Questions and Replies

Filter by year

19 June 2020 - NW998

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In view of reports that clinics and other essential healthcare providers for other illnesses are being shunned due to fear of contracting Covid-19, as well as the general fear of harassment from the SA Police Service and/or SA National Defence Force, what steps has his department taken to ensure that persons are still able to receive other essential medical care during the Covid-19 pandemic; (2) what total number of deaths were caused by (a) tuberculosis and (b) HIV and/or Aids-related illnesses since the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 began; (3) whether the specified number of deaths caused by such illnesses has increased as the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 continues; if not, why not; if so, what has his department identified as the reason for the increase?

Reply:

1. The Department of Health has been implementing the Central Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) programme. The CCMDD programme is a National Department of Health (NDoH) initiative to improve access to chronic medicines to stable patients by enabling them to collect their repeat medicines from a convenient collection point near their home or place of employment thereby decreasing the patient volumes in health care facilities.

  • (a) Eligible patients collect their diabetes, hypertension, ARVs and other chronic medication for free from a convenient pick-up point like Dis-Chem, Clicks, Pick n Pay or even a local spaza shop. Majority of these service providers have been open during the National lockdown, allowing clients to collect their treatment without interruption.
  • (b) The majority of these service providers have been open during the National lockdown, allowing clients to collect their treatment without interruption. However, lockdown restrictions created a confusion around availability of public transport services to access these service outlets.
  • (c) In health facilities, before and during the lockdown patients were given 2-3 month Tenofovir + Lamivudine + Dolutegravir (TLD) supply and 2 months Tenofovir +Emtricitibine + Efavirenz (TEE) supply;

2. The Department of Health has also strengthened in-facility processes and support to People Living with HIV (PLHIV) on ART in order to maintain adherence. Tracking and tracing (telephonically and then in-person) of clients lost to follow-up is ongoing in majority of our facilities during lockdown;

  • (i) The Department of Health has developed messaging for PLHIV and people living with TB regarding the importance of treatment. These various messages have been sent to clients through SMS and social media;
  • (ii) The Department of Health in partnership with the SABC and other partners, have initiated COVID-19 radio programme. This communication is cutting across all health programmes in relation to the pandemic through daily pre-recorded interviews in all SABC radio stations, to address what needs to happen during the lockdown period regarding treatment adherence and access to services.

(2) The registered deaths from the civil registration system are maintained by the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) and the Department of Health is not in a position to provide the requested information.

(3) The Department of Health is not able to provide the requested analysis because of access restrictions to the civil registration system data, which is hosted by the Department of Home Affairs.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1004

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the fact that the multinational corporation Johnson and Johnson will stop selling talc-based baby powder in the United States and Canada after paying out billions of dollars in lost legal battles over claims that the product causes cancer, talc-based baby powder will continue to be sold in the Republic; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The View of the Ministerial Advisory Committee on the Prevention and Control of Cancer

a) The Ministerial Advisory Committee on the Prevention and Control of Cancer (MACC) sees no reason to withdraw the Johnson and Johnson talc-based baby powder from the South African market as long as it is asbestos free.

b) The relevant details are as follows:

  1. Talcum powder is made from a substance called talc whose components are magnesium, silicon and oxygen.
  2. Talcum powder is used in cosmetic products such as baby powder, adult body and facial powders, as well as in a number of other consumer products
  3. In its natural form some talc contains asbestos which is known to cause cancer and it was linked to ovarian cancer in 1958.
  4. Globally, guidelines inform that all cosmetic products which contained talc in them had to be free from detectable amounts of asbestos.
  5. Johnson and Johnson’s talc powder is no longer being used in the USA following a class action court case where Johnson and Johnson were ordered to pay billions of dollars’ compensation to women with ovarian and other genitourinary cancers allegedly caused by the use of talc powder on their genitalia. Although this judgement went against Johnson and Johnson, the evidence that talc powder is carcinogenic is very limited as confirmed by the National Cancer Institute.
  6. Talcum powder used to contain asbestos which is a known carcinogen but is no longer the case

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1121

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

By what date is it envisaged that his department will fill the 13% vacancy rate at Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital (details furnished)?

Reply:

The Chief Executive Officer (CEO) Dr Lesia confirmed that as at 31 May 2020, the vacancy rate of the Hospital stood at 11,77%, since the process to fill the vacant posts is ongoing.

The details are as follows:

1. Management

One post of Senior Manager: Nursing was filled; and the successful candidate assumed duty on 01 June 2020. The processes are underway to fill the following posts:

  • 1 Quality Assurance Manager: 01 July 2020
  • 1 Senior Clinical Manager: 01 January 2021

2. Administration

As at 31 May 2020, vacancies for Administration cadre stood at 171 reduced from the 202 number as mentioned above.

  • 31 Administration Clerks were appointed and commenced work on 01 June 2020.
  • 34 posts are in the process of being filled for 01 July 2020.
  • 21 posts are in the process of being filled around August and September, respectively.

3. Allied Support

Only 1 Specialised Auxiliary Services post has been filled because the department is prioritising the critical l posts.

4. Support

41 support staff have been appointed; and 26 Cleaners have assumed duty on Monday 15 June 2020.

5. Medical

Medical posts are filled on a continuous basis.

  • A replacement process is adopted for vacated posts in the Hospital for clinicians. It is for this reason that the 95 vacant posts were reduced to 68 as at 31 May 2020, with 27 appointments confirmed.
  • The Department/Hospital has a generic open advertisement that allows recruitment of medical staff as and when it is required.

6. Nursing

Like with Medical posts, there is an open advertisement for nursing positions. 10 posts from the 253 vacant posts will be filled from 01 July 2020 as applicants received offers, and they have confirmed start date.

The National Department of Health will engage the Gauteng Department of Health to further assist Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital to access the Disaster Management Funds in order to fill the outstanding critical vacant posts.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1125

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to an oversight visit by the Portfolio Committee on Health to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital in February 2020, where it was found that the number of infants and children suffering from malnutrition and kwashiorkor had increased, (a) what is the overall status of malnutrition and kwashiorkor cases of children reported around the Republic, (b) how does his department plan on intervening for mothers and children who suffer from malnutrition behind recovery at hospitals and (c) what measures have been put in place to ensure interventions go beyond hospital care?

Reply:

We are not aware of the oversight visit conducted by the Portfolio Committee on Health from Parliament. However the response is as follows:

a) The number of children under five years of age admitted to public sector hospitals during 2018/19, 2019/20 and the first quarter of 2020/2021 is shown in the table below. It should be noted that in line with World Health Organisation recommendations, children with kwashiorkor are classified as having Severe Acute Malnutrition and are not counted separately.

 

No of children under-five years of age admitted with Moderate acute malnutrition (MAM)

No. of children under five years admitted with Severe acute malnutrition (SAM)

2018/19

6,057

11,280

2019/20

6,159

11,089

     

Feb 2020

534

1,129

March 2020

479

991

April 2020

272

596

The reduction in cases during April may be a reflection of level 5 lockdown regulations. The shift in focus to COVID-19 activities did not allow for active case finding of children at risk of severe acute malnutrition, and caregivers of children may have lacked access to transport to the facilities. Data may also be incomplete if data capturers were not on duty.

b) All children with severe acute malnutrition admitted in health facilities are managed according to standardised guidelines and protocols. The Department has also prioritised nutritional assessment and classification of all children who are admitted to ensure that cases of malnutrition are not missed.

All provinces have been requested to draft response plans focusing on addressing the prevention and management of children with acute malnutrition in the context of COVID-19 during and after the lockdown.

A draft national guidance framework has been developed and shared with provinces to ensure that key issues such as ensuring the availability of key commodities and supplies is ensured.

c) The national guidance framework on nutrition response in the context of COVID-19 shared with provinces to guide development of province/ district response plan has outlined key priorities including:

  • Ensuring that Community Health Workers screen, identify and refer children with severe acute malnutrition – this is part of their routine activities, but was not done during lockdown as Community Health Workers were focussed on community screening and testing for COVID-19;
  • Prevention strategies e.g. breastfeeding promotion and support, promotion of appropriate complementary feeding;
  • Forecasting the need for essential nutrition supplies (e.g. F-75, F-100, Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), micronutrient supplements, MUAC tapes, etc.) for 2-3 months, and ensure adequate storage conditions;
  • Increasing the amount of nutritional supplements provided to outpatients to reduce the frequency of follow-up visits;
  • Consider task shifting for community health workers to provide nutrition supplements during home visits for follow-up patients with missed appointments or hard to reach areas;
  • Ensure linkages and referral systems to the Department of Social Development of SAM cases through social workers to benefit from social protection measures such as social relief for distress and food parcels.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1000

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Until what date will the Cuban health care workers who travelled to the Republic to render assistance with the Covid-19 pandemic, be needed, (b) by what date will all the Cuban health care workers return to Cuba, (c) to whom will the remuneration for the services of the health care workers be paid and (d) which country will pay for the return of the health care workers; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) South Africa appreciates the help from the Cuban Government. The Cuban health care workers will stay as long as needed and the current arrangement is for a period of 12 months, and reviewed quarterly;

(b) It is expected that if all goes as planned the Cuban brigade will travel back to Cuba on the month of May 2021;

(c) The salaries for the Cuban health care workers will be paid to the health care workers individual bank accounts, like any other employee employed in the South African Public Health Sector;

(d) In accordance with the signed Government-to-Government Agreement between the Republic of South Africa and the Republic of Cuba, the air transport at the end of the contract will be at the expense of the receiving Country.

2. As the statement was made when the Cuban brigade arrived in South Africa, it will be necessary for the government of the Republic of South Africa to make a statement when they leave, to thank them for their selfless service in assisting the Republic in its fight against COVID-19.

END.

19 June 2020 - NW1120

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) Who are all the suppliers of the personal protective equipment (PPE) that his department will be providing, (b) what is the total number of the PPEs that has been supplied and (c) what total monetary value did the PPE cost; (2) whether there are any PPEs that are sourced locally in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The suppliers that the Department of Health have used to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) are as follows:

No.

Supplier

1.

BARRS Pharmaceutical Industries

2.

Unicore Holdings (Pty) Ltd

3.

Mr First Aid (Pty) Ltd

4.

Biologica Pharmaceuticals

5.

X-Business Resources

6.

SciProfs

7.

Tammy Taylor Nails

8.

Lora Medical Supplies

9.

Libera Management Services

(b) The total number of PPE that has been supplied is depicted on the table below as follows:

Item / Commodity

Quantity

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

40 715

Masks Surgical / Medical

54 900

Masks Cloth

3 400

Face Shields

15

Gloves Examination Sterile

12 000

Gloves Examination Non-Sterile

8 000

Gloves Surgical

12 000

Safety Goggles

2 000

Boot Covers

2 000

Aprons

3 000

Coveralls

2 000

Hand Sanitizers

78 522

Infrared Thermometers

350

TOTAL

218 902

 

(c) The total monetary value of PPE cost is R 6 853 123.44.

2. All PPE were sourced from local suppliers as depicted on the table under the response to question 1. (a).

 

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1129

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

What is the new strategy for curbing new community infections for coronavirus since the lockdown has not manifested tangible outcomes of reducing new infections in communities?

Reply:

The strategy for curbing infections in communities is in keeping with the World Health Organisation’s recommendations, which is to undertake contact tracing, community screening and testing - which has now evolved into targetted community screening, especially in the hotspots (where there is greater than 5 cases per 100 000 population). The National Department of Health is also working closely with its provincial counterparts to also ensure hospital readiness for COVID-19. Moreover, community messaging on social distancing and hygiene practices are being stepped up in provinces, especially where the hotspots have been identified. A revised testing strategy will prioritise those persons who are at very high risk and are symptomatic.

The lockdown has been effective in managing new infections. The mathematical models have shown us that we would have had a five times higher mortality if the lockdown was not implemented.

Additionally the lockdown provides the health system an opportunity to plan for the surge of infections. The lockdown has achieved both these objectives reducing new infections and providing the healthcare system with more time to prepare for the surge.

The new strategy is a risk adjusted model of alert levels based on the level of infection and the health system capacity in an area. The health system must focus its energy and resources on these areas where there are high levels of infection. These areas are different from other areas where there is little or no infection. The areas with low risk do not require the stringent restriction that areas of high risk require. There is little value in a generalised lockdown when the reality is that there are specific areas of the country that are of high risk (Hotspot). These areas require intervention to curb the spread of infection. The risk adjusted approach is intended to focus our attention on areas that are at high risk. This is a much more efficient approach to responding to COVID-19.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1029

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What oversight measuring tools does his department use to ensure that provincial health departments use the monies allocated to them adequately and appropriately; (2) whether he has found that each provincial department of health has used the allocated monies adequately in the past three financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The oversight measuring tools to strengthen health system effectiveness based on the use of cost-effective interventions that are rendered at an appropriate level of the health system, the Provincial Health Departments report monthly, quarterly, half yearly and annually to National Department as per Public Finance Management Act No.1 of 1999 as amended, section 40. The reports entails In-Year Monitoring, Division of Revenue Act (Conditional Grants) and Pre-determined sets of Non Negotiables.

The reports are tabled and discussed through the National Health Chief Financial Officers Forum, Technical National Health Council and National Health Council.

2. Yes, the allocated funds were used adequately.

The Provincial Departments of health spending for the past three years are as follows;

EASTERN CAPE

ll Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

24 026 752

22 337 081

20 650 214

19 033 530

17 714 926

Actual Expenditure

24 472 665

22 275 458

20 506 290

18 957 776

17 549 854

Employee Compensation

15 980 940

14 558 949

13 454 333

12 562 282

11 576 335

Goods and Services

6 110 829

5 784 042

5 206 207

4 522 995

4 595 261

Capital Assets

1 287 172

1 236 256

1 277 587

1 280 152

1 020 742

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

-

-

-

90 403

Irregular Expenditure

295 570

176 117

241

946

91 209

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

1 224

998

6 855

2 161

1 819

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

48 005

52 246

45 140

45 140

43 210

Posts Filled

41 519

40 424

40 282

40 225

39 216

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

FREE STATE

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Qualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

10 381 697

9 738 931

9 043 067

8 728 675

8 327 177

Actual Expenditure

10 238 606

9 801 950

9 077 195

8 694 952

8 293 755

Employee Compensation

6 678 866

6 262 519

5 814 798

5 539 463

5 258 723

Goods and Services

2 586 120

2 647 858

2 365 315

2 375 189

2 287 592

Capital Assets

686 059

654 221

714 398

621 435

648 642

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

140 791

67 634

31 814

11 167

Irregular Expenditure

359 511

324 525

300 966

56 055

16 707

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

32 910

1 171

662

691

7 966

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

22 902

21 629

21 596

20 952

23 930

Posts Filled

17 781

17 371

17 329

17 810

17 916

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

GAUTENG

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

47 543 133

42 739 750

38 192 111

35 816 383

32 015 230

Actual Expenditure

46 010 560

42 013 459

37 440 067

34 864 555

31 005 212

Employee Compensation

26 902 299

25 085 331

23 289 574

20 648 000

18 654 909

Goods and Services

15 229 603

13 583 390

11 078 374

11 257 325

9 735 281

Capital Assets

1 572 106

1 476 113

1 582 158

1 481 189

1 031 499

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

-

-

-

-

Irregular Expenditure

2 292 068

1 352 204

1 860 020

493 155

-

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

26 682

37 918

-

7 433

159 759

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

72 244

71 943

72 894

73 199

n/a

Posts Filled

63 962

66 124

67 467

65 118

n/a

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

KWAZULU-NATAL

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

42 850 312

40 228 250

37 337 104

34 213 586

31 409 398

Actual Expenditure

42 549 830

39 911 321

37 026 397

34 110 724

31 245 510

Employee Compensation

26 336 189

24 614 793

23 354 896

21 793 160

20 014 422

Goods and Services

13 342 400

12 343 292

11 382 844

10 105 233

8 895 999

Capital Assets

1 758 330

1 592 882

1 106 314

1 257 629

1 505 879

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

14 248

-

18 997

147 119

127 693

Irregular Expenditure

2 977 103

1 464 342

1 325 084

1 257 484

708 803

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

6 089

3 186

5 763

5 117

3 033

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

n/a

74 080

79 087

78 669

81 226

Posts Filled

n/a

68 125

69 924

72 078

71 257

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

LIMPOPO

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Financially Unqualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

