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18 December 2019 - NW1685

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What budget or grants are provided for the South Rand Hospital, (b) what mechanisms and processes exist to ensure that the highest level of service is provided at the hospital and (c) on what date will the current staff vacancies be filled?

Reply:

a) The budget or grants for the 2019/2020 financial year, South Rand Hospital is as follows:

  • Voted funds - R274 213 000
  • Programme 8 - R 9 140 000
  • HIV/AIDS Conditional Grant - R 21 719 000
  • TB Conditional Grant - R 1 841 000

b) The hospital implements quality improvement programme that was initaited by the Premier of Gauteng called “deliverology”. Through this programme, the hospital is able to monitor staff absenteesim through attendance registers, monthly leave reports for both planned and unplanned leaves. This programme ensures that all staff are at service stations to ensure prompt service delivery.

Processes that exist to ensure that the highest level of service is provided at the hospital are as follows:

  • Quality meetings. These meetings monitor patients complaints, patient waiting times and where problem areas are identified, corrective measures are put in place.
  • Vetting committee (Bid and Adjudication committee at the hospital level) is used to ensure proper adherence to supply chain management process are followed and goods and services, equipment and the tools of trade are available in good quantities where required.
  • Governance structures such as EXCO meetings, Clinical Executive meetings, hospital board meetings) are held to ensure accountability of the staff and these are aligned with the department’s APP.

c) The recruitment process is under way to fill the vacancies and the details are as follows:

  • 13 Vacant posts
  • 13 Advertised
  • 10 Interviews held
  • 7 candidates recommended

A total of 3 Posts will be readvertised due to inability to get the suitable candidates.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1694

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to access to health care by the transgender community, what is the (a) current process for and (b) budget allocated to hormone replacement and gender re-assignment surgery in Government hospitals; (2) whether there is a backlog in respect of hormone replacement and gender re-assignment surgery in Government hospitals; if so, what number of persons are affected by the backlog?

Reply:

1. (a) The patient comes for assessment in the Endocrine Clinic by a muti-disciplinary team inclusive of Physicians and Psychologists. The patient is placed on hormonal treatment and when ready, then referred for transgender surgery.

(b) There is no dedicated budget allocated for the treatment of Transgender patients. The budget comes from voted funds under the Clinical and Surgery business unit and Pharmacy budget.

(2) No, there is no backlog. At present there are only 3 patients that are waiting for surgery.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1677

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 137 on 14 October 2019, he will furnish Ms H Ismael with a detailed report of all National Health Insurance pilot projects, including the name of facilities; (2) whether any of the pilot projects have failed; if so, what (a) are the names of the pilot projects that have failed and (b) has he found to be the reasons that the projects failed?

Reply:

(1) A copy of the independent report “Evaluation of the Phase 1 Implementation of the Interventions in the National Health Insurance Pilot Districts in South Africa. NDOH10/2017-2018. Final Evaluation Report. August 2019 is attached to this response as Annexure 1.

(2) (a) No specific facilities that have failed were identified in the report.

Overall, the implementation of the pilot interventions had mixed success across the pilot districts. None of the interventions can be considered “failures”, as all were implemented at scale.

Where successful, a few common factors were identified:

  1. Strong political will;
  2. Adequate human and financial resources for implementation;
  3. Good coordination and communication; and
  4. Good monitoring systems put in place at the time of implementation.

(b) The interventions also faced a number of challenges, and, to varying degrees, these factors hindered their success:

  1. Inadequate planning;
  2. Lack of resources;
  3. Inconsistent communication;
  4. A lack of coordination where necessary; and
  5. Insufficient mechanisms to monitor progress to ensure course correction.

Reports regarding specific projects are contained in the Report and are summarized as follows:

1. Ward-based Primary Healthcare Community Outreach Teams (WBPHCOTS)

  1. A total of 3 323 WBPHCOTs providing basic health services to children and adults were in place at the end of 2017/18.
  2. These teams were able to successfully fulfil their mandate to provide outreach health services within the community.
  3. WBPHCOTs completed community visits and were also able to report on the health status of the individuals at the households visited.
  4. Teams often lacked the envisioned team composition, with many teams lacking outreach team leaders.
  5. Data collection was insufficient to adequately monitor the effectiveness of the referral systems and follow up processes.
  6. At times there were insufficient funds for transport and equipment; this impacted the team’s ability to successfully undertake their work.

2. Integrated School Health Program (ISHP)

  1. A total of 4 339 875 learners had been screened through ISHP since 2012; of these 504 803 were identified to have various health barriers and referred for treatment.
  2. The ISHP intervention was particularly successful in its ability to demonstrate good inter-departmental collaboration between the NDoH and Department of Basic Education (DBE).
  3. There was a lack of data to support the effectiveness of the referrals and a lack of feedback mechanisms between school teams and facilities.
  4. The lack of sufficient equipment, such as measurement scales and transport to travel to schools, often impacted negatively on the success of this intervention.
  5. There was a lack of prioritisation and targeting of learners within this intervention.
  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination campaign as part of the ISHP was launched in 2014. Of 2,289,699 girls in Grade 4, 1,934,635 received HPV vaccines.

3. General Practitioners (GPs) Contracting

  1. A total of 330 General Practitioners (GP) had been contracted by end of 2017/2018.
  2. Where contracting of GPs was implemented successfully, the access to doctors improved at PHC facilities. Patients also perceived that the quality of care improved at facilities due to the presence of GPs.
  3. Inadequate monitoring of contracted GPs caused some challenges during implementation.
  4. Unforeseen challenges including negotiations that were outside of the DPSA rates as well as inadequate monitoring of contracts resulted in GPs claiming substantially higher expenses than budgeted for.

4. Ideal Clinic Realisation Model (ICRM)

  1. A total of 3434 facilities had been assessed of which 1507 had attained ideal clinic status at end of 2017/2018.
  2. This project is deemed to have improved the ability of facilities to procure much needed equipment.
  3. Where the ICRM was believed to have been implemented as planned, there was a perceived improvement in quality of care by both facility managers and patients.
  4. One of the challenges identified was that ICRM limited flexibility and the ability for managers to adapt facilities to the local context and to the needs of the facilities at the time.
  5. The changing manual and frequent change of standards in the ICRM made it difficult for managers to keep up with the changes and resulted in managers experiencing frustration.

5. District Clinical Specialist Teams (DCST)

  1. At the end of March 2017, 45 of 52 districts in nine provinces had functional DCSTs with at least three members per team to provide specialist oversight within the districts.
  2. The introduction of these teams was perceived by some stakeholders to have promoted clinical governance within the districts.
  3. The team composition, which often lacked critical specialists, limited their ability to provide the envisioned training and support structures.
  4. The lack of gynaecologist and paediatricians meant that DCSTs were not able to adequately improve child and maternal health as envisioned.
  5. Not all specialists were seen necessarily as good mentors and they may have been unable to provide adequate support.
  6. The DCST model was assessed to be a costly model and it stretched the limited specialist resources in the public sector.

6. Centralised Chronic Medicine Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD)

  1. A total of 2 182 422 patients enrolled on the CCMDD, collecting medicines in over 855 pick-up points (PUPs) at the end of 2017/2018.
  2. The strong political leadership and will behind CCMDD contributed towards its successful implementation.
  3. CCMDD was scaled up beyond target and the consistent monitoring of the programme contributed to the availability of reliable data to support continued implementation.
  4. Changes of service providers threatened the intervention’s continuity.
  5. The lack of sufficient integration between CCMDD pick-up points and facilities resulted in inadequate tracking of patients between the two systems.

7. Health Patient Registration System (HPRS)

  1. At the end of 2017/2018, 2968 PHC facilities were using HPRS and there were over 20 million (20 700 149) people registered on the system.
  2. Good communication and feedback loops are seen to have facilitated implementation success.
  3. The poor connectivity at some facilities and challenges with hardware have contributed to the challenges experienced during NHI phase 1 implementation.
  4. The lack of human resources and lack of capacity in some districts to implement affected the success of HPRS

8. Stock Visibility System SVS

  1. At the end of 2017/2018, SVS was being implemented in 3167 clinics and community health centres (92% coverage).
  2. The successful training of available staff led to an in-depth understanding of the system at facility level. The introduction of SVS led to reduced stock outs and improved efficiency at facilities.
  3. The lack of reliable internet connectivity and hardware in some districts , impacted its success.
  4. The minimal number of available pharmacists and pharmacy assistants limited facilities ability to ensure the smooth running of the system.
  5. The sustainability of this intervention poses a challenge as implementation during NHI phase1 relied heavily on the support from external funders.

9. Infrastructure

  1. Since 2013/2014, work in 139 of 140 identified CHCs and clinics has been completed through the NHI rehabilitation projects.
  2. In 2017/2018 alone, 107 facilities were maintained, repaired and/or refurbished in NHI districts.
  3. Where completed, patients perceived an improvement in the quality of care as a result. Small infrastructure changes had a positive impact on the overall environment at facilities.
  4. Projects were rarely implemented or completed due to the lack of planning capacity to release the assigned funds.
  5. Funds which were released were used mainly for new infrastructure projects
  6. However, insufficient attention was paid to the maintenance of facilities, which is critical to both access and the provision of quality services and preventing unnecessary new-build costs due to deterioration because of a lack of basic maintenance.

10. Human Resources for Health

  1. The introduction of Workload Indicators of Staffing Need (WISN) provided a standardised, evidence-based staffing needs assessment at facility level. These assessments were implemented widely across the pilot districts.
  2. The resource constrained environment meant that hiring of staff had been frozen and as a result the WISN findings were not always implementable and caused further frustration among facility managers who had done the assessment.

END.

18 December 2019 - NW1678

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What (i) is the reason for the Good Hope Clinic in the Eastern Cape not being fully built, (ii) was the initial amount budgeted for the building of the clinic and (iii) total amount has been spent to date and (b) who was the appointed contractor?

Reply:

(a) There is a mobile clinic service called Gope Hope. The community in the Eastern Cape receives through the mobile clinic which visits monthly. There is no budget or plans for the construction of a clinic at mobile service point “Good Hope”.

(b) Not applicable.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1545

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What percentage of (a) persons living with mental health conditions are receiving the professional care they need, (b) the total budget of his department is used for the care of patients with mental health conditions in each province, (c) the mental health care budget is used on treating severe symptoms and (d) the mental health care budget is used for the early evaluation and prevention of mental health conditions; (2) what total number of public hospitals (a) are compliant with the mental health care legislation, (b) are providing the requisite 72 hours assessments and (c) have qualified child psychiatrists in each province?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Nationally representative psychiatric epidemiological study, the South African Stress and Health (SASH) survey, found that 25,2% of participants with a mental disorder had sought treatment within the previous 12 months of which 5,7% with a mental disorder received mental health care.

(b) The national survey on the evaluation of health system costs of mental health services and programmes in South Africa undertaken by the University of Cape Town using the 2016/17 Financial Year provincial health budget expenditure found the following in respect of expenditure on Mental Health in 2016/17.

Province

2016/17 financial year total inpatient and outpatient mental health expenditure

 

Millions

Eastern Cape

R806

Free State

R253

Gauteng

R2,334

KwaZulu-Natal

R1,831

Limpopo

R422

Mpumalanga

R178

Northern Cape

R177

North West

R296

Western Cape

R1,504

The above budgets does not include funds that are transferred to private health care providers who are contracted by some provincial departments of health to provide mental health services in provinces where such contracts exist.

(c)-(d) The budget for provision of mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation is not separated in terms of severity of mental health symptoms or type of mental health intervention. Available budget data separation is in terms of percentage spent on inpatient mental health care and percentage spent on outpatient mental health care as reflected in the table below.

