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06 November 2020 - NW2472

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(a) What are the reasons that the fisheries offices of her department are still closed and (b) on what date will they re-open?

Reply:

(a) The Fisheries Offices are closed

The Fishing Sector was identified as an essential service in the provision of food during the National Covid-19 Lockdown. Office-based fisheries staff have been working on rotation since Alert 4 of the Lockdown, but have all returned to office with the commencement of Alert Level 1.

(b) Not applicable

Regards
MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 6/11/2020

06 November 2020 - NW2484

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) (a) What are the reasons that parts of the fishing industry which were given exemption from permits until September have been unable to get their permits renewed and (b)(i) why has the online system been down and (ii) on what date is it envisaged to operate again; (2) Whether she has been informed that the lack of permits has stopped he catching, import and export of fish; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is she doing to remedy the situation and (b) by what date will the situation be remedied?

Reply:

(1) (a) Despite being given a one and half months notice B apply for new permits, the majority of the industry operators submitted their applications for new permits on the eve of the expiration of the exemption given to them until the end of Alert Level 2 of the National Covid-19 Pandemic Lockdown. Furthermore, a number of fishing seasons also commence in the 9ummer months and right holders are therefore applying for new permits which have ‹exulted in the current backlog. The Department is currently working on clearing a backlog of Permit Applications that have been submitted by the industry.

(b) (i) The Electronic Application System is not down, it is currently operational. The Department is experiencing a slight backlog in processing permits for the reasons explained above.

(ii) The Electronic Application System is currently operational.

  1. A large number of applications that have been submitted to the Department do not meet the minimum application requirements, and have been returned to applicants for resubmission with full and up-to-date documentation æ that the applications can be processed. This causes delays in the Department being able B issue new permits. The Department has also received a large number of new applications since the start of Alert Level 1 Lockdown and is working to clear the backlog.
  2. The Department has engaged with Industry Associations as well as individual applicants to prioritise the processing and issuing of the outstanding permits and licences that meet the requirements and have been submitted to the Department timeously. Staff in the relevant permitting sections will also be working overtime to assist in clearing the backlog.
  3. It is envisaged that the existing backlog should be cleared by mid November 2020.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
Date: 6/11/2020

06 November 2020 - NW2487

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether, with reference to the Fishing Rights Allocation Process 2015-16 (FRAP), the provisional allocation included a process to inspect the Deputy Director-General’s (DDG) allocations and submit comments to Whistle Blowers (Pty) Ltd, she will furnish Mr J R B Lorimer with the details of the comments submitted; if not, why not; if so, what (a) verification process was followed on the basis of the comments and (b) are the details of how the provisional allocations changed as a result of the comments; (2) whether there was an effective verification process; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) how will the FRAP 2020-21 process differ from the process used previously, (b) what steps will be taken during the FRAP 2020-21 to ensure that there are no paper quotas to persons from non-coastal communities; and (c) what will be the role of the Fisheries DDG in the FRAP 2020-21 process?

Reply:

 

  1. The Department received over one thousand (1000) comments, with the majority (876) being submitted in the West Coast Rock Lobster Fishery. These comments are available for inspection at the premises of the Fisheries Branch.

    1. The comments were assessed and analysed by members of the Assessment Panel in each fishery.

    2. The details of how the provisional allocations changed as a result of the comments received can be determined by studying the difference between the Provisonal GPR and the Final GPR.

 

 

 

(2) and (3) a,b,c
It is common knowledge that the FRAP process 2015/16 has been the subject of lengthy litigation some of which continues to this day.

In our view one of the reasons for this was the decision to centralise decision-making in the hands of the Deputy Director-General of the Fisheries Branch, who was subsequently dismissed, by the then Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries.

In an effort to ensure a fair, transparent and accountable process of FRAP 2020/21 the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries is doing the following:

appointing a number of Delegated Authorities, rather than just one;
augmenting the capacity of the Department via the appointment of external service providers to assist with the various phases of the FRAP process; appointing a Process Observer/Auditing Firm to oversee and audit the process;
the appointment of an independent Legal Team to advise and ensure a legally defensible process;
developing an online application process in order to reduce data-capturing errors.

 


MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT DATE: 05 NOVEMBER 2020

 

06 November 2020 - NW2406

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) In view of a recent letter, dated 9 October 2020, and signed by more than 350 scientists and conservationists from 40 countries, which calls for global action to protect whales, dolphins and porpoises from extinction and specifically calls on countries like South Africa where there are whales, to take precautionary measures to ensure that these species are being protected from human activities, and to work with regional fishing bodies to ensure that overfishing does not impact whales, what precautionary measures does her department intend b take to ensure(a) the long-term survival of whales and (b) that whales have sufficient access to food during their migration to their breeding grounds; (2) how will her department work together with local fishing authorities to ensure that (a) there is a framework for sustainability and (b) the specified policy framework is adhered to?

Reply:

(a) Whales are fully protected in South African waters. Legal instruments are in place to ensure the long-term survival of whales, including the following:

The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004). In the Threatened or Protected Marine Species Regulations, whales are listed as a threatened or protected species. In terms of these regulations, certain aMvitl99 are prohibited, such as hunting, catching, killing, capturing, importing or exporting of a listed species. Human activities around whales are also regulated.


The National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Amendment Act, 2014 (Act No. 21 of 2014) which enables the establishment of marine protected areas to provide sanctuaries for all marine species.

South Africa is also a signatory or party to various international treaties that promote the protection of whales, including Convention on Migratory Species (CMS), the Commission for the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources(CCMALR) and the International Whaling Commission.

These legal instrument provide optimum conditions for all whale species to recover from past unsustainable whaling practices. In addition, South African re9earcheo play a leading role in international science forums aimed at determining the food requirements of top predators such as whales and setting measures to ensure adequate access to their prey.

(b) Whales eat a variety of prey within South African marine waters and at traditional feeding grounds in the Southern Ocean. In general, whales feed in the polar waters and breed in warmer waters. Feeding time is therefore typically spent away from South Africa in Antarctic and sub-Antarctic waters. The Southern Ocean is managed by agreement, including the Convention on the Conservation of Antarctic Marine Living Resources (CCAMLR). South Africa is an active member and contributes to deliberations on conservation of the Southern Ocean.

  1. (a) The South African policy and legal framework protects all whale species. The Department plays a meaningful role in International Conventions and Regional Fisheries Management Organisations to ensure that all fisheries are sustainable and that the environment is protected.

(b) The existing policy and legal framework to protect whales is currently being implemented and compliance and enforcement initiatives are in place to aid protection of our marine species.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 6/11/2020

06 November 2020 - NW2457

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1995 on 11 September 2020 in relation to the setting of the 2020 trophy hunting quota of 50 elephant, what are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence to support the trophy hunting quota of 50 elephant; (2) whether she, when approving the quota, considered the scientific data that shows that removing older male elephant, parlicula8y through trophy hunting has a disastrous impact on the species as a whole; if not, why not; if so, (a) how and (b) on what basis is the 2020 quota of 50 elephants allocated for each province; (3) what (a) is the 2020 elephant trophy hunting quota for each province and (b) are the 9cientific masons and/or scientific evidence for the specific provinces b be allocated with an elephant hunting quota?

Reply:

(1)  The 2020 trophy hunting quota for elephants was set at 106 elephants. However, on average only 50 bulls are hunted annually. Globally, elephant as listed on the IUCN Red List as "Vulnerable“. In South Attica, the species is listed on the regional Red List as “Least Concern"

The national elephant population for South Africa is increasing, and estimated at approximately 30,000 individuals, of which an estimated 24,000 individuals occur within national and provincial reserves collectively, in seven of the nine provinces of South Africa.

The elephant population of South Africa is well managed and activities related to elephants are regulated through the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act 10 of 2004 (NEMBA), specifically the Threatened or Protected Species Regulations (TOPS Regulations), the National Norms and Standards for the Management of Elephants in South Africa (Government Gazette no. 30833), and respective provincial conservation legislation. In addition, local protocols managing elephant trophy hunting, taking into consideration the role of mature bulls, are in place in many areas were t trophy hunting of elephants take place in South Africa. South Africa has an annual national Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) trophy hunting quota of 150 elephants (300 tusks). In managing this quota, provinces are required to conduct calculations of their annual provincial level off-takes. These provincial off-takes are then collated to provide for a national quota.

On a provincial level, the quota is calculated by estimating the total elephant population within the province, multiplied by 19› to obtain the off-take quota for the specific province. Trophy hunting of elephants within South Africa is limited and the allocated annual quota is often not fully utilised. Therefore, trophy hunting is considered as having a negligible impact on elephant populations in South Africa. The 1% trophy hunting off-take is much lower than the average growth rate of the national elephant population.

(2) The study by Elephants for Africa and the University of Exeter, on "The Importance of Old Bulls: Leaders and Followers In Collective Movement of All-Male Groups In African Savannah Elephant", was recently published in September 2020, whereas the determination of the 2020 quota was made prior to the results of the said study. The department and the Provincial Scientific Authority will consider the key findings of the study in making determination of hunting quota for elephant in the future.

However, given the population numbers and the low number of elephant bulls' trophy hunted per annum the impact on populations is likely to be negligible. The Allen e/ at. (2020) study highlights that the off take (trophy hunting) of older mature bulls (considered bulls over 26 years of age) not only removes the prime breeders, but also removes individuals with a central ‹ale in the male society.

In South Africa the majority of bulls hunted are over the age of 50 years and nearing senescence, thus no longer bleeding. It is acknowledged that mature older bulls do play an important role in bull society. However, where low numbers of mature bulls and specifically those nearing senescence are hunted the impact on the population aa a whole and the bull society is likely to be negligible. In addition, elephant have evolved to cope with natural mortalities taking place, with the natural mortality rate of older mature bulls at approximately 1% per annum.

A study conducted by Burke et al, (2008) evaluating the risk and ethical concerns of hunting male elephant has indicated that all responses measured were minor and that the hunting of male elephant in South Africa is ethically acceptable when considering effects on the remaining elephant population. The authors recommended that bulls should be hunted when alone. This recommendation has been captured in the Norms and Standards for Management of Elephant in South Africa

(3) (a) The table below indicates the 2020 elephant trophy hunting quota for each province:
 

Province

Quota No.

Eastern Cape Province

3 Elephants (06 Tusks)

Free State Provinc

0

Gauteng Province

0

KwaZulu-Natal Provinc

15 Elephant(30 Tusks)

Limpopo Province

50 Elephant (100 Tusks)

Mpumalanga Province

40 Elephants (80 Tusks)

North West Province

0

Northern Cape Province

0

Western Cape Province

0

TOTAL

108 Elephants (216 Tusks)


b. See the response to question 1 above

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 6/11/2020

(#)

06 November 2020 - NW2455

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether, with reference to the 2017 decision by Parliament’s Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs that the game animals, which were the subject of the R183million irregular donation of game animals through the SA Rare Game Breeders Association to so-called politically connected private game farm owners, be returned to the North West Province and the repatriation costs be funded by certain person (name and details furnished), the game animals with their progeny have been returned in full; if not, (a) what number of animals have in fact been returned and (b) on what date are the remaining animals expected to be returned; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified person refunded the cost of the repatriation as instructed; if not, what action has been taken to ensure the recovery of the costs; (3) whether the SA Police Service and/or any other judicial body have been requested to investigate the matter; if not, why not; if so, what are the results of the investigation in each case?

Reply:

(1),(2) and (3) The management of the environment and protection of natural resources is a concurrent function between the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries and Provincial Departments responsible for matters related to the environment, Therefore, the issues raised in this question fall within the jurisdiction of the North West Provincial Department of Economic Development, Environment, Conservation and Tourism. In View of this it is recommended that the matter be referred to the relevant Member of Executive Council (MEC) responsible for environmental affairs in the North West Province.

Regards
MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 6/11/2020
 

05 November 2020 - NW2456

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1995, on 11 September 2020, in relation to the setting of the trophy hunting quota of eleven leopards for 2020, what is (a) the total number of wild leopards in the Republic and (b) their distribution in each province; (2) what (a) is the total number of male Leopards in the age range of seven years and above and (b) is the distribution of male leopards in each province; and (3) (a) chat are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence for the decision to set the 2020 national trophy hunting quota at eleven leopards, (b)(i) how and (ii) on what basis is the 2020 quota of eleven leopards allocated per province, (c) what (i) is the 2020 leopard hunting quota for each province and (ii) are the scientific reasons and/or scientific evidence for the specific provinces to be allocated with a leopard hunting quota?

Reply:

(1)(a)(b), (2)(a)(b) and (3)(a)

Subsequent to the publication of the non-detriment finding for leopard in 2015, the Department, in liaison with the Scientific Authority, adopted an adaptive approach to determine the annual leopard hunting quota. Population trend data generated through the South African Leopard
Monitoring Project is used to inform decision making on the annual leopard hunting quota. South Africa ensures that leopard hunting is consistent with the sustainable use principles and that it does not have a detrimental impact on the survival of the leopard in the wild. Hunting of leopards in South Africa is therefore managed through:

Restrictions to designated hunting zones where trends in leopard density indicate that populations are stable or increasing, and

Limits to males older than 7 years, which is likely to have a minimal impact on population trends. This is used as an additional precautionary safeguard.

