furnished), what total number of artists attended District Consultations in each province; 2. (a) what has he found to be the reason that his department organized the District Consultations and Provincial Summits even though the Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) has not yet been dissolved and (b) why does he intend to go to the CCIFSA National Conference without allowing the CCIFSA to have an annual general meeting first; 3. does his department have all necessary reports and audited financial statements prior to his attending the National Conference, as delegates never received any reports and the CCIFSA Interim Committee never accounted by submitting audited financial statements of about R5 million and yet his department continues to fund CCIFSA; 4. what (a) exactly is the status of the National Conference and (b) total amount has his department given to CCIFSA so far, including money given for the Usiba Conference and Awards?

Reply:

1. In my view, the Districts Consultations and Provincial Summits were well organized and went according to the CCIFSA NEC’s plan. The total number of voting participants across all nine provinces were a total of 2223.

2. (a). My department engaged on the District Consultations, which were held under the umbrella of (District General Meetings) and Provincial Summits as an emergency intervention after seeing that CCIFSA was failing to achieve the planned Conference.

(b) I had indicated in the past that CCIFSA was encouraged to continue with its programmes and related activities, however I cautioned CCIFSA that this should not delay the conference further as it was long overdue already in March 2019 and that their term of office had lapsed and other stakeholders such as CITT were adamant that the conference should be held in order to appoint a new leadership.

3. My department received all necessary reports and audited financial statements from CCIFSA prior to the National Conference. As this was a CCIFSA Conference, the CCIFSA National Executive Committee (NEC) was responsible for the content of the conference including distribution of the reports to their delegates at their own accord. The role of the department was only to provide strategic support and logistics coordination in order for CCIFSA NEC to achieve the implementation of the conference. The Interim Committee was able to account to the Department for the funds provided by submitting reports and audited financial reports.

4.(a).The National Conference took place in August 2019 and a new CCIFSA leadership was elected comprising of 6 National Executive Committee members and 9 Sector Representatives.

(b). The total amount given to the CCIFSA so far amounts to R15 million inclusive of the funds provided to the Interim Committee, the amount given for the Usiba amounts to R12 million.

16 September 2019 - NW730

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether his department still regards the SA Doping Control Laboratory (SADoCoL) as a strategic national asset in anti-doping, as previously expressed by his department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the new Director-general of his department will continue with the negotiations with SADoCoL in order to render support to the laboratory; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will this happen; (3) whether his department has given the World Anti-Doping Agency any assurance of its intended financial support to SADoCoL; (4) whether, once the non-profit organisation is established, his department still intends to proceed with the registration of SADoCoL as a sporting body; (5) Whether, in view of the fact that since the start of negotiations between his department and SADoCoL in 2015, there were three changes in Ministers of the department, he and his department will now fully support SADoCoL?

Reply:

The Department still regards the South African Doping Control Laboratory (SADoCol) as a strategic national asset in anti-doping. SADoCol is the only Doping Control Laboratory accredited by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) in the African Continent. The proper and effective operations of the SADoCol is therefore critically important for the country, the region and the entire continent.

The Acting Director General is planning to meet SADoCol at least by 15 October 2019 to continue with the co-operative work undertaken to date.

The Department has previously provided WADA with the letter of intended support to SADoCol.

It is the intention of the Department to register SADoCol as a sporting body to enable the Department and Government in general to work with and support the Laboratory on Anti-doping matters.

It should be noted that the final status of incorporation for SADoCol will have to be in line with the WADA prescripts which seeks to safe guard the independence of the Doping Control Laboratory from external influence.

Recognizing the strategic significance of the SADoCol as outlined in (1) above, the Department remains committed to support the Laboratory.

16 September 2019 - NW862

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Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1) Whether the Government budgeted for the 2019 All Africa Games; if not, why not; if so, what amount was budgeted; (2) whether there were any arrangements that the SA Football Association (SAFA) would not participate in the games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of any agreements made; (3) did the Government assist the (a) SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) and (b) SAFA to secure funding to go to Morocco; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) who (a) granted SAFA the permission to participate in the games and (b) is responsible for covering SAFA’s costs for participating in major events and/or tournaments?

Reply:

(1) No. The Government did not specifically budget for the All Africa Games.

(ii) Government provide an annual funding to the South African Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC).

(iii) SASCOC determines the split of the funds allocated towards various projects including the African Games.

