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14 October 2019 - NW912

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What are the names of all the approved clinics and/or institutions in the Republic where abortions are legally allowed to take place; (2) Whether his department has a database of the names of trained and certified practitioners and midwifes who meet the approved standards to perform legal abortions in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What steps is he taking to remove all illegal practicing doctors and services that advertise safe and pain-free abortions and that are also selling illegal pills on the street or on the internet with delivery to homes for free?

Reply:

(1) The names of all the approved clinics/institutions where abortions are legally allowed are attached in Appendix A.

(2) In terms of training the National Department of Health conduct a ten (10) days theoretical training for nurses followed by ten (10) clinical cases practical sessions before they are certified as competent.

Provincial offices contract the General Practitioners (GPs) and private organizations like Marie Stopes to provide Termination of Pregnancy (ToP) services. The National contracting stopped when the CToP Act was amended in 2008.

The focus for training is currently mainly on medical termination.

(3) Efforts to reduce illegal ToP providers. KZN provincial officie, with the previous MEC, embarked on the process of removing the advertisements of illegal abortions on street poles and some of the findings were:

- Adverts are put up by young people who do not even understand what abortion means, mainly boys;

- They were confronted and they could not provide details of the people who gave them the adverts, they just received the money given and started putting up the adverts.

- Most numbers provided, will lead you to different places, sometimes they send you to hotel reception or individuals on the street.

Mobile units are not providing abortions because they do not have backup of MVA equipment in case there is a need for surgical evacuation following the medical abortion.

Provincial Departments have an assessment tool to assess the readiness of facilities both private and public sector to perform abortions.

END.

APPENDIX A

Name of Facility

Frere Hospital

Tembisa Hospital

Kalafong Hospital

Mankweng Hospital

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

Tygerberg Hospital

Groote Schuur Hospital

Mthatha General Hospital

Dora Nginza Hospital

Frontier Hospital

St Elizabeth's Hospital

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

Sebokeng Hospital

Leratong Hospital

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

Addington Hospital

Prince Mshiyeni Memoral Hospital

Newcastle Hospital

Stanger Hospital

RK Khan Hospital

Edendale Hospital

Ladysmith Hospital

Port Shepstone Hospital

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

Tshilidzini Hospital

St Rita's Hospital

Philadelphia Hospital

Letaba Hospital

Mokopane Hospital

Ermelo Hospital

Mapulaneng Hospital

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

Potchefstroom Hospital

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

New Somerset Hospital

Paarl Hospital

Worcester Hospital

George Hospital

Butterworth Hospital

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Matatiele)

Bisho Hospital

Empilisweni Hospital

Uitenhage Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Settlers Hospital

Elliot Hospital

Cofimvaba Hospital

Humansdorp Hospital

Andries Vosloo Hospital

Midland Hospital

Cala Hospital

Glen Grey Hospital

Cradock Hospital

Nompumelelo (Peddie) Hospital

Port Alfred Hospital

All Saints Hospital

Bambisana Hospital

Tafalofefe Hospital

SS Gida Hospital

Bedford Hospital

Cloete Joubert (Barkly East) Hospital

Hewu Hospital

Adelaide Hospital

Lady Grey Hospital

Madzikane kaZulu Memorial Hospital

Isilimela Hospital

SAWAS Memorial (Jansenville) Hospital

Elizabeth Ross Hospital

National District Hospital

Katleho Hospital

Fezi Ngumbentombi Hospital

Botshabelo Hospital

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

Tokollo Hospital

Phekolong Hospital

Albert Nzula District Hospital

Thusanong Hospital

Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital

Bertha Gxowa Hospital

Heidelberg Hospital

Carletonville Hospital

Odi Hospital Jubilee Hospital

Kopanong Hospital

Norhtdale Hospital

Benedictine Hospital

Itshelejuba Hospital

Wentworth Hospital

Vryheid Hospital

Manguzi Hospital

Nkonjeni Hospital

Estcourt Hospital

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

Rietvlei Hospital

Greytown Hospital

Murchison Hospital

Dundee Hospital

Eshowe Hospital

GJ Crooke's Hospital

Emmaus Hospital

St Andrew's Hospital

Christ the King Hospital

Nkandla Hospital

St Apollinaris Hospital

Montebello Hospital

Untunjambili Hospital

Umphumulo Hospital

Betesda Hospital

Catherine Booth Hospital

Mbongolwane Hospital

Appelsbosch Hospital

KwaMagwaza Hospital

Niemeyer Memorial Hospital

Ekhombe Hospital

Elim Hospital

Seshego Hospital

Donald Fraser Hospital

Ellisras Hospital

Lebowakgomo Hospital

Jane Furse Hospital

Helen Franz Hospital

Zebediela Hospital

Malamulele Hospital

Nkhensani Hospital

Warmbarths Hospital

Botlokwa Hospital

WF Knobel Hospital

Siloam Hospital

Voortrekker Memorial (Potgietersrus) Hospital

Dilokong Hospital

Mecklenburg Hospital

Matlala Hospital

Sekororo Hospital

FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital

Louis Trichardt Hospital

Dr CN Phatudi Hospital

Kgapane Hospital

Thabazimbi Hospital

George Masebe Hospital

Witpoort Hospital

Embhuleni Hospital

KwaMhlanga Hospital

Evander Hospital

Tintswalo Hospital

Mmametlhake Hospital

Sabie Hospital

Standerton Hospital

Bernice Samuels Hospital

Piet retief Hospital

Barberton Hospital

Carolina Hospital

Amajuba Memorial Hospital

Bethal Hospital

Elsie Ballot Hospital

Tshwaragano Hospital

Postmasburg Hospital

De Aar (Central Karoo) Hospital

Moses Kotane Hospital

Brits Hospital

Nic Bodenstein Hospital

Taung Hospital

Ganyesa Hospital

Koster Hospital

Gelukspan Hospital

Karl Bremer Hospital

Khayelitsha Hospital

Mitchells Plain Hospital

Helderberg Hospital

False Bay Hospital

Westfleur Hospital

Vredenburg Hospital

Hermanus Hospital

Stellenbosch Hospital

Knysna Hospital

Mossel Bay Hospital

Oudtshoorn Hospital

Vredendal Hospital

Eerste Rivier Hospital

Clanwilliam Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Radie Kotz Hospital

Caledon Hospital

Ceres Hospital

Montagu Hospital

Swellendam Hospital

Otto Du Plessis Hospital

Robertson Hospital

Kgotsong (Welkom) Clinic

Dr Moeti Surgery

Klipdrift Health Post

SAMHS 2 Military Hospital

Cape Town Reproductive Health Centre

Harry Comay TB Hospital

Elim Satellite Clinic

Marie Stopes Port Elizabeth Clinic

New Rest Clinic

Civic Centre Clinic (Mthatha)

Lanti Clinic

Philani Clinic (Cradock)

Addo Clinic

Molemo Healthcare Clinic

Karabo Clinic

Bren Health Care Clinic

Marie Stopes Bloemfontein Clinic

Vaal Woman's Choice Clinic (Vereeniging)

Protop Women's Clinic (Vereeniging)

Vaal Woman's Clinic (Evaton)

Phedisong 1 clinic

Marie Stopes Durban Clinic

Marie Stopes Isipingo Clinic

Khululeka Clinic

TSM Health Care Clinic

Nancefield Clinic

Seloane Clinic

Levubu Clinic

Mamotshwa Clinic

Dendron Clinic

Mariveni Clinic

Northam Clinic

Raphahlelo Clinic

Matoks Clinic

Willows Clinic

Buffgelshoek Clinic (Blouberg)

Mashishimale Clinic

Jamela Clinic

Seshego IV Clinic

Motsepe Clinic

Mashamba Clinic

Witfontein Clinic

Mabins Clinic

Mankuwe Clinic

Renee Clinic

Katrina Koikoi Clinic

Makapanstad (Seaparankwe) Clinic

Hartebeesfontein Clinic

Schweizer-Reneke Town Clinic

Preshco Clinic

Mononono Clinic

Site C Youth Clinic

Mediclinic Constantiaberg Hospital

Empiliseni (Worcester) Clinic

De Doorns Clinic

Zolani Clinic

Nkqubela Clinic

Railton Clinic

Bergsig Clinic

Swellendam PHC Clinic

Caledon Clinic

Heidelberg Clinic

Villiersdorp Clinic

Annie Brown Clinic

Montagu Clinic

Wolseley Clinic

Nduli Clinic

Prince Alfred Hamlet Clinic

Tulbagh Clinic

Groendal Clinic

Mediclinic Durbanville Hospital

Touws Rivier Clinic

Happy Valley clinic

Idas Valley Clinic

McGregor Clinic

Suurbraak Clinic

Marie Stopes Cape Town Clinic

Marie Stopes Bellville Clinic

Barrydale Clinic

Great Brak Rivier Clinic

Michael Mapongwana CDC

Lady Michaelis CDC

Kuyasa CDXC

Noulungile CDC

TC Newman CDC

Bishop Lavis CDC

Thebalethu CDC

Town w CDC

Mbekweni CDC

Wellington CDC

Dr Abdurahman CDC

Worcester CDC

Ceres CDC

Cloetesville CDC

Motherwell CHC

Empilweni Gompo CHC

Nontyatyambo CHC

Idutywa Village CHC

Laetitita Ban CHC

Duncan Village CHC

Nqamakwe CHC

Xhora CHC

Soshanguve CHC

Chiawelo CHC

Zola CHC

Lenasia South CHC

Kgabo CHC

Johan Heyns CHC

Pedisong 4 CHC

Laudium CHC

Jabulane Dumane CHC

Hillbrow CHC

Phoenix CHC

Nseleni CHC

Inanda C CHC

Tongaat CHC

Pomeroy CHC

eDumbe CHC

Sundumbili CHC

Dannhauser CHC

Turton CHC

Hlengisizwe CHC

St Chads CHC

Ndwedwe CHC

Rethabile CHC

Makhado CHC

HC Boshoff CHC

Tshilwavhusiku CHC

Tiyani CHC

Mookgophong CHC

Nchabeleng CHC

Ratshaatshaa CHC

Matsulu CHC

Kanyamazane CHC

Nelspruit CHC

Phola-Nzikasi CHC

Naas CHC

M'Africa CHC

Kabokweni CHC

Bhunga CHC

Thulamahashe CHC

Perdekop CHC

Galeshewe Day Hospital

Bafokeng CHC

Letlhabile CHC

Bapong CHC

Mogwase CHC

Mabeskraal CHC

Atamelang CHC

JB Marks CHC

Mamusa CHC

Mitchells Plain CHC

Kraaifontein CHC

Guguleto CHC

Vanguard CHC

Hanover Park CHC

Mediclinic Welkom Hospital

Mediclinic Cape town Hospital

Mediclinic Cape Gate Hospital

Mediclinic Paarl Hospital

Mediclinic Worcester Hospital

Life Kingsbury Hospital

Mediclinic George Hospital

Mediclinic Hermanus Hospital

Life Bay View Private Hospital

Data Source: DHIS DATA (2018 Jan to August 2019) accessed 17 September 2019.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW890

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the report by the Council for Medical Schemes that mental health diseases are increasing, under-diagnosed and under-treated and that the approved budget for 2019-20 financial year only accommodates 5 000 patients on the new mental health programme to be rolled out in the current financial year, how does he plan to address (a) access, (b) awareness and (c) the shortage of mental healthcare facilities under the new programme?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The National Department of Health has in place the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan 2013-2020 which is currently being implemented in all nine provinces. Progress reports obtained from provinces in 2017/18 and 2019/20 financial years show that implementation of the plan has gained traction but a lot more still needs to be done.

In addition to the implementation of the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Plan, the following have been undertaken:

- A call for expression of interest to render mental health services was made to psychologists, psychiatrists and registered counsellors. Practitioners per province have been identified for provinces to contract using the Human Resources Capacitation Fund.

- In order to improve the quality and access to mental health services a Mental Health Training Programme was developed. The programme targets health practitioners working at primary health care clinics as well as district hospitals to improve their competencies in detection of mental disorders and provision of good quality mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation. A total of 30 training workshops were conducted during this financial year reaching 920 health practitioners in 8 Provinces. This programme will be expanded in the coming financial years to train more health practitioners.

- The National Department of Health evaluated the health systems cost of mental health services and programmes in South Africa in 2018/19. This was aimed at helping us understand what we are currently spending on mental health across all service levels and the potential resource envelop to be augmented to address the key mental health service gaps. The study found that the total costs of inpatient and outpatient mental health services and known transfers for contracted hospitals and NGO mental health sevices across all nine provinces amounted to R8.37 billion in the 2016/17 financial year. This represented 5% of the total health budget in the2016/17 (provincial range: 2.1-7.7%), and equated to a national average of R180.9 per capita uninsured.

We have embarked on the second phase of the project, to determine a prioritized package of mental health services and the resource estimates that should be made available to address the gaps and implement the prioritized interventions. The “investment case for mental health” will be finalized during the course of next year.

(c) Mental health infrastructure additions, upgrades and renovations are funded through the Indirect Conditional Grant: Health Infrastructure Revitalization Grant. In the 2019/20 financial year 21 mental health infrastructure projects are funded and they are at different stages of implementation.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW978

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What (a) is the total number of Clinic Health Committees that are active in each province, (b) is the total budget for Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year, (c) total number of members served on the Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year, (d) is the remuneration package of each committee member that served on the Clinic Health Committees in each province for the 2019-20 financial year and (e) is the purpose of the Clinic Health Committees; (2) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(a, b, c, d & e) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Q (1)

(a) Total # of Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(b) Total Budget for Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(c)Total No of members served on Clinic Health Committees 2019/20

(d) Remuneration package of each Committee member 2019/20

PPROVINCES

 

EC

696

R16 240.00

10 440

R 500.00 p/p p/q

GP

1488

No budget allocated

11 904

No remuneration

FS

139

No budget allocated

973

No remuneration


KZN

592 

R7 104 000

8880 

R200.00 p/p p/q

LP

492

No budget allocated

4428

No remuneration

MP

263

No budget allocated

3156

No remuneration

NC


169

No budget allocated

845

No remuneration

NW

301

R4 214 000

2107


R500.00 p/p p/q

WC

200

1 958 400

2400

S&T only p/p p/q

(e) Purpose of the clinic Committee

Clinic Committees facilitate the following:


1. Serve as a link between Primary Health Care, community based services and

households;
2. Participate in the achievement of improved health outcomes;
3. Promote community participation, local accountability and intersectoral

collaboration;
4. Engage with the management of PHC facilities with regards to planning,

monitoring and oversight of Health Services; and
5. Engages with other governance structures e.g. Ward committees to ensure

streamlining of initiatives which provide a broader platform in engaging with

stakeholders.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW779

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What amount was spent on advertising by (i) his department and (ii) state-owned entities reporting to him in the (aa) 2016-17, (bb) 2017-18 and (cc) 2018-19 financial years; (2) What amount of the total expenditure incurred by (a) his department and (b) state-owned entities reporting to him went to (i) each specified black-owned media company and (ii) outdoor advertising in each specified financial year and (c) on outdoor advertising by his department and state-owned entities reporting to him went to each black-owned media company in each specified financial year?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

  1. Department of Health

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (i) Amount was spent on advertising

R2 878 917.97

R16 181 705.22

R582 010.39

(2) (a) (i) black-owned media company:

 

   

 

 

Black Owned Media Company

R207 600.00

Nil

Nil

Kone Staffing Solution

R2 671 317.97

R14 912 472.77

Nil

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R1 269 232.45

R582 010.39

       

(2) (a) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor advertising

     

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R972 660.89

Nil

       

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

     

Media House (Sadmon)

Nil

R972 660.89

Nil

       
  1. State Owned Entities

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

Council for Medical Schemes

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R2 400 090,08

R1 965 244,48

R950 714,11

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Independent Media

R741 592,80

R836 336,68

R917 035,86

Message Platform

R7 980,00

Nil

Nil

Mahogany Trading

Nil

R419 554,20

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor advertising

R202 874,40

R507 653,40

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Mohagany Trading

Nil

R419 554,20

Nil

       

National Health Laboratory Service

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Human Communication (Pty) LTD

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Human Communication (Pty) LTD

R799 079.47

R287 792.73

R120 768.13

       

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Details

(aa) 2016-17

(bb) 2017-18

(cc) 2018-19

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R412 337

R2 943 463

R620 482

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Human Communication

R127 807

R119 804

R70 128

Basadzi Media and Personnel

R178 326

R46 039

R126 346

Ultimate Recruitment Solution

R102 954

R22 696

R24 501

Pheta Trading Enterprise

Nil

Nil

R302 140

Kone Solutions

Nil

Nil

R78 122

Druzmia Project Trading

Nil

Nil

R6 383

Government Printing Works (Tender Advertisements)

R3 250

R1 000

R12 862

Government Communication and

Information Systems (Radio

Advertisement)

Nil

R2 753 923

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Nil

Nil

Nil

       

South African Medical Research Council

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

R1 417 593.45

R1 828 522.83

R1 893 653.72

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

African Directory

R29,900.00

Nil

R 14,950.00

African News Agency

Nil

R196,000.00

R84,000.00

Ayanda Mbanga Communications

R846,885.13

R674,367.43

R930,409.28

Black Moon Advertising

Nil

Nil

R358,300.40

Human Communications

R378,243.10

R505,250.54

Nil

Robin Events & Services

Nil

R1,300.00

 

Phanda Personnel

Nil

Nil

R9,956.95

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

R48,400.00

R16,000.00

R358,300.40

(2) (c) black-owned media company:

Black Moon

Nil

Nil

R358,300.40

       

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

(1) (a) (ii) Amount was spent on advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (b) (i) black-owned media company:

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (ii) Total expenditure incurred on outdoor

advertising

Nil

Nil

Nil

(2) (c) black-owned media company

Nil

Nil

Nil

END.

