Questions and Replies

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01 July 2022 - NW2353

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What has been the total number of specialist trained nurses over the past 10 years and (b) where have they been allocated during the specified period?

Reply:

(a) According to the information as received from the South African Nursing Council (SANC) the total number of specialist nurses who completed their studies and registered as nursing specialists over the past 10 years period, is 52 887, as per table below:

Nurse category

Output per year

 

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

2021

Grand Total

Specialist Nurses

5185

6321

4722

6211

6010

5494

4941

5530

3508

4965

52 887

*Statistics obtained from South African Nursing Council

(b) According to the records as drawn from the Persal System on 31 May 2022, the table below indicate the number of nursing specialists appointed in the public service, in each province, over the reporting 10 years period (per financial year):

*Data extracted from the PERSAL System dated 31 May 2022

It is important to inform the Honourable Member that the trend of high number of production of specialist nurses vs low number of appointment (in the public sector) is because of a number of factors but not limited to:

(i) Some nurse specialists are absorbed by the private sector after qualifying as specialists;

(ii) Some nurse specialists especially ICU trained prefer to work for agencies as proven during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic;

(iii) Some nurses underwent training towards non-clinical specialty programs such as Nursing Management and Nursing Education, as a way of preparing themselves for future career prospects when they apply to be managers etc. Incidentally, these two programs are the ones with higher production (see SANC data). It has also been empirically proven that sometimes nurses study for these programs to add bars on their epaulets as each one has a distinct bar, silver and white respectively;  

(iv) Some specialist nurse already employed within an Organization, may study towards a specialty of their choice as part of life-long learning not necessarily to be absorbed within that specialty. As an example, a nurse educator at a college may further pursue studies in Primary Health Care (PHC), so that they can teach PHC in the future but already employed as Specialist (nurse educator); and

(v) Finally, in contrast, another example is psychiatric nurses who decide to study for the Occupational Nursing specialty just out of curiosity but not necessarily to work in an OHS environment.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2336

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

What are the details of the shortage of doctors in rural villages in (i) Limpopo and (ii) the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

Generally, it remains a challenge to recruit health professionals, particularly doctors to underserved and rural areas despite all measures taken by Government to introduce additional emoluments, which amongst others include payment of rural allowance. However, in response to the specific question by the honourable member, the Provincial Departments of Health of Limpopo and Eastern Cape, respectively informed as follows:

(i) Limpopo Department of Health has 12.37% vacancy rate in rural areas.

(ii) Eastern Cape Department of Health has 50-60% vacancy rate in rural areas.

The reason these two Provinces are unable to recruit to their full capacity, amongst others, is because of poor infrastructure, no recreational facilities, lack of medical equipment in those deep rural institutions and the shortage of nurses. The rural allowance is no longer attracting the doctors more especially when they get married. Less chances to specialize like in the Regional Hospitals.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2331

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed of Mrs Erna Jansen van Vuuren (details furnished) who was admitted to the Steve Biko Academic Hospital in Pretoria on Sunday, 22 May 2022, with stage 4 cancer and who died on Wednesday, 25 May 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the reasons that the specified patient was placed in a tent outside the specified hospital when the patient was admitted; (2) whether he has been informed if the patient received sufficient medical treatment during the stay in the tent; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the treatment received; (3) whether he has been informed of the (a) reason that the patient was initially admitted and (b) cause of death; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Yes, I have been informed about the said patient, including why she was admitted I have also been informed that the patient received adequate medical treatment whilst she was in the tent.

I wish to raise my concern regarding exposing patient’s names and conditions I as in the public domain as in the Department of Health we are bound by the patient-doctor confidentiality, however I wish to respond as follow regarding the context of patients being admitted into the tent is as follows:

  • The response to the COVID-19 pandemic at Steve Biko Academic Hospital wanted additional infrastructure to manage the COVID-19 suspected and confirmed patients and limiting risk of exposure to patients who were confirmed to be virologically negative.
  • Tents are well ventilated and fully equipped as wards. This was the immediate response to the then rapidly progressing pandemic, where semi-formal structures were erected.
  • The semi-formal structures added an additional 30 beds to treat the COVID-19 patients and remedy the challenges with space and enabled Steve Biko Academic Hospital to as far as possible, continue with rendering the non-COVID-19’s highly specialised services and not to utilize the regular patient beds to accommodate person under investigations (PUIs).
  • Tents have enabled Steve Biko Academic Hospital to be in the position to successfully manage Priority 1 and Priority 3 COVID-19 suspected patients.
  • As with all patients who had respiratory symptoms, the patient in question presented to Steve Biko Academic Hospital and admitted as a person under investigation (PUI) on the 22/05/22 and was admitted to Ward 8.2, gynaecology ward on the 24/05/22 where the patient subsequently demised on the 25/05/2022 at 11h35min.
  • The details regarding the detailed treatment of the said patient are available and will not presented here as these are deemed confidential as per patient doctor confidentiality.

2. No, I will not make any statement regarding this matter, this to maintain patient-doctor relationship in accordance with health care professionalism. The matter was raised as a complaint and the prescribed complaints management processes were followed. The patient received an optimal treatment for her condition.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2418

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What total number of (a) hospitals and (b) clinics are currently being built by his department in each town and province of the Republic?

Reply:

According to information received from the Provincial Departments of Health through Project management information system, the table below provides a summary of the number of (a) hospitals and (b) clinics that are being built (newly built and upgrades). These facilities are all funded from the Health Facility Revitalisation Grant. It is also imperative to note that these include new and replaced facilities as well as upgrades and additions.

Province

District Municipality

Local Municipality

No of Hospitals being built

No of CHC’s and Clinics being built

Eastern Cape (EC)

Amatole (DC12)

Mbhashe (EC121)

1

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Amatole (DC12)

Raymond Mhlaba (EC129)

2

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

Buffalo City (BUF)

Buffalo City (BUF)

2

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Chris Hani (DC13)

Enoch Mgijima (EC139)

0

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

Joe Gqabi (DC14)

Elundini (EC141)

1

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

Joe Gqabi (DC14)

Senqu (EC142)

0

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

Sarah Baartman (DC10)

Makana (EC104)

0

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

O.R.Tambo (DC15)

Port St Johns (EC154)

1

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Nelson Mandela Bay Metro (NMA)

Nelson Mandela Bay (NMA)

3

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

O.R.Tambo (DC15)

King Sabata Dalindyebo (EC157)

0

1

Eastern Cape (EC)

Alfred Nzo (DC44)

Umzimvubu (EC442)

0

2

Eastern Cape (EC)

Alfred Nzo (DC44)

Matatiele (EC441)

1

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Alfred Nzo (DC44)

Ntabankulu (EC444)

1

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Alfred Nzo (DC44)

Mbizana (EC443)

1

0

Eastern Cape (EC)

Chris Hani (DC13)

Engcobo (EC137)

1

0

Free State (FS)

Thabo Mofutsanyane (DC19)

Maluti a Phofung (FS194)

1

0

Free State (FS)

Thabo Mofutsanyane (DC19)

Dihlabeng (FS192)

0

2

Free State (FS)

Lejweleputswa (DC18)

Tswelopele (FS183)

0

1

Free State (FS)

Fezile Dabi (DC20)

Moqhaka (FS201)

1

2

Free State (FS)

Xhariep (DC16)

Kopanong (FS162)

0

1

Free State (FS)

Lejweleputswa (DC18)

Matjhabeng (FS184)

0

3

Free State (FS)

Mangaung (MAN)

Mangaung (MAN)

1

1

Free State (FS)

Fezile Dabi (DC20)

Mafube (FS205)

0

1

Gauteng (GT)

City of Johannesburg (JHB)

City of Johannesburg (JHB)

1

5

Gauteng (GT)

City of Ekurhuleni (EKU)

City of Ekurhuleni (EKU)

3

2

Gauteng (GT)

City of Tshwane (TSH)

City of Tshwane (TSH)

2

6

Gauteng (GT)

West Rand (DC48)

Mogale City (GT481)

0

4

Gauteng (GT)

West Rand (DC48)

Merafong City (GT484)

0

3

Gauteng (GT)

Sedibeng (DC42)

Emfuleni (GT421)

0

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Ugu (DC21)

Umdoni (KZN212)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

eThekwini (ETH)

eThekwini (ETH)

11

4

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Ugu (DC21)

Ray Nkonyeni (KZN216)

2

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

iLembe (DC29)

KwaDukuza (KZN292)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

King Cetshwayo (DC28)

uMlalazi (KZN284)

2

3

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

King Cetshwayo (DC28)

Nkandla (KZN286)

2

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Zululand (DC26)

Nongoma (KZN265)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

King Cetshwayo (DC28)

uMhlathuze (KZN282)

2

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Zululand (DC26)

Ulundi (KZN266)

2

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Amajuba (DC25)

Newcastle (KZN252)

2

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umgungundlovu (DC22)

The Msunduzi (KZN225)

4

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Harry Gwala (DC43)

Dr Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma (KZN436)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Amajuba (DC25)

Emadlangeni (KZN253)

2

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Harry Gwala (DC43)

Ubuhlebezwe (KZN434)

0

3

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

iLembe (DC29)

Maphumulo (KZN294)

2

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umzinyathi (DC24)

Endumeni (KZN241)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Uthukela (DC23)

Alfred Duma (KZN238)

1

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Harry Gwala (DC43)

Greater Kokstad (KZN433)

2

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Ugu (DC21)

Umzumbe (KZN213)

0

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Zululand (DC26)

eDumbe (KZN261)

0

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umgungundlovu (DC22)

Richmond (KZN227)

0

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Harry Gwala (DC43)

Umzimkhulu (KZN435)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umkhanyakude (DC27)

Big Five Hlabisa (KZN276)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umgungundlovu (DC22)

Mpofana (KZN223)

0

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umzinyathi (DC24)

Msinga (KZN244)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umzinyathi (DC24)

Nqutu (KZN242)

1

2

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Uthukela (DC23)

Inkosi Langalibalele (KZN237)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umgungundlovu (DC22)

uMngeni (KZN222)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Uthukela (DC23)

Okhahlamba (KZN235)

1

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

King Cetshwayo (DC28)

Mthonjaneni (KZN285)