SAFA, which qualified for the games via the CAF process of qualification as early as February already, and as such were not bound by the criteria for qualification stated by SASCOC, which had in any event not been approved by the Members

(i) SAFA (as with the other member federations) had notice in respect of SASCOC’s selection policy for the African Games 2019.

(ii) In respect of delivering Team SA to the African Games 2019 and as per the applicable selection policy, football was not a qualifying code.

(iii) The selection policy had as its basis that only those codes of sport that needed to participate in the African Games for purposes of gaining the necessary qualification to participate in the 2020 Olympics, would be part of Team SA for these games.

(IV) The policy was motivated due to SASCOC not being able to fund a larger team to attend these games.

(i) Government assisted SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) to secure funding to go to Morocco. This as part of the support provided to SASCOC over the quadrennial towards preparation and delivery of teams at various multi-coded events including the African Games.

(ii) Given the constrained budget allocated to the Department, the Department could only provide additional funding to SASCOC in previous financial year by cutting the allocation to the Federations. This could not be repeated for consecutive years.

(iii) The time at which SASCOC wrote to the Department indicating the inadequacy of the budget did not allow for any engagement of corporate for possible sponsorship.

(i) Government does not support individual codes for participation at the multi-coded events. This is because participation at multi-coded events such as the African Games is through SASCOC.

(i) SAFA, following an appeal to SASCOC and subsequently the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture, were granted permission by SASCOC after the Minister’s intervention to SASCOC, understanding the SAFA appeal and statement of facts around this matter.

(i) The approval for SAFA to participate in the African Games 2019 came from the intervention of the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture. In a letter dated 15 August 2019, the Minister issued a directive in terms of section 13 of the National Sport and Recreation Act.1998 (Act No. 110 of 1998 as amended), for SASCOC to grant SAFA to participate in the African Games 2019.

(i) In respect of costs, SAFA has at all times taken full responsibility for its own costs in all major events, with no support from other stakeholders, other than the related sponsors who fund the relevant teams

(i) With reference to the African Games 2019, SAFA paid for all the registration participation, travel and accommodation costs to attend these games. No costs of SAFA attending these Games were covered by SASCOC.

(ii) Should SAFA have qualified in terms of SASCOC’s approved selection criteria to be a part of Team SA in attending major events and/or tournaments then SASCOC would have met the cost of attendance as with any other qualifying sport code.

(iii) One of the main reasons for adopting the selection policy that resulted in a reduced team to the African Games 2019 was due to SASCOC not being in receipt of the requisite funds to be able to cover the cost of a larger Team SA size.

11 September 2019 - NO68

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

Whether his department has developed any plans, in collaboration with the Department of Basic Education, to provide training to educators to implement physical training programmes in schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Ministers of both Sport and Recreation and Basic Education signed a Memorandum of Understanding in 2018 committing to the provision of an integrated school sport programme. The MOU identifies various role players who are tasked with delivering physical education and sport in schools. Physical Education is a learning area within the Curriculum of Basic Education.

In line with the integrated strategic framework for Teacher Education and development that has been developed between the Department of Basic Education and Department of Higher Education, teachers are capacitated through Life Orientation subject committees. (national, provincial and district) focussing on Physical Education as a learning area. The Curriculum within the Department of Basic Education identifies training needs and submits to the teacher development unit to facilitate the training of teachers in Physical Education.

The Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant from the Department of Sport and Recreation that is allocated to Provinces makes provision for 38% of the grant to be allocated to the School Sport Programme, annually.

Of the allocated amount, 10% is ring-fenced for training of educators which includes training of coaches in specific codes of sport.

11 September 2019 - NO66

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether he has found that the Mzansi Golden Economy programme of his department is achieving its targets; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant detail?

Reply:

The Mzansi Golden Economy (MGE) programme was established to make a strategic investment to optimize the economic benefit of the Cultural and Creative sector of South Africa. It was positioned as a valuable capital investment tool to economic growth and job creation.

Its main purpose was to stimulate demand, audience development and consumption, and human capital development, amongst others.

Targets (as can be traced in the ANNUAL REPORTS) were met consistently over the past 5 years. The current target in APP is to create 9000 job opportunities and all effort is made to ensure that this set target is achieved.

MGE has immensely made an impact throughout the country in the arts and culture sector. Through MGE funding a number of Provincial events have been sustained and these events have over the years showcased local talents, contributed in forming collaborations between arts practitioners, created platforms for skills development and increased levels of arts appreciation.