14 October 2019 - NW656

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the exorbitantly high cost of cancer medication in the Republic and in comparison to other countries such as India, he will consider removing the patent laws on cancer medication and treatment in order for low-cost generics to be produced to enable the majority of South Africans to have access to affordable treatment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

A patent allows the pharmaceutical manufacturer an exclusivity over the sale of a medicine. During this time the manufacturer price is very high and unaffordable to low and middle income countries. Companies argue that the high prices are intended to recoup their costs of research and development, however these companies have been reluctant to be transparent about such costs. There is much evidence to suggest that the cost of research and development is actually much lower than claims made by the pharmaceutical industry.

South Africa has been at the forefront of challenging the high prices of medicines globally including where patents are the barrier to access. There currently are legislative provisions which would allow us to access a medicine that is protected by a patent. These provisions are included in Section 15C of the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act, 1965 (Act No. 101 of 1965). It is important to bear in mind that in order for one to access medicines using Section 15C, such a medicine must first be registered by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) in terms of efficacy, safety and quality. SAHPRA will consider an application of a generic even while a patent remains in effect. So the provisions to address patent barriers already exist in South Africa however a product must be registered by SAHPRA before we can implement such a provision.

South Africa has never had to use the patent legislation to access a lower priced generic medicine. The patent holders have in many cases negotiated either through bilateral agreements or have participated in the Medicines Patent Pool which provides manufacturers in developing countries like South Africa access lower cost generic antiretroviral (ARV) drugs at an affordable price. This has allowed us to afford the world’s largest ARV programme.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW137

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What amount has been spent on each pilot project of the National Health Insurance since the inception of the programme?

Reply:

The health system strengthening initiatives were implement in the NHI pilot districts. There initiatives were funded through conditional grants. The grant funding related to the following activities:

The ward based primary healthcare outreach teams which were responsible for the provision of primary healthcare to families/households; community outreach services; preventative, promotive, curative, rehabilitative and palliative services.

The Integrated school health programme focused on screening of health-related barriers to learning such as vision, hearing, cognitive, and related developmental impairments.

General Practitioners and Pharmacy Assistants were contracted to primary care facilities to support clinics in service delivery.

The ideal clinic realisation model was introduced in response to the existing insufficiencies in quality of PHC services and to lay the foundation for NHI implementation.

The centralized chronic medicines dispensing and distribution model involves the centralized dispensing of medicines for chronic stable patients and the collection of the medicine at a point close to patients,

The purpose of the health patient registration system is to serve as an online registry of all patients using healthcare services in South Africa that can be accessed at any facility to provide health workers with patients’ demographic information and their most up-to-date health records.

The stock visibility system is used in PHC clinics to monitor and report on stock availability levels for essential medicines like ARVs, TB medication and vaccines. The purpose of the SVS is to enable more informed decision-making and proactive stock management at the PHC facility level.

The infrastructure grant was intended to fund nursing college infrastructure as well as the maintenance, repair and construction of primary care facilities

The expenditure below outlines the grants allocated to the National Health Insurance as reported in Departmental annual reports over the period

Name of the Grant

Grant Deliverables

(R 000') 2017/18

(R 000') 2016/17

(R 000') 2015/16

(R 000') 2014/15

(R 000') 2013/14

(R 000') 2012/13

National Health Insurance

Equipment for PHC facilities and outreach teams, training of staff in SCM, impact assessment of pilot interventions

 

99 665

63 491

63 605

71 614

78 019

Ideal Clinics

Evaluate clinics against ideal clinic criteria and support facilities to reach ideal clinic status

26 590

9 792

 

 

 

 

Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

Two dose vaccination

199 534

189 992

158 719

189 489

 

 

Health Professionals Contracting

Contracting health professionals and CCMDD

549 035

361 580

279 780

R82,261

9 457

 

Health Facility Revitalisation

Nursing Education Institutions, maintainance, repair and refurbishment

657 099

686 496

612 623

292 345

373 483

 

Information Systems

Health Patient Registration System, PHC Stock Visibility System and Hospital Stock Visibility System.

83 807

 

 

 

 

 

END.

14 October 2019 - NW617

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The following tables reflect the details in this regard.

(a)(ii) Entities

(aa) total amount spent on cleaning

(bb) total amount spent on security

(cc) total amount spent on gardening services

 

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

R890,379.82

R858,726.38

R36,813.10

R409,294.50

R154,370.08

R130,995.60

National Health Laboratory Service

R30,851.489

R4,620.615

R13,588.664

R1,054.711

R402,477

In-sourced

Office of Health Standards Compliance

R131,644

R190,521

R0

R249,814

R0

R0

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

South African Medical Research Council

R4,100,616.27

R5,458,526.90

R8,885,876.97

R9,428,708.73

R671,297.44

R245,290.80

(b) Amount paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount paid to each service provider

(a)(ii) Entities

Service provider

Specified Service

Amount paid

2017/18

Amount paid

2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

FSG Property Services

Cleaning chemicals

-

R12,778.45

 

PTY Trade 242

Cleaning consumables

R58,845.80

R21,558.04

 

Cannon Hygiene

Hygiene consumables

R134,139.41

R8,516.30

 

Rentokil Initial (Pty) Ltd

Hygiene services

R26,886.72

R136,571.72

 

Salaries of cleaners

Salaries

R622,888.89

R661,953.87

 

Temporary Services

Temporary Services

R47,619.00

R17,348.00

 

Perfect Solutions Security

Security Guards

R318, 680.19

400,888.40

 

TFS Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R34,728.89

-

 

Sefeko Guard Security

Security Handsets

R8,404.02

R8,406.10

 

Bidvest Execuflora

Gardening/Plant hire

-

R63,467.35

 

Servest Interior Solutions

Gardening/Plant hire

R154,370.08

R67,528.25

National Health Laboratory Service

Afriboom (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R2,878.819

-

 

Amandla Ahlanene Trading Enterprise CC

 

R7,433.137

R1,254.206

 

Amararo Trading(Pty)Ltd

 

R36, 309

-

 

Ambius

 

R16,784

R18,100

 

Basan S A Trading

 

R11,628

R8,280

 

Botho Ubuntu Cleaning

 

R838,981

R804, 299

 

Clean Room Maintenance CC

 

-

R5,244

 

Columbus Hygiene Systems

 

R8,884

R18,530

 

Greater Kokstad Municipality

 

R1,833

-

 

H Coetzee t/a Milandi's Skoonmaakdienste

 

R600

-

 

HDS Interprise and Medispeed Pty Ltd

 

R172,827

-

 

Masana Hygiene Services CC

 

R5,946.359

R2,283

 

Masango Cleaning Services and Construction CC

 

R5,945

-

 

Masutlhadokgwa Construction & Project CC

 

R19,947

-

 

Mathasani Construction and Cleaning

 

R4,646.418

R16,213

 

Nondumiso Cleaning Services (Pty)Ltd

 

R2,678.782

-

 

Nontobeko Mketi

 

R1,500

R2,800

 

Omnilab Supplies CC

 

-

R6,443

 

Prestige Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,173.655

R214,852

 

Pristene Health Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R280,198

-

 

Pronto Kleen

 

R18,989

R1,854

 

Prospect Cleaning Services

 

R1,004.657

-

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

-

R15,741

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty)

 

R1,352,587

R1,361,855

 

Servest Pty Ltd

 

R35,435

R222,506

 

Shanbar Property Development cc

 

R3,852

-

 

Siyaya Teledata Comm & Courier CC

 

R2,256

-

 

Steiner Hygiene (Pty) Ltd

 

R35,248

R981

 

Steiner Services (Johannesburg):

 

R211,388

R240,746

 

Thistle Lab Services

 

R34,471

R23

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty Ltd

 

-

R28,870

 

Steiner Hygiene (George)

 

-

R854

 

Industro Clean OFS cc

 

-

R993

 

Bidserv Industrial Products Pty Ltd T/a G Fox & Company

 

-

R2,989

 

Kenglo Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R58,286

 

Gcinasande Projects

 

-

R1,288

 

Supra Later Pty Ltd

 

-

R3,367

 

N Hiliza Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R2,533

 

MM629K Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R300,070

 

Satis-Vaction Cleaning Services

 

-

R23,407

 

Sebaeng Construction

 

-

R3,000

 

Armand Trading CC

Security

R8,892

-

 

Atlas Security Systems

 

R26,231

R19,332

 

Bonolo Claudina Sefularo

 

R2,720

R4,590

 

Chubb Security South Africa (Pty) Ltd.

 

R7,167

R3,826

 

Electroalarm-Monitor cc

 

R6,301

R5,729

 

Enforce Security Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R782,232

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions Pty Ltd

 

R79,198

R61,738

 

Hi Tec Security

 

R7,533

R6,519

 

Home At Kimberely

 

R4,809

R6,228

 

Ingwempisi Security Services

 

R7,218,569

-

 

Juanique R van Zyl

 

R991

R100

 

Nextec Industrial Technologies

 

-

R556,309

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

R4,626.498

R121,876

 

Roman Business Management

 

R5,970

R6,223

 

Saayman's Security Services CC / Capital Security Services CC

 

R6,767

R4,533

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,019

-

 

Secureco

 

R314,701

R28,484

 

Separations

 

R153

-

 

Top Security Systems Pty Ltd

 

R12,562

R668

 

Top Ten catering and Security

 

R108,922

R12,209

 

Transfire Pty Ltd

 

R11,159

-

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty

 

R353,628

-

 

World Focus 799 CC

 

R1,642

-

 

Minatlou Trading 331

 

-

R80,000

 

Signal Network Telecom cc

 

-

R107,364

 

No 1 Corporate Promtional

 

-

R18,012

 

B & M Scientific B035

 

-

R8,970

 

C Kader

 

-

R400

 

Valencia Z Jokazi

 

-

R1,600

 

Katanga Property Care Pty Ltd

Gardening

R402,477

-

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Medical Research Council

Cleaning

R131,644

R120,115.41

 

Khumoetsile Vision Group

 

-

R70,405.59

 

Imvula Quality Protection

Security

-

R191,439.50

 

Rise Security Services

 

-

R58,374.10

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Medical Research Council

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

Cleaning Services

R110,535.33

R25,043.13

 

Bidvest Managed Solutions (Pty

 

R2,003848.56

R2,661 757.19

 

Bright Idea Projects 2806 cc

 

-

R1 200.00

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R20 586.00

-

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4 342.11

-

 

Rhumbu Trading And Projects (P

 

R17 375.00

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R1 312.50

-

 

Ndabazasembo Trading Enterpris

 

R59 812.00

-

 

2 Oceans Computer Consumables

Cleaning Consumables

R18,146.20

-

 

AB Holdings

 

R6,670

-

 

ABD Fuels (Pty) Ltd

 

R7,386

-

 

Afri Zonke Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

 

R10,089.03

-

 

Amanthi TRAD

 

-

R3,649.39

 

Ambicion11 (PTY)

 

-

R520

 

Armada Supplies (Pty) Ltd

 

R8,908

-

 

As Premium Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,650.80

-

 

Atlantic Laundromat

 

R16,832.83

R13,255.91

 

Atur Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,248.88

-

 

Aylu Civils And Construction C

 

R6,300.00

-

 

Azura Suppliers (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,680.00

-

 

Black Wealth Institute

 

-

R1,700

 

Bidserv Industrial Products (Pty)Ltd

 

R12,399.40

-

 

Bidvest Management solutions

 

-

R97, 662.23

 

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

 

R1,280 515.73

R1,854 382.49

 

Biofarm

 

-

R1,757.28

 

Bkj Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,055.90

-

 

Bongukulunga Cleaning Services

 

R8,089.16

-

 

Bonwepy Management Entertainme

 

R-2 832.48

-

 

Bralmor Business Administrator

 

R395.07

-

 

Breez Villiage

 

-

R1,020.60

 

Cape Africa Marine Supp

 

R1,594.99

R11,303.18

 

Capital Ship Trading 605 Pty Ltd

 

R8,361.90

-

 

Caprichem Saccs (Pty) Ltd

 

R746.25

R1,958.20

 

Cishumlilo SA

 

-

R15,250.00

 

Clean Hygiene CC

 

R4,530.00

-

 

Corpchem (Pty) Ltd

 

R4,155.30

-

 

Cross Country Pest Control And

 

R7,500

-

 

DBZN Trading

 

-

R12,509.96

 

Deejay Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R12,000

-

 

Devershan Naicker T/A Buckingham

 

R1,794.50

-

 

Diesel Innovations

 

-

R120,462.53

 

Dixinox Cc T/A Exitol Cleaning

 

R10,734.80

R3,302.08

 

Drivers Licence Test Control C

 

R8,640

-

 

Dwm Cleaning And General Tradi

 

R4,420

-

 

Eagles stationers

 

-

R56,536.20

 

Emergency Diesel

 

-

R56,935.00

 

Emtek Industrial Supplies Tpy

 

R2,554.80

-

 

End Wise (Pty) Ltd

 

R700

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R6,462.28

-

 

Execuflora

 

-

R348.00

 

Formax

 

-

R12,979.63

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4,342.11

-

 

Geo-Vul Constructions And Gene

 

R40,480

-

 

Growing In Faith Entrepeneurs

 

R4,651.20

-

 

Grundnorm Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,350

-

 

Hat Agencies - Hardware Abrasi

 

R4,729.70

-

 

Hobozola

 

-

R5,541.00

 

Husbandoncall (Pty) Ltd T/A Hu

 

R8,368.40

-

 

Ikamva Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,140.80

-

 

Impilwenhle Trading Enterprise

 

R5,521.06

-

 

Industrial And Proactive Solut

 

R14,487.06

-

 

Inkosazana

 

-

R16,007.00

 

Izinyanyeni (Pty) Ltd

 

R24,817.56

-

 

Jamilo Sales And Services (Pty

 

R4,520

-

 

JT Maritz

 

-

R15,354.00

 

K2014085852 (Sa) (Pty) Ltd T/A

 

R6,046.45

-

 

Kb2 Distributors

 

-

R4,235.00

 

KA SALARI

 

-

R4,391.22

 

Kopanang 7 Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,083

-

 

Laborem Investment Trading (Pty)

 

R-5,034

-

 

Laborem Lab Supplies

 

R50

-

 

Lazer chemicals

 

-

R3,000

 

Legg & Wessels

 

-

R21,885.61

 

Lum Mila (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,274

-

 

Manjapha Trading Enterprise Cc

 

R3,670

-

 

Maphallang Projects

 

R1,800

-

         
 

Melokuhle Envoy (Pty) Ltd

 

R14,566.30

-

 

Msanzi

 

-

R9,003

 

Njikelela Constructand Project

 

R6,480

-

 

Nrb Liquid Dream (Pty) Ltd

 

R647

-

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R38,258.50

-

 

Nyazile Building Construction

 

R22,670.86

-

 

Ojenny And Sons (Pty) Ltd

 

R400

-

 

Okamkhathini Trading

 

R4,373.60

-

 

OMH Projects

 

-

R1,200

 

Ophilayo Trading Enterprise CC

 

R5,968

-

 

OQ Detergents

 

-

R2,344.00

 

Phat group

 

-

R2,517.35

 

Pula Pele (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,200

-

 

R-5 Distributors

 

-

R198.30

 

Rhumbu Trading and Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R17,375

-

 

Sibanye Office Solution

 

R29,890.02

R160,807.77

 

SMJ Group Cc

 

R8,145.25

-

 

Sthezeh Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R30,841

-

 

Take Note Trading 35 Cc

 

R10,684.22

-

 

Techris Tech

 

-

R76,399.91

 

Telegenix Trading 429 CC

 

-

R1,048.55

 

Togu Civils (Pty) Ltd

 

R-0.26

-

 

Trans Africa Medicals

 

R850

-

 

Trat Z Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,347.40

-

 

Tshiamo

 

-

R24,251.49

 

XV Ntsinde

 

R75,081

-

 

Yukon

Cleaning Consumables

-

R1,476.00

 

Petty Cash

   

34,937.39

 

Adt Security (Pty) Ltd (Durban

Security Services

R44,903.52

R16,176.97

 

Blue Apple Trading Enterprise

 

-

R483,046.00

 

Blue Light Monitoring & Armed

 

R1,862.30

-

 

Chubb Integrated Systems

 

R1,539.05

R- 3,383.93

 

Eric And Son Pty Ltd

 

R3,150

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions (Pty)

 

R129,284.20

R138,962.64

 

Hiway Integrated Security (Pty

 

R5,140

-

 

Imvula Quality Protection Afri

 

R8,478 636.93

R8,340 356.92

 

Jt Maritz Electrical

 

R32,930.04

R7,777.95

 

Liberty Technologies (Pty) Ltd

 

R6,425

-

 

Masibambisane Maswati (Pty) Lt

 

R13,528

-

 

Mzansi Fire And Security (Pty)

 

R99,811.59

R199,597.02

 

Oostenberg Patrols Cc

 

R47,340

-

 

Panther Procure (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,535.96

-

 

Petty Cash

 

R2,085.38

R105.00

 

Sakh`Ikhaya Suppliers Cc

 

R2,926

R112,299.03

 

Shanken Security Solutions Cc

 

R2,779

-

 

Techris CC

 

-

R179,771.13

 

Dway Projects (Pty) Ltd

Gardening Services

 

R34,355.00

-

 

Full Flow Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R205,533.00

-

 

K R A S Agencies Cc

 

R1,650.00

-

 

Mecam Industrial (PTY)

 

-

R5,197.40

 

Ngula Constraction property

 

-

R18,900.00

 

Pamper Zone Trading And Projec

 

R162,000.00

-

 

Sakh’ikhaya suppliers

 

-

R58,913.04

 

Seteline (Pty) Ltd

 

R38,660.00

-

 

Sotobe Farming And Enterprizin

 

R20,000.00

-

 

STRATOSTAFF Prev. ADECCO (DBN)

 

R24,099.44

R17,875.00

 

Thokad Group

 

-

R22,697.06

 

Weymer Construction And Mainte

 

R185,000.00

R121,708.30

END.