It is again emphasised that only hunting zones where leopard populations are stable and increasing have been designated as eligible for hunting of leopard. Trends in leopard populations were determined by multi state models fitted to leopard density data that wee collected through the Leopard Monitoring Project at 17 monitoring sites between 2013 and 2019. Data from these sites were used to designate hunting zones. As a precautionary measure, only one leopard can be hunted per eligible hunting zone.

(b)(i)(ii)

The 2020 quote of eleven leopards is a country wide quota and not a quota per province. In other words, the total number of leopards that may be hunted in South Africa in 2020 is eleven (11) and not ninety-nine (99) as inferred by be question. The basis for the allocation of the quota is provided in question 3(a) above.

The table below indicates the allocation of the 2020 leopard hunting quota for each province:

Province

Allocated quota

Eastern Cape Province

0

Free State Province

O

Gauteng Province

0

KwaZulu-Natal Province

0

Limpopo Province

nine (9) male leopards of seven years or older

Mpumalanga Province

O

North West Province

No (2) male leopards of seven years or older

Northern Cape Province

0

Western Cape Province

0

(c)(ii)

The basis for the allocation of the quota is provided in question 1-3 above.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 6/11/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2352

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What(a) pollutants require mandatory monitoring and reporting in all air quality monitoring stations, (b) are acceptable levels of the specified pollutants and (c) steps are taken once a station reports on excessive levels of pollution at a station of the SA Air Quality Information Systems or a municipal station?

Reply:

 

  1. In terms of Section 9 of the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act 20 of 2014 (NEMAQA), the Minister is empowered to identify ambient air pollutants which present a threat to human health and well-being of the environment, and to establish National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for the identified pollutants. In this regard, the Minister established national ambient air quality standards for particulate matter (PM10. articles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 10 micrometres (10-6 m) and PM2.5, particles with an aerodynamic diameter of less than 2.5 micrometres), sulphur dioxide (SO2). nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), lead (Pb), ozone (O3) and benzene (CsH6). The NAAQS include averaging periods, limit values or concentrations, permitted frequency of exceedance per year, and compliance dates.
  2. The table below shows the ambient standards for the criteria pollutant.
  3. Where excessive levels of pollution at a station are reported by the South African Air Quality Information System or a municipal station, the information is shared with the public to empower them about the possible impacts their human health, as well as to guide them on how to carry out their daily activities to minimise the effects. In addition, tailor-made interventions are designed in air quality management plans or other strategic government programs to identify sources contributing to the pollution levels, and to implement necessary emission reduction measures. Within the regulated pollution sources such as industries, these interventions include enhanced compliance monitoring and enforcements through the atmospheric emission licencing command and control regime. For non-regulated pollution sources, air quality management interventions are designed to target those pollutants with reported excessive levels, towards progressive realisation of air that is not harmful to the health and wellbeing of the public.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2376

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

In light of the fact that eight environment ministry officials have been suspended in relation to a R2 billion tender fraud (details furnished), and her department's undertaking that it would, in due course, implement system recommendations that were outlined in the forensic investigation report, what(a) are the recommendations and (b) is the expected timeline for the implementation of the recommendations?

Reply:

A The forensic investigation report made the following recommendations with regard to improvement to supply chain management processes:

  1. The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) should revise its functionality criteria for tenders such that these is compliance with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, 2000: Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2017.
  2. The DEFF should revise its practice of appointing the same officials to serve on the Bid Specification Committee (BSC) and Bid Evaluation Committee (BEC). The functions of bid specification and evaluation should be segregated in order b minimise the risk of allusion between officials.
  3. The DEFF should implement a system whereby all BSC, BEC and Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) meetings are mechanically bearded. Such recordings should be filed for reference.
  4. The Supply Chain Management (SCM) Directorate should ensue that all minutes of BSC, BEC and BAC meetings are prepared within a reasonable period and filed. Such minutes should be signed by the relevant officials present at such meetings.
  5. The DEFF should cancel all contracts and/or negotiations with bidders who did not meet the mandakry and functional requirement of the bid.

B The following recommendations have been implemented to date:

    1. Criteria far evaluation of tenders have been amended b ensure objectivity and transparency. All Terms of Reference are reviewed by a quality assurer and are approved by the BAC.
    2. BAC meetings are recorded and minutes are prepared timeously. The BAC will only consider tenders for adjudication of the BSC and BEC minutes are included in submission.

The following recommendations will be implemented in due course:

iii. Amendments to the SCM with regard B the BSC and BEC composition

lv. Contracts as currently being reviewed by Counsel to consider any legal risks and to advise regarding the due process that must be followed when contracts are cancelled.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISIJERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE:
27/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2359

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) hunting offtakes recommended by SA National Packs (SANParks) for the individual private nature reserves that form part of the Associated Private Nature Reserves for 2020, (b) latest census information on which the decision was based and (c) copies of the letters of recommendation from SANParks to (i) Timbavati Private Nature Reserve, (ii) Balule Nature Reserve, (iii) Umbabat Nature Reserve and (iv) Klaserie Private Nature Reserve regarding 2020 hunting offtakes, noting that the previous Managing Executive of SANParks promised to make the hunting offtake figures public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, chat are the further relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) SANParks does not recommend hunting off-takes to the Private, Community and State managed reserves open to Kruger National Park (KNP). SANParks comment on the scientific- based animal off-take reque9B reC9ÏVed from such entities, in 00n9Ultation with the provincial regulatory authorities overseeing the allocation of such quotas; namely Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency (MTPA) and Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Tourism and Environment (LEDET).

(b) Census and scientific reports are submitted by the neighbouring Private, Community and State managed areas, which inform and support the off-take requests. The reports are then considered, and if supported, they are approved by the MTPA and LEDET, as the regulatory authorities. The MTPA and LEDET are the custodians of the Census information.

© SANParks comment on the hunting off-take request (See Addendum 1). The allocation of quotas is approved by the MTPA and LEDET, as the regulatory authorities. Approved quotas can be obtained Atom the aforementioned provincial regulatory authorities. However, some of the reserves publish the off-takes quotas on their websites and within their annual reports.

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2353

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

On what data will her Department set up a meeting to discuss shark fishing quotas, considering that shark numbers are dwindling and that catch-and-release has shown B cause slow and painful death by drowning according to studies?

Reply:

There has been no date set by this Department to specifically discuss 6hark quotas or allocations as yet. Previously, rights in the Demersal Shark Longline sector were allocated by the then Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fi9henes in 2013 and will be expiring at the end of 2020. A Total Applied Effort(TAE) of 5 vessels was allocated in the sector previously.

In May 2020, the Minister appointed an Expert Panel to formally review South Africa's National Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (NPOA-Sharks). The Panel was mandated to, among other things, focus on alignment with the International Plan of Action for the Conservation and Management of Sharks (lPOA-Sharks) of the Food and Agricultural Organisation (FAO), as well as to advise regarding progress on the current plan. The Expert Panel must also make recommendations on the plan generally with a view to improving it and ensuring its proper implementation so as to ensure the Department’s commitment to the long-term sustainable consumptive and non-consumptive use of the species. The Panel is expected to provide the Minister with a report by mid-November 2020

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER 0F FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

 

30 October 2020 - NW2351

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) (a) What is the reasoning behind the Kruger National Park dropping fences to areas bordering members of the Associated Private Nature Reserves (ANPRs) B allow movement of animals that are meant to be safeguarded in protected areas, allowing for trophy hunting of these protected animals, (b) what are the reasons that the decision to drop the fences to surrounding APNRs was not bought before the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries when it undermines the purpo9e of protecting wildlife in national parks, and (c) whether she will furnish Ms H S Winkler with the concept document for the dropping of fences to the APNRs; (2) what are the terms of the agreement on trophy hunting with the APNRs and (b) who provide oversight; and (3) whether she has been informed of the hunting of a young bull elephant that was shot 18 times in a Kruger National Park APNR in December 2016 in an unethical hunt in front of tourists; if not, chat is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) what steps has she taken to hold those responsible for the unethical hunt accountable?

Reply:

 

1. (a) The western boundary fence was dropped alongside fourteen (14) Private, Community and State managed conservation areas and was not limited B the Associated Private Nature Reserves (APNR). The reason this include, but are not limited to, support for integrated ecological management, with ecosystem processes, e.g. catchment processes, ecological corridor, climate change processes, natural species migration routes, following a west-east landscape gradient(from the mountain catchment west of the KNP).

The fence dropping is also in fulfillment of the international Great Limpopo Transfrontier Conservation Treaty (GLTFCA, 2002), promoting integrated land use approaches, including the inclusion of Private, Community and State conservation areas into the open conservation estate within South Africa, Mozambique and Zimbabwe. This promotes ecological and socio- economic outcomes, as per Treaty objectives. In addition, the inclusion of these areas is also aligned to South Africa's international commitment to expand the conservation estate in the country.

The fence dropping with Private, Community and State area look place in the late 1990s and early 2000s, as per the above explanation. The GLTFCA Cooperative Agreement (2018), its objectives, associated legislative requirements and workplan were presented to the Portfolio Committee during 2019.

The GLTFCA Cooperative Agreement is the first Agreement that provides a consistent framework for the regularisation of all 14 reserves open to KNP, as guided by the legal framework. The Agreement provides a uniform and consistent management framework based on the protected area and associated legislation. Please find attached a copy of the Agreement(Addendum 1c1-2).

2. (a) Approved protocols need to be formalised within reserves that conduct hunting, as per legislative requirements (NEMPA, NEMBA). Please refer attached Addendum 2 for requirement that need to be met.

(b) The Provincial Conservation authorities; Mpumalanga Tourism and Parks Agency (MTPA) and the Limpopo Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism (LEDET) are responsible for the regulation of the hunting within these reserves, together with the management structures of such reserves overseeing the management plans and associated practices, such as hunting, in the reserves (NEMPAA Act, 2003{Act No. 57 of 2003)).

3. (a) and (b) SANParks does not allow hunting within the Kruger National Park.

According to information at my disposal, the said elephant bull was hunted in a reserve within the APNR, in accordance with the relevant statutory requirements and the APNR Hunting protocol. Such hunts are overseen by the management structures of the reserves, together with the Provincial Conservation Authorities, they being the regulatory authorities tasked with monitoring compliance with the Protocol. I am advised that during the particular hunt being referred to, no "tourist' besides the hunting party were witness to the hunt. I am also advised that the LEDET provided the documentation to substantiate that the permit were legally issued and that no laws were contravened.

According to information at my disposal, the hunt was legal and took place in accordance with the APNR Hunting Protocol. The APNR off-take committee furthermore reviewed the incident and provided a ruling that the hunt was in accordance with the Protocol. The provincial environmental authority (LEDET) conducted a full investigation into this matter.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER 0F FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 30/10/2020

30 October 2020 - NW2298

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether she will explain why South Africa has not yet signed the Leaders' Pledge for Nature, which has already been signed by 70 countries, and which will commit South Africa B implement immediately actionable policy in order to ‹averse biodiversity loss over the next decade; if not, why not; if so, what are the full, relevant details?

Reply:

The Leaders' Pledge for Nature deals with a number of issues that are currently the subject of multilateral negotiations within the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) and the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), amongst others.

Given the fact that this Leaders' Pledge for Nature is not a multilaterally agreed document, nor did not form part of any multilateral negotiations and that it contains element which are the subject of ongoing negotiations as well as its requirements for a commitment to act and take accountability, it is prudent for any responsible Government to study the actions required and it implications on the country, prior to committing. The Leaders' Pledge for Nature is still open for endorsement and therefore, South Africa may still sign it after careful study of its content and the implications thereof on its biodiversity policy.

Our country remains committed to the implementation of its goals and objectives, and are committed to working towards an adoption of a post-2020 global biodiversity framework at the COP15 of the CBD in Kunming, China next year.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF F0RE8TRY, FISHERES AND THE ENVIRONNENT

DATE: 30/10/2020

25 September 2020 - NW2140

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What is the (a) compliance status of landfill sites in the Republic, (b)(i) total number and (ii) list of names of landfill sites that are (aa) licensed and (bb) unlicensed in each province and (c)(i) name and (ii) total number of landfill sites that are not compliant with their permits in each province?

Reply:

 

  1. The compliance status of landfill sites in the Republic, according to the Department’s currently

available information, is as contained in the table below:

 

 

PROVINCE

Non-Compliant 0% to 49%

Partially Compliant

50% to 74%

Compliant 75% to 100%

Eastern Cape

7

3

2

Mpumalanga

17

4

4

Gauteng

7

5

5

 

Northern

Cape

9

0

0

North West

11

7

0

KwaZulu

Natal

12

3

9

Western Cape

41

26

24

Limpopo

14

6

16

Free State

6

1

1

TOTAL

124

55

61

 

  1. (i) and (ii) The required information can be sourced from the relevant provincial authorities. (aa), (bb) See (b) above
  2. (i) and (ii) See (b) above.