11 September 2019 - NO94

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Mamabolo, Mr JP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

How is his department, in partnership with the National House of Traditional Leaders, planning to deepen society’s understanding about cultural diversity and our heritage with particular reference to his department’s efforts to balance its focus between arts on the one hand and culture on the other hand?

Reply:

The Department of Sports, Arts and Culture and the Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Affairs concluded and signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) in 2018. The MOU includes amongst others the following areas

  • Rites of passage including Traditional Initiation
  • Harmful cultural practices
  • Oral history
  • Indigenous Knowledge Systems (IKS)
  • Promotion of Indigenous languages
  • Moral Regeneration
  • Resistance and Liberation Heritage
  • Social Cohesion

The two departments are presently developing an implementation protocol with activities and timeframes to be presented to the two Ministers. The Departments are already cooperating on projects such as the documentation and protection of indigenous knowledge through the documentation of the work of Living Human Treasures. Projects such as the restoration of the grave of Chief Maqoma, King Hintsa exhumation and reburial and the construction of the Sarah Bartmann Center of Remembrance and KhoiSan Museum are some of the projects that focus on and promote South Africa’s diverse culture and heritage.

These projects involve both the DTA and traditional leaders. The Department of Sports, Arts and culture is in the process of appointing a panel of experts who will assist with compiling a national register of our rich and diverse indigenous knowledge systems. The panel will also develop another register of IKS needing urgent safeguarding. The Department of Traditional Affairs and the National House of Traditional Leaders will be invited to second a representative to the panel of experts.

11 September 2019 - NO93

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Modise, Mr PMP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With reference to the strides made by his department over the past five years as a result of the initiative that addressed societal challenges through a more integrated approach and decisive interventions that included all three tiers of government, what impact will the national convention that is scheduled for this month have on community engagement, social cohesion and nation building?

Reply:

The rationale for the social compact convention comes upon the realisation that no single sector, including government, can single-handedly succeed in the goal of achieving a socially integrated and inclusive society. That is, for South Africa to become a socially integrated and inclusive society, the different sectors in society need to make commitments and hold each other to account.

At the national convention, a broad consensus would be obtained in terms of the letter and the spirit of the social contract on social cohesion and nation building. The social compact or social contract will be an agreement among the different sectors in society, including labour, business, traditional authorities, and the faith based sector, wherein they will collectively and individually commit to concrete and tangible deliverables, all in an effort towards meeting the goal of a socially integrated and inclusive society.

Currently, sector consultations are in progress and a desktop study on compacting is being concluded.

It must be noted here too that the social compact project is not meant to circumvent the broader programme of action of government on social cohesion and nation building i.e. the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). Rather, the programme of action as it relates to Priority 5, is meant to give traction to the social compact project. In other words, government’s commitments, as a sector as they relate to the social compact project, will be extrapolated from government’s commitments in terms of the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (Priority 5). That is, while the 5-year NDP Implementation Plan (priority 5) focuses on total effort by government on social cohesion and nation building, the social compact project focuses on total effort at the societal level that includes all sectors of society, not just government. In terms of impact, government is hopeful, since there have been numerous examples of compacting before that went reasonably well. The negotiated settlement and the Constitution of the Republic, for which there was much consensus, are examples of social compacts.

11 September 2019 - NO92

Profile picture: Manganye, Ms J

Manganye, Ms J to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What steps is his department taking to ensure that physical activity and sports become a vehicle for social cohesion (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Outcome 14 sets out five long-term nation building goals for South Africa. For the sports sector, what is key is the promotion of social cohesion across society through increased interaction across race and class. Therefore, it is without question that the NDP and the sectoral National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) that is aligned to (NDP) recognise sport as a way to foster nation building and social cohesion.

To give expression to the visions of these plans over the medium term, Department of Sports, Arts and Culture intends to:

  • continue broadening the participation base in sport,

The Department will therefore continue to work for transformation in the sports fraternity by ensuring equitable access, development and excellence at all levels of participation, thereby improving social cohesion, nation building and the improving quality of life of all South Africans.

The NSRP reminds us that “no country can expect to achieve and sustain success at the elite level without a strong participation base in the community, because that is the beginning for every champion”. It is therefore not by accident that the greater part of our budget is allocated to the Active Nation Programme. This Programme provides mass participation opportunities for participants from different walks of life.