19 801 784

18 609 439

17 300 715

15 501 794

14 618 588

Actual Expenditure

19 722 686

18 389 158

17 217 613

15 432 088

14 526 110

Employee Compensation

14 199 041

12 978 967

12 218 486

11 352 270

10 336 806

Goods and Services

4 839 161

4 259 771

3 785 515

3 012 337

3 122 861

Capital Assets

425 597

457 016

421 877

499 136

493 679

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

-

-

-

-

Irregular Expenditure

80 243

165 956

217 342

259 062

544 881

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

1 728

3 523

3 378

15 901

43 356

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

64 343

63 460

63 640

63 460

63 460

Posts Filled

32 908

33 848

34 613

35 552

35 202

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

MPUMALANGA

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

13 119 591

12 160 053

10 611 965

10 163 902

9 045 682

Actual Expenditure

13 055 943

12 083 013

10 579 880

10 080 392

8 879 292

Employee Compensation

7 662 953

7 217 105

6 686 678

6 102 017

5 537 663

Goods and Services

3 913 891

3 439 974

3 064 888

2 902 264

2 639 473

Capital Assets

1 028 712

1 057 356

509 496

595 955

434 074

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

33 999

-

-

190 115

Irregular Expenditure

138 899

309 920

1 552 623

1 919 578

1 918 896

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

487

317

2 306

1 007

3 614

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

22 338

22 516

21 970

21 670

31 277

Posts Filled

20 412

20 421

20 288

20 090

19 244

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Note

         

NORTH WEST

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Financially Unqualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

n/a

10 600 197

9 681 617

9 199 705

8 184 743

Actual Expenditure

n/a

10 303 417

9 767 254

9 042 677

8 372 853

Employee Compensation

n/a

6 412 002

6 051 077

5 609 901

5 389 881

Goods and Services

n/a

3 005 112

2 802 201

2 581 210

2 286 569

Capital Assets

n/a

641 097

600 349

675 411

579 777

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

n/a

-

99 647

-

262 564

Irregular Expenditure

n/a

880 911

682 777

696 654

763 834

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

n/a

1 770

1 501

15 254

20 374

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

n/a

21 809

21 357

21 334

21 103

Posts Filled

n/a

17 536

17 310

17 946

18 929

 

SOURCE

n/a

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Note

         

NORTHERN CAPE

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

Qualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

4 858 837

4 631 443

4 494 185

4 228 961

3 758 130

Actual Expenditure

4 839 637

4 567 470

4 369 138

4 168 520

3 714 324

Employee Compensation

2 804 762

2 572 131

2 322 039

2 150 712

1 936 740

Goods and Services

1 627 617

1 452 145

1 479 782

1 317 295

1 150 049

Capital Assets

350 015

480 835

395 290

583 256

486 084

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

1 261

100 296

51 576

92 790

91 636

Irregular Expenditure

714 939

412 379

574 183

805 906

537 169

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

5 394

5 270

10 537

4 392

6 212

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

7 533

7 196

7 703

9 020

8 929

Posts Filled

6 828

6 924

6 882

6 840

6 694

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Note

         

WESTERN CAPE

Financial Information

All Financial Values: R'000

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2015/16

2014/15

 

AUDIT OUTCOME

Clean Audit

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

Financially Unqualified

 

APPROPRIATION STATEMENT

Total Final Appropriation

23 215 861

21 738 171

20 234 419

19 154 794

17 552 380

Actual Expenditure

23 045 811

21 498 184

20 080 640

18 740 193

17 307 548

Employee Compensation

13 515 392

12 660 391

11 833 864

10 949 652

10 072 353

Goods and Services

7 219 595

6 892 429

6 457 483

5 976 263

5 510 960

Capital Assets

1 004 040

751 434

784 560

747 064

746 805

 

UIFW EXPENDITURE

Unauthorised Expenditure

-

-

-

-

-

Irregular Expenditure

12 886

23 553

11 330

7 284

24 426

Fruitless & Wasteful Expenditure

-

-

7

-

-

 

HUMAN RESOURCES

Posts Approved

33 857

33 018

32 626

33 055

33 190

Posts Filled

31 914

31 549

31 463

31 432

31 267

 

SOURCE

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

Annual Report

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1002

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of ventilators have been procured in the fight against Covid-19; (2) whether any of the total number of ventilators were and/or are being procured from local suppliers; if not, why not; if so, (a) what number of ventilators, (b) what are the names of the local suppliers they were and/or are being procured from and (c) on what date(s) in each case?

Reply:

1. As at 15 June 2020, a total of 1138 ventilators have been procured through Provincial Health Departments as well as National Department and they are all imported with a lead-time of minimum of 3 months and maximum of 9 months. Eastern Cape and Limpopo received 15 of the 60 and 3 of the 133 procured ventilators, respectively. The remaining 1120 ventilators are still to be delivered. Table below give a full illustration of all ventilators procured and the numbers that were delivered.

Province

Current ventilator capacity

No of Ventilators Procured

Supplier

Date of delivery

National

Procurement

 

300

SSEM Mthembu

Delivery expected on 1st week of August

EC

68

30

Mbuso Medical

15 delivered. 15 will be delivered on 31-Jul-2020

 

 

30

SSEM Mthembu

5 on 30-Jun-2020, 10 on 31-Jul-2020, 15 on 31 Aug 2020

EC Total

68

60

 

 

FS

200

50

Phoenix Neomed

15 -31 July 2020

 

  

 

 

 

     

Mbuso Medical

 
     

SSEM Mthembu

 
     

Drager

 
     

Marquet

 
     

Medhold

 
     

Respiratory Care Africa

 

FS total

200

50

 

 

GP total

409

145

 

Drager

An incorrect order was placed for 145 circuits instead of ventilators. This will be amended & an order for 145 ventilators will be processed on today (15 June 2020)

KZN

164

18

Drager

26-Jun-20

     

SSEM Mthembu

3 on 7 Jul 2020

   

11

 

8 on 5 Aug 2020

   

6

Marquet

05-Aug-20

KZN Total

164

35

 

 

LP

78

3

 

Only 3 delivered

   

30

SSEM Mthembu

30-Jun-20

   

100

Mbuso Medical

27 on 25-June-2020

       

73 on 21-July-2020

LP Total

78

133

 

 

MPU

130

75

SSEM Mthembu

31-Jul-20

   

50

Drager

31-Aug-20

   

75

Marquet

31-Aug-20

   

75

Mbuso Medical

31-Aug-20

MPU total

130

275

SSEM Mthembu

Awaiting delivery

NC total

17

   

No ventilator ordered

NW total

59

40

Drager

Jan-Mar 2021 - They are currently looking for another supplier who can deliver earlier

 

125

70

Respiratory Care Africa

31 July 2020

   

30

 SSEM Mthembu

15 July 2020

WC total

125

100

   

Total

1250

1138

 

18 delivered

         

2. Yes, all are procured through local suppliers;

a) 1120 Ventilators are still to be delivered;

b) Local suppliers are SSEM Mthembu, Mbuso Medicals, Phoenix Neomed, Drager, Marquet, Medhold and Respiratory Care Africa;

c) Delivery dates are expected from end June to August 2020 and between January and March 2021.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1123

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his department’s submission to the Portfolio Committee on Health that the current supply of personal protective equipment (PPE) sits at 10% local and export from other countries at 90%, what steps has his department taken to ensure that local suppliers of PPE are included, especially rural and township designers and suppliers?

Reply:

The National Department of Health collaborated with the National Treasury and Department of Trade and Industry to identify local manufacturers and distributors to enable departments to procure locally manufactured Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) products. To this effect, the following initiatives have been concluded:

  • Visibility of local manufacturers and distributors: A market intelligence tool was developed listing all local manufacturers and their distributors of the key seventeen (17) PPE items used in the prevention of the spread of COVID-19. The tool enables public sector buyers to inter alia identify manufacturers and their distributors as follows:
    • According to their provinces, cities, towns and districts;
    • It also provides information such as GPS coordinates of manufacturers and distributors;
    • Contact details of manufactures and distributors for ease of use
    • Information of where the PPE comes from such as country of origin and quality assurance;
    • It allows public sector buyers to identify exactly where the stock they are procuring coming from.
    • Local manufacturers’ information regarding BBBEE Level;
    • % Black Ownership;
    • Manufacturer information
    • Product Name
    • Product Price;
    • Shipper Pack Quantities; and
    • Product Category (Distinguishing between 17 Essential PPE Categories and Non-Essential PPE Product Categories).

(2) The National Department of Health and all provincial departments have allowed access to this tool for use in the sourcing of PPE items/products. The tool is available online and data / information is continuously updated with the information of new entry of service providers to PPE market.

  • On Central Supplier Database (CSD) there are approximately 20 000 suppliers registered who have indicated that they are able to for deliver PPE items. On the basis of that information the National Department of Health collaborated with National Treasury to ask Treasury to do modification on CSD that will allow all service providers who are registered on CSD for the supply of PPE to be able to provide additional information such as stock-on-hand information;
  • As at 7 June 2020, approximately 2600 suppliers have uploaded stock-on-hand information. This initiative will enable public sector buyers to be able to source PPE products with service providers who actually have stock;
  • They can select service providers according to their province, districts and towns etc;
  • They can further select service providers according to their BEE status, % black ownership, military veterans, black youth, black women, owned by black persons with disabilities, rural or township based business and SME status.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW993

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to his media release on 17 May 2020, in which he reported that a total number of 21 314 tests for Covid-19 were done on citizens throughout the Republic during the 24 hour period since 16 May 2020, he can indicate (a) what total number of test results are outstanding and still need to be finalised by public and private laboratories on a daily basis for Covid-19, (b) from what dates these test results are behind in each province and (c) what are the reasons for the (i) specified delays and (ii) Republic not being able to reach the stated goal of 30 000 tests per day; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total number of outstanding tests fluctuates on a daily basis, mainly due to the increased community screening that was undertaken in the provinces with corresponding increase in demand for testing for persons under investigation. The number of outstanding COVID-19 tests as at 16 June 2020 in the public sector is currently 54 901, obtaining data from the private sector is proving difficult. The weekly outstanding tests are tabulated below, with backlogs being cleared:

 

09/05/20

14/05/20

21/05/20

25/05/20

28/05/20

04/06/20

09/06/20

10/06/20

11/06/20

16/06/20

Total

49 550

58 930

101 000

96 480

83 767

81 069

70 219

63 244

57 034

54 901

(b) Currently the outstanding tests are about 107 hours old, this is approximately 4 and a half days.

(c) (i) The outstanding tests started in the first week of May 2020 when demand exceeded supply, this was due to:

  • A global shortage of extraction and high throughput kits for undertaking the tests;
  • Logistical issues – interruptions with production, flights cancellations, customs delays;
  • The number of tests allocated to the country is not determined by what the country ordered or needs but by what the supplier can provide.

(ii) The Republic has the capacity to undertake 30 000 tests per day, the key challenge being faced is the supply of chemicals and reagents to undertake the testing. Testing will be prioritised in the hotspot areas especially among the vulnerable persons (greater than 60 years of age and those with underlying medical conditions).

END.

18 June 2020 - NW995

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, given the worldwide trend that statistics of positive cases and deaths due to Covid-19 are made available in terms of age, gender and race, he will consider to release statistics for positive cases and deaths in the Republic in terms of age, gender and race on a daily basis; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. We release data on Covid-19 daily. The following information is contained in the data daily reports to the public:

  • Cumulative number of tests conducted by public and private sector laboratories;
  • Daily new number of tests conducted by public and private sector laboratories;
  • Cumulative number of positive cases identified by province;
  • Cumulative number of recoveries by province;
  • Cumulative number of deaths per province, including age and gender distribution of deaths; and
  • We will indicate the issue of race classification later.

2. I am willing to make a statement in the House in this regard.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1124

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether he has been informed about an anonymous tip-off from a healthcare worker in Gauteng that the National Institute Communicable Disease has advised to no longer conduct secondary retests to patients who have supposedly recovered; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what the relevant details; (2) what are the conditions of second tests being conducted on those who have tested negative and then requested a second test and (b) how often do healthcare workers in hospitals and clinics undergo testing of Coronavirus, more so the workforce that works with patients of Covid-19?

Reply:

1. Policies are constantly reviewed to meet the demands of an evolving epidemic. Due to the global shortage of testing extraction kits, earlier policies that advocated repeat testing had to be revised. The National Institute for Communicable Diseases has aligned its recommendation to WHO Guidelines and national resources imperatives. Second tests are not conducted on persons who are negative and asymptomatic due to the shortage of testing kits.

2. (a) Those persons that test negative and are asymptomatic are not tested again, however those that are symptomatic- tests are repeated for these individuals, especially those that are at high risk.

(b) The health professional staff are not tested routinely except if they have symptoms of Covid-19 or fulfil the criteria of a high-risk exposure with a person who tested positive with Covid-19. They may after seven days of self-isolation be clinically evaluated and tested on day 8 with the possibility of early return to work if they have a negative test and are clinically well. They will continue to be monitored for symptoms till day 14 and are counselled on personal hygiene measures. Health professional staff are monitored daily through symptom screening. The rationale is that there are not enough test kits and targeted testing is needed. Risk assessments in health care settings, use of public health measures, personal hygiene, training on Covid-19 and personal protective equipment all contribute to a lowered risk of transmission exposure.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1030

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether in the past three years his department has come across any cases of the condition called Paediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome that is responsible for the hospitalisation of hundreds of children overseas; if so, (a) what number of cases and (b) where were they found; (2) whether his department has found that this condition is in some way linked to the coronavirus; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Department is not aware of any cases of Paediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in South Africa. This is not unexpected. The condition remains very rare, and has only been documented in areas which have experienced a very high incidence of COVID-19 infection. In addition, most children have presented two to four weeks after the peak of the epidemic.

It is therefore likely that any cases which may occur in South Africa will present later in the year, during or after the expected peak in COVID-19 cases. It is however important that health care workers and parents remain alert as cases may be missed unless a high index of suspicion is maintained.

Any cases that are identified will be notified through the Notifiable Medical Conditions system, as well as to the World Health Organization clinical database.

(2) Evidence of past infection with coronavirus or exposure to someone with COVID-19 infection is part of the WHO case definition of the condition. The Department of Health currently uses the same case definition.

END.

Background

Most children with COVID-19 infection are asymptomatic or exhibit mild symptoms. However, in the last three months a small number of children have been identified who develop a significant systemic inflammatory response[1].

This rare syndrome shares common features with other paediatric inflammatory conditions including: Kawasaki disease, staphylococcal and streptococcal toxic shock syndromes, bacterial sepsis and macrophage activation syndromes. It can also present with unusual abdominal symptoms with excessive inflammatory markers. Affected children may require paediatric intensive care and input from paediatric infectious diseases, cardiology, and rheumatology specialists.

This syndrome has been named Paediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome, and the World Health Organization has developed the following case definition[2]:

Children and adolescents 0–19 years of age with fever > 3 days AND two of the following:                                

  1. Rash or bilateral non-purulent conjunctivitis or muco-cutaneous inflammation signs (oral, hands or feet).
  2. Hypotension or shock.
  3. Features of myocardial dysfunction, pericarditis, valvulitis, or coronary abnormalities (including ECHO findings or elevated Troponin/NT-proBNP),
  4. Evidence of coagulopathy (by PT, PTT, elevated d-Dimers).
  5. Acute gastrointestinal problems (diarrhoea, vomiting, or abdominal pain).

AND

Elevated markers of inflammation such as ESR, C-reactive protein, or procalcitonin. 

AND

No other obvious microbial cause of inflammation, including bacterial sepsis, staphylococcal or streptococcal shock syndromes.

AND

Evidence of COVID-19 (RT-PCR, antigen test or serology positive), or likely contact with patients with COVID-19.

As data on this condition remains very limited, clinicians have been requested to submit details of identified cases to a Global COVID-19 Clinical Data Platform.

  1. Royal College of Paediatricians and Guidance: Paediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19. https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/sites/default/files/2020-05/COVID-19-Paediatric-multisystem-%20inflammatory%20syndrome-20200501.pdf. Accessed 1st June 2020.

  2. World Health Organization. Scientific Brief: Multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children and adolescents with COVID-19. Geneva, World Health Organization. 15th May 2020. https://www.who.int/publications-detail/multisystem-inflammatory-syndrome-in-children-and-adolescents-with-covid-19. Accessed: 1st June 2020.