25 September 2020 - NW2142

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) are the reasons that KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) has not submitted an Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP), (b) is the deadline for submission of KZN’s AQMP, (c) is de air quality management plan being used in KZN in the absence of an AQMP and (d) are the reasons that (i) many of the air quality monitoring stations are in KZN and (ii) then is no monitoring for PM2.5 and PM10 in other province, as per regulations in accordance with the National Environment Management: Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act No. 39 of 2004)?

Reply:

a). To address capacity challenges in the KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) province, the Air Quality Management Office was re-established in July 2020, with the appointment of a Director who will be responsible for Air Quality Management. In addition, an official was transferred horn the national Department B work in the Province. The process to develop the Air Quality Management Plan (AQMP) has been initiated by the Province.

(b). The Act does not explicitly state a deadline for the submis9ion of an AQMP. However, it was expected that when the Act was promulgated, all spheres of government would develop or initiate the process B draft their AQMPs.


©. In the absence of an AQMP, KZN is implementing the current air quality national legislation, i.e. Air Quality Act and the associated regulations.


(d)(i) Ambient monitoring is conducted by all sphere of government and there are a fair number of monitoring stations that are located in KZN. Of the 136 government-owned ambient air quality monitoring stations across the country, 25 of these are located in KZN province (the province has 5 stations under its control, eThekwini Metropolitan has 14 stations, the City of uMhlathuze has 3 stations and Msunduzi local municipality has 3 stations).


(ii). All spheres of government have comprehensive air quality monitoring of PM10 and PM2.5 across the country, as per regulations in accordance with the National Environment Management: Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act No. 39 of 2004). Of the 136 government-owned monitoring stations, nearly all of them monitor PM10. The monitoring of PM2.5 is still confined to the national priority areas and metropolitan municipalities, as the ambient monitoring standard for the pollutant was promulgated years after stations had been commissioned. However, the number of stations monitoring PM2.5 was significantly increased in 2016 through a national project initiated by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. As part of this initiative, 20 dual PM10PM2.5 monitors were rolled out into the national monitoring network to support municipal stations that were missing such Pm10/PM2.5 monitors, or had old monitors that needed to be replaced.

 

25 September 2020 - NW2141

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) With reference to the Government Gazette No.43601, what is the Nationale behind the phased-out approach to banning (a) single-use plastic carriers and (b) plastic flat bags as opposed to a stricter timeframe for an outright ban; and

Reply:

 

  1. (a) and (b)

The rationale behind the phasing out (or banning) of plastic carrier bags and plastic flat bags that are not manufactured from recyclate is to promote resource efficiency (that is, the use of recyclate as opposed to virgin material); improve waste management and create a demand for waste materials; increase circularity, recycling and recovery and to improve the design of environmentally sound bags and mitigate the economic impact of an outright ban of plastic carrier and flat bags.

This rationale is the result of extensive research and consultation with relevant stakeholders as well as consideration of international research and best practice.

 

(2). The Department has to consider the implications of any proposed policy interventions and the costs attached thereto as well as transitional measures. One of the critical stages of the Socio- Economic Impact Assessment System procedure is the identification of options, alternative, the implications (social and other) and the costs thereof. À policy recommendation needs B be guided by inter alia, evidence, B avoid unintended consequences. The Department is thereof e currently pursuing a study on single-use plastic products that would inform the policy direction. However, in the interim, the Extended Producer Responsibility is being put in place to manage items such as straws and cutlery. In this regard, the Department has been engaging industry and continues to do so. In addition:


(a).the Department has included straws as part of products to be controlled under Extended Producer Responsibility.

(b). the Department has included plastic cutlery as part of products to be controlled under the Extended Producer Responsibility.

©. The Department has also engaged the Department of Health b amend the Cosmetic Regulations b ban the use of plastic microbeads in cosmetics.

11 September 2020 - NW1963

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What was the total number of live (a) black rhino and (b) white rhino in the Republic (i) in each of the past six financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is

Reply:

Rhino numbers are informed by a variety of sources, and complied in report submitted to institutions responsible for the implementation of conservation treaties such æ the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species(CITES). Specific complementary reports are the following:
Red List of Mammals of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland for bath white and black rhino;
the Non Detriment findings for both white and black chino;
a report from the IUCN Species Survival Commission (IUCN SSC) African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups; and
TRAFFIC to the CITES Secretariat pursuant to Resolution Conf. 9.14 (Rev. CoP17)

Ms BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE:11/09/2020

11 September 2020 - NW2039

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What (a) plans does her Department have in place for providing preferential pricing structures for South Africans, as opposed B non-South Africans, which will provide access to South African National Parks (SANParks) properties, (b) research has been done in this regard and (c) are the (i) timeframes, (ii) milestones and (iii) deadlines regarding preferential pricing structures?

Reply:

 

  1. SANParks already implements a differential pricing and fee structure for South Africans and international guests. This differentials system was introduced in 2003, and the effect thereof is that South Africana receive preferential rates as compared to international guests. This was done to improve and expand access to National Parks by South Africans.
  2. Research had been conducted prior b the implementation of the preferential pricing system. SANParks embarked on a benchmarking exercise, comparing our fee structure with similar conservation authorities on the African continent.
  3. SANParks started implementing the Preferential Pricing mechanism in November 2003, and this pricing structure is being implemented currently

i Not applicable as the system is already being implemented

ii Not applicable as the system is already being implemented

iii. Not applicable as the system is already being implemented

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 11/09/2020

11 September 2020 - NW1994

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether an export quota for lion bone is being considered for 2020; if not, why not; Neo, what are the reasons?

Reply:

The judgment of National Council of the Society for Prevention of Cruelty to Animals v Minister of Environ mental Affairs and Others on the lion bone export quota determination process requested the Minister to give consideration to welfare issues relating to lions in captivity when determining the quota. The Department was, therefore, not able b determine the 2019 lion bone export quota and such determination process was thus deferred.

 

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP
Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment:

Date: 11/09/2020

11 September 2020 - NW1950

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Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether, in terms of the allocation of fishing rights to small-scale fishermen, her Department has an indication as b what number of the rights holder (a) are paper quota holders and (b) harvest their own quotas; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

Small-scale fishing rights are allocated to community-based legal entities in the form of co-operatives. These cooperatives as made up of verified and declared small-scale fishers in teas of the Marine Living Resources Act, 2014 (Act No. 5 of 2014). These fishers have met the relevant criteria and proved their historical involvement in fi9hing, as well as deriving a major part of their livelihood from traditional fishing operations. As such, there are no 'Paper Quota Holders' in the Small-scale Fishing Sector.

All fishes that form part of the small-scale fisheries cooperatives are involved in either one of the many fishing operations that include, amongst others, catching, processing and/or marketing of fish.

Regards

Ms BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 11/09/2020

16 July 2020 - NW1394

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) What number of other breeding and preservation facilities are currently in the Kruger National Park; (2) whether any of the other bleeding and preservation facilities suffered similar losses as the roan antelope breeding programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether the Senior Ranger from the roan antelope breeding programme who was dismissed had any verbal and/or written warnings; if so, what (a) number of warnings and (b) were the changes in each case; and (4) whether the specified ranger had a previous disciplinary record; if so, what controls were put in place by the Department in order for him not to regress again?

Reply:

(1) Currently, there are no other animal breeding camps in the Kruger National Park other than the Nwaxitsumbe Roan Bleeding Facility.

(2) In 2012, a total of 45 roan antelope died of Anthrax disease in the Capricorn Breeding Camp during August of that year. The breeding camp was subsequently dismantled in 2014.

(3) Yes, the Senior Ranger from the roan antelope breeding programme was dismissed on 25 April 2014 but challenged his dismissal at the CCMA, and as a result thereof, a Settlement Agreement was reached at the CCMA in terms of which he was re-instated on the 17th of November 2014.

(4) See (3) above

(5) After his reinstatement, the ranger was transferred from Nwanetsi Section to Shangoni Section. There were no further incidents that have been brought to my attention until the incident in 2020

16 July 2020 - NW1393

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) Whether the Department found that the 12+ roan antelope that died in 2019 had been purchased; if so, (a) from which location(s) were they purchased, (b) from whom were they purchased, (c) on what date(s) were the antelope purchased, (d) what was the cost of each specified antelope and (e) what number of breeding pairs were purchased; (2) whether the Department found that the 12+ roan antelope that died in 2019 had been captured; so, were they captured in the Kruger National Park and moved b the Nwaxitsumbe Breeding Camp; and (3) whether the Department found that the 12+ roan antelope that died in 2019 were donated; if so, (a) why were they donated and (b) what was the value of the donation?

Reply:

 

  1. None of the roan antelope that died in the Nwaxitsumbe Bleeding Camp had been purchased.

They were not captured, nor were they donated and none of them were planned for donation.

a) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

c) Not applicable.

d) Not applicable.

e) Not applicable.

(2) None of the roan antelope that died were captured anywhere prior to their death. These particular antelopes were the offspring of roan antelope in the camp. They were originally captured in Malawi as part of a breeding programme and subsequently moved to the Nwaxitsumbe Breeding Camp. They are the result of several generations of breeding in the Kruger National Park.

(3) None of the roan antelope that died had been donated and none were they planned for donation

a) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

Regards

MS B CREECY

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 17/7/2020

02 July 2020 - NW1301

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1) With reference to the reply to question 834 on 29 May 2020, (a) what progress has the Department made in establishing the stakeholder forum, (b) who has been invited to the specified forum, (c) how is the Department advertising for stakeholder inclusion on the platform, (d) who is the departmental contact person for queries on the stakeholder platform, and (e) is there a time-frame for the establishment of the stakeholder forum; and 2) whether there is a time-frame for th9 69Bbliahment and conclusion of a health study, given the urgency of the health concern in the area; if so, (a) by what date will the health study be commissioned, (b) who will be appointed to conduct the health study on air pollution in the South Durban Basin, and (c) wh0 I9 the contact person/s in the Department commissioned to initiate the health study?

Reply:

1 a) Progress in establishing the stakeholder forum has been severely impacted by the lockdown restrictions as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic. Currently a stakeholder mapping exercise i9 Underway aimed at ensuring that all affected stakeholders are part of the forum. This exercise is being undertaken in conjunction with the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and the KwaZulu-Natal Province, which have provided a database of existing air quality stakeholders in the South Durban Basin (SDB).

(b) The stakeholders that have been identified for the mapping exercise and inclusion in the forum are Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO's) /Community Based 0ganÏ98tI0n8 (CBO's) that are active in air quality issues in the SDB, industry organisations in the SDB (specifically those who have an impact on air quality), departments responsible for air quality management across all three spheres of government, academia and any other interested and affected parties that may be identified in due course

(c) As already indicated, the Department is working closely with the municipal and provincial officials who have provided the Department with a database of existing air quality stakeholders. The database has been used to announce the establishment of the forum as well as the stakeholder mapping exercise currently under way. Prior to the lockdown restrictions, the plan was to hold community gatherings in the SDB as a means of introducing the forum. This plan will be implemented once the restrictions Ioosen up enough to allow community gatherings to take place

(d) The contact person in the Department is Vumile Senene (Director: Air Quality Management Service), Tel: (012) 399-9217, Email: vesenene@environment.gov.za

e) Completion of the initial stakeholder mapping and •on-boarding sessions' for stakeholders happened at the end of June 2020. The on-boarding sessions will assist the stakeholder to contribute to the terms of reference for the forum and other related aspects. The first virtual meeting will take place on 22 July 2020 and the Department has already sent out a letter to identified stakeholders introducing the forum.

(2) (a) The process to conduct the South Durban health study has been initiated by the department. The department, eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality and the Provincial government are in the process of concluding the Terms of Reference (TORs) for the study. The TORs will then be consulted with the various stakeholders, which include indU9tdes, non-governmental organisations, community-based organisations and academia. The Department is determined to use available channels to expedite inputs from all affected and interested parties. As such the first stakeholder consultation will be conducted on 22 July 2020 and it will be a virtual meeting given the Covid-19 restrictions on both travel and meeting/gatherings .

b) Once the TORs are finalised, the government Supply Chain Management process will be followed to appoint a qualified and suitable service provider. Any potential service provider is allowed to submit a proposal, which will be evaluated following the Supply Chain Management process and National Treasury Regulations. The plan is to conclude the appointment of the service provider during this financial year and start the actual work in the next financial year (2021/22). Given the financial constraints and the experience with the precious health studies conducted in the Highveld and Vaal Triangle Air shed priority areas, this study is planned for a maximum of 36 months.

c) The National Air Quality Officer, Dr Thuli Khumalo, is the person responsible for the health study. Her contact details are: tkhumalo@encironment.gov.za Tel (012) 3998187.

Regards

MS B D CREECY,

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE EWIRONMENT

DATE: 2/07/2020

02 July 2020 - NW1303

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

By what date does she envisage will the list of prohibited fish species that apply to recreational fishing be aligned with the International Union for Conservator of Nature’s Red List of Threatened Species?