Being a winning nation has very favourable spinoffs for nation building and social cohesion.

Therefore, the Department’s daily work contributes directly towards the achievement of Social Cohesion. This, because the work of the Department is about bringing people from different sectors, and demographic profiles, together to share common spaces and experiences. To ensure that physical activity and sports becomes a vehicle for social cohesion, the Department does among other things, the following (in no particular order):

  • Consult the sector during its strategic planning to ensure that its plans go beyond just playing.
  • Deliver the Youth Camps in all 9 provinces. The National Youth Camp provides a platform for the youth of our country to interact across race, class and social backgrounds. The youth Camp includes young learners from urban rural, the disabled sector and across race groups. The content of the Youth Camp includes, Leadership skills relating to Social cohesion and Nation building, Community Services, Sport and indigenous games and Entrepreneurial skills.
  • Encourage communities to organise sporting events, leagues and championships – by making available, the Mass Participation and Sport Development Grant to further facilitate the delivery of sport and recreation through partnerships with relevant delivery agents such as provinces.

11 September 2019 - NO91

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Malomane, Ms VP to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What are the details of the sustainable and long-term solutions that will be implemented to ensure that the SA Broadcasting Corporation broadcasts the Premier Soccer League matches (details furnished)?

Reply:

The broadcast of sports events is regulated by the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations. In December 2018, The Independent Communications Authority (ICASA) published the draft Broadcast Services Regulations to amend Broadcast Services Regulations of 2010.

In order to ensure a long-term sustainable broadcast solution regarding sport broadcast rights, ICASA in consultation with Department of Communications and Digital Technologies conducted public hearings so that it can undertake amendments to the Sports Broadcast Service Regulations of 2010 and concluded the public hearings process in May 2019.

The process of further consultation, analysing and finalising the inputs is still in progress.

As provided by the Act, ICASA will communicate with the two Ministries Sports, Arts and Culture and Communications and Digital Technologies prior to publishing the final regulations.

11 September 2019 - NO90

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Adams, Ms R C to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What strategic mechanisms has his department put in place to ensure that the critical analysis noted by the Eminent Persons Group Transformation Status Dashboard (details furnished) is conducted in order to inform the effective and efficient creation of an enabling environment for the thriving participation of women in sport?

Reply:

DSAC has prioritised the Code Specific training as approved by the International Federations and the National Federations for Women and the effects thereof will be visible as from 2020. As a result, rugby, football and cricket’s national women teams at an under 15 and under 17 levels have shown an increase in all provinces as did the number of women coaches and referees.

Following the 2017/18 EPG report in which women‘s position in sport was compared to that of men in 19 sports in Dashboard format, this indicate that funding continues to be a challenge in women sport, the EPG is in the process of compiling a dashboard on women’s position in the 19 sports codes on its own. This will bring sharper focus and a basis for comparison of women in sport annually.

The National Federations that are part of the Eminent Person Group Report (EPG) are required to outline the programmes aimed at addressing the key findings / shortcomings as identified in the EPG Report. These programmes form part of the Business Plans that are submitted for the release of annual funding.

In addition, the Federations sign the Agreements wherein they commit to the self-set targets (Barometer targets). These targets form the basis of continuous engagements on the performance of the identified National Federations.

11 September 2019 - NO67

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van Wyk, Ms A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether his department is investigating alleged (a) irregularities that were identified during the verification of the National Arts Council’s (NAC) 2017-18 audit outcomes and misuse of public funds by certain officers of the NAC; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a). The audit outcomes of the 2017/2018 financial year did not reflect irregularities for the National Arts Council. The entity was granted clean audit.

(b). My department instructed the Council of the National Arts Council to investigate the allegations against the CEO of the NAC. The investigation was conducted by Gobodo Forensic Investigative Authority that made findings which were concluded through a disciplinary hearing. The final outcome of the hearing received from the independent Chairperson of the hearing was received on 03 April 2019. The CEO was subsequently acquitted on all charges and reported for duty on the 12th April 2019.

11 September 2019 - NO95

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Dlulane, Ms BN to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(a) What were the key recommendations addressing socioeconomic transformation that came from the inaugural national film summit that was held earlier this year under the theme Transformation and innovation in the South African film/audio visual industry in the fourth industrial revolution; are we geared for change? and (b) what are the timeframes for implementing the recommendations?