Province

Total mental health budget

% of total mental health budget spent on inpatient mental health care

% of total mental health budget spent on outpatient mental health care

 

Millions

%

%

Eastern Cape

R806

86%

14%

Free State

R253

88%

12%

Gauteng

R2,334

89.1%

10.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

R1,831

82.3%

17.7%

Limpopo

R422

70.2%

29.8%

Mpumalanga

R178

76.2%

23.8%

Northern Cape

R177

82%

18%

North West

R296

86.2%

13.8%

Western Cape

R1,504

90.5%

9.5%

The above budgets do not include funds that are transferred to private health care providers who are contracted by some provincial departments of health to provide mental health services in provinces where such contracts exist.

(2) The following table reflects the details in this regard.

 

Total number of public hospitals

 

Province

Compliant with Mental Health Care Legislation

Providing 72 hour assess-ments

Have qualified child psychiatrists

   

(a)

(b)

(c)

 

Eastern Cape

7

39

0

 

Free State

1

29

1

 

Gauteng

13

17

5

 

KwaZulu-Natal

27

56

1

 

Limpopo

5

35

0

 

Mpumalanga has 28 public health facilities providing mental health services BUT they do not meet the basic requirements prescribed

0

28

0

 

Northern Cape

13

1

1

 

North West

2

6

0

 

Western Cape

11

31

3

 

TOTAL

67

254

11

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1566

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What are the guidelines and/or protocols that provinces should have in place to ensure safety (a) at health facilities and (b) of Emergency Medical Services personnel; (2) does his department require any basic level safety requirements to be met by each province; (3) what total number of healthcare professionals have been killed in the line of duty by patients and/or criminals in the past five years?

Reply:

1. (a) Health Facilities

The Department has security guards in all the health facilities. The purpose is to protect both the staff and the patients on continuous basis. The security guards conduct patrol in the health facilities throughout the day. The Ideal Hospital Realisation and Management Framework and the Ideal Clinic Realisation and Maintenance as well as the Office of Health Standards Compliance, have measures compelling all health facilities to introduce safety and security features. The health facilities have been declared gun free ones. These are measured at regular intervals by means of inspections and reports being submitted.

(b) Emergency Medical Services Personnel

  • Through engagement with the National Joint Intelligence Structures, a PROJOC instruction was issued that SAPS is required to escort ambulances to calls in volatile areas.
  • Provinces are required to establish a response protocol to areas identified as hot zones.
  • A comprehensive National EMS Safety Guideline is in place to ensure that the (EMS) personnel work in an environment consistent with accepted minimum safety and security standards. This encompasses the development of provincial EMS safety plans and of mainstreaming the individual and collective sense of security and safety awareness and responsibility.
  • A National EMS Safety Forum has recently been considered to advise the National and Provincial Departments of Health on safety challenges, undertaking risk assessments and proposing risk reduction measures in addition to mitigating, developing, maintaining, updating and implementing safety protocols and standard operating procedures according to the changing situation, where necessary.

2. Each province is required to develop and implement their respective Safety Plan in line with the National EMS Safety Guideline depending on the level of threat/incidents in their respective provinces. The guideline is as follows:

STRATEGIC FOCUS

OUTPUT

ACTIVITIES

SUCCESS PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

Focus on Staff

Staff Preparedness

  • Promote staff operational readiness
  • Staff are encouraged to take part in Wellness Initiatives.

Reduce the risk to staff member being targeted by criminals

 

Staff Vigilance / Awareness

  • Staff members to be sensitised in vigilance and awareness of surroundings

Staff members have access to all information regarding high risk zones

 

Staff Resilience

  • Regular debriefing and mental health training sessions to be attended by staff members

Mentally fit staff

 

Staff Safety Course

  • A Safety course is currently being developed

Awareness & Preparedness of EMS in hostile situations

Focus on Community

Informal

  • Awareness campaigns within communities highlighting challenges with regards to limitations and barriers and implementation of red zones

Staff members will be familiar to community members and a level of trust can be built between all parties.

 

Formal

  • Active participation in Community Police forums, neighbourhood watches and farm watches – meeting scheduled with agenda item tabled

Greater awareness within the community of incidents that have occurred. Also to provide support to staff that needs to testify

Focus on Management

Before the incident

  • Keep staff informed of all pertinent activities within their district so as to increase their vigilance and awareness.

Ensuring a fluid process during and after an incident

 

During the Incident

  • Immediate response of officers to scene of incident if safe, or to place of safety

Ensuring staff support

 

Post Incident

  • Staff wellness to investigate a more proactive and efficient external staff support service for ongoing management of individuals that have been subjected to traumatic incidents especially attacks on their person

Supported staff members will feel they are able to contribute to the service and this will assist in their recovery.

 

Provincial

  • Regular stakeholders meeting with the Community Police Forum (CPF), Business South Africa, Private Security in the identified affected areas;

Regular feedback to staff on stakeholder meetings.

 

National

  • Regular feedback to NHC -TAC on prevention and mitigation strategy to reduce the attacks on EMS.

Support from NHC-TAC.

Monitoring on the implementation of the Emergency Medical Support in Hostile Environments) training.

National and Provincial feedback on Health Care In Danger Project

Focus on Technology

 
  • Panic button located in the front and rear of vehicles to be tested on a regular basis to check their status
  • Use of social media/ digital media,
  • Use digital media to campaign with other platforms on the management of EMS
  • Safety Vest specifications were approved at the National Committee for EMS meeting held on the 15th October 2019

Improved responsiveness and confidence in service capacity

Ensure safety and protection for EMS personnel.

 

3. One EMS personnel was fatality shot in Gauteng Province in 2017, and one security guard in Limpopo province

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1623

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with compliance certificates for each (a) clinic and (b) hospital in the Northern Cape?

Reply:

We have requested information from the Province to enable me to respond to this question. The response will be submitted as soon as the Province has sent us the details.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1565

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the current waiting period for treatment for patients who have been diagnosed with cancer from time of diagnosis to first phase of treatment?

Reply:

Treatment of different types of cancer differ by province, facility and type of cancer The estimated waiting period for patients diagnosed with cervical cancer ranges from 6-11 weeks and for prostate cancer 11-28 weeks.

Waiting times at selected hospitals such as Frere Hospital, Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Livingstone Hospital, Polokwane Hospital ranges between 6 to 8 weeks. In Tygerberg, Groote Schuur and Universitas Hospitals the waiting times are between 12-14 weeks.

We are currently conducting an audit on cancer services and the outcome will be made available once the audit is completed.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1564

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What number of government health care facilities in each province offer reproductive healthcare, including termination of pregnancies, pap smears and mammograms?

Reply:

All primary health facilities are providing sexual and reproductive health services however the table below is for Termination of Pregnancy facilities:

Public Health Facilities Providing TOP services per Province

Eastern Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Cacadu District

 
  1. Andres Vosloo hospital

Nelson Mandela Bay

 

1. Dora Ndiza hospital

2. Uitenhage provincial hospital

Amathole District

 

1. Madwaleni hospital

2. S.S Gida hospital

3. Frere hospital

4. Cecilia-Makwane hospital

5. Empilweni-Gompo CHC

6. Elliotdale CHC

7. Ngqamakwe CHC

UKhahlamba

 

1. Empilisweni hospital

2. Toylor-Bequest hospital

OR Tambo

 

1. Umthata-General hospital

2. St Pats hospital

3. St Barnaba’s hospital

4. St Liz hospital

5. Nessie Night hospital

6. Qumbu CHC

Chris Hani

 

1. Cofimvaba CHC

2. Cala Hospital

3. Elliot hospital

4. Cradock hospital

6. Glen Grey hospital

Gauteng

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Ekurhuleni

 

1. Natalspruit hospital

2. Tembisa hospital

3. Pholosong hospital

4. Far Eastrand hospital

5. Germiston hospital

6. Nokuthela-Ngwenya CHC

7. Jabulane-Dumane CHC

8. Pholopark CHC

Sedibeng

 

1. Sebokeng hospital

2. Kopanong hospital

3. Heidelberg hospital

4. Johan Heyns CHC

Tshwane

 

5.Kalafong hospital

2. George-Mokhari hospital

3.Odi hospital

4. Tshwane-district hospital

5. Phedisong 4 CHC

6. Laudium CHC

7. Soshanguve CHC

8. Kgabo CHC

City of Johannesburg

 

1. Chris-Hani Baragwaneth

2. Charlotte-Maxeke hospital

3. Raheema-Moosa hospital

4. Edenvale hospital

5. Hilbrow CHC

6. Chawelo CHC

7. ZolaCHC

8. Lenasia South CHC

West Rand

 

1. Leratong hospital

2. Dr-Yusuf-Dadoo hospital

3. Carltonville hospital

Free Sate

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Lejweleputswa

 

1. Bongani hospital

Thabo Mofutsanyane

 

1. Elizabeth Ross

Motheo

 

1. National hospital

Fezile Dabi

 

1. Matsimaholo

Limpopo

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Capricorn

 

1. Batlokwa

2. Lebowakgomo

3. Mankweng

4. Polokwane

5. Seshigo

6. WF Nnobel

7. Ratshatsha CHC

8. Rethabile

9. Mamottshwa clinic

Mopani

 

1. C N Phathudi

2. Kgapane

3. Letaba

4. Maphutha L Malatji

5. Nkhensani

6. Sekororo

7. Van Velden

Duiwelskloof Clinic

  1. Duiwelskloof CHC
  2. Shilivane CHC
  3. Bolobedu Clinic
  1. Raphahleol Clinic

Sekhukhune

 
  1. Jane Furse
  1. Matlala
  1. Mecklenburg
  1. Philadephia

Vhembe

 
  1. Dolnald Fraser
  1. Elim
  1. Louis Tritchardt
  1. Malamulele
  1. Siloam
  1. Tshilidzini
  1. Makhado CHC
  1. Thohoyandou CHC

Waterberg

 
  1. Ellisras Hospital
  1. FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital
  1. Mookgopong CHC
  1. Voortrekker Memorial Hospital
  1. Warmbaths Hospital

Mpumalanga

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Nkangala

 
  1. Mammethlake hospital
  1. Kwamhlanga hospital

Gert Sibande

 
  1. Bethal hospital

Northern Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Frances Baard

 
  1. Galeshwe CHC

John Taolo Gaetsewe

 
  1. Tshwaragano level 1 hospital

Siyanda

 
  1. Gordonia level 1 hospital
  1. Askam CHC

Kwa-Zulu Natal

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

UThungulu

 
  1. Ngwelezane hospital
  1. Mbongolwane hospital
  1. Catherine Booth hospital

Zululand

 
  1. Nkonjeni hospital

UMkhanyakude

 
  1. Bethesda hospital

UGu

 
  1. GJ Crookes hospital

EThekwini

 
  1. Prince Mushiyeni hospital
  1. Wentworth hospital
  1. Addington hospital

ILembe

 
  1. Maphumulo hospital

UMgungundlovu

 
  1. Edendale hospital
  1. Northdale hospital
  1. Applesboch hospital

UThukela

 
  1. Escourt hospital
  1. Emawusi hospital

Amajuba

 
  1. Newcasle hospital

Sisonke

 
  1. Christ the King hospital
  1. St Appllinaris hospital
  1. EG Usher hospital

North West

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Dr K Kaunda

 
  1. Klerksdorp hospital
  1. Potchefstroom hospital
  1. Grace Mkhomo CHC
  1. Nic Bodenstein hospital

Dr RS Mopati

 
  1. Taung hospital
  1. Vryburg hospital
  1. Sweitzereneke hospital
  1. loemhof hospital

Dr M Molema

 
  1. Mafikeng hospital
  1. Gelukspan hospital
  1. Thusong hospital
  1. Ottosdal CHC
  1. Delareyville CHC
  1. Sannieshoff CHC
  1. Ratlou CHC
  1. Montshioa Stdt CHC