18 June 2020 - NW1031

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has investigated the effects of wearing masks for long periods of time in view of reports of both adults and children fainting due to wearing the mask for long hours; if not, why not; if so, (2) whether, since it is now mandatory for citizens to wear masks when they leave the house, his department can and will take responsibility for persons who develop adverse health effects due to wearing of the masks for long periods of time; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No, the Department has not undertaken any investigations on the effects of wearing masks for long periods as there is substantial published research on this important topic. The wearing of cloth masks by the general public for long-periods is commonplace in several countries prior to Covid-19. Similarly, the wearing of surgical masks by healthcare personnel for long periods is standard practice and has been found to be safe. Cloth masks are better tolerated than surgical masks or N95 respirators used by healthcare workers. Fainting may occur when the mask is worn incorrectly such that the nose and mouth are occluded, but as far as we have been able to ascertain, there are no peer-reviewed scientific reports of this. There are anecdotal accounts of people passing out from long-term use of N95 respirators;

2. Wearing of cloth masks has been shown in many reports to reduce community transmission of the virus and therefore is a necessary intervention like hand hygiene and social distancing. The National Department of Health will ensure that whether the person wears a mask or not, anyone in respiratory distress will be provided the best possible care in our healthcare facilities. 

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1100

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How does his department (a) choose and (b) allocate the service providers that provide food at each quarantine site; (2) whether the tenders to provide food at quarantine sites are advertised; if not, why not; if so, where are they advertised; (3) (a) on what basis are the service providers procured and (b) what amount is budgeted for the tenders?

Reply:

1. When private sites are procured to function as quarantine facilities, the rate negotiated includes all meals and forms part of the Service Level Agreement signed between the National Department of Public Works & Infrastructure and the facility. Where National or Provincial parks are being used, the park itself or tourism board provide catering. If such a site decides to outsource the service it is done based on their Supply Chain Management processes. For state-owned sites however, the processes for providing food is managed by the Provincial Department of Health and procured based on government Supply Chain Management processes;

2. There is an approved protocol agreement between the National Department of Public Works & Infrastructure and National Department of Health related to procurement of private facilities that include catering. Where the tenders or procurements are advertised for public facilities it would depend on the size of the contract and the normal Supply Chain Management processes the provincial departments follow;

3. (a) The service providers are procured as per standard Supply Chain Management principles;

(b) The budget for the provision of food is not fixed. It is need based and would vary based on the size of the site, the number of people that it needs to cater for, the duration that the food is to be supplied for and the basis for provisioning.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1128

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the admission by The Presidency that information regarding Covid19 was intentionally withheld from the public stating managing of panic as a reason to do so, (a) which information in particular was kept away from the public, (b) how has and/or will this affect public response to lockdown regulations and (c) what is the true status of hospitals in handling the pandemic?

Reply:

a) We cannot respond specifically on this question as it is a matter that was relating to The Presidency. It is best that this question is addressed to The Presidency;

b) As indicated above it is not clear what information The Presidency was referring to therefore we cannot provide more details in this regard;

c) The details are as follows:

(i) The Modelling consortium Incident Management Team has developed detailed projections and recommendations of the hospital requirements in all provinces including isolation beds, general beds and critical care beds;

(ii) A National Hospital Readiness Task Team has been established comprising of clinicians, disaster management experts and experienced hospital managers. The role of this team is to provide guidance and support to the provinces on all aspects of hospital readiness;

(iii) The Department has developed a surge strategy, which guides the provinces in various areas of health system support. The strategy also includes guidance on the management of the various categories of the covid-19 patients. Alongside this strategy, a detailed guidance has already been provided to all hospitals on all aspects of hospital readiness including in the form of Action Plans. Ten of these plans have already been provided to the hospitals covering: Preparation, Area allocation, Command and Control, Bed Statistics, Safety, Communication, Assessment, Decontamination, Surge capacity and Triage;

(iv) All hospitals have been provided with an on-line assessment of readiness including: equipment requirements, oxygen requirements, operational management, case management, infection prevention and control, human resources, infrastructure, medicines, linen, supply chain and support services;

(v) Hospitals have been provided with detailed clinical guidelines for the clinical management of patients;

(vi) Ventilators that were donated by the US Government have been distributed to hospitals in Gauteng, Western Cape and Eastern Cape Provinces;

(vii) All provinces have developed and have started implementing detailed hospital readiness strategies;

(viii) The bed allocation for the covid-19 response is as follows:

  • General beds = 12 029;
  • High Critical Beds = 2 309;
  • High care beds = 13 129.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1103

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

Following the announcement by the National Coronavirus Command Council on 2 April 2020 that South Africans may travel overseas to seek medical attention, what measures are in place to accommodate South Africans stranded in (a) Zimbabwe, (b) Mozambique, (c) Botswana and (d) Eswatini who need to be repatriated back to the Republic for health reasons?

Reply:

Measures have been put in place to allow all South Africans to be able to come back home, the below-mentioned is applicable to all countries including those listed (a) to (d):

Medical Evacuation processes have been developed to accomodate every person who requires to travel into South Africa for medical attention including foreign nationals. South Afrcians who are in need of medical attention may travel back into the country to obtain all necessary medical attention. This is managed through the embassies who then communicate through to the Department of International Relations and Cooperation (Dirco). Depending on the condition or nature of illness of the person, they are allowed to enter the country by means of an ambulance or general transportation in cases that do not warrant ambulance services. The application process for medical evacuation is facilitated by the referring health facility or directly from the embassy in the case of outpatients.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1126

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his undertakings that the Republic’s participation in vaccination trials for coronavirus as the country is part of the Health Emergency Solidarity Trial under the auspices of the World Health Organizations and further made an assertion that fears raised by society around this should not be the case as the nature and ethics of the trials are unfounded because times have changed, in what way (a) have the ethics of the trials changed from their historical association with the abuse of human rights and dignity and (b) will the Republic be participating as guinea pigs and/or as collaborators of the scientific process from initial stages and not just on the receiving end?

Reply:

a) The World Health Organisation (WHO) Solidarity Trial is a global study that is evaluating therapeutic interventions to support the treatment of patients admitted with COVID-19. This protocol describes a randomised trial among adults (age ≥18 years) hospitalised for COVID-19 that randomly allocates them between four treatment arms, each to be given in addition to the usual standard of care in the participating hospital. Randomisation is proposed into the following 4 arms: a) Standard of care; b) Remdesivir; c) Lopinavir-Ritonavir with Interferon β1b; and hydrochloroquine. This trial will be subjected to South African research standards to protect human rights through regulatory approval for clinical trials and ethics, besides similar processes being undertaken at a global level. The ethical review is rigorous and robust in ensuring that a relevant Research Ethics Committee protects potential participants by taking into account potential risks and benefits for the community in which the research will be carried out. In line with ethical principles, the Ethics Committee ensures protection of individual autonomy through informed consent; protecting participants against grievous bodily harm, and justice in assessing risks and benefits of the study

The South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) is statutorily obliged to ensure that medicines, drugs and other health care products available in the country comply with the requirements for safety, quality and efficacy. It is also authorised to terminate a trial when serious breaches of Good Clinical Practice (GCP) occur, and where participants in clinical trials have had, their safety or well-being compromised. To date, a number of clinical trials have been approved in South Africa to determine the effectiveness of different therapeutic interventions to treat and prevent SARS-CoV-2 infection. SAHPRA has reviewed and approved one COVID-19 vaccine trial application submitted by Professor Shabir Madhi who is one of South Africa’s leading vaccinology experts and is the director of Wits University and the Medical Research Council Respiratory and Meningeal Pathogens Research Unit (RMPRU). The proposed vaccine study will be undertaken by RMPRU, in partnership with the Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute and the Setshaba Research Unit, organised under the auspices of Wits University’s flagship vaccinology programme, the African Leadership in Vaccinology Expertise (ALIVE).

b) The South African Solidarity Trial Team is led by Prof Helen Rees and senior academics and clinicians from eight medical schools who have made major contributions to the study design. These researchers have been conducting community advocacy, as well as engaging communities and healthcare workers on the ground.

The leading hospitals in South Africa are:

• Livingston Tertiary Hospital and Dora Nginza Hospital (Nelson Mandela University)

• Dr George Mukhari Hospital (Sefako Makgatho Health Science University)

• Tygerberg Hospital (Stellenbosch University)

• Groote Schuur Hospital (University of Cape Town)

• Military Hospital, NHLS Universitas Hospital, Pelonomi Hospital and a private hospital with Mediclinic (University of Free State)

• King Edward Addington and Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital (University of KwaZulu-Natal)

• Steve Biko Academic Hospital (University of Pretoria)

• Baragwanath and Charlotte Maxeke (Wits University)

The candidate COVID-19 vaccine that has been approved for study was developed by Oxford University in the UK and is called ChAdOx1. The Oxford University vaccine developers have completed the early Phase 1 trials in the UK and have demonstrated that the vaccine is safe and immunogenic. There is now a second phase clinical trial being undertaken in the UK to determine the safety and efficacy of the vaccine. There are over 1200 participants already enrolled, and a further 9,000 participants to be enrolled over the next few months. Brazil and Kenya will also be involved in clinical trials of the same vaccine. In South Africa, it is proposed that 2000 volunteers will be recruited to join the study, with similar numbers to be enrolled in the study planned in Brazil. The ability of RMPRU to lead the proposed study has been assessed and approved by the governing regulatory authorities in South Africa.

COVID-19 vaccine development is proceeding at an unprecedented speed, with many of the world’s leading scientific institutions contributing to this effort. There are currently over 100 vaccines in development and clinical trials have been undertaken in the UK, USA and France. For products such as vaccines, it is critically important that studies are performed in Southern Hemisphere countries including in the African region, concurrently with studies in Northern Hemisphere countries. This allows evaluation of the efficacy and safety of candidate vaccines to be assessed in a global context, failing which the introduction of many life-saving vaccines into public immunization programmes for Low Middle Income Countries (LMICs) frequently lags behind that in High Income Countries (HIC). Furthermore, if South Africa participates in the development of a vaccine it places an ethical obligation on the vaccine developers to allow early access to that vaccine in the countries where the research was undertaken.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW994

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to his media release on 17 May 2020, in which he reported that a total number of 10 737 341 persons have been screened throughout the Republic for Covid-19, he can indicate (a) what number of persons have been screened in each province, (b) on what date(s) did the specified screening in each province take place, (c) in what areas and/or suburbs of each province the screening took place and (d) what period of time will it take to screen each and every citizen in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) As of 3 June 2020, 15,224,792 individuals have been screened for COVID19. The provincial breakdown is tabulated below:

Province

Number of Individuals Screened

Eastern Cape

1,419,988

Free State

1,914,289

Gauteng

1,835,140

KwaZulu-Natal

1,755,049

Limpopo

3,098,840

Mpumalanga

1,889,989

North West

1,892,341

Northern Cape

838,831

Western Cape

580,325

National

15,224,792

(b) The community screening campaign started on the 8th of April 2020 and continues to date, however a shift to a more targeted screening strategy commenced on the 18th of May 2020;

(c) The screening activities focussed in areas with confirmed CODIV-19 cases such as townships, villages, farms, suburbs including vulnerable groups such as old age homes, prisons, supermarkets etc. The number of people screened is highest in Limpopo Province as a result of careening even in districts with no confirmed COVID-19 cases. The list of areas where community screening was done received from GP,NW, EC and LIM is attached. Some provinces did not respond to the request on the areas covered through community screening;

(d) There is no evidence on the time it will take to physically screen every person in the country as this will be influenced by the distance and travel time between households, demographic structure, the number of household members per household and the working hours per each person doing screening. In order to reach others an application called Healthcheck was deployed. It can be used by anyone with a mobile phone to check and report symptoms. Between April 13 to June 3,922,626 users screened for symptoms through Healthcheck.

2. Statements are made on the screening activities as part of the media release on COVID-19.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1122

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the recent oversight visit to the Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital, where it was brought to our attention that there is a challenge with managing personal protective equipment (PPE) stock for workers, which is a challenge in many other hospitals, what has the department done to standardise stock control of PPEs (a) nationally, (b) provincially and (c) in local clinics; (2) whether the system differs per capacity of each facility; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) nationally, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

  • Seventeen (17) PPE items were identified as minimum requirements for the prevention of the spread of COVID-19;
  • Specifications for the identified 17 PPE items have been developed for use and adopted by Provincial Departments of Health and they are currently being used in procuring PPE equipment of acceptable quality;
  • Prices were set for each PPE item in by National Department of Health in collaboration with National Treasury and issued under National Instruction Note 3 of 2020/21 and subsequently repealed and replaced by National Instruction Note 5 of 2020/21 in an attempt to prevent price exploitation or unnecessary price hike by manufacturers and distributors;
  • The Department issued Infection Prevention Control (IPC) guidance to cover PPE use and change regimes. The correct use of PPE is key to forecasting PPE demand and ensure correct stock holding is secured at facilities;
  • A Demand Forecasting Model was developed to ensure that the correct PPE items that are compliant with the set specifications are procured at the right price, right quantity and correct quality;
  • Stock Visibility Systems (SVS) was expanded for it to cater for both PPE and Pharmaceutical products which is funded and procured by NDOH and distributed devices were rolled out to provinces. Currently facilities in the provinces can capture their stock levels using SVS;
  • Another tool called PPE Reporting Tool (PPERT) was developed at National and was rolled out to provincial level to capture stock levels and order information of PPE at depot level;
  • In cases of shortages, donations were used to augment stock levels at the facilities in the provinces;
  • Training in the use of SVS were provided to provincial users and access to National Surveillance Centre (NSC) provided to empower provincial decision makers to access, interpret and take action regarding stock levels, distribution and logistics of PPE and sourcing and procurement of PPE items;
  • A Supplier Mapping Portal was developed to provide Provincial Health departments access to information of PPE manufacturers and distributors available in their prospective provinces.

(b) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) provincially, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

Ensure that each province appoints a dedicated Provincial PPE coordinator who monitors stock level continuously from depot to facilities so that they can be able to track the following:

  • Provincial visibility of stock on hand;
  • Stock use, quality and specification of PPE;
  • Storage and distribution;
  • Demand forecasting;
  • Allocation of PPE stocks.

(c) In order to standardize stock control of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in local clinics, the Department of Health has taken measures as follows:

  • Stock Visibility System (SVS) has been expanded and rolled out thereof to local clinics.

2. The stock management systems differ per province and per facility depending on the IT infrastructure in so far as monitoring the following activities:

  • storage capacity;
  • distribution method of PPE;
  • stock ordering system, and
  • replenishment methods;
  • stock count procedures; and
  • controls of PPE.

END.

18 June 2020 - NW1101

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether any medical studies have been conducted on the effects of 5G radiation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) studies have been conducted and (b) are the effects thereof?

Reply:

a) Yes, several studies have been done internationally on the effects of 5G radiation and published in accredited scientific journals. Some of these studies are:

(i) Towards 5G communication systems: Are there health implications? International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health (2018);

(ii) 5G Radiation and COVID-19: The Non-Existent Connection. International Journal of Research in Electronics and Computer Engineering (2020);

(iii) 5G Wireless Communication and Health Effects—A Pragmatic Review Based on Available Studies Regarding 6 to 100 GHz. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (2019);

(iv) 5G wireless telecommunications expansion: Public health and environmental implications. Environmental Research (2018);

(v) Adverse health effects of 5G mobile networking technology under real-life conditions. Toxicology Letters (2020);

The World Health Organisation (WHO): 5G mobile networks and health (February 2020) acknowledges two international bodies that have produced electromagnetic fields exposure guidelines that countries need adhere to: a) The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (2020) guidelines for limiting exposure to Electromagnetic Fields; and b) The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, through the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety has produced guidelines for radiofrequencies up to 300 GHz, including the frequencies under discussion for 5G.

b) According to the International Commission on Non‐Ionizing Radiation Protection 2020 Guidelines, 5G is safe. These Guidelines are the revision of the 1998 Guidelines and provide protection for humans from exposure to Electro-Magnetic fields from 100 Kilo Hertz to 300 Giga Hertz. The only substantiated adverse health effects caused by exposure to radiofrequency Electro-magnetic Fields are nerve stimulation, changes in the permeability of cell membranes, and effects due to temperature elevation. Kostoff et al (2020), and Russell (2018) have argued that radiofrequency radiation (RF) used in 5G is increasingly being recognized as a new form of environmental pollution, and adverse systemic health effects beyond skin and eyes.

The WHO (2020) conclusion on 5G mobile networks and health was that no adverse health effect has been causally linked with exposure to wireless technologies. Health-related conclusions were drawn from studies performed across the entire radio spectrum but, so far, only a few studies have been carried out at the frequencies to be used by 5G. Tissue heating was identified as the main mechanism of interaction between radiofrequency fields and the human body. Radiofrequency exposure levels from current technologies resulted in negligible temperature rise in the human body. As the frequency increases, there is less penetration into the body tissues and absorption of the energy becomes more confined to the surface of the body (skin and eye). Provided that the overall exposure remains below international guidelines, no consequences for public health are anticipated.