Reply:

The following outlines the Key summary of instruments/ recommendation addressing socio-economic transformation that were identified at the Film/Audio-visual Summit:-

  1. Establishment of a Transformation Charter/Sector Codes & Bargaining Council: to encourage Ownership, preferential procurement, Supplier development, Enterprise development for impact on socio-economic development. The Bargaining Council: will address the status of contract worker, labour issues, social security and standards.
  2. Sign a work place Sexual Harassment and Discrimination Code of Good Practise pledge to encourage standard of good practice within film & audio-visual production companies.
  3. Policy, legislation review with attention to the Intellectual Property (IP) regime: to conduct a socio-economic impact study on the Copyright Amendment Bill.
  4. Mobile Economy opportunities: together with the partner department DOCT establishment and support of Innovation, Digital Content hubs; support the initiatives that will gear up South Africa for the 4th Industrial Revolution, in particular Animation training to stimulate content creation activities.
  5. Advocacy and Consultation: to support existing key industry organisations for strategic partnership in pursuing advocacy role, continuous consultation on issues affecting the industry through an Industry Reference Group.
  6. Establishment of Film/Audio-visual Fund: we will submit a motivation to SARS to collapse Sections 12 (o) and 12 (J) to encourage and stimulate private sector investment into the film/audio-visual industry,
  7. Private Sector investment stimulation: Submit a business case to National Treasury motivating for a budget increase – maybe the DTI Film Incentives budget can be managed by DSAC and the NFVF for the creation of the Film Production Fund that will support more African co-productions and Animation productions.
  8. Marketing & Distribution support: encourage preferential scheduling for local films and co-productions amongst local companies. Incentivise Sales agencies, subsidise marketing and distribution for theatrical releases.
  9. Skills & Infrastructure support: to engage TVET Colleges in creating centres of audio-visual specialisation in all the value chain. Support: Mentorship, film training initiatives, technical skills, film literacy and appreciation.

(b). the implementation of the Summit recommendations has been structured as follows:

Short Term: 2019/2020: Our Department is already addressing three (3) of the above recommendations

Short to Medium Term: 2019/2020–2020/2021-2021/2023

Long Term: 2021/2022 – 2023/2024

02 September 2019 - NW537

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

(1) Why did the Athletics South Africa (ASA) General Council refuse to answer the queries raised by KwaZulu-Natal Athletics (KZNA) at the ASA annual general meeting held on 27 October 2017; (2) (a) can she provide Mr T W Mhlongo with (i) a list of each source of income from which ASA has benefited in the past three years and (ii) a copy of ASA's annual budget and business plan for the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc)2018-19 financial years and (b) what percentage of ASA's total income is attributable to (i) fees/commission charged by ASA on road running events, (ii) sponsorship related to road running events and (iii) the issuing of ASA permanent licenses to road runners and/or road running clubs? NW2461E

Reply:

  1. KZNA submitted the questions after the deadline stipulated by the notice of the AGM.
  2. The ASA Board did have the answers on the KZNA questions ready, but the ASA Council instructed the Board not to answer, as KZNA did not follow constitutional protocol.
  3. Furthermore KZNA submitted Delegates for the AGM after the deadline. One of the 2 Delegates was not eligible as per ASA Constitution.
  4. The ASA Council ruled that the KZNA President must be allowed to be part of the Council Meeting but the ineligible member was not allowed to attend the ASA Council meeting.
  5. The KZNA President refused to be part of the ASA Council, and the ASA Council, with a quorum present, continued without the KZNA Delegation present.
  6. The ASA Council also reprimanded KZNA for submitting the financial statements to the media soon after ASA send the ASA Financial Statements to the ASA Members for scrutiny, but KZNA fail to submit the questions on the financial statements to the ASA Council in time.
  7. The ASA Council also mandated the ASA board to consult the KZNA regarding the manner the KZNA Delegation tried to intimidate and discredit the ASA Council.