0

1

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Ugu (DC21)

UMuziwabantu (KZN214)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umkhanyakude (DC27)

Umhlabuyalingana (KZN271)

1

0

KwaZulu - Natal (KZ)

Umkhanyakude (DC27)

Jozini (KZN272)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Sekhukhune (DC47)

Elias Motsoaledi (LIM472)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Capricorn (DC35)

Polokwane (LIM354)

2

2

Limpopo (LP)

Capricorn (DC35)

Lepele-Nkumpi (LIM355)

2

0

Limpopo (LP)

Capricorn (DC35)

Blouberg (LIM351)

1

1

Limpopo (LP)

Mopani (DC33)

Ba-Phalaborwa (LIM334)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Waterberg (DC36)

Bela-Bela (LIM366)

0

1

Limpopo (LP)

Waterberg (DC36)

Thabazimbi (LIM361)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Waterberg (DC36)

Mogalakwena (LIM367)

2

1

Limpopo (LP)

Mopani (DC33)

Greater Tzaneen (LIM333)

3

0

Limpopo (LP)

Vhembe (DC34)

Thulamela (LIM343)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Sekhukhune (DC47)

Ephraim Mogale (LIM471)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Vhembe (DC34)

Makhado (LIM344)

2

0

Limpopo (LP)

Waterberg (DC36)

Modimolle/Mookgophong (LIM368)

1

2

Limpopo (LP)

Sekhukhune (DC47)

Greater Tubatse/Fetakgomo (LIM476)

2

0

Limpopo (LP)

Sekhukhune (DC47)

Makhuduthamaga (LIM473)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Mopani (DC33)

Greater Giyani (LIM331)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Vhembe (DC34)

Musina (LIM341)

1

0

Limpopo (LP)

Mopani (DC33)

Greater Letaba (LIM332)

0

1

Mpumalanga (MP)

Nkangala (DC31)

Dr JS Moroka (MP316)

0

1

Mpumalanga (MP)

Ehlanzeni (DC32)

Mbombela (MP326)

1

1

Mpumalanga (MP)

Gert Sibande (DC30)

Msukaligwa (MP302)

0

2

Mpumalanga (MP)

Nkangala (DC31)

Thembisile (MP315)

1

0

North West (NW)

Bojanala Platinum (DC37)

Moses Kotane (NW375)

0

1

North West (NW)

Dr Kenneth Kaunda (DC40)

Maquassi Hills (NW404)

0

1

North West (NW)

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati (DC39)

Greater Taung (NW394)

1

2

North West (NW)

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati (DC39)

Kagisano (NW397)

1

1

North West (NW)

Dr Kenneth Kaunda (DC40)

Ventersdorp/Tlokwe (NW405)

3

3

North West (NW)

Ngaka Modiri Molema (DC38)

Mafikeng (NW383)

3

1

North West (NW)

Bojanala Platinum (DC37)

Local Municipality of Madibeng (NW372)

0

1

North West (NW)

Ngaka Modiri Molema (DC38)

Ramotshere Moiloa (NW385)

0

2

North West (NW)

Bojanala Platinum (DC37)

Moretele (NW371)

0

1

North West (NW)

Ngaka Modiri Molema (DC38)

Ratlou (NW381)

0

2

North West (NW)

Ngaka Modiri Molema (DC38)

Tswaing (NW382)

0

3

North West (NW)

Ngaka Modiri Molema (DC38)

Ditsobotla (NW384)

1

0

North West (NW)

Bojanala Platinum (DC37)

Rustenburg (NW373)

1

0

North West (NW)

Dr Kenneth Kaunda (DC40)

City of Matlosana (NW403)

0

2

Northern Cape (NC)

John Taolo Gaetsewe (DC45)

Ga-Segonyana (NC452)

0

1

Northern Cape (NC)

John Taolo Gaetsewe (DC45)

Joe Morolong (NC451)

0

2

Northern Cape (NC)

Namakwa (DC06)

Richtersveld (NC061)

0

1

Northern Cape (NC)

ZF Mgcawu (DC08)

!Kheis (NC084)

0

1

Northern Cape (NC)

Namakwa (DC06)

Nama Khoi (NC062)

1

0

Western Cape (WC)

City of Cape Town (CPT)

City of Cape Town (CPT)

10

8

Western Cape (WC)

Overberg (DC03)

Theewaterskloof (WC031)

0

2

Western Cape (WC)

Cape Winelands (DC02)

Drakenstein (WC023)

1

3

Western Cape (WC)

Garden Route (DC04)

Kannaland (WC041)

0

1

Western Cape (WC)

Cape Winelands (DC02)

Breede Valley (WC025)

1

2

Western Cape (WC)

Cape Winelands (DC02)

Witzenberg (WC022)

1

0

Western Cape (WC)

Overberg (DC03)

Overstrand (WC032)

1

1

Western Cape (WC)

Garden Route (DC04)

Mossel Bay (WC043)

1

1

Western Cape (WC)

West Coast (DC01)

Saldanha Bay (WC014)

0

3

Western Cape (WC)

Garden Route (DC04)

Knysna (WC048)

0

1

Western Cape (WC)

Central Karoo (DC05)

Laingsburg (WC051)

0

1

Total

 

 

123

140

01 July 2022 - NW2415

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of backlogs on surgeries do hospitals have across the Republic as a result of the delays caused by COVID-19 and (b) steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs?

Reply:

The Provincial Departments of Health provided the information as follows:

a) Table below

Province

Total number of backlogs on surgeries

Eastern Cape

5373

Free State

1923

Gauteng

13433

KwaZulu Natal

Waiting for response

Limpopo

4229

Mpumalanga

190

North West

5531

Northern Cape

Waiting for response

Western Cape

77139

Gauteng Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic hospital,

Charlotte Maxeke Academic hospital,

Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital,

Steve Biko Academic Hospital,

Tembisa Provincial Tertiary Hospital,

Kalafong Provincial Tertiary Hospital,

Rahima Moosa Mother and Child Hospital

Chris Hani Baragwanath

  • There is a plan to purchase 1 boiler or convert existing ones from coal to gas
  • Contractors sourced to repair and maintain tunnel washers
  • Purchasing disposable linen to compensate for the shortfalls
  • Electronic theatre booking system
  • Contractor appointed for repair and maintained Autoclaves
  • Two additional gas sterilizers have been ordered
  • Appointing a dedicated clinical Manager to oversee all 46 theatre efficiencies
  • Washing linen outside (privately) or using Masakhane, Danswart, Edenvale Laundry services, etc.
  • From the local DID information, the plans are aligned with the presentation

Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital

  • District outreach surgical teams provide services once a week per quarter and spent time in a district conducting various surgeries utilising all hospitals (Rural Health Matters campaign).
  • A team of volunteers (orthopaedics and anaesthetics) from other provinces form part of the outreach teams.
  • Through the National Health Insurance Grant, public patients are taken to accredited private service providers (hospitals) where surgery is conducted as part of addressing the surgical backlog.

Dr George Mukhari Academic hospital

  • In- and outreach activities for procedures that can be done at a lower level of care will be planned once our Covid numbers are declining on a regular basis.
  • Surgical department’s theatre allocations have been reduced due to the shortage of staff. Surgical bookings and scheduled operations are cancelled, and the ones admitted are postponed and have to wait longer for their operations in the ward.
  • Theatre has 14 posts in-active: 4 vacant consultant posts and 6 registrar post (Maternity) and 4 vacant medical officer posts (Interviewed April and awaiting appointment).
  • Outreach is only done if the cluster hospital allocates the anaesthetist otherwise the bookings will be cancelled.

Steve Biko Academic hospital

  • Utilizing other facilities within the cluster for procedure appropriate to each hospital

Tembisa hospital

  • Resumed all Elective Surgery post COVID waves/ surge
  • Re-purposed and re-allocated COVID Theatre back to General surgery, and re-allocated a second theatre for Ophthalmology
  • We also re-purposed COVID wards to increase post-operative care space
  • Conducted Cataract Blitz for a week (25-29 October 2021) and achieved a total of 74 cataract operations
  • Allocated extra theatre on Fridays for Urology
  • Renovation of Burn’s Theatre to increase the number of functional theatres
  • Allocated an extra Community Service Medical Officer for Anaesthesia

Kalafong hospital

  • Dedicate specific “catch-up” days e.g., surgical cataract marathons in Ophthalmology.
  • Additional Orthopaedics list on Fridays.
  • Weekly Urology, ENT, Ophthalmology lists.
  • Optimization of theatre utilization in collaboration with cluster hospitals (Pretoria West District Hospital).
  • Constant supervision on change over times in between cases not to be more than 10 minutes, thereby improving the efficiency.
  • Rescheduling of elective surgeries; Planning to increase High Care Unit beds;
  • Beefing up of human resource through sessional appointments for specialists and nursing agencies for nurses.

Rahima Moosa Hospital

  • Theatre time allocating for the year organized in blitz weeks.
  • Workable additional plant to operate at Yusuf Dadoo and South Rand Hospital requires appointment of medical officers in surgery and anaesthesia for mobile teams to these institutions.

Limpopo Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Letaba,

Mokopane,

Philadelphia

St Ritas

Tshilidzini

Mankweng

Pietersburg

  • District outreach surgical teams provide services once a week per quarter and spent time in a district conducting various surgeries utilising all hospitals (Rural Health Matters campaign).
  • A team of volunteers (orthopaedics and anaesthetics) from other provinces form part of the outreach teams.
  • Through the National Health Insurance Grant, public patients are taken to accredited private service providers (hospitals) where surgery is conducted as part of addressing the surgical backlog.
  • Lists of patients are coordinated by the tertiary hospitals that have the overall information on patients that need surgery.

Mpumalanga Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Rob Ferreira

Witbank

Mapulaneng

Themba

Ermelo

  • The hospitals have rescheduled all non-emergency operations.
  • The suspension of operating non-emergency cases was lifted, and operations are back to normal.
  • Shortage of specialists however also contribute to the backlog.
  • The tertiary hospitals conduct outreach service where minor orthopaedic operations in the district hospitals are performed.