Reply:

All the twelve (12) prohibited fish species that apply to the South African recreational fishing sector as listed in Table 4 of the Recreational Fishing Brochure have been listed with the International Union for Conservation of Nature's Red List of Threatened Species under different categories.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY FISHERIE8 AND THE ENVIRONMENT

Date: 3/7/2020

02 July 2020 - NW1302

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1. Whether beaches are open under Alert Level 3 to fisherfolk with permit for recreational fishing; if not, why not; if so, what as the relevant details; 2. whether there is a daily curfew for commercial, recreational and small-scale fisherfolk to operate; if so, what are the relevant details; 3. whether marine protected area that permit fishing are open to fisherfolk with permit for recreational fishing; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 4. whether harbours are open to fisherfolk with permits for recreational fishing; I not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; and 5. what regulations govern the number of individuals who are permitted on private fishing vessels

Reply:

 

  1. Beaches are open under Alert Level 3 to fisherfolk with permits for commercial, small-scale and recreational fishing.
  2. The Disaster Management Regulations and the Fisheries Directive under Alert Level 3 set no curfew for the operations of commercial, recreational and/or small-scale fisherfolk.
  3. During Lockdown Alert Level 3, Marine Protected Areas that are zoned for fishing are still open to fisherfolk with permit for recreational fishing
  4. Commercial Fishing Harbour remain open to fisherfolk with permit for recreational fishing. Although it is important to note that due b security concerns, ports under the National Ports Authority (TNPA) remain heavily regulated, with some ports having a restriction on recreational fishing and others having designated and open areas for the public, with relevant permit, to fish.
  5. Determination of safe staffing levels (or the number of individuals who are permitted on private fishing vessels) is the e9pon9Ïbility of the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA), and this is done in terms of the Merchant Shipping Act, 1951 (Act No. 57 of 1951) section 68(1),72a(2) and 194(1).

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 2/7/2020

02 July 2020 - NW1276

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

In light of the fact that the Department is responsible for implementing control activities and operations on the Roodeplaat dam according to the 2014 Strategic Plan for the integrated Control of Aquatic Weeds in Roodeplaat Dam, what (a) control activities have been undertaken by the Department since the directive to local stakeholders to stop spraying, on 7 February 2020, (b) urgent actions will be taken to deal with the complete average of the rowing course by water hyacinth, and (c) process will be undertaken to ensure that reasonable expenses incurred by the community are reimbursed given that the community surrounding the Roodeplaat Dam needed b step in and fund water hyacinth control activities from December 2018 to February 2020to present an environmental crisis?

Reply:

The control of Roodeplaat Dam is covered under the Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) between the Department of Environment, forestry and Fisheries (DEFF), and the Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation (DHSW&S). DHSW&S appointed DEFF as the implementing agent to control all Invasive Alien Species (AIS) on the dam, including Water Hyacinth (Eichhomia cassipes] which is the major aquatic weed present on the Roodeplaat Dam.

a) The 2014 Strategic Plan for the Control of Aquatics Weeds in Roodeplaat Dam is currently under review due to the National Water Act amendment regarding the application of Section 21 (i) and Section 21 (c) permit applications. This requires that any activities that are implemented on the dam needs to be approved by the DHSW&S. The directive to stop all spraying on Roodeplaat dam was given by the DHSW&S at a stakeholder's meeting held on the 7th of February 2020.


b) DEFF has been working on the permit needed to commence activities on the dam for the manual

removal, biological and potential harvesting of biomass. The Department submitted a proposal for a Section 21 (c) permit for the algal control programme that occurred In March 2020, prior the SA Rowing championships event. This was approved, and assisted the swing event to go ahead due to the removal of the cyanobacterial blooms on the dam. The COVID-19 lockdown temporarily stopped all implementation activities such as the manual removal of the Water Hyacinth biomass from the dam and the release of biocontroI agents.


c) DEFF is currently in the process of directly appointing contractors to manually remove the Water Hyacinth biomass on the dam, but first needs to ensure that and safety compliance measures are in place. Furthermore, COVID-18 risk assessment training must be done with the contractors before allowing them to start work again. The stakeholders around the dam agreed to assist in the control of the Water Hyacinth, in the stakeholder's meeting held on 7 February 2020. DHSW&S informed stakeholders of their responsibilities on the dam, ‹elating b the National Water Act. It was indicated that the stakeholders' assistance in this regard is a responsibility under the National Water Act and, as such, they will not be compensated.

Regards

MS B D CREECY,

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE: 3/07/2020

 

26 June 2020 - NW1167

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

With reference to the Kruger National Park and tourist camp sites, what (a) renovation and maintenance plans are in place for each camp for the current financial year, (b) are the timelines, deadlines and timeframes for each camp in this regard, and (c) budget has been allocated for each camp site in each case?

Reply:

 

1167. THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:

(a, b & c) On 24 June 2020 the Honourable Minister of Finance, Mr Tito Mboweni, delivered a Supplementary Budget in the National Assembly. Accordingly, all Departments and Entities are required to re-submit their Annual Performance Plans (APP’s).

Once the revised APP of SANParks is submitted to the National Assembly, further information on the maintenance budgets and projects will be available.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT DATE: 25 JUNE 2020

05 June 2020 - NW932

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Mey, Mr P to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether her Department awarded any tender connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this ega‹d; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each Bnder awarded and (c) was the service and/or product \o be supplied by each business;

Reply:

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

(For written reply)

QUESTION NO. 932(NW1221E}

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.17 of2020 DATE OF PUBLICATION: 22 May 2020

Mr P Mey (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment:

  1. Whether her Department awarded any tender connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this ega‹d; if so, what (a) are the names of the businesses to whom these tenders were awarded, (b) are the amounts of each Bnder awarded and (c) was the service and/or product \o be supplied by each business;
  2. whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the awarding of the tandem; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case;
  3. 3) what was the reason for which each specified business was awaited the specified tender; and whether she will make a statement on the matter2

932. THE MINISTER OF FORE8TRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:

  1. Yes, the Department awarded tenders connected b the COVIŒ19 pandemic as follows:

(a) Name of the businesses/service

Provides

(b) Amount

R'000

(c) Service provided

Multisurge Pty Ltd, Promed

R1 008 780

1900 x (box of 50) masks surgical face

standard and 57 x digital body infrared thermometers.

Promed Technologies (Pty) Ltd

R45 000

5 liters X 500 battle disinfectant

Kanga Business Management

R494 500

3500 Alcohol gel hand sanitisers and 250 boxes of surgical masks

Orange Juice Inve9tr«ent (Pty) Ltd T/A

X-Treme Cleaning Solutions

R138 500

Disinfecting, sanitisation and fogging Foretrust building.

  1. Yes, there was a deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures. The Department utilised the Instruction Note 3 of 2016/17, paragraph 8.2, which states that 'An emergency procurement may occur when there is a serious and unexpected situation that pose an immediate risk B health, life, property or environment which calls an urgency to action and there is insufficient time to invite competitive bids', as well as Instruction Note 5 of 2020/21 Emergency Procurement in response to National State of Disaster.
    1. The Department received a case of an official who were infected with COVID-19 and, as a result, the Department had to disinfect the building æ a matter of emergency.
    2. The Department approached four service providers to submit quotations on an emergency basis, and an order was issued b Orange Juice Investment Pty Ltd T/A X-Treme Cleaning Solutions au they submitted a quotation that met the Department specifications.

(sj

The reason for which each specified business was awarded the specified tender:

The Service Provider, as listed below, submitted quotations that met the Department procurement specifications and RTCOVID19-0@ s§ecificätÏ0FI9 B9 I6sued by National Treasury.

Name of the business /Service Provides

 

Multisurge(Pty) Ltd, Promed

  • Standard surgical face masks to be given to officials and visitors entering the building for protection against COVID-19.
  • Body thermometers infrared for the screening of officials and visitors when entering the Department.

Promed Technologies (Pty) Ltd

Disinfectant for the cleaning of surfaces in the

building.

Kanga Business Management

Alcohol gel hand sanitisers and surgical masks for the sanitising of hands and protection from the COVID-19 infection of officials and visitors

Names of the businesses/Service Providers

 
 

entering the building.

Orange Juice Investment Pty LB T/A X-Treme

Cleaning Solutions

Emergency sanitisation and logging of Foretrust

building.

4. The regulations on how departments must respond to COVID-19 have bean widely publicized by the various government department.

Regards

MS BD CREECY
MINISTER OF FORESTORY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATES: 5/6/2020

29 May 2020 - NW834

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(a) What criteria are necessary to declare an area a High Priority Air Quality Area, (b) has she considered declaring the South Durban Basin a High Priority Air Quality Area considering that the area has been identified as an air pollution hot spot with high incidences of respiratory illness, (c) what oversight does her Department exercise over the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in terms of monitoring compliance with the National Environmental Management: Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act No. 39 of 2004, (d) how often does her Department exercise oversight over the specified municipality in terms of compliance with the specified Act, considering that her Department has been made aware of high levels of air pollution in the South Durban Basin and across the province, and (e)(1) what oversight and (ii) how often does her Department exercise oversight over municipalities in terms of their compliance with the specified Act?

Reply:

 

 

(b) 834. THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:

a) For the Minister to declare an area as a national air quality priority area, amongst other things:
• It must have exceedances of national ambient air quality standards;
• The Minister reasonably believes that such will be the case in the future; and
• it must extend beyond provincial boundaries

b) As indicated above, for an area to be declared to be declared as a priority area, it must extend beyond provincial boundaries. In the case of the South Durban Basin, the area falls entirely within the boundaries of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality. As a consequence, it would be for the Membe of Executive Council (MEC) in the province to make such a declaration if the area needs the requirements as set out in Section 18 of the National Environmental Management : Air Quality Act, 2004 (Act No/ 39 of 2004)/

c) The national department provides and support to all municipalities in the execution of their air quality management duties and responsibilities through an intergovernmental forum called MINMEC, consisting of the Minister of Environment and the MECs responsible for Environment, as well as Mayors of metropolitan municipalities, relevant sector department and SALGA. Minmec meetings are held on a quarterly basis to ensure that policy coordination takes place.

Furthermore, the MINIMEC has established a technical forum called MINITECH, consisting of the Director General and provincial Heads of Department, relevant sector departments, metropolitan municipal managers and SALGA to provide formal technical support to the MINMEC, MINTCH, as the technical structures, informs and advises the Minister and MECs. MINTECH is informed by Working Groups consisting of national, provincial and local government officials ,Working Group 2 is designated for air quality management.

Through these structures sector targets are set, in line with relevant legislation, performance monitored and corrective measures taken by all three spheres of government according to the principles of cooperative government as set out in Chapter 3, section 41(1) of the Constitution. This section of the Constitution stipulates the principles of cooperative government and intergovernmental relations applicable to all spheres of government, and requires them (spheres of government) tp operate within the framework of mutual trust and good faith

d) The establishment for a meet on a quarterly basis

e) (i) and (ii) The Department is in the process of establishing a stakeholder forum in the area, with the view to bring together spheres of government, industry, NGOs/CBOs, academia and any othver interested and affected parties. The forum will provide a platform for all stakeholders to engage openly and transparently with a view to address air pollution concerns in the area.

In addition, the Department will be conducting a health study in the area in order to get a better understanding of the impact of air pollution on the residents of the area

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTORY FISHERIES AND ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 29/05/202

29 May 2020 - NW804

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1) With regard to the Level 4 regulations on the relaxation of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19 which came into effect on 1 May 2020, (a) on what date did she issue directives to clarify what the phrase 'all fishing allowed' means and (b)(i) what are the directives and (ii) on what grounds are they based; and (2) with regard to the internationally known sardine run which will take place soon, what considerations have been given to cater for the sardine run phenomenon in view of current lockdown regulations?

Reply:

804. THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:


1. (a) The Directions Regarding measures to Address, Prevent and Combat the Spread of COVID-19, in particular relating to the Freshwater and Marine Fishing Sectors, were gazetted on 14 May 2020.

(b) (i) These Directions apply to:
■ Mariculture, commercial and small-scale fishing rights, permits and exemptions;
■ Commercial and small-scale fishing vessel licences;
■ Fishing Processing Establishments rights, permits and exemptions
■ Permits or exemptions to import or export fish; and
■ Recreational fishers

They provide for the prohibition of sports and recreational fishing activities, as well as for the extention of validity of permit, exemption or licence issued in terms of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act No. 18 of 1998) prior to the national lockdown.

(ii) The Directives were based on the principle of restricting personnel movement other than for essential travel for work in terms of the alleviation provided for in Part A OF Table 1 of the Regulations as they pertain to fishing activities.

2. The KwaZulu Natal Sardine Beach Seine fishery is a fully fledged fishing sector with right holders fishing on commercial and small scale permits. During the upcoming Sardine Run, Rights Holders that operate in this sector, will operate in a similar manner as right holder in other commercial fishing sectors.

At the current lockdown alert level , access to beaches continue to remain restricted, and the Department will continue to work with all relevant Coastal Municipalities and Law Enforcement Officers to ensure that authorised fishers have access to beaches and there is compliance with the lockdown Regulations.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTORY FISHERIES AND ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 29/05/202
 

29 May 2020 - NW618

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(1) what (a) is the total number of informal wet markets in the Republic and (b) steps will her department in association with other relevant departments take to avoid that such markets become incubators for dangerous pathogens and viruses as most recently seen regarding the circumstances for the suspected outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic at a fish market in Wuhan, China; (2) whether she intends closing wet markets in the Republic; if not, what preventative measures will she put in place; if so, what are the full details of the effect that this will have on general food security generated by these markets?