END.

Annexure: Reply to Question No. 1101 References

Reference

Abstract

Findings

1. Di Ciaula, A. (2018). Towards 5G communication systems: Are there health implications? International journal of hygiene and environmental health, 221(3), 367-375.

Preliminary observations showed that MMW increase skin temperature, alter gene expression, promote cellular proliferation and synthesis of proteins linked with oxidative stress, inflammatory and metabolic processes, could generate ocular damages, affect neuro-muscular dynamics. Further studies are needed to better and independently explore the health effects of RF-EMF in general and of MMW in particular. However, available findings seem sufficient to demonstrate the existence of biomedical effects, to invoke the precautionary principle, to define exposed subjects as potentially vulnerable and to revise existing limits.

  • RF-EMF exposure is rising and health effects of are still under investigation.
  • Both oncologic and non-cancerous chronic effects have been suggested.
  • 5G networks could have health effects and will use MMW, still scarcely explored.
  • Adequate knowledge of RF-EMF biological effects is also needed in clinical practice.
  • Underrating the problem could lead to a further rise in non-communicable diseases.

2. Uthman, M., Shaibu, F. E., Bara’u Gafai Najashi, I. F., Labran, A. S., & Umar, U. S. A. (2020) 5G Radiation and COVID-19: The Non-Existent Connection. International Journal of Research in Electronics and Computer Engineering, Vol. 8 Issue 2 Apr.-June 2020

This paper presents an overview of the 5G mobile technology alongside an overview of coronavirus diseases and demonstrate that there is no connection between them by providing the scientific evidence of research carried out by international organizations in charge of 5G technology.

From all the discussions it has been established that coronaviruses are not new disease pathogens but there have been various outbreaks of the disease over the years with various strains. The latest of which is COVID-19. 5G technology is still in development and has not been fully deployed around the world yet. As such, there is no correlation between COVID-19 and 5G technology. COVID-19 originate from animals (bats) and are transmitted to humans and subsequently spread from human to human, certainly not through 5G radiation.

3. Simkó, M., & Mattsson, M. O. (2019). 5G Wireless Communication and Health Effects—A Pragmatic Review Based on Available Studies Regarding 6 to 100 GHz. International journal of environmental research and public health, 16(18), 3406.

This review analyzed 94 relevant publications performing in vivo or in vitro investigations. Each study was characterized for: study type (in vivo, in vitro), biological material (species, cell type, etc.), biological endpoint, exposure (frequency, exposure duration, power density), results, and certain quality criteria.

In order to evaluate and summarize the 6–100 GHz data in this review, it draws the following conclusions:

Regarding the health effects of MMW in the 6–100 GHz frequency range at power densities not exceeding the exposure guidelines the studies provide no clear evidence, due to contradictory information from the in vivo and in vitro investigations.

Regarding the possibility of “non-thermal” effects, the available studies provide no clear explanation of any mode of action of observed effects.

Regarding the quality of the presented studies, too few studies fulfil the minimal quality criteria to allow any further conclusions.

4. The International Commission on Non‐Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines (2020)

The Germany-based scientific body that assesses the health risks of radio broadcasts, called for new guidelines for millimetre-wave 5G, the most high-frequency version of the telecommunications standard.

5G is safe, according to the international body in charge of setting limits on exposure to radiation.

5. Russell, C. L. (2018). 5G wireless telecommunications expansion: Public health and environmental implications. Environmental research, 165, 484-495.

This article will reviews relevant electromagnetic frequencies, exposure standards and current scientific literature on the health implications of 2G, 3G, 4G exposure, including some of the available literature on 5G frequencies.

5G technologies are far less studied for human or environmental effects. It is argued that the addition of this added high frequency 5G radiation to an already complex mix of lower frequencies, will contribute to a negative public health outcome both from both physical and mental health perspectives. Radiofrequency radiation (RF) is increasingly being recognized as a new form of environmental pollution. Like other common toxic exposures, the effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation (RF EMR) will be problematic if not impossible to sort out epidemiologically as there no longer remains an unexposed control group.

6. International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection. (2020). Guidelines for limiting exposure to Electromagnetic Fields (100 kHz to 300 GHz). Health Physics, 118(5), 483-524.

This document presents the revised guidelines, which provide protection for

humans from exposure to EMFs from 100 kHz to 300 GHz.

The only substantiated adverse health effects caused by exposure to radiofrequency EMFs are nerve stimulation, changes in the permeability of cell membranes, and effects due to temperature elevation. There is no evidence of adverse health effects at exposure levels below the restriction levels in the ICNIRP (1998) guidelines and no evidence of an interaction mechanism that would predict that adverse health effects could occur due to radiofrequency EMF exposure below those restriction levels.

7. Kostoff, R. N., Heroux, P., Aschner, M., & Tsatsakis, A. (2020). Adverse health effects of 5G mobile networking technology under real-life conditions. Toxicology Letters, 323, 35-40.

This article identifies adverse effects of non-ionizing non-visible radiation (hereafter called

wireless radiation) reported in the premier biomedical literature.

  • Identifies wide-spectrum of adverse health effects of non-ionizing non-visible radiation.
  • Most laboratory experiments were not designed to identify the more severe adverse effects reflective of real-life conditions.
  • Many experiments do not include the real-life pulsing and modulation of the carrier signal.
  • Vast majority of experiments do not account for synergistic adverse effects of other toxic stimuli with wireless radiation.
  • 5G mobile networking technology will affect not only the skin and eyes, but will have adverse systemic effects as well.

8. World Health Organisation

(5G mobile networks and health

27 February 2020 | Q&A)

Two international bodies produce exposure guidelines on electromagnetic fields. Many countries currently adhere to the guidelines recommended by:

The International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection and,

The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, through the International Committee on Electromagnetic Safety

These guidelines are not technology-specific. They cover radiofrequencies up to 300 GHz, including the frequencies under discussion for 5G.

To date, and after much research performed, no adverse health effect has been causally linked with exposure to wireless technologies. Health-related conclusions are drawn from studies performed across the entire radio spectrum but, so far, only a few studies have been carried out at the frequencies to be used by 5G.

Tissue heating is the main mechanism of interaction between radiofrequency fields and the human body. Radiofrequency exposure levels from current technologies result in negligible temperature rise in the human body.

As the frequency increases, there is less penetration into the body tissues and absorption of the energy becomes more confined to the surface of the body (skin and eye). Provided that the overall exposure remains below international guidelines, no consequences for public health are anticipated.

18 June 2020 - NW1099

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the current average collection rate of medication at all public health facilities in each province; (2) in view of the fact that patients with tuberculosis and/or HIV/Aids are more susceptible to the coronavirus, what measures will his department put in place to (a) trace patients who have defaulted on their medication because of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 and (b) assist in the distribution of the medication in each province?

Reply:

(1) There is variability in the average medicine collection rates overtime, taking into consideration public holidays and the number of months supplied to patients on chronic medication at various facilities. Based on the information available to the National Department of Health, the average rate of collection for the first four months of 2020 is depicted in the table below:

 

Jan

Feb

Mar

April*

National

89.9%

92.6%

86.7%

84.8%

Eastern Cape

94.5%

94.4%

87.8%

87.0%

Free State

94.6%

96.9%

87.0%

75.9%

Gauteng

91.0%

96.2%

86.1%

81.6%

KwaZulu Natal

92.3%

94.4%

88.0%

85.5%

Limpopo

95.3%

96.2%

88.4%

81.5%

Mpumalanga

93.1%

97.2%

91.8%

87.5%

North West

95.6%

96.1%

83.1%

85.6%

Northern Cape

94.5%

93.4%

77.1%

78.9%

2. (a) Tracing of patients who defaulted on their medication

  • Tracking and tracing (telephonically and in-person) of clients lost to follow-up is ongoing in the majority of our facilities. District supporting partners and Community Health Workers (CHWs) assist with community tracking and tracing of patients; a list of missed appointments is drawn weekly from Tier.Net and those who missed appointments are contacted via SMS (by District support partners) and in some cases are delivered to patients directly;
  • The Department of Health has developed messaging for People Living with HIV (PLHIV) and people living with TB regarding the importance of treatment. These various messages have been circulated to clients through SMS and social media;
  • The Adherence Guidelines SOP also provide the procedure to track and trace patients who defaulted.

(b) Distribution of medicines in each province

  • The Department of Health has been implementing the Central Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) programme, a National Department of Health (NDoH) initiative to improve access to chronic medicines to stable patients by enabling them to collect their repeat medicines prescriptions from a convenient collection point near their home or place of employment.
  • Eligible patients (i.e. stable on treatment) on ARVs and other chronic medication collect their medicines for free from a convenient contracted pick-up point such as Dis-Chem, Clicks, Pick-n-Pay, Pharmacy, or even a local Spaza shop. The majority of these service providers have been open during the National lockdown, allowing clients to collect their treatment without interruption.
  • In health facilities, before and during the lockdown, all stable patients are given two months TEE supply and three months TLD supply of ARVs.
  • The Department of Health has also strengthened in-facility processes and support to PLHIV on ART in order to maintain adherence.
  • For TB patients, the Department of Health has made arrangements for home delivery of TB medicines by Community Health Workers. The Community Health Workers also collect sputum from patients who require follow up testing.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW789

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the total number of specialists who arrived in the Republic with the medical personnel from the Republic of Cuba on 27 April 2020 to assist the Republic in the fight against Covid-19, (b) are the respective fields of specialisation of each specialist and (c) are the details of the professional qualification(s) of each of the specified specialists; (2) what total number of the Cuban medical personnel are proficient in (a) English and/or (b) any other official South African language; (3) what is the (a) total cost associated with the deployment of the Cuban medical personnel in the Republic in the (i) 2020 and (ii) 2021 calendar years and (b) detailed itemised breakdown of how the costs were calculated?

Reply:

1. (a) To date the Republic of Cuba has availed 187 Medical Specialists who will be assisting South Africa in the response to Covid-19.

Epidemiology (Technologist)

Health Technology

Family Physician

Biostatistics Dr

Biotechnologist

Public Health Specialist

(b) The 187 Medical Specialists in the areas that the Country is unable to produce enough. These are qualified in Biostatistics, Epidemiologists, Family Physicians and Health Technologists

(c) Epidemiology (Technologist); Health Technology; Family Physician; Biostatistics, Biotechnologist and Public Health Specialist

2. All of them

3. The following table reflects the details in this regard

 

Activity

Number

Estimated Cost

Notes on the activities

Registration with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA)

187

R734 100.00

It is a norm that the registration cost is paid by an individual health professional to the Council. However, as per the Government-to-Government Agreement, the South African pays the fee to the HPCSA and thereafter, deduct the full amount of registration from the individual health professionals’ first salary. This means there is no actual cost to be incurred by the South African Government, however it is a convenient process arranged to ensure that all of the professionals are registered accordingly.

Accommodation

187

 

Most Provinces have entered into agreements with providers for a 12 months period. Other provinces are only accommodating the brigade for May and June and then move them to hotspots Districts / communities. Therefore, the accommodation in these areas are still not confirmed, as negotiations are still underway. A table below shows the cost on accommodation where available. The Provinces will first consider Doctors quarters where the brigade will be stationed.

Salaries

187

R239 181 933

The estimated budget cost is informed by actual appointment levels of the Cuban Health Brigade as determined by their Registration category, which took into consideration years of experience. All the Family Physicians and Biostatisticians are appointed at Grade 2 of Medical Officer level and Epidemiology Technologists/ Health Technology and Public Health Specialists are at Deputy Director level while Biomedical Engineers are at ASD level. Table below give overall illustration of salary levels and numbers in each level.

 

ACCOMMODATION OF CUBAN BRIGADE IN PROVINCES

Province

Accomodation

Period

Costs

Eastern Cape

The brigade has been distributed in various Facilities across the Province. They are residing in B&Bs and should be accommodated for the full period of their contract

12 Months

R384 000.00

Free State

The brigade is currently accommodated at Premier Hotel in Bloemfontein, while going through orientation processes. They will be accommodated until end of June at Premier hotel.

After which from 1 July 2020, they will be distributed to facilities across the Province and they will be staying in Facility accommodation

May-June

July 2020-April 2021

R162 464.00

(R3500X17X10)

R595 000

Gauteng

The Brigade are accommodated at Burgers Park till 30 June 2020

It is expected that they will be distributed across the Province from I July 2020 to April 2021. Accommodation will then to be Provided by Hospitals

15 May-30 June 2020

July 2020-April 2021

Negotiated rate at Burgers Park Hotel is R1000 per room include breakfast, lunch and dinner, laundry services and hand sanitation

KwaZulu-Natal

Information from the Province will be submitted in due course.

   

Limpopo

The brigade is currently accommodated at Zanami Lodge (Polokwane), while being orientated.

It is expected that they will be distributed across the Province from I July 2020 to April 2021. Accommodation will then to be Provided by Hospitals

19 May 2020 to June 2020

July 2020-April 2021

R252 000.00

Not yet finalised

Mpumalanga

Information outstanding

Want a formal letter to HOD

19 May-19 August

 

Northern Cape

The brigade is currently accommodated at B&B till June 2020

It is expected that they will be distributed across the Province from I July 2020 to April 2021. Accommodation will then to be Provided by Hospitals

May –June 2020

July 2020-April 2021

R320 000.00

(9X12000X11)

R1 188 000.00

2 Doctors are at an Official Accommodation

North West

The brigades have been distributed across the Provincial districts staying in B&Bs and others in Hospital Accommodation

June 2020 – April 2021

R 2 016 000

Western Cape

The brigade is currently accommodated at B&B called Icon Luxury Apartments for 12 months.

12 months

R1 200 000 p/a

 

OVERALL - CUBAN BRIGADE HEALTH WORKFORCE

   
     

Qualification

Agreed Post Classification (DPSA)

No

Total cost

Family Physician

MO Gr 2

116

172,767,798

Health Technology (IM)

Deputy Director: Information Management

32

25,941,166

Epidemiology Technologists (IM)

Deputy Director: Information Management

18

14,715,735

Biostatistics (Medical Doctors)

MO Gr 2

13

19,566,449

Public Health Specialist

DPSA salary level 11 (NON OSD)

2

2,231,276

Biomedical Engineer

ASD Salary level 9

5

2,773,887

Nurse

Gr3

1

528,852

 

 

187

239,181,933

END.

08 June 2020 - NW611

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether all government hospitals have been sufficiently and constantly equipped with personal protective equipment (PPE) including (a) masks, (b) gloves, (c) hazmat suits, (d) sanitisers and (e) bleach to deal with COVID-19 infections; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Pelonomi Training Hospital in Bloemfontein has been adequately equipped with the specified PPE; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Government hospitals are constantly equipped with personal protective equipment (PPE) to deal with COVID-19 infections.

Information obtained from National Surveillance Center data as at end May 2020 indicated the following stock on hand at Provinces (reporting compliance at Gauteng has been low). Information is highly dependent on Provincial reporting.