14 October 2019 - NW936

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have, (b) number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees and (c) is the name of each service provider of each clinic?

Reply:

  1. Number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have,

(i) Number of mobile units National: None

(ii) Number of mobile units provincial: 15

(iii) Number of mobile units in local public health clinics: 2

(iiii) Number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees

DISTRICTS/ REGIONS

TOTAL NUMBER OF CLINICS

NUMBER OF CLINICS WITH CLINIC COMMITTEE MEMBERS

EKURHULENI

   

Ekurhuleni East

30

28 (93%)

Ekurhuleni North

28

20 (71%)

Ekurhuleni South

35

30 (86%)

TOTAL

93

78 (84%)

  1. The name of each service provider of each clinic?

Please refer to Annexure A list of City of Ekurhuleni Facilities and Ekurhuleni Health District Facilities (Provincial)

END.

14 October 2019 - NW360

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) he and (ii) his deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

The attached Annexure 1 indicates detailed information as requested. It should be noted that the Minister has a prerogative to delegate to the Deputy Minister any trip or invitation he is not in a position to honour.

With regards to cost implications to the trips, it is not possible to provide such information only until the logistical arrangements are done. It must also be noted that not all the trips indicated are funded from the State, but are sponsored by the relevant host governments and/or organisations.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW823

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What number of forensic pathologists are currently appointed (a) at each mortuary and (b) in each province; (2) What (a) progress has been made to ensure that forensic pathology officers are registered with a professional body and (b) number of forensic pathology officers are currently registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa?

Reply:

  1. For 1 (a) and (b) for Western Cape (updated 14 September 2019), please refer to Table 1 below:

The Western Cape does not appoint their Forensic Pathologists to the mortuaries, as they (outside of the Metro) are a resource that provides services across a geographic area. In the Metro they are linked to the two Departments of Forensic Medicine (University of Stellenbosch & University of Cape Town) and they also have academic responsibilities. Registrars are excluded, as they are not qualified pathologists. This also supports the deployment of pathologists beyond their specific area when they have service pressures elsewhere or during major incident response. In the rural areas either the doctors travel or the case travels to the doctor.

Please refer to the table overleaf.

Table 1: Western Cape

Facility / Area

FPS Facilities supported

Title / Portfolio

Number

Comment

Cape Town Metro East /US

Metro East / Tygerberg FPL

Head of Department

1

Not only service delivery responsibilities.

The HOD should not be counted towards service delivery due to the nature of their responsibilities

   

Head Clinical Unit

1

 
   

Pathologists

3

 

Sub Total

   

5

 

Cape Town Metro West / UCT

Metro West / Salt River

Head of Department

1

Not only service delivery responsibilities

The HOD should not be counted towards service delivery due to the nature of their responsibilities

   

Head Clinical Unit

1

 
   

Pathologists

5

 

Sub Total

   

7

 

West Coat / Winelands

Paarl, Malmesbury, Vredenburg, Vredendal

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Winelands / Overberg

Worcester, Hermanus, Ceres; Swellendam

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Garden Route / Central Karoo

George, Knysna, Mossel Bay, Riversdale, Oudtshoorn, Laingsburg, Beaufort West

Head Clinical Unit

1

Doctor travel or case travel

   

Pathologist

1

 

Sub Total

   

2

 

Total with HODs

   

18

 

Total without HODs

   

16

 

For 1 (a) and (b) for Mpumalanga (updated 30 June 2019), please refer to Table 2 below:

Table 2: Mpumalanga

Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Themba

1

Mapulaneng

0

Tonga

0

Tintswalo

0

Barberton

0

Lydenburg

0

Kwamhlanga

0

Middelburg

0

Witbank

1

Belfast

0

Delmas

0

Mmamethlake

0

Ermelo

1

Evander

0

Piet Retief

0

Embhuleni

0

Carolina

0

Standerton

0

Volksrust

0

Balfour

0

Bethal

0

Total

3

For 1 (a) and (b) for North West (updated 30 June 2019), please refer to Table 3 below:

Table 3: North West

Name of Mortuary

No of pathologists

Klerksdorp

0

Potchefstroom

1

Lichtenburg

0

Mahikeng

0

Phokeng

1

Brits

0

Vryburg

0

 Total

For 1 (a) and (b) for Eastern Cape (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 4 below:

 

Table 4: Eastern Cape

Name of Mortuary:

No of Pathologists

Mdantsane

0

Woodbrook

0

Bisho

0

Butterworth

0

Pe Region

0

Gelvandale

0

Uitenhage

0

Mount Road

1

New Brighton

0

Grahamstown

0

Graaff Reinet

0

Mthatha

0

Lusikisiki

0

Mt Frere

0

Mt Fletcher

0

Bizana

0

Aliwal North

0

Queenstown

0

Regional

1

 Total

2

For 1 (a) and (b) for Free State (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 5 below:

Table 5: Free State

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

   

Botshabelo

0

Bloemfontein

4

Smithfield

0

Jagersfontein

0

Bethlehem

0

Phuthaditjhaba

0

Harrismith

0

Ficksburg

0

Sasolburg

0

Kroonstad

0

Welkom

1

 Total

5 

For 1 (a) and (b) for Gauteng (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 6 below:

Table 6: Gauteng

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

   

Pretoria

4

Ga-Rankuwa

2

Bronkhorstspruit

0

Diepkloof

2

Sebokeng

0

Johannesburg

6

Springs

0

Germiston

2

Heidelberg

0

Roodepoort

1

 Total

17

(a) and (b) for Kwa-Zulu Natal (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 7 below:

Table 7: Kwa-Zulu Natal

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Gale Street

2

Phoenix

2

Pinetown

1

Park Rynie

0

Port Shepstone

0

Harding

0

KwaDukuza

0

Pietermaritzburg

0

New Hanover

0

Howick

0

Richmond

0

Mooi River

0

Ladysmith

0

Estcourt

0

Bergville

0

Dundee

0

Nqutu

0

Tugela Ferry

0

Greytown

0

Newcastle

0

Madadeni

0

Utrecht

0

Dannhauser

0

Kokstad

0

Ixopo

0

Umzimkulu

0

Bulwer

0

Ulundi

0

Nongoma

0

Paulpietersburg

0

Vryheid

0

Pongola

0

Mtubatuba

0

Mkhuze

0

Mosvold

0

Mseleni

0

Manguzi

0

Richards Bay

1

Eshowe

0

Nkandla

0

TOTALS

6

For 1 (a) and (b) for Northern Cape (updated 16 September 2019), please refer to Table 8 below:

Table 8 Northern Cape

Name of Mortuary

No of Pathologists

Kimberley

1

Upington

0

Kuruman

0

De Aar

0

Sprongbok

0

Calvina

0

Total

1

For 1 (a) and (b) for Limpopo (updated 22 February 2018), please refer to Table 9 below:

Table 9: Limpopo

Name of Mortuary:

No of Pathologists

Lebowakgomo

0

ST. Ritas

0

Groblersdal

0

Mokopane

1

Bela-Bela

1

Letaba

0

Kgapane

0

Nkhensani

0

Maphutha-Malatji

0

Elim

0

Tshilidzini

0

TOTAL

2

(2) (a) A special HPCSA Board meeting was held in March 2019 and the Board resolved to:

“a. To rescind the resolution taken in October 2018 to approve the revised Regulations relating to registration Forensic Pathology Officers which had provided for five (5) categories / designations.

b. The Regulations relating to the registration of Forensic Pathology Officers as amended during the meeting be approved.”

It was concluded that the Regulations relating to the registration of Forensic Pathology Officers approved on 27 March 2019 and the response to public comments would be submitted to the Department of Health for final promulgation once the Department of Planning Monitoring and Evaluation has issued the socio-economic impact certificate.

(b) No forensic pathology officers have been registered to date.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW338

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What total number of (i) Linear Accelerator machines, (ii) Orthovoltage machines and (iii) any other machine relating to the treatment of cancer patients are available in each province, (b) where in each province are the specified machines located and (c) what number of the machines are currently (i) in use, (ii) broken and (iii) not in use in each case?

Reply:

The following information is currently available to the National department of Health. An updated audit of equipment is underway and additional information can be provided once the audit is completed.

 

Province

Facility

No of Bunkers

Total No. Linear accelerators available

No. of Linear accelerators Needing Replacement

 

No. Linear accelerators in Procurement with funding allocated

Eastern Cape

Frere

2

2

1

 

 

Free State

Universitas

5

2

2

 

2

Gauteng

Steve Biko

4

3

 

 

2

Gauteng

CMAH

4

4

 

 

1

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Greys

2

1

2

 

1

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Ngwelezane

 

 

 

 

 

Kwa Zulu-Natal

IALCH

3

3

0

 

 

Kwa Zulu-Natal

Addington

2

2

0

 

 

Limpopo

Polokwane

 

 

 

 

 

Northern Cape

RMSH

 

 

2

 

 

Western Cape

Tygerberg

3

3

 

 

 

Western Cape

Groote Schuur

5

3

 

 

 

TOTAL

 

30

23

 

 

 

END.

14 October 2019 - NW741

Profile picture: Faber, Mr WF

Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Health

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Department hosted the function;

(a) It was held at the Parliamentary restaurant in the Good Hope building, in the Parliamentary precinct.

(b) R16,768.00;

(c) The list of guests invited is attached as Annexure 1.

2. No.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW979

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What has he found to be the reasons that the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses in State hospitals; (2) What are the main reasons why new doctors and nurses are trained in Cuba whereas the Republic has universities that can provide training for doctors and nurses; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The primary reasons why the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses is the fact that the Public Health Sector budget has not been increasing in real terms for the past ten years, impacting on the number of staff that can be appointed. Furthermore, the demand for health services in the country is increasing while there is no additional funding to address the change, which results primarily from immigration into the Country and the increasing burden of disease.

The shortage of health professionals is a global phenomenon and is more pronounced in low and middle income countries as health workers are more likely to migrate to upper middle income countries in search of better living and working conditions.

(2) I am not aware of any nurses being in trained in Cuba under the auspices of the Nelson Mandela/Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration except for the training of medical doctors. The aim of training doctors in Cuba are multifold:

(a) It is to expose medical doctors to a preventative approach to health care which is the cornerstone of the Public Health System in Cuba Health Care provision initiatives focus on community needs assessments and health indicators. The health care system is divided into three levels, namely primary, secondary and tertiary, but implemented differently from the South African setting.

(i) The primary care level focuses on providing health promotion and protection, along with the resolution of the minor health issues that account for an estimated 80% of total health concerns of Cuba. Clinics, Community Health Centres and patients’ homes are key sites that provide primary level care;

(ii) Secondary care level is focusing on 15% of health problems that result in patient hospitalisation; and

(iii) Tertiary care focuses on the remaining 5% of health problems, particularly where illness has resulted in severe complications. Such illnesses are handled in specialised hospitals and institutes throughout the country.

(b) The Cuban Public Health System is thus a model that we want to learn from, and apply in our health care system as we reorient the Health System towards Primary Health Care, to prevent diseases, promote health and reduce the number of patients that are admitted to hospitals. Our Medical Schools still focus on a curative and hospicentric health care system, with limited focus on Primary Health Care, which is also evident in their Curriculum;

(c) By training medical students in Cuba, we also want to produce a new cadre of a medical doctor who understands prevention, and how to tailor health services to specific community needs;

(d) Another reason for training medical students in Cuba is to give an opportunity to students who would not have been admitted to the South African medical schools because of their socio-economic conditions, in particular those from poor rural communities.

(3) Yes I will make a statement on this matter.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW960

Profile picture: Waters, Mr M

Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to a certain report (details furnished), (a) on what date was each brand of bread last tested and (b) which brands did not fully comply with ingredients stated on their packaging;

Reply:

1. (a) and (b) The referenced article does not report on a monitoring programme commissioned by the Department of Health. Ingredients that may be in bread are regulated under the Agricultural Products Standards Act, 1990 (Act No. 119 of 1990).

2. (a) and (b) The referenced article indicates that the African Centre for Biosafety conducted tests on white bread. The organisation has not shared the report nor their concerns with the Department. The article states that genetically modified soya was found in white bread. This is to be expected as the South African Government (Executive Council comprising eight (8) Departments as prescribed by the Genetically Modified Organisms Act, 1997 (Act No. 15 of 1997) has approved three genetically modified products. These are maize, soya, and cotton.

3. The Department of Health has regulations in place to cover certain aspects of labelling that the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972) mandates the Minister of Health to publish. The Regulations Relating to the Labelling of Foodstuffs Obtained through Certain Techniques of Genetic Modification (R 25 of 2004), requires mandatory labelling for genetically modified foodstuffs that are not substantially equivalent to the non-genetically modified conventional counterpart. Labelling is thus only required for genetically modified foodstuffs when they differ significantly from the conventional counterpart in terms of:

Composition, nutritional value, mode of storage, preparation or cooking;

i) If it contains an allergen

ii) or if derived from genes of human or animal.

iii) This is in conformance to the joint WHO/FAO Codex Alimentarius Commission, the international food labelling and safety standards setting body.

The Africa Centre for Biosafety has been at the forefront of campaigning for general labelling of genetically modified ingredients. The Department of Trade and Industry included provisions for such labelling in the Consumer Protection Act, 2008 (Act No. 68 of 2008). This covers the aspect of “the right to know” and not safety matters as per the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics & Disinfectants Act, 1972 (Act No. 54 of 1972), for which the Minister of Health is responsible. The Department of Health is not aware of any undue impact on health from genetically modified food as it participates in the country’s robust internationally bench marked approval system for Genetically Modified Organisms and foodstuffs derived therefrom.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW980

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the report of his Director-General on 28 August 2019 to the Portfolio Committee on Health, with regard to the infant mortality rate and the neonatal mortality rate (details furnished), (a) what are the reasons for the high mortality rate, (b) what preventative measures has his department put in place to combat the high mortality rate and (c) on what date were the preventative measures put in place;

Reply:

  1. (a) The reasons for the high infant mortality rate and the neonatal mortality rates are:

i. Severe prematurity;

ii. Birth asphyxia;

iii. Infections;

iv. Severe congenital disorders;

v. Diarrhoeal disease;

vi. Pneumonia;

vii. HIV/AIDS; and

viii. Injuries.

(b)-(c) Health sector preventive measure to address the causes of neonatal and infant mortality rates and date put in place are summarized in the table below.

Preventive measures

Date put in place

(1)(b)

(1)(c)

Integrated Management of Childhood Illnesses

1996

Prevention of vertical (mother-to-child) transmission of HIV infection.

The PMTCT guidelines began in 2002, and it is revised periodically to include new evidence and the latest revision is the 2019 version

Comprehensive care, management and treatment of HIV infected children.

2004

Immunization against pneumococcal and rotavirus infection to protect children against the commonest forms of diarrhoea and pneumonia.

2009

Promotion of breastfeeding especially exclusive breastfeeding for 6 months.

The Tshwane Declaration in 2011.

The improvement of staff skills through the Essential Steps for Management of Obstetric Emergencies (ESMOE)- so that they are able to manage high risk pregnancies which may result in neonatal deaths.

2010

Introduction of District Clinical Specialist Teams and Ward-based Outreach teams.

2012

Helping Babies Breathe (HBB) and Management of Small and Sick Neonates (MSSN).

2013

Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) to manage very small babies.

2015

Basic Antenatal Care Plus (BANC Plus) which is the increase of antenatal visits to 8 visits during the pregnancy period so that abnormalities such as hypertension can be detected early and managed to prevent stillbirths.

2017

Safe Ceasarean Section Standards for accre-ditation of hospitals to be able to conduct high risk pregnancies safely.

2017

Side by side under-five campaign.

April 2018

(2) Yes.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW887

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, given the current high costs of medicine and western medical treatments, he will consider the establishment of public/private partnerships as well as private Centers for Medical Innovation and Research in the Republic, whereby innovative and cost-effective traditional alternatives to conventional western medicine can, with the informed consent of the patients, be explored and developed by the SA Medical Professionals for the benefit of all the citizens; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

A significant proportion of the South African population use traditional medicine as part of primary healthcare. It is therefore important that government integrates traditional medicine as part of the mainstream western medicine.

As a first step in this direction, Parliament established the Traditional Health Practitioners Act, which regulates and recognises traditional health practice in South Africa. An interim Council has been was established which will regulate the practice of Traditional medicine in South Africa. The Council will register persons as practitioners that meet the requirements to be a Traditional Health Practitioner. Registered persons will be required to adhere to a code of conduct and practice guidelines.

In addition to the regulation of the practitioner we need to also understand the “medicine”. In many cases the medicine is a plant or a mixture of plants and other products recommended by the traditional practitioner for the treatment of an ailment. Understanding the composition of these products and more importantly the potential active ingredients that influence diseases is crucial.

Traditional medicines offer massive opportunity for the treatment of diseases especially in areas where western medicine has been ineffective in addressing diseases. The Medical Research Council has been investigating the potential that traditional medicine could offer. They have established a Herbal Drugs Research Unit.