Northwest Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Klerksdorp/Tshepong

Job Shimankana Tabane

Mafikeng Provincial

Joe Morolong Memorial

Potchefstroom

  • Implementation of surgical blitz
  • Providing theatre services during the weekends and extended hours to reduce backlogs
  • Utilization of all available theatres to improve efficiency
  • Public/Private partnership where it is feasible

Free State Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Universitas

Pelonomi

Dihlabeng

Bongani

  • Monthly monitoring of waiting time
  • Marathons arranged if department notices backlog
  • Patient education to ensure patients show up for appointments
  • A team on call for emergency theatres
  • Sometimes using theatre at private hospitals
  • Recruitment of additional staff
  • Increase of theatre time
  • Prioritizing according to severity or quality of life
  • Conducting Blitz over weekends
  • Outreach to district hospitals

Eastern Cape Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

Livingstone hospital

Port Elizabeth Provincial hospital

Frere Hospital

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

Dora Nginza hospital

Frontier hospital

 

Western Cape Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Alan Blyth Hospital

Beaufort West

BreedeValey

Caledon

Ceres

Citrusdarl

Clanwilliam

Eerste River

False Bay

George

Groote Schuur

Helderberg

Hermanus

Karl Bremer

Khayelitsha

Knysna

Laingsburg

Mitchells Plain

Montagu

Mossel Bay

Murraysburg

New Somerset

Otto du Plessis

Oudtshoorn

Paarl

Prince Albert

Red Croos War Memorial Children

Riversdale

Robertson

Stellenbosch

Swartland

Swellendam

Tygerburg

Victoria

Vredenburg

Vredendal

Wesfleur

Worcester

Operations increased by dedicated budget increase and efficiency gains

KZN NATAL State Province

Hospital Name

(b)What steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs

 

Madadeni Hospital

King Edward Hospital

RK Khan Hospital

IALCH

Ngwelezana Hospital

Port Shepstone Regional

Murchison Hospital

GJ Crookes Hospital

Grey’s Hospital

Harry Gwala Regional Hospital

Northdale Hospital

Manguzi Hospital

Mosvold Hospital

Ladysmith Regional Hospital

  • Catch up has been done by increasing theatre times
  • Elective slates done over the weekend to catch up. Camps have also been planned
  • Increase theatre times
  • Use after hours to reduce backlog
  • Elective theatre slates run even after hours
  • Electives commenced in 2021
  • Emergencies are given priority
  • Maximum utilization of theatres with added slates on weekends.
  • Weekend camps are planned

The hospital is increasing theatre time. Additional days added

  • Weekend cataract camps held to reduce the backlog
  • Additional half day theatre planned for every Thursday
  • No waiting for emergencies or malignancies as these were all done under emergency slates. No new dates given but electives are called back according to priority and bed availability.
  • For GIT procedures i.e. endoscopy and colonoscopy- are limited to emergencies only, e.g. GI bleeds, malignancy and selected elective cases after discussion with a specialist.
  • There is a plan to conduct a marathon (i.e. request for 2 theatres to do only elective cases)
  • Theatre time increased

Information from NC still outstanding.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2374

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1457 on 13 May 2022, he has received the information from the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date will he furnish Mr M S F de Freitas with the information?

Reply:

According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, the tables below reflect the details in this regard:

  1.  
  2.  
  3.  

1. With reference to the South Rand Hospital in (a) each of the past three financial years and (b) the current financial year, what was the (i) allocated budget and expenditure, (ii) average expenditure in each month for water, electricity, security and security services, food and catering services, maintenance and upgrades, cleaning services, medical, consumables and disposables and (iii)(aa) maximum bed capacity and (bb) average bed occupancy in each month;

2. what is the (a) staff complement currently in each department of the hospital and (b) total number of posts that are unfilled currently in each department?

  1. (a)       The tables below reflect the details in this regard.

            (b)       (iii)       (aa)     Maximum bed capacity of the hospital is 278.

                                    (bb)     Average bed occupancy is 60% because of reduced COVID-19 admissions.

(2)       (a)-(b) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

 

Department

(a)

Staff complement currently

(b)

Posts that are unfilled

Executive Management

7

1

Administration Staff

76

3

Medical Staff

45

2

Clinical Support Staff

52

0

Nursing Staff

332

7

Support Services

137

2

Hospital Board members

5

0

Total

657

15

 

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2354

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Given that a few years ago the Tambo Memorial Hospital in Boksburg was deemed unfit for human habitation and an occupational health hazard, what are the reasons that the specified building is still being used; (2) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with the 2017 Health and Safety Report of the specified hospital; if not, why not; if so, by what date; (3) given that some portions of the hospital still have asbestos buildings and noting that the structural damages are worrisome, (a) how are the specified issues being addressed and (b) by what date will the hospital either (i) be moved to an alternative site and/or (ii) start with infrastructural maintenance projects?

Reply:

1. The province is aware of the bad infrastructural condition that the Tambo Memorial hospital is in and had embarked on a feasibility study with the intention of revitalizing the entire facility. Initially the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health (GPDOH) wanted to construct two new facilities, a 350 bed District Hospital, and 800 bed Tertiary Hospital respectively on different sites. However, the Gauteng Department of Infrastructure Development (GDID) currently has no land (site) allocated for both facilities. Following the peer review meetings of July 2016, it was decided that the Tambo Memorial will now be a single 600 bed Regional Hospital, but no site was available. The Peer Review Committee in August 2017 proposed the decanting and diversion of critical services and demolish the existing facility to build on current site. The City of Ekurhuleni (COE) was tasked to assist with Identification of a suitable site. The City of Ekurhuleni was also requested to assist in identifying and donating any suitable nearby land (Around 30 000 and 40 000m2). During a meeting held between MEC of GDID and MEC of GPDOH on 14 June 2018, it was decided that this project will only proceed to construction once the financial position of the department improves.

2. There is an amount of R40 million that has been allocated under the Provincial Equitable Share funding for the Major Refurbishments of the facility as well as the OHS Compliance Services. This project is still on the early stages on planning.

3. In terms of the maintenance, there is also a maintenance and repairs project that is underway and has been allocated a budget of R13 million for 2022/23 financial year. Subsequent to that there is an allocation of R1 million that has been allocated for the installation of a 500kva generator which has already been installed on the 04/11/2021.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2352

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the total number of hospitals in the Republic, (b)(i) number of the total number of hospitals have psychiatric units and (ii) percentage of the hospitals have psychiatric units (aa) nationally and (bb) provincially and (c) total number of beds are available for mental health patients (i) nationally and (ii) provincially, detailing a breakdown of such hospitals in each province?

Reply:

(a) 357;

b) According to the Provincial Departments of Health, Table 1 below reflects the situation in this regard.

(i) There are 44 hospitals that have psychiatric inpatient units.

(ii) (aa) 12.3% of hospitals that have psychiatric inpatient units nationally

(bb) The percentage of hospitals that have inpatient units provincially is shown below on Table 1.

Table 1:

Province

(a) total number of hospitals in the Republic

(b)(i) hospitals that have psychiatric units

(b)(ii) Percentage of the hospitals that have psychiatric units (b/a *100)

Eastern Cape

63

3

4.7%

Free State

31

2

6%

Gauteng

37

9

24.3%

Kwa-Zulu

72

10

14%

Limpopo

40

9

22,5%

Mpumalanga

29

3

10.3%

Northwest

19

2

10.5%

Northern Cape

14

0

0%

Western Cape

52

6

11.5%

South Africa

357

44

12.3%

(i) There are 14004 total number of beds are available for mental health patients and

(ii) Provincially as shown on the Table 2 below.

Table 2

Province

Total beds

Eastern Cape

1816

Free State

927

Gauteng

2478

KwaZulu-Natal

3028

Limpopo

1569

Mpumalanga

329

North West

1446

Northern Cape

344

Western Cape

2067

National Total

14004

1. EASTERN CAPE PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

1. Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

-

50

-

2. Umthata Hospital

-

60

-

3. Dora Nginza Hospital

-

39

-

4. Elizabeth Donkin Psychiatric Hospital

163

-

-

5. Fort England

313

-

-

6. Komani

440

-

-

7. Tower

400

-

-

8. Mount Ayliff

-

-

2

9. Madzikane KwaZulu (Mary Theresa)

-

-

2

10. St Elizabeth

-

-

2

11. Holy cross

-

-

2

12. St Patrick

-

-

2

13. Canzibe

-

-

2

14. Bambisana

-

-

5

15. Taylor Bequest Hospital Matatiele)

-

-

12

16. St Lucy’s

-

-

2

17. Zitulele

-

-

2

18. Madwaleni

-

-

2

19. Tafalofefe

-

-

2

20. Bisho

-

-

32

21. Butterworth

-

-

2

22. Victoria

-

-

10

23. Fort Beaufort Provincial

-

-

2

24. S.S Gida

-

-

13

25. All Saints

-

-

2

26. Frontier

-

-

40

27. Hewu

-

-

10

28. Glengrey

-

-

23

29. Cala

-

-

2

30. Cofimvaba

-

-

2

40. Cradock

-

-

2

41. Empilisweni

-

-

8

42. Aliwal North

-

-

2

43. Nompumelelo

-

-

2

44. Settlers

-

-

28

45. Port Alfred

-

-

18

46. Midland

-

-

2

47. Andries Vosloo

-

-

2

48. Humansdorp

-

-

2

49. Dora Nginza

-

-

30

50. Uitenhage

-

-

40

51. Livingstone

-

-

40

Total

1316

149

351

2. FREE STATE PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

         

1. Free State Psychiatric Complex

760

-

-

 

2. Mofumahadi Manapo Mopeli

-

30

-

 

3. Boitumelo Hospital

-

47

-

 

4. Diamant district hospital

-

-

2

 

5. Embekweni district hospital

-

-

2

 

6. Stoffel Coetzee district hospital

-

-

2

 

7. Tromsburg/Albert Nzula hospital

-

-

2

 

8. Botshabelo district hospital

-

-

2

 

9. Dr J.S Moroka district hospital

-

-

2

 

10. Pelonomi regional hospital

-

-

2

 

11. National Hospital

-

-

12

 

12. Univesitas central hospital

-

-

0

 

13. Bongani regional hospital

-

-

18

 

14. Katlehong district hospital

-

-

2

 