It should be noted that the position can change on a daily basis and although stock may be available it may not be adequate in the long term

PROVINCE

STOCK ON HAND

 

MASKS

GLOVES

SANITISORS/ BLEACH

EC

443,962

796,481

10,934

FS

164,409

404,398

4,385

GP

55,715

23,636

7,258

KZN

2,205,748

5,541,039

991,071

LIMP

619,658

434,745

32,365

MPU

886,321

1,490,271

68,052

NC

57,703

355,844

339,729

NW

342,886

524,507

260,528

WC

2,085,684

5,758,626

17,925

TOTAL

6,862,086

15,302,547

1,732,247

2. Yes, Pelonomi Training Hospital has been adequately equipped with the PPE.

Description for Portal

Product Long Description

SIZE

Unit of Measure (UOM)

Latest Stock-on-Hand as per the indicated UOM

Surgical Gloves - Nitrile

Glove, surgical, sterile, Type 2 (gloves made primarily from nitrile rubber latex, polychloroprene rubber latex, styrene-butadiene rubber solution, styrene-butadiene rubber emulsion or thermoplastic-elastomer solution). Single use, Powder free, One pair (1 left + 1 right) of gloves are folded & packed in a paper wallet. The paper wallet is packed in a plastic pouch which is sealed from all sides. Inner package shall be clearly marked with the size and the designation "left" or "L" or "right" or "R" on the package. Easy donning. To comply with the latest issue of SANS 68
Packaged as pairs in Sterile Packages. Size:6; 6.5; 7; 7.5; 8; 8.5; 9
50 pairs of gloves. Box of 100

6

Pairs

300

   

6.5

Pairs

250

   

7

Pairs

450

   

7.5

Pairs

200

   

8

Pairs

350

   

8.5

Pairs

100

   

9

Pairs

0

Examination Gloves Latex

Glove, examination, non-sterile,type1 (gloves made primarily from natural rubber latex), Single use, Powder free, ambidextrous. SANS 11193-1,
Size: S; M; L & XL
Box of 100 gloves

S

Glove

0

   

M

Glove

20,00

   

L

Glove

19,400

   

XL

Glove

0

Examination Gloves Nitrile

Glove, examiniation, non-sterile, type2 (gloves made primarily from nitrile rubber latex, stryene-butadiene rubber solution, stryene-butadiene rubber emulsion or thermoplastic-elastomer solution) single use, Powder free, Ambidextrous. SANA 11193-1
Size: S; M; L & XL
Box of 100 gloves

S

Glove

0

   

M

Glove

0

   

L

Glove

0

   

XL

Glove

0

General Purpose Gloves

Gloves for general purposes and cleaning

 

Pairs

0

Surgical Mask (Medical)

Mask, face, aseptic: Fluid Resistant, Molded, Blue (3 PLY)

 

Unit

0

Mask Respirator N95

N95 Mask - Respirator

 

Unit

3,305

Mask Respirator KN95/FFP2

KN95 / FFP2 - Mask Respiratior / Dust Mask
Box of 10 Pieces

 

Unit

4,980

Apron

Apron, plastic, full body, single use, no-noise smooth plastic material
Length from neck: not less than 110cm
Width: not less than 65cm
Thickness: 25 micron
Ties length: not less than 50cm
Width: not less than 5cm

 

Unit

0

Eye Protection

Goggles
Good seal with the skin of the face,
Flexible PVC frame to easily fit with all face contours even with pressure, Enclose eyes and the surrounding areas,
Accommodate wearers with glasses,
Clear plastic lenses with fog and scratch resistant treatment

 

Each

76

Visor

Disposable Constructed from high-quality optically clear, distortion-free 7mil polyester film Anti-fog coating Must fit well over spectacles. Foam brow-band fits comfortably against the forehead. Headband/arms to holds visor in place disposable/reusable

 

Each

1,358

Gowns Disposable

Isollation gown
Protective 3- layers of spunbond meltblown spunbound fabric( Top layer of spunbound polypropylene, a middle layer of meltdown polypropylene and a bottom layer of meltdown polypropylene for light fluid contact and contact Isolation, elastic cuff, Tape-tab neck closure, Tie waist, Non Sterile
Dimensions: Large
Length: (from shoulder to hem) 116cm
Sleeve length: (from shoulder to wrist) 56cm
Belt length: 167cm; Belt Width: 5cm; Belt place: (neck to top of belt) 38cm

 

Each

0

Gowns Surgical

Gown, surgical, non-woven polypropylene body+- 54g/m sleeves +- 66g/m. Long sleeves with cuffs. Reinforced in chest and forearm areas. Resistant to liquid penetration. Lint free, non flammable, Bacteria barrier effeciency, to comply with SANS 53795, Compliance certificate to be submitted, Sterile, individual doudle peel packed

 

Each

0

Coveralls

Protective cover bodysuits, disposable
MEDIUM, LARGE, X-LARGE, XX-LARGE, 3X LARGE

M

Each

0

   

L

Each

0

   

XL

Each

0

   

XXL

Each

0

   

3XL

Each

0

Boot Covers

Overshoe, non-woven, single use. To be made from durable, water-repellent, opaque material Seam free under sole. Elasticated opening. Suitable for all size shoes

 

Pairs

20

Digital Thermometer

Digital Body Thermometer INFRARED NON CONTACT

 

Each

0

Saniters

Sanitizer, with not less than 70% alchohol
must comply to WHO-recommended handrub formulations

500ml

Units

23

   

1000ml

Units

0

   

1 litre

Units

0

   

20 litre

Units

0

   

25 litre

Units

10

Disinfectants

 

Sachets

Units

0

Biohazard bags

Bright red colour PP bags are easy to open and are used to dispose used Micro tips, Tubes and other plastic products, made of 60 micron/240 gauge thickness

 

Each

0

Body Bags

Manufactured from 280 micron reinforced PVC, both ends are stitched and sealed to prevent any leakage, there must be 3 handles on each side with a full length curved zip, all handles must be box stitched using Polycotton Corespun Polished 36 Tex thread, and box stitching dimensions are all 4cm x 3cm. The dimensions are as follows: Length: 2.4 METERS Width: 1 METER, Zip: 1.8 METERS, Sizes:(Child, Small, Medium, Large, Extra-large)

 

Each

0

Shoe-string bags

WHO Standards

 

Each

0

Spray Bottles

Spray Bottles

250 ml

Units

0

   

500ml

Units

0

END.

08 June 2020 - NW902

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the budget constraints in the public health sector, particularly at provincial level, (a) what has it cost his department to accommodate repatriated South Africans at the quarantine sites to date and (b) from which budget(s) were or will the costs be paid?

Reply:

(a) The State’s position has always been to first utilise state-owned facilities before utilising private facilities, the cost would differ based on facility availability, type of facility and ownership thereof.

For private-owned facilities the operational costs are included in the rate negotiated with the facilities and excludes all clinical services. The rate is negotiated by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) for each site and as such the National Department of Health does not get involved in this other than to provide the clinical and support services.

The costs therefore would be a combination of costs associated with the clinical services, support services and operationalisation of these sites as carried by the Department of Health and the procurement of private facilities as currently carried by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure.

(b) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure will be responsible for the infrastructure costs relating to quarantine facilities and the Department of Health will be responsible for the operationalization costs of the quarantine facilities.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW710

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Health

What measures does he intend to take to regulate retail stores which have emerged as a dangerous point of infection for COVID-19 to stop the surge in infections at such centres?

Reply:

Information from a number of provinces including the Eastern Cape, Gauteng, Kwazulu-Natal and Western Cape shows that during the lockdown retail stores became a node for the transmission of COVID-19. This should not surprise us as grocery shops were one of the essential parts of the economy that had to be kept open with high volumes of people congregating in them. Thus facilitating the spread of the virus. This also meant that infected shoppers – many of whom may have been asymptomatic (that is they didn’t know that they were infected) also infected employees in the retail sector. These employees then go back to their communities and the virus spreads in their local communities.

Provinces have implemented a number of steps to mitigate the risk of transmission in retail stores. In the Western Cape the Department of Economic Affairs and Tourism had several engagements with the owners and management of small and large retail outlets and mall management. They were provided with guidelines on the prevention of COVID-19 transmission, including deep cleaning, dealing with personal hygiene, dealing with staff that become symptomatic, making public announcements, etc. In Gauteng, the MECs for health and economic affairs met with the leadership of the retail sector in the province to discuss the implementation of measures to prevent transmission of the virus, including hand washing/ sanitizing and social distancing as well as the use of masks. The major retail stores are currently implementing these measures nation-wide. In the Eastern Cape, health officials have visited retail stores in urban areas to monitor compliance.

Workplace health and safety issues were also discussed at NEDLAC. These included the need to conduct risk assessments in all workplaces, implementation of public health measures to prevent the spread of the virus as well as personal hygiene measures. It was also agreed that sector specific guidelines will be produced and implemented

END.

08 June 2020 - NW900

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Why do quarantine protocols relating to the testing of persons differ from one site and/or facility to the next, as persons in the different sites and/or facilities are tested either on arrival or only after the expiry of 11 to 14 days of quarantine?

Reply:

As per the approved GUIDELINES FOR QUARANTINE AND ISOLATION IN RELATION TO COVID-19 EXPOSURE AND INFECTION it states that: “Because some quarantined people might be COVID-19 positive (or might become positive during the quarantine period), individuals in quarantine facilities must be kept under individual quarantine (self-quarantine) within the facility. Those who develop symptoms {meet the person-under-investigation (PUI) criteria} should be tested and managed appropriately.” It also indicates the following: “The recommended duration of quarantine for COVID-19 exposure is 14 days from the time of exposure (close contact or entering the country). If the patient remains well during the period of quarantine, they do not need to test/retest at the end of the 14-day period.”

There are certain circumstances that necessitate testing and others that do not. Testing is dependent on the risk assessment of the individual at any specific point in time.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW331

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Eastern Cape and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Eastern Cape

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

Alfred Nzo

447

65

65

10 731

Amathole

 

60

60

21 117

Buffalo City

 

45

45

2 750

Chris Hani

 

65

65

36 407

Joe Gqabi

 

45

45

25 617

Nelson Mandela Metro

 

40

40

1 957

OR Tambo

 

40

74

12 141

Sarah Baartman

 

53

53

58 245

END.

08 June 2020 - NW975

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Health

What number of false-positive test results for Covid-19 were detected in each province since the declaration of a national state of disaster?

Reply:

There have been claims of false positive results, however, it is difficult to confirm the claims because the same sample needs to be tested to determine if there are inconsistent results. The results are determined by the amount of virus in the sample and this can differ if samples are taken at different times. The National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS) will conduct external quality assurance and proficiency testing schemes to determine the quality of results. Proficiency testing schemes are performed by providing participants with test samples for analysis and determine how closely their results agree with the accepted values. Regular participation in a proficiency testing scheme provides staff with an insight into their laboratory’s performance, benchmark performance with that of the other participant laboratories and demonstrate to end user of analytical data, regulatory bodies and accreditation bodies that there is a commitment to measuring quality.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW914

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Since the start of the lockdown to prevent the spread of the Covid-19 pandemic, what has been the total number of persons in (a) public and (b) private hospitals, in each province who (i) were treated for hunger-related diseases, (ii) have died due to hunger-related diseases and (iii) are still being treated for hunger-related diseases; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

(1) (a) (i) The District Health Information System (DHIS) only collects nutrition-related data on severe acute malnutrition (SAM) in children under 5 years of age. The DHIS data is available for March and April 2020 and reflects that nationally 991 children were admitted in public hospitals for SAM in March 2020. In comparison 1220 children under 5 were admitted with SAM in March 2019. In April 2020 596 children under 5 were admitted to public hospitals with SAM compared to 1118 in April 2019. These data show that the number of children admitted with SAM were lower in March and April 2020 compared to the same period in 2019. Refer to Annexure 1.

(ii) According to the DHIS in March 2020 there were 83 SAM related deaths in public hospitals while in April 2020 there were 50. In comparison in March 2019 and April 2019 there were 91 SAM related deaths each month. As for SAM admissions, SAM deaths were lower in March and April 2020 compared to the same period in 2019. Refer to Annexure 1.

(iii) The DHIS does record the number of children or adults currently being treated for hunger-related diseases.

(b) The National Department of Health has no data from the private hospitals on number of people treated for hunger-related diseases, died from hunger related diseases or still being treated for hunger-related diseases.

(2) The statement has already been made on this matter.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW335

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in Limpopo and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Limpopo

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

Capricorn

164

59

59

21 705

Waterberg

 

48

48

44 913

Sekhukhune

 

56

56

13 528

Mopani

 

73

73

20 011

Vhembe

 

64

64

25 597

END.

08 June 2020 - NW460

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the transfer of baby Edward Erasmus between various hospitals (details furnished), (a) what were the complications during his birth, (b) what was done at the John Daniel Newberry Hospital to stabilise the baby during the complications, (c) why there was no oxygen available at the Dihlabeng Regional Hospital to assist the baby, (d) why did the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein send the baby to the Intensive Care Unit without informing the parents, (e) why was the life support machine disconnected without the consent of the parents and (f) why did the Universitas Academic Hospital in Bloemfontein refuse to provide the postmortem certificate to the parents; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) The mother (21 years old) delivered the baby (the mother's third delivery) at Clocolan, JD Newberry District Hospital with a reported history of meconium stained liquor and Apgar score of 5/10 and 6/10 at 1 minute and 5 minutes respectively. The mother arrived un-booked as a result no ultrasound was done antenatally. The baby was preterm estimated gestation age of 34-35 weeks with low birth weight (1,98 kg). In addition the following were found: Dysmorphic features and multiple congenital anomalies, anorectal malformation - imperforate anus, bilateral renal malformation - confirmed by kidney ultrasound, severe respiratory distress - most likely due to lung hypoplasia during pregnancy and upper gastrointestinal bleeding.

(b)-(c) The patient was transferred to the Neonatal ICU at the Dihlabeng Regional Hospital where the baby was put on a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) machine to assist the baby to breathe. As the baby's respiratory distress worsened the medical officer decided to transfer the patient Universitas Academic Hospital.

(d) The baby's condition was critical and it was transported via air transport, given respiratory support via CPAP. On arrival at Universitas Academic Hospital the baby was admitted to the Neonatal ICU as his condition required life support - at no stage did parents raise the issue of objection to the baby being put on life support.

(e) The baby died while on life support machines and his parents were allowed to hold the baby whilst he was still intubated.

(f) A post-mortem was offered to the parents but they refused.

2. Yes.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW518

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What is the total number of (a) mortuaries in each province and (b) corpses that were received in each mortuary as a result of the COVID-19 virus; (2) whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. (a) The Department has a database that includes mortuaries in hospitals, forensic pathology and private funeral undertakers. The database is updated on a daily basis as and when new information is received from provinces and municipality. The database as at 04 June 2020 is as follows:

Table 1: Database of number of Mortuaries in forensic pathology, hospitals and private funeral undertakers

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF MORTUARIES

Eastern Cape

374

Free State

279

Gauteng

440

Kwazulu Natal

522

Limpopo

242

Mpumalanga

229

North West

272

Northern Cape

150

Western Cape

189

Total

2697

(b) The attached table provides a record of corpses that were received in each mortuary as a result of COVID–19.

Table 2: Covid-19 deaths and mortuaries

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

GAUTENG

City of Tshwane

Pretoria East Hospital (Private)

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

Muslim Community (Pretoria and Central Muslim Burial)

2

 

Dr. George Mukhari

Rhulani Funerals

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

3

City of Johannesburg

     
 

Fourways Hospital (Private)

Poonees Funeral Undertaker- Cremation

1

 

Charlotte Maxeke Academic hospital

Kupane Funeral Undertaker

1

 

Sunninghill

Chevra Kadisha

1

 

Chris H Chris Hani Baragwanath

Kwa Vusa Funeral Undertaker

1

 

Leratong Hospital

Associated funeral homes

1

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Vuyo Funeral Undertaker

1

 

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Nkanyiso Funerals

1

 

Charlotte Maxeke Academic hospital

Lebowa Funeral Undertaker

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

8

Westrand District Municipality

Pinehaven Hospital (Private)

Krugersdorp Hospital (Private)

AVBOB - Krugersdorp

AVOBOB – Carltonville

2

1

 

Leratong Hospital

Sepotokele Funeral Parlour

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

4

City of Ekurhuleni

Charlotte Maxeke Academic hospital

Lebowa Funeral and was transferred to Cape town

1

 

Morningside Mediclinic

J&S Funerals Boksburg

1

 

Unitas Hospital

Kupane Funeral Undertaker

1

 

Glynwood Private Hospital

Tembisa Hospital

Doves

2

 

Charllotte Mxeke Academic Hospital

Central Islamic Trust

1

 

Thelle Mogoerane

Phuthang Batho Funeral Service - Thokoza

1

 

Thelle Mogoerane

Surprise Funerals - Orange Farm

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

8

GRAND TOTAL GAUTENG

23 (As of 04 June 2020)

LIMPOPO

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

Capricorn

Netcare Pholosho

Lebowa funeral undertaker

1

 

Netcare Pholosho

Ruth Modiba funeral undertaker

1

Sekhukhune

Mojalefa Practice, Medi 24

Wivani funeral undertaker

1

GRAND TOTAL LIMPOPO

3 (As of 04 June 2020)

KWAZULU NATAL

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

Ethekwini

St Augustine’s Hospital

Nqaki Funeral Undertakers

1

 

Umhlanga Hospital

Newlands Funeral Undertakers

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Oakleigh Funeral Home

2

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Wyebank Funeral Undertakers

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Isipingo Funeral Undertakers

1

 

Parklands Hospital

Ndabes Dignified Funeral Undertakers

1

 

Life Entabeni

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services)Clairwood

1

 

Lenmed Shifa Hospital)

Bayview Muslim Services

1

 

Kingsway Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

IALCH

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services) Clairwood

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Cebolethu Funeral Services

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services) Clairwood

1

 