The Herbal Drugs Research Unit, based at Tshwane University of Technology, uses modern scientific techniques to understand the true value of herbal-based traditional medicine (phytomedicines). The unit has developed extraction techniques that would contribute to the global understanding of how the “active ingredients” can be extracted from plant based materials. After the extraction of these “active ingredients” the unit also describes the chemical characteristics of the product and the plant. This information becomes part of a larger online database so that other researchers can also access information of such medicinal plants.

Government provides a platform across various sectors for research into ATM. This is through collaboration with institutions including the Centre for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), Agricultural Research Council (ARC), the Medicines Research Council (MRC), Department of Agriculture (DoA) as well as Department of Science and Technology (DST). Traditional medicine research is conducted at several institutions, facilitated by funding from government through the National Research Foundation (NRF), and other parastatal organisations as part of indigenous knowledge systems (IKSs). Flagship programmes are presently running in key institutions with a focus on medicinal plants for the development of immunomodulators, microbicides, anti-diabetic medicines, anti-tuberculosis medicines, antimalarial agents and anti-cancer medicines. Across other institutions, there is a focus on the research in ATM for antihypertensive, anti-diabetic, antimalarial, antimicrobial and anti-HIV medicines. This work would form the opportunity for public private partnership in the commercialisation of molecules that have shown pre-clinical potential.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW889

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

By what date will he institute an investigation into allegations of racial profiling raised by general practitioners to the Council for Medical Schemes that medical aid schemes do not pay them on the basis of racial discrimination?

Reply:

The Council for Medical Schemes (CMS) instituted an investigation into racial profiling by medical schemes on 16 May 2019, following allegations of racial profiling raised by General Practitioners, as directed by the Ministry of Health. The investigation is called the “Section 59 Investigation” in line with the Section in the Medical Schemes Act, 131 of 1998, which unpacks the charges by suppliers of service. The CMS on 25 June 2019 published the Terms of Reference for the Section 59 Investigation Panel in CMS Circular 45 of 2019. Circular 45 of 2019 is attached as Annexure A.

The Section 59 investigation is in terms of CMS’s regulatory mandate, under section 7(a)(b)(c)(d), 8(a) and (k) and 9(2) of the Medical Schemes Act, 131 of 1998. The CMS appointed an independent investigation panel chaired by Advocate Tembeka Ngcukaitobi together with Advocates Adila Hassim and Kerry Williams. The investigation will examine allegations made by medical practitioners, that they are being treated unfairly, and their claims are being withheld by medical schemes based on their ethnicity and colour of their skin. The panel will ultimately make recommendations to the CMS in relation to addressing the complaints, the appropriate administrative, legal and policy interventions.

Accordingly in terms of the circular 45 above, Section 59 Investigation panel was to receive written submissions from interested parties until 19 July 2019, extended from 30 June 2019. Interviews and public hearings were to be conducted from 29 July 2019 to September 2019, and the final report is to be delivered by the Investigation Panel in November 2019.

A total of 75 submissions were received within the open period for submissions and 163 submissions were received after the closing date. All submissions were handed over to the Investigation Panel for further deliberations and scrutiny. To date the CMS held 2 sessions of hearings consisting of 9 days. Session 1 had 221 attendees and 9 stakeholders appeared before the Investigation Panel. The 9 stakeholders were:

  1. Solutionist Thinkers Group – 29 July 2019
  2. Competition Commission – 29 July 2019
  3. Council for Medical Schemes – 30 July 2019
  4. Board of Healthcare Funders of Southern Africa – 30 July 2019
  5. Health Professions Council of South Africa – 31 July 2019
  6. National Healthcare Professionals Association – 31 July 2019
  7. South African Medical Association – 1 August 2019
  8. Independent Practitioners Association Foundation – 1 August 2019
  9. Health Funders Association – 2 August 2019

Session 2 had 134 attendees and 10 stakeholders. The 10 stakeholders were:

  1. South African Private Practitioners Forum – 20 August 2019
  2. Independent Community Pharmacy Association – 20 August 2019
  3. Elsabe Klinck and Associates – 21 August 2019
  4. Health Man – 21 August 2019
  5. South African Medical and Dental Practitioners – 21 August 2019
  6. South African Optometric Association 23 August 2019
  7. Wim Trengove (SC) – 23 August 2019
  8. Dental Professions Association – 23 August 2019
  9. South African Society of Psychiatrists – 29 August 2019
  10. NHC Healthcare Centre – 29 August 2019

The next public hearings took place on the 25th, 26th and 27th September 2019 where individual complainants were heard. The dates of the 17th, 18th, 21st, 22nd, 23rd, 24th/25th October will be reserved for Medical Schemes and Administrators.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW965

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the progress on the revamping of the Nessie Knight Hospital in Qumbu, Eastern Cape, (b) what total number of patients are being treated in the hospital as in-patients as at the latest date for which information is available, (c) on what date is it envisaged that the hospital renovations will be completed and (d) what is the total budget allocated for the renovations?

Reply:

a) The contract for the renovations of Nessie Knight Hospital project has been cancelled due to non-performance by the contractor on 15 March 2019. The progress at this stage is at 9% on the renovation works. The contract start date was 12 July 2018 with the contract value of R37,67 million and incurred expenditure of R1,04 million. Currently there is no work happening because the contractor has abandoned the site. The Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health is in the process of facilitating the appointment of a replacement contractor; however, some emergency works have been implemented to ensure that hospital services and operations are not disrupted.

b) The latest total number of in-patients that have been treated in the hospital is 1 022. This is according to the end of August 2019 statistics.

c) The Eastern Cape Department of Health plans to have the substitute contractor by March 2020 with the anticipated project completion date of April 2021.

d) The total budget allocated for the renovation is R38 million.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW891

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the national programme of action in addressing the staff and facility shortages in maternity wards around the country, which result in the avoidable instances of negligence and maternal and neonatal fatalities that cost the department millions in claims against it?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with the Ministerial Committees, the National Confidential Enquiry into Maternal deaths (NCCEMD) and the National Perinatal Mortality and Morbidity Committee (NaPeMMCo) to review the proposal on norms and standards as recommended by the International Federation of Obstetricians (FIGO). The provincial representatives in both committees are consulting with provincial managers to adapt the standards and norms to address staff and facility shortages in maternity wards across the country so that they fit the South African context. The pre final report together with the Saving Mothers, Saving Babies 2018 recommendations will be presented to the National Health Council in November 2019 for ratification and adoption.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW888

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed of the allegations of corruption and racism at the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) regarding South African medical doctors who have foreign qualifications and who upon their return to the Republic find it difficult to engage with the HPCSA regarding the recognition of their foreign qualifications and to write their medical board exams (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

  1. (a) No, I have not been informed of the allegations as stated above as the HPCSA management has only been made aware of the allegations of racism at a recent meeting held with representatives of some of these medical graduates;

b) The HPCSA has since advised the representatives to submit these allegations to the Special Investigations Unit (SIU) as they have a broad investigation by the SIU on similar allegations made against the HPCSA in general, as proclaimed by the President of the Republic;

c) The Registrar has since informed the SIU of these allegations and the representatives have been put into contact with the SIU;

d) The HPCSA, represented amongst others by the President and Registrar, has engaged extensively with the foreign qualified medical graduates, their parents and their lawyers at various levels, either at meetings both in Pretoria and Durban, as well as several email correspondences over the last few months; and

e) In assisting the foreign-qualified medical graduates, the HPCSA has arranged a new examination process that can accommodate more of the foreign-qualified medical graduates and more than 250 of these graduates have registered and have participated in these exams during the month of September 2019.

(2) Yes, in due course I will call a meeting between the department and Mr N Singh and representatives of the South African foreign qualified medical professionals. In the meantime, meetings between the representatives of the foreign-qualified medical graduates and the HPCSA have already taken place over the last few months. At the last meeting some agreements were reached, and a proposal has been made to sign a Memorandum of Understanding between the HPCSA and the representatives of the foreign-qualified medical graduates so that rules of engagement could be developed and agreement be reached on how to address pertinent questions as they arise.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW961

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department chartered any flights (a) in the (i) 2016-17, (ii) 2017-18 and (iii) 2018-19 financial years and (b) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) what was the (aaa) cost, (bbb) purpose and (ccc) final destination of each flight chartered in each specified time period and (bb) what number of passengers was aboard each flight chartered?

Reply:

a) (i) No;

(ii) No;

(iii) Yes.

b) Yes.

(aa) The cost implication are as follows:

(aaa) For 2018/19 amounted to R 47 million and since 1 April 2019 to date R 24 million.

(bbb) For both financial years mentioned which are 2018/19 and since 1 April 2019 to date, the purpose was to transport South African students studying medicine in Cuba to South Africa. Because of the big numbers and the logistics involved in transporting them all at once a charter option was deemed most effective.

These are students in different categories as follows:

i) those who have completed their 5th year in Cuba and would be commencing their 6th year in the South African Medical in Schools;

ii) those that are on vacation;

iii) those that come to do Electives in our health facilities in their Provinces to gain clinical experience;

iv) Sometimes those who have medical problems during the time the charter is available and need to be brought to South Africa for further medical treatment and intervention. In particular, when the Medical Schools Cuba have made a determination that they may not be able to cope with their Academic activities during the period of illness. The opportunity to bring them on a Charter is also used.

 

(ccc) For 2018/19 the following flights:

Date

From

To

03 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

06 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

08 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

11 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

15 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

18 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

31 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

03 August 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

26 August 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

30 August 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

Since 1 April 2019 to date the following flights:

Date

From

Destination

03 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

05 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

08 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

10 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

12 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

14 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

(bb) The number of passengers aboard each flight were as follows:

For 2018/19 the passenger numbers:

Date

From

To

Passenger Number

03 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

01

06 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

281

08 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

95

11 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

244

15 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

04

18 July 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

217

31 July 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

0

03 August 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

281

26 August 2018

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

300

30 August 2018

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

75

During 2018/19 financial year, the department chartered 282 (1 + 281) passengers on 3 to 6 July 2018; 339 (95 + 244 passengers from 8 to 11 July 2018; 221 (4 + 217) passengers from 15 to 18 July 2018; 281 (0 +281) passengers from 31 July 2018 to 03 August 2018; and 375 (300 + 75) passengers from 26 to 30 August 2018.

Since 1 April 2019 to date the passenger number:

Date

From

Destination

Passenger Number

03 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

7

05 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

214

08 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

5

10 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

214

12 July 2019

OR Tambo, SA

Havana, Cuba

193

14 July 2019

Havana, Cuba

OR Tambo, SA

222

In 2019 the department chartered 221(7+214) passengers on 3 to 5 July, on the 08 to 10 July chartered 219 (5+214) passengers and on the 12 to 14 July chartered 415 (193+222) passengers.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW339

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the name of each prison facility that houses mental health patients who are not inmates, (b) what is the total number of patients who are housed at each facility, (c) what amount does the State contribute annually to each institution and (d) how does the department keep track of standard of care at each institution?

Reply:

According to the attached report from the Department of Correctional Services as at 1 August 2019, the name and total number of State patients housed at each facility is as follows:

REGION

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

(a)

TOTAL NUMBER OF STATE PATIENTS

(b)

Eastern Cape

Grahamstown

5

 

King William's Town

9

 

East London Medium B

14

 

Mount Fletcher

5

 

Mthatha Remand

26

 

St Albans Medium A

28

Total

 

87

Gauteng

Kgoši Mampuru II Local

4

Total

 

4

Kwazulu Natal

Durban Med A

3

 

Qalakabusha

1

 

Ladysmith

4

 

Ncome Med A

3

 

Vryheid

10

 

Pietermaritzburg Medium A

10

 

Waterval Medium B

3

 

Newcastle

1

Total

 

35

REGION

CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

(a)

TOTAL NUMBER OF STATE PATIENTS

(b)

Limpopo Mpumalanga North West

Nelspruit

6

 

Ermelo

7

 

Potchefstroom

1

 

Witbank

3

Total

 

17

Free State Northern Cape

Grootvlei Medium A

29

 

Kimberley

10

Total

 

39

GRAND TOTAL

 

182

(c) The budget for prison facilities is allocated to the Department of Correctional Services

(d) The standard of care in prison facilities is monitored by the Department of Correctional Services

END.

07 October 2019 - NW972

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Which criteria did the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority use to approve five of the 80 medicinal cannabis licence applications and/or reject the other 75, despite the fact that there has not been amendments and/or legislation passed to accommodate the anticipated legislation to allow for the manufacturing of medicinal cannabis and hemp?

Reply:

The Constitutional Court found Section 22A(9)(a)(i) of the Medicines and Related Substances Act, 1965 (Act No. 101 of 1965) (“the Medicines Act”) to be unconstitutional, as it renders the use or possession of cannabis by an adult in private for that adult’s personal consumption in private a criminal offence. In terms of this ruling, it is no longer an offence for an adult person to use or be in possession of cannabis in private for his or her personal consumption in private, and to grow cannabis in a private place for his or her personal consumption in private. Furthermore, the Constitutional Court has required that the relevant provisions of the Medicines Act, as well as that of other applicable legislation, be amended accordingly.

The Medicines Act allows the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) to regulate cultivation of cannabis for research purposes and the cultivation, production and manufacture of cannabis containing products for medicinal use. Thus enables effective control, and facilitates patient access to safe, effective and quality products. Cannabis grown for medicinal purposes, as well as any resulting products prepared form the plant material, are subject to stringent security and quality control measures. In this regard, SAHPRA has published guidelines on the cultivation of cannabis and manufacture of cannabis-containing medicines intended for therapeutic and research purposes.

The five applicants whose applications were compliant and were recommended by the SAHPRA Licensing Unit to be issued with licences, were as a result of site inspections and subsequent corrections of inspection findings found to be deficient.

To date no applications have been rejected. There is ongoing review of these applications by SAHPRA and correspondences have been sent to applicants to address deficiencies identified in the original licence applications. A few applicants communicated withdrawal of their licence applications, however, they did not indicate whether the withdrawal was temporary or permanent.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW935

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the number of (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinics in the City of Ekurhuleni, (b) number of staff members are employed at each specified facility, (c) are the hours of operation of each specified clinic, (d) type of services does each clinic offer and (e) mechanisms have been implemented at each clinic to eliminate long queues and waiting times?

Reply:

(a) The number of public health clinics

(i) National Facilities – None

(ii) Provincial Facilities – 16

(iii) City of Ekurhuleni – 77

(b) Number of staff members employed at each specified facility.

Please refer to Annexure A as requested list of staff members employed per Facility.

(c) Are the hours of operation of each specified clinic.

Please refer to Annexure B as requested list of hours operating of each Facility.

(d) Type of services does each clinic offer

Please refer to Annexure C as requested list of type of services each clinic provided.

(e) Mechanisms have been implemented at each clinic to eliminate long queues and waiting times.

  • Appointment system of patients visiting healthcare facilities in chronic and maternal and child health care streams are implemented.
  • District-wide consultations with stakeholders were conducted to get buy-in for waiting times Implementation Plan
  • Standardized waiting time tool is designed to measure the time the patients spend in the health facilities
  • Chronic Central Medicine Dispensing and Distribution is implemented (CCMDD), where stable chronic patients collect the medicines from the pick-up-points in the community that are convenient to them. In this way they do not have to wait in the queues in the clinics.
  • Guideline for waiting times of patients in health facilities is implemented.
  • Facilities will be visited on a regular basis to ensure that appropriate and effective measures are implemented.
  • Facilities are monitored to ensure that available protocols, guidelines and policies pertaining management and reduction of waiting time are adhered.
  • Provide feedback to all staff members on monthly basis on patient waiting times
  • Keeping track and monitoring Patient Waiting Time report for reference.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW910

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total number of births that have been recorded at public health facilities since 1 January 2018?

Reply:

A total number of One Million Five Hundred and Sixty One Thousand and Seventy Seven (1,561,077) births have been recorded at public health facilities since 01 January 2018.

END.

07 October 2019 - NW896

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has been informed of the shortage of doctors and nurses at Tonga Hospital in Nkomazi, Mpumalanga; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date is it envisaged that the hospital will be fully incapacitated with the required personnel?

Reply:

Yes the Department is aware of shortage of doctors and nurses at Tonga Hospital. The Hospital is in a deep rural area, which makes it very difficult to recruit and retain professionals to provide services in the area.

The Hospital is currently running at 28.6% vacancy rate for doctors. There are 11 permanent doctors, 14 sessional doctors and 6 Community Service Professionals against the 35 posts for doctors on the establishment in the Hospital.

There is a greater need for nurses because the Hospital is currently running at 53.7% vacancy rate for nurses (39% vacancy rate for Professional nurses, at 32 vacancy rate for Enrolled nurses and 65% for Assistant nurses).

The Department has conducted an analysis and realised that there is a misdistribution of resources especially the nurses in Nkomazi Municipality. The sub-district is being serviced by two district hospitals, Shongwe and Tonga Hospitals, that are less than 50km apart. Shongwe is currently overstaffed, especially with professional nurses, yet their workload is very low, while Tonga is understaffed with a high workload, especially in the maternity section because of the cross-border patients.

The Department has initiated a project that will address efficiency in the two hospitals and their surrounding clinics by looking at rationalisation of resources and to distribute them more equitably. It will also consider advertising vacant posts if there is still a need to do so. According to the timelines of the project, the initiative should be completed by end of November 2019.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW206

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) his department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to him and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled in each case?

Reply:

1. (i) The total number of vacancies on the National Department Health establishment is 25 after the reprioritization process.