Reply:

 


618. THE MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT REPLIES:

1(a). According to the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries, there are no known formal or informal wet markets in the republic. However, in accordance with the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, section 162, Municipalities are responsible for the publication of relevant bylaws in their respective provinces, which would regulate activities associated with such markets. It should further be noted that the Meat Safety Act (Act No. 40 of 2000), enforced by the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) regulates the meat product. Therefore, please refer further questions in this regard to municipalities and/or the DALRRD

1(b) Please see 1(a) above

2. Please 1(a) above

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTORY FISHERIES AND ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 29/05/202

 

27 February 2020 - NW37

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Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

What was the total number of live (a) black rhino and (b) white rhino in the Republic on (i) 31 December 2015, (ii) 31 December 2016, (iii) 31 December 2017, (iv) 31 December 2018 and (v) 31 December 2019?37. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES REPLIES:Rhino numbers are informed by a variety of sources. Specific complementary reports are the following:• Red List of Mammals of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland for both white and black rhino;

Reply:


Rhino numbers are informed by a variety of sources. Specific complementary reports are the following:

• Red List of Mammals of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland for both white and black rhino;

• the Non Detriment findings for both white and black rhino;

• a report from the IUCN Species Survival Commission (IUCN SSC) African and Asian Rhino Specialist Groups; and

• TRAFFIC to the CITES Secretariat pursuant to Resolution Conf. 9.14 (Rev. CoP17)

 

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
Date: 27/02/2020

08 November 2019 - NW1290

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

With reference B the Government Notice No 1317 and her establishment of an advisory committee known as the high level panel in kms of section 3A of the National Environmental Management Act, Act 107 of 1998, whose mandate is to review policies, regulations and practices on matters related to the management, breeding, hunting, trade and handling of elephant, lion, leopard and rhinoceros, what (a) is the name of each body that each member of the high-level panel is (i) affiliated to and (ii) a member of and (b) (i) qualifications and (ii) knowledge and/or experience served as the basic on which each member was selected

Reply:

 

The details of each member of the High-Level Panel are provided below:

  1. Ms Aadila Agjee

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to Centre for Environmental Rights

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of • Wildlife Project for Centre for Environmental Right NPC

(b)(i) Qualifications • Degree - Bachelor of Law (LLB)

    • Postgraduate LLM -Animal Rights Law

b)(II) Knowledge and experience Environmental legal matee, litigation, legal regulations

 

for welfaRe of wild animal9 and compliance, legislative review. Animal nghb and welfare legislation

Professor Brian Child

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body member of

‹b›‹i 4uaiirlcationx

b){II) Knowledge and experience

Mr Kule Chitepo

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

NATIOML A6SEfBLY

Global Environmental Fund

  • Biodiversity Panel Member
  • Scientific Advisory Panel of the Global Environmental Fund
  • University of Florida
  • Peace Parts Foundation’s Community

Development Programme

  • Biodiversity Panel Member on the Scientific and technical Advisory Panel of the Global Environmental Facility(2014-2018)
  • B.Sc. Honors - Agricultural Economics
  • M.Sc. - Agricultural & Forest Science
  • D.Phil. - Ecology

Nature Conservation, Communal Area management, Indigenous resources and Camp fie

Africa Resources Trust (ART) - Resources Africa

  • Chemonics International's Resilient Waters

IUCN Species Survival Commission (sustainable

use and livelihoods)

Resource Africa

  • Masters in Science - Environment and Development

Bachelor of Science - Renewable Resources

Trans-boundary biodiversity conservation expert, community development, policy development on rural communities, exposure to trade, Resource mobilization

 

Ms Ashleigh Doc

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(ii) Name of each body member of (b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

Mr Stewart Dorrington

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(li) Name of each body member of

•Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Nkosi Mpumalanga Gwadiso

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body members

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Kgosi Edward Mabalane

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body member of

UT xsseuatY

Endangered Wildlife Trust Admitted attorney

  • Master of Laws - Environmental
  • Postgraduate Certificate - Environmental 6 Sustainable Development
  • Degree - LLM - Environmental Law

Nature conservation, community empowerment, admitted attorney dealing with environmental issues, restorative justice

Professional Hunter Association of South Africa (PHASA)

  • Custodians of Professional Hunting & Conservation South Africa (CPHC-SA)
  • Hunting regulation and captive lion breeding

» FASA

Degree - Bachelor of Commerce

Wildlife conservation, Hunting and Game Farming

Amakhonjwayo Traditional Council

Amakhonjwayo Traditional Council

  • Traditional House of Leaders
  • Chairman of Agriculture
  • CONTRALESA

CONTRALESA investment holdings

Certificate - Businees Administration

Community Leadership, Community Development and

Human Rights Activist

Baphiring Nation-Mabaalstad

Moses Kotane Hospital - Board Member

QUESTION NO. 1200 W2501E

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

6. Mr Reuben Malema

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Dr Kelly Mamewick

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(li) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

MTIONAL AG6EMBLY

    • Village FM - Board Member
    • REMDEC (Community and Consultative Process Dispute Resolution Committee
    • HRM Mabalane Haven of Hope Foundation
    • Freedom Park-Board Member,
    • Provincial Contralessa Chairperson
    • Chairperson of HR & Remuneration Freedom Park Council
    • Groot Marico Biosphere Reserve Board
  • Certificate - Indigenous Law & Restorative Justice with Traditional Leaders
  • Certificate- Executive Leadership & Municipal Development Programme

Community Leadership, Mail & Guardian Top 200 young leader award, trained in Restrictive Justice

Empower Wildlife Ranching and South African Agricultural Industry Association (AGRI-SA)

Black Evolution Product (Game Meat Trade)

  • DAFF Ministerial advisory committee on Game

meat regulations

Food Security & BBG

  • Transformation Committee in Wildlife Ranching South Africa (WRSA)

National Diploma - Business Management

Sustainable use of wildlife, Policy development in agriculture, Game meat regulations, Business management

IUCN African Lion Working Group

Southern African Wildlife Management Associate

IUCN Cat Specialist Group

  • IUCN Candid Specialist Group
  • Wildlife Forum
  • Doctorate - Ph.D. - Wildlife Management

I

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Ms Lulama Lorraine Matyolo

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

{a){II) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Mr Tebogo Mogashoa

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Mr Mavuso Msimang

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

tJATl0hAL A66Ef/IBLY

    • Masters - Wildlife Management

BSc Honors-Zoology

    • BSC Degree-Zoology & Botany

Carnivore Conservation & Biology of Cheetahs, Project Management, Data Management, Wildlife Trade

Attorneys Admission Board

    • National People & Part B Task Team
  • Deputy Secretary - Provincial People & Packs Forum (Western Cape)
  • Degree - Bachelor of Arts
  • Degree - LLB
  • Honors Degree - Business Administration
  • Certificate - Legislative drafting

Legal and Compliance related matters

Wildlife Ranching Association of SA

  • Wildlife Ranching Association of SA
  • Kwandwe Rhino Conservation Trust

Degree - Bachelor of Science (Engineering)

Game Ranching, Investment in the SA economy through Wildlife sector, Wildlife farming

World Wide Fund for Nature SANParks

United Nations

Peace Parks Foundation

  • SANParks
  • African Parks Foundation, established in 2000
  • iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority
  • Peace Parks Foundation
  • WWF South Africa
  • Board's Social, Ethics & Transformation Committee

QJE6TDN NO. 12N W2501E

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

Dr Tshifhiwa Constance Nangammbi

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(iI) Knowledge and experience

  1. Ms Elizabeth Johanna Lizanne Nel

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(ii) Knowledge and experience

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

    • Tourism Conservation Fund
    • Masters - Business Administration
    • Degree - Bachelor in Entomology & Biochemistry

Nature conservation, Institutional development, Tourism development, Chairman of Corruption watch, community development

The South African Council For Natural Scientific Professional(SACNASP)

The Parasitology Society of Southern Africa

    • UNITAS Malacologica
  • Zoological Society of Southern Africa
  • Doctorate - PhD. Zoology
  • Post-graduate Diploma- Higher Education

MasBrs of Science - Systematic 6 Biodiversity

  • BSc. Honors - Biological Sciences
  • Degree - Bachelor of Arts - Biology & Psychology

Curriculum Development in genetics, Piloting the establishment of a wildlife biological resource centre. Established the molecular genetics lab at UNIVEN. Empowerment of PDls and student

South African Hunters 6 Game Conservation

Association

Tshwane University of Technology IUCN Sustainable

Use & Livelihood Specialist Group

Southern African Wildlife Management Association

  • Southern African Wildlife Management

Association

  • Biodiversity Management(Scientific Services)

Limpopo Department of Economic Development

LEDET

MBA(Masters in Business Administration)

  • B.Sc. Hons. Wildlife Management

BSc Degree

Wildlife Conservation, Conservation lecture, IUCN specialist group, hunting, Wildlife management, Policy

QUESTION NO. 1200 NM501E

development, advocacy

  1. Ms Mmboneni Esther Netshivhongweni

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Professor Azwihangwisi Edward Nesamvuni (a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(li) Knowledge and experience

Wildlife Eco-Tourism Bio-Prospecting Association of South Africa (WEBSA)

Wildlife Ranches of South Africa (WRSA)

  • WEBSA
  • Board of Directors of the Professional Hunters'

Assoc.SA's(PHASA)

  • Conservation & Empowerment Fund
  • People and Parks
  • Master of Commerce
  • B. Comm Honors
  • B. Comm
  • Advanced Diploma- Professional Management

Sustainable Use of wildlife, Community conservation management

Professor Extra-Ordinary: Centre for Sustainable Agriculture at University of the Free State

South African Council for Natural Scientific

Professions

  • South African Society for Animal Science

Association of Feed Manufacturer of South Africa

  • South African Society of Agricultural Expansion

Doctorate - Ph.D. Animal Bleeding and Reproduction

  • Masters -Agriculture
  • Master - Business Administration

Bachelor of Science -Agriculture (Honors)

  • Bachelor of Science -Agriculture

Nature Conservation and Research in Animal Bleeding & Repuzluction

Advocate for Women in Conservation & Sustainable use and Strategic development & Implementation

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OUESTION NO. 1200 NW2501E

  1. Ms Sibusiswe Maureen Ngcobo

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(ii) Knowledge and experience

  1. Host Pheni Cyprian Ngove

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a){ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(ii) Knowledge and experience

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Kana U \/hulunge Mvelele

    • Member of the National Action Programme
    • Implementing initiatives related to Bio-trade
    • United Nations Convention to combat desertification in South Africa
    • Inter-governmental Science Policy platform on Biodiversity and Eco-system
    • Master - Social Science - Policy & Development
  • Bachelor - Home Economics

Diploma - Home Economics

  • Certificate in PFMA

Advocate for women participation in Conservation issues, Conservation and Sustainable use, Women in Conservator, Strategic development specialist and Implementation

Nghonyama Wildlife Africa

  • Institute of Dike of South Africa

Wildlife Ranching South Africa

  • People and Parks Organisation
  • Mabunda Community Game Reserve
  • LEDET Letaba Ranch Co Management

Limpopo Provincial House of Traditional Leaders

  • National Diploma - Public Administration & Management
  • Post-Graduate Diploma - Human Right
  • P0st Graduate Diploma- Labor Law
  • Post-Graduate Certificate - Local Government Law

Knowledge and Experience in matters relating to indigenous knowledge system in South Africa, Bleeding, community development

QUESTION NO. 12B0 NW2501E

  1. Mr Michael 't Sas Rolfes

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(ii) Name of each body member of

{b){l) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Professor Robert Hugh Slotow

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and axpe8ence

  1. Mr Deon Swart

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body member of

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

International Union for Conservation of Nature

    • IUCN Species Survival Commission African

Rhino Specialist Group

    • IUCN Sustainable Use and Livelihoods Specialist

Group

    • MSc. - Biodiversity, Conservation and Management

MSc. - Environmental Resource Economic9

B. Com (Hons) - Business Economics

    • Diploma- Integrated Environmental

Management

Environmental resource economist, legal and illegal market for wildlife products. He is knowledgeable in sustainable use, an expert in the analysis of wildlife trade policy for high value species and works closely with both national and international bodies in biodiversity sector.

Elephant Specialist Advisory Group (ESAG)

Institute for Commercial Forestry Research

    • Sugar Milling Research Institute
    • KwaZulu-Natal Institute in Research TB & HIV/AIDS
    • Africa Health Research Institute (AHRI)

Ph.D. - Biology

  • M.Sc. - Zoology
  • Bachelor of Science (Hons) - Zoology
  • Bachelor of Science-Zoology

Research on genetics and conservation of large mammals. Specializes in Corporate Governance and species-related policy development, economics, animal physiology, welfare and protected areas management.