Parklands Hospital

Wyebank Funeral Undertakers

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Phoenix Funeral Undertaker

1

 

Umhlanga Hospital

Muslim Burial Society

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

KwaDabeka Clinic - RK Khan

Ndabes Funeral

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Shanleys Funeral Home

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services) Clairwood

1

 

Westville Hospital

Ndabes Funeral

1

 

St Augustine’s Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services) Clairwood

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Shanleys Funeral Home

1

 

Victoria Hospital

Mandeni Funeral parlour

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Wyebank Funeral Undertakers

1

 

Kingsway Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Khalidsha Bawa (Bayview Muslim Burial Services) Clairwood

1

 

Nu Shifa Hospital

Ethekwini Funeral Services

1

 

Crompton Hospital

Oakleigh Funeral Home

1

 

Umhlanga Hospitial

Ethekwini Funeral Services

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

Durdoc Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

 

Parklands Hospital

Mosaic Funeral Undetakers Ugu District

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Pinetown Funeral Services

1

 

IALCH

Bayview Muslim Burial Service

1

 

Entabeni Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

 

King Edward Hospital

Cebolethu Funeral Services

1

 

Isipingo

Doves Greyville

1

 

Lenmed Nu Shifa Hospital

Bayview Muslim Burial Service

1

 

Lenmed Ethekwini Heart Hospital

Wyebank Funeral Services

1

 

RK Khan Hospital

Cebolethu Funeral Services

1

 

IALCH

Oceans Funeral Services

1

 

Kingsway Hospital

Doves Greyville

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

46

King Cetshwayo

Ngwelezane Hospital

Notha Funeral Parlour

1

 

Netcare the Bay Hospital

Eshowe Crematorium

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

2

uThukela

Ladysmith Larvena Hospital

AVBOB

2

SUB-TOTAL

   

2

Ugu

Margate Private Hospital

Above All Funeral Undertakers

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

1

GRAND TOTAL KZN

51 (As of 04 June 2020)

WESTERN CAPE

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

Cape Town

Groote Schuur Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

Constantia Medi-clinic

Doves

2

 

Durbanville Medi-clinic

Peninsula Funeral Services

1

 

Heideveld Emergency Centre

Quest Funerals

1

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Western Cape Muslim Undertakers Forum

1

 

Community death

AVBOB

1

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Alijac Funeral Services

1

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Sweet Victor/Kabashe Funerals

1

 

Groote Schuur Hospital

AVBOB

1

 

Community death

AVBOB

1

 

Groote Schuur Hospital

Western Cape Muslim Undertakers Forum

2

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Uzuko/Keiza Funerals

1

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Amazizi/Lafuta Funerals

1

 

Tygerberg Hospital

Mthuthuzeli Funerals

1

 

Groote Schuur Hospital

AVBOB

3

Sub Total

   

19 (As of 25 April)

Cape Winelands DM

Ceres Hospital

Fourbeth Funerals

4

 

Worcester Hospital

Valley Funerals

1

 

Ceres Hospital

Ceres Funerals

4

 

Worcester Hospital

Undertaker: Avbob Worcester

1

 

Worcester Hospital

Undertaker: El Shaddai Begrafnisdienste

1

 

Paarl Hospital

Willy’s Funerals

8

 

Paarl Hospital

AVBOB

3

 

Paarl Hospital

Aubrey Solomon’s Funerals

1

 

Paarl Hospital

Paarl Muslim Jamaa

2

 

Paarl Hospital

I. Arm (undertaker from City of Cape Town)

1

 

Paarl Medi Clinic

Willy’s Funerals

1

 

Name of Facility not mentioned

Name of undertaker not mentioned

5

SUB-TOTAL

   

32 (As of 4 June 2020)

West Coast DM

No death recorded

 

0

Overberg DM

No death recorded

 

0

Central Karoo DM

No death recorded

 

0

Garden Route DM

No death recorded

 

0

GRAND TOTAL WC – Gross underreporting has been noted and the Province is currently correcting and updating the figures

51 (As of 04 June 2020)

FREE STATE

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

Mangaung Metro

Pelonomi Hospital

Molly

1

 

Medi Clinic

AVBOB

1

 

Medi Clinic

Bloemfontein Funerals

1

 

At home

AVBOB

1

 

National Hospital

AVBOB

1

GRANT TOTAL FREE STATE

5 (As of 25 April 2020)

EASTERN CAPE

District

Health Facility

Undertaker/Mortuary

Number of Mortal Remains received

Amathole DM

Frere Hospital, East London

AVBOB East London, transferred to AVBOB Butterworth

1

 

Life Beacon Bay

East London

Thuso Funeral Parlour

Idutywa

1

 

Stutterheim Hospital

Hospital Road

Hewu Funerals

Mlungisi Location

Stutterheim

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

3

OR Tambo DM

Died at home. New Payne Village, Mthatha, KSD LM

Phakamani Bantu, Payne Village, Mthatha, KSD LM

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

1

Nelson Mandela Bay

Mercantile Private Hospital

Vantyi and Vantyi Funeral Home, Zwide, Port Elizabeth

1

 

Livingstone Hospital

Fortuin Funeral Home, Bethelsdorp, Port Elizabeth

1

 

Lingstone Hospital, Port Elizabeth

Shweme Zilamkhonto, Zwide, Port Elizabeth

1

 

Livingstone Hospital, Port Elizabeth

Vantyi and Vantyi Funeral Home, Zwide, Port Elizabeth

1

SUB-TOTAL

   

4

Chris Hani DM

Frontier Hospital

Russel and Son Funeral Directors

5

 

Queenstown Private

Russel and Son Funeral Directors

3

 

East London Private Hospital

Russel and Son Funeral Directors

1

 

Frontier Hospital, Hewu Hospital & Frere Hospital

AVBOB, Komani

3

 

Cradock Hospital

Tusano Funerals

1

 

Middelburg Hospital, Greenacres Hospital

Middelburg Funerals

2

SUB-TOTAL

   

15

GRAND TOTAL EASTERN CAPE

23 (As of 4 June 2020)

MPUMALANGA

     

Gert Sibande

No death recorded

 

0

Ehlanzeni

No death recorded

 

0

Nkangala

No death recorded

 

0

GRANT TOTAL MPUMALANGA

0

NORTH WEST

     

Bojanala

JST Hospital

Name of undertaker not mentioned

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

No death recorded

 

0

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

No death recorded

 

0

Dr Ruth Mogomotsi Mompati DM

No death recorded

 

0

GRAND TOTAL NORTH WEST

0

NORTHERN CAPE

     

Namakwa

No death recorded

   

Frances Baard DM

Jan Kenpdorp CHC

Kgalalelo

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

No death recorded

   

Pixley ka Semme

No death recorded

   

ZF Mgcawu

No death recorded

   

GRAND TOTAL NORTHERN CAPE

1

2. A statement will be made on the matter as part of media statements to update the country on the outbreak.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW338

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Northern Cape and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Northern Cape

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

Frances Baard

85

18

18

12 836

John Taolo Gaetsiwe

 

11

11

27 322

Namakwa

 

24

24

126 836

Pixley ka Seme

 

20

20

103 411

Zf Mgcawu

 

12

12

102 484

END.

08 June 2020 - NW821

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Following the admission by the Office of The Presidency that information regarding Covid-19 was being withheld from the public, (a) what are the details of the information that is being withheld from the public, (b) how will the specified information affect public responses and (c) what is the true status of hospitals in handling the pandemic?

Reply:

(a)-(b) We are unsure which statement from the Presidency this question refers to. However there have been media requests for the modeling done by various groups to be made public. The National Department of Health convened a public symposium of all modelers on Thursday the 21st of May 2020 during which the models, together with the assumptions used for the modeling outputs were presented.

(c) Hospitals in the public sector are currently being prepared to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic. General beds are being repurposed into critical care beds and field hospitals are being built jin many provinces. In addition, a national ventilator project has been established by DTI and donations have been received (for example 1,000 ventilators donated by the US government - of which 50 have already been received).

END.

08 June 2020 - NW493

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the concerns about the coronavirus outbreak and the porous borders of the Republic, (a) what number of quarantine centres have been established in each province, (b) what kind of infrastructure is being used in the specified centres, (c) has each centre been equipped with the necessary scanners and medical equipment to handle potential cases, (d) what number of staff have been formally trained in each province to deal with potential cases of the coronavirus and (e) what was the cost of the establishment of each centre?

Reply:

a) The first part of the question related to the number of Quarantine facilities that have been activated in the country and shown per province.

Province

NO OF SITES

NO OF BEDS

Eastern Cape

19

662

Free State

5

313

Gauteng

21

6236

KwaZulu Natal

48

1098

Limpopo

6

313

Mpumalanga

6

434

North West

6

188

Northern Cape

9

497

Western Cape

16

2537

Grand Total

136

12278

There are a number of sites on standby but is only activated as and when the Province deem it necessary to accommodate patients and or PUI's.

(b) There is currently 64 privately owned and 72 state owned facilities utilised. The following types of facilities are being utilised:

Type of facility

Number of Sites in this category

B&B

15

CARAVAN PARK/CAMP SITE

1

HEALTH FACILITY

52

HOTEL

38

LODGE

7

NATURE RESERVE LODGE

6

Other

1

RESORT

12

Training Centre

4

Grand Total

136

These sites were assessed for their suitability against a set of guidelines that looks at their locality, access to the site, ventilation, basic infrastructure requirements like access to electricity and water and then space for each occupant.

(c) There is a list of equipment requirements provided for in the guideline that include the following:

Minimum Equipment

Clinical gloves (latex, single-use gloves for clinical care)

N95 masks – only for aerosol generating procedures (taking of specimens)

Medical/Surgical masks

Aprons - disposable

Sharps containers

Red health risk waste bags to be in health care risk waste box with biohazard sign

Alcohol-based hand sanitiser

Liquid hand wash

Clean single-use towels (e.g. paper towels)

Cleaning gloves (reusable vinyl or rubber gloves for environmental cleaning)

Appropriate detergent for environmental cleaning and disinfectant for disinfection of surfaces, instruments or equipment

Large plastic bag for general waste (black or transparent)

Linen bags

Collection container for used equipment

What has been issued to each site is dependent on the type of site and their own commitment to the cause. In the Western Cape for example some privately owned sites only required masks, gloves, bioboxes and red bags. The rest were provided by the establishment themselves.

(d) A standard set of training is conducted by Provincial Departments of Health related to the following:

  • Training of healthcare professional on SOPs that needs to be followed at the quarantine centres for daily examination, movements in the facility, infection prevention control measures and use of PPE kit etc.
  • Paramedical staff (staff nurses, medics, pharmacist etc) need to be trained on SOPs to be followed at quarantine/isolation centres and use of PPE.
  • Support staff (housekeepers/cleaners, caterers, security staff, drivers and general duty staff) need to be trained on the use of masks, gloves, cleaning and disinfection procedures and use of PPE kit, etc.
  • When a new staff member is assigned to a quarantine/isolation site, it needs to be ensured that he/she has received proper training before undertaking the work.
  • All training should emphasise that all activities/procedures must be done under the strict monitoring and observation of trained specialists.

The exact numbers of people trained at these facilities is currently unknown.

(e) The costs associated at each of these centres varies and is dependent on the type of facility, who owns it and what the commitment is from each related to the cause. Private facilities in the hospitality industry is paid per person per night. For that they provide the full accommodation and catering support function, and the Provincial departments pick up the bill related to any clinical and waste management services. Costs associated with that range between R850 to R1200 per night per person. This includes accommodation and two meals per day.

For public facilities, again depending on the type of facility the cost would vary. From a priority perspective, public facilities already equipped with linen, beds and other basic furniture and services were first activated. In more dire times the Department is preparing public facilities by procurement of all beds, furnishing and operational equipment to activate facilities as a second priority. However, in the short term there is a heavy reliance on privately owned facilities where the moneys paid, also strengthened the tourism industry where no income could be generated.

The procurement of Health Technology equipment is also not done in bulk and at a rapid rate to make provision and address the demands that Covid-19 is placing on the department. Equipment is issued to where it is needed and includes Medical, Isolation and Quarantine facilities so to isolate the costs to only quarantine facilities is difficult at present.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW339

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Western Cape and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Western Cape

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

City of Cape Town

254

115

115

2 446

Cape Winelands

 

40

40

21 473

Central Karoo

 

16

16

38 854

Garden Route

 

30

30

23 331

Overberg

 

24

24

12 239

West Coast

 

29

29

31 119

END.

08 June 2020 - NW767

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)How often are health care professional staff tested, given that they are front line staff dealing with the Covid-19 pandemic; (2) whether a health care professional may refuse to test a person who wants to be tested; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The health professional staff are not tested routinely except if they have symptoms of Covid-19 or fulfil the criteria of a high-risk exposure with a person who tested positive with Covid-19. They may after seven days of self-isolation be clinically evaluated and tested on day 8 with the possibility of early return to work if they have a negative test and are clinically well. They will continue to be monitored for symptoms till day 14 and are counselled on personal hygiene measures. Health professional staff are monitored daily through symptom screening.

The rationale is that there are not enough test kits and targeted testing is needed. Risk assessments in health care settings, use of public health measures, personal hygiene, training on Covid-19 and personal protective equipment all contribute to a lowered risk of transmission exposure.

2. The health care professional cannot refuse to clinically evaluate and test the person based on the national Department of Health guideline of prioritized testing for patients in hospitals with respiratory conditions as well as health care workers.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW336

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in Mpumalanga and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

(a) (i) serviceable ambulances

(a) (ii) fully equipped ambulances

(aa) in each district municipality

(a) (ii) (bb) in each local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance services

134

EHLANZENI =48

Mbombela = 20

Ambulances are not restricted to a service Area

   

Nkomazi = 13

 
   

Thaba Chweu = 8

 
   

Bushbuckridge = 7

 
 

NKANGALA = 40

Emalahleni = 10

 
   

Steve Tshwete = 8

 
   

Emakhazeni = 6

 
   

Thembisile Hani = 4

 
   

Dr JS Moroka = 8

 
   

Victor Khanye = 4

 
 

GERT SIBANDE = 46

Mkhondo = 3

 
   

Albert Luthuli = 7

 
   

Msukaligwa = 5

 
   

Govan Mbeki = 12

 
   

Pixley Ka Seme = 7

 
   

Albert Luthuli = 4

 
   

Lekwa = 4

 
   

Dipaleseng = 4

 

END.

08 June 2020 - NW769

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)In light of the shortage of test kits to test for the presence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, which causes the Covid-19 disease, what steps is he taking in this regard; (2) whether he or his department has taken any steps to reduce the turnaround time of four to five days for the release of the results; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether he intends to take any steps with regard to the general shortage of test kits and the very limited quantities available for testing in the testing sites and mass-screening areas which cause delays for effective testing; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant steps?

Reply:

(1) There is a global need for test kits with countries in the north taking up the majority of the kits that are available given the large number of positive patients in these countries. This has resulted in a global shortage of test kits. The Department has worked with the National Health Laboratory Service to increase the number of test kits that are available to South Africa. The Minister has engaged with some of the manufacturers of test kits to encourage them to increase the number of test kits that they supply to South Africa. A challenge is that the limited number of flights from countries that manufacture the test kits adds to the challenges being experienced.

(2) Yes, steps have been taken to reduce the turnaround time. In-hospital admission, patients under investigation are prioritised, and the turnaround time for these patients will be reduced to 48 hours. The turnaround time for the other samples are being addressed through utilisation of academic platform testing sites and private laboratories, as well as increased output at NHLS laboratories. Over the last week the number of tests have increased from 51,000/week to about 60,000/week.

As a result of the global shortage of COVID-19 test kits, including extraction kits, the criteria for testing has been amended. The Department has prioritised testing of patients in hospitals with respiratory conditions, as well as people who have had contact with a known positive patient as well as health care workers. As soon as serological (antibody) tests are registered by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAPHRA) these will be used for population level surveillance to get prevalence rates.

(3) As noted above, the criteria for testing have been changed. We have halted mass testing as the target that was set of 14 million people screened through community screening has been achieved and we have moved to targeted screening and testing. In addition, as mentioned the number of laboratories that test for COVID-19 has increased. With respect to antibody testing, the NHLS and SAPHRA are fast tracking the validation and registration of these tests. However, it should be noted that these tests will largely be used for surveillance with the PCR test used to test individual patients for acute infections.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW333

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in Gauteng and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

Gauteng

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

City of Ekurhuleni

915

240

240

1 975

City of Johannesburg

 

168

168

1 645

City of Tshwane

 

160

160

6 298

Sedibeng

 

118

118

4 173

West Rand

 

118

118

4 087

END.