(ii) Information on provinces according to Persal report reflects a total of 42,926 vacancies for the nine provincial departments. A verification process is currently underway for provinces to match the Persal report with their actual existing funded vacancies.

2. Identified critical vacancies for the National Department of Health will be filled in the current financial year by 31 March 2020.

Information still awaited from provinces to confirm timelines for filling their vacant posts.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW135

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the reply of the former Minister of Health to question 2989 on 19 November 2018, the co-operation agreement with the Republic of Cuba has been renewed; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (2) whether the Government intends to terminate the exchange of doctors between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what number of (a) students will attend Cuban universities for medical training in each of the next five years, (b) students will be sent from each province, (c) Cuban doctors will be sent to the Republic to assist in the public health sector and (d) Cuban doctors will be dispatched to each province; (4) what (a) number of South African students on the programme did not complete their medical training since the inception of the programme of exchange, (b) were the reasons in each case and (c) steps were taken to recuperate any funds lost due to the incompletion of their studies?

Reply:

1. Yes it has been renewed and signed 4 March 2019. The Agreement covers the following areas of co-operation:

a) Recruitment of Medical doctors and lecturers form Republic of Cuba;

b) Training of Medical students and postgraduates in the Republic of Cuba;

c) Exploration of possible areas of mutual interests in the fields of Biotechnology production and the development of pharmaceuticals and any other area of scientific research; and

d) Any other program or activity that may be mutually agreed upon between the Parties

2. No, the Government of the Republic of South Africa does not intend to terminate the exchange of doctors between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba. In accordance with the Agreement concluded and signed between the Government of the Republic of South African and the Republic of Cuba on 4 March 2019 in Havana, at the request of the Government of the Republic of South Africa, through its Ministry of Health, the Republic of Cuba shall assist in the recruitment of Cuban health professionals in identified categories.

The Cuban health professionals recruited under this Agreement will be recruited for the following purpose:

a) Providing health services to rural and other disadvantaged communities within areas where such services are inadequate;

b) Assisting the provision of health services in hospitals, clinics community health centres and other institutions throughout the provinces of the Republic of South Africa; and

c) Training and supporting local medical doctors, interns and students who work in such areas and institutions, on teaching programmes that the Parties agree upon.

(3) (a) Eighty (80) students depended on the availability of Provincial financial resources;

(b) Ten (10) students per eight (8) participating Provinces excluding the Western Cape. The only Province that will be sending students for the 2019/20 intake is the North West, 15 students;

(c) Provinces intend to recruit a total number of 112 Cuban doctors to the Republic to assist in the public health sector as identified by Provinces; and

(d) These Cuban doctors will be dispatched as per the following Provincial requests: Free State = 27; Limpopo = 37, Mpumalanga Province = 15; Northern Cape Province = 12 and North West Province = 21.

(4) (a) and (b) There are 326 students who have dropped out due to various reasons reflected in the table below

Province

Medical

Misconduct

Academic

Voluntary

Deaths

Total

Eastern Cape

12

16

19

3

2

52

Free State

2

8

13

3

1

27

Gauteng

7

4

12

2

1

26

KwaZulu/Natal

12

7

31

11

4

65

Limpopo

4

5

8

0

0

17

Mpumalanga

2

19

5

7

3

36

Northern Cape

13

9

10

4

2

38

North West

18

6

29

7

5

65

Total

70

74

127

37

18

326

(c) The bursary contract is entered into between the student and the individual Provincial Health Department. The contract is standard across the country. When the student drops out each Province refers the student through writing to the Debt Collection office. Provinces have a difficulty in recouping the funds as these students are selected from the most disadvantaged families whose socio-economic status makes it impossible for repayment, unless the student might get a gainful employment.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW397

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the post of chief executive officer (CEO) of certain hospitals in Limpopo (names furnished) is filled; if not, (a) why not, (b) since what date has each specified hospital been without a permanent CEO and (c) on what date will each vacant post be (i) advertised and (ii) filled; if so, what (aa) is the name of each CEO, (bb) are the qualifications and experience of each CEO and (cc) is the term of each CEO’s contract; (2) what are the (a) details of the term of each acting CEO in each specified hospital and (b) qualifications and experience of each acting CEO?

Reply:

1. The table below reflects the details in this regard:

a) The CEO for Letaba Hospital has been transferred to another hospital in the Province.

b) Only Letaba Hospital has been without the CEO since 01 February 2019.

c) (i) The post of the CEO of Letaba Hospital will be advertised as soon as the former CEO has vacated the post on PERSAL.

(ii) The post will be filled after the recruitment process has been concluded.

(aa), (bb) and (cc) refer to the attached spreadsheet

Hospital

CEO Post status

(aa)

Incumbent

 

(bb)

Qualifications and Experience

(cc)

Contract Term

Letaba Hospital

Acting

Sibuyi MV

 

Bachelor of Dental Therapy

21 yrs

On secondment

Van Velden Hospital

Filled

Selatlha JM

 

MBCHB

10 yrs

N/A

Maphutha Malatji Hospital

Filled

Peta MR

 

BA: Nursing Science

38 yrs

N/A

2. (a) The Acting CEO of Letaba Hospital has been seconded to the Hospital.

(b) The Acting CEO has 21 Experience as the manager.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW20

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) clinical psychologists, (ii) psychiatrists and (iii) counsellors are currently employed by his department, (b) number of hospitals does each specified person serve, (c) official languages does each person provide services in and (d) in each case, is the average case load in each month?

Reply:

Management of Mental Health users at different levels is a function of a Multi -disciplinary team. The first line service are rendered by the Psychiatric nurses

a) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Province

Clinical Psychologists

Psychiatrists

Counsellors

 

(a)(i)

(a)(ii)

(a)(iii)

Eastern Cape

29

10

1

Free State

20

13

0

Gauteng

63

110

1

KwaZulu-Natal

59

29

0

Limpopo

16

6

8

Mpumalanga

7

3

7

North West

21

5

0

Northern Cape

12

4

1

Western Cape

31

37

0

b) The following table reflects the details in this regard

Province

Name of Health Establishment

Psychiatrists

Clinical psychologists

Counsellors

Eastern Cape

Elizabeth Donkin Hospital

1

5

0

 

Fort England Hospital

5

12

0

 

Komani Hospital

1

4

0

 

Tower Hospital

0

2

0

 

Mthatha Mental Health Unit

2

3

1

 

Dora Nginza Mental Health Unit

1

3

0

Free State

Free State Psychiatric Complex Hospital

9

9

0

 

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

2

3

0

 

National District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Gateway

0

1

0

 

J.S. Moroka District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Dihlabeng Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

MMM Regional Hospital

1

1

0

 

Boitumelo Regional Hospital

1

1

0

 

Heidedal Clinic

0

1

0

 

MUCCP Clinic

0

1

0

Gauteng

Sterkfontein Hospital

16

11

0

 

Tara H Moross Centre Hospital

9

9

0

 

Weskoppies Hospital

11

16

1

 

Cullinan Care and Rehab Centre

0

0

0

 

Sizwe TB

2

0

0

 

Tshwane Rehabilitation

1

0

0

 

Chris Hani Bara

12

9

0

 

Charlotte Maxeke

6

4

0

 

Dr George Mukhari

12

4

0

 

Steve Biko

3

2

0

 

Helen Joseph

2

3

0

 

Tembisa

5

1

0

 

Kalafong

1

0

0

 

Rahima Moosa

4

1

0

 

Edenvale

0

0

0

 

Leratong

6

1

0

 

Pholosong

1

0

0

 

Sebokeng

2

1

0

 

Tambo Memorial

2

1

0

 

Far East Rand

3

0

0

 

Mamelodi

1

0

0

 

Thelle Mogoerane

2

0

0

 

Dr Yusuf Dadoo

0

0

0

 

South Rand

0

0

0

 

Bertha Gxowa

1

0

0

 

Heidelberg

1

0

0

 

Kopanong

0

0

0

 

Pretoria West

1

0

0

 

Jubilee

2

0

0

 

Odi District

2

0

0

 

Carletonville

0

0

0

 

Tshwane District

1

0

0

 

Bheki Mlangeni

1

0

0

 

Bronkhorspruit

0

0

0

KwaZulu-Natal

Ekhulengeni Sanatorium Hospital

1

0

0

 

Fort Napier Hospital

2

2

0

 

Umgeni Waterfall Institute Hospital

0

0

0

 

Townhill Hospital

4

7

0

 

Umzimkhulu Hospital

0

2

0

 

Madadeni Psychiatric Hospital

2

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in King George V Hospital

4

0

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Ladysmith Hospital

1

0

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Port Shepstone Hospital

1

2

0

 

Addington Hospital

3

0

0

 

EThekwini District Office

1

0

0

 

GJG Mpanza

1

0

0

 

Ngwelezane

3

2

0

 

Prince Mshiyeni

1

2

0

 

RK Khan

2

1

0

 

King Edward

3

1

0

 

East Griqualand and Usher District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Edendale Regional Hospital

0

3

0

 

Estcourt District Hospital

0

3

0

 

Ethekwini DHO

0

1

0

 

GJ Crookes District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Grey's Tertiary Hospital

0

3

0

 

Head Office

0

1

0

 

Hlabisa District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

0

1

0

 

King Dinuzulu District Hospital

0

5

0

 

KwaMashu CHC

0

1

0

 

Mahatma Gandhi Regional Hospital

0

3

0

 

McCord Specialized Eye Hospital

0

1

0

 

Mseleni District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Murchison District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Newcastle Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Northdale District Hospital

0

3

0

 

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Stanger Regional Hospital

0

1

0

 

Tongaat CHC

0

1

0

 

Vryheid District Hospital

0

1

0

 

Wentworth District Hospital

0

2

0

Limpopo

Evuxakeni Hospital

0

0

0

 

Hayani Hospital

1

1

0

 

Thabamoopo Hospital

1

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Donald Fraiser Hospital

0

1

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Elim Hospital

0

1

2

 

Psychiatric Unit in Letaba Hospital

1

3

1

 

Psychiatric Unit In Malamulele Hospital

0

0

1

 

Psychiatric Unit in Mankweng Hospital

3

5

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Matlala Hospital

0

2

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Siloam Hospital

0

0

2

 

Psychiatric Unit in Tshilidzini Hospital

0

0

2

Mpumalanga

Psychiatric unit in Rob Ferreira Hospital

2

2

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Witbank Hospital

1

3

0

 

Psychiatric Unit in Tintswalo Hospital

0

2

0

 

Lydenburg Hospital

0

0

1

 

Shongwe Hospital

0

0

1

 

Witbank

0

0

1

 

Ermelo

0

0

1

 

Carolina

0

0

1

 

Embhuleni

0

0

1

 

Evander

0

0

1

Northern Cape

West End Specialised Psychiatric Hospital

3

3

0

 

Frances Baard District

0

3

1

 

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

0

1

0

 

Pixley Ka Seme District

0

1

0

 

Namakwa District

0

1

0

 

ZF Mgcawu District

0

1

0

 

Dr Harry Surtie

0

2

0

North West

Witrand Psychiatric Hospital

1

8

0

 

Bophelong Psychiatric Hospital

1

5

0

 

JST Hospital

1

2

0

 

Klerksdorp Tshepong Hospital Complex

1

2

0

 

Brits Hospital

0

2

0

 

Joe Morolong Hospital (Vryburg)

0

1

0

 

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

0

1

0

Western Cape

Alexandra Hospital

1

4

0

 

Lentegeur Hospital

11

10

0

 

Stikland Hospital

8

8

0

 

Valkenberg Hospital

10

6

0

 

Tygerberg Hospital Adult Psychiatry

4

0

0

 

Tygerberg Hospital: Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Unit

3

3

0

(c) Information on the official language that each person who provides a service in is not collected and reported on in the current health information systems. Information that was provided by provinces shows the following generic or regional trends.

Province

Languages used in providing services

Eastern Cape

  • Afrikaans;
  • Xhosa; and
  • English

Free State

  • Afrikaans;
  • English; and
  • Sotho

Gauteng

 

KwaZulu-Natal

  • Information not provided

Limpopo

  • Information not provided

Mpumalanga

  • Isizulu;
  • Isiswati;
  • IsiNdebele;
  • Tshonga;
  • Sotho;
  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Pedi.

North West

  • Information not provided

Northern Cape

  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Setswana.

Western Cape

  • English;
  • Afrikaans; and
  • Xhosa.

(d) Currently the district Health Information system, which is the agreed upon information system between the National and Provincial Departments of Health collects and reports on nine mental health data elements on a monthly basis in terms of the National Indicator Data Set. One of the nine data elements is "mental health client total" which is utilized to calculate and report on caseloads on clients who attended ambulatory (non-patient) services for mental health conditions per facility. The current system does not collect information and report on caseload per health practitioner that provides a service.

Information on the average Mental Health Case Load per Province

Province

April 2018 to March 2019

Eastern Cape

2.2

Free State

3.1

Gauteng

2.5

KwaZulu-Natal

1.7

Limpopo

2.7

Mpumalanga

1.2

Northern Cape

2.2

North West

1.4

Western Cape

1.6

END.

16 September 2019 - NW337

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With regard to nongovernmental mental health institutions for each of the past 10 financial years, (a) what was the total number of (i) such institutions in each province and (ii) patients housed at each specified institution and (b) what total amount does the State contribute annually to each institution; (2) whether each institution is a registered nongovernmental organisation, company or independent entity; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what processes does his department follow to keep track of standards of care at each institution?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The table below provides information received from provinces on the total number of nongovernmental mental health institutions per province for the past 10 financial years in each province.

Table 1

PROVINCE

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

2012/13

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

EASTERN CAPE

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

02

03

FREE STATE

0

05

05

05

05

05

05

05

10

12

GAUTENG

49

48

62

48

51

65

68

139

136

164

KWAZULU NATAL

32

32

32

32

31

30

28

28

28

32

LIMPOPO

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

MPUMALANGA

-

-

 

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

NORTHERN CAPE

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

NORTH WEST

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

WESTERN CAPE

40

90

102

114

126

134

148

157

165

177

Note: North West, Mpumalanga, Limpopo and Northern Cape Provinces reported that there were no Non-governmental Organisations that were licensed to provide mental health

(1)(a)(ii)-(b) The table below provides information on the total number of patients that are currently housed in each specified institution and the total amount that is contributed by the Provincial Departments of Health annually to each institution.

Where zero funding is indicated, private funding is received. Some of the organizations are fully funded whilst others are partially funded.

The duplicates in the table below reflect different business entities whilst sharing the brand name.

Table 2

 

PROVINCE

NO. OF PATIENTS

STATE ANNUAL CONTRIBUTION

(a)(ii)

(1)(a)(ii)

(1)(b)

EASTERN CAPE

   

PE Mental Health Society (Capricorn Halfway House)

10

R180,000.00

Khulanathi Psychosocial Day Care Centre

15

R75,900.00

Care Have Psychiatric Centre

60

R1,151,280.00

FREE STATE

   

Onze Rust Old Age Home

23

R75,856.00

Trompsburg Sentrum Vir Bejaardes

16

R37,928.00

Huis Kosmos Kestel

16

R18,964.00

Huis Avondvrede Vrede

12

R28,446.00

Stillehawe Dewetsdorp

7

R9,482.00

Vredeshof Dealsville

9

R9,482.00

Vrystaat Nasorg Sentrum, Day Care & Residential

47

R0

Jahweh Day Care Centre

17

R0

Reddersrus Tehuis vir Berjaarsdes

7

R0

Epilepsy SA Free State & North West Branch

41

R0

Engo Sentrum Vir Berjaardes-Senekal

37

R0

Nasina Sentrum vir Berjaardes Ventersburg

7

R0

GAUTENG

   

Boikanyo

20

R1,097,280.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

10

R548,640.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

25

R418,200.00

Bophelong Special Children Care Centre

13

R476,112.00

Chrysalis Pre-School

30

R501,840.00

Eersterust Care Centre

80

R1,338,240.00

Horison Care Centre

40

R669,120.00

Jacob`s Well Ministries

40

R669,120.00

Kungwini Welfare Organisation

159

R2,659,752.00

Laudium Workshop

100

R1,672,800.00

Lesedi Self Help Association for People with disabilies

20

R1,097,280.00

Lethabo Le Khutso

19

R695,856.00

Lethabo Le Khutso

15

R250,920.00

Little Ables Children's Sanctuary

50

R2,171,160.00

Nthutoko Stimulation Centre

20

R334,560.00

Odirile Centre for Person with Mental and Physical Disabilities

95

R5,212,080.00

Qumi Houses

38

R2,084,832.00

Qumi Houses

54

R903,312.00

Refeng Sebaka

30

R501,840.00

Sebo Sa Rena

40

R669,120.00

Kairos House of Traumatised People

84

R3,076,416.00

Kairos House of Traumatised People

24

R1,316,736.00

Sizanani Village Trust

70

R3,840,480.00

Sizanani Village Trust

59

R986,952.00

Situla Stimulation Centre

30

R501,840.0

Shalom Community Care Centre

80

R1,338 240.00

Simunye Disabled Centre

30

R501,840.00

Thabang Old Age Home

18

R987,552.00

Tshepong Centre for the Disabled

50

R836,400.00

Gilead Old Age &Adult Res (Tshwane Leadership)

45

R1,648,080.00

Gilead Old Age &Adult Res (Tshwane Leadership)

15

R822,960.00

Gauteng North service to people (little Abels)

35

R1,920,240.00

Gauteng North service to people (little Abels)

15

R250,920.00

Tswelopele

25

R418,200.00

Xihlovo Mental Health Care Centre

10

R366,240.00

Xihlovo Mental Health Care Centre

10

R366,240.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

2

R109,728.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

44

R1,611,456.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

13

R476,112.00

Y.A.N.A (Pretoria vereniging van persone me......)