South African Predator Association (SAPA)

  • National Wildlife Forum
  • Provincial Wildlife Forum'
  • Hunting and Wildlife Association SA

African Lion Task team

QUESTION NO.1200 NW2501E

(b)(I) Qualifications

b)(ii) Knowledge and experience

  1. Inkosi Mabhudu Israel Tembe

(a)(i) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Ms Karen Tendler

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(II) Name of each body member of

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

Diploma - Nature Conservation and Management

Wildlife Conservation, Policy Development, Conservation management, lion breeding and captive breeding, wildlife trade(local and international), monitoring and enforcement

  • The Tembe Traditional Council
  • Provincial House of Traditional Leaders
  • KwaZulu - Natal Department of Co-Operative Governance and Traditional Affairs
  • UMkhanyakude Local House of Traditional Leader
  • Former Board member of iSimangalico
  • Former member of Wildlife Steering Committee of EKZNW
  • Diploma - Computer Course
  • Certificate - Management of International Criminal Prosecutions
  • Certificate - Leadership and Good Governance

Specializes in community development. Criminal Prosecutions. Training in SA Constitution, Community Development and Environmental Administration

National Council of Societies for the Presentation of Cruelty to Animals

  • SANParks Ethics and Animal Use and Care Committee
  • SABS code of Practice for Translocation and Capture of African Herbivores, Code on Zoo standard and animal experimentation
  • Advanced IWRC USA
  • NSPCA Wildlife Trade and Trafficking Unit

Rhino Response Project Coordinator

  • EWT 2012 -2015
  • Rhino Response Strategy

IFAW on wildlife rescue, response and ehabilita6on

  • Pretoria Biomedical Research Ethics Committee member

E\/\/T Conservation Management Committee

  • Committee for Elephant Welfare during the Tuli

0flE5TlQt NO. 12B0 NYf2 01E

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Mr Andries Lucas van Coffer

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to

(a)(ii) Name of each body member of

(b)(i) Qualifications

b)(II) Knowledge and experience

  1. Ms Pamela Bulelwa Yako

(a)(I) Name of each body affiliated to (a)(II) Name of each body member of

MTIOKAL ASSEMBLY

elephant cruelty case

National Diploma - Nature Conservation 6 Wildlife Management

Trained in Wildlife Rehabilitation, Wildlife Conservation, Pharmacology in wildlife rehabilitation. Rhino rearing and rehabilitation, Ethics of wildlife rehabilitation, Rearing and rehabilitating wildlife, Nursing and specialized nursing. Introduction to Basic Wildlife Rehabilitation, Wildlife nursing, fearing orphaned wildlife, Advanced Wildlife Rehabilitation 1&2, Rehabilitating raptors, Crisis management, Oil spill response, Wound management in wildlife, Pharmacology for Wildlife rehabilitate, Ethics, Wildlife we4e

Professional Hunter's Association of South Africa (PHASA) and Confederation of Hunter Association of South Africa (CHASA)

  • Tourism Business Council South Africa (TBCSA)

Ezemvelo KZN Honorary Officers Association

  • Board of Directors of the PHASA Conservation &

Empowerment Fund

Board of Directors of the Tourism Business Council

South Africa (TBCSA)

  • Registered national tour guide with SA Tourism (SAT)

PHASA Conservation & Empowerment Fund

  • Board of Zululand Rhino Reserve
  • Ezemvelo KZN Honorary Officer Association
  • Goss Estate Hunting Academy
  • National Diploma - Electronics
  • Diploma - Business Management
  • National Certificate - Toun9lTl Guiding

Specialist in agriculture and wildlife conservation, game farm management, community participation and hunting.

Zenande Leadership Consulting

  • Eastern Cape Parks and Tourism
  • Seriti Institute Board
  • South African Tourism Board

Former DG: (DEAT and DWAF)

  • DDG: Biodiversity & Conservation

QUESTION NO.1290 NW2501E

b)(ii) Knowledge and experience

Regards

  • Former Board ECPTA
  • Master in Business Leadership
  • Bachelor of Commerce - Industrial Sociology, Management and Economics

Municipal Support and Turnaround Specialist, Environmental policy development. Women empowerment. Municipal governance, stakeholder facilitation and financial strategy development and sustainability planning specialist.

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FlSHERIES

.

NATIONAL ASSE£/BLY QJE8TION NO. 1200

08 November 2019 - NW1360

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department did business with certain (a) persons, (b) companies and (c) trusts (names and details furnished in each case) (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2019; if so, (aa) on what date(s) did her department do business with the specified persons, companies and trusts and (bb) what was the (aaa) nature and (bbb) monetary value of each business arrangement?

Reply:

a) b) c) i) ii) The Department did not do any business with the relevant persons, companies and trusts for the past five financial years and current financial year.

 

aa) Not applicable.

bb) aaa) bbb) Not applicable.

 

08 November 2019 - NW1314

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

(I) Will the member of the South African Weather Service boast still be held personally liable for the finances spent on the six months salary in the premature termination of employment of a certain person (name and details furnished); (2) What are the relevant details of the allegations faced by the specified person?

Reply:

 

 

1. The Audited Financial Statement for the South African Weather Service (SAWS) for the period under consideration are available and the Auditor General has made no finding that the expenditure arising from the settlement of the dispute between the Board and the lower CEO amount to fruitless and wasteful expenditure. For his reason the SAWS Board, will not be held personally liable for this expenditure, as there is no legal basis to do so.

 

 

2. The Board removed the Chief Executive officer from office for, inter alia, failing to perform certain functions connected with the office of the Chief Executive Officer or b exercise those powers adequately, diligently and efficiently and because the was an irretrievable breakdown in the relationship between the Boast and the former Chief Executive Officer due b the following reasons:

  • A breakdown in communication occurred between the Chair of the Board and the former Chief Executive Officer;
  • The former Chief Executive Officer failed B, inter alia, attend meeting requested by the Chair;
  • Absenteeism on the part of the former Chief Executive Officer (CEO) for extended period during critical periods for the organisation;

  • Inability or unwillingness on the part of the CEO b finali9e matters ‹elated to her missing employment contract and performance agreement for 2016/17 and to confirm the date of conclusion of the employment contract as 31 March 2017;

Regatdc

MG BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:.. .].!.!.. .I#/.1

MTIQ\IAL A99EMBLY QUESTION NO. 1g14 IM2528E

31 October 2019 - NW1185

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether she intends taking action to ensure that Africa's most iconic species, the African lion, is fully protected in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action will she take to (a) close legislative gaps in this regard and (b) enforce the relevant laws?

Reply:

Globally, African lion is listed as Vulnerable on the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List of Threatened Species. However, the wild lion population in South Africa is not under threat of extinction, as recent quantitative data found the population to be increasing stably. According to the Red List of Mammals of South Africa, Lesotho and Swaziland (2016) which was a regional assessment, the

South African population is currently listed as Least Concern, whereas in 2004 the national Red List status of the South African population was Vulnerable. The change in the conservation status was due to an increase of the South African population, resulting from the successful conservation efforts in South Africa. Further, according to the regional Red List report, the lion population in four South African Development Community countries (Botswana, Namibia, South Africa and Zimbabwe) grew by an estimated 120/, whereas the lion population in the remaining African range countries declined by an estimated 61%.

(a) Activities involving African lion are currently well regulated in South Africa in terms of biodiversity conservation legislation, in order to ensure its protection and sustainable utilisation including, but not limited to:

  • The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act(NEMBA), 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004): 
  • due to the fact that lion is included in the list of threatened or protected species, a permit is required for the carrying out of any restricted activity (such as hunting, catching, breeding, selling, transporting, exporting from or importing into the Republic of South Africa, and so forth) involving any specimen.
  • The Threatened or Protected Species (TOPS) Regulations, 2007, promulgated under NEMBA, which:
    • require the compulsory registration of captive breeding facilities, rehabilitation facilities, sanctuaries, commercial exhibition facilities (such as zoos), or persons operating as wildlife traders;
    • require that measures be taken by captive breeding facilities to prevent hybridisation or inbreeding;
    • prohibit certain hunting-related activities; and

 

  • The CITES Regulations, 2010, promulgated under NEMBA, which require:
    • that the Scientific Authority must confirm whether the export of a specimen included in the appendices of CITES, including African lion, will be detrimental to the survival of a species;
    • the registration, marking and tagging of specimens;
    • the setting of quotas where applicable, and the management of the utilisation thereof.
    • the issuing of a separate permit for each consignment, to be valid for one consignment only, and the cancellation of a used permit;
    • reporting to the CITES Secretariat:

                          - annually on the international trade in specimens of species included in the appendices of CITES; and

                            - biennially on legislative, regulatory and administrative measures taken to enforce the provisions of CITES; and

  • Provincial conservation legislation.

The following legislation is aimed at preventing cruelty to lions:

  • Animals Protection Act, 1962 (Act No.71 of 1962), which aims at preventing cruelty to animals; and
  • Performing Animals Protection Act, 1935 (Act No. 24 of 1935), which regulates the training and performance of animals.

In addition to the legislative requirements referred to above, a number of conservation tools have been developed, either formally in terms of NEMBA, or informally as guidelines, aimed at the protection and conservation of lion, namely:

  • A non-detriment finding (NDF) by the Scientific Authority established by the then Minister. The NDF was published in the Gazette on 23 January 2018, and indicated that legal local and international trade pose a low to moderate, but non-detrimental, risk to the species in South Africa;
  • A Biodiversity Management Plan (BMP) for the African lion (Panthera /eo) which was published in the Gazette on 02 December 2015 for implementation. The purpose of the BMP is to ensure the survival of lion in the wild. As part of the BMP, a metapopulation management plan has been developed to improve the management of the managed wild lions within South Africa; and
  • Guidelines for the implementation of a meta-population management plan for managed lions in South Africa, with specific reference to trophy hunting, which have been developed by the Scientific Authority. Currently, all managed wild lion populations are being assessed against the criteria to determine the effectiveness of the metapopulation management plan.

(b) The Department of Environmental Affairs coordinates its activities, as well as the implementation of its strategies and plans, through a number of formal structures, including the following:

  • Permit and Enforcement Planning Committee (PEPC), where permit information and enforcement actions are discussed with provincial conservation authorities;
  • National Biodiversity Investigators Forum (NBIF), where information on contraventions are shared and investigations coordinated at a broader level, with provincial conservation authorities, conservation entities and enforcement agencies;
  • Scientific Authority, that, among others:
    • makes NDFs on the impacts of international trade in specimens of species listed as TOPS or included in the appendices of CITES.
  • National African Lion Task Team (NALTT), to coordinate the implementation of the actions highlighted in the BMP for lion, with provincial and other conservation entities and industry.

Further actions to be taken aimed at the protection of lion, involve the following legislative developments:

  • An urgent amendment to NEMBA, as part of the National Environmental Management Laws Amendment Bill, 2017, which has been approved by the Portfolio Committee of Environmental Affairs of the 5* Administration, to include empowering provisions to regulate the well-being of faunal biological resources. The Minister responsible for the environment would be in a position to prohibit activities that may negatively impact on the welfare of lions.
  • As part of a more substantial amendment to NEMBA which is already underway, the penalty clause will be amended to include higher penalties for persons who are found guilty of offences involving wildlife trafficking, or offences commited as a member of a syndicate.
  • The enforcement of NEMBA, the TOPS Regulations and the CITES Regulations is done by members of the South African Police Service (SAPS), or by ofcials who have been appointed in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998) as Environmental Management Inspectors (EMIs).
  • The Stock Theft Unit and Endangered Species Unit of SAPS have prioritised lion for investigations and enforcement actions. The Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations of the SAPS (also known as the Hawks) works closely with the EMIs from the department to investigate cases originating from O.R. Tambo International Airport, involving lion bones.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES DATE:. ..... .!.....

29 October 2019 - NW1300

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether mining activities are prohibited or restricted in wetland areas in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the details of the (a) legislative provisions relied upon when restricting or prohibiting mining, (b) process that needs to be followed in order to stop mining activities in Wetland areas and (c) mechanisms put in place by her department to rehabilitate an aha affected by mining activities in a we8and area (2) Whether portion 24 of the farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS in Mpumalanga is located within a wetland area?

Reply:

 

 

  1. Prohibitions or restrictions of activities are part of a series of environmental impact management measles aimed at facilitating sustainable development. Such measures should be applied within the constitutional framework and all other applicable laws as administered by all departments, but more specifically those responsible for minerals, environment and water

affairs. Most environmental issues are managed primal in terms of the overarching legislation which is National Environment Management Act, (Act 107 of 1998) (NENA) and its Specific Environmental Management Acts (SEMA’s).

Conservation of wetlands is access-cutting mandate and the management of impacts therefore depend on the nature the proposed activity. Legislative provisions that may be relevant to wetlands areas in the Republic are:

 

 

  • The National Environmental Management Act, Act 107 of 1998:
  • Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act28 of 2002

 

 

  • National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, Act 10 of200J

(b) Currently there is no “process to stop mining activities in wetland areas” in South Africa, unless the wetland is part of the protected area system. However, in terms of section 49 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Act 28 of 2002, the Minister of Minerals Resources and Energy may prohibit or restrict the granting of any reconnaissance permission, prospecting right, mining right or mining permit in respect of land identified by the Minister for such period and on such teas and conditions as the Minister may determine.