(2) (a) can she provide Mr T W Mhlongo with

(i) a list of each source of income from which ASA has benefited in the past three years and

ASA income

2017

2016

2015

SABC

13 250 000.00

12 500 000.00

8 333 333.34

SASCOC

5 250 000.00

12 836 713.00

1 498 587.75

IAAF- Grant

374 943.00

3 425 967.00

 

Permanent licences

2 581 579.00

2 369 079.00

2 274 818.45

Rental Inc - Telkom tower

80 040.00

   

Grant - Lotto

14 260 400.00

36 884 800.00

2 500 000.00

SRSA Grant income

2 000 000.00

2 000 000.00

700 000.00

Rule book

84 296.00

168 290.00

27 350.00

Temporary licence

1 317 323.00

570 064.00

 

Old mutual

   

2 192 982.46

 

39,198,581.00

70,754,913.00

17,527,072.00

(ii) a copy of ASA's annual budget and business plan for the (a) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc)2018-19 financial years and

a) The ASA Business Plan was endorsed at the 2016 ASA AGM and is effective for the period 2016 – 2020, in other words for the 4 years from Olympic Games to Olympic Games.

b) The Business Plan and annual budgets are attached.

 

(b) what percentage of ASA's total income is attributable to:

a From 2014 to 2017, 100% of the ASA income was applied mainly due to the debt of more than R20 000 000.00 liabilities, inherited mainly from the previous Boards of 2010 & 2012, as well as projects according the ASA Business Plan.

b) Although some of the projects where scaled down during the period 2014 – 2017 to adhere to budget constraints, none of the ASA projects were cancelled and took place successfully.

(i) fees/commission charged by ASA on road running events,

a) ASA charged no commission or fees for any event including Road Races.

b) Provinces do charge levies on events, but ASA has no access to these resources as it is intended to finance the development of athletics at provincial and club level.

(ii) sponsorship related to road running events and

a) ASA did not have a Road Running Sponsor since 2010. National Road Running events are funded from levies from the sale of licenses.

b) The primary challenge is clubs called “Corporate Clubs” whom claim special treatment, yet contaminate the commercial space with their branding on clothing, in violation with IAAF advertising regulations.

c) All clubs are equal within ASA structures. The fact that some clubs are financially stronger does not give “Corporate Clubs” special rights within ASA.

d) “Corporate Clubs” whom claim to sponsor athletes, do not contribute towards the funding of races where their athletes must run, and fail to assist on expenses related to funding South African teams to international events.

e) “Corporate clubs” are using athletes as “running billboards” and very little of the commercial profits from such exposure is invested in developing athletics.

(iii) (iii) the issuing of ASA permanent licences to road runners and/or road running clubs? NW2461E

a) ASA obtain income annually on average R2 400 000.00 from the sale of licenses.

b) On average the cost of printing the licenses are R1 300 000.00.

c) The remaining income on license levies, on average R1 100 000.00, are used to subsidize the provinces who host the National Road Running Championships ( 10km; 21.1km; 42.2 km) and prize money for the road running category winners.

Expenses from Road Running often are more than the income obtained from licenses and have to be balanced from other income

 

02 September 2019 - NW538

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture”

Whether he will provide Mr T W Mhlongo with a list of each development initiative funded by Athletics South Africa (ASA) in the past three years, including (a) the class or category of athletes who benefited, or who were intended to benefit, from each development initiative and (b) an indication of the amount spent by ASA on each development initiative; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW1533E

Reply:

  1. The ASA Board received a mandate from the ASA Council at the ASA QGM in 2016 to align the ASA Development Strategy, to achieve success at the Olympic Games, as its primary objectives.
  2. In this regard ASA has a National Development Strategy which is available on the ASA website http://www.athletics.org.za/centresofexcellence.
  3. Athletics is a labour intensive sport which requires substantial resources to engage large quantities of athletes, coaches, officials and administrators at all levels of participation.
  4. With the above in mind, the ASA Development Programme is an all-inclusive programme.
  5. Effectively, this means that ASA have to fund expenses related to international competitions, national competitions and skills development projects to level the playing field ensure that athletes from all communities has access to athletics.
  6. The strategy to fund all phases of development, are paying dividends for South Africa. The following is relevant:

6.1 To ensure that South African athletes are exposed to international competitions at youth, junior and senior level, ASA cover all expenses of all athletes in the team, e.g. clothing, travel, accommodation and per diems for the duration of the championships.

6.2 The ASA Youth Team is currently listed no.1 in the world on the medal tally

6.3 The ASA Junior Team is currently listed no.6 in the world on the medal tally

6.4 The ASA Senior Team is currently listed no.3 in the world on the medal tally

7. ASA is one of a few countries in the world that send representative teams to all IAAF World Championships, and CAA African Championships at youth, junior and senior level.