15

R250,920.00

Avril Elizabeth Home

11

R184,008.00

Avril Elizabeth Home

120

R6,583,680.00

Casa Caritas

55

R0

Kgaugelo Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Kwa-Thema Stimulation Centre

76

R1,271,328.00

Little Eden- Edenvale

180

R9,875,520.00

Little Eden- Elvira Rota Village

120

R6,583,680.00

Mavis Stimulation centre

20

R334,560.00

Monde Stimulation Centre

17

R284,376.00

Rekopane Inclusive Development

22

R1,207,008.00

Rekopane Inclusive Development

15

R250,920.00

San Michele Home 1

15

R549,360.00

San Michele Home 2

200

R10,972,800.00

San Michele Home 3

10

R167,280.00

Sunshine Association centre

36

R602,208.00

Talitha Stimulation Centre - Edenpark

74

R1,237,872.00

Talitha Stimulation Centre - Daleside

40

R2,194,560.00

Tshephong Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Tshephong Stimulation Centre

20

R1,097,280.00

Tsakane Therapy Center

26

R434,928.00

Vita Nova Centre

90

R4,937,760.00

Benbow House

10

R366,240.00

Derby House

12

R439,488.00

Dolphins Acre

20

R1,097,280.00

Dolphins Acre

10

R366,240.00

Dolphins Acre

10

R548,640.00

Ebenezer House

23

R842,352.00

Ebenezer House

5

R83,640.00

Eyethu Centre for disabled child

20

R1,097,280.00

Eyethu Centre for disabled child

60

R1,003,680.00

House Elpidos - Shalom

7

R0

House Elpidos - Emmanuel

9

R0

Gateway Campbell House"

19

R0

Gateway Murray House

25

R0

Gordonia

70

R2,563,680.00

J.I.S.W.A Profound Unit

10

R167,280.00

Kopanang Stimulation Centre

40

R669,120.00

Gateway Campbell House"

19

R0

Gateway Murray House

25

R0

Lenasia Group Home

5

R183,120.00

Mthimkhulu Grootboom Stimulation Centre

7

R183,120.00

Mthimkhulu Emahlubeni Stimulation Centre

7

R0

Nkanyezi Stimulation Centre

60

R1,003,680.00

Nokuthula School for Learners with Special Education Needs

70

R1,170,960.00

Papillon Psychiatric Recovery Centre

26

R0

Pillsbury Child Care Centre

22

R1,207,008.00

Pillsbury Child Care Centre

10

R167,280.00

Ratanang Group

30

R501,840.00

Sandile Life Skills Centre

11

R184,008.00

Sithandiwe Care Centre

31

R518,568.00

Sithandiwe Care Centre

9

R493,776.00

Sandringham Lodge

50

R0

Sandringham Square

50

R0

Selwyn Segal

25

R0

Society For The Care of Mentally Disabled

25

R418,200.00

S.B.D.A

50

R0

Sunshine Centre Craighall

50

R836,400.00

Sunshine Centre Eldorado Park

50

R836,400.00

Takalani Home

100

R5,486,400.00

Talisman Foundation

200

R7,324,800.00

Tebogo Home

35

R1,920,240.00

Thandanani Rose House

12

R439,488.00

Thandanani Rose House

5

R83,640.00

Thandanani Jabulani

23

R842,352.00

Thandanani Welgelee House

10

R366,240.00

Thandanani Crystal

16

R877,824.00

Thuli Home- Zanele

40

R1,464,960.00

Tumelo Home: Ivory

30

R1,645,920.00

Tumelo Home Ivory

20

R334,560.00

United Cerebral Palsy Association of South Africa

35

R1,920,240.00

United Cerebral Palsy Association of South Africa

5

R83,640.00

Woodside Sanctuary

50

R2,743,200.00

Woodside Sanctuary

50

R2,743,200.00

Woodside Sanctuary

10

R167,280.00

Vuyiswa Home for the Disabled

50

R1,831,200.00

Tiba Services For The Blind

15

R250,920.00

Areyeng Residence

40

R1,464,960.00

Ahang Development Center

15

R250,920.00

Anani Trauma Center

20

R1,097,280.00

Anani Trauma Center

33

R1,208,592.00

Boipoloko Stimulation Centre

22

R368,016.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

30

R501,840.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

26

R1,426,464.00

Ikhwezilokusa psychiatric Home

80

R2,929,920.00

June Nicholls School

30

R501,840.00

Käenguru Institute

42

R2,304,288.00

Kanana Houses

56

R2,050,944.00

Katleho Home

10

R548,640.00

Lapeng Home for The Aged House1

28

R1,536,192.00

Lapeng Home for The Aged 2

15

R822,960.00

Lebohang Centre

45

R2,468,880.00

Mosupatsela Centre

12

R439,488.00

Nyakallong Home For Physically and Mental Retarded

6

R329,184.00

Precious Place Of Hope

16

R877,824.00

Solution Care Center

7

R384,048.00

Tabita Versorgings Oord

21

R1,152,144.00

Tabita Versorgings Oord

65

R2,380,560.00

Thekganang Support Group 1

10

R366,240.00

Thekganang Support Group 2

4

R146,496.00

ThekganangSupport Group 3

7

R256,368.00

Thuthukani Disabled Center

15

R250,920.00

Agakitso

20

R334,560.00

Friends of Sterkfontein

5

R183,120.00

Goitsimodimo

40

R1,829,760.00

Hephzibah Home Care

26

R1,426,464.00

Korekile

150

R8,229,600.00

Light Centre

30

R1,645,920.00

Moonlight Homes

40

R669,120.00

Mosego Home 109

22

R1,207,008.00

Mosego Home 110

12

R658,368.00

Mosego Home 111

15

R822,960.00

Mosego Home 112

18

R987,552.00

Mosego Home 113

14

R768,096.00

Mosego Home 114

17

R932,688.00

Mosego Home 115

18

R987,552.00

Mosego Home 116

25

R1,371,600.00

Rainbow Day Care Centre

30

R501,840.00

Salvation Army Mountain Lodge

60

R2,197,440.00

Salvation Army Mountain Lodge

10

R548,640.00

Zanele Mtshali Disability Home

35

R1,920,240.00

Sinikulwazi Home Based Care

9

R329,616.00

KWAZULU NATAL

   

John Peattie

50

R1,371,451.00

Lynn House

21

R687,594.00

Rainbow Haven

24

R459,877.00

Sunfield Homes (Jointly funded with DSD)

111

R302,541.00

Clermont

30

R438,205.00

Scdifa

40

R1,072,647.00

Jewel House

12

R0

Phrenaid

5

R0

Masada Workshop

20

R0

Azalea

24

R573,841.00

Phoenix Happy Hours

20

R292,137.00

Durban North Happy Hours

35

R512,399.00

Madeline Manor

42

R1,003,931.00

uMlazi Halfway House

13

R310,685.00

Cheshire Homes Sparks Estate

48

R1,274,042.00

Kwa Ximba Happy Hours

35

R468,347.00

Mpumalanga Happy Hours

32

R468,347.00

Amaoti Happy Hours

32

R585,434.00

St Luke’s

24

R1,026,886.00

Ninikhona Happy hours

20

R291,982.00

Ikhwezi Cripple Care

52

R1,356,742.00

Nyangwini Happy Hours

21

R307,349.00

Ikhanzi Mentally Disturbed Care centre

20

R142,585.00

Reinhardt’s Place

30

R0

Hibberdine Care Centre

20

R351,370.00

Give a Child a Family

6

R0

Othandweni Cerebral Palsy

15

R0

Ikhayalethu Home of Love and Care

54

R0

Umusa wenkosi Care Centre

46

R0

Palm Haven Care Centre for Elderly

25

R0

Hlanganani Ngothando

17

R411,205.00

Austerville Halfway House

26

R621,370.00

SORD (Solid Foundation)

Target:1500 homes p/m

R1,447,577.00

WESTERN CAPE

   

Stellenbosch Work Centre for Adult Persons with Disabilities

55

 

Paarl Stimulation Centre for Disabled Children

40

 

Lewensruimte for Adult Deaf Person

71

 

Sive Nathi Licensed Home

40

 

Bizweni Centre for children with Disabilities

80

 

Zandvliet Care facility

120

 

Cenida Centre for intellectual Disabled

26

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 1

19

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 2

19

 

Sibongile Day&Night Care House 3

12

 

Sherwood Park Special Educare centre

50

 

Sinethemba Day Care Centre

35

 

Nomaxabiso Centre for Children with special needs & Inclusive Education

45

 

Comcare Trust-Squibb House

8

 

Joy Special Educare

20

 

Unity Work Centre by the Disabled

47

 

Adam’s Farm Home Trust

54

 

Woodside Village Health Care Centre

48

 

Comcare Trust - Arran House

10

 

Comcare Trust - Graham House

14

 

Comcare Trust - Skye House

9

 

Comcare Trust - Rosebank Court

10

 

Comcare Trust - Eve House

12

 

Glendale Home

64

 

Joyce Chevalier Centre for the Handicapped

41

 

Helpende Hande Versorgingsoord

50

 

Comcare Trust – Nuralo House

10

 

Comcare Trust – Iona House

9

 

Rosecourt House (Rosecourt Foundation)

10

 

Rosecourt Terrace (Rosecourt Foundation)

8

 

Emmaus Protective Workshop & Hostels for the disabled

150

 

Die Sterreweg Day Care Centre

50

 

Epilepsy SA

53

 

Comcare Trust: Welcome Club

80

 

ACVV Elizabeth Roos Tehuis

43

 

Optima Day Care Centre

70

 

Elijada Institute

112

 

Elim Home

50

 

Die Eiland Huis vir Gestremdes

20

 

Camphill Farm Community

62

 

Sunfield Home Marais Street

9

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Kerrith Retreat

55

 

Little Angels Day Care & Rehad Centre

14

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Harris Huis

45

 

Oasis Association: Chukker Road

40

 

CPOA: Erica Place

81

 

CPOA: Lilyhaven Place

124

 

CPOA: Oakhaven Place

78

 

CMHS: Imizamo Yethu

100

 

Vukani Centre for Children with Special Needs

30

 

CMHS – Garden Cottage

8

 

Rosedon House

58

 

CMHS – Erika Special Day Care Centre

33

 

Advanced Homecare

35

 

Oudewest Hof Health Care

43

 

Sinethemba Day Care Centre

90

 

CPOA: Lotus River Place

120

 

CPOA: Constantia Place

36

 

De Heide Children Special Care Centre

28

 

CPOA: Trianon Care Centre

13

 

The Village Work Centre

50

 

Oasis Association: Claremont Protective Workshop

165

 

Oasis Association: Delft Day Care Centre

20

 

Oasis Association: Ravensmead Day Care Centre

110

 

Oasis Association: Ruylerwacht Group Homme

12

 

Oasis Association: Elsie River Protective Workshop

210

 

CPOA: Nerina Place

98

 

Grassy Park Centre

50

 

CPOA: Anchusa Annex

17

 

CPOA: Avondrust Court Annex

60

 

CPOA: Fairmead Court Annex

36

 

CPOA: Riverside Care Centre

10

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Dela Haye

8

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Hensie Vroom

33

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Sonop

60

 

Community Mental Health and Psychiatry: Huis Miles Bowker

66

 

Orion Organisation

220

 

Robin Trust

23

 

Oasis Care Centre

40

 

CPOA: Riverglade Health Care

16

 

CMHS: Kimber House

12

 

CMHS: Fountain House

90

 

CPOA: Arcadia Place

45

 

ACVV Hellen Bellinhanhof

46

 

CPOA: Arcadia Place

31

 

APD Oudtshoom: Protective Workshop & Sonskyn Day Care Centre

73

 

Vermont Centre

22

 

Die Werkswinkel

16

 

Huis Isabella

19

 

Camphill Village

87

 

Sean Kelly Group Home

14

 

ACVV Prins Albert – Huis Kweekvallei

20

 

Heatherton House Healthcare Facility

11

 

CMHS – Nomceba Workshop

120

 

CMHS – Athlone Workshop&Garden Pot Centre

250

 

CMHS – Nitchells Plain Workshop

200

 

Panorama Palms

25

 

CMHS – Retreat Workshop

140

 

Miracles Protective Workshop

55

 

Sea Park Nursing Care Centre

35

 

Friends Care Centre

120

 

ACVV – Huis Elsje

36

 

Helderberg Lodge

166

 

Mountview

34

 

Livewell Suites

70

 

Heritage Manor Health Care

18

 

Bridgewater Manor Health Care

35

 

Lonwabo Home for Disabled Children

25

 

Sibongile Day abd Night CARE Centre House 4

12

 

Noordhoek Manor Health Care

14

 

Cle Du Cap Health Care

18

 

Emmanuel Day Care Centre

80

 

God’s Gift Trust

12

 

Onrus Manor Health Care Centre

18

 

Caring and Sharing Day Care Centre-APD Breede Valley

18

 

Breede Valley APD

105

 

Sean j Kelly Training Centre

45

 

Uniqcraft Workshop – APD Beaufort West

45

 

Masixole Day Care Centre – APD Beaufort West

30

 

Gabriella Centre

34

 

CMHS-Heideveld Special Education& care centre

70

 

Hurley Homes cct/a St Anthony’s Home

45

 

Sunrise Special Care Centre

30

 

Hope House Trust

8

 

Agape Family Ministries: Day Care for Special Needs

65

 

Agape Family Ministries: Asiphe Home

50

 

Vukuhambe Association for the Multi Disabled

31

 

Astra Centre

65

 

Vriende Huis

8

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly (House 6)

35

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly (House 8)

20

 

Aan de Drostdy Home for the Elderly –Mike Mutter Street

26

 

Rotary Park Frail Care Centre

25

 

Jo Dolphin Swartland APD - Malmesbury

20

 

Huis Perelberg

20

 

Livewell Villa

35

 

Hurdy Gurdy House for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)

9

 

Autism Connect Learning Centre

30

 

Brigadoom Lodge

22

 

Community Mental Health&Psychiatry: Huis Elroi

20

 

The Open Circle

40

 

Jewish Community Services: House 226

6

 

Jewish Community Services: House 227

6

 

Siyabonga (Special Kidz Centre)

15

 

Siyabonga (2 Care Day Care Centre)

30

 

Siyabonga (Sisonke Protective Workshop)

30

 

Jura Centre

25

 

Garisbaai Stanford Day Care

21

 

Goodhope Day Care Centre

15

 

Simanyene Centre for the Disabled

20

 

Yomelelani Centre for Children with Disabilities

18

 

Silvermine Village Health Care Centre

52

 

Iris House Childrens Hospice

12

 

Umthi Special Care Centre

16

 

Suideroord ACVV Tehuis vir Bejaardes

108

 

Bredasdorp Day Care Centre

6

 

Trevelyn Lodge

55

 

Sunfield Home-Brainskloof Road

105

 

Iqhayiya Care and Support House

23

 

Play on wheels-Gugulethu

12

 

Balula Children’s Home Based Care and Craft Centre

9

 

Ocean View APD

135

 

Roosendal Special Care Centre Inclusive Educare

55

 

The Villa Nazareth House

24

 

Play on Wheels Langa

12

 

Unakho Day Care Centre for Disabled Children

20

 

ACVV Robertson: Trippel Toonjies Playschool for Disabled Children

21

 

Vrolike Vinkies Pre-Primary Educare Centre

24

 

Heartlands Baby Santuary

20

 

Faircape Health (Pty) Ltd: Tokai

16

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Hadassa Child&Youth Care Centre

8

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Natachia Group Home for person with Disabilities

14

 

Siyabonga: Huis Van Danksegging: Huis Cornelius Residential Care for Adults

18

 

CPOA: Pinelands Grove Care Centre

18

 

CPOA: The Manor Care Centre

23

 

Bendiga House for Independent Living

10

 

Hermanus Elderly Care Place

54

 

Huis horizon Sentrum

102

 

Note: The Western Cape Province provided information on the total annual contribution for Nongovernmental Organizations in the 2019/202 financial year which amounts to R5,148,000.00 for rural health districts and R52,910,768.00 for facilities in the Metro District.

(2) The table below provides information on the registration status of the entities in each province:

Table III

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF NGOs PER PROVINCE

Registered/Company/Independent entity

Eastern Cape

03

Registered NPO

Free State

12

Registered NPO

Gauteng

164

Registered NPO

KwaZulu-Natal

32

Registered NPO

Limpopo

0

-

Mpumalanga

0

-

Northern Cape

0

-

North West

0

-

Western Cape

177

164 Registered NPOs

13 Registered company/independent entities

(3) In terms of the Mental Health Care Act, 2002 (Act No. 17 of 2002) and its General regulations, Provincial Departments of Health are required to subject such entities to at least an annual audit by designated officials of the Provincial Department concerned. If a condition of a licence is not complied with, the Provincial Department concerned may withdraw that licence.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW351

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed that the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) is yet to publish a list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by his department and as indicated in item 6 on the Policy Guideline on the Requirements for Practice of Medical Professionals in South Africa, 2018; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the full relevant details of the steps that he intends to take in order to expedite regulatory compliance by HPCSA as this matter is seemingly at the very core of the problem that South African foreign qualified medical doctors are facing today in terms of having a recognised foreign qualification?