08 June 2020 - NW661

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of (a)(i) screenings and (ii) tests has the Government conducted in each municipality to test for the coronavirus disease caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 since 1 January 2020, (b) health professionals have tested positive and (c) persons (i) recovered from and (ii) died as a result of the contraction of COVID-19 in each municipality; (2) what (a) number of COVID-19 mobile testing units have not been delivered to the designated municipalities yet and (b) are the reasons that they have not been delivered in each case; (3) whether any backlog is being experienced in the processing of test samples; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) (a) what number of (i) quarantine and (ii) testing facilities are available in each municipality and (b) where is each specified facility situated?

Reply:

1.(a) (i) The number of screenings as of 1 June 2020 across all 9 provinces in each municipality stands at 20,170,837;

(ii) The numbest of tests as 2 June 2020 across all 9 provinces in each municipality stands at 785,979;

(b) The number of health professionals as of 1 June 2020 that tested positive for COVID-19 is 2,084;

(c) (i) The number of health professionals as of 1 June 2020 that recovered from COVID-19 is 808;

(ii) and that died from COVID-19 is 18.

2. (a) All sixty-seven (67) NHLS mobile testing units have been delivered to all nine provinces. The testing mobile units rotate through the province depending on the schedule determined by the provincial department of health.

(b) Not applicable;

3. The backlog is experienced in the process of test samples due to inadequate supply of extraction kits to perform PCR tests and the high through put test kits for integrated testing platform like GeneXpert and Roche instruments;

4. (a) (i) A total of 136 out of 396 sites have been activated as of 1 June 2020 across all 9 provinces in each municipality;

(ii) testing facilities are available in each municipality;

(b) Refer to the table below

Table 1.

Province

  1. (ii) Laboratory location

(c) Municipality

Eastern Cape

Port Elizabeth Provincial Hospital

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality

 

Nelson Mandela Academic/Walter Sisulu University

OR Tambo Municipality

 

East London Laboratory, Frere Hospital

Buffalo City Municpality

Free State

Universitas Academic Hospital

Mangaung Metro

 

Pelonomi Hospital

Mangaung Metro

 

Manapo Hospital

Thabo Mofutsanyana

Gauteng

Charlotte Maxeke Johanessburg Academic Hospital

City of Johannesburg Metro

 

Tshwane Academic Division,University of Pretoria

City of Tshwane Metro

 

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

City of Tshwane Metro

 

Tambo Memorial Hospital

Ekurhuleni Metro

 

Braamfontein TB Laboratory

City of Johannesburg Metro

KwaZulu Natal

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Academic Hospital

Ethikwini Metro

 

Addington Hospital

Ethekwini Metro

Limpopo

Mankweng Provincial Hospital

Polokwane Municipality

 

Polokwane

Polokwane Municipality

Mpumalanga

Rob Ferreira

Mbombela

North West

Tshepong Hospital

Dr KK Municipality

 

Rustenburg Hospital

Bojanala Municipality

Western Cape

Greenpoint

City of Cape Town Metro

 

Groote Schuur Academic Hospital

City of Cape Town Metro

 

Tygerberg Academic Hospital

Belville Municipality

END.

08 June 2020 - NW824

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has plans to accredit laboratories in public hospitals to test for Covid-19; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, by what date will hospitals be accredited?

Reply:

All the laboratories in public hospitals that test for COVID-19 are part of the National Health Laboratory Service (NHLS). These laboratories are accredited with the Standard ISO 15189. Furthermore, all laboratories participate in the external quality assurance and proficiency testing schemes to ensure quality results.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW337

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the North West and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard

North West

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

119

17

17

43 700

Dr Kenneth Kaunda

 

18

18

14 642

Bojanala

 

11

11

18 333

Ngaka Modiri Molema

 

21

21

28 206

END.

08 June 2020 - NW415

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)(a) What number of hospitals are ready to treat patients infected by the coronavirus and (b) does each hospital have the necessary equipment and supplies to ensure the safety of professional health staff; (2) what (a) number of public clinics are equipped to handle patients with the coronavirus and (b) precautions will be taken in the event of a breakout of the virus; (3) on what basis will the decision be made to ban travel to and out of the Republic; (4) what education campaign programmes are in place to ensure that South Africans are properly guided and informed with regard to the steps to take when they suspect they may have the disease?

Reply:

1. (a) The number of hospitals ready to treat COVID-19 patients is 262 hospitals.

(b) The Department conducts weekly audits on the availability, requirements and current equipment and commodities in hospitals. Where challenges are found they are highlighted to provincial officials to intervene.

2. (a) All (3467 Primary Health Care facilities/clinics) are provided with the national protocols through their provinces for handling corona virus suspected patients and are submitting individual questionnaires on their readiness to respond to the pandemic.

(b) Precautions to be taken in the event of an outbreak in Clinics include use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE's) by all staff; ensuring effective triage facilities are in place to separate patients with COVID-19 symptoms from those without symptoms, rapid and safe referral of patients to hospitals for patients who need to be hospitalised.

(3) The initial transmission of the COVID-19 virus was from imported cases from high risk countries. The ban on travel in/out of the country is purely to disrupt transmission from other countries, especially high risk countries.

(4) A comprehensive Risk Communication and Stakeholder Engagement (RCCE) Strategy has been developed as guided by the International Health Regulations of the World Health Organisation.

Some of the Objectives of this strategy are:

  • To ensure that people have the life-saving information they need to protect themselves and others (from the virus and to reduce its impact on health, social life, and the economy)
  • To ensure consistency in information and language from all partners and avoid misinformation/rumours.
  • To inform the general public how the public health response is being conducted and health authorities are being pro-active in monitoring, detecting, and preventing the spread of COVID-19.

To ensure participation of and engagement with relevant communities to work out barriers to the implementation and uptake of public health measures.

END.

08 June 2020 - NW332

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of (i) serviceable and (ii) fully equipped ambulances are being used in each (aa) district municipality and (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Free State and (b) area in square kilometres does each ambulance service?

Reply:

The following table reflects the details in this regard.

Free State

Districts

(a)(i) Serviceable ambulances

(a)(ii)

Fully equipped ambulances

In each (aa) district, (bb) local municipality in the public health sector in the Province

(b) Area in square kilometres each ambulance service

Mangaung Metro

132

25

65

7 250

Xhariep

 

15

60

9 810

Lejweleputswa

 

29

45

11 880

Fezile Dabi

 

27

65

10 705

Thabo Mofutsanyana

 

36

45

12 640

END.

08 June 2020 - NW566

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the need to protect our frontline health personnel from COVID-19 infection, what (a) total amount has his department spent to procure Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), (b) is the breakdown in costs of the procured PPE equipment, including, but not limited to (i) face masks, (ii) face shields and (iii) body protection garments and (c)(i) companies are listed as suppliers for his department and (ii) corresponding PPE equipment are the specified companies supplying?

Reply:

The following response is based on the information received from the provinces.

EASTERN CAPE

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE is R 78,771,950.00

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE.

 

 

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

2 372 295

Masks Surgical/medical

17 282 250

Gloves Examination sterile

23 691 335

Gloves examination non-sterile

19 686 340

Gloves surgical

349 280 

Gowns Disposable

3 570 230

Safety Goggles

703 190

Aprons

105 632

Hand Sanitizers

1 772 725

Disinfectant

7 663 993

Infrared Thermometers

1 574 680

     
 

TOTALS

78 771 950

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

Allenco Medical and Dental Supplies Cc Total

Sanitizers, Surgical Masks

B Braun Medical (Pty) Ltd Total

 

Barrs Pharmaceuticals Industries (Pty) Ltd Total

Sanitizers

Central Medical (Pty) Ltd Total

Aprons

Central Medical (Pty) Ltd (Kzn) Total

Aprons

Dr Temp (Pty) Ltd Total

Thermometer (disposable)

Evergreen Latex (Pty) Ltd Total

Gloves

Lechoba Medical Technologies (Pty) Ltd Total

Masks

Liora Medical Supplies Cc Total

Masks N95

Logan Medical & Surgical (Pty) Ltd Total

Masks/Surgical Gowns

Medical International Orthopaedic Cc Total

Gloves

Medi-Core Technologies (Pty) Ltd Total

Gloves

Medtex (Pty) Ltd Total

Gloves

Multisurge Cc Total

Masks/Gloves/Isolation Gowns

Promed Technologies (Pty) Ltd Total

Surgical Gowns

Quality Medical Supplies (Pty) Ltd Total

Safety Goggles

Royal Fortress Holdings (Pty) Ltd Total

Gloves

Tara Technologies Cc Total

Safety Goggles/Sanitizer/Disinfectant

Unitrade 1032 Cc Total

Masks

Dessert Rose 0305

3-ply surgical masks

Vortex Health

Sanitizers/Hand Soap/ Disinfectant

Sanbonani

Thermometers

Motla Investments

Thermometers

Zuys Enterprise

Heavy duty gloves

Beloved Ventures

Safety Goggles

FREE STATE

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE is R 20,606,539.50

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

 

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent

 

   

Masks Surgical/medical

 R 5 739 000.00

Gloves surgical

 R 121 365.00

Gowns Disposable

 R 1 117 500.00

Safety Goggles

 R 388 200.00

Visors

 R 180 000.00

Humidifier bottles

R 279 450.00

Coveralls

 R 3 590 000.00

Hand Sanitizers

 R 2 385 000.00

Disinfectant

 R 5 654 400.00

Body bags

 R 266 660.00

Infrared Thermometers

 R 376 400.00

Toiletries

R 29 175.00

Mattresses-Durafoam

R 479 389.50

 

TOTALS R 20 606 539.50

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

1st Order Placed (26 March 2020)

1. Tara Healthcare

  • Hand Sanitizers
  • Surgical Masks

2. Lechoba Medical Technologies

  • Safety Goggles
  • Coverall

3. Unitrade 1032

  • Visors – Face Shields

4. Supra Healthcare

  • Surgical Gloves

5. Logan Medical and Surgical

  • Isolation Gowns

6. Alframed

  • Digital Thermometers
   

2nd Order Placed (21 April 2020)

1. Imperial Logistics HC 3

2. East Coast Medical Northern Region

3. Barrs Pharmaceuticals Industries

4. FS & NCP Medical Agency

5. Zaahir Concept & Design Projects

6. Kaofela Clothing & Textile

7. Arjo Huntleigh SA

8. Roka Media

  • Surgical Masks
  • Humidifier Bottles
  • Disinfectants
  • Body Bags
  • Gowns
  • Mattress-Durafoam
  • Toiletries

GAUTENG

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE R86 283 902

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

 

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent

 

   

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

R 6 674 016

Masks Surgical/medical

R31 464 691,75

Gloves Examination sterile

R184 225

Gloves examination non-sterile

R1 298 357

Gloves surgical

R322 875,90

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

 

Gowns Disposable

R 5 450 053

Safety Goggles

R 520 990

Visors

R 515 819,90

Boot covers

R 150 173

Aprons

R255 000

Coveralls

R 19 843 277,25

Hand Sanitizers

R 19 753 108

Infrared Thermometers

 R 26 317,54

     
 

TOTALS

R86 283 902,44

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

1. Senatla’s Medical Surgical Solutions

Coveralls, Face Shield, Safety Spectacles, Disposable Aprons, Foot Covers, Surgical Masks, Gloves, Sanitizers

2. Be Sure

Sanitizers

3. Dinaane Consulting Services

Surgical Masks, Hand Sanitisers

4. Future Advertising and Medical

Gloves, Surgical  Mask , Masks - FFP2 , Disposable Visors, Goggles, Overshoe 100s, Gloves powder free, Hand Sanitizer, Mask - FFP1, Surgical Gloves

5. Jendza Capital

FFP2 Masks

6. Liora Medical Supplies

Googles, Theater overshoes

7. Opal Sky (Pty) Ltd

Hand Sanitiser

8. Ori Medical Supplier

FFP2 Masks

9. Promed

FFP2 Masks

10. Teeprash Pty Ltd

Surgical gowns

11. Dischem

Infrared Thermometers

12. Babonolo Holdings

Antiseptic Bar Soap

13. Black Renaissance

Mask Surgical 3 ply

14. Bliss Pharmaceuticals (PTY) Ltd

Hand Sanitizer, Mask - 3Ply Face Mask

15. Macduke Trading Projects

Mask ear loop or tie on - surgical  3 ply,  Surgical Gloves

16. Mbuso Medical

Thermometer Digital

17. Nkhane Projects & Supply

Hand Sanitizers, Medical Disposable Coveralls, Disposable Visors, Goggles, Dromex Chemical Gloves

18. Steelwood International (PTY) Ltd t/a Medena

3 ply surgical mask

KWAZULU-NATAL

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE R 205 935 455

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent

Apron

R4,240

Boot Covers

R22,048

Coveralls

R261,712

Digital Body Thermometer

R22,567,546

Gloves (latex/examination and high risk)

R 4,935,542

Goggles

R 336,260

Isolation Gowns

R 21,095,332

N95 Masks

R 23,737,953

Sanitizer

R 51,062,910

Scrub Suits

R 224,232

Surgical Gowns

R 1,233,437

Surgical Masks

R 76,967,243

Visor / face shield

R 3,487,000

TOTAL

R 205,935,455

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

Access Medical

Surgical Mask

AG Medical

Digital Thermometers

Alframed Pty (Ltd)

Digital Body Thermometer

Andile Ruby Trading

Sanitizer; N95 Mask

BSN Trading

Surgical Mask

Buhle Waste

Biohazard Bag

Community Health

Sanitizer

Cyngatha CC.

Sanitizer

Dart Props

Surgical Mask

EGS

Surgical Mask

Ezamancinza Investments

Surgical Mask

Ezombuso Group

Surgical Mask

Gibela Trade & Investment

Sanitizer

Halyard Health SA

Scrub Suite; Gloves: Cuff-length High Risk; Surgical Gowns; N95

Healthware

Surgical Mask

Inqaba Medical

Surgical Mask

Iphakhade Trading (Pty) Ltd

Surgical Mask; Sanitizer

Ithosi Healthcare Solutions

Surgical Mask

Juba Fly

Particulate Respirator (Mask) N95/FFP2

Lechoba Medical

Isolation Gown; Coveralls

Liamed Medical

Latex Gloves

LionBee Investments (Pty) Ltd

Sanitizer; Isolation Gown

Logan Medical and Surgical Supplies (Pty) Ltd

Sanitizer; Isolation Gowns; Surgical Masks

Mafinikio Capital Investments

Sanitizer

Multisurge Medical

Digital Body Thermometer

National Community Marketing

Sanitizer

Nondlu Consultants

Surgical Masks

NYI Logistics

Surgical Masks

Orap Medical Supplies

Surgical Masks

Petroright LTD

Surgical Masks

Platinum

Surgical Masks

Pro Secure Ltd

Sanitizer

RMA

Particulate Respirator (Mask) N95/FFP2

SA Health

Gloves:

Cuff-length High Risk

Safarmex

Gloves:

Examination (Latex)

Sebenzani Trading

Surgical Mask; Surgical Gown

Steiner Hygiene

Sanitizer

The New Look

Surgical Mask

Unitrade

Visor/ Face-Shield; Coveralls

LIMPOPO

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE R329,674,987

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent

Body bag

4,263

Boots Rubber Durable

65,218

Cap Theatre Balaclava

160,000

Chlorhexidine

1,799,278

Coveralls

164,925

Dispenser Sanitizer

7,567,347

Dispenser soap

641,687

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

1,374,201

Goggles

495,303

Infrared Thermometers

57,700,445

Mask surgical

148,412,012

Overshoes

172,800

Paper Towel

211,687

Sanitizer

109,081,101

Soap Anti-bacterial

27,130

Visor

1,797,590

 

 

Total

329,674,987.00

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

Indlovu Manufacturers

Body bag

Eagles Eyes Suppliers

Boots Rubber Durable

Pienaar Bros

Cap Theatre, Coveralls & overshoes

Tsopane Pharm T/a LennyMed Pharmacy Inc

Chlorhexidine & Mask surgical

Clinipro (Pty) Ltd

Dispenser Sanitizer & sanitizer

Prosecure (Pty) Ltd

Dispenser Sanitizer & sanitizer

Liberer Consulting T/a Laundry Dynamics

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

Magaga Ditshwene Trade & General Project

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

Mma Maru Pty(Ltd)