8. ASA cater for all disciplines of athletics, Track and Field, Road Running, Off-Road Running and ultra-distance. Most countries in the world cater for only some of the disciplines in athletics.

9. ASA Coaches serve as head coaches in countries such as Germany, India and many African Countries.

10. ASA National Coaches are used as facilitators/instructors in coaching courses by many countries in the world

11. ASA Technical Officials serve as Referees and Chief Judges in many international competitions.

12. ASA Leaders and Administrators are serving on many structures at African and IAAF level

13. Many countries in the world are now seeking guidance from ASA as to how to develop athletics in their countries

14. Many countries send their athletes to participate in South African events, and/or send them to training camps in South Africa to prepare for the Olympic Games

15. ASA have Squads of more than 300 athletes at senior, junior and youth level in preparation for the 2020 Olympic Games and 2024 Olympic Games

16. ASA expose annually, more than 2 000 000 athletes at the various levels of competitions to a network of more than 1500 IAAF/ASA certified competitions. Collectively, the ASA Development Programme is one of the largest, and one of the most effective programmes in the world.

ASA Development initiative

2017 -2019

Class or category

Summary of amount spent by ASA: 2017 – 2019

   

2017

2018

2019

Total

International events

Youth, junior and senior

3,035,364

5,548,643

2,887,882

11,471,889

National and provincial events

Youth, junior and senior

3,384,983

3,080,247

2,232,364

8,697,594

Skills development

National Symposiums/ Workshops for Athletes, Coaches, Officials, Administrators and educational material

2,303,293

2,393,780

2,056,780

6,753,853

Total

26,923,336

 

02 September 2019 - NW540

Profile picture: Julius, Mr J

Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Sports Arts and Culture

1. Whether his department has set aside a budget to embark on (a) Cultural and Creative Industries Federation of South Africa (CCIFSA) district consultations and (b) CCIFSA provincial summits; if so, (i) what is the total budget, (ii) on what date is the conference and (iii) did his department consult with stakeholders; 2. whether the CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference; if not,why not;if so, will he provide Mr. J W W Julius with a list of the new leadership that was elected. In terms of the provisions of the Public Administration Management Act, 2014 (Act no. 11 of 2014), (a) how many employees of his department have been found to be directors and/or members of private companies that are doing business with the state from 1 February 2017 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what is the value of the business by such companies for the said period?

Reply:

1. A budget was allocated for;

(a) CCIFSA’s district consultations

i) The toatal budget for 54 district summits amounts to R5,000,000.00

(b) CCIFSA provincial summits and national conference

(i) The total budget for 9 Provincial summits and a National Conference amounts to R8 650 000.00

(ii) The dates for the conference were 24th and 25th August 2019.

(iii)The Department engaged with the relevant stakeholders including CCIFSA members and the Creative Industries Task Team (CITT) members who were part of the organizing team.

2. The new CCIFSA leadership was endorsed at the national conference. The list of the new leadership as below:

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA NATIONAL EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

 

DESIGNATION

NAME AND SURNAME

PROVINCE

1

PRESIDENT

JOY MBEWANA

KZN

2

DEPUTY-PRESIDENT

JOHANNES MSOMI

MP

3

SECRETARY GENERAL

AYANDA RODA

FS

4

DEPUTY SECRETARY GENERAL

ANELE MAKI

WC

5

TREASURER

MANGALISO MTSHULA

NC

6

NATIONAL CO-ORDINATOR

LUZUKO KHOHLI

EC

LIST OF NEWLY ELECTED CCIFSA SECTOR REPRESENTATIVES

ITEM

SECTOR

NAME AND SURNAME

1

CULTURAL AND NATURAL HERITAGE SECTOR

HANS KHANYE

2

INDIGENOUS WISDOM

ZUKO NTONZIMA

3

VISUAL ARTS AND CRAFTS

MASEGO MOILOA

4

DESIGN AND CREATIVE

SIBUSISO MABUZA

5

ARTS, CULTURE AND HERITAGE TECHNICAL SUPPORT

EDWIN STHEMBISO KHUMALO

6

PERFORMANCE AND CELEBRATION

VUYOKAZI MESILANE

7

LANGUAGE AND PUBLISHING

JAHROSE NTHABISENG JAFTA

8

AUDIO-VISUAL AND INTERACTIVE MEDIA

PINKI TUSWA

9

ARTS EDUCATION AND TRAINING

MAHLUBI NIXON KRAAI