Bojanala

 
  1. Phokeng CHC
  1. Mogwase CHC
  1. Makapanstad CHC
  1. George Stegman hospital
  1. Lethlabile CHC
  1. JS Tabane hospital

Western Cape

 

Designated Facilities Providing TOP services

Cape Town Metro

 
  1. Groote Schuur hospital
  1. Somerset hospital
  1. Wesfleur hospital
  1. False Bay hospital
  1. Victoria hospital
  1. 2 Military hospital
  1. GF Jooste hospital
  1. Michell’s Plain CHC
  1. Carnation-ward Lentegeur hospital
  1. Karl Bremer hospital
  1. Tygerburg hospital
  1. Eerste River hospital
  1. Helderburg hospital
  1. Michael hospital
  1. Mapongwana CHC
  1. Nolungile clinic
  1. Kuayasa clinic

West Coast District

 
  1. Clan William Hospital
  1. Swartland Hospital
  1. Vredenburg Hospital
  1. Vredendal Hospital

Cape Wine lands District

 
  1. Paarl Hospital
  1. TC Newman CDC
  1. Stellenbosch Hospital
  1. Ceres Hospital
  1. Worcester Hospital
  1. Montagu Hospital
 

Overberg District

 
  1. Caledon Hospital
  1. Hermanus Hospital
  1. Otto-du-Plessis Hospital

pap smears services

All primary health care facilities are providing Pap Smear services

Mammogram services

Province

Facilities

Limpopo

  1. Pietersburg Hospital
  1. Mankweng Hospital

Mpumalanga

  1. Witbank Hospital
  1. Rob Ferreira Hospital

Free State

  1. Universitas Hospital;
  1. Pelenomi Hospital

North West

  1. Klerksdorp Tshepong Complex
  1. Job Shimankane Tabane Hospital
  1. Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

Western Cape

  1. Groote Schuur Hospital
  1. Tygerberg Hospital

Northern Cape

  1. Kimberly Hospital

Eastern Cape

None

Gauteng

  1. Chris Hani Hospital
  1. Charlotte Maxeke Hospital
  1. George Mukhari Hospital
  1. Kalafong Hospital
  1. Mamelodi Hospital
  1. Steve Biko Hospital
  1. Tembisa Hospital
  1. Helen joseph Hospital
  1. Rahima Moosa Hospital
  1. Sebokeng Hospital
  1. Thelle Mogoerane Hospital

KwaZulu Natal

  1. Ngwelezane Hospital
  1. Addington Hospital
  1. Prince Albert Luthuli Hospital
  1. Ngwelezane Hospital
  1. Greys Hospital
  1. RK Khan Hospital
  1. Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital

Annexure A: Current Facilities Providing Oncology Treatment and Availability of Equipment (NDoH Audit, 2017)

Province

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Contracting

No of Linacs

Eastern Cape

Frere Hospital

X

X

X

 

1

 

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Livingstone Hospital

X

X

X

 

2

Free State

Universitas Hospital

X

X

X

 

2

Gauteng

Steve Biko Hospital

X

X

X

 

3

 

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

X

X

X

 

4

 

Chris Hani Baragwabath Academic Hospital

   

X

   
 

Kalafong Hospital

X

       

Kwa Zulu Natal

Greys Hospital

X

X

X

 

1

 

Addington Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Ngwelezane Hospital

X

   

Yes

 
 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

X

X

 

Yes

3

Limpopo

Polokwane Hospital

X

X

X

Yes

1

Mpumalanga

Rob Ferreira Hospital

X

   

Yes

 

Northern Cape

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

X

X

X

Yes

 

Western Cape

Tygerberg

X

X

   

3

 

Groote Schuur

X

X

   

3

 

George Hospital

X

X

 

Yes

 
 

Red Cross Hospital

   

X

   

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1559

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Health

What progress has his department made in establishing Ketlaphela, the state-owned pharmaceutical company that will supply anti-retroviral drugs to his department as the former President, Mr Jacob G Zuma, announced during the state of the nation address in 2016?

Reply:

The establishment of the State-owned company Ketlaphela was led by the Department of Science and Technology. The initial plans were to establish a State-owned active pharmaceutical ingredients company producing the API’s for the widely used ARVs. After the expression of interest advert for companies to partner on API production, there was no economically viable proposal.

The project has since been taken over by NECSA with a change in focus towards medicines formulation and packaging as an initial step toward final API production. The business case in this regard suggests that this approach would be economically viable. The Department of Energy would be able to provide full details regarding progress with Ketlaphela given that it is now with that Department.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1622

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What number of ambulances are available in the Northern Cape?

Reply:

The Northern Cape has 88 ambulances available for operations.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1567

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What total number of healthcare professionals are on incapacity leave for longer than one year in each province, (b) what are the posts that they occupy and (c) at what cost has their leave been to each provincial health department?

Reply:

Information is still being sourced from Provinces. The answer will be submitted to Parliament as soon as the information is received from Provinces.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1621

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What total number of (a) clinics and (b) hospitals are in the Northern Cape; (2) what total number of (a) doctors and (b) nurses are employed at each (i) hospital and (ii) clinic; (3) (a) who received the contract to build and/or upgrade the Good Hope Clinic and (b) how far is the building/upgrade of the clinic?

Reply:

1. (a) 161 clinics based on the Ideal clinic database (on the software) and

(b) 14 hospitals based on the regulation relating to categories of hospitals 2012 in the Northern Cape province.

2. (a) (i) Total doctors employed in hospitals in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Medical Officer employed in Hospital as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Medical Officer

54

 

Medical Officer (Community Service)

17

 

Medical Specialist

1

Northern Cape Total

 

72

(ii) Total doctors employed in clinics in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Medical Officers employed in Clinics as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Medical Officer

1

b) (i) Total nurses employed in hospitals in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Nurse Professionals employed in Hospital as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Assistant Manager Nursing (Head Nursing Service)

3

 

Clinical Nurse Practitioner (Prim H Care)

3

 

Nursing Assistant

168

 

Operational Manager Nursing (General)

11

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

1

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Speciality Unit)

4

 

Professional Nurse

250

 

Professional Nurse ( Speciality Nursing)

37

 

Professional Nurse (Community Service)

29

 

Staff Nurse

64

Northern Cape Total

 

570

(ii) Total nurses employed in clinics in Northern Cape as at end October 2019

Nurse Professions employed in Clinics as at October 2019

Northern Cape

Staff Nurse

37

 

Assistant Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

3

 

Professional Nurse

162

 

Deputy Manager Nursing (Level 1 & 2 Hospital)

1

 

Professional Nurse ( Speciality Nursing)

2

 

Nursing Assistant

173

 

Professional Nurse (Community Service)

20

 

Operational Manager Nursing (General)

17

 

Assistant Manager Nursing Area

1

 

Operational Manager Nursing (Primary H Care)

89

 

Clinical Nurse Practitioner (Prim H Care)

111

Northern Cape total

 

616

3. Good Hope is a mobile point in Flagstaff in the Eastern Cape province. The community from the village has been requesting the department to build a clinic for them. The department could not build it due to budgetary constraints. The community is being serviced through a mobile clinic which visits once per month.

(a) There is nobody who has been awarded a contract to build and/or upgrade the Good Hope clinic;

(b) Due to the fact that there was no tender awarded to anyone, there is no progress on the building/upgrade of the clinic.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1563

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Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What number of deaths have been recorded as a result of medical negligence across the Republic in the past five years?

Reply:

Information is still being sourced from provinces to enable us to respond to this question. The final response will be submitted to Parliament as soon as the relevant information has been received from provinces.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1634

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What progress has his department made in implementing the National Strategic Plan for HIV, TB and STIs 2017 – 2022; (2) how does his department intend to address the issue of noncommunicable diseases that have been identified as forming part of the quadruple burden of diseases; (3) what (a) number of Gene Xpert TB diagnosis machines has his department acquired, (b) is the coverage of the machines and (c) has he found to be the impact of the machines on TB (i) testing and (ii) treatment?

Reply:

(1) The South African National AIDS Council secretariat is currently finalising the midterm report against activities and targets set in the National Strategic Plan, 2017-2022. Highlights of the review were presented, on 23 November 2019, to the SANAC Extended Plenary meeting, co-chaired by the Deputy President and Ms Steve Letsike representing civil society. Once the midterm report is finalised copies can be made available to Members of Parliament.

In brief, South Africa has made progress against the various pillars of Strategic Plan as reflected by data on reduction in new infections as well as access to antiretroviral treatment. With respect to HIV incidence, the number of new infections has fallen from 270,000 in 2012 to 222,000 in 2018. Whilst this reduction is welcome it is clearly too slow and more needs to be done to reduce new infections.

The mother to child transmission rates at 10 weeks postpartum have declined to 0.74% which means that fewer children are being born HIV positive. Although condom distribution has increased, condom utilisation is on the decline, particularly in the 15-24 year old age group. Combination prevention and differentiated service delivery, addressing the needs of each target population in a more holistic and comprehensive way, has been prioritised.

In terms of treatment, South Africa has reached the 5 million people on treatment. The majority of the patients are in the public sector (4.8 million) with the remainder in the private sector. With respect to the UNAIDS 90-90-90 targets (90% of people with HIV know their status, 90% of these on treatment, and 90% of those on treatment virally suppressed), the country has reached 91-71-88. This means that South Africa has achieved the 1st 90, and is steadily progressing towards achieving the 2nd and 3rd 90’s. Three districts (in KwaZulu-Natal) have reached the 90-90-90 targets with another 14 nation-wide likely to reach this target by March 2020.

We need to test and treat more men and young people and retention on treatment continues to be a challenge which government and its partners are working on. Internal and external migration together with a lack of an electronic information system across the health system are contributory to a higher than acceptable percentage of patients retained in care.

The burden of tuberculosis remains large with South Africa being one of the high burden countries. We have recently completed the first ever national TB prevalence survey and the results are currently being verified by the World Health Organisation. Once verified we will have a better understanding of the TB incidence and prevalence rates. The TB prevalence survey report can also be made available to Members of Parliament once finalised. From routine data we know that notifications are on the decline but that we are still missing an estimated 160,000 patients – as for HIV, we are missing young people as well as men. Efforts are underway to intensify screening, testing and initiation of young people and men on treatment and finding the missing TB patients.

(2) The Department intends addressing the issue of non-communicable diseases that have been identified as forming part of the quadruple burden of disease through the National Strategic Plan on Non-Communicable Diseases 2020-2035 which is in the process of being approved. This Strategy aims to strengthen existing initiatives on the prevention and control on non-communicable diseases (NCDs). Such initiatives include:

PREVENTION AND PROMOTION

South Africa has taken a number of legislative/regulatory/policy steps to prevent NCDs. Specific preventive interventions include (by main risk factors):

Tobacco

a. A new Draft Control of Tobacco Products and electronic Delivery Systems Bill has been tabled;

b. The key areas that the Bill will regulate are:

- restrictions on public smoking;

- the sale and advertising of tobacco products and electronic delivery systems;

- the prohibition on financial or other support;

- the prohibition of vending machines;

- the standardisation of the packaging and appearance of tobacco products; and electronic delivery systems; and

- restriction on the sale of products.

Diet

a. A regulation on Trans-fats in Foodstuffs was passed in 2011 (R127). According to this regulation the trans-fat content of any oils and fats cannot exceed two grams per 100 grams. Products with higher trans fats levels are prohibited from entering or being sold in the country.

b. A regulation on reduction of sodium in 13 categories of foodstuffs that are the most common source of sodium for the majority of South Africans was passed in 2013 (R214) and amended in October 2017.

c. A levy on sugar sweetened beverages (Health promotion levy) was passed in 2018. The levy is foxed at 2.1 cents per gram of sugar content that exceeds 4g per 100ml. Fruit juice is exempt.

d. South Africa adopted a Strategy for the Prevention and Control of Obesity in South Africa (2015-2020).

e. National Nutrition Week and National Obesity Week took place annually from 09 to 15 and 15 to 19 October respectively. For the past three years (2016, 2017 and 2018) the Department of Health campaigns focused on the importance of eating regular, healthy meals to prevent obesity and consequently non-communicable diseases and to promote health.