Reply:

1. The list of accredited tertiary medical institutions as recognised by the Health Professions Council of South Africa is as follows:-

  • Stellenbosch University
  • Sefako Makgatho Health Sciences University
  • University of Cape Town
  • University of the Free State
  • University of Pretoria
  • University of Witwatersrand
  • Walter Sisulu University
  • University of Kwa Zulu Natal
  • University of Limpopo

2. As a creature of statute, the HPCSA and Boards powers are confined to those conferred by the statute creating them and limited to the Republic of South Africa. The HPCSA thus endeavours to run its operations in accordance with the relevant Act and Regulations.

In this regard, the HPCSA will soon be embarking on a process to review the regulations and rules in their entirety so as to address any gaps identified in the course of application of the said rules and regulations.

It is envisaged that this process will be completed in a few months and that the above concern will be addressed in the process.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW275

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total amount is budgeted for his private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in his private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) Budget allocated to the private office of the Minister for the 2019-20 financial year

 

Compensation of Employees

R11 615 000-00

Goods and Services

R 8 700 000-00

Machinery and Equipment

R 35 000-00

TOTAL

R20 350 000-00

(b) (i) See (a) above.

(ii) and (iii) The salary level of each employee appointed in the past three financial years are as follows:

JOB TITLE

SALARY LEVEL

Food Aid

2

Domestic Worker (PTA)

3

Domestic Worker (CPT)

3

Driver Messenger

5

Receptionist

6

Administrative Secretary

13

Deputy Administrative Secretary

12

Appointment Secretary

12

Assistant Private Secretary

10

Registry Clerk

5

Administrative Clerk (Supervisor)

7

Administrative (Supervisor)

7

Senior Administrative Officer

8

Deputy Parliamentary Officer

12

Parliamentary Officer

13

Media Liaison Officer

13

Chief of Staff

Vacant

Advisor

14

Special Advisor

16

(iv) The qualifications of each employee appointed are as follows:

JOB TITLE

QUALIFICATION

Food Aid

Information not available

Domestic Worker(PTA)

Grade 11

Domestic Worker (CPT)

Grade 11

Driver Messenger

Senior Certificate

Receptionist

Senior Certificate

Administrative Secretary

Senior Certificate, Bachelor Laws(LLB)

Deputy Administrative Secretary

Senior Certificate, National Diploma Public Management and Administration

Appointment Secretary

Senior Certificate

Assistant Private Secretary

Senior Certificate, Bachelor’s degree Accounting Science

Registry Clerk

Senior Certificate, National Diploma Public Relations Management

Administrative Clerk(Supervisor)

Senior Certificate

Administrative Clerk(Supervisor)

Not indicated

Senior Administrative Officer

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Commerce, Honours Bachelor of Commerce

Deputy Parliamentary Officer

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Administration Human Resources and Public Administration, Master’s degree Business Administration

Parliamentary Officer

Senior Certificate.

Media Liaison Officer

Senior Certificate, Diploma Emergency Care, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery

Chief of Staff

Vacant

Advisor

Senior Certificate, LLB

Special Advisor

Senior Certificate, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery, Bachelor of Administration, Post graduate certificate in Occupational Health, Strategic Transformation programme certificate, Human Resources for Health certificate and many others

(v) These will be done by the end of August 2019.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW425

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) number of new-born babies have died in public (i) hospitals and (ii) clinics (aa) in each of the past four years and (bb) since 1 January 2019 and (b) has he found to be the main causes of the deaths; (2) whether any investigations have been conducted into the mortality rate of new-born babies in the public health-care system; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) details of the recommendations?

Reply:

(1) (a) The following table reflects the details in this regard

(Neonatal deaths in hospitals, Community Health Centres and Clinics, 2015-2019

(aa)

(bb)

 

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

(i) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: Hospitals (public and Private)

16.3

15.3

14.8

14.5

14.6

(ii) Neonatal deaths/1000 live births: clinics and CHCs (public only)

0.9

1.1

1.5

1.2

1.2

(b) The main causes of newborn deaths (source: Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Immaturity related causes;

ii. Hypoxia;

iii. Infections, mostly associated with HIV; and

iv. Congenital abnormalities.

(2) (a) Relevant details of investigations in causes of mortality:

The National Perinatal Morbidity and Mortality Committee - a Ministerial Committee appointed since 2012 is mandated to report on the number and causes of neonatal mortality. The Committee reviews data from all available sources such as the District Health Information System, the Perinatal Problem Identification Programme and StatSA data to determine mortality rates. The Committee prepares reports and presents the report to the Minister and the National Health Council.

(b) Details of recommendations:

Recommendations to reduce neonatal mortality (Saving Babies Report, 2014-2016) are:

i. Scale up Helping Babies Breathe skills;

ii. Continue with the implementation of the management of small and sick neonates programme;

iii. Continue with scale-up of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) intervention;

iv. Focus on intrapartum care; and

v. Scale up Basic Antenatal Care plus.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW136

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the current total number of doctors registered with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) in each province in the (i) public and (ii) private health sectors and (b) number of the specified doctors are currently practicing in each case; (2) what (a) is the current total number of nurses registered with the HPCSA in each province in the (i) public and (ii) private health sectors and (b) number of the specified nurses are currently practicing in each case; (3) what number of (a) medical and (b) nursing students (i) have been and (ii) have not been placed for community service in each province since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

1. (a) According to the information provided by the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA), the total number of doctors registered is as follows:

Province

Public

Private

(b) number of the specified doctors are currently practicing in each case

Eastern Cape

376

2761

HPCSA does not keep a record of whether a doctor is practising in the public or private sector, nor of the province in which they are working.

Free State

151

1713

 

Gauteng

1237

14304

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal

781

6944

 

Limpopo

229

1521

 

Mpumalanga

249

1449

 

North West

249

1172

 

Northern Cape

121

540

 

Western

443

9115

 

Foreign

47

504

 

No Province shown

120

649

 

Total

4003

40672

 

2. (a) Nurses are not required to register with the HPCSA to practice as nurses in South Africa. However, according to South African Nursing Council (SANC), a total number of nurses registered in each province is as follows:

2(a) Province

(i) Public and (ii) Private

(b) number of the specified nurses are currently practicing in each case

Eastern Cape

29533

SANC does not register nurses by employment authority (i.e. public or private) but registration is done in line with the categories of nurses as provided for in the Nursing Act, 2005 (Act. No. 33 of 2005)

Free State

13398

 

Gauteng

74044

 

Kwa-Zulu Natal

71030

 

Limpopo

28839

 

Mpumalanga

14878

 

North West

18002

 

Northern Cape

3747

 

Western Cape

32233

 

Total

285704

 

3. The following South African (a) Medical and (b) (i) Nursing Students who met requirements of being registered with their relevant Professions Council, were allocated since 1 January 2019:

Province

Medical Practitioner

Professional Nurse

EC

125

591

FS

67

168

GP

260

672

KZ

222

747

LP

138

331

MP

170

313

NC

82

50

NW

144

485

WC

205

302

SAMHS

47

14

Grand Total

1460

3673

No South African (a) Medical and (b) (ii) Nursing Students who met requirements of being registered with their relevant Professional Council have not been allocated for community service in each province since 1 January 2019 (i.e. all medical and nursing students who registration requirements were placed).

END.

16 September 2019 - NW455

Profile picture: Jacobs, Mr F

Jacobs, Mr F to ask the Minister of Health

Whether all community health care workers in the Western Cape have been integrated into the public health system; if not, why not, if so, what is their remuneration package?

Reply:

Community Health Workers (CHWs) in the Western Cape Department of Health (WCDoH) are contracted through the local Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs). When the Public Health and Social Development Sectoral Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC) Resolution 1 of 2018 agreement between the Department of Health and the Labour Unions on the standardisation of the Community Health Worker Remuneration was communicated to all provinces, the WCDoH indicated that the agreement does not apply to them as their model of contracting CHWs is different from that of the National Department of Health. This matter was also discussed in the National Health Council (NHC) meeting of 28 February 2019 wherein the same argument was presented. The NHC decided that all provinces should pay CHWs through PERSAL except for the Western Cape.

This meant that the WCDoH could continue with their contractual arrangement that is, contracting CHWs through NPOs.

The WCDoH also defended their argument in the PHSDSBC in response to a dispute that was referred by a Labour Union, NUPSAW, on the interpretation of Resolution 1 wherein an award was made as follows:

  • Resolution 1 of 2018 applies and binds the WCDoH;
  • As a result of the WCDoH not having Health Care Workers in its employ, it has no obligation to implement Resolution 1 of 2018.

It is for the reasons stated above that the WCDoH is contracting CHWs through local NPOs.

With regards to the remuneration package, the WCDoH complies with Resolution 1 agreement. CHWs are remunerated at R3,500 per month.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW143

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the current and future plans to roll out 5G, a term used to reference the next generation of high speed mobile network, he and/or his department conducted any research that suggests any possible long or short term human health risks posed by 5G technology; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of associated risks; (2) whether he has found that there are potential risks and/or consequences to the mental and physical health of persons, particularly in a situation where the skin and sweat ducts absorb the higher millimetre frequencies intended for 5G; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the findings; (3) whether, in view of the findings of the US National Toxicology Program which found clear evidence of cancer due to cell phone radiation, he has any plans in place to protect the citizens from the (a) identified potential health risks and/or consequence and (b) the added cell tower frequencies needed for 5G linked to the damage of human blood; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the plan?

Reply:

1. The Directorate Radiation control (formerly part of the Department of Health, now transferred to the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority – SAHPRA) has the mandate in terms of the Hazardous Substances Act (Act 15 of 1973) to exercise regulatory control over devices and installations that have been declared Group III hazardous substances, i.e. all devices and installations covered by the Schedule of listed Electronic Products (Reg R1302, 14 June 1991).

The Directorate Radiation Control does not have the mandate, resources or infrastructure to engage in or support research with respect to the health effects of any such listed electronic product. Instead, the Directorate (in performing its regulatory responsibility with regard to listed electronic products that purposely produce non-ionising electromagnetic fields) has opted since 1998 to follow the recommendations and guidelines of the WHO International Electromagnetic fields Project (www.who.int/peh-emf).

Since the publication of exposure guidelines by the International Commission on Non-Ionising Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) in 1998, the WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has constantly been recommending the use of these guidelines (updated periodically) as the science-based way to deal with any situation where a person might be exposed to non-ionising electromagnetic fields. Compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit will afford protection against the known adverse health effects of any such electromagnetic fields.

Surveys conducted around the world and also in South Africa have consistently indicated that the levels, to which the general population is exposed as a result of various wireless technologies, invariably are orders of magnitude below the applicable ICNIRP limit.

The WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has not published any report or statement to the effect that 5G technology would have any deleterious effect on the health of either the users of this technology or the population in general.

2. See (1) above.

(3) The methodology in the US National Toxicology Program involved exposing rats for long period of time to levels of microwave radiation well above the applicable ICNIRP limit for humans.

Compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit is expressly aimed at avoiding any significant heating of the body or part of the body. Given these high levels of microwave radiation, it would not be unreasonable to suspect that the effects that were noticed in some rat populations were indeed mainly or exclusively due to excessive heating caused by the exposure to microwave radiation.

Although no human subject would knowingly be exposed to the high levels of microwave radiation to which the rats are exposed, this study does serve as confirmation of (a) the fact that the ICNIRP limits would have to be exceeded significantly before any health effects would become apparent, and (b) that compliance with the applicable ICNIRP limit will indeed protect against significant heating and hence the health effects that could be associated with heating.

In making policy recommendations to the Department of Health on the health effects on non-ionising electromagnetic fields, the Directorate Radiation Control does not consider it appropriate to even attempt to look at the results of any single study in isolation. The WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project has rigorously been reminding member countries that a single study on its own could never by an adequate basis for setting or changing policy, no matter how significant or even ground breaking it may seem. Only in the event that other researchers independently make the effort to replicate a single study under the same conditions and their results turn out similar to those yielded by the initial study, could the process even of looking closer at the results of that initial study start. In all of this the implicit assumption would be that the initial study had been properly designed in the first instance, and carried out according to a scientifically justified methodology, and that the statistical analysis had been executed properly. The guidance and recommendations of the WHO International Electromagnetic Fields Project have therefore always been based on reviews which were conducted by multi-disciplinary panels of scientists employing a health-oriented, science-based weight-of-evidence approach involving all of the available scientific evidence.

The US National Toxicology Program has as yet not been replicated independently. The Japanese and Korean Ministries of Health announced in April 2019 that they were embarking on a five-year joint research effort aimed at verification of the results of the US National Toxicology Program. Regardless of the outcome, any replication/verification of these results would then still need to be evaluated in terms of the overall weight of evidence with respect to the health effects of exposure to high frequency electromagnetic fields.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW7

Profile picture: Majozi, Ms Z

Majozi, Ms Z to ask the Minister of Health

What steps has he taken or does he intend to take to address (a) public health facilities that are below standard and (b) service delivery which is negatively impacted by a lack of human resources, aging infrastructure and rampant corruption?

Reply:

a) The Office of Health Standards Compliance (OHSC) was established in accordance with the amended National Health Act of 2013, Chapter 10. One of the objectives of the OHSC is to protect and promote the health and safety of users of health services by monitoring and enforcing compliance by health establishments with norms and standards prescribed by the Minister in relation to the national health system. The Norms and Standards Regulations applicable to different categories of health establishments was Gazetted in February 2018.

In addition, National programmes such as the Ideal Clinic and Hospital programme was established to give guidance and monitor the progress of health facilities with the implementation of the Norms and Standards Regulations.

The NDOH is tasked with the management of public health facilities and infrastructure of the country, in conjunction with the provincial Infrastructure Units of the Provincial Health Departments. The Cluster focuses on co-ordinating and funding health infrastructure to enable provinces to plan, manage, modernise, rationalise and transform infrastructure, health technology and hospital management, and improve the quality of care in line with national policy objectives. This programme is funding infrastructure projects ranging from new and replaced facilities; upgrades and additions; refurbishment, rehabilitation and renovations, to maintenance and repairs. Of importance most of the healthcare infrastructure projects funded over the MTEF period by the Provincial Equitable Share, Health Facility Revitalisation Grant, and In-kind Grant focused on upgrades and additions; refurbishment, rehabilitation and renovations, to maintenance and repairs.

b) The human resources for health (HRH) crisis will undermine the achievement of high-quality universal health coverage. This crisis is characterised by: staff shortages, inequities and mal-distribution between urban and rural areas and between the public and private health sectors; unprofessional behaviour and poor staff motivation and performance. This crisis will undermine the achievement of high-quality universal health coverage, if not addressed. In the public sector, the lack of knowledge and skills of doctors and nurses were contributory factors in the potentially preventable maternal deaths.

We have realized a need to invest in, and transform human resources in support of a high-quality health system, focusing on the following:

Development of a transformative HRH plan.

(i) The National Department of Health (NDoH) will use the opportunity provided by the development of the HRH plan forthe period 2019/20-2024/25 to partner with front-line health care providers for a high quality health system, and to make health equity and quality the foundation of the new HRH plan.

(ii) The NDoH will finalize the staffing norms and standards for District Hospitals, that are informed by the national quality Program of Action (POA).

Corruption

Fraud and corruption are major threats to equitable access to quality health care. Therefore all provincial departments of health are required (according to legislation) to have an approved fraud and corruption plan. Employees are encouraged to report all corruption to the Anti-corruption hotline.

END.

16 September 2019 - NW178

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What budget or grants are allocated to the South Rand Hospital, (b) what (i) mechanisms and (ii) processes exist to ensure that the highest level of service is rendered at the hospital and (c) by what date will the existing staff vacancies be filled?

Reply:

(a) For the 2019/20 financial year, South rand Hospital has the following budget allocations:

  • Voted Funds                                               R 274,218,000.00
  • Programme 8                                              R 9,140,000.00
  • HIV/AIDS Conditional Grant                         R 21,719,000.00
  • TB Conditional Grant                                   R 1,841,000.00

(b) (i) The budget is structured, captured and allocated according to 4 Economical Classifications, namely: Compensation of Employees, Goods and Services, Machinery and Equipment and Households

(ii) Institutions are compelled to spend the allocated budget in line with the Demand Plan which is in line with the allocated budget. All Goods and Services to be procured are reconciled to this plan.

(c) The existing staff vacancies will be filled in August and September 2019. The interviewing processes are currently underway.

END.

13 September 2019 - NW266

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the name of each person who is a member of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa and (b) what criteria were used to appoint each person?

Reply:

a) The processes for the appointment of the second Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa are underway and Minister will announce names after appointment.

b) Constitution of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council is provided for by section 7 of the Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 2007 (Act No. 22 of 2007). The Criteria used in appointing members of the Council is detailed in the Regulations relating to the appointment of the interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa, Government Gazette No. R 685 of 22 August 2011 as follows:

Nomination of members of the Council

1. The Minister must by –

a) Notice in the Gazette;

b) An advertisement placed in at least two newspapers with national and regional circulation; and

c) Any other means considered necessary by him or her.

Invite nomination for persons to be considered for appointment of the Council.

2. The notice contemplated in sub-regulation (1) must state –

a) The requirements for consideration for appointment;

b) The period within which the nominations must be submitted; and

c) An address to which the nominations must be sent.

3. The Minister must request nominations of one person each from –

a) The Director-General for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (d) of the Act;

b) The Health Professions Council of South Africa for persons to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (f) of the Act; and

c) The South African Pharmacy Council of South Africa for a person to be considered for appointment as a member contemplated in section 7 (g) of the Act

 

Selection process

1. The returning officer must, not later than 21 days after the close of nominations, submit all valid nominations to the Minister.

2. The Minister may appoint a panel comprising of at least four people, whom at least two shall be persons who have experience in traditional health practice, to consider and advise the Minister on the nomination received.