15. Thusanong district hospital

-

-

2

 

16. Mohau district hospital

-

-

2

 

17. Winburg district hospital

-

-

2

 

18. Nala district hospital

-

-

2

 

19. Mafube district hospital

-

-

2

 

20. Parys district hospital

-

-

2

 

21. Metsimaholo (Fezi Ngubentombi)district hospital

-

-

10

 

22. Tokollo district hospital

-

-

2

 

23. Elizabeth Ross district hospital

-

-

2

 

24. Phekolong district hospital

-

-

2

 

25. Phutoloha district hospital

-

-

2

 

26. J.D Newberry district hospital

-

-

2

 

27. Thebe district hospital

-

-

2

 

28. Itemoheleng district hospital

-

-

2

 

29. Dihlabeng regional hospital

-

-

2

 

30. Nketoane district hospital

-

-

2

 

31. Mantsopa district hospital

-

-

2

 

32. Phumelela district hospital

-

-

2

 

Total

760

77

90

 

3. GAUTENG PROVINCE

Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Specialized Psychiatric Hospital

Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

         

Weskoppies Hospital

732

 

 

 

Sterkfontein Hospital

585

 

 

 

Tara H. Moss Hospital

141

 

 

 

Cullinan Care & Rehabilitation Centre

300

 

 

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital

 

165

 

 

Charlotte Maxeke Academic Hospital

 

40

 

 

Dr George Mukhari Academic Hospital

 

48

 

 

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

 

20

 

 

Helen Joseph Tertiary Hospital

 

30

 

 

Tembisa Tertiary Hospital

 

30

 

 

Kalafong Tertiary Hospital

 

 

20

 

Leratong Regional Hospital

 

40

 

 

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

 

20

 

 

Kopanong District Hospital

 

30

 

 

Pholosong Regional Hospital

 

 

24

 

Tambo Memorial Regional Hospital

 

 

26

 

Mamelodi Regional Hospital

 

 

28

 

Sebokeng Regional Hospital

 

 

30

 

Jubilee District Hospital

 

 

50

 

Bheki Mlangeni District Hospital

 

 

30

 

South Rand District Hospital

 

 

32

 

Pretoria West District Hospital

 

 

15

 

Bertha Gxowa District Hospital

 

 

8

 

Carletonville District Hospital

 

 

8

 

Dr Yusuf Dadoo District Hospital

 

 

8

 

Odi District

 

 

12

 

Heidelberg District Hospital

 

 

6

 

Provincial total

1758

423

297

 

4. KWA ZULU-NATAL PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

         

1. Ekuhlengeni

884

-

-

 

2. Fort Napier

370

-

-

 

3. Townhill

280

-

-

 

4. Umngeni

464

-

-

 

5. Umzimkhulu

320

-

-

 

6. King (Dinuzulu) George V

-

68

-

 

7. Ladysmith Hospital

-

10

-

 

8. Port Shepston Hospital

-

32

-

 

9. the St. Benedictine

-

-

15

 

30. GJ Crooks

-

-

8

 

31. Northdale

-

-

10

 

32. Edendale

-

15

   

33. Church of Scotland

-

-

20

 

34. Charles Johnson

-

-

17

 

35. Dr Prixley Ka Seme

-

26

   

36. Vryheid

-

-

15

 

37. Murchison Hospital

-

-

12

 

38. St Francis

-

-

16

 

39. Greytown Hospital

-

-

11

 

40. Estcourt

-

-

12

 

41. Stanger (General Justice Gizenga Mpanza)

-

20

   

42. Umphumulo

-

-

2

 

43. Addington

-

 

20

 

44. KE VIII

-

20

   

45. RK Khan

-

20

   

46. Prince Mshiyeni

-

25

   

47. Mahatma Gandhi

-

-

18

 

48. Wentworth

-

-

8

 

49. Madadeni

250

     

50. Hillcrest

-

-

10

 

51. Ngwelezane Hospital

-

30

-

 

Total

2568

266

194

 

5. LIMPOPO PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

1.Botlokwa

-

-

10

2.Mankweng

-

20

 

3.F W Knobel

-

-

2

4.Seshego

-

-

16

5.Lebowakgomo

-

-

19

6.Zebediela

-

-

4

7.Polokwane

-

-

10

8.Helena Franz

-

-

14

9.Thabamoopo

500

-

 

10.C N Phathudi

-

-

10

11.Evuxakeni

354

-

 

12.Kgapane

-

-

14

13.Letaba

-

40

 

14.Maphuta-Malatji

-

-

20

15.Nkhensani

-

15

-

16.Sekororo

-

-

8

17.Van Velden

-

-

1

18.Matlala

-

15

 

19.Groblersdaal

-

-

2

20.Philadelphia

-

-

20

21.Dilokong

-

-

15

22.Mecklenburg

-

-

2

23.St Ritas

-

-

12

24.Jane Furse

-

 

12

25.Donald Fraser

-

36

 

26.Elim

-

40

 

27.Hayani

250

-

 

28.Louis Trichardt

-

-

0

29.Malamulele

-

16

 

30.Messina

-

-

4

31.Siloam

-

30

-

32.Tshilidzini

-

13

-

33.George Masebe

-

-

12

34.F H Odendaal

-

-

4

35.Warmbad

-

-

5

36.Thabazimbi

-

-

4

37.Ellisrus

-

-

3

38.Witpoort

-

-

2

39.Mokopane

-

-

24

40.Voortrekker

-

-

4

Total

1104

212

253

6. MPUMALANGA PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

1.Witbank

-

26

12

2. Rob Ferreira

-

30

10

3. Tintswalo

-

50

10

4. Tonga

-

-

10

5. Themba

-

-

27

6. Matikwane

-

-

8

7. Mapulaneng

-

-

4

8. Sabie

-

-

6

9. Matibidi

-

-

5

10. Barberton

-

-

6

11. Lydenburg

-

-

4

12. Embhuleni

-

-

20

13. Carolina

-

-

2

14. Ermelo

-

-

8

15. Standerton

-

-

12

16. Elsie Ballot

-

-

4

17. Amajuba

-

-

6

18. Bethal

-

-

6

19. Piet Retief

-

-

6

20. Evander

-

-

4

21. HA Grove

-

-

4

22. Waterval Boven

-

-

2

23. Middelburg

-

-

8

24. Impungwe

-

-

4

25. Kwamhlanga

-

-

12

26. Bernice Samuel

-

-

3

27. Mmamethlake

-

-

8

28. Shongwe

-

-

12

Total

0

106

223

7. NORTHWEST

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

1. Bophelong

384

-

-

2.Witrand

(Profound intellectual disability services)

982

-

-

3.Taung hospital

-

20

-

4.Job- Shimankana Tabane

-

60

-

5.Klerksdorp / Tshepong

-

-

30

6.Mahikeng Provincial

-

-

46

7.Potchefstroom

-

-

11

Total

1366

80

 

8. NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

         

1. Kimberly Mental Health

287

-

 -

 

2. Kuruman Hospital

-

-

5

 

3. Tshwaragano Hospital

-

-

9

 

4. Calvinia

-

-

2

 

5. Springbok Hospital

-

-

2

 

6. De Aar

-

-

2

 

7. Prieska

-

-

2

 

8. Manne Dipico Hospital

-

-

2

 

9. Harry Surtie Hospital

-

-

8

 

10. Kakamas Hospital

-

-

2

 

11. Postmasburg Hospital

-

-

2

 

12. Connie Voster Hospital

-

-

2

 

13. Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe

-

-

15

 

14. Prof ZK Matthews

-

-

2

 

15. Hartswater Hospital

-

-

2

 

Total

287

 

57

 

9. WESTERN CAPE PROVINCE

(c) Hospital Name

Total number of beds are available for mental health patients

 

Standalone Psychiatric Hospital

Designated Mental Health Inpatient Units

72hr Assessment Facilities

         

1. Alexandra - intellectual disability

300

-

 -

 

2. Lentegeur - General Adult psychiatry, Intellectual Disability and Forensics

690

-

-

 

3. Stikland - General Adult Psychiatry, Psychogeriatrics and Detox

423

-

   

4. Valkenberg - General Adult Psychiatry and Forensics

391

-

   

5.Mitchell’s Plain

   

44

 

6. Khayelitsha

-

-

55

 

7. Helderberg

-

-

12

 

8. Karl Bremer

-

-

36

 

9. Eerste River

-

-

30

 

10. Falsebay

-

-

9

 

11. Victoria

-

-

15

 

12. Somerset

-

-

32

 

13. Worcester

-

24

   

14. Paarl

-

30

   

15. George

-

12

   

16. Tygerberg

-

42

   

17. Groote Schuur

 

25

30

 

Total

1804

 133

263

 

The Mental Health Care Act provides for designation of specialized standalone psychiatric hospitals and inpatient units/wards attached to general hospitals, which are also referred to as designated psychiatric hospitals. This is a concurrent function of the National Director-General of Health and the Provincial Heads of Departments.

The Act further provides for a list of health establishments to conduct 72-hours assessment for involuntary mental health care, with designated beds for this purpose. Other general hospitals render 72-hours assessment in medical wards as there are no dedicated beds for this service in those hospitals. This is the prerogative of the Provincial Heads of Departments. The list above provides only health establishments that have dedicated beds for 72 hours assessment services.

END.

01 July 2022 - NW2342

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the current maintenance budget of his department for public health facilities, (b) has been the (i) budget allocated by his department for each province targeted towards maintenance and (ii) expenditure of public health facilities for each province and (c) is the detailed breakdown of such (i) budgets and (ii) expenditure for each public health facility throughout the Republic?

Reply:

(a)-(b) According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the Table below provides the details in this regard, regarding the 2022/23 maintenance allocations per province:

c) The attached Annexure A – covers (c) (i) and (ii) questions regarding the breakdown of maintenance budget and expenditure per facility and per province.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2332

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he will indicate (a) what the current status of availability is of (i) resources and (ii) the capacity to roll out the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) and (b) if state hospitals and clinics, with their current challenges of shortages of doctors, nurses, medicine, equipment and infrastructure challenges, can indeed be seen as a favourable environment for the implementation of the NHI; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

It is important to recognise that reforms of the magnitude anticipated in the NHI Bill need to be phased in over time. For that reason, the transitional arrangements in section 57 of the Bill state:

57(1) (b) National Health Insurance must be gradually phased in using a progressive and programmatic approach based on financial resource availability.

And subsection (2) elaborates that Phase 1 will:

  1. continue with the implementation of health system strengthening initiatives, including alignment of human resources with that which may be required by users of the Fund;
  2. include the development of National Health Insurance legislation and amendments to other legislation;
  3. include the undertaking of initiatives which are aimed at establishing institutions that must be the foundation for a fully functional Fund; and
  4. include the purchasing of personal health care services for vulnerable groups such as children, women, people with disabilities and the elderly;

The NHI Bill (and the Fund that it seeks to establish) will not replace the National Health Act of 2003 although it will amend several sections as listed in the first Schedule.

1. Bearing the context in mind it must be noted that the current status and availability of resources and capacity are only a starting point.

a) (i) The resources available for the establishment of the reformed health system where providers are paid by the Fund are the current resources of the entire public and private health sectors. This includes all health establishments, personnel and technologies currently in use.

(ii) The capacity to roll out the reforms described in the NHI Bill starts with the commitment and stewardship of Parliament to improving the health system for all. The leadership will be provided by the National Department of Health. To this end the Minister of Public Service and Administration has approved a special transitional NHI Branch in the NDOH to serve as the incubator for the Schedule 3A entity. The five clusters, and the nucleus of 44 new posts to be added to the existing 40 posts, are funded through earmarked funding from National Treasury. The reorganisation of the Branch and the preparations for the advertisement of the new posts have commenced.

The remaining Branches in the National Department of Health are all focussed on providing leadership and direction on the anticipated reforms.

In addition to this is provincial management lead by the nine provincial HoDs for Health plus renewed support from many donor partners.

There are many private sector providers that engage with the department and [provide support to various committees and structures involved in the reform.

b) The state of public hospitals and clinics varies widely from immaculate to extremely poor. The department maintains an infrastructure condition assessment and all provinces submit User Asset Management Plans (UAMPS) annually as required by the Government Immoveable Asset Management Act (GIAMA). There is a quality improvement programme in nineteen locations covering over 100 establishments as we have reported to the house in the recent past. Private establishments also vary in their condition.

The health system suffers from shortages of professional personnel in all categories as we have reported to this house. The biggest challenge is the inequitable distribution of personnel but there are nominal shortages. The public sector budgets allocated for Conditions of Employment are fully committed so there is extremely limited room for recruitment of additional personnel. It is for this reason that the NHI envisages a ‘universal’ system for everyone in the country where the NHI Fund purchases services from both public and private providers.

2. Yes, The Minister is prepared to make a statement.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2314

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What immediate measures have been put in place to provide assistance to the Life Chatsmed Garden Hospital in Durban, which caught fire on 5 June 2022?

Reply:

The Life Chatsmed Garden Hospital is a private hospital in Durban. We are informed by the management of the Hospital that there were no patients transferred to any of our Public health facilities following the fire incident. Instead injured patients were transferred to other private facilities.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2271

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) amount has been paid by his department for the purchase of (i) office furniture, (ii) beds, (iii) medication, (iv) bed linen and blankets and (v) pillows and pillow cases in the (aa) past three financial years and (bb) since 1 January 2022 by the South Rand Hospital in Johannesburg, (b) is the value of each item in each financial year and (c) informs the decision to purchase the specified items in each financial year?

Reply:

According to the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health, the following details provide the responses in this regard:

a)

South Rand Hospital

 (aa)

 (bb) 

 

 2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Since 1 January 2022

Office furniture

R233 565,00

R770 508,50

R424 499,50

R0.00

Beds

R993 268,93

R2 764 455,72

R3 122 868,00

R0.00

Medication

R10 164 376,93

R13 292 299,42

R12 498 823,64

R5 669 243,48

Bedlinen and blankets

R221 425,00

R39 600,00

R0.00

R868 544

Pillow and pillow cases

R85 300,00

R20 520,00

R0.00

R67 820

 

 (b)      Value of each item in each financial year

 

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

Office furniture

R1 717,39

R965,55

R5 306,24

Beds

R7 699,76

R13 290,65

R31 228,68

Medicatio

An average value for medication will not yield an accurate figure due to the types of medication purchased, to maintain minimum medicines stock available

Bedlinen and blankets

R260,50

R330,00

None

Pillow and pillow cases

R289,15

R190,00

None

 

(c)        The decision to purchase is informed as follows:

 

 2019/20

 2022/21

 2021/22

Office furniture

Replacement after been worn out

Replacement after been worn out

Replacement after been worn out

Beds

Replacement of old un-adjustable high beds and broken beds with new high-low beds

Replacement of old un-adjustable high beds and broken beds with new high-low beds

Replacement of old un-adjustable high beds and broken beds with new high-low beds

Medication

To keep minimum stock available

Bedlinen and blankets

Replacement after been worn out

Replacement after been worn out

None purchased

Pillow and pillow cases

Replacement after been worn out

Replacement after been worn out

None purchased

24 June 2022 - NW2324

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of medico-legal cases were lodged against his department in the past two financial years and (b) is the total cost to his department for such cases?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the following details provide responses to these questions:

(a)-(b) The following tables reflect the details in this regard

2020/21 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEDICO-LEGAL CASES LODGED AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL COST TO THE DEPARTMENT, POTENTIALLY

Eastern Cape

361 Cases

R4 095 828 952.00

Free State

72 Cases

R 744 220 990.29

Gauteng

80 Cases

R 958 735 433,55

Kwazulu- Natal

256 Cases

R2 652 163 923.10

Limpopo

215 Cases

R1 709 116 099.00

Mpumalanga

117 Cases

R1 117 605 000.00

Northern Cape

15 Cases

R 531 716 811.04

North West

61 Cases

R 325 119 700.00

Western Cape

62 Cases

R 527 000 000.00

TOTALS

878 Cases

R8,591,051,276.41

2021/22 FINANCIAL YEAR

NAME OF THE PROVINCE

TOTAL NUMBER OF MEDICO-LEGAL CASES LODGED AGAINST THE DEPARTMENT

TOTAL COST TO THE DEPARTMENT, POTENTIALLY

Eastern Cape

379 cases

R4 542 556.761.00

Free State

52 cases

R 446 981 920.00

Gauteng

107 cases

R 974 802 814.21

Kwazulu- Natal

204 cases

R1 885 019 875.00

Limpopo

277 cases

R2 452 118 059.00

Mpumalanga

142 cases

R 1 427 477 670.00

Northern Cape

20 cases

R 326 816 465.00

North West

64 Cases

R 379 378 957.00

Western Cape

77 cases

R 806 000 000.00

TOTALS

866 Cases

R13,241,152,521.21

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2144

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of incidents of (i) rape, (ii) sexual assault and (iii) physical assault have been reported by medical staff in (aa) private and (bb) public health facilities in the past three financial years, (b) is the breakdown of the incidents in each province, (c) is the total number of allegations that have resulted in (i) dismissal and/or (ii) non-dismissal in the specified period and (d) what were the outcomes of all investigations that were reported?

Reply:

In accordance with information received from Provincial Departments of Health (excluding Gauteng and Northern Cape), the table below outlines the number of cases reported in the Public Health Sector. Unfortunately, information as received from Provinces does not provide details of each case and progress made on investigations. Therefore, letters have since been written to Provincial Departments of Health to provide such information where possible, without jeopardising investigations and the individuals concerned:

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 EASTERN CAPE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

 DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

0

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 FREE STATE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

1

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 MPUMALANGA

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

 

2019/20

0

0

0

DISMISSAL

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 NORTH WEST

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

1

0

N/A

2020/21

0

1

0

N/A

2021/22

0

0

0

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

FINANCIAL YEAR

NATURE OF INCIDENT

OUT COME

 WESTERN CAPE

RAPE

SEXUAL ASSAULT

PHYSICAL ASSAULT

DISMISSAL

2019/20

0

0

0

N/A

2020/21

0

0

0

N/A

2021/22

0

8

2

N/A

 

 

 

 

 

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2252

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of psychiatric (a) patients are currently in need of care and (b) beds are currently available in the (i) public and (ii) private sector; (2) what (a) total number of psychiatric specialists are in the public sector and (b) is the vacancy rate for such specialists; (3) what is the (a) total number of psychiatric specialists, (b) breakdown of the specified number of psychiatric specialists in each province, (c) vacancy rate in each province and (d) current ratio of psychiatric specialists to the population?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the following details provide the responses to the above questions:

1. (a) Based on the prevalence of mental disorders in South Africa, it is estimated that 6 566 703 persons need care for common mental disorders and 1 292 991 of those aged 15 years and older need care for severe psychiatric conditions.

(b) (i) There are 14060 beds in the public sector and (ii) 5692 in the private sector.

(2)-(3) The table below indicate the breakdown of psychiatric specialist in each province (Public Sector) with the vacancy rate:

PSYCHOLOGIST PUBLIC SECTOR

Province

Filled

Vacant

Total

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

2

10

12

83.33

Free State

4

4

8

50.00

Kwazulu-Natal

35

14

49

28.57

Limpopo

6

29

35

82.86

Mpumalanga

3

12

15

80.00

Northern Cape

2

4

6

66.67

North-West

41

6

47

12.77

Western cape

99

1

100

1.00

Grand Total

451

187

638

29.31

The current ration of psychiatric specialist to the population breakdown per provinces reflected below:

POPULATION PER PROVINCE (PUBLIC SECTOR RATIO)

Province

Population

Total Psychologists

Ratio to population

Eastern Cape

6,676,590

2

1: 3338295

Free State

2,932,441

4

1: 733110

Kwazulu-Natal

11,513,575

35

1: 328959

Limpopo

5,926,724

11

1: 538793

Mpumalanga

4,743,584

3

1: 1581194

Northern Cape

1,303,047

2

1: 651523

North-West

4,122,854

41

1: 100557

Western cape

7,113,776

99

1: 71856

Grand Total

60,142,979

 

 

       

STATSSA:

https://www.statssa.gov.za/publications/P0302/P03022021.pdf

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2241

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with reference to media reports that a former employee of the Eastern Cape Department of Health allegedly forged her matric certificate to secure a job as a senior data capturer and that the specified person is currently facing charges of fraud in the Mthatha Specialised Crimes Court, he will furnish Ms M D Hlengwa with the details on the steps undertaken by his department, in collaboration with the provincial department of health, to confirm the authenticity of prospective employees’ qualifications; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The allegation of submission of fraudulent matric certificate by an employee at Cofimvaba Hospital in the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health as investigated by the Fraud Management Unit is confirmed. However, the employee concerned has since resigned and the matter reported to South African Police Services (SAPS) for further handling.