Physical activity

a. The Country commemorates the Move for Health campaign on an annual basis on the 10th of May. The campaign is led by the Sport and Recreation South Africa in collaboration with the Department of Health.

b. The Department of Sports and Recreation hosts an annual Big Walk on the first Sunday of October each year. The Big Walk is the South African version of the World Walking Day. Since 2012 it has taken place in all provincial capital cities with more than thirty thousand (30,000) participants in 2017.

c. The Cabinet of South Africa also declared the first Friday of October as the National Recreation Day since 2014. The campaign is targeting all Citizens to be physically active.

The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination programme

a. The Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccination programme was launched in 2014 by the National Department of Health in partnership with the Department of Basic Education, as part of primary prevention against cervical cancer.

b. The aim was to target an estimated 550,000 girls in grade 4, aged 9 years in 17,000 public and special schools, before they were exposed to HPV infection.

c. A bivalent vaccine (Cervarix) is given at five to six month intervals using a campaign approach implemented through the Integrated School Health Programme.

d. The first round is conducted during February to March and the second round in August to September of each year.

e. Between 2014 when this programme started and February 2019 a total of one million nine hundred and thirty four thousand six hundred and thirty five (1,934,635) Grade 4 girls had received Dose 1 and one million two hundred and seven thousand four hundred and seventy seven (1,207,4077) Dose 2.

HEALTH SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENT

a. An Integrated Clinical Services Management Model that incorporates all chronic diseases, whether communicable or non-communicable, was introduced through the Ideal Clinic initiative. This means that patients are seen for whatever chronic disease they have, including for multiple conditions, at the same visit. As of 2018, 97,2% of clinics had reorganized with designated consulting areas for management of chronic conditions and had patient appointment systems for people with chronic conditions (up from 87% and 73% respectively in 2017).

b. Medicine for many patients that are stable on Non Communicable Diseases medication are provided through the Centralised Chronic Medicines Dispensing and Distribution (CCMDD) model.

c. Together with the Affordable Medicines Directorate (AMD), concerted efforts have been made to improve drug availability at hospital and primary care levels and systems are in place to monitor medicine stock outs.

(3) (a) Table 1: The provincial distribution of GeneXpert devices in South Africa

PROVINCE

GX4

GX16

GX48

GX80

Total

Eastern Cape

17

28

0

2

47

Free State

11

9

0

1

21

Gauteng

25

27

1

2

55

KwaZulu-Natal

25

51

0

1

77

Limpopo

19

25

0

0

44

Mpumalanga

3

14

0

1

18

North West

8

17

0

0

25

Northern Cape

2

6

0

0

8

Western Cape

17

13

0

1

31

Total

127

190

1

8

326

(3) (b) The National Health Laboratory Services (NHLS) laboratory were mapped in Figure 1 to show the coverage of laboratories in South Africa. This was generated using Global Positioning System (GPS) coordinates provided by the National Priority Programme (NPP).

C:\Users\pajayi\Documents\GIS DataBase\Project Folders\NPP\Xpert locations ii.jpg

Figure 1: The geographic coverage of NHLS laboratories across South Africa

(3) (c) (i)-(ii) The impact of GeneXpert has been:

- Early diagnosis of TB and initiation of treatment resulting in reduction in deaths from 33,300 patients (in 2011) to 16,133 (in 2017), a 51% reduction in deaths due to TB;

- The universal drug susceptibility testing for all patients has enabled early triage of patients with rifampicin resistant TB to appropriate second line treatment. This has resulted in a reduction in treatment failure from 5 062 (in 2011) to 934 (in 2017); and

- Reduction in number of patients hospitalised for DS and DR-TB, saving on hospitalisation costs.

Figure 2 summarises the progress of the GeneXpert program over time from March 2011 to September 2019. This was generated using the monthly data provided to the Research and Development team by the NPP. The figure shows a general decrease of both Mycobacterium Tuberculosis (MTB) detection (despite seasonal trends of increased MTB detection in the winter months) and Refampicin-resistant Tuberculosis (RIF) resistance. The “trace”/MTB Indeterminate rate is relatively consistent.

The yearly NPP reported figures for the GeneXpert program are shown in Tables 2 and 3. Table 2 shows the operational programmatic indicators for test outcomes. Table 3 shows the RIF outcomes for MTB detected tests.

Figure 2: The temporal progression of the GeneXpert program at national level. The figure shows the number of tests (for both Xpert MTB/RIF and Xpert MTB/RIF Ultra), the MTB detection rate, “trace”/MTB Indeterminate rate and RIF resistance rate.

END.

29 November 2019 - NW1544

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the fact that the SA Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) recently commissioned an investigation and report into potential human rights violations by the Limpopo Department of Health, (a) on what date was the SAHRC’s report presented to the Limpopo Department of Health, (b) will his department make the report available to the Portfolio Committee on Health and (c) what (i) actions have been taken against persons involved in human rights violations and (ii) are the details of the persons against whom the SAHRC recommended action?

Reply:

(a) The Report was issued in February 2019 to the Limpopo Department of Health.

(b) Yes. The Preliminary report (for comments by the Limpopo Department of Health) is attached.

(c) (i) and (ii) Information is still awaited from the province and will be submitted once received.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1425

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of (i) nurses who are employed at the Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg, North West and (ii) vacant positions and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled?

Reply:

(a) (i) Nurses employed at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg, North West is 578.

(ii) Vacant positions is 106 (vacancy rate of 15%).

(b) The vacancies will be advertised before the end of this financial year (2019/2020), and filled during the 2020/2021 financial year.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1496

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Why is the clinic in Makolokwe Ward 29 in Rustenburg, North West dysfunctional, (b) what total amount was spent to build the clinic and (c) who was the service provider contracted to built the clinic?

Reply:

(a) It is not true that the clinic in Makolokwe, ward 29 is dysfunctional. It operates for limited number of days because it is not a fully-fledged clinic. It is a health post which is supported by Bethanie Clinic which is about 7km away and it provides 24 hour services. It is visited by a mobile clinic twice per week. Due to the small catchment population and its proximity to Bethanie Clinic the facility could not be made a fully-fledged clinic. The structure is a health post that was built in the 2004-2005 financial year.

(b) The costs for the structure at the time was approximately R 250 000.

(c) The departmental records do not show who the service provider was as it was built over 15 years ago and at the lowest costs at the time.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1432

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of nurses are employed at the Middelburg Provincial Hospital; (2) whether any nursing positions are vacant at the specified hospital; if so, (a) what number of nursing positions are vacant and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled?

Reply:

1. The table below reflects the total number of nurses who are employed at Middelburg Provincial Hospital, Mpumalanga.

2. (a) The table also indicates the vacant nursing posts and (b) Since each post was vacated at a different date, it is not possible to mention the specific date that a post will be filled, however, in accordance with the Department of Public Service and Administration directive on reducing the recruitment period and the vacancy rate in the public service dated 08 June 2015, a median period to fill a vacant funded post is six (6) months.

Table 1

Middelburg Hospital in Mpumalanga as at end September 2019

Filled / Vacant

 

 

Province

Profession: NURSE

Filled

Vacant

Grand Total

Mpumalanga

OPERATIONAL MANAGER NURSING (SPECIALITY UNIT)

2

 0

2

 

NURSING ASSISTANT

37

 0

37

 

OPERATIONAL MANAGER NURSING (GENERAL)

7

 0

7

 

PROFESSIONAL NURSE

117

1

118

 

PROFESSIONAL NURSE (COMMUNITY SERVICE)

9

 0

9

 

STAFF NURSE

61

 0

61

Mpumalanga Total

 

233

1

234

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1535

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

What number of public health facilities are made of asbestos?

Reply:

In 2011, a base line infrastructure audit found a total of 958 health facilities with at least one type of asbestos building material (roof, ceiling, internal or external walls). Currently we have a total of 382 facilities with at least one component of asbestos out of the four components. A total of 576 facilities have been replaced to date and the plan is to eradicate the remaining ones within the next three financial years in line with available budget.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1498

Profile picture: Shembeni, Mr HA

Shembeni, Mr HA to ask the Minister of Health

What are the reasons that the patients at the Rob Ferreira Provincial Hospital are expected to pay R700,00 for a date stamp after completion of the insurance forms for chronic diseases?

Reply:

1. The Uniform Patient Fee Schedule (UPFS) is Ministerial approved annually, based on the MTBS (CPI).

2. A UPFS Technical Tariff Task team has been established and consist of both provincial and national representatives of which national facilitates the process and provide guidance;

3. The UPFS makes provision for three groups of users: Full paying, subsidized and free users:

  • Full Paying

This category of users includes but is not limited to externally funded users, users being treated by their private practitioner and certain categories. They are liable for the full UPFS fee.

  • Subsidised

Subsidised users are categorised based on their ability to pay for health services into four categories: H0, H1, H2 and H3. The fees payable by subsidised users are expressed as a percentage of the fees payable by full paying users as determined by the latest edition of the Uniform Patient Fee Schedule (UPFS).

  • Free

There are certain circumstances under which users will receive services free of charge independently of their classification as full paying or subsidised users. These circumstances have a statutory basis and apply only to the episode of care directly related to the circumstances under which the user has qualified for free services.

4. The UPFS further makes provision for non subsidised services and the full UPFS tariff applies irrespective of the classification of the patient.

  • Cosmetic Surgery (None Medical Reasons)
  • Medical Reports
  • Mortuary services
  • Autopsies
  • Port Health and Travel Medicine

MEDICAL REPORTS (Examinations)

This tariff is levied for the completion of a report for insurance or any other purpose e.g. medico-legal and / or procedure above that required for the purposes of the report are undertaken. If a clinical examination and/or procedure are undertaken in addition to the examination, the relevant categories of that particular tariff should also be charged.

The tariff fee is payable strictly in advance before any information is disclosed. This tariff grouping accommodates: the issue and/or the completion of original medical reports and the completion of certificates/forms; as well as the issue of copies of reports/records.

Current UPFS

The tariff payable by e.g. Medical Scheme, Insurance Company etc. is R620.00 for

the financial year 2019/2020

CODE

DESCRIPTION

BASIS

Professional Fee

FACILITY FEE

     

 

LEVEL 1

LEVEL 2

LEVEL 3

     

R

R

R

R

04

Medical Reports - 100%

0410

Medical Report – Facility Fee

Report

 

185

185

185

0411

Medical Report – General medical practitioner

Report

435

 

 

 

0412

Medical Report – Specialist medical practitioner

Report

435

 

 

 

Response from the Mpumalanga Health Department after consultation with Rob Ferreira Hospital on the process followed for Medical Reports and stamps:

The patient will request the completion of the medical report in writing or verbal. The Patient Accounts or Patient Admission will request payment upfront before the completion of the form, immediately payment is received, the form will be forwarded to the specific doctor for completion and the relevant section will stamp it after either Patient Admission or Accounts. The charging of the completion of the form is as per the UPFS tariffs regardless of the level of the hospital.

If is difficult to reply to the question as more information is needed on the patient and exactly what form is referred too to give a more defined answer

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1429

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether he has found that there are enough beds at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital in Rustenburg; if not, (a) on what date will the hospital receive extra beds and (b) what number of beds will be delivered?

Reply:

We are aware that there not enough beds at Job Shimankana Tabane Provincial Hospital.

a) The Hospital is expecting additional beds by the end of this financial year;

b) The number of beds to be delivered is 20.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1543

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to his department’s financial report on the R31 million virement that was requested for vaccines for Limpopo, (a) what was the Limpopo budget for vaccines in the (i) 2017-18 and (ii) 2018-19 financial years, (b) why was a R31 million virement necessary, (c) which budget in his department was this virement taken from and (d) what engagements has he had with the Member of the Executive Council for Health to curb poor planning and jeopardising the health of Limpopo citizens?