The EIA Regulations require that an EIA process be undertaken for ident8ed activities and submitted b the competent authority for consideration and informed decision-making. These Regulations regulate the procedure and criteria as contemplated in Chapter 5 of the NEMA

relating to the preparation, evaluation, submission, processing and consideration of, and decision on, applications for environmental authorizations for the commencement of activities, subjected to environmental impact assessment, in order B avoid or mitigate detrimental impact on the environment, and to optimize positive environmental impact, and for matters pertaining thereto. In this regard an application for environmental authorization may be refused. One of the many identified activities requiring an environmental authorization in terms of Listing Notice 1 of the EIA Regulations 2014 (as amended), is the following:

The infilling or depositing of any material of more than 10 cubic meters info, or dredging, excavation, removal or moving of soil, sand, shells, shell grit, pebbles or rock of more than 1O cubic meters from a watercourse; but excluding whets such infilling, depositing, dredging, excavation, removal or moving

(a) Will occur behind a comeback setback;

(b) Is for maintenance purposes undertaken in accordance with a maintenance management

(c) falls within the ambit activity 21 in this Notice, in which case that activity applies,

(d) occurs within existing ports or harbor that will not increase the development footprint of the port harbor; or

(e) where such development is related to the development of port or harbor, in which case actively 26 in Listing Notice 2 of 2014 applies'.

(c) In terms of section 41 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Act28 of 2002, the Minister of Minerals and Energy, before granting a mining or prospecting right, shall approve the environmental management plan or programmer. In terms of section 39 (4), financial provision for the rehabilitation or management of negative environmental impact has b be made by an applicant.

In addition, accosting to section 43 of Mineral Petroleum Resources Ad, Act 28 of 2002, the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy may not issue a mining closure certificate until the permit holder of a prospecting or mining right takes responsible measures to address pollution or ecological degradation, including rehabilitation thereof.

(2) Accosting B information generated from the Departmental National Web Based Environmental Screening Tool, the South African National Biodiversity institute’s wetland maps and the attached screening report, Portion 24 of the Farm Boschmanspoort 159 IS, in the Mpumalanga province, is located within a Critical Biodiversity Area (CBA), although the web based survey tool does not indicate the presence of a wetland. Attached please find the two maps and the screening report supporting the response provided.

Regards

 

MB BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FI8HERIE9

DATE:. .).I!.. ........ . "

25 October 2019 - NW1186

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Environment. Forestry and Fisheries

What progress has been made since her reply to question 33 on 04 July 2019 with reviewing the effectiveness of her Department's policies relating to the management of plastic waste?

Reply:

On 11 July 2019, as part of the Department's budget vote, I indicated that the management of waste, in particular single use plastic waste, Is a matter that also requires the most urgent and pressing attention.

The Plastic Bag Regulations and the plastic bag levy are two mechanisms Government has used to influence consumer behaviour and reduce littering. The Department is currently assessing single-use plastic products which include: plastic carrier bags, straws, earbuds, crockery and cutlery. The department will be conducting various stakeholder engagements in this regard.

In addition, the Department of Environmental Affairs Is in the final stages of completing a study on the review of the plastic carrier bag and flat bag policy Instruments in South Africa, with the aim of determining their effectiveness and to provide research evidence that may inform alternative policy instruments.

Strategic partnerships with relevant stakeholders are also important as plastic pollution is a global issue which cannot be solved by Government alone. As a result, I have signed a partnership agreement with the Commonwealth Clean Oceans Alliance. Under the alliance, the Department is working on the implementation of the Commonwealth Litter Programme (CUP) in South Africa through the roll-out of the Source to Sea programme. The programme will be piloted in Ethekwini by the end of this financial year (2019).

The Department, in partnership with Plastics SA and the Consumer Goods Council of South Africa, will be hosting The Plastic Colloquium from 21 to 22 November 2019 in the Gauteng Province. The colloquium is positioned around six key working groups which are already established and Include:

1) Product standards validation/authentication/definition/labelling.

2) Product design, development and innovation.

3) Integration of the informal waste economy.

4) Biodegradable and compostable plastics.

5) Infrastructure.

6) Consumer Education and Awareness.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE: 24/10/2019
 

25 October 2019 - NW1069

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August, Mr SN to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether, in view of the fact that the former Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries was unable to resolve the matter of the long-term fishing rights in the abalone commercial sector since 2016, her department has made any progress with regard to the Fishing Rights Allocation Process (FRAP 2020); if not, by what date does she expect the (a) FRAP 2020 to be completed and (b) abalone fishing allocations to be finalised In order for harvesting to commence; if so, (2) has the abalone fishing sector been included In the FRAP 2020; If not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) On 04 September 2019, Cabinet endorsed the recommendation to extend the timeframes for dealing with the fishing rights in 12 commercial fishing secto11 which ~ due to expire on 31 December 2020. The FRAP process will therefore be extended until 31 December 2021.

During this time, the Department will conduct Socio-Economic Impact Analysis studies on the General Policy on the Allocation of Commercial Fishing Rights as well as the 12 sector-specific polices. The Department will also appoint a number of service providers ~ manage and observe the Rights Allocation process; to develop and manage the database; to assist with adjudications, and to conduct forensic Investigations and audits on the information provided by the applicants. The Department will ensure that the awarding of all the tenders as well as the actual decision-making during the allocation process Is open to public scrutiny. The Department will also use the additional time to ensure that the decision making is supported by credible scientific and sock>«:onomic information on all the fishing sectors due for reallocation.

(1)(b) The abalone fishery Is currently operating under exemption. A further exemption will be granted for the 2019n020 fishing season in order to allow for the harvesting of this resource.

(2) The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries decided to postpone the allocation of fishing rights in order to allow the time to engage meaningfully with interested and affected parties, with the aim of developing a roadmap and turnaround strategy involving a range of local and International stakeholders for the future sustainable management of fishing. To this end, we will appoint a special task team with speclflc terms of reference to take the process forward.

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 24/10/2019

25 October 2019 - NW1163

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department incurred anyrelated to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, held in Pretoria on 25 May 2019 and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2010; if so, in each case, (i) what coats were incurred and (ii) for what reason?

Reply:

Answer to (a); (b)

The Department did not Incur any costs related to the (a) inauguration of the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa and (b) State of the Nation Address held in Cape Town on 20 June 2010;

(b){i) No costs incurred;

(ii) Not applicable as no costs were incurred.

 

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTEROF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:... ..)!..'... .

13 September 2019 - NW660

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

(a) When last did her department monitor the waste dumping sites at the (i) Macadamia Military Base, (ii) Louisville sewer plant, (iii) Tonga Hospital and (iv) Shongwe Hospital in Mpumalanga, (b) what were the results in each case and (c) on what date will her department do a follow-up monitoring on the sites; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of the monitoring reports?

Reply:

 

  1. Officials from the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) have not conducted any monitoring at the Macadamia Military Base, Louisville sewer plant, Tonga Hospital and Shongwe Hospital in the Mpumalanga Province. These sites are not regulated in terms of the Waste Act, 2008 and as such, no waste licenses were issued by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. No auditing has therefore been conducted at these sites because they are not classified as waste facilities in terms of the Waste Act, 2008.

Departmental officials have consulted with compliance and enforcement officials from the following departments: National Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation (DHSWS)’s regional office in Mpumalanga, National Department of Health and the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Agriculture, Rural Land and Environmental Affairs (MDARLEA) with a view to determine the status quo at these sites.

In accordance with the response received from DHSWS’ Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA), the four sites mentioned above are Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). These WWTW were monitored recently by the agency between the period March 2019 and June 2019. Monitoring reports are available from the IUCMA.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

13 September 2019 - NW738

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;

Reply:

environmental aFairs

Department: Environmental Affairs

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

(For written reply)

QUESTION NO.738 {NW1783E}

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 12 of 2019

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06 September 2019

Mr G K Y Cachalia (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries:

  1. Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;
  2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so,
    1. what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

738. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

REPLIES:

  1. The Department did not host any event and/or function related to the 2019 Budget Vote debate.
    1. The Department served refreshments like coffee, tea, soft beverages and light snacks at the Parliament Media Centre;
    2. The total cost incurred in serving these amounted to R71 000;
    1. The attendees at this event were members of the Portfolio Committee, officials of the Department, members of the public who attended the debate and members of the media.
  1. No gifts were distributed to any guests or attendees.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: !.I..(.it. 7J'3

05 September 2019 - NW457

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

Question : In view of the fact that no permit would be granted to a captive predator breeding facility unless it could demonstrate positive conservation value (details furnished), on what grounds has her department reissued permits for facilities that it found to be operating without permits; Question 2: What are the full relevant details of how positive conservation value is ascertained and determined? Question 3: With reference to the Non-Detrimental Finding of 2018 (details furnished), (a) why do the provincial authorities still issue licences for such facilities to continue operating and (b) what are the full relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(1) The Threatened or Protected Species (TOPS) Regulations, which have been promulgated in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004) (NEMBA) and commenced on 01 June 2007, compel the registration of captive breeding facilities involving listed TOPS. Listed species include predators, among others lion, leopard, cheetah, brown hyena, spotted hyena and African wild dog. Permits for the carrying out of restricted activities (such as keeping, breeding, selling, conveying, exporting from the Republic, etc.) by registered captive breeding facilities are issued in terms NEMBA.

The existing TOPS Regulations (2007) do not prohibit the breeding of the above-mentioned predator species in captivity. The only requirement in respect of the issuance of a registration certificate for any captive breeding facility, is that the certificate must be issued subject to a condition that the person to whom the registration certificate is granted to, must:
(a) prevent hybridisation and or inbreeding;
(b) keep a studbook, where appropriate; and
(c) provide information relating to paragraphs (a) and (b) to the issuing authority within three months after the end of each calendar year.

Substantial amendments, including amendments relating to captive breeding facilities, have been proposed to the TOPS Regulations. These proposed amendments have not yet been promulgated, but are in the final stages of approval, as the draft amended regulations have already been tabled with the National Council of Provinces for approval.

The new/ amended TOPS Regulations will still contain the compulsory requirement relating to the registration of captive breeding facilities, as well as the compulsory requirement relating to the prevention of inbreeding and the keeping of studbooks by registered captive breeding facilities.

However, the new/ amended TOPS Regulations will further require that:

(a) an issuing authority must refuse to issue a permit for the breeding in captivity of specimens of listed large predators (lion, leopard, cheetah, brown hyena, spotted hyena and African wild dog), black rhinoceros or white rhinoceros, unless the applicant can demonstrate how the breeding in captivity of such specimens will contribute to the conservation of the particular species; and (b) the issuing authority must issue a permit subject to a condition that no specimens of critically endangered species or listed large predators originating from wild populations, may be introduced into captive breeding facilities, except for conservation purposes

(2) The draft amended TOPS Regulations do not prescribe the nature of the contribution to the conservation of the species involved, as each individual applicant would have to motivate the conservation contribution to which the particular application relates, and each application together with its motivation would have to be considered and decided upon, on a case-by-case basis. This approach provides flexibility in decision-making by the relevant issuing authority and would prevent a situation where a permit would have to be refused if an appropriate contribution has not been provided for in the regulations.

(3) (a) Non-Detriment Findings (NDFs) are made by the Scientific Authority, which has been established in terms of section 60 of NEMBA by the Minister responsible for environmental management, and of which the members are appointed by the Minister in accordance with the TOPS Regulations. The purpose of a NDF is for the Scientific Authority to confirm whether or not an action would have a detrimental impact on the survival of a species in the wild.

Issuing authorities continue to issue permits for the breeding of lion in captivity, for the following reasons:

(i) The current TOPS Regulations do not provide any circumstances in which the breeding of listed predator species must be prohibited;

(ii) The NDF that was published in the Gazette on 23 January 2018 for commencement, and which relates to lion in particular, does not indicate that the breeding of lion in captivity is detrimental to the survival of lion in the wild in the current circumstances; and

(iii) In the current circumstances, the refusal of permits for the breeding of listed predator species does not meet the requirement of Section 57(2) of NEMBA, which provides that the Minister may prohibit the carrying out of a restricted activity which is of a nature that may negatively impact on the survival of a listed TOPS.

(b) Due to the fact that Members of the Executive Council responsible for the conservation of biodiversity in the respective provinces are the issuing authorities in terms of section 87 A of NEMBA for permits, as well as for the registration of breeding facilities in terms of the TOPS Regulations, the provincial conservation authorities are the holders of the full details of predator captive breeding facilities. In the absence of a national electronic permitting system, the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries does not have the full details of these facilities.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 03/09/2019

05 September 2019 - NW458

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) What is the (a) impact of the declaration of the Aliwal Shoal Marine Protected Area and (b) protection goal; (2) What is the impact of line fishing along the shore of the specified protected area; (3) Whether there is any portion within A and E that is restricted to line fishing; if so, why; (4) What regulations would be applicable in the designated area; (5) Is there any restriction on recreational off-shore fishermen launching their boats from within the marine protected area and returning with fish caught in the unprotected area?

Reply:

1 (a) The impact of the declaration is to provide much needed protection to habitats and species in the Marine Protected Areas. This does require limits being placed on certain activities and areas, which may have an impact on users, but which will also benefit users in the longer term. The MPA will be monitored to confirm whether the objectives are being reached .