The employee has since been arrested and the case has been reminded to the month of August 2022 in the Mthatha Specialized Crimes Court.

In order to avert such mishaps in the future, The Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health has since issued a Departmental Operations Manual that emphasises that Managers must confirm the authenticity of prospective employees’ qualifications prior to their employment.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2155

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) are the backlogs in terms of postmortems in each province, (b) are the causes of the specified backlogs and (c) steps have been taken to deal with the backlogs; (2) how long does it take to compile a report for a postmortem; (3) how long does it take to complete a general postmortem; (4) (a) what total number of reports are outstanding at the forensic chemistry laboratories in terms of postmortem requirements, (b) for how long have such reports been outstanding and (c) what is the cause of the delay?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with Provincial Departments of Health to finalise this information and the Minister will provide a full response as soon as the required information is received from the provinces.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2156

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What total (i) amount was spent on the Gauteng field intensive care hospitals and (ii) number of the specified hospitals were built and (b) at what cost was each hospital built; (2) what (a) total number of the hospitals were not completed, (b) are the reasons for their incompletion and (c) number of the specified hospitals are currently operational; (3) what are the names of the companies that submitted a tender for the building of each hospital; (4) (a) what consequence management has been implemented as a result of incomplete projects and (b) who has been fired and/or received disciplinary hearings as a result of unfinished hospitals?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with the Gauteng Provincial Department of Health to finalise this information and the Minister will provide a full response as soon as the required information is received from the Province.

END.

24 June 2022 - NW2417

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Noting that the National Health Insurance (NHI) does not have an arrangement that will focus on improving and/or developing infrastructure of health facilities in the Republic, (a) what plans and/or measures has he put in place to ensure that infrastructure of public facilities is improved and/or developed prior and/or during the NHI and (b) how will improving infrastructure of public facilities be planned, catered and paid for under the NHI?

Reply:

The NHI Bill (and the Fund that it seeks to establish) will not replace the National Health Act of 2003 although it will amend several sections as listed in the first Schedule. The reforms do not replace the budget process nor the public works and other infrastructure mandates.

Therefore, the NHI does not have any specific arrangement that will focus on improving and/or developing infrastructure since that is catered for in other laws.

a) Public health sector infrastructure is subject to the Government Immoveable Asset Management Act (GIAMA) and construction of infrastructure in public health facilities is managed in terms of Treasury and Public Works prescripts. The national and provincial health departments will remain responsible for infrastructure of public health facilities. In keeping with the purchaser/provider split the NHI Fund will not be a provider of health services and therefore will not maintain and build infrastructure. That is a provider function. The NHI Fund will purchase services of a quality that it determines and in so doing will ensure that infrastructure is improved and/or developed.

b) Improving infrastructure of public health facilities will be planned by the National Department of Health with provincial departments. Maintenance of infrastructure must be paid for and managed by the providers (including the provinces as the provider in the public sector). Under the reformed health system major refurbishment, extensions and new infrastructure will be paid for through infrastructure allocations, such as is done through the present conditional grants, preferably from a centralised national health infrastructure fund.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2157

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of measles vaccinations have been administered in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021; (2) what is the breakdown of the specified measles vaccinations in each (a) province and (b) specified academic year; (3) what plans are being put in place by his department to increase inoculations for the measles vaccine; (4) what was the vaccination rate for the measles vaccine in (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021 in each province?

Reply:

(1) The following table reflects the details in this regard:

Year

Measles 1st dose

 

Measles 2nd dose

(a)

2019

966,002

84,1%

 

920,084

80,2%

(b)

2020

974,179

84,8%

 

888,383

77,2%

(c)

2021

1,000,082

87,5%

 

939,138

82,2%

(2) The following table reflects the details in this regard:

PROVINCE

MEASLES

2019

2020

2021

Eastern Cape

1st dose

115,357

111,609

114,320

 

2nd dose

118,254

108,060

110,055

Free State

1st dose

41,999

43,710

44,670

 

2nd dose

38,634

38,721

39,406

Gauteng

1st dose

228,967

224,802

234,553

 

2nd dose

203,020

197,829

218,545

KwaZulu-Natal

1st dose

208,524

208,825

213,695

 

2nd dose

216,419

213,090

223,628

Limpopo

1st dose

113,671

121,443

114,731

 

2nd dose

102,155

103,199

101,441

Mpumalanga

1st dose

78,956

81,911

94,505

 

2nd dose

82,248

73,931

83,496

Northern Cape

1st dose

21,038

19,875

20,802

 

2nd dose

18,404

17,596

18,007

North West

1st dose

57,099

57,225

57,624

 

2nd dose

54,368

49,922

55,187

Western Cape

1st dose

100,391

104,779

105,182

 

2nd dose

86,582

86,035

89,373

(3) The Department is implementing four streams of the primary health care (PHC) re-engineering which contribute to the increase in uptake of measles vaccination, namely, PHC Ward-Based Outreach Teams (WBOTS), Integrated School Health Programme (ISHP), the District Clinical Specialist Teams (DCST) and contracting of private healthcare providers. Each of the streams significantly contribute to the immunisation program in the following ways: the WBOTS have a potential role in defaulter tracing. ISHP provide immunisation catch-up at schools to increase coverage. The DCSTs have a role to play in clinical governance (ensuring implementation of all policies and guidelines). The private healthcare providers help in identifying and referring children who have missed immunisation doses.

In order to address long-standing inequities in immunisation access thereby reducing the number of zero-dose children, the Department of Health is implementing the followings:

  • Reach Every District (RED) Strategy to reduce missed opportunities in childhood vaccination uptake. The RED Strategy emphasizes important areas for vaccination uptake in the country: (1) reducing inequity in immunisation coverage, integration of health services, delivering vaccines beyond infancy using a life course approach, focusing on urban, poor and marginalized populations, and paying special attention to poor performing districts.
  • Under-5 Side-by-Side campaign by the Department that ensures all children survive and thrive, by improving coverage of key promotive, preventive and curative interventions with inclusive of measles vaccination and childhood vaccination in general. Five key themes of under-five are: (1) good nutrition to grow and be healthy; (2) love, play and talk for healthy development; (3) protection from preventable childhood illnesses and injuries; (4) health care for sick children and (5) special care for children who need a little more help. This campaign also focuses on the supportive relationship between child and caregiver, as well as the relationship with practitioners, including health-care workers, who help and advise the caregiver
  • In November 2020, the country intensified immunisation catch-up drive in all districts. The catch-up drive reduced number of zero-dose children from 125,923 in 2020 to 104,153 in 2021. The delivery of both routine and catch-up immunisation doses forms part of a coordinated effort to improve access to high-quality, affordable primary health to achieve universal health coverage and accelerate progress towards the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • The country as a member state of the global community has endorsed the global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan (MRSP) 2021 - 2030 which outlines guiding principles that provide a foundation for all measles and rubella control efforts. The Department is using this strategic plan as a guiding principle to secure the commitment and action required for a country free of measles transmission. In line with global measles strategy, the Department has endorsed international measles coverage target of reaching 90% of children with both 1st and 2nd dose in all districts to reach desirable population immunity levels. As part of implementing Global Measles and Rubella Strategic Plan, the Department together with NICD implement Integrated Disease Surveillance and Response (IDSR) system. The system makes case-based surveillance and laboratory data more usable and strengthen outbreak response measures at all levels of healthcare. Through implementation of IDSR, the country is utilising Notifiable Medical Conditions Surveillance (NMC) Application (NMC APP) for mobile devices. The NMC App enable healthcare practitioners to promptly report NMCs for appropriate and timely public health response. The IDSR uses outbreaks as an entry point to identifying unvaccinated communities and strengthening immunisation system.
  • The Department is also using Stock Visibility System (SVS) that enables the electronic communication of medicine availability data from PHC level into upstream electronic stock management systems. The SVS helps to monitor availability of vaccines in facilities and expedites vaccine deliveries to prevent stock outs.

(4) The following table reflects the details in this regard:

PROVINCE

MEASLES

2019

2020

2021

Eastern Cape

1st dose

80.3%

80.1%

85.2%

 

2nd dose

82.3%

77.2%

80.9%

Free State

1st dose

78.6%

83.3%

87.3%

 

2nd dose

72.3%

73.5%

76.4%

Gauteng

1st dose

89.4%

86.5%

89.5%

 

2nd dose

79.1%

75.9%

83.4%

KwaZulu-Natal

1st dose

83.3%

82.5%

83.9%

 

2nd dose

87.1%

84.9%

89.0%

Limpopo

1st dose

85.7%

93.4%

90.4%

 

2nd dose

76.7%

78.5%

78.6%

Mpumalanga

1st dose

83.7%

85.6%

97.9%

 

2nd dose

87.6%

77.8%

87.7%

Northern Cape

1st dose

82.8%

77.5%

80.8%

 

2nd dose

73.0%

69.2%

70.8%

North West

1st dose

70.9%

70.6%

71.1%

 

2nd dose

67.7%

61.9%

68.7%

Western Cape

1st dose

89.5%

94.0%

95.5%

 

2nd dose

76.8%

76.6%

80.3%

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2006

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, with regard to his department’s Budget Vote for the 2022-23 financial year which indicates that an amount of R1,5 billion will be managed by his department nationally to support various infrastructure projects in the National Health Insurance pilot districts, he will furnish Ms M D Hlengwa with (a) a detailed breakdown of the infrastructure projects to be undertaken in each province and (b) the deadline for each contract to be issued in terms of the specified infrastructure projects; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) The In-Kind Grant 2022/23 budget is R1.5 Billion. See below a detailed list of approved Infrastructure In-Kind Grant Projects that will be undertaken within the National Department of Health during the 2022/23 financial year.

b) It should also be noted that these projects are at the different stages as per the Framework for Infrastructure Delivery and Procurement Management (FIDPM) and the Infrastructure Delivery Management System (IDMS).

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2043

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of the qualified (a) nurses and (b) specialist medical personnel, who qualified from training programmes that have been in place since 2018, work in the (i) private sector and (ii) public sector; (2) what is the total budget that has been allocated towards the training of (a) nurses and (b) specialist medical personnel; (3) what total number of public-private partnerships are currently in place for the training of (a) nurses and (b) specialist medical personnel?

Reply:

The National Department of Health is working with the Provincial Departments of Health and the private health sector to source this information. As soon as the information has been received by the National Department of Health, the Minister will be able to furnish the full response to the Honourable Member and Parliament.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2047

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1) Whether he or his department intends to disclose more information about the World Health Organisation (WHO) International Pandemic Treaty to opposition parties and the relevant portfolio committees, before voting to ratify it; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Government will resist relinquishing any of the Republic’s sovereignty to the WHO as part of the International Pandemic Treaty; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the main points that the South African delegation will try and negotiate into the specified treaty?

Reply:

1. Yes. Section 231 (1) of the Constitution is clear that the negotiation and signing of all international agreements is the responsibility of the national executive. Meaning that international agreements become national law only upon ratification by Parliament. The Minister of Health is therefore enjoined by the Constitution to submit the treaty to Parliament for consideration and approval.

2. No. The draft Pandemic Treaty will be subjected to legal scrutiny by State Law Advisers at the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development to ensure its compliance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa.

3. For South Africa, it is crucial that the treaty is anchored on human rights to ensure equitable access to available medical solutions in order to improve the health and well-being of all, regardless of socio-economic status or geographical location. Therefore the main points to be pushed by South Africa in this regard are access and equity.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2089

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the budget allocation for the Termination of Pregnancy (TOP) services in the Republic, (b) how is the budget calculated for the specified services, (c) on what basis does a clinic turn away TOP patients, (d) what is the current backlog of TOPs, (e) what training is provided to staff to properly handle and support TOP patients, (f) what is the staff vacancy rate for those who conduct TOP services, (g) what is the breakdown of staff vacancies in this regard in each province, (h) what is his department doing to address the unwillingness of medical practitioners to perform TOP services thus creating a barrier to the services, (i) what total number of TOPs have been performed in the past five years and (j) what is the breakdown of the TOPs that were performed in each province?

Reply:

(a) There is no specific budget allocated for termination of pregnancy services, however the services are covered under Equitable Share

(b) There is no specific budget calculation for termination of pregnancy, the service/program is not a stand-alone programme it falls within the Women, Maternal and Reproductive Health at all level of care, therefore the calculation is done under Equitable share budget.

(c) The clinic cannot turn away the clients however; clinic can only refer clients on the following basis:

    1. If there is no one trained and providing the termination of pregnancy services in a facility; the health care workers, don’t turn them away BUT refer clients where services are rendered
    2. If the client is above 12 weeks, and there is no Doctor who can provide the above 12 weeks’ cases in a facility as stipulated in the Choice on Termination of Pregnancy Act, 92 of 1996, then the client can be referred to next level of care where second trimester termination of pregnancy is offered;
    3. If the client is above 20 weeks, however the client can be counselled on pregnancy resolutions e.g. adoption etc.

(d) The National Department of Health did not receive reports from provinces indicating challenges related to backlog on termination of pregnancy

(e) The National Department of Health has developed the Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights Training Package/Curriculum consisting of 14 modules.

1. Module one is compulsory and covers value clarification and mind transformation and

2. Module 7 is a specific module for termination of pregnancy (theory and practical session).

(f)-(g) Staff vacancy rate. The Department do not have the vacancy rate specific for termination of pregnancy however the service is being rendered under Women, Maternal and Reproductive Health programme. There is no breakdown of vacancies because termination of pregnancy is not a standalone programme it is offered under the Women, Maternal and Reproductive Health programme.

(h) The Department Conduct Value Clarification and mind transformation workshop to address unwillingness and negative attitude of the health care workers at all levels of care. Choice on termination of pregnancy guidelines (2019) provides guidance to managers, frontline workers and service users to respond to issues on conscientious objection which is described as blocking access to care .

(i)-(j) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

 

Year

Total number of TOP’s performed in the last five years per province and National

 
   

Province

(i)

South Africa (National)

(j)

   

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu-Natal

Limpopo

Mpuma-langa

Northern Cape

North West

Western Cape

 
 

2017

9,905

5,397

11,929

17,700

6,703

3,080

1,149

4,859

15,415

76,137

 

2018

14,130

7,404

18,827

27,032

11,297

5,738

1,671

7,840

18,785

112,724

 

2019

13,342

7,666

19,881

28,344

14,323

7,584

1,533

9,557

18,831

121,061

 

2020

10,922

7,242

23,338

22,399

14,494

4,449

1,337

8,325

17,209

109,715

 

2021

12,118

7,617

25,827

23,688

13,828

5,014

1,705

9,002

16,129

114,928

Source DHIS

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2090

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the total number of (i) persons who claimed from the COVID-19 Vaccine Injury No-Fault Compensation Scheme, (ii) claims that were rejected and (iii) claims that were processed, including the full details of the type of vaccines taken and all other relevant details, (b) are the reasons that the claims were rejected and (c) are the full details in terms of the age groups of persons who were affected after vaccinations?

Reply:

Claims against the No Fault Compensation Fund (NFC) are only lodged after the conclusion of assessment of an Adverse Event Following Immunisation (AEFI) that has been determined by the National Immunisation Safety Expert Committee (NISEC) to be caused by the Vaccine. It is not compulsory for an affected person with a causally linked injury to claim.

a) (i) 2 appeal claims and 2 claims have been sent to the NFC. There are 68 eligible individuals (AEFI causally linked to the use of the vaccine)

(ii) No claims have been rejected

(iii) No claims have been processed.

b) No claims have been rejected, although not all claims will be eligible as the outcome of the event should be serious thus either resulting in death, permanent or temporary disability.

c) 68 AEFI linked to the use of the vaccine of which the outcomes were not all serious (Only serious outcomes will be compensated, need for compensation will be determined by the adjudication panel.)

  • M (14 ) F  (54)
  • 12-18y (3); 19-30y (15); 31-50y  (19); above 50y (31)

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2091

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of critical skills personnel who are (i) employed in each public health care facility in each province, (ii) trained locally and (iii) sourced from other countries, (b) which countries do the specified personnel come from, (c) what is the current vacancy rate of critical skills in each public health care facility in each province and (d) what is the breakdown of the type of critical skills shortages in each public health care facility in each province?

Reply:

a) The core business in the health sector is born in health services as provided by health professions that requires various skills mix to respond to the burden of diseases in South Africa. In response to the question, the following critical skills that are required in majority numbers were concentrated on (i.e. Medical Practitioners Categories, Nursing Categories, Pharmacists and Emergency Medical Services)

(i) The table below indicate the total identified critical skill personnel per province

Critical Skills employed per Province - All citizenship categories as at May 2022

 

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo Province

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Grand Total

NURSE CATEGORIES

20327

7158

31255

34714

16525

10256

9866

2618

13735

146454

EMS / PARAMEDICS

264

194

351

335

238

79

156

57

330

2004

MEDICAL PRACTIONER

2208

1116

6271

4639

1510

1227

1307

437

3400

22115

PHARMACIST

417

151

538

803

567

315

312

109

319

3531

Grand Total

23216

8619

38415

40491

18840

11877

11641

3221

17784

174104

 

(ii) A total of South African Citizens health professionals trained locally and employed in critical skills categories per provinces:

Critical Skills employed per Province - South African Citizenship as at May 2022

 

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo Province

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Grand Total

NURSE CATEGORIES

20304

7143

31180

34687

16510

10237

9837

2614

13693

146205

EMS / PARAMEDICS

263

194

351

335

238

79

156

57

329

2002

MEDICAL PRACTIONER

2020

985

5643

4338

1402

1139

975

339

3266

20107

PHARMACIST

404

139

511

781

558

303

291

103

313

3403

Grand Total

22991

8461

37685

40141

18708

11758

11259

3113

17601

171717

*Data source is PERSAL System extracted on May 2022

(iii) Other citizenship critical skill categories sourced from Countries

Critical Skills employed per Province - Other Counties as at May 2022

 

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo Province

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Grand Total

NURSE CATEGORIES

23

15

75

27

15

19

29

4

42

249

EMS / PARAMEDICS

1

 0

 0

1

2

MEDICAL PRACTIONER

188

131

628

301

108

88

332

98

134

2008

PHARMACIST

13

12

27

22

9

12

21

6

6

128

Grand Total

225

158

730

350

132

119

382

108

183

2387

*Data source is PERSAL System extracted on May 2022

b) The following data indicates the countries the specified personnel come from.

Critical Skills employed per Province - Other Counties as at May 2022

 

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KZN

Limpopo

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Grand Total

ANGOLA

 

 

1

3

 

 

 

 

 

4

ARGENTINA

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

ARUBA

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

AUSTRALIA

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

1

3

AUSTRIA

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

BANGLADESH

1

1

1

9

2

 

3

 

 

17

BELGIUM

1

 

5

3

1

1

 

 

2

13

BOTSWANA

4

3

29

2

6

 

20

2

 

66

BRITISH INDIAN OCEAN TERRITORY

1

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

2

BULGARIA

 

 

 

3

 

1

 

 

 

4

BURKINA FASO

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

BURMA

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

BURUNDI

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

5

7

CAMEROON

1

1

8

1

2

 

 

1

4

18

CANADA

 

 

1

1

1

 

 

 

1

4

CENTRAL AFRICAN REPUBLIC

1

1

 

1

 

 

1

 

 

4

CHILE

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

CHINA

 

 

5

2

 

 

 

 

 

7

COLOMBIA

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

COOK ISLANDS

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

2

 

3

COSTA RICA

 

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

COTE D_LVOIRE

 

 

2

1

 

 

 

 

 

3

CROATIA

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

CUBA

20

21

22

15

24

16

40

27

 

185

CURACAO

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

4

 

5

CZECH REPUBLIC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

DENMARK

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

 

1

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

EAST GERMANY

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

EGYPT

1

 

2

 

1

 

1

 

 

5

ENGLAND

3

 

1

2

 

 

 

 

10

16

ERITREA

 

 

4

1

 

 

1

 

 

6

ETHIOPIA

 

1

3

1

2

 

1

 

1

9

FRANCE

2

 

1

2

 

 

 

 

 

5

FRENCH GUIANA

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

 

2

FRENCH SOUTHERN TERRITORIES

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

GABON

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

GEORGIA

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

GERMANY

2

 

1

 

 

1

1

 

2

7

GHANA

10

 

6

6

1

 

 

 

1

24

HONG KONG

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

INDIA

18

6

37

14

10

3

14

 

3

105

INDONESIA

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

IRAN:ISLAMIC REPUBLIC OF

 

 

6

1

1

3

3

 

1

15

IRAQ

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

IRELAND

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

2

ITALY

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

JAMAICA

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

JAPAN

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

KENYA

6

 

12

4

1

1

7

1

2

34

KOREA(NORTH)

 

1

1

 

1

 

 

 

 

3

KOREA(SOUTH)

2

 

1

1

 

 

2

 

4

10

LEBANON

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

LESOTHO

6

34

18

6

5

1

12

1

3

86

LIBERIA

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

2

LIBYA

4

1

1

6

 

1

7

 

 

20

MALAWI

 

2

8

4

3

 

2

 

3

22

MALI

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

MAURITANIA

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

MAURITIUS

2

 

6

5

1

 

1

 

7

22

MEXICO

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

MOZAMBIQUE

 

 

9

1

 

2

2

 

 

14

NAMIBIA

2

1

9

4

4

1

3

2

5

31

NEPAL

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

1

NETHERLANDS

1

 

 

1

 

 

1

 

7

10

NEW ZEALAND

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

NIGER

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

2

NIGERIA

36

14

66

45

14

26

33

9

18

261

NORWAY

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

PAKISTAN

6

 

8

2

 

 

1

1

1

19

PALESTINE: STATE OF

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

PHILIPPINES

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

POLAND

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1

3

PORTUGAL

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

QATAR

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

REPUBLIC OF CONGO

42

37

266

87

9

13

152

44

36

686

ROMANIA

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

RUSSIAN FEDERATION

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

RWANDA

 

2

2

7

2

1

 

1

10

25

SCOTLAND

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

SENEGAL

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

SOMALIA

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

SOUTH SUDAN

 

 

 

 

1

 

1

 

 

2

SPAIN

 

 

1

2

1

 

 

 

 

4

SRI LANKA

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

SUDAN

 

 

4

1

 

1

1

 

 

7

SWAZILAND

2

3

16

6

2

10

2

 

1

42

SWEDEN

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

1

SWITZERLAND

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

2

SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

1

TAIWAN

1

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

2

TANZANIA

2

 

1

1

 

 

2

 

 

6

TOGO

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

1

TUNISIA

2

4

1

13

 

7

6

3

 

36

TURKEY

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

1

UGANDA

7

 

9

7

2

2

3

 

1

31

UKRAINE

 

1

 

 

 

1

2

 

1

5

UNITED KINGDOM

 

 

3

5

 

 

 

 

5

13

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

4

 

3

1

 

 

 

 

3

11

URUGUAY

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

USSR

 

 

3

1

2

 

 

 

 

6

WEST GERMANY

 

1

3

1

 

 

 

 

3

8

YUGOSLAVIA

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

ZAIRE

3

6

8

2

 

 

5

3

1

28

ZAMBIA

2

 

8

7

3

5

7

 

4

36

ZIMBABWE

23

14

102

49

22

18

40

6

28

302

Grand Total

225

158

730

350

132

119

382

108

183

2387

*Data source is PERSAL report extracted in May 2022

c) The following is the current vacancy rate of critical skills in each province.

Critical Skills employed per Province - Vacancy rate as at May 2022

 

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Overall % Vacant

NURSE CATEGORIES

15.38

10.13

20.40

29.33

8.51

3.74

5.94

2.02

4.57

15.47

EMS / PARAMEDICS

10.72

11.60

49.21

8.96

3.69

0.53

5.27

1.76

8.26

28.39

MEDICAL PRACTIONER

8.42

13.58

16.15

23.95

20.97

3.12

4.21

2.40

7.19

16.22

PHARMACIST

13.76

8.56

10.40

16.51

25.99

4.89

11.31

2.75

5.81

9.26

Grand Total

14.34

10.59

20.32

28.04

10.26

3.60

5.76

2.07

5.01

15.59

*Data source is PERSAL report extracted in May 2022

 

d) The breakdown of the type of critical skills shortages in each province is as follows:

Vacant Posts in the Public Health Sector

 

JOB TITLE

Eastern Cape

Free State

Gauteng

KwaZulu Natal

Limpopo Province

Mpumalanga

North West

Northern Cape

Western Cape

Grand Total

NURSE CATEGORIES

3484

2294

4621

6644

1927

847

1346

457

1035

22655

EMS / PARAMEDICS

61

66

280

51

21

3

30

10

47

569

MEDICAL PRACTIONER

302

487

579

859

752

112

151

86

258

3586

PHARMACIST

45

28

34

54

85

16

37

9

19

327

Grand Total

3892

2875

5514

7608

2785

978

1564

562

1359

27137

Data source is PERSAL report extracted in May 2022

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2136

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his reply to question 1334 on 5 May 2022 about age-specific excess deaths since March 2020, which states that 6 779 excess deaths were recorded for the age group 0-9 years, 1 803 for the age group 10-19 years and 4 709 for the age group 20-29 years, what proportion of the excess deaths does the SA Medical Research Council estimate to be directly attributable to (a) COVID-19 and (b) non-COVID-19 factors for each of the specified age groups

Reply:

(a) In an effort to determine the proportion of the excess deaths which are attributable to COVID-19 and what proportion are attributable to non-COVID factors, the SAMRC Burden of Disease Research Unit and University of Cape Town (UCT) Centre for Actuarial Research used the correlation of excess natural deaths with other measures of the COVID-19 pandemic in South Africa. Based on comparison of the time trends in excess deaths, the confirmed COVID-19 deaths (by date of occurrence), and proportions testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 in 2020 and 2021, the SAMRC/UCT collaboration estimated that 85%-95% of excess deaths were directly related to COVID-19. However, it was not possible to assess whether this differs by age groups.

(b) The remaining 5-15% of the excess deaths are considered to be attributable to non-COVID-19 factors.

END.

17 June 2022 - NW2145

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the total number of mental health care training facilities in the (a) Republic and (b) in each province; (2) whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with the outdated criteria for nursing cover; if not, why not; if so, on what date; (3) (a) what is the latest criteria for nursing cover and (b) in what ways does it cover mental health service demands?

Reply:

(1) (a) Currently, Mental Health Nursing, also known as Psychiatric Nursing Science is offered either as a subject or as a module in a comprehensive programme, or as a stand-alone specialist programme. It is offered in the following ways:

(i) As one of the subjects of the legacy four-year Diploma in Nursing (General, Psychiatric & Community) and Midwifery (R425) that is currently being taught out in public nursing colleges. All 9 public nursing colleges are currently teaching out the R425 diploma programme, which is being taught at their 31 campuses.

(ii) As one of the subjects of the legacy four-year Degree in Nursing (General, Psychiatric & Community) and Midwifery (R425) that is currently being taught out in universities. There are currently 17 universities that are teaching out the R425 degree programme.

(iii) As part of the modules for the new 3-year Diploma in Nursing. To date, 6 public nursing colleges are offering the R171 programme in 24 campuses, whilst 1 university is offering the programme.

(iv) As part of the modules for the new 4-year Bachelor’s degree in Nursing and Midwifery (R174). To date, 19 universities are offering this programme. 1 college has been accredited for this programme but is not yet offering it.

(v) As a new specialised postgraduate diploma programme (PGD) in Mental Health Nursing). To date, 2 universities have been accredited to offer this programme. 1 college has been accredited for this programme but is not yet offering it.

(b) Table 1 below illustrates the total number of mental health care training facilities in the Republic and in each province.

Table 1: The total number of mental health care training facilities in the Republic and in each province

No.

Province

Number of institutions offering the Mental Health Nursing (Psychiatric Nursing) programme per programme

   

R425 diploma

R425 degree

R171 diploma

R174 degree

Postgraduate Diploma in Mental Health Nursing

1

Eastern Cape

5 college campuses

3 universities

Not yet offering

3 universities

None

2

Free State

3 college campuses

1 university

3 college campuses

1 university

None

3

Gauteng

3 college campuses

5 universities

4 college campuses

5 universities

None

4

KwaZulu-Natal

10 college campuses

3 universities

11 college campuses

3 universities

None

5

Limpopo

3 college campuses

2 universities

Not yet offered at college; 1 university

2 universities

None

6

Mpumalanga

1 college campus

None

1 college campus

None

None

7

North West

2 college campuses

2 university campuses

2 college campuses

2 university campuses

None

8

Northern Cape

1 college campus

None

Not yet offering

None

None

9

Western Cape

3 college campuses

1 university

3 college campuses

3 universities

2 universities

TOTALS IN THE REPUBLIC

31 college campuses

17 universities

24 college campuses, 1 =university

19 universities

2 universities

(2) The outdated criteria for nursing cover for Psychiatric Nursing Science subject in the R425 programme offered by both nursing colleges and universities entailed the following:

  • Nursing patients of different age groups receiving treatment in a psychiatric hospital, psychiatric unit or psychiatric community service, on both short term and long-term basis.
  • Executing a nursing regimen to ensure continuity of nursing for a meaningful number of the above patients – both short-term and long term. Before being implemented, the nursing plan for each patient shall be approved by the registered nurse responsible for the nursing regimen for the patient.
  • Conducting group sessions/activities, taking cognisance of cultural differences/preferences where relevant.
  • Conducting therapeutic interactions for evaluation purposes.
  • Developing an assessment and plan care for a patient who is being cared for in the community and who requires psychiatric nursing.</