Reply:

(a)

Limpopo budget for vaccines (as allocated by Provincial Treasury)

 

2017-18

(i)

2018-19

(ii)

 

R268,920,000

R317,781,000

(b) The National Department of Health responded to a request for support from the Acting Head of Department of Limpopo Department of Health who asked for help as the province had run out of funds to procure vaccines.

(c)

 

Amount

Budget from which funds were taken and motivation

1.

R6,000,000

HIV/AIDS & STI'S: Male Condoms due to supplier being unable to supply male condoms and the National Department of Health did not project at that stage a condom shortage or stock outs.

2.

R9,000,000

HIV/AIDS & STI'S: Consultants. No tender for Mass Media communication was in order and expenditure were done through the three quotations process. Note: Mass Media Communication is budgeted for under Consultants on BASS.

3.

R16,000,00

Chronic Diseases: Health Promotion Levy part of Mass Media Communication that could not be spent as no tender was in place and expenditure were done through the three quotation system.

(d) Following the Presidential Health Summit Compact (2018) it was resolved that a budget planning process for pharmaceuticals be instituted and that National Treasury earmark funds for procurement of pharmaceuticals (ring-fencing of the budget). The National Department has embarked on a process to generate a budget for pharmaceutical products for FY2020-2021 for each of the provinces based on accurate demand forecasts. This was discussed at the National Health Council and will be submitted to National Treasury in line with budgeting processes.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1413

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of key vacancies at the National Health Laboratory Service that were not filled, (b) what are the details of the (i) irregular expenditure and (ii) material irregularities incurred by the entity for the previous financial year and (c) how is his department ensuring that the entity’s (i) expenditure and (ii) procurement processes are in line with applicable legislation?

Reply:

a) 297

b) (i) Irregular expenditure

IRREGULAR SPEND

2018/19 (R’000s)

Opening balance

4 445 560

This relates to expenditure on valid contracts that expired. This relates mostly to reagents and consumables

1 690 132

In terms of the NHLS Delegations of Authority, the Board needs to approve all contracts with a value of more than R10 million. The previous CEO and CFO was found guilty of entering contracts for more than R10 million which they were not allowed to do in terms of their delegated authority

104 770

In certain instances, goods were procured without any tender procedures being followed. This relates to items that NHLS classify as “catalogue” items. It is a practice that originated many years ago, but that the new management only became aware of in the last year. Processes are underway to correct this

800 671

In certain instances, the contract value that was approved had been exceeded by more than the allowed 15%. This relates mostly to reagents where there was an unanticipated spike in the number of tests that needed to be performed

361 810

Although evidence exist of a valid tender process and award, the actual contract confirming the award could not be found. It relates to one contract only

19 470

Cases were found where expenditure was incurred after the award of a tender but before the actual contract was signed (normally due to the urgency of the situation). Standard contract wording has now been changed to prevent this from recurring

18 282

In one Region, the Manager authorized several separate tenders for the same product on the same day. This was erroneously done in an effort to allocate the expenses easier to various cost centers. Procedures have been put in place to prevent this from happening again

1 707

Less: Amount Condoned

-2 310 258

Total

5 132 144

(ii) None

(c) (i) The Department has put in place the following mechanism to ensure that expenditure is in line with applicable legislation:

  • The Minister has approved the NHLS Materiality and Significance Framework in terms of Sections 50 and 55 of the PFMA and Treasury Regulation 28.3, which define significant, material and parameters of transaction that the institution is authorised to approve. The purpose of the Framework is to regulate the disclosure of material facts by public entities to the Executive Authority. This includes information to be provided in terms of the Annual Report and financial statements, as well as requests for approval from the Minister to participate in certain significant transactions, and
  • The Department monitors NHLS’s budget on a quarterly basis to ensure that the actual expenditure is aligned to the budget.

(ii) The Department has put in place a mechanism to ensure that the NHLS report on quarterly basis on the level of compliance to the PFMA which includes the following:

  • Ensuring that NHLS has a delegation of authority that define powers entrusted or delegated to officials within the organisation,
  • Ensuring that NHLS takes appropriate disciplinary steps against employees who have made or permitted irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure,
  • Ensuring that NHLS has an appropriate procurement and provisioning administration system, which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective, and

Ensuring that NHLS has mechanisms in place to prevent irregular, fruitless, and wasteful expenditure.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1433

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is a proper drainage system at Middelburg Provincial Hospital; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of how the drainage system is maintained on a timeous basis?

Reply:

Yes.

Middelburg Provincial Hospital has a working drainage system. Maintenance of the drainage system (plumbing works, etc) is done internally by the Department of Public Works, Roads and Transport (DPWRT) artisans based at the Hospital on a day-to-day basis.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1412

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of key vacancies at the SA Health Products Regulatory Authority that were not filled, (b) what are the details of the (i) irregular expenditure and (ii) material irregularities incurred by the entity for the previous financial year and (c) how is his department ensuring that the entity’s (i) expenditure and (ii) procurement processes are in line with applicable legislation?

Reply:

a) 92

b) (i) Irregular expenditure

  • Three (3) written quotations were not approved by the delegated official R63235
  • Payment made to supplier is in excess of the quoted amount (difference R12, 750) R97750
  • Supplier unqualified based on the awarding of the quotation was not fair, transparent, competitive and cost effective which is in contravention of Section 16A3 of the Treasury Regulation and the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act of 2000 which therefore results in irregular expenditure R1045800;

(ii) None

(c) (i) The Department has put in place the following mechanism to ensure that expenditure is in line with applicable legislation:

  • The Minister has approved the SAHPRA Materiality and Significance Framework in terms of Sections 50 and 55 of the PFMA and Treasury Regulation 28.3, which define significant, material and parameters of transaction that the institution is authorised to approve. The purpose of the Framework is to regulate the disclosure of material facts by public entities to the Executive Authority. This includes information to be provided in terms of the Annual Report and financial statements, as well as requests for approval from the Minister to participate in certain significant transactions, and
  • The Department monitors SAHPRA’s budget on a quarterly basis to ensure that the actual expenditure is aligned to the budget

(ii) The Department has put in place a mechanism to ensure that the SAHPRA report on quarterly basis on the level of compliance to the PFMA which includes the following:

  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has a delegation of authority that define powers entrusted or delegated to officials within the organisation,
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA takes appropriate disciplinary steps against employees of who have made or permitted irregular or fruitless and wasteful expenditure,
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has an appropriate procurement and provisioning administration system, which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective, and
  • Ensuring that SAHPRA has mechanisms in place to prevent irregular, fruitless, and wasteful expenditure.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1533

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What number of (a) public health facilities throughout the Republic provide oncology treatment and (b) the specified facilities has he found to possess the necessary equipment to provide oncology services; (2) what are the details of the lack in oncology treatment in each province, as reflected in the National Cancer Registry?

Reply:

1. ​(a)-(b)      There are Twenty (20) hospitals in the Public Service that provide oncology services as reflected in the table below.

 

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Frere Hospital

X

X

X

Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital

X

 

 

Livingstone Hospital

X

X

X

Universitas Hospital

X

X

X

Steve Biko Hospital

X

X

X

Charlotte Maxeke Johannesburg Academic Hospital

X

X

X

Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital

 

 

X

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

X

 

 

Greys Hospital

X

X

X

Addington Hospital

X

X

 

Ngwelezane Hospital

X

 

 

Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital

X

X

 

 

Facility

Chemo-therapy

Radiation Oncology

Paediatric Oncology

Polokwane Hospital

X

X

X

Rob Ferreira Hospital

X

 

 

Robert Mangaliso Sobukwe Hospital

X

X

X

Tygerberg Hospital

X

X

 

Groote Schuur Hospital

X

X

 

George Hospital

X

X

 

Red Cross Hospital

 

 

X

Klerksdorp Hospital

X

X

 

2. The details of the lack in oncology treatment in each province is not reflected in the National Cancer Registry. The National Cancer Registry is a pathology based registry which registers cancer incidence and not the status of treatment for cancer. 

Waiting times at selected hospitals such as Frere Hospital, Nelson Mandela Academic Hospital, Livingstone Hospital, Polokwane Hospital ranges between 6 to 8 weeks.  In Tygerberg, Groote Schuur and Universitas Hospitals the waiting times are between 12-14 weeks.

The National Department of Health are currently conducting an audit on cancer services and details will be made available on completion of audit.

28 November 2019 - NW1532

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What is the total number of suppliers that his department did not pay within 30 days as at the latest date for which information is available and (b) by what date will the suppliers be paid?

Reply:

Information is still being sourced from the Province on this matter, it will be submitted as soon as the Province has supplied such information.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1431

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the boiler at the Middelburg Provincial Hospital is in working condition; if so, (a)(i) who is the coal supplier and (ii) on what date was the supplier appointed and (b) what amount did the specified hospital spend on maintenance of the boiler in the past financial year?

Reply:

Yes, the boiler in Middleburg Provincial Hospital is in working condition.

a) (i) The appointed coals supplier is Kiabuse (Pty) Ltd.

(ii) The appointment of Kiabuse was done in August 2017.

b) The Hospital spent R800 000 on maintenance of the boiler in the past financial year.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1534

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether the Compensation Commission for Occupational Diseases (CCOD) is a listed entity; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether CCOD was a listed entity; if so, what are the reasons that it was removed from the list?

Reply:

1. The Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases (CCOD) is not a listed entity. The Compensation Commissioner is currently in discussions with National Treasury about the status of the Mines and Works Compensation Fund in terms of the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act, No. 78 of 1973 and the Public Financial Management Act, No. 1 of 1999.

Section 61(1) of the Occupational Diseases in Mines and Works Act, No. 78 of 1973 (ODMWA) provides for the establishment of the Mines and Works Compensation Fund. Section 61(2) of the ODMWA states that the Compensation Fund shall be managed by the Compensation Commissioner for Occupational Diseases (CCOD).

2.  The Fund was listed as a Public Entity in terms of schedule 3A of the Public Finance Management Act, No. 1 of 1999. However, it was removed in terms of Gazette Notice 3366 of 2003 on 18 November 2003.

Since then, the CCOD was referred to as a trading entity or account of the National Department of Health and produces its Annual Financial Statements separately. The acronym the CCOD and the Fund has been used interchangeably.

The Fund should be classified as an Unlisted Public Entity as it is not listed in Schedule 3A of the PFMA and does not meet the definition of a Trading Account or Entity. The Compensation Commissioner is to apply to National Treasury to have the Fund re-instated as a Public Entity, once the current status as an Unlisted Public Entity has been confirmed by National Treasury. Correspondence in this respect is expected from National Treasury.

END.

28 November 2019 - NW1434

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is a governing board in Middelburg Provincial Hospital; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what (i) is the total number and (ii) are the qualifications of members serving on the board and (b) on what date were the board members appointed?

Reply:

Yes, there is an appointed Hospital Board at the Hospital

(a) (i) There are three (3) external Board Members. The others are five (5) Hospital Management Team Members;

(ii) The three external members are having the following qualification

  • Ms S. Mculu = Bachelor of Information
  • Mr A.J. Nethononda = Diploma in Government Finance
  • Mr R.M. Xaba R.M (Chairperson) = Standard 10 (Matric) only

(b) 01 August 2017

END.

21 November 2019 - NW1286

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Why are the (i) Magogong and (ii) Buxton clinics in the Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District Municipality, North West, without medication for chronic illnesses such as (aa) HIV, (bb) diabetes and (cc) hypertension and (b) by what date will he ensure that the specified clinics have the required medication?