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

Samsrec Production

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

Tsalach Solution (Pty) Ltd

Face Cloth Mask 2 Ply

Khayalamandaba Business Solutions

Goggles

Gigy's Trading (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

IVM Chemicals (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Limacon CC

Infrared Thermometers

Lunako Solutions

Infrared Thermometers

Malutend Trading (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Mamello Clinical Solutions

Infrared Thermometers

Manare 5 (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Optics Defined Technology (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Pro Asanta (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Smandi Project Management Cc

Infrared Thermometers

Steelwood Int (Pty) Ltd T/a Medena

Infrared Thermometers

T7 Mash (Pty) Ltd

Infrared Thermometers

Value Chem Medical Group

Infrared Thermometers

AG Medical

Mask surgical

Asitanga Trading & Projects (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

Basani IT Solutions

Mask surgical

BD IT Solutions

Mask surgical

Devine Catering & Events (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

Enpro Laboratories

Mask surgical

Glen Life Group

Mask surgical

Hipco Trading (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

Hudi Medical Equipment

Mask surgical

Kobuhla Engineering Building Services

Mask surgical

Luhura Trading & General Supplies

Mask surgical

Mahika Trading

Mask surgical

Makanama (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

Malache Business Solutions

Mask surgical

Maphondo Trading & Projects

Mask surgical

Marothodi Projects

Mask surgical

Masemosi Developers

Mask surgical

Mizana Trading (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

Mmapadi Group

Mask surgical

Murunwa Consulting

Mask surgical

North Siders Management Consultant

Mask surgical

RRA Trading

Mask surgical

Sedilaka Projects

Mask surgical

Shilombe Trading (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical

YNF Engineering

Mask surgical

Mavu-Ashu Civil Construction

Mask surgical & Infrared thermometers

NMM Investment Solutions (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical & Infrared thermometers

RIHM Media & Marketing (Pty) Ltd

Mask surgical & Infrared thermometers

Tshiamiso Trading 135

Mask surgical & Infrared thermometers

Promed Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Paper Towel

Servest (Pty) Ltd

Soap Anti bacterial

Bapedi Conglomerate Holdings (Pty) Ltd

Visor

Bas Medxpress Cc

Visor

Big O Trading 844 Cc

Visor

Nox Business Trading (Pty) Ltd

Visor

Pat & Josh Business Consultants

Visor

Rebantle Trading & Projects (Pty) Ltd

Visor

Sejala Business Enterprise

Visor

Tendiroli Business Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

Visor

Thinamuthu General Trading

Visor

Tshimangi Accommodation & Cash Loans

Visor

MPUMALANGA

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE R63, 723,000.00

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

 

 

ITEMS / COMMODITIES

Amount spent

1

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

112,000

2

Masks Surgical/medical

43,212,000

3

Gloves Examination sterile

8,000

4

Gloves examination non-sterile

8,493,000

5

Gloves surgical

142,000

6

Gowns Disposable

451,000

7

Safety Goggles

2,453,000

8

Boot covers

324,000

9

Aprons

250,000

10

Hand Sanitizers

6,918,000

11

Infrared Thermometers

1,359,000

 

Totals

63,722,000

 
  1. Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

  1. Stop Medical

Aprons

  1. BCN Medical

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Biosurge (Pty) Ltd

Boot covers

  1. Bophirima Healthcare

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Central Medical

Aprons

  1. Clinipro

Gloves examination non-sterile & Hand Saniters

  1. Emergency Medical

Gloves Examination sterile & Safety Goggles

  1. Flotenk

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. G-Merv

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Hlalulindzile

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Jaaziel

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Liora Medical

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

  1. Logan Medical

Gowns Disposable

  1. Multisurge

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Nala Medical

Gloves examination non-sterile

  1. Nkabo Waters

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Promed

Gowns Disposable

  1. Quality Medical

Safety Goggles

  1. Resmed

Hand Sanitizers

  1. Vitea Zoe

Infrared thermometer

  1. Pristine

Infrared thermometer

  1. Silver Falls

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Tara Technology

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Uhuruwankha

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Umndeni

Masks Surgical/medical

  1. Unitrade

Hand Sanitizers

NORTHERN CAPE

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE R 24,841,500.00

b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE

 

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Spent R'000

 

   

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

 1 828 500

Masks Surgical/medical

 6 525 200

Gloves Examination sterile

 

Gloves examination non-sterile

 432 000

Gloves surgical

 

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

 

Gowns Disposable

 13 712 500

Safety Goggles

 555 400

Visors

 75 000

Boot covers

 

Aprons

133 200

Coveralls

 402 900

Hand Sanitizers

 470 000

Disinfectant

 

Biohazard bags

 

Body bags

 

Infrared Thermometers

 706 800

     
 

TOTALS

24 841 500

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

1. DNS Supplies

1000 X 500ml sanitizers and 4000 boxes X 100 gloves

2. CMED Medicals

200 000 surgical masks, 30 000 N95 masks, 5 000 X 500ml sanitizers, 2 000 coveralls, 1 000 goggles, 1 000 face shield, 10 000 gowns, 100 hand gun thermometers

3. Revolt Headboy

240 000 surgical masks

4. Mellow Live

100 000 disposable gowns, 10 000 goggles, 300 infra-red thermometer, 180 000 aprons

NORTH WEST

a) The department has committed R 87,045,585.26 to procure PPE.

b) Breakdown costs of the commitments of the procured PPE

ITEMS/ COMMODITIES

Amount Committed

Apron

R216 950,00

Body Bag

R77 015,90

Boot covers

R230 000,00

Coveralls

R104 650,00

Disinfectant

R4 198 067,00

Gloves Examination non-sterile

R5 459 617,00

Gloves Examination sterile

R869 707,00

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

R75 000,00

Gloves surgical

R3 740 792,76

Goggles

R161 330,00

Gown disposable

R881 603,00

Hand sanitizer

R2 776 979,60

Infrared Thermometer

R6 441 939,60

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

R40 289 169,00

Masks Surgical/medical

R4 990 330,00

Ventilators

R16 479 934,40

Visors

R52 500,00

Grand total

R87 045 585,26

c) (i) Companies listed as suppliers and (ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

(ii) corresponding PPE equipment specified companies supplying

  1. (i) Companies listed as suppliers

Apron plastic yellow

Apron

CENTRAL MEDICAL

Apron plastic light blue

Apron

CENTRAL MEDICAL

Plastic aprons

Apron

Winimed

Plastic apron (100`s)

Apron

MULTISURGE

Plastic apron (100`s)

Apron

CENTRAL MEDICAL

Plastic apron (100`s)

Apron

CENTRAL MEDICAL

Plastic apron (100`s)

Apron

CENTRAL MEDICAL

Protective cover body suit disposable- different size

Body Bag

ALFREHUTCH

Protective cover body suit disposable- different size

Body Bag

ARC Technology (Pty) Ltd

Protective cover body suit disposable- different size

Body Bag

ARC Technology (Pty) Ltd

Protective cover body suit disposable-Non woven med, L, XL, XXL
3X L
polypropylene

Body Bag

ARC Technology (Pty) Ltd

Protective cover body suit disposable- different size

Body Bag

ALFREHUTCH

Overshoes 100`s

Boot covers

MULTISURGE

Overshoes 100`s

Boot covers

MULTISURGE

Disposable coveralls - Medium 1`s

Coveralls

CHEMICAL WORLD

Disposable coveralls - Large 1`s

Coveralls

CHEMICAL WORLD

500ml Jik

Disinfectant

Tumi & Rori construction

Trigger Spray Bottels

Disinfectant

Promed Technologies

Disinfectant 5lt bottle

Disinfectant

TARA HEALTHCARE

 

Disinfectant

 
 

Disinfectant

Red spot trading

CHLORHEXIDINE SOL 4% 500ML WITH PUMP (S/SCRUB) 1'S

Disinfectant

Barrs

CHLORHEXIDINE SOL 4% 500ML WITH PUMP (S/SCRUB) 1'S

Disinfectant

Barrs

CHLORHEXIDINE SOL 4% 500ML WITH PUMP (S/SCRUB) 1'S

Disinfectant

Barrs

CHLORHEXIDINE SOL 4% 500ML WITH PUMP (S/SCRUB) 1'S

Disinfectant

Barrs

Bleach 5l

Disinfectant

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Spray Bottles 250ml

Disinfectant

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Spray Bottles 500ml

Disinfectant

E.G.S Investment Solutions

BOTTLE SPRAY CAP

Disinfectant

OFENTSE'S PROMOTION DISTRIBUTIONS

Disinfactant hand soap

Disinfectant

Remorabaji

Liquid hand soap

Disinfectant

Remorabaji

Hand wipes-anti bacteria

Disinfectant

Remorabaji

Bio Scrub

Disinfectant

Remorabaji

Non-sterile Examination Gloves

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Cherish Life

Non-sterile gloves

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Promed Technologies

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Small Non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Small Non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Mutsh medical international

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Small Non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Rachis Projects

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Small Non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Evergreen

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Small Non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Evergreen

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Medium non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Medium non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Medium non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Rachis Projects

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Medium non-sterile

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Mutsh medical international

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Large

Gloves Examination non-sterile

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Large

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Rachis Projects

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Large

Gloves Examination non-sterile

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Large

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Evergreen

Examination gloves TYPE 1 Large

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Mutsh medical international

Heavy duty gloves medium red

Gloves Examination non-sterile

STEPAHEAD MANUFACTURING

Gumboots size 6

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Emergency hospital suppliers

Gumboots size 7

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Emergency hospital suppliers

Gumboots size 8

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Emergency hospital suppliers

Isolation gown - Medium

Gloves Examination non-sterile

GENESIS PHARMACEUTICALS

Isolation gown - Medium

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Plan B trolley engineering and operation

Isolation gown - small

Gloves Examination non-sterile

GENESIS PHARMACEUTICALS

Isolation gown - small

Gloves Examination non-sterile

Plan B trolley engineering and operation

Heavy duty gloves large red

Gloves Examination non-sterile

STEPAHEAD MANUFACTURING

Sterile Surgical Latex Gloves, different sizes

Gloves Examination sterile

Liora Medical Supplies

Sterile Med gloves

Gloves Examination sterile

Evergreen Latex CC

Elbow extender sterile gloves

Gloves Examination sterile

Evergreen Latex CC

Elbow reach sterile gloves Medium & L

Gloves Examination sterile

Evergreen Latex CC

Non-sterile Examination Gloves

Gloves Examination sterile

Winimed

Sterile and powder free surgical gloves

Gloves Examination sterile

Medtex

Examination gloves small

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Examination gloves medium

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Examination gloves large

Gloves general purpose/cleaning

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Surgical gloves size 6 to 8

Gloves surgical

Evergreen Latex CC

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Large

Gloves surgical

Access

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Large

Gloves surgical

Supra

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Large

Gloves surgical

Medtex

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Large

Gloves surgical

PROMED

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Large

Gloves surgical

Medi-Core

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Medium

Gloves surgical

Access

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Medium

Gloves surgical

Access

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Medium

Gloves surgical

Supra

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Small

Gloves surgical

Access

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Small

Gloves surgical

Supra

Examination gloves TYPE 2 Small

Gloves surgical

Supra

Surgical gloves size 8 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 8 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 6.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 6.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Meze Bussiness trading

Surgical gloves size 6.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Full face mask with eye protection

Gloves surgical

Allenco

Full face mask with eye protection

Gloves surgical

Allenco

Full face mask with eye protection

Gloves surgical

Allenco

Surgical gloves size 7 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 7 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 7 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 7.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 7.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves size 7.5 packs of 50`s

Gloves surgical

Evergreen

Surgical gloves , hypoallergic , sterile size 7

Gloves surgical

Medtex

Surgical gloves , hypoallergic , sterile size 7

Gloves surgical

Medtex

Surgical gloves , hypoallergic , sterile size 7

Gloves surgical

Supra

Safety goggles 1`s

Goggles

LECHOBA

Goggles- good seal with skin of the face

Goggles

ARC Technology (Pty) Ltd

Visitor disposable constructed high quality optically clear.

Goggles

ARC Technology (Pty) Ltd

Google flexible PVC

Goggles

TARA HEALTHCARE

Gown surgical long sleeves with cuffs

Gown disposable

Promed Technologies

Isolation gown X-large

Gown disposable

Lechaba Medical Supplies

Isolation gown

Gown disposable

ALFREHUTCH

Isolation gown- large

Gown disposable

GENESIS PHARMACEUTICALS

Isolation gown- large

Gown disposable

Plan B trolley engineering and operation

Water less hand sanitizers 70%

Hand sanitizer

Bareki Itumeleng Suppliers and Projects

Water less hand sanitizers 70%

Hand sanitizer

Selcas Trading PTY Ltd

Medical hand sanitizer 70% alcohol 500ml

Hand sanitizer

TARA HEALTHCARE

Hand sanitizer 5l

Hand sanitizer

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Hand sanitizer 20l

Hand sanitizer

E.G.S Investment Solutions

500ml gel hand sanitizer

Hand sanitizer

Remorabaji

Chlorhexidine in alcohol green hand disinfectant

Hand sanitizer

Barrs

Chlorhexidine in alcohol green hand disinfectant

Hand sanitizer

Barrs

Chlorhexidine in alcohol green hand disinfectant

Hand sanitizer

Barrs

Chlorhexidine in alcohol green hand disinfectant

Hand sanitizer

Biotech

Handsanitizer (alcohol based ) 500ml

Hand sanitizer

LOGAN MEDICAL

Handsanitizer (alcohol based ) 500ml

Hand sanitizer

Red spot trading

Sanitizer 70% alcohol 25 liters

Hand sanitizer

Red spot trading

Sanitizer 70% alcohol 25 liters

Hand sanitizer

Red spot trading

Digital body thermometer

Infrared Thermometer

TARA HEALTHCARE

Digital thermometer infrared non contact

Infrared Thermometer

MULTISURGE (Pty) Ltd

Thermometer Electronic temporal artery temprature measure 3cm away from forehead

Infrared Thermometer

Sambonani Holding

THERMOMETERS CLINICAL NON-MERCURYS ORAL & AUXILLARY 1'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETERS CLINICAL NON-MERCURYS ORAL & AUXILLARY 1'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETERS CLINICAL NON-MERCURYS ORAL & AUXILLARY 1'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETERS CLINICAL NON-MERCURYS ORAL & AUXILLARY 1'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETERS CLINICAL NON-MERCURYS ORAL & AUXILLARY 1'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETER NON-MERCURY SEMI - DISPOSABLE E 100'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETER NON-MERCURY SEMI - DISPOSABLE E 100'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

THERMOMETER NON-MERCURY SEMI - DISPOSABLE E 100'S

Infrared Thermometer

Dr Temp

Infrared Thermometer

Infrared Thermometer

Sanbonani

Infrared Thermometer

Infrared Thermometer

Sanbonani

N95 - size small

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

LECHOBA

N95 - size small

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Allenco

N95 - size small

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Liora

N95 - size small

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

QUALITY MEDICAL SUPPLIES

3-Ply Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Meddreg Technology

3-Ply Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Multisurge PTY Ltd

3-Ply Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Sooliman's Retail Enterprise

3-Ply Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Sooliman's Retail Enterprise

N95 Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Lechaba Medical Supplies

N95 Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

ALFREHUTCH

Filtering half mask

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

LIORA Med. Supplies

Particulate filtering mask disposable N95 S,M & L

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Quality Medical Supplies

N95 Masks

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Face mask with loops 50`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

LOGAN MEDICAL

Face mask with loops 50`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

Medi-Core

Face mask with loops 50`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

GENESIS PHARMACEUTICALS

Face mask with loops 50`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

KHUABO HOLDINGS (PTY) LTD

N95 - Mask medium 1`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

LECHOBA

N95 - Mask large 1`s

Masks Respirator N95/FFP2/KN95

LECHOBA

Mask surgical face

Masks Surgical/medical

Chemical Medical

Mask surgical face with eye shield

Masks Surgical/medical

ALLENCO MEDICAL & DENTAL SUPPLIES

Surgical mask

Masks Surgical/medical

E.G.S Investment Solutions

Surgical mask tie-backs

Masks Surgical/medical

Allenco

Surgical mask tie-backs

Masks Surgical/medical

MULTISURGE

Ventilators

Ventilators

Draggler

Disposabel Visors

Visors

Evergreen Latex CC

WESTERN CAPE

a) Total amount spent to procure PPE

(i) Orders placed as at end March 2020 R115 304 818

(ii) Of which R15 952 162 had been received and invoiced

(b) Breakdown in costs of the procured PPE