3. The Minister may call for further nominations if no nominations are received in a particular category or an insufficient number of nominations were received within the period specified in the notice for invitation contemplated in regulation 2 (1).

4. The panel may use a screening process and interviews of nominees in selecting candidates to be recommended for appointment by the Minister.

5. The panel must submit a report of the recommended candidate together with the list of all nominees and supporting documents to the Minister for consideration of appointment to the Council.

6. The Minister’s power to appoint members of the board is not limited to the recommended candidates.

END.

11 September 2019 - NO89

Profile picture: Dyantyi, Dr PP

Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

What are the details of the recommendations from the Health Compact that he has been able to implement since the compact was signed on 25 July 2019?

Reply:

The Health Compact recommendations were summarised into nine pillars relating to the key elements of the healthcare system:- human resources, medicine supply, infrastructure, private sector engagement, improvement in the quality of PHC services, public sector financial management, strengthening of governance and leadership, community engagement and development of information systems.

For each of these areas there are clear deliverables with targets which has been reflected in the Departments Annual Performance Plans either at National or Provincial level. The Department has started with the implementation of these plans.

A number of these areas are outlined below including:

  • A joint committee of the National Treasury and National Department of Health has been established to review the Equitable share and grants in the Health sector
  • A Ministerial Committee Task Team was established and the Human Resource for Health (HRH) Strategy is being finalized, which incorporates a number of human resources issues raised in the compact. Reorganisation of the Health Organogram and reprioritisation to shift resources for services delivery at the front end.
  • Estimates of the provincial pharmaceutical budget will be ring fenced.
  • A system to monitor key operations at a hospitals that influence health system quality.

Various interventions for Medico-Legal claims introduced:

(i) Quantification of the contingent liability: The current contingent liability as at June 2019 is R 100 822 486 781. 93. However, most of these claims as frivolous and vexatious. The Department is in the process of identifying the legitimate claims.

(ii) Mediation: The patient admission forms have been standardized across the Provinces to make the provision for mediation. There are already 18 officials from Provinces who have been trained for mediation. These include Legal and Medical officers. The Department will also train the officials to implement patient admission forms for mediation.

(iii) Provision of future medical treatment: Department has published Public Health facilities, in Government Gazette No 42687 of 5 September 2019, to provide for future medical services instead of advance payment of future medical expenses. This will address the future medical expenses that constitute over 80 percent of the quantum (amount) claimed. This will ensure that our facilities continue to function effectively and efficiently.

  • Training materials to train clinic committees and Hospital Boards has been developed, training has begun in three (3) provinces.
  • A draft proposal to fast track the infrastructure backlog has been developed.

Quality improvement plan has been developed and funded, training will resume in September.

The copy of the Health Compact is hereby attached as Annexure 1.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW36

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the recorded total number of (a) alcohol-related deaths and (b) children who have been born with foetal alcohol syndrome in (i) each province and (ii) each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a)(i)-(ii) Table 1 below provide information on the numbers of alcohol related deaths in South Africa was obtained from the South African Medical Research Council, that was extracted from unit records of deaths provided by Statistics South Africa which are available up to 2016.

Table 1:

Number of registered deaths with underlying causes that is alcohol related by province, 2012-2016

PROVINCE

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

47

87

110

116

107

467

Free State

19

26

39

30

33

147

Gauteng

40

53

45

48

57

243

KwaZulu-Natal

65

76

73

83

75

372

Limpopo

20

15

18

23

20

96

Mpumalanga

18

12

16

22

11

79

North West

22

18

16

26

22

104

Northern Cape

21

33

36

30

29

149

Western Cape

118

120

129

123

139

629

TOTAL

370

440

482

501

493

2286

(b)(i)-(ii) Currently, data is available on the prevalence of foetal alcohol syndrome among grade-1 learners which is collected through surveys that were conducted in selected communities. Table 2 below provides a summary of the prevalence data that is available and was provided by the Foundation for Alcohol Related Research[1]

Table 2:

Summary of the prevalence of foetal alcohol syndrome among grade-1 learners

PROVINCE

COMMUNITY

PREVELANCE RATE AS A PERCENTAGE

REFERENCE

Eastern Cape

Bethelsdorp,

Port Elizabeth

13,0

Olivier, et al., 2017a

 

Burgersdorp

6,2

Still to be published

Free State

Jacobsdal

12,9

Still to be published

Gauteng

Soweto,

Diepsloot,

Lenasia

2,6

Viljoen, 2001

Northern Cape

De Aar

11,9

Urban et al., 2008

 

Upington

7,4

Chersich et al., 2012b

 

Kimberley

6,4

Urban et al., 2015

 

Renosterberg Municipality

28,2

Olivier et al., 2017b

 

Hanover

20,8

Still to be published

Western Cape

Wellington

8,9

Viljoen, Gossage, Brooke, Adnams, Jones, Robinson ... & May, 2005

 

Aurora

10,0

Olivier et al., 2013

 

Witzenberg Sub-district

9,6

Olivier et al., 2016

 

Saldanha Bay Municipality

6,7

Olivier et al., 2016

 

Wellington,

Montague,

Ashton,

Robertson

13,5 - 20,8

May et al., 2016

END.

  1. Probst, C, Parry C, Wittchen H, Rehm J. The socioeconomic profile of alcohol-attributable mortality in South Africa: a modelling study. BMC Medicine. 2018; 16:97

09 July 2019 - NW51

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the (a) name and (b) location of each (i) clinic and (ii) hospital that does not have 24/7 security?

Reply:

(a) The Name and Location

i) There are 429 Primary Health Care facilities that do not have 24 hours’ security in place.

ii) There is no hospital that does not have 24/7 security

A list with names and location of each facility is attached as Annexure A

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF FACILITIES

Eastern Cape

112

Free State

129

Gauteng

6

KwaZulu-Natal

22

Limpopo

15

Mpumalanga

15

Northern Cape

75

North West

34

Western Cape

21

END.

09 July 2019 - NW2

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he is aware of a proposed 2 dose Glaxo Smith Klein (GSK) ChAd155-RSV Vaccine Trial, to be conducted in the Republic (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) why is the Government exposing infants to (a) untested and (b) potentially fatal drugs for profit and ongoing science experimentation contrary to the protection contained in the Bill of Rights in the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996?

Reply:

(1) Yes. I am aware that the MRC Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit (based at the University of the Witwatersrand) is taking part in a multi-centre, multi-country study that aims to provide critical information on the safety, reactogenicity and immunogenicity profile of the ChAd155-Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) vaccine in infants likely to be unexposed to RSV. Sites in European, South American and North American countries are also participating.

Although RSV infection is a leading cause of death in young children, interventions to protect children against RSV infection and to treat children who acquire RSV infection are not available. For this reason, the World Health Organisation ranked a vaccine against RSV as the most important vaccine that needs to be developed in order to protect children in low- and middle-income countries from preventable mortality.

(2) (a) The vaccine should not be regarded as untested. The immunogenicity, safety and reactogenicity of the ChAd155-RSV vaccine in healthy adults has been evaluated and determined to be satisfactory by an Independent Data Monitoring Committee (IDMC). A clinical study is currently being conducted in RSV-sero positive infants aged 12 to 23 months (study 204838 [RSV PED-002]) in Europe. The proposed study will only proceed if the safety profile of the current study is evaluated as being satisfactory by an IDMC. The study will be monitored by an IDMC at each step for safety, and any reports communicated to the regulatory authorities in real-time.

(b) There is no merit in the concern that children are being exposed to a dangerous vaccine, since this is a non-replicating vaccine and the vaccine itself cannot biologically cause any illness. As noted above, the trial will be conducted in line with clinical trial guidelines and will be strictly monitored to ensure the safety and well-being of all participants.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW37

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the total number of drug-related deaths that have been recorded (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past five financial years?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The table below reflects the total number of drug-related deaths in South Africa. This data has been extracted by the South African Medical Research Council from unit records of deaths provided by Statistics South Africa which is available up to 2016.

Number of registered deaths with underlying causes that is drug-related by province, 2012-2016

PROVINCE

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

25

24

56

38

34

177

Free State

26

21

23

14

26

110

Gauteng

42

46

56

82

88

314

KwaZulu-Natal

38

52

53

42

65

250

Limpopo

5

12

13

13

17

60

Mpumalanga

5

16

14

13

23

71

North West

13

23

13

12

15

76

Northern Cape

16

25

24

19

19

103

Western Cape

27

39

22

42

24

154

TOTAL

197

258

274

275

311

1315

END.

09 July 2019 - NW50

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What number of citizens have not received ARVs in the past three months as a result of the second-line ARV shortage and (b) are there any further expected shortages?

Reply:

(a) There is a shortage of the abacavir/lamivudine and zidovudine/lamivudine combination used in second line. The shortage meant that there was lesser stock than is ordinarily available but we do not have stock. There are 360 000 patients on both combinations that are in short supply. There is currently 558 382 (AL = 177 741 + ZL = 380 641) units of the second line regimen available as at 28 June 2019.

Additionally the contracted supplier is bringing 650 000 units in July 2019. The National Department of Health has implemented stock visibility system where we have sight of the medicine stock holding at facility level. We have managed this situation by asking facilities to reduce the quality dispensed. Some patients receive two/three months supply at a time and we have advice that patients are dispensed only 1 month treatment. Secondly, we have moved stock around between facilities with higher stock levels to facilities with less stock. Thirdly, we have proposed an alternative treatment regimen should the current second line regimen not be available;

(b) The global supply of lamivudine API remains erratic however, the new ARV tender commenced on the 1st July 2019 where we have contracted additional suppliers, which we anticipate will fill the gap.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW10

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

What support does he and/or his department intend to give in order to restore the dignity of the African people through the integration of traditional medicine in primary health care and the national health system?

Reply:

The Department of Health supports the integration of traditional medicine in primary health care and the national health system as follows:

(1) The Department of Health has taken steps towards the official recognition and inclusion of Traditional Medicine in the National Health System through relevant regulatory frameworks;

(2) The Traditional Health Practitioners Act, 2007 (Act No. 22 of 2007) was enacted as one of the tools to assist the Department in achieving this goal. The objectives of the Act are:

(a) to establish the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa;

(b) to make provision for control of the registration, training and practices of Traditional Health Practitioners in South Africa;

(c) to serve and protect the interests of Practitioners and those of members of the public who use the services of Traditional Health Practitioners.

(3) In implementing the Act, the Department has appointed the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa. It was established to oversee the registration and regulation of the practice of Traditional Medicine by setting practice standards. This will assist in eliminating bogus practitioners and charlatans in the practice. The Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council has to ensure safety, efficacy and quality of services provided by Traditional Health Practitioners through the enforcement of the code of ethics and conduct.

(4) The Department has appointed the Registrar of the Interim Traditional Health Practitioners Council of South Africa who assumed duty on 1 September 2017. The Registrar is the secretary and accounting officer of the Council and performs the functions assigned to him by the Interim Council in terms of the Act. Amongst his responsibilities is to set up institutional arrangements such as structures and systems for the registration of Traditional Health Practitioners. Registration of Traditional Health Practitioners will commence as soon as this office is capacitated and it is functional to carry out its mandate.

(5) Processes are underway to finalise the draft policy on Traditional Medicine in South Africa. The policy on Traditional Medicine will serve as a guide to avoid a clash between the traditional medicine system and western medicine. Within the context of primary health care, they should blend in a beneficial harmony, using the best features of each system, and compensating for weaknesses in each.

END.

09 July 2019 - NW52

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to each type of antiretroviral drug, for how long is it envisaged that the Government’s stockpile will last?

Reply:

The Department of Health currently stockpiles the first line treatment regimen (Tenofovir/metrictabine/efavirenze) which 90% of patients are prescribed on. There is adequate supplies of the first line treatment , 10 million units currently with no shortage of API at this time. The stockpile will last for eight (8) weeks.

END.

18 April 2019 - NW756

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What number of persons in the country were diagnosed with (a) tuberculosis, (b) pneumonia, (c) diabetes and (d) cancer in each province (i) in 2018 and (ii) since 1 January 2019?

Reply:

The system that generates data for the TB programme does so in quarterly (3 months) cohorts. Data before the end of the quarter is always incomplete, and in fact, its is global standard practice to report TB data a quarter behind. Notwithstanding, the programme reported data in 2018 as follows:

(a)

01 January 2019 to 31 March 2019

 

Eastern Cape

11,842

 

Free State

2, 665

 

Gauteng

8,007

 

KwaZulu-Natal

11,976

 

Limpopo

2,751

 

Mpumalanga

3,040

 

North West

3,257

 

Northern Cape

2,160

 

Western Cape

8,980

 

TOTAL SA

54,678

(b) The table below shows the number of Pneumonia new cases among under-5 children diagnosed in public health facilities and number of severe Pneumonia cases among under-5 children admitted to hospital 2018 and January 2019 only. (Data source: DHIS).

(b)(i)

01 January 2018 to 31 December 2018

 

Province

Pneumonia new cases among under-5 children diagnosed in public health facilities

Number of severe Pneumonia cases among under-5 children admitted to hospital

 

Eastern Cape

11,141

4,395

 

Free State

9,088

2,347

 

Gauteng

22,907

4,362

 

KwaZulu-Natal

53,099

10,683

 

Limpopo

11,124

5,836

 

Mpumalanga

2,234

3,034

 

Northern Cape

2,718

983

 

North West

3,391

2,222

 

Western Cape

46,249

13,150

 

TOTAL SA

161,951

47,012

 

(b)(ii)

01 January 2019 (ONLY)

 

Province

Pneumonia new cases among under-5 children diagnosed in public health facilities

Number of severe Pneumonia cases among under-5 children admitted to hospital

 

Eastern Cape

1,761

688

 

Free State

357

111

 

Gauteng

1,128

307

 

KwaZulu-Natal

4,050

1,236

 

Limpopo

469

272

 

Mpumalanga

86

123

 

Northern Cape

133

62

 

North West

178

110

 

Western Cape

2,249

751

 

TOTAL SA

10,591

3,660

(c) Number of persons 40 years and older screened for diabetes and number of new persons diagnosed with diabetes reported in 2018 and 2019 (January only) (Data source: DHIS)

(c)(i)

01 January 2018 to 31 December 2018

 

Province

Client 40 years and older screened for diabetes

Diabetes client 40 years and older new

 

Eastern Cape

2,412,674

19,078

 

Free State

697,852

9,157

 

Gauteng

2,908,672

49,485

 

KwaZulu-Natal

5,261,552

18,498

 

Limpopo

2,048,233

15,684

 

Mpumalanga

1,110,747

16,190

 

Northern Cape

176,988

2,423

 

North West

808,038

7,543

 

Western Cape

247,705

9,853

 

TOTAL SA

15,672,461

147,911

(c)(ii)

01 January 2019 (Only)

 

Province

Client 40 years and older screened for diabetes

Diabetes client 40 years and older new

 

Eastern Cape

438,872

4,365

 

Free State

69,307

596

 

Gauteng

259,459

4,680

 

KwaZulu-Natal

499,803

1,301

 

Limpopo

178,356

1,102

 

Mpumalanga

97,935

910

 

Northern Cape

18,421

192

 

North West

79,044

938

 

Western Cape

23,632

772

 

TOTAL SA

1,664,829

14,856

(d)(i)-(ii) According to the pathology-based National Cancer Registry 2014 report total number of cancers diagnosed in South Africa: 75,577.

END.

15 April 2019 - NW763

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 317 on 11 March 2019, what (a) is the total number of public healthcare facilities that were nonoperational in each province as at 1 February 2019 and (b) type of facility is each?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Province

No of facilities

Type of facility

Comments

Eastern Cape

4

  1. Gengqe clinic
  1. Rosedale clinic (12-20) February 2019
  1. Gqeberha clinic

The clinic was under construction for the duration of 2018/19. It was just handed over in March 2019. It will be opened for services in the first quarter of 2019/20

Rosedale clinic was closed for few days by the community.

Gqeberha was closed for few days and was later reopened community protest.

Hellenvale clinic closed due to gangsterism in the area. The safety of the staff and the patients was taken into consideration

Gauteng

7

  1. Orchards Clinic
  1. Florida Clinic
  1. 4th Avenue Clinic
  1. Jeppe Street Clinic
  1. 80th Albert Street Clinic
  1. Joubert Park Clinic
  1. Claremont Clinic

All these clinics in the City of Johannesburg are undergoing major renovations.

Free State

NIL

N/A

 

KwaZulu- Natal

NIL

N/A

 

Limpopo

2

  1. Mogalakwena/Potgietersrus clinic
  1. Naboomspruit clinic

Both these clinics were operating from the houses that were offered by the Municipality. The services were discontinued when the Municipality took their houses back.

The Department had to build Manyoga clinic to continue with the services in Mogalakwena/ Potgietersrus

Mpumalanga

NIL

N/A

 

Northern Cape

2

  1. Olifant’s Hoek Community Health Centre
  1. Wrenchville Clinic

Olifant’s hoek CHC is under major renovation.

Wrenchville clinic was burnt by the community during protests. The contractor is on site for repairs.

North West

5

  1. Boitekong Community Health Centre
  1. Jouberton Community Health Centre
  1. Sun Rise Park clinic
  1. Ramokokastad clinic
  1. Tshiretso clinic
  • Boitekong is undergoing construction. It is due to be opened during the first quarter of 2019/20
  • Jouberton CHC is an old facility which is being replaced with a brand new CHC will be opened during the course of this year.
  • Both Sunrise Park and Ramokoka were burned down during community protest respectively.
  • Tshireletso clinic was closed by the Department of Labour in 2015 and since not been replaced or upgraded.

Western Cape

0

Still waiting for response

N/A

Total

20

   

END.