Reply:

 

(a)  (i) Magogong clinic

(aa) There have been no stock outs of any HIV medicines at the clinic this year. (bb) There has been a National challenge with the supply of metformin. Until supply is normalized facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 28 Oct 2019.

(cc) There has been a National challenge with the supply of enalapril. Until supply is normalized facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(a) (i) Buxton clinic

(aa) There have been no stock outs of any HIV medicines at the clinic this year. (bb) There has been a National challenge with this supply of metformin. Until supply is normalised facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 4 Nov 2019.

(cc) Hypertension medicines

There has been a National challenge with the supply of enalapril. Until supply is normalised facilities were requested to use alternative strengths.

(b) Supplies were delivered to the clinic on 28 Oct 2019.

END.

21 November 2019 - NW1350

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Health

What is the current total number of (a) funded positions and (b) vacant funded positions in the public health sector in each (i) province, (ii) health category or specialty and (iii) health facility?

Reply:

The table attached indicates a summary of (a) funded filled positions and (b) vacant funded positions in the public health sector in each (i) province, (ii) and for all health categories or specialities.

Province

Health related Funded Filled / Vacant posts as at end September 2019

 

Filled

Vacant

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

26311

85

26396

Free State

12340

22

12362

Gauteng

41042

135

41177

KwaZulu-Natal

44992

108

45100

Limpopo Province

31589

57

31646

Mpumalanga

12644

19

12663

North West

11466

28

11494

Northern Cape

4279

13

4292

Western Cape

20042

107

20149

Grand Total

204705

574

205279

END.

14 October 2019 - NW979

Profile picture: Van Staden, Mr PA

Van Staden, Mr PA to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What has he found to be the reasons that the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses in State hospitals; (2) What are the main reasons why new doctors and nurses are trained in Cuba whereas the Republic has universities that can provide training for doctors and nurses; (3) Whether he will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

  1. The primary reasons why the Republic has a shortage of doctors and nurses is the fact that the Public Health Sector budget has not been increasing in real terms for the past ten years, impacting on the number of staff that can be appointed. Furthermore, the demand for health services in the country is increasing while there is no additional funding to address the change, which results primarily from immigration into the Country and the increasing burden of disease.

The shortage of health professionals is a global phenomenon and is more pronounced in low and middle income countries as health workers are more likely to migrate to upper middle income countries in search of better living and working conditions.

(2) I am not aware of any nurses being in trained in Cuba under the auspices of the Nelson Mandela/Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration except for the training of medical doctors. The aim of training doctors in Cuba are multifold:

(a) It is to expose medical doctors to a preventative approach to health care which is the cornerstone of the Public Health System in Cuba Health Care provision initiatives focus on community needs assessments and health indicators. The health care system is divided into three levels, namely primary, secondary and tertiary, but implemented differently from the South African setting.

(i) The primary care level focuses on providing health promotion and protection, along with the resolution of the minor health issues that account for an estimated 80% of total health concerns of Cuba. Clinics, Community Health Centres and patients’ homes are key sites that provide primary level care;

(ii) Secondary care level is focusing on 15% of health problems that result in patient hospitalisation; and

(iii) Tertiary care focuses on the remaining 5% of health problems, particularly where illness has resulted in severe complications. Such illnesses are handled in specialised hospitals and institutes throughout the country.

(b) The Cuban Public Health System is thus a model that we want to learn from, and apply in our health care system as we reorient the Health System towards Primary Health Care, to prevent diseases, promote health and reduce the number of patients that are admitted to hospitals. Our Medical Schools still focus on a curative and hospicentric health care system, with limited focus on Primary Health Care, which is also evident in their Curriculum;

(c) By training medical students in Cuba, we also want to produce a new cadre of a medical doctor who understands prevention, and how to tailor health services to specific community needs;

(d) Another reason for training medical students in Cuba is to give an opportunity to students who would not have been admitted to the South African medical schools because of their socio-economic conditions, in particular those from poor rural communities.

(3) Yes I will make a statement on this matter.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW741

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Health

(1) Whether his department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

  1. Yes, the Department hosted the function;

(a) It was held at the Parliamentary restaurant in the Good Hope building, in the Parliamentary precinct.

(b) R16,768.00;

(c) The list of guests invited is attached as Annexure 1.

2. No.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW936

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have, (b) number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees and (c) is the name of each service provider of each clinic?

Reply:

  1. Number of mobile units does each (i) national, (ii) provincial and (iii) local public health clinic in the City of Ekurhuleni have,

(i) Number of mobile units National: None

(ii) Number of mobile units provincial: 15

(iii) Number of mobile units in local public health clinics: 2

(iiii) Number of the specified clinics have established clinic committees

DISTRICTS/ REGIONS

TOTAL NUMBER OF CLINICS

NUMBER OF CLINICS WITH CLINIC COMMITTEE MEMBERS

EKURHULENI

   

Ekurhuleni East

30

28 (93%)

Ekurhuleni North

28

20 (71%)

Ekurhuleni South

35

30 (86%)

TOTAL

93

78 (84%)

  1. The name of each service provider of each clinic?

Please refer to Annexure A list of City of Ekurhuleni Facilities and Ekurhuleni Health District Facilities (Provincial)

END.

14 October 2019 - NW912

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Health

(1) What are the names of all the approved clinics and/or institutions in the Republic where abortions are legally allowed to take place; (2) Whether his department has a database of the names of trained and certified practitioners and midwifes who meet the approved standards to perform legal abortions in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) What steps is he taking to remove all illegal practicing doctors and services that advertise safe and pain-free abortions and that are also selling illegal pills on the street or on the internet with delivery to homes for free?

Reply:

(1) The names of all the approved clinics/institutions where abortions are legally allowed are attached in Appendix A.

(2) In terms of training the National Department of Health conduct a ten (10) days theoretical training for nurses followed by ten (10) clinical cases practical sessions before they are certified as competent.

Provincial offices contract the General Practitioners (GPs) and private organizations like Marie Stopes to provide Termination of Pregnancy (ToP) services. The National contracting stopped when the CToP Act was amended in 2008.

The focus for training is currently mainly on medical termination.

(3) Efforts to reduce illegal ToP providers. KZN provincial officie, with the previous MEC, embarked on the process of removing the advertisements of illegal abortions on street poles and some of the findings were:

- Adverts are put up by young people who do not even understand what abortion means, mainly boys;

- They were confronted and they could not provide details of the people who gave them the adverts, they just received the money given and started putting up the adverts.

- Most numbers provided, will lead you to different places, sometimes they send you to hotel reception or individuals on the street.

Mobile units are not providing abortions because they do not have backup of MVA equipment in case there is a need for surgical evacuation following the medical abortion.

Provincial Departments have an assessment tool to assess the readiness of facilities both private and public sector to perform abortions.

END.

APPENDIX A

Name of Facility

Frere Hospital

Tembisa Hospital

Kalafong Hospital

Mankweng Hospital

Klerksdorp-Tshepong Tertiary Hospital

Job Shimankana Tabane Hospital

Dr George Mukhari Hospital

Chris Hani Baragwanath Hospital

Steve Biko Academic Hospital

Tygerberg Hospital

Groote Schuur Hospital

Mthatha General Hospital

Dora Nginza Hospital

Frontier Hospital

St Elizabeth's Hospital

Cecilia Makiwane Hospital

Thelle Mogoerane Regional Hospital

Sebokeng Hospital

Leratong Hospital

Queen Nandi Regional Hospital

Addington Hospital

Prince Mshiyeni Memoral Hospital

Newcastle Hospital

Stanger Hospital

RK Khan Hospital

Edendale Hospital

Ladysmith Hospital

Port Shepstone Hospital

Mahatma Gandhi Hospital

Tshilidzini Hospital

St Rita's Hospital

Philadelphia Hospital

Letaba Hospital

Mokopane Hospital

Ermelo Hospital

Mapulaneng Hospital

Dr Harry Surtie Hospital

Potchefstroom Hospital

Joe Morolong Memorial Hospital

Mahikeng Provincial Hospital

New Somerset Hospital

Paarl Hospital

Worcester Hospital

George Hospital

Butterworth Hospital

Tayler Bequest Hospital (Matatiele)

Bisho Hospital

Empilisweni Hospital

Uitenhage Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Settlers Hospital

Elliot Hospital

Cofimvaba Hospital

Humansdorp Hospital

Andries Vosloo Hospital

Midland Hospital

Cala Hospital

Glen Grey Hospital

Cradock Hospital

Nompumelelo (Peddie) Hospital

Port Alfred Hospital

All Saints Hospital

Bambisana Hospital

Tafalofefe Hospital

SS Gida Hospital

Bedford Hospital

Cloete Joubert (Barkly East) Hospital

Hewu Hospital

Adelaide Hospital

Lady Grey Hospital

Madzikane kaZulu Memorial Hospital

Isilimela Hospital

SAWAS Memorial (Jansenville) Hospital

Elizabeth Ross Hospital

National District Hospital

Katleho Hospital

Fezi Ngumbentombi Hospital

Botshabelo Hospital

Dr JS Moroka Hospital

Tokollo Hospital

Phekolong Hospital

Albert Nzula District Hospital

Thusanong Hospital

Dr Yusuf Dadoo Hospital

Bertha Gxowa Hospital

Heidelberg Hospital

Carletonville Hospital

Odi Hospital Jubilee Hospital

Kopanong Hospital

Norhtdale Hospital

Benedictine Hospital

Itshelejuba Hospital

Wentworth Hospital

Vryheid Hospital

Manguzi Hospital

Nkonjeni Hospital

Estcourt Hospital

Charles Johnson Memorial Hospital

Rietvlei Hospital

Greytown Hospital

Murchison Hospital

Dundee Hospital

Eshowe Hospital

GJ Crooke's Hospital

Emmaus Hospital

St Andrew's Hospital

Christ the King Hospital

Nkandla Hospital

St Apollinaris Hospital

Montebello Hospital

Untunjambili Hospital

Umphumulo Hospital

Betesda Hospital

Catherine Booth Hospital

Mbongolwane Hospital

Appelsbosch Hospital

KwaMagwaza Hospital

Niemeyer Memorial Hospital

Ekhombe Hospital

Elim Hospital

Seshego Hospital

Donald Fraser Hospital

Ellisras Hospital

Lebowakgomo Hospital

Jane Furse Hospital

Helen Franz Hospital

Zebediela Hospital

Malamulele Hospital

Nkhensani Hospital

Warmbarths Hospital

Botlokwa Hospital

WF Knobel Hospital

Siloam Hospital

Voortrekker Memorial (Potgietersrus) Hospital

Dilokong Hospital

Mecklenburg Hospital

Matlala Hospital

Sekororo Hospital

FH Odendaal (Nylstroom) Hospital

Louis Trichardt Hospital

Dr CN Phatudi Hospital

Kgapane Hospital

Thabazimbi Hospital

George Masebe Hospital

Witpoort Hospital

Embhuleni Hospital

KwaMhlanga Hospital

Evander Hospital

Tintswalo Hospital

Mmametlhake Hospital

Sabie Hospital

Standerton Hospital

Bernice Samuels Hospital

Piet retief Hospital

Barberton Hospital

Carolina Hospital

Amajuba Memorial Hospital

Bethal Hospital

Elsie Ballot Hospital

Tshwaragano Hospital

Postmasburg Hospital

De Aar (Central Karoo) Hospital

Moses Kotane Hospital

Brits Hospital

Nic Bodenstein Hospital

Taung Hospital

Ganyesa Hospital

Koster Hospital

Gelukspan Hospital

Karl Bremer Hospital

Khayelitsha Hospital

Mitchells Plain Hospital

Helderberg Hospital

False Bay Hospital

Westfleur Hospital

Vredenburg Hospital

Hermanus Hospital

Stellenbosch Hospital

Knysna Hospital

Mossel Bay Hospital

Oudtshoorn Hospital

Vredendal Hospital

Eerste Rivier Hospital

Clanwilliam Hospital

Victoria Hospital

Radie Kotz Hospital

Caledon Hospital

Ceres Hospital

Montagu Hospital

Swellendam Hospital

Otto Du Plessis Hospital

Robertson Hospital

Kgotsong (Welkom) Clinic

Dr Moeti Surgery

Klipdrift Health Post

SAMHS 2 Military Hospital

Cape Town Reproductive Health Centre

Harry Comay TB Hospital

Elim Satellite Clinic

Marie Stopes Port Elizabeth Clinic

New Rest Clinic

Civic Centre Clinic (Mthatha)

Lanti Clinic

Philani Clinic (Cradock)

Addo Clinic

Molemo Healthcare Clinic

Karabo Clinic

Bren Health Care Clinic

Marie Stopes Bloemfontein Clinic

Vaal Woman's Choice Clinic (Vereeniging)

Protop Women's Clinic (Vereeniging)

Vaal Woman's Clinic (Evaton)

Phedisong 1 clinic

Marie Stopes Durban Clinic

Marie Stopes Isipingo Clinic

Khululeka Clinic

TSM Health Care Clinic

Nancefield Clinic

Seloane Clinic

Levubu Clinic

Mamotshwa Clinic

Dendron Clinic

Mariveni Clinic

Northam Clinic

Raphahlelo Clinic

Matoks Clinic

Willows Clinic

Buffgelshoek Clinic (Blouberg)

Mashishimale Clinic

Jamela Clinic

Seshego IV Clinic

Motsepe Clinic

Mashamba Clinic

Witfontein Clinic

Mabins Clinic

Mankuwe Clinic

Renee Clinic

Katrina Koikoi Clinic

Makapanstad (Seaparankwe) Clinic

Hartebeesfontein Clinic

Schweizer-Reneke Town Clinic

Preshco Clinic

Mononono Clinic

Site C Youth Clinic

Mediclinic Constantiaberg Hospital

Empiliseni (Worcester) Clinic

De Doorns Clinic

Zolani Clinic

Nkqubela Clinic

Railton Clinic

Bergsig Clinic

Swellendam PHC Clinic

Caledon Clinic

Heidelberg Clinic

Villiersdorp Clinic

Annie Brown Clinic

Montagu Clinic

Wolseley Clinic

Nduli Clinic

Prince Alfred Hamlet Clinic

Tulbagh Clinic

Groendal Clinic

Mediclinic Durbanville Hospital

Touws Rivier Clinic

Happy Valley clinic

Idas Valley Clinic

McGregor Clinic

Suurbraak Clinic

Marie Stopes Cape Town Clinic

Marie Stopes Bellville Clinic

Barrydale Clinic

Great Brak Rivier Clinic

Michael Mapongwana CDC

Lady Michaelis CDC

Kuyasa CDXC

Noulungile CDC

TC Newman CDC

Bishop Lavis CDC

Thebalethu CDC

Town w CDC

Mbekweni CDC

Wellington CDC

Dr Abdurahman CDC

Worcester CDC

Ceres CDC

Cloetesville CDC

Motherwell CHC

Empilweni Gompo CHC

Nontyatyambo CHC

Idutywa Village CHC

Laetitita Ban CHC

Duncan Village CHC

Nqamakwe CHC

Xhora CHC

Soshanguve CHC

Chiawelo CHC

Zola CHC

Lenasia South CHC

Kgabo CHC

Johan Heyns CHC

Pedisong 4 CHC

Laudium CHC

Jabulane Dumane CHC

Hillbrow CHC

Phoenix CHC

Nseleni CHC

Inanda C CHC

Tongaat CHC

Pomeroy CHC

eDumbe CHC

Sundumbili CHC

Dannhauser CHC

Turton CHC

Hlengisizwe CHC

St Chads CHC

Ndwedwe CHC

Rethabile CHC

Makhado CHC

HC Boshoff CHC

Tshilwavhusiku CHC

Tiyani CHC

Mookgophong CHC

Nchabeleng CHC

Ratshaatshaa CHC

Matsulu CHC

Kanyamazane CHC

Nelspruit CHC

Phola-Nzikasi CHC

Naas CHC

M'Africa CHC

Kabokweni CHC

Bhunga CHC

Thulamahashe CHC

Perdekop CHC

Galeshewe Day Hospital

Bafokeng CHC

Letlhabile CHC

Bapong CHC

Mogwase CHC

Mabeskraal CHC

Atamelang CHC

JB Marks CHC

Mamusa CHC

Mitchells Plain CHC

Kraaifontein CHC

Guguleto CHC

Vanguard CHC

Hanover Park CHC

Mediclinic Welkom Hospital

Mediclinic Cape town Hospital

Mediclinic Cape Gate Hospital

Mediclinic Paarl Hospital

Mediclinic Worcester Hospital

Life Kingsbury Hospital

Mediclinic George Hospital

Mediclinic Hermanus Hospital

Life Bay View Private Hospital

Data Source: DHIS DATA (2018 Jan to August 2019) accessed 17 September 2019.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW890

Profile picture: Chirwa, Ms NN

Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

In light of the report by the Council for Medical Schemes that mental health diseases are increasing, under-diagnosed and under-treated and that the approved budget for 2019-20 financial year only accommodates 5 000 patients on the new mental health programme to be rolled out in the current financial year, how does he plan to address (a) access, (b) awareness and (c) the shortage of mental healthcare facilities under the new programme?

Reply:

(a)-(b) The National Department of Health has in place the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Strategic Plan 2013-2020 which is currently being implemented in all nine provinces. Progress reports obtained from provinces in 2017/18 and 2019/20 financial years show that implementation of the plan has gained traction but a lot more still needs to be done.

In addition to the implementation of the National Mental Health Policy Framework and Plan, the following have been undertaken:

- A call for expression of interest to render mental health services was made to psychologists, psychiatrists and registered counsellors. Practitioners per province have been identified for provinces to contract using the Human Resources Capacitation Fund.

- In order to improve the quality and access to mental health services a Mental Health Training Programme was developed. The programme targets health practitioners working at primary health care clinics as well as district hospitals to improve their competencies in detection of mental disorders and provision of good quality mental health care, treatment and rehabilitation. A total of 30 training workshops were conducted during this financial year reaching 920 health practitioners in 8 Provinces. This programme will be expanded in the coming financial years to train more health practitioners.

- The National Department of Health evaluated the health systems cost of mental health services and programmes in South Africa in 2018/19. This was aimed at helping us understand what we are currently spending on mental health across all service levels and the potential resource envelop to be augmented to address the key mental health service gaps. The study found that the total costs of inpatient and outpatient mental health services and known transfers for contracted hospitals and NGO mental health sevices across all nine provinces amounted to R8.37 billion in the 2016/17 financial year. This represented 5% of the total health budget in the2016/17 (provincial range: 2.1-7.7%), and equated to a national average of R180.9 per capita uninsured.

We have embarked on the second phase of the project, to determine a prioritized package of mental health services and the resource estimates that should be made available to address the gaps and implement the prioritized interventions. The “investment case for mental health” will be finalized during the course of next year.

(c) Mental health infrastructure additions, upgrades and renovations are funded through the Indirect Conditional Grant: Health Infrastructure Revitalization Grant. In the 2019/20 financial year 21 mental health infrastructure projects are funded and they are at different stages of implementation.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW656

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Health

Whether, in light of the exorbitantly high cost of cancer medication in the Republic and in comparison to other countries such as India, he will consider removing the patent laws on cancer medication and treatment in order for low-cost generics to be produced to enable the majority of South Africans to have access to affordable treatment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

A patent allows the pharmaceutical manufacturer an exclusivity over the sale of a medicine. During this time the manufacturer price is very high and unaffordable to low and middle income countries. Companies argue that the high prices are intended to recoup their costs of research and development, however these companies have been reluctant to be transparent about such costs. There is much evidence to suggest that the cost of research and development is actually much lower than claims made by the pharmaceutical industry.

South Africa has been at the forefront of challenging the high prices of medicines globally including where patents are the barrier to access. There currently are legislative provisions which would allow us to access a medicine that is protected by a patent. These provisions are included in Section 15C of the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act, 1965 (Act No. 101 of 1965). It is important to bear in mind that in order for one to access medicines using Section 15C, such a medicine must first be registered by the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) in terms of efficacy, safety and quality. SAHPRA will consider an application of a generic even while a patent remains in effect. So the provisions to address patent barriers already exist in South Africa however a product must be registered by SAHPRA before we can implement such a provision.

South Africa has never had to use the patent legislation to access a lower priced generic medicine. The patent holders have in many cases negotiated either through bilateral agreements or have participated in the Medicines Patent Pool which provides manufacturers in developing countries like South Africa access lower cost generic antiretroviral (ARV) drugs at an affordable price. This has allowed us to afford the world’s largest ARV programme.

END.

14 October 2019 - NW617

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total amount has (i) his department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to him spent on (aa) cleaning, (bb) security and (cc) gardening services in the (aaa) 2017-18 and (bbb) 2018-19 financial years, (b) amount was paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount was paid to each of the service providers?

Reply:

The following tables reflect the details in this regard.

(a)(ii) Entities

(aa) total amount spent on cleaning

(bb) total amount spent on security

(cc) total amount spent on gardening services

 

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

(aaa)2017/18

(bbb) 2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

R890,379.82

R858,726.38

R36,813.10

R409,294.50

R154,370.08

R130,995.60

National Health Laboratory Service

R30,851.489

R4,620.615

R13,588.664

R1,054.711

R402,477

In-sourced

Office of Health Standards Compliance

R131,644

R190,521

R0

R249,814

R0

R0

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

R0

South African Medical Research Council

R4,100,616.27

R5,458,526.90

R8,885,876.97

R9,428,708.73

R671,297.44

R245,290.80

(b) Amount paid to each service provider to provide each specified service and (c) total amount paid to each service provider

(a)(ii) Entities

Service provider

Specified Service

Amount paid

2017/18

Amount paid

2018/19

Council for Medical Schemes

FSG Property Services

Cleaning chemicals

-

R12,778.45

 

PTY Trade 242

Cleaning consumables

R58,845.80

R21,558.04

 

Cannon Hygiene

Hygiene consumables

R134,139.41

R8,516.30

 

Rentokil Initial (Pty) Ltd

Hygiene services

R26,886.72

R136,571.72

 

Salaries of cleaners

Salaries

R622,888.89

R661,953.87

 

Temporary Services

Temporary Services

R47,619.00

R17,348.00

 

Perfect Solutions Security

Security Guards

R318, 680.19

400,888.40

 

TFS Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R34,728.89

-

 

Sefeko Guard Security

Security Handsets

R8,404.02

R8,406.10

 

Bidvest Execuflora

Gardening/Plant hire

-

R63,467.35

 

Servest Interior Solutions

Gardening/Plant hire

R154,370.08

R67,528.25

National Health Laboratory Service

Afriboom (Pty) Ltd

Cleaning Services

R2,878.819

-

 

Amandla Ahlanene Trading Enterprise CC

 

R7,433.137

R1,254.206

 

Amararo Trading(Pty)Ltd

 

R36, 309

-

 

Ambius

 

R16,784

R18,100

 

Basan S A Trading

 

R11,628

R8,280

 

Botho Ubuntu Cleaning

 

R838,981

R804, 299

 

Clean Room Maintenance CC

 

-

R5,244

 

Columbus Hygiene Systems

 

R8,884

R18,530

 

Greater Kokstad Municipality

 

R1,833

-

 

H Coetzee t/a Milandi's Skoonmaakdienste

 

R600

-

 

HDS Interprise and Medispeed Pty Ltd

 

R172,827

-

 

Masana Hygiene Services CC

 

R5,946.359

R2,283

 

Masango Cleaning Services and Construction CC

 

R5,945

-

 

Masutlhadokgwa Construction & Project CC

 

R19,947

-

 

Mathasani Construction and Cleaning

 

R4,646.418

R16,213

 

Nondumiso Cleaning Services (Pty)Ltd

 

R2,678.782

-

 

Nontobeko Mketi

 

R1,500

R2,800

 

Omnilab Supplies CC

 

-

R6,443

 

Prestige Cleaning Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,173.655

R214,852

 

Pristene Health Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R280,198

-

 

Pronto Kleen

 

R18,989

R1,854

 

Prospect Cleaning Services

 

R1,004.657

-

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

-

R15,741

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty)

 

R1,352,587

R1,361,855

 

Servest Pty Ltd

 

R35,435

R222,506

 

Shanbar Property Development cc

 

R3,852

-

 

Siyaya Teledata Comm & Courier CC

 

R2,256

-

 

Steiner Hygiene (Pty) Ltd

 

R35,248

R981

 

Steiner Services (Johannesburg):

 

R211,388

R240,746

 

Thistle Lab Services

 

R34,471

R23

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty Ltd

 

-

R28,870

 

Steiner Hygiene (George)

 

-

R854

 

Industro Clean OFS cc

 

-

R993

 

Bidserv Industrial Products Pty Ltd T/a G Fox & Company

 

-

R2,989

 

Kenglo Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R58,286

 

Gcinasande Projects

 

-

R1,288

 

Supra Later Pty Ltd

 

-

R3,367

 

N Hiliza Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R2,533

 

MM629K Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

-

R300,070

 

Satis-Vaction Cleaning Services

 

-

R23,407

 

Sebaeng Construction

 

-

R3,000

 

Armand Trading CC

Security

R8,892

-

 

Atlas Security Systems

 

R26,231

R19,332

 

Bonolo Claudina Sefularo

 

R2,720

R4,590

 

Chubb Security South Africa (Pty) Ltd.

 

R7,167

R3,826

 

Electroalarm-Monitor cc

 

R6,301

R5,729

 

Enforce Security Services (Pty) Ltd

 

R782,232

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions Pty Ltd

 

R79,198

R61,738

 

Hi Tec Security

 

R7,533

R6,519

 

Home At Kimberely

 

R4,809

R6,228

 

Ingwempisi Security Services

 

R7,218,569

-

 

Juanique R van Zyl

 

R991

R100

 

Nextec Industrial Technologies

 

-

R556,309

 

Red Alert Alarms

 

R4,626.498

R121,876

 

Roman Business Management

 

R5,970

R6,223

 

Saayman's Security Services CC / Capital Security Services CC

 

R6,767

R4,533

 

Sanitech a division of Waco Africa (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,019

-

 

Secureco

 

R314,701

R28,484

 

Separations

 

R153

-

 

Top Security Systems Pty Ltd

 

R12,562

R668

 

Top Ten catering and Security

 

R108,922

R12,209

 

Transfire Pty Ltd

 

R11,159

-

 

Vetus Schola Protection Services Pty

 

R353,628

-

 

World Focus 799 CC

 

R1,642

-

 

Minatlou Trading 331

 

-

R80,000

 

Signal Network Telecom cc

 

-

R107,364

 

No 1 Corporate Promtional

 

-

R18,012

 

B & M Scientific B035

 

-

R8,970

 

C Kader

 

-

R400

 

Valencia Z Jokazi

 

-

R1,600

 

Katanga Property Care Pty Ltd

Gardening

R402,477

-

Office of Health Standards Compliance

Medical Research Council

Cleaning

R131,644

R120,115.41

 

Khumoetsile Vision Group

 

-

R70,405.59

 

Imvula Quality Protection

Security

-

R191,439.50

 

Rise Security Services

 

-

R58,374.10

South African Health Products Regulatory Authority

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

South African Medical Research Council

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

Cleaning Services

R110,535.33

R25,043.13

 

Bidvest Managed Solutions (Pty

 

R2,003848.56

R2,661 757.19

 

Bright Idea Projects 2806 cc

 

-

R1 200.00

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R20 586.00

-

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4 342.11

-

 

Rhumbu Trading And Projects (P

 

R17 375.00

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R1 312.50

-

 

Ndabazasembo Trading Enterpris

 

R59 812.00

-

 

2 Oceans Computer Consumables

Cleaning Consumables

R18,146.20

-

 

AB Holdings

 

R6,670

-

 

ABD Fuels (Pty) Ltd

 

R7,386

-

 

Afri Zonke Enterprises (Pty) Ltd

 

R10,089.03

-

 

Amanthi TRAD

 

-

R3,649.39

 

Ambicion11 (PTY)

 

-

R520

 

Armada Supplies (Pty) Ltd

 

R8,908

-

 

As Premium Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,650.80

-

 

Atlantic Laundromat

 

R16,832.83

R13,255.91

 

Atur Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,248.88

-

 

Aylu Civils And Construction C

 

R6,300.00

-

 

Azura Suppliers (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,680.00

-

 

Black Wealth Institute

 

-

R1,700

 

Bidserv Industrial Products (Pty)Ltd

 

R12,399.40

-

 

Bidvest Management solutions

 

-

R97, 662.23

 

Bidvest Services (Pty) Ltd T/A Bidvest Steiner

 

R1,280 515.73

R1,854 382.49

 

Biofarm

 

-

R1,757.28

 

Bkj Holdings (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,055.90

-

 

Bongukulunga Cleaning Services

 

R8,089.16

-

 

Bonwepy Management Entertainme

 

R-2 832.48

-

 

Bralmor Business Administrator

 

R395.07

-

 

Breez Villiage

 

-

R1,020.60

 

Cape Africa Marine Supp

 

R1,594.99

R11,303.18

 

Capital Ship Trading 605 Pty Ltd

 

R8,361.90

-

 

Caprichem Saccs (Pty) Ltd

 

R746.25

R1,958.20

 

Cishumlilo SA

 

-

R15,250.00

 

Clean Hygiene CC

 

R4,530.00

-

 

Corpchem (Pty) Ltd

 

R4,155.30

-

 

Cross Country Pest Control And

 

R7,500

-

 

DBZN Trading

 

-

R12,509.96

 

Deejay Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R12,000

-

 

Devershan Naicker T/A Buckingham

 

R1,794.50

-

 

Diesel Innovations

 

-

R120,462.53

 

Dixinox Cc T/A Exitol Cleaning

 

R10,734.80

R3,302.08

 

Drivers Licence Test Control C

 

R8,640

-

 

Dwm Cleaning And General Tradi

 

R4,420

-

 

Eagles stationers

 

-

R56,536.20

 

Emergency Diesel

 

-

R56,935.00

 

Emtek Industrial Supplies Tpy

 

R2,554.80

-

 

End Wise (Pty) Ltd

 

R700

-

 

Ethekwini Pest Control Cc

 

R6,462.28

-

 

Execuflora

 

-

R348.00

 

Formax

 

-

R12,979.63

 

Galactic Pest Control

 

R4,342.11

-

 

Geo-Vul Constructions And Gene

 

R40,480

-

 

Growing In Faith Entrepeneurs

 

R4,651.20

-

 

Grundnorm Industries (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,350

-

 

Hat Agencies - Hardware Abrasi

 

R4,729.70

-

 

Hobozola

 

-

R5,541.00

 

Husbandoncall (Pty) Ltd T/A Hu

 

R8,368.40

-

 

Ikamva Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,140.80

-

 

Impilwenhle Trading Enterprise

 

R5,521.06

-

 

Industrial And Proactive Solut

 

R14,487.06

-

 

Inkosazana

 

-

R16,007.00

 

Izinyanyeni (Pty) Ltd

 

R24,817.56

-

 

Jamilo Sales And Services (Pty

 

R4,520

-

 

JT Maritz

 

-

R15,354.00

 

K2014085852 (Sa) (Pty) Ltd T/A

 

R6,046.45

-

 

Kb2 Distributors

 

-

R4,235.00

 

KA SALARI

 

-

R4,391.22

 

Kopanang 7 Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,083

-

 

Laborem Investment Trading (Pty)

 

R-5,034

-

 

Laborem Lab Supplies

 

R50

-

 

Lazer chemicals

 

-

R3,000

 

Legg & Wessels

 

-

R21,885.61

 

Lum Mila (Pty) Ltd

 

R2,274

-

 

Manjapha Trading Enterprise Cc

 

R3,670

-

 

Maphallang Projects

 

R1,800

-

         
 

Melokuhle Envoy (Pty) Ltd

 

R14,566.30

-

 

Msanzi

 

-

R9,003

 

Njikelela Constructand Project

 

R6,480

-

 

Nrb Liquid Dream (Pty) Ltd

 

R647

-

 

Nvirogreen Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R38,258.50

-

 

Nyazile Building Construction

 

R22,670.86

-

 

Ojenny And Sons (Pty) Ltd

 

R400

-

 

Okamkhathini Trading

 

R4,373.60

-

 

OMH Projects

 

-

R1,200

 

Ophilayo Trading Enterprise CC

 

R5,968

-

 

OQ Detergents

 

-

R2,344.00

 

Phat group

 

-

R2,517.35

 

Pula Pele (Pty) Ltd

 

R3,200

-

 

R-5 Distributors

 

-

R198.30

 

Rhumbu Trading and Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R17,375

-

 

Sibanye Office Solution

 

R29,890.02

R160,807.77

 

SMJ Group Cc

 

R8,145.25

-

 

Sthezeh Business Solutions (Pty) Ltd

 

R30,841

-

 

Take Note Trading 35 Cc

 

R10,684.22

-

 

Techris Tech

 

-

R76,399.91

 

Telegenix Trading 429 CC

 

-

R1,048.55

 

Togu Civils (Pty) Ltd

 

R-0.26

-

 

Trans Africa Medicals

 

R850

-

 

Trat Z Trading (Pty) Ltd

 

R5,347.40

-

 

Tshiamo

 

-

R24,251.49

 

XV Ntsinde

 

R75,081

-

 

Yukon

Cleaning Consumables

-

R1,476.00

 

Petty Cash

   

34,937.39

 

Adt Security (Pty) Ltd (Durban

Security Services

R44,903.52

R16,176.97

 

Blue Apple Trading Enterprise

 

-

R483,046.00

 

Blue Light Monitoring & Armed

 

R1,862.30

-

 

Chubb Integrated Systems

 

R1,539.05

R- 3,383.93

 

Eric And Son Pty Ltd

 

R3,150

-

 

Fidelity Cash Solutions (Pty)

 

R129,284.20

R138,962.64

 

Hiway Integrated Security (Pty

 

R5,140

-

 

Imvula Quality Protection Afri

 

R8,478 636.93

R8,340 356.92

 

Jt Maritz Electrical

 

R32,930.04

R7,777.95

 

Liberty Technologies (Pty) Ltd

 

R6,425

-

 

Masibambisane Maswati (Pty) Lt

 

R13,528

-

 

Mzansi Fire And Security (Pty)

 

R99,811.59

R199,597.02

 

Oostenberg Patrols Cc

 

R47,340

-

 

Panther Procure (Pty) Ltd

 

R13,535.96

-

 

Petty Cash

 

R2,085.38

R105.00

 

Sakh`Ikhaya Suppliers Cc

 

R2,926

R112,299.03

 

Shanken Security Solutions Cc

 

R2,779

-

 

Techris CC

 

-

R179,771.13

 

Dway Projects (Pty) Ltd

Gardening Services

 

R34,355.00

-

 

Full Flow Projects (Pty) Ltd

 

R205,533.00

-

 

K R A S Agencies Cc

 

R1,650.00

-

 

Mecam Industrial (PTY)

 

-

R5,197.40

 

Ngula Constraction property

 

-

R18,900.00

 

Pamper Zone Trading And Projec

 

R162,000.00

-

 

Sakh’ikhaya suppliers

 

-

R58,913.04