1 (b) The purpose of declaring this marine protected area is:

• To contribute to a national, regional and global representative system of marine protected areas by conserving and protecting coastal and offshore benthic and pelagic ecosystems comprising of reef complex, deep reefs, and other ecosystems on the shelf and including threatened ecosystem types;

• to conserve and protect the biodiversity and ecological processes associated with these ecosystems, including protected, threatened or overexploited species such as tiger sharks, red steenbras, seventy four, geelbek and dusky kob and processes such as the sardine run;

• to facilitate species management and sustainable use of linefish, subtidal and intertidal resources by supporting fisheries recovery and enhanced species abundance in fished areas;

• to support the recovery of linefish and sharks by protecting spawning,

nursery, foraging, aggregation and refuge areas;

• to conserve and protect an area of life history importance for migratory species including seabirds, turtles, sharks, seabreams and other fish;

• to support sustainable nature-based tourism opportunities in the are through the protection of marine wildlife and maritime heritage;

• to protect and regulate a scenic area to support sustainable nature-based tourism, cultural and spiritual assets and a functionally connected coastal marine system to retain a land-ocean 'sense of place'; and

• to protect and provide an appropriate environment for research and monitoring particularly research on recovery of linefish, and also to promote and contribute to environmental education.

(2) A key impact of line-fishing from the shore is the removal of fish that are big and old enough to breed. This impact is greater for those fish species which are largely resident in an area and also where there are moderate or high numbers of fishers.

Lack of breeding fish rapidly leads to further declines in fish stocks and catches. Notake areas are the best proven tool to ensure that bigger fish can survive and breed in an area, leading to improved sustainability of catches outside the MPA (and within the controlled areas of the MPA). These no-take areas function more effectively when they are larger and therfore have a minimum size to be effective. The scientifically determined minimum size for a restricted zone in the region under consideration for linefish conservation is between 3-Skm coastline length.

(3) There are two inshore restricted (no-take) areas between points A and E (which mark the the northern and southern coastal boundaries of MPA respectively in the regulations). One is in the centre and one is in the south. The central area, named the Green Point Inshore Restricted Area, extends from the rocky point just north of the Mahlongwana Estuary to the white beacon on the Green Point Rocks.

The southern area, named the Rocky Point Inshore Restricted Area, extends from the white beacon at start of the rocky point at the southern end of the Rocky Bay Caravan Park to the north bank of the Mzimayi Estuary. These areas will protect vulnerable and over-exploited species of linefish, subtidal and intertidal resources and thus support fisheries recovery and enhanced species abundance in fished areas.

(4) The regulations applicable in the inshore restricted (no-take) areas are that collection of marine resources is not allowed. Specifically Regulation 7 (1) states No person may fish, or attempt to fish, in any Restricted Zone, including spearfishing and fishing for invertebrates or collecting or harvesting of intertidal organisms including any bait species. Further regulations give effect to this by restricting fishing gear and possession of fish in these areas.

(5) Yes. Off-shore fishermen launching their boats from within the marine protected area may only be in possession of or have on board a vessel the species listed in Annexure 2 to the regulations. They may not return to the MPA with any fish, except for the species listed in Annexure 2 to the regulations, even if these fish were caught outside the protected area.

 

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 03/09/2019

05 September 2019 - NW480

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) What is the square meterage and grade of office space for her department's Environment House in Pretoria; (2) What (a) number of office spaces does her department have in the Republic, (b) is the square meterage and grade in each case and (c) amount is paid for office rental in each case?

Reply:

1) 27 422 m2 and SAPOA Grade A

(2) (a) The Department has 24 (twenty four) office spaces in the Republic.

Find here: (b) & (c). Table

05 September 2019 - NW443

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Which beaches lost their blue flag status in (a) 2016, (b) 2017 and (c) 2018; And (2) whether any measures are in place to restore the blue flag status of the specified beaches; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The following beaches lost their Blue Flag status:
(a) 2016: Struisbaai Beach (Agulhas Municipality).

(b) 2017: Gouritsmond Beach (Hessequa Municipality); Santos Beach (Mossel Bay Municipality); Wilderness Beach (Garden Route District Municipality); Kleinemonde Beach (Ndlambe Municipality).
(c) 2018: No Blue Flag beaches lost their status in 2018.

(2) (a) 2016: Struisbaai Beach - The municipality opted not to apply in 2016 in order to carry out infrastructure upgrades at the site. Struisbaai became a Blue Flag beach again in 2017.
(b) 2017:
• Gouritsmond Beach - The municipality lost the Blue Flag status due to failed water quality. Gouritsmond became a Blue Flag beach again in 2018.

• Santos Beach - The municipality lost the Blue Flag status due to failed water quality. Santos Beach became a Blue Flag beach again in 2018.
• Wilderness Beach - The municipality did not apply to the programme in 2017 for unknown reasons. Wilderness Beach have submitted an application for Blue Flag status in 2019/20.
• Kleinemonde Beach - The municipality did not apply to the programme in 2017 due to budgetary constraints. Kleinemonde Beach has, since then, not returned to the programme.

 

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 01/09/2019

12 August 2019 - NW344

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether, In respect of the Republic's listed terrestrial ecosystems, she can advise as to the delay regarding her department's publication of (a) estuarine, (b) freshwater and (c) marine ecosystems that are (i) threatened or (ii) protected; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (Act 10 of 2004) provides for the listing of threatened or protected ecosystems. Listings will be conducted for terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystems.


In December 2011, the national list of terrestrial ecosystems that were threatened and in need of protection was published in the Government Gazette. The assessment methodology for estuarine , freshwater and marine ecosystems had not been sufficiently robust to provide the basis for the listing of estuarine and freshwater ecosystems.

The National Biodiversity Assessment (2018) due to be released In September 2019, will provide a better basis for listing estuarine, freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Regards

MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW413

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Lorimer, Ms K to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) What number of (a) persons were arrested for rhino poaching in each month since 1 January 2018 In the (I) Kruger National Park, (ii) Pilanesberg National Park and (ill) any other national park, (b) the specified persons were employed by the SA National Parks and (c) successful convictions were achieved; (2) what number of (a) white and (b) black rhinos were poached in each of the specified parks In ea~ month since 1 April 2018; (3) whether her department has put a plan In place to ensure the survival of rhino in the Republic;. If so, what are the relevant details? NW1385E

Reply:

(1) (a) Number of persons arrested for rhino poaching from 1 January 2018 to 31July 2019 in:

(i) Kruger National Park: 366 (three hundred and sixty six)

(II) Pilanesberg: 7 (seven)

(iii) any other national park: Mokala National Park, 3.(three)

(b) 15 (fifteen) of the specified persons were employed by SA National Parks

(c) Information on convictions should be sourced from the South African Police Service or National Prosecuting Authority.

 

(2) Number of:

(a) White rhino poached from 1April2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 472 (four hundred and seventy two)

Mokala National Park: 1 (one)

Marakele National Park: 2 (two)

Pilanesberg: 28 (twenty eight)

(b) Black rhino poached from 1Aprll2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 32 (thirty two)
Pilanesberg: 3 (three)


(3) Due to the persistent threat posed by rhino poaching, South Africa developed and Is implementing a holistic, Integrated and multidimensional response, involving various government departments, including the Department of Environmental Affairs, SANParks, the provincial conservation and environmental departments and agencies. the South African Police Service (SAPS). the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI), Customs Division of the South African Revenue Service, the South African National Defence Force, the National Prosecuting Authority, the State Security Agency and other stakeholders such as the private rhino owners, the hunting industry and non-governmental organisations. The Implementation of the 2014

Integrated Management Plan combines the use of technology. extensive antipoaching work as well as the management of the rhino population. This approach also involves extensive international collaboration across our borders to ensure that rhino poachers are brought to book. This approach has seen a moderate decline of 91 (ninety one) Incidents from the same period last year.

Regards


MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW410

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) (a) What number of (i) lions are currently kept in predator-breeding farms across the Republic and (ii) farms or facilities across the Republic are involved In the breeding of predators and (b) what systems are In place to audit the captive lion breeding Industry in each province; (2) what Is the reason that the specified Industry has been allowed to continue when it is commonly accepted that the Industry has no conservation value and Is detrimental to the Republic's conservation record (details furnished); and (3) why has her Department not adhered to the strong recommendations and resolutions put forward by the parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs in November 2018, which called for an end to the captive lion-breeding Industry in the Republic?

Reply:

(1) (a) In terms of section 87A of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004) (NEMBA), the Members of the Executive Council (MECs) of the provinces who are responsible for the conservation of biodiversity are the issuing authorities for permits In respect of listed threatened or protected species, which, In this case, Includes the registration of captive lion breeding facilities. The following information is applicable, as reported by provincial issuing authorities in December 2017:

(i) There are approximately 7 979 lions in captivity in South Africa.
(ii) There are 366 captive facilities that are registered in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004):
Threatened or Protected Species Regulations, 2007.

The figures provided in (i) and (ii) are an Indication of all lions In captive facilities, which could be purely captive breeding facilities; or captive facilities that operate as a combination of captive breeding facilities and commercial exhibition facilities (zoos); or captive keeping facilities/zoos that do not specifically engage in breeding.

(b) A permit is required, in terms of NEMBA, to carry out any restricted activity involving a listed threatened or protected species. Since lions are currently listed as a vulnerable species in terms of sectio~ 56(1) of NEMBA, the permit requirements of NEMBA apply to all specimens of African lion, whether those specimens are In the wild or In a captive environment. Further, the Threatened or Protected Species (TOPS) Regulations, promulgated in terms of NEMBA in 2007, require that any captive breeding operation must be registered.

Officials from the provincial conservation authorities who have been appointed as Environmental Management Inspectors (EMls) in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107of1998), are responsible for monitoring compliance with the provisions of NEMBA, as well as conditions of permits issued in terms of NEMBA and registrations Issued in terms of the TOPS Regulations. These EMls are also responsible for taking enforcement action in the case of non-compliance with NEMBA and the TOPS Regulations.

(2) A non-detrimental finding (NDF) made by a Scientific Authority, in respect of African lion and in terms of section 61(1)(d) of the National Environmental Management:

Biodiversity Act, 2004 (copy attached for ease of reference), indicates that there are currently no major threats to the wild and managed lion population of South Africa, whereas minor threats include over-utilisation, disease, poaching and conflict with communities around protected areas. The NDF further states that trophy hunting of captive-bred lions poses no threat to the wild population within South Africa, and .,it is thought that captive lions may in fact serve as a buffer to potential threats to wild lions by being the primary source for hunting trophies and derived products (such as bone).". The NDF was published in the Gazette, No. 41393. on 23 January 2018.

(3) The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries takes the resolutions and recommendations -of the Portfolio Committee (PC) on Environmental Affairs seriously. It is for this reason that the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries Is finalising the appointment of a High-Level Panel to review the policies, legislation and practices In respect of the handling, management, breeding, hunting and trade involving, among others, lion.

Regards

MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW411

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries:

(1) What are the details of the process followed by her Department to assess experimental fisheries; (2) what has she found to be the reasons why (a) smooth-hound and (b) soupfin sharks are still the main target species for the shark-fishing industry, even though her Department determined that these species' populations were endangered; and (3) what (a) number of (i) vessels and (II) fishers are working In the shark-fishing Industry, (b)(i) number of the specified vessels carried observers with them while fishing shark since 01 January 2016 and (ii) was the number of observers on each vessel on each trip, and (c) are the reasons for permitting any shark-fishing trips without observers being onboard the vessel?

Reply:

1. The Department has a Polley on 'The Establishment and Management of New Fisheries In South Africa' that is implemented by the New Fisheries Scientific Working Group, comprising of relevant experts to guide the establishment of new fisheries in a structured manner. The Policy outlines the operational protocol for the development of new fisheries in South Africa. The Protocol consists of three phases, Phase O: Information gatherlng1 Phase1 :  Implementation of the experimental fishery and Phase 2: Commercial fishery.
Each phase comprises of steps that need to be undertaken before a fishery can be classified fully as commercial and rights are allocated.Smoothhound and soupfin sharks are the main target of the demersal shark longline fishery as they were the most abundant demersal sharks, and markets for these were established.

The preliminary (2017) stock assessments Indicated that the soupfin and smooth-hound sharks are subject to overfishing. The Department is In the process of putting In place slot limits relating to length across a number of fishing sectors. This has been assessed as the most appropriate measure to return catches to sustainable levels.

The Department is In the process of conducting the SEIAS (Socio-Economic Impact Assessment Study) In order to tum this proposal into regulation in the commercial linefishery, the sector which is responsible for the majority of catches of these resources. Similar measure will be considered in the demersal shark longline fishery later In 2019.

2. There are:

(a) (i) 6 vessels operating in the sector.

(ii) Approximately 250 employees.

(b) (i) No shark long-line vessels have carried observers since 01 January 2016.

(ii) It Is not mandatory for the vessels In the Demersal Shark Long-line Fishery to carry observers on board. However, provision is made In the Permit Conditions for the Department to deploy observers In the event that unusual landings or fishing practices are detected.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 12/08/2019