Questions and Replies

Filter by year

13 September 2019 - NW660

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

(a) When last did her department monitor the waste dumping sites at the (i) Macadamia Military Base, (ii) Louisville sewer plant, (iii) Tonga Hospital and (iv) Shongwe Hospital in Mpumalanga, (b) what were the results in each case and (c) on what date will her department do a follow-up monitoring on the sites; (2) Whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with copies of the monitoring reports?

Reply:

 

  1. Officials from the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (DEFF) have not conducted any monitoring at the Macadamia Military Base, Louisville sewer plant, Tonga Hospital and Shongwe Hospital in the Mpumalanga Province. These sites are not regulated in terms of the Waste Act, 2008 and as such, no waste licenses were issued by the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries. No auditing has therefore been conducted at these sites because they are not classified as waste facilities in terms of the Waste Act, 2008.

Departmental officials have consulted with compliance and enforcement officials from the following departments: National Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation (DHSWS)’s regional office in Mpumalanga, National Department of Health and the Mpumalanga Provincial Department of Agriculture, Rural Land and Environmental Affairs (MDARLEA) with a view to determine the status quo at these sites.

In accordance with the response received from DHSWS’ Inkomati-Usuthu Catchment Management Agency (IUCMA), the four sites mentioned above are Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW). These WWTW were monitored recently by the agency between the period March 2019 and June 2019. Monitoring reports are available from the IUCMA.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

13 September 2019 - NW738

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;

Reply:

environmental aFairs

Department: Environmental Affairs

REPUBLIC OF SOUTH AFRICA

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

(For written reply)

QUESTION NO.738 {NW1783E}

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 12 of 2019

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 06 September 2019

Mr G K Y Cachalia (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental, Forestry and Fisheries:

  1. Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest;
  2. Whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so,
    1. what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

738. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

REPLIES:

  1. The Department did not host any event and/or function related to the 2019 Budget Vote debate.
    1. The Department served refreshments like coffee, tea, soft beverages and light snacks at the Parliament Media Centre;
    2. The total cost incurred in serving these amounted to R71 000;
    1. The attendees at this event were members of the Portfolio Committee, officials of the Department, members of the public who attended the debate and members of the media.
  1. No gifts were distributed to any guests or attendees.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: !.I..(.it. 7J'3

12 August 2019 - NW410

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) (a) What number of (i) lions are currently kept in predator-breeding farms across the Republic and (ii) farms or facilities across the Republic are involved In the breeding of predators and (b) what systems are In place to audit the captive lion breeding Industry in each province; (2) what Is the reason that the specified Industry has been allowed to continue when it is commonly accepted that the Industry has no conservation value and Is detrimental to the Republic's conservation record (details furnished); and (3) why has her Department not adhered to the strong recommendations and resolutions put forward by the parliamentary Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs in November 2018, which called for an end to the captive lion-breeding Industry in the Republic?

Reply:

(1) (a) In terms of section 87A of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004) (NEMBA), the Members of the Executive Council (MECs) of the provinces who are responsible for the conservation of biodiversity are the issuing authorities for permits In respect of listed threatened or protected species, which, In this case, Includes the registration of captive lion breeding facilities. The following information is applicable, as reported by provincial issuing authorities in December 2017:

(i) There are approximately 7 979 lions in captivity in South Africa.
(ii) There are 366 captive facilities that are registered in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004):
Threatened or Protected Species Regulations, 2007.

The figures provided in (i) and (ii) are an Indication of all lions In captive facilities, which could be purely captive breeding facilities; or captive facilities that operate as a combination of captive breeding facilities and commercial exhibition facilities (zoos); or captive keeping facilities/zoos that do not specifically engage in breeding.

(b) A permit is required, in terms of NEMBA, to carry out any restricted activity involving a listed threatened or protected species. Since lions are currently listed as a vulnerable species in terms of sectio~ 56(1) of NEMBA, the permit requirements of NEMBA apply to all specimens of African lion, whether those specimens are In the wild or In a captive environment. Further, the Threatened or Protected Species (TOPS) Regulations, promulgated in terms of NEMBA in 2007, require that any captive breeding operation must be registered.

Officials from the provincial conservation authorities who have been appointed as Environmental Management Inspectors (EMls) in terms of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107of1998), are responsible for monitoring compliance with the provisions of NEMBA, as well as conditions of permits issued in terms of NEMBA and registrations Issued in terms of the TOPS Regulations. These EMls are also responsible for taking enforcement action in the case of non-compliance with NEMBA and the TOPS Regulations.

(2) A non-detrimental finding (NDF) made by a Scientific Authority, in respect of African lion and in terms of section 61(1)(d) of the National Environmental Management:

Biodiversity Act, 2004 (copy attached for ease of reference), indicates that there are currently no major threats to the wild and managed lion population of South Africa, whereas minor threats include over-utilisation, disease, poaching and conflict with communities around protected areas. The NDF further states that trophy hunting of captive-bred lions poses no threat to the wild population within South Africa, and .,it is thought that captive lions may in fact serve as a buffer to potential threats to wild lions by being the primary source for hunting trophies and derived products (such as bone).". The NDF was published in the Gazette, No. 41393. on 23 January 2018.

(3) The Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries takes the resolutions and recommendations -of the Portfolio Committee (PC) on Environmental Affairs seriously. It is for this reason that the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries Is finalising the appointment of a High-Level Panel to review the policies, legislation and practices In respect of the handling, management, breeding, hunting and trade involving, among others, lion.

Regards

MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW357

Profile picture: Bagraim, Mr M

Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What (a) number of official international trips is (I) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake In the 2019-2022 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (Iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (I) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a) Travel is confined to meetings, which are required in terms of the International Protocols of Agreement to which South Africa is a signatory. Therefore, It is not feasible to provide the detailed Information on official international trips for the 2019--2022 medium-term expenditure framework.

(i) The Minister is planning to undertake four official international trips while;
(ii) the Deputy Minister is planning to undertake five official trips for the period from 01 August to 31 December 2019.

Please find here: (b) (i), II), Iii), and (iv) The detailed information on the destination, date, purpose, number of officials in the delegation for the Minister and Deputy Minister Is listed in the table below.

12 August 2019 - NW344

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether, In respect of the Republic's listed terrestrial ecosystems, she can advise as to the delay regarding her department's publication of (a) estuarine, (b) freshwater and (c) marine ecosystems that are (i) threatened or (ii) protected; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

The National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act (Act 10 of 2004) provides for the listing of threatened or protected ecosystems. Listings will be conducted for terrestrial, freshwater, estuarine and marine ecosystems.


In December 2011, the national list of terrestrial ecosystems that were threatened and in need of protection was published in the Government Gazette. The assessment methodology for estuarine , freshwater and marine ecosystems had not been sufficiently robust to provide the basis for the listing of estuarine and freshwater ecosystems.

The National Biodiversity Assessment (2018) due to be released In September 2019, will provide a better basis for listing estuarine, freshwater and marine ecosystems.

Regards

MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

12 August 2019 - NW412

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether she has found that long-line shark-fishers operated In marine reserves in the past five years without being stopped by her Department in collaboration with other relevant authorities; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, what (a) are the full relevant details and (b) steps does she intend to take in this regard; (2) what number of (a) white sharks, (b) smooth sharks and (c) any other threatened, endangered and/or protected shark species have been reported (i) caught and (ii) landed by the experimental long-line shark-fishing operators since 01 January 2016; (3) whether she has found any discrepancies in the reporting of the caught shark numbers; if so, what are the relevant details; and (4) what are the details of the future of the long-line shark-fishing Industry?

Reply:

1. Yes.

(a) The Department Intercepted a vessel that was suspected of having illegally operated in the De Hoop Marine Protected Area. The skipper of the vessel was subsequenlty arrested and the catch was confiscated. A criminal case was subsequenlty opened In May 2019 at the Humewood Police Station, Port Elizabeth. The criminal case referred to above involved a vessel that was operating with a Demersal Shark Long-line Catch Permit. The apprehension was collaborative work conducted with other relevant State Security Agencies involving the South African Police Service as well as the National Prosecuting Authority. This case is currently before the courts for prosecution.

(b) While the investigation and criminal proceedings are underway, the Department is In the process of initiating proceedings under Section 28 of the Marine Living Resources Act, 1998 (Act. No. 18of1998).

2. The Demersal Shark Long-line fishery is not an experimental fishery, but a full commercial fishery that has been regulated separately, and rights have been allocated since 2006.

(a) The numbers of White sharks (i) caught in the demersal shark longline fishery since 2016 was (2) two. The number (ii) landed was (1) one. The first shark caught was released alive, and the most recently caught White Shark In May 2019 has been retained by the Department and will be used as training material in future CITES Appendix II identification Workshops.

(b) The numbers of smoothhound sharks (I) caught and (ii) landed by the demersal longline shark fishery were 17 558 in 2016, 18 298 in 2017, 30112 in 2018 and 11 796 in 2019.

(c) The numbers of other shark species, including threatened, endangered and/or protected shark species (i) O threatened, endangered and/or protected

Find here: (II) other shark species caught and landed by the demersal shark longing fishery were as follows:
 

12 August 2019 - NW411

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries:

(1) What are the details of the process followed by her Department to assess experimental fisheries; (2) what has she found to be the reasons why (a) smooth-hound and (b) soupfin sharks are still the main target species for the shark-fishing industry, even though her Department determined that these species' populations were endangered; and (3) what (a) number of (i) vessels and (II) fishers are working In the shark-fishing Industry, (b)(i) number of the specified vessels carried observers with them while fishing shark since 01 January 2016 and (ii) was the number of observers on each vessel on each trip, and (c) are the reasons for permitting any shark-fishing trips without observers being onboard the vessel?

Reply:

1. The Department has a Polley on 'The Establishment and Management of New Fisheries In South Africa' that is implemented by the New Fisheries Scientific Working Group, comprising of relevant experts to guide the establishment of new fisheries in a structured manner. The Policy outlines the operational protocol for the development of new fisheries in South Africa. The Protocol consists of three phases, Phase O: Information gatherlng1 Phase1 :  Implementation of the experimental fishery and Phase 2: Commercial fishery.
Each phase comprises of steps that need to be undertaken before a fishery can be classified fully as commercial and rights are allocated.Smoothhound and soupfin sharks are the main target of the demersal shark longline fishery as they were the most abundant demersal sharks, and markets for these were established.

The preliminary (2017) stock assessments Indicated that the soupfin and smooth-hound sharks are subject to overfishing. The Department is In the process of putting In place slot limits relating to length across a number of fishing sectors. This has been assessed as the most appropriate measure to return catches to sustainable levels.

The Department is In the process of conducting the SEIAS (Socio-Economic Impact Assessment Study) In order to tum this proposal into regulation in the commercial linefishery, the sector which is responsible for the majority of catches of these resources. Similar measure will be considered in the demersal shark longline fishery later In 2019.

2. There are:

(a) (i) 6 vessels operating in the sector.

(ii) Approximately 250 employees.

(b) (i) No shark long-line vessels have carried observers since 01 January 2016.

(ii) It Is not mandatory for the vessels In the Demersal Shark Long-line Fishery to carry observers on board. However, provision is made In the Permit Conditions for the Department to deploy observers In the event that unusual landings or fishing practices are detected.

Regards

MS BD CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 12/08/2019

12 August 2019 - NW413

Profile picture: Lorimer, Ms K

Lorimer, Ms K to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) What number of (a) persons were arrested for rhino poaching in each month since 1 January 2018 In the (I) Kruger National Park, (ii) Pilanesberg National Park and (ill) any other national park, (b) the specified persons were employed by the SA National Parks and (c) successful convictions were achieved; (2) what number of (a) white and (b) black rhinos were poached in each of the specified parks In ea~ month since 1 April 2018; (3) whether her department has put a plan In place to ensure the survival of rhino in the Republic;. If so, what are the relevant details? NW1385E

Reply:

(1) (a) Number of persons arrested for rhino poaching from 1 January 2018 to 31July 2019 in:

(i) Kruger National Park: 366 (three hundred and sixty six)

(II) Pilanesberg: 7 (seven)

(iii) any other national park: Mokala National Park, 3.(three)

(b) 15 (fifteen) of the specified persons were employed by SA National Parks

(c) Information on convictions should be sourced from the South African Police Service or National Prosecuting Authority.

 

(2) Number of:

(a) White rhino poached from 1April2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 472 (four hundred and seventy two)

Mokala National Park: 1 (one)

Marakele National Park: 2 (two)

Pilanesberg: 28 (twenty eight)

(b) Black rhino poached from 1Aprll2018 to 31 July 2019:

Kruger National Park: 32 (thirty two)
Pilanesberg: 3 (three)


(3) Due to the persistent threat posed by rhino poaching, South Africa developed and Is implementing a holistic, Integrated and multidimensional response, involving various government departments, including the Department of Environmental Affairs, SANParks, the provincial conservation and environmental departments and agencies. the South African Police Service (SAPS). the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigations (DPCI), Customs Division of the South African Revenue Service, the South African National Defence Force, the National Prosecuting Authority, the State Security Agency and other stakeholders such as the private rhino owners, the hunting industry and non-governmental organisations. The Implementation of the 2014

Integrated Management Plan combines the use of technology. extensive antipoaching work as well as the management of the rhino population. This approach also involves extensive international collaboration across our borders to ensure that rhino poachers are brought to book. This approach has seen a moderate decline of 91 (ninety one) Incidents from the same period last year.

Regards


MS BD CREECY. MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES
DATE; 2019/08/12

05 August 2019 - NW312

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether her department has set a deadline to remove the gear used for octopus fishing after imposing a temporary ban in False Bay; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) Whether all live fish and other animals caught in the gear will be released; (3) Whether her department has a map of where all the gear was placed in order to ensure that all traps are removed; if not, how will her department ensure that all the traps are removed in order to combat the illegal fishing of octopus in False Bay?

Reply:

(1) The Permit Holders were instructed on 28 June 2019 to remove all octopus fishing gear with immediate effect. The process of removal of the entire octopus fishing gear in the False Bay area was completed on 11 July 2019.

(2) Permit Holders were allowed to retain all their catch.

(3) The Department has all the GPS coordinates where all the octopus gear was deployed. The Department also works with the South African Navy Hydrographic Office (SANHO) to ensure that all the areas where their octopus gear is deployed, are recorded on the Navigational Chats in support of safe navigation. All the 46 lines and 987 pots that were deployed, have been removed and the removal was monitored by the Fisheries Compliance Officers at the Kalk Bay Fishing Harbour.

 

Regards

MS BARBARA CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 02/08/2019

02 August 2019 - NW313

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1)(a) On what scientific data did her department rely when setting its quotas for octopus fishing in South African waters; (b) on what date was the scientific data collected; and (c) who collected the data (2) Whether her department appointed any independent observers to attest to the accuracy and veracity of the scientific data; if not, (a) why not and (b) what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The purpose of the exploratory fishery is to gain scientific knowledge regarding octopus harvesting in various areas in terms of catch, effort, as well as seasonal trends and gear efficiency.

(a) The purpose of the exploratory fishery is to gain scientific knowledge regarding octopus harvesting in various areas in terms of catch, effort, as well as seasonal trends and gear efficiency.No quota has been set for octopus fishing in South African waters. The octopus fishery is managed by effort (number of pots).

Effort for this fishery was determined and set below the sustainable levels based on data collected through a desktop study prior to the establishment of the exploratory phase of the fishery.

(b) The desktop studies were conducted in 2003 and 2004 prior to the first phase of the experimental fishery and were further inferred by a PhD thesis titled: A Development and Management Framework for a New Octopus Vulgaris Fishery in South Africa, which was published by Ané Oosthuizen of Rhodes University. The study focussed on the first phase of the theoretical framework and protocol and was implemented by using a proposed octopus pot fishery in South Africa as a case study.

This was followed by a scientific paper in 2004 titled Economic Feasibility of an Experimental Octopus Fishery in South Africa which was published in the South African Journal of Science 100(11). The Study generated baseline information necessary in the design of the experimental fishery, giving guidelines as to which vessels, fishing gear and markets would be most feasible. The proposed fishery, gear and vessel type, fishing techniques and expected catch rates were described, the results of market research were also outlined, as well as the estimated cost of fishing.

(c) The data was collected by Departmental officials.

(2) No. The infromation was considered was information that was available in the reports and published works from a variety of sources. With regard to the long-term future of whether or not the Department plans to set up a permanent octopus fishery, we have instructed our marine scientists to urgently review all existing scientific data to inform the way forward with regard to this fishery. This process must be complete within this financial year.

 

Regards

MS BARBARA CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 02/08/2019

02 August 2019 - NW272

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) job description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a)

 

2019/20

 

Compensation

Operational

Total

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

Ministry Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

23 595

14 687

38 282

Minister

2 500

3 712

6 212

Ministerial Support

21 095

10 975

32 070

 

 

 

 

(b) i) ii) iii) iv) v)

 

NAME OF OFFICIAL

LEVEL

SALARY

POST NAME & JOB DESCRIPTION (Purpose)

QUALIFICATIONS

1.

Feroze Shaik

L14

R1 327 974 pa

Chief of Staff:

To manage the office of and render a support service to the executive authority (EA).

B. Hon. Degree: Public Administration

2.

Mamonkwe Sipilica

L12

R922 335 pa

Private Secretary:

Provide assistance with secretarial services and support the EA with private obligations.

National Certificate:

Public Administration

National Diploma: Human Resource Management (Currently studying)

3.

Bongani Ngquba

L10

R646 193 pa

Stakeholder Relations Officer:

Provide assistance to the EA with community outreach and stakeholder relations management

National Diploma:

Productivity

4.

Liesel Jacobs

L9

R532 814 pa

Assistant Appointments Secretary:

Provide secretarial support to the EA

National Diploma:

Business Management

5.

Buchule Mbuli

L7

R443 929 pa

Secretary / Receptionist:

Provide secretarial support and Reception services to the EA.

B tech:

Public Management

6.

Gift Mnguni

L11

R863 748 pa

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer:

To manage and coordinate matters

emanating from Parliament/ Cabinet / other legislative structures and community outreach

Certificate in Public Management

B. Degree:

Public Management

(Currently Studying)

7.

Sylvester Pandelani

L8

R528 654 pa

Registry Clerk:

Provide registry support services in the

office of the EA

Matric

Nat Diploma:

Public Management and Administration

(Currently Studying)

8.

Clifford Seanego

L6

R373 987 pa

Driver Messenger:

Provide messenger and driver services in the office of the EA

Matric

Certificate: Computer Literacy

9.

Nicholas Leontsinis

L11

R733 257pa

Media Content Manager:

To manage and coordinate the development of content for speeches/ inputs of the EA

Masters Degree: African Studies

BA Hon Degree

 

Regards

 

MS BARBARA CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 02/08/2019

 

02 August 2019 - NW298

Profile picture: Whitfield, Mr AG

Whitfield, Mr AG to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What are the legislative requirements concerning the operational aspects of the offshore bunkering operation in Algoa Bay; and (b) what number of (i) litres of oil have been spilled since the specified operation commenced, (ii) ships have docked alongside the bunkering ship since the specified operation commenced, and (iii) people are directly employed as a result of this bunkering operation?

Reply:

a) Offshore oil bunkering operations are authorised through the South African Maritime Safety Authority (SAMSA). Application requirements and procedures are outlined in SAMSA’s Marine Notice No. 4 of 2016, which also identifies Section 21 of the South African Marine Pollution (Control and Civil Liability) Act, 1981 (Act No. 6 of 1981) as the main piece of legislation authorising this activity. There is currently no gazetted regulation or authorisation process in place for this activity (and there is no process in place for public participation/consultation with interested and affected parties prior to authorisation.)  

If an incident impacting on the environment were to occur, as a result of the bunker operations, the responsible parties are required to submit reports to the Department as per Section 30 of the National Environmental Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998).

b) (i) The Department is aware of two (2) oil spill incidents related to offshore bunkering in Algoa Bay. The first incident took place on 14 August 2016 wherein approximately 100 liters of oil was spilled. The second incident occurred on 6 July 2019 and, reportedly, 200 liters of oil was spilled. This latest incident is still under investigation by SAMSA, after which a confirmed volume of oil spilled will be reported. Further information can be obtained from SAMSA.

(ii) and (iii) SAMSA and Transnet National Ports Authority for the Port of Ngqura are the authorities who jointly authorise and monitor the bunkering activities in Algoa Bay, and will therefore be able to provide this information.

 

Regards

MS BARBARA CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 02/08/2019

02 August 2019 - NW314

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether she will consider introducing a ban, as she did in False Bay, on octopus fishing in Mossel Bay, in order to prevent any further deaths of whales; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

At this stage we are not considering a further ban. Our marine scientists are currently in discussion with licence holders on mitigation measures that can be introduced in all licensed areas. These options still require testing. If however entanglements are reported the situation will be re-evaluated. In line with the Permit conditions of Octopus Exploratory Fishing, if there are entanglements of cetaceans, operators are required to suspend their fishing operations.

 

Regards

MS BARBARA CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE: 02/08/2019

26 July 2019 - NW214

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What (a) is the total number of employees in his department who are being paid whilst they are on suspension and (b) is the total cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

(A)

Department

Fisheries

Forestry

None

None

None

(B)

Department

Fisheries

Forestry

None

None

None

 

 

Regards

Ms. Barbara Creecy

Minister - Environment, Forestry & Fisheries Date : . . . . .

26 July 2019 - NW213

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What is the total number of vacancies in (i) her department and (ii) each of the provincial departments reporting to her; and (b) by what date will the vacancies be filled?

Reply:

Due to the cost containment measures and after reaching a ceiling for compensation of employees, the Department of Environment embarked on a process to reprioritise positions and realignment of the organisational structure to enhance efficiency and eliminate duplication. The process has subsequently been concluded. The concurrence letter on realignment of the structure was issued by MPSA on 10 May 2019.

The department has commenced with the process of filling the vacancies within a year in line with the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and will continue to reduce the vacancy rate to a target of 8% by the end of the current financial year in line with the Annual Performance Plan.

(a) Department of Environment

  1. 211 vacancies
  2. None. There are no provincial departments reporting to me.

Branch: Fisheries

  1. 157 vacancies
  2. The Branch: Fisheries Management does not have provincial branches.

Branch: Forestry

  1. 13 vacant positions as of 01 July 2019.
  2. The Forestry Branch in the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries has vacant positions in the following Provinces:

Province

Number of vacancies

Forestry Management: Eastern Cape

292

Forestry Management: KwaZulu-Natal

61

Forestry Management: Mpumalanga and Limpopo

117

Forestry Management: Other Regions (Free State,

Gauteng, Northern Cape, North West & Western Cape)

19

Woodlands and Indigenous Forest Management

(Eastern Cape, KwaZulu-Natal and Limpopo and Mpumalanga)

84

Total in Provinces

573

(b) Department of Environment

The department fills in vacancies on a continuous basis in line with the Public Service Regulations, 2016.

 

Branch: Fisheries & Forestry

The National Macro Organisation of Government process is still underway, which will guide whether all these posts are required and whether there is budget to fill them.

 

 

Regards

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

26 July 2019 - NW215

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What is the total (a) number of government employees in her department who are being paid whilst on undue and/or extended periods of sick leave and (b) cost to the Government in each case?

Reply:

Department

a) No employees are on undue sick leave. Five employees are on approved incapacity leave due to injuries or illness.

b) The total cost to the department is as follows:

Employee

Period of absence

Cost

1

November 2018 to July 2019

R342 214.98

2

September 2018 to July

2019

R814 071.95

3

February to July 2019

R154 125.00

4

February to July 2019

R240933.60

5

February to July 2019

R138 725.82

Total

 

R1690 071.35

Branch: Fisheries

a) None.

b) None.

 

Branch: Forestry

(a) There are three officials in the Eastern Cape and one in Limpopo who applied for extended sick leave/temporary incapacity leave and receiving payment.

(c) Of cials who applied for extended sick leave are paid as follows:

No.

Province

Type of leave

Amount

1.

Limpopo and Mpumalanga (from

November 2017 to date)

Temporary Incapacity

leave

R136 065.00

2.

Eastern Cape (from December 2018 to

date)

Extended sick leave

R217 850.55

3.

Eastern Cape (from December 2018 to

date)

Extended sick leave

R238 756.75

4.

Eastern Cape (from June 2018 to date)

Extended sick leave

R196 330.59

Total:

   

R789 002.89

Regards

IIIS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

19 July 2019 - NW169

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether her department appealed the Western Cape High Court ruling against fishing quotas for West Coast Rock Lobster (WCRL); if so, what a‹e the details of procedure in this case; if not, (2) Whether the court action will go ahead; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) Whether, in light of the ruling, she has found that the total allowable catch figures are for WCRL quotas ears improperly set; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) On what scientific data did her department reply when it set the total allowable catch levels for WCRL (5) What steps has her department taken to stop the decline in the WCRL number to prevent it from becoming extinct?

Reply:

  1. Yes. However the department subsequently withdew the appeal application on 10
  2. The court action will not proceed as the department has withdrawn the appeal lodged against the ruling.

  3. I am guided in this matter by the court judgement wherein the judge bund, intar alia that: '..the 2017/18 TAC detorninaton of termination of 1924.08 tons waa unlawful....". The judge saw, among other things, the fact that the decision-maker failed b have egaxl B mandatory objectives and principles concerning the need for lobster to be potected from over-exploitation and for the exploitation of lobster to be ecologically sustainable. However, the judge stopped short of instructing the Department to reduce the TAC allocation as the 2017/18 West Coast Rock Lobster season had already closed.
  4. I am advised by the Department that the data considered in the scientific recommendation included:

(a) Commercial Catch Per Unit of Effort(CPUE);

(b) Somatic Growth Rata

(c) Fisheries Independant Monibring Survey(FIMS) Indices; and

(d) Poaching eatimatas.

(5)(a) West Coast Rock Lobster (WCRL) has been identified as one of the two priority species with a recovery plan and stately in place

(5)(b) These are improved eeea«›h and compliance efforts as well as a move forwards ensuring more effective cooperation with various lawenforcement agencies B reduce the levels of poaching. The Department has, through the Chief DiecBrate: Monitoring Control and Survaillance (MCS), embarked on a number of nearshore enforcement efforts to the WCRL and abalone sectors. This has been augmented by Operation Phakisa joint operators in partnership with South African Police Services (SAPS), the Department of Transport (Taxes), the Department of Home Affairs and various Municipal Metro Police.

Regards

MB B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:....!.... . .. .

19 July 2019 - NW141

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

1. Whether, with regard to the current and future plans to roll out 5G, she has found that the electromagnetic fields have an impact on the ecosystem such as, but not limited to, birds, bees, wildlife and the environment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2. Whether she intends to take steps in order to protect the ecosystems of the Republic with regard to the added frequencies being emitted by 5G mobile networks; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The National Environmental Management Act, through the Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Regulations requires that activities which are deemed to have significant impacts on the environment be subjected to an impact assessment process. This process provides that the applicant willl have to carry out a study or studies where such infrastructure will be developed, to ascertain the types of impacts that such a development will have on the immediate environment and the biodiversity. These studies and the proposed mitigation measures are considered in deciding whether or not such developments can be allowed.

The roll out of 5G related infrustructure will therefore be site-specific and, as such, geographical context will inform the nature and extent of the impact required assessment. With respect to electromagnetic radiation, the Department takes guidance from the Department of Health, who have a dedicated unit that is mandated to consider the health effects of electromagnetic radiation.

Regards

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:

11 July 2019 - NW125

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

(1) Whether any action is being taken to enforce compliance with the court order relating to the rehabilitation, maintenance and security of the Makhanda landfill site; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; and (2) Whether her Department conducts regular inspections of the landfill site to ensure compliance with relevant legislation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

  1. No action has been taken to enforce compliance with the court order by the National Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries (previously the Department of Environmental Affairs) as it has not been involved in the legal proceedings which resulted in the court order competing, among others, the Municipality to undertake rehabilitation, maintenance and installation of security measures at the Makana landfill site.
  2. The Makana landfill site is a general landfill site and, accordingly, the regulatory duties, including taking compliance and enforcement action when non-compliances are detected, falls within the mandate of the Eastern Cape Department of Economic Development, Environmental Affairs and Tourism.

This Department has contacted the Eastern Cape Department of Economic Developement, Environmental Affairs and Tourism who confirmed that they are actively engaging with the Makana Municipality, and that they undertook a compliance visit to the landfill site as recently as June 2019.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

11 July 2019 - NW113

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

What are the full relevant details of the (a) progress her department has made in the fight against abalone poaching along the Western Cape Coastline, particularly in the coastal communities of Gansbaai, Kleinbaai, Franskraal and Pearly Beach where abalone poaching remains rife and (b) additional steps that will be taken by her department in co-operation with the SA Police Service, law enforcement agencies and other specialised environmental law enforcement bodies to eradicate this scourge from the coastline?

Reply:

a) There has been an increase in the number of enforcement operations conducted in the Gansbaai, Kleinbaai, Franskraal and Pearly Beach areas which have been identified as hot spots for abalone poaching. During the 2018/19 financial year, 10 (ten) operations took place in the Overberg area in the Western Cape under Initiative 5 of Operation Phakisa (Oceans Economy) — the Enhanced and Co-ordinated Compliance and Enforcement Programme. This initiative has created a platform to achieve an integrated and coordinated approach to ensure compliance with, inter alia, the South African Maritime Legislative and Regulatory frameworks within the coastal regions. These operations are a combination of proactive and reactive operations, focused in some instances on visible policing and, in others, are aimed at disrupting illegal activities and apprehending poachers.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY OUESTION NO.33 NW990E

These operations resulted in arrests of some key role players and the confiscation and seizure of equipment used in illegal harvesting. Overall confiscations during Initiative S Phakisa operations for the 2018/19 financial year were R28 022 983, with the value of confiscated abalone and rock lobster being R21 317 365 and R675 050, respectively, with most of the abalone confiscated coming from the Overberg region. Confiscated equipment associated with illegal activity in the coastal region amounted to R5 052 160 for the same period. In the last six months, there have been four operations over 81 days, together with other law enforcement agencies where approximately 539 potential poachers were prevented from diving and 40 arrests were made.

b) The Department will continue to engage the South African Police Services around the approval and implementation of a medium-term deployment plan that will ask for additional resources in the affected areas to increase Government’s response to illegal harvesting of marine resources. In addition, we are looking at the dynamics driving demand, illicit exports and markets for illegal trade and obtaining a comprehensive threat assessment.

Operation Phakisa will also continue to undertake compliance and enforcement operations in the Overberg Region. Both proactive and reactive operations will be planned to ensure Government has a visible presence in the high-risks areas. The ongoing collaboration with the SANDF’s Operation Corona as a force multiplier will continue to have a positive impact on operations.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENYIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:.. .. ....... :..

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION NO. 33 N\/Y990E

10 July 2019 - NW47

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Who are the current 20 largest recipients of fishing quotas in terms of (a) total fishing quota and (b) type of fish?

04 July 2019 - NW57

Profile picture: Hlonyana, Ms NKF

Hlonyana, Ms NKF to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What tonnage and percentage of the timber produced in the country in 2018 was (a) immediately exported and (b) kept in the country for beneficiation?

Reply:

(a) Information on the exported timber for 2018 is currently not available. This information becomes available annually, around the month of November, through a Report on Commercial Timber Resources and Roundwood Processing in South Africa together with an Abstract of South African Forestry Facts. The only available reports are for the year 2016/2017.

(b) Information on tonnage of the timber kept in the country for beneficiation for 2018 is currently not available. This information becomes available annually, around the month of November, through a Report on Commercial Timber Resources and Roundwood Processing in South Africa together with an Abstract of South African Forestry Facts. The only available reports are for the year 2016/2017.

Regards

MS B CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT FISHERIES AND FORESTRY

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION NO. 57 NW1O14E

04 July 2019 - NW33

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

Whether she intends to introduce legislation in the National Assembly to ban the use of single-use plastic in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, by what date does she intend to introduce the specified legislation?

Reply:

The National Environment Management Act, 1998 (Act No. 107 of 1998), contains specific provisions under section 44 which controls single-use plastic products. The National Environment Management: Waste Act, 2008 (Act No. 59 of 2008), contains specific provisions under sections 17, 18, 28 and 29 to control the disposal of plastic products.

It is a matter of public record that the management of plastics in the world generally and in our own country, is sub-optimal. Consenquently this is an important area to which we must respond if we are to proctect our oceans.

The World Economic Forum and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation, observed could be “more plastics that fish (by weight) in the ocean by 2050 if no action is taken immediately”.

The department has initiated a process to review the effectiveness of our policies relating to the management of plastic waste and to consider whether it is necessary to have a new policy direction.

This review includes discussions with the retail, pharmaceutical and cosmetics sectors as well as the paper and packaging industries on ways to combat the use of one time plastics and their disposal management.

We expect to conclude this process within the current financial year. At this point we will make further announcemnets on our approach to this important matter.

 

Regards,

Regards

ITIS B D CREECY, M

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

 

04 July 2019 - NW48

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries

What is the total tonnes of (a) glass, (b) plastic and (c) paper that the Republic recycles in each financial year?

Reply:

 

 

   

2015 (Industry, Report)

2016 (Industry Report)

2017 (SoWI?)

(a)

Glass

286 thousand tonnes

278 thousand tonnes

1,9 million tonnes

(b)

Plastic

352 thousand tonnes

310 thousand tonnes

480 thousand tonnes

(c)

Paper

1,06 million tonnes

1,1 million tonnes

1,2 million tonnes

Regards

 

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT, FORESTRY AND FISHERIES

DATE:.... . .*..) .t... .

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY QUESTION NO. 48 NW1005E

04 July 2019 - NW49

Profile picture: Paulsen, Mr N M

Paulsen, Mr N M to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What is the total amount of revenue collected from the leasing of state-owned forests in the 2018-19 financial year?

Reply:

 

The Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) indirectly manages 230 264 hectares of State plantations (Category A) through lease agreements signed with four forestry companies. The companies are MTO Forestry (Pty) Ltd; Amathole Forestry (Pty) Ltd; SiyaQhubeka Forest (Pty) Ltd; and Singisi Forest Products (Pty) Ltd. In addition to this, an area of 187 320.27 hectares is managed by the South African Forestry Company (SAFCOL), which is a State-owned company.

In January of every year, the forestry companies pay lease rental into the DAFF bank account. The lease rental money is then transferred and invested with the Public Investment Corporation (PIC) in an interest bearing account which is administered by DAFF. The balance as of 31 March 2019 is R788 397 015.

Rental Money collected during the 2018/19 financial year

Forestry

package

Leaseholder

Date of lease

signature

Extent (ha)

Lease rental collected

from 01 April 2018 to

31 March 2019 in Rands

MTO

MTO Pty Ltd.

24 Jan 2005

57 061(ha)

4 708 502,31

AMATHOLE

Amathole Pty Ltd

24-Jan-2005

25 405(ha)

3 273 446,00

SQF

SQF Pty Ltd

06 Mar 2001

21 956(ha)

14 113 388,54

SINGISI

Singisi Forests

Products Pty Ltd

06 Mar 2001

76 563(ha)

10 485 743,67

Total

32 581 080,40

Source: Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries

Regards

 

MS B CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENT FISHERIES AND FORESTRY

DATE: . . ...

18 April 2019 - NW699

Motshidi, Ms T to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and/or the former minister and (ii) her deputy and/or former deputy minister (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 01 April 2018?

Reply:

(a, b, c and d) (i) (aa) (aaa) None.

(bbb) None.

(bb) None.

(ii) (aa) (aaa) None.

(bbb) None.

(bb) None.

The Department of Environmental Affairs did not procure any vehicles for the use by the former Minister and her Deputy Minister in the financial years: 2016-2017, 2017-2018 and since 01 April 2018.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW753

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What has been the country’s carbon emission rates in terms of each sector’s contribution in each of the past 10 years?

Reply:

To support tracking of domestic climate change policy imperatives, South Africa, as a Non-Annex I Party to the UNFCCC, prepares and regularly updates a National Greenhouse Gas Inventory which provides an account of current emissions levels and trends. The latest official greenhouse gas (GHG) inventory, approved officially by the late Minister of Environmental Affairs and submitted to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), covers a period of 2000 – 2012. However, the Department has prepared preliminary GHG estimates for the period 2000 – 2015, which have gone through an independent review and public consultation process. Thus, in responding to the question raised, the preliminary estimates of 2000 – 2015 are provided by the sector. In terms of South Africa’s GHG inventory, four sectors are covered, and these include the Energy Sector; Industrial Processes and Product Use Sector; Agriculture Forestry and Other Land Use Sector; as well as the Waste Sector.

According to the 2000 – 2015 GHG inventory, the net emissions are currently 510 694,09 Gigagrams of Carbon Dioxide Equivalent (GgCO2eq). The Energy Sector contributed 84% of these emissions in the year 2015.

The table below provides a breakdown of the 4 sectors and their respective contributions to the national emissions profile across the time series of 2000 – 2015.

 

Energy

IPPU

AFOLU (excl. FOLU)

AFOLU (incl. FOLU)

Waste

Gross total

Net total

Emissions (Gg CO2e)

2000

341 494

34 071

50 600

35 306

10 838

437 003

421 709

2001

339 566

34 057

50 286

33 617

11 502

435 412

418 743

2002

350 968

36 141

50 886

33 258

12 137

450 132

432 504

2003

374 586

35 607

49 252

33 674

12 755

472 199

456 622

2004

390 091

35 784

49 179

35 301

13 355

488 409

474 531

2005

384 329

39 118

48 200

34 825

13 940

485 587

472 212

2006

391 155

40 173

48 529

34 803

14 511

494 368

480 642

2007

419 689

38 223

47 931

35 486

15 069

520 912

508 467

2008

411 802

36 048

49 424

38 082

15 616

512 890

501 548

2009

419 841

34 352

47 656

32 970

16 150

517 999

503 313

2010

433 688

36 442

48 803

30 890

16 671

535 605

517 691

2011

412 992

40 228

49 169

34 590

17 282

519 670

505 091

2012

425 532

38 955

48 224

25 429

17 866

530 577

507 782

2013

445 187

41 349

49 841

20 609

18 387

554 764

525 532

2014

436 363

41 878

50 269

19 148

18 965

547 475

516 354

2015

429 872

41 882

49 592

19 407

19 533

540 878

510 694

The table below provides the emissions for the base year 2000, the 2012 GHG inventory and the year 2015. It also provides the changes in emissions, in terms of emission levels and percentage, for each of the four sectors.

Sector

Emissions (Gg CO2e)

Increase
2000 to 2015

Increase
2012 to 2015

 

2000

2012

2015

Gg CO2e

%

Gg CO2e

%

Energy

341 494

425 532

429 872

88 377

25,9

4 340

1,0

IPPU

34 071

38 955

41 882

7 812

22,9

2 927

7,5

AFOLU (excl. FOLU)

50 600

48 224

49 592

-1 008

-2,0

1 368

2,8

AFOLU (incl. FOLU)

35 306

25 429

19 407

-15 899

-45,0

-6 022

-23,7

Waste

10 838

17 866

19 533

8 695

80,2

1 667

9,3

Gross total

437 003

530 577

540 878

103 876

23,8

10 302

1,9

Net total

421 709

507 782

510 694

88 985

21,1

2 912

0,6

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW791

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) What is the current (a) storage, (b) processing and (c) product development capabilities of the South African Weather Service; and (2) what (a) products and (b) capabilities have been developed for astronomy by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her in the past three financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) The South African Weather Service (SAWS) has constantly struggled to upgrade its computer capabilities due to budget constraints over the last few years. The nature of the business of the SAWS is heavily reliant on computing power and storage in executing its mandate to South Africa. This reliance is mostly on High Performance Computing (HPC) and high end server infrastructure in processing and generating products required for Disaster Risk Reduction in South Africa related to Weather and Climate.

(b) The South African Weather Service has in the last eighteen months upgraded its HPC Facillity to the following:

  • 336 CPU’s that equates to 4032 cores that gives a speed of 73.8 Terra Flops; and
  • Storage Capaicity on the HPC is 2 Petabytes.

The current upgraded HPC is used at 90% capacity at 90% of the time to fulfill some of the South African Weather Service operational needs. The South African Weather Service has a Memoradum of Understanding (MoU) with CSIR, Meraka Institute to use its Center for High Perfomance Computing (CHPC) for research work and Business Continuty Processes (disaster recovery). With the South African Weather Service increased opertional requirements to run Numerical Weather Predictions (NWP) models i.e additional Regional NWP models, Ensembles NWP models, Oceans and Coasts models, Air Quality Models, new and enhanced Climate Prediction models, etc. Due to this increased operational workloads, the South African Weather Service is looking into replacing its HPC capabalities within 2 to 3 year time frame , as well as looking at alternatives including using HPC as service in the Cloud.

(c) The HIGH-END Servers used in SAWS is to run its Virtual eniviroment for all its production enviroment related to weather and climate, as well as all its back office enviroment. Currently, the enviroment consist of 23 high-end servers and 800 Terra Bytes which runs 250 virtual servers for the South African Weather Service. The IT enviroment at SAWS Head Office is currently in the process of being upgraded, with SAWS regional offices being done in the next 6 to 12 months. For BCP requirements the South African Weather Service also needs to upgrade its disaster recovery infrastructure over the next 12 to 18 months. The South African Weather Service is also looking into cloud offering to compliment server requirements and reduce costs for infrastructure.

(2) (a and b)SAWS is not involved in astronomy, this lies completely outside SAWS and perhaps it could be traced back to DST with the SKA project. However, SAWS is working with South African National Space Agency (SANSA), the agency under Department of Science and Technology. SANSA has recently been designated by International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) as Regional Space Weather Centre to provide space weather products in support of Avaition industry. The capabilities and product development lies with SANSA. SAWS is working with SANSA as the provisions of space weather are included as the standard and recommended practices in ICAO which is under the custodianship of SAWS for the provision of aeronautical meteorological services to international air navigation.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW792

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What are the details of (a) the strategy adopted by the (i) South African Weather Service and (ii) South African National Parks to embrace the Fourth Industrial Revolution and (b) how the specified entities will use the Fourth Industrial Revolution to (i) track the movement of rhino horn, (ii) predict poaching, (iii) predict the migration of climate zones and (iv) predict where crops should be planted?

Reply:

a) (i) The South African Weather Service (SAWS), as the national meteorological service, operates under the authority of the South African Weather Sevice Act, 2001 (Act No. 8 of 2001), as amended, through the SAWS Amended Act, 2013 (Act No. 48 of 2013). As mandated, SAWS contribute to solutions that relate to extreme weather, natural disasters and climate change and variability. These solutions are fundamentally aimed at saving lives, infrastructure and property, as well as supporting socio-economic development and building societal resilience. To achieve this, SAWS has developed a five-year Strategic Plan (2019/20 – 2023/24) that is particularly aligned with the Fourth Industrial Revolution (hereafter 4-IR).

SAWS strategic plan is anchored on three pillars i.e., science, technology and services. These pillars are supported by the human capital (with requisite knowledge and skills which are suited for 4-IR), inter-institutional and multi/cross-disciplinary collaboration, as well as global and regional linkages. The integration of all these systems with artificial intelligence, indigenous knowledge and machine learning are key to realising the SAWS mission of improving safety and quality of life of the people in South Africa in support of government’s priorities and programs such as the National 9 point Plan.

(ii) South African National Parks (SANParks) has an IT Strategy that seeks to leverage initiatives delivered over the past years and builds on the successes already achieved towards its desired future state. The strategy is adaptable to the changing technological trends moving towards the 4th industrial revolution. The implementation of the strategy towards this future state has realised a number of initiatives, such as building a sensory network (internet of things –IoT) in support of anti-poaching. SANParks management will continue to build on initiatives in the years to come.

b) (i) South African National Parks

SANParks does not have the capability to track rhino horn; however, we can track the movement of poachers and combat poaching as they enter the Park, in their pursuit for rhino horn. In addition, the horn can be traced back to its origin using chip technology, once it has been confiscated at or en route to destination.

(ii) In 2014, SANParks, more specifically the Kruger National Park (KNP), pioneered a multi-facetted program to enhance connectivity and situational awareness. These projects have now evolved to a system where the Internet of Things (IOT) approach resulted in the so called “smart park” concept. The core of this is the common and collaborative platform called C – MORE, developed at the CSIR jointly with Armscor and SANParks. This user friendly platform can be operated by all levels of management (rangers to park wardens) and all agencies involved in EAP, and specifically rhino protection, on any device ranging from smart phones to multi-screen computers in the operation rooms.

Through this system, information is streamed to allow surveillance, early warning, detection and tracking (SEDT), as well as fusion of all information and subsequent data from a suite of sensors. Current sensors include radar, magnetic, seismic, optronic, electronic and acoustic. These sensors can be in the rhino horn, on the rhino, on a fence, in the ground, on the ranger and on vehicles or air craft. It allows in time monitoring of animals, i.e. rhino; but also dogs utilised in the Anti-Poaching Units (APU), own forces and poachers. Intelligent collation and customised programs to process the data subsequently allows for the benefit of some Artificial Intelligence (AI) through predictive modelling in the form of heat maps, graphs, histograms and tables. This informs decision making and more intelligent deployment of resources based on validated trends.

(iii) In the context of the 4-IR, SAWS uses advanced Information and Communication Technology (ICT), Mobile Technology (MT), radar and satellite technologies, and High Performance Computing (HPC) for weather forecasting and climate predictions. Further, the institution runs earth system models on the HPC and processes weather and climate data and information for developing products and services for different climate sensitive sectors such as agriculture, water, energy, health, aviation, marine and for air quality and disaster risk reduction.

In addition, SAWS’ Integrated Service Strategic (ISS) approach integrates innovative technologies, physical, digital and biological systems to generate useful and innovative products and services. SAWS is actively implementing new weather deveopment programes to improve its capibilities in Early Warning Prediction (Weather and Climate), that includes Artifical Intelligence in Numerical Weather Prediction models and data management solutions for big data. SAWS also implemented a new Marine Research Business Unit that is active in implementing operational wave and storm surge forecasting along the coast of South Africa in support of operation PHAKISA.

In this regard, the analysis of long-term historical climatic trends and future climate projections are used for climate zoning. These results are used to derive agro-hydrological products such as heat and chill units, frost, evapotranspiration, as well as other products that are useful for identifying suitable sites and planting dates for different crops under current and future climates.

SAWS data, SANParks weather station records and satellite observations are being used to predict species’ future zones of climate suitability in combination with modeled future climate surfaces based on global circulation models, several of which have been statistically and/or dynamically downscaled for use at a South African scale through the CORDEX project
(e.g. Engelbrecht et al, CSIR, 2018). Species-specific models are being carried out on an ongoing basis by both South African and international researchers. Amongst the correlative species distribution models used to develop these are those that rely on artificial neural networks (ANN) to predict where species will be able to survive in the future. Principles of Network Flow are being used to identify the pathways of least resistance for each to use to move through the landscape in order to reach these, enabling SANParks to plan strategies to help this climate change adaptation. We hope to use several new and emerging technologies to monitor both climate change impacts and the effectiveness of our strategies to minimise them; these could include environmental DNA, additional satellite imagery (e.g. high-resolution Lidar), more sensitive and detailed weather monitoring and new technologies for measuring air and water quality.

(iv) The SAWS mobile applications (WeatherSmart APP and AgriCloud APP) are also mobile APPs showing SAWS weather forecasting products, which, for example, are used for planting dates of maize crop. SAWS is constantly exploring and implementing new digital avenues to get the products and services to the citizens of the country so that they can make informed decisions on climate impact. The same solutions are also used for agricultural operational activities. Most importantly, SAWS infrastructure and knowledge generation processes (e.g. development of data mining algorithms) are suitably integrated as early warning systems for weather and climate related extreme conditions such as flooding, droughts and heat waves; thanks to 4-IR.

--ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW793

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)Whether her department brought the agreement between the National Research Foundation and SA National Parks to establish a new national park in the Northern Cape to any meeting of the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will her department bring the agreement to the Committee; if so, what are the relevant details; and (2) what is the latest update on the due diligence regarding the specified agreement?

Reply:

(1) The agreement has not been brought to the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs.

(a) South African National Parks (SANParks) is still completing internal approval processes for the agreement; and

(b) the agreement will be tabled to the next Board meeting during 2019. Upon the completion of internal approval processes, the agreement will also be submitted to the Minister of Environmental Affairs for consideration, since the authority to establish new national parks rests with the Minister. Once the Minister has considered and given SANParks the green light to proceed with the project, the Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) and SANParks will be ready to bring the agreement to the Committee.

(2) The agreement between the National Research Foundation (NRF) and SANParks for the possible establishment of a new national park around the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) radio astronomy facility in the Northern Cape, should be considered as ongoing. The Business Plan for the establishment of the new national Park was considered and approved by the Board in 2018. The Board provided the Chief Executive Officer of SANParks with a mandate to negotiate the draft Contractual Agreement between SANParks and the NRF.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW279

Profile picture: Yako, Ms Y

Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What number of (a) tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her Department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her; and (b) specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

Department of Environmental Affairs

(a) (i) Number of tender briefings in:

2017/18 = Eighteen(18); and

2018/19 = Sixteen(16)

Total = Thirty-four (34)

(b) 2017/18 = Seveteen (17); and

     2018/19 = Seven (7)

     Total = 24

 

iSimangaliso

(a) (ii) Number of tender briefings in:

2017/18 = None (0); and

2018/19 = One (1)

Total = One (1)

(b) One (1)

 

South African National Biodiversity Institute

(a) (ii) Number of tender briefings in:

2017/18 = Twenty-seven (27); and

2018/19 = Thirty-four (34)

Total = Sixty-one (61)

(b) Sixty (60)

 

South African National Parks

(a) (ii) Number of tender briefings in:

2017/18 = Thirty-five (35); and

2018/19 = Nineteen (19)

Total = Fifty-four (54)

(b) Fifty-two (52)

 

South African Weather Service

(a) (ii) Number of tender briefings in:

2017/18 = Nine (9); and

2018/19 = Nine (9)

Total = 18

(b) Seventeen (17)

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW127

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her Department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 01 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)(i) and (ii); (b)(i) and (ii); (c); and (d)(i) and (ii).

The total expenditure incurred by the Department, in terms of travel privileges by former Ministers and Deputy Ministers as well as their related family members, had always formed part of the audited Departmental Annual Reports that are submitted to Parliament at specific intervals after the close of each financial year. The same process, as outlined above, would be followed in terms of the current financial year.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW631

Profile picture: Matiase, Mr NS

Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What (a) number of privately owned game farms are there in the country; and (b) is the (i) location, (ii) size and (iii) Rand value of each game farm?

Reply:

a) The Department is responsible for the maintenance of the Register of Protected Areas. The Register has 934 Nature Reserves that are privately owned, totaling 1.91 million ha. Game Farms are not a type of protected area according to the National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003, and are therefore not captured as such. Game Farms are, in the main, covered within the mandate of DAFF, and further information in this regard should be requested from DAFF.

b) (i)(ii) The Department has not conducted any assessment to ascertain the number, location and average size of privately-owned game farms in the country. However, according to the research conducted by ABSA in 2013 it was found that commercial/private wildlife ranches covered 16.8% of the country's landmass, covering approximately 20,5 million hectare encompassing just over 9000 wildlife ranches.

More information can be obtained from the research conducted in 2001 to determine the extent or the footprint of game farming in the country. According to this research it was estimated that there were 5,061 wildlife ranches in South Africa covering an area of 103,642 km2 (Bothma, 2005). The Limpopo province contained 2,482 of these wildlife ranches covering an area of 33,257 km2 (Bothma, 2005). Limpopo dominates, with 50% of ranches; Northern Cape - 20%; Eastern Cape - 12%; and other remaining Provinces - 18%.

Below is a table depicting provincial distribution and extent of privately-owned game farms in 2001:

PROVINCE

NO OF WILDLIFE PRODUCTION UNITS (GAME FARMS)

% OF TOTAL WILDLIFE PRODUCTION

AREA(HA)

% OF TOTAL AREA

Free State

180

3.56

147743

1.43

Limpopo

2482

49.04

3325652

32.09

North West

340

6.72

364935

3.52

Mpumalanga

205

4.05

276016

2.66

Gauteng

72

1.42

82076

0.79

KwaZulu Natal

90

1.78

168841

1.63

Eastern Cape

624

12.33

881633

8.51

Northern Cape

986

19.48

4852053

46.82

Western Cape

82

1.62

265205

2.56

Total

5061

100

10364154

100

Source: Bothma (2005)

(iii) The Department has not undertaken an exercise to determine the Rand value of each game farm in the country. However, the Rand value of each game farm depends on the amount invested towards acquiring land possessing conducive ecological infrastructure to support game animals and the size, the quality, type and size of game fence, number of game species and animals in the farm, existing infrastructural developments such as water reticulation, accommodation, roadways, permits and the ability to attract the targeted market. In view of this, the Rand value of each game farm can only be determined on a case by case basis.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW547

Profile picture: Khubisa, Mr NM

Khubisa, Mr NM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the climate change and constant changing weather conditions, particularly in the uMkhanyakude district and other rural communities where there have been reports of persons dying due to thunderstorms, what is her Department, together with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs, doing to deal with the situation?

Reply:

South African Weather Service (SAWS) has a close and active relationship with South Africa’s disaster management structures at all levels. SAWS participates in the quarterly local, district and provincial disaster management forum meetings, which include, among others, the uMkhanyakude District Municipality. At these meetings a seven-day outlook on the expected weather is usually presented, as well as longer seasonal (one to three months) predictions. The last uMkhanyakude disaster meeting forum was held on 7 February 2019.

In addition, SAWS also conducts awareness campaigns in the rural areas of KwaZulu-Natal Province. SAWS also issues different categories of weather warnings in the province through different media platforms, including SMSs and radio, e.g. Ukhozi FM. The recent severe weather event on 23 February 2019 caused considerable hardship to the northern part of the Province. For this event, severe weather was foreseen using model predictions and weather radar observations; and warnings were issued to the media, including community radio stations, and through SMSs. This specific event is being investigated in detail as a special case study. In this manner SAWS is constantly improving its understanding of such storms and their impacts in order to improve its services and warnings.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW546

Profile picture: Nyambi, Ms HV

Nyambi, Ms HV to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the recent expansion of marine protected areas to restore biodiversity and ecological wellbeing of the marine life, (a) what are the main benefits derived from supporting the ecosystems and (b) how will the expansion contribute to fishery sustainability in the country?

Reply:

(a) The main benefits arising from the new Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are:

  • More resilient ecosystems. This means that widespread anthropogenic impacts such as climate change,ocean pollution and fishing will have less of an impact on our ocean resources;
  • Protected marine species such as whales and turtles are still very vulnerable to habitat loss and human disturbance. Marine protected areas (MPAs) will serve as refuges for these organisms and others alike. This is particularly important during periods of breeding activity;
  • Opportunities for eco-tourism on popular species like whales, seals, sharks, turtles and seabirds, are significantly enhanced in MPAs in two ways: firstly, there are generally higher numbers of these species in protected areas and secondly, the public and tourists want to see them in their natural environments (like seeing an Elephant or Lion in a National Park, and not in a cage in a zoo). Marine eco-tourism is a growing multi-billion rand Industry and supports thousands of jobs;
  • Protecting marine genetic resources (including those of species which we still do not know about). However, we do explore these areas which are biodiversity-rich or otherwise important or unique. Some of these species found there have already been shown to have importance in medicine, such as anti cancer compounds, with biodiscovery into their uses still continuing; and
  • Development of industrial activities outside MPAs (the vast majority of the ocean) can proceed with more confidence in the knowledge that good examples of the habitat (which may be impacted by development) are being protected within these areas. This does not exclude proper environmental management for all activities.

(b) The expansion of the Marine Protected Areas will contribute to fishery sustainability through:

  • Protection of areas where fish congregate to breed so that successful breeding can improve fish stock numbers. Fish stock numbers are improved not only in the MPA, but also outside of it by the drift of fish eggs and larvae, as well as young fish migrations. These fish are then available to be caught outside of the MPA, thus enhancing the sustainability of commercial resources. A South African case study published in the top scientific journal, nature showed that this process indeed resulted in increased catch rates by fishers outside of the MPA;
  • Recovery of stocks which are currently being over-exploited can occur more rapidly within MPAs, allowing certain fisheries to become sustainable once again;
  • Protection and sustainability of key sea-bed habitat features such as coral reefs, some of which are important breeding or nursery grounds and would otherwise be impacted by activities such as trawling. International consumer and industry certification programmes recognise the importance of protected areas for sustainable fisheries. This certification is in fact a requirement for export to an increasing number of markets, and also results in good prices;
  • Maintenance of biological and genetic traits of fish species (associated with ecosystem resilience) enhances sustainability;
  • Some species of fish grow very slowly and are long-lived. Without the protection of MPAs, it is unlikely that fishlings of long-lived species would reach maturity. Without marine protected areas, these species are likely to become extinct. This includes some commercial fish species;
  • Most of the new MPAs are designed with flexibility in mind, and allow fishing activities that have little impact on the main purpose of protection within the protected area. This includes a number of small-scale, recreational and commercial fishing activities that are allowed in different parts of most MPAs. These areas are called controlled zones, and the MPA regulations set out the activities allowed within these controlled zones. In restricted zones, it is generally only non-consumptive (ecotourism) activities that are allowed; and
  • Activities such as mining are not allowed anywhere in MPAs, giving the Fishing Industry greater protection from the impacts of such activities, and thus also promoting sustainability.

---ooOoo---

18 April 2019 - NW62

Profile picture: Dlamini, Ms L

Dlamini, Ms L to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)Whether she has been informed that she has been implicated in testimony made under oath and in written documents by Mr Agrizzi at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry to Inquire into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, chaired by Deputy Chief Justice Raymond Zondo; if so, were the allegations made by Mr Agrizzi in respect of her true; (2) whether she declared any financial or material gifts from Bosasa as required by the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Honourable Member would be aware that the question he is asking is already in the public domain including the communication between my lawyers and the Judicial Commission of Inquiry c haired by Deputy Chief Justice Zondo. The Commission has also been on record to advise that the individuals who are somehow implicated by certain witnesses at the said inquiry would also be given an opportunity to testify and or to give their own account of events. The Honuorable Member is therefore advised to be patient until that particular opportunity surfaces.

(2) This particular question is also likely to form part of the evidence at the said inquiry.

 

 

---ooOoo---

14 March 2019 - NW521

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her Department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property, and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)(iii) (aa) None.

(bb) Twenty three (23).

(b) (i) None.

(ii) Refer to the table below.

(c)(i)(ii)(iii) Refer to the able below.

 

DEA LEASED PROPERTIES

         

(b)(ii)

(c)(i)

(c)(ii)

(c)(iii)

 

PROVINCE

TOWN

STREET ADDRESS

FACILITY

PURPOSE OF ACCOMMODATION

TERM FOR RENTAL

FACILITY RENTED FROM

MONTHLY RENTAL

1

Gauteng

Pretoria

473 Steve Biko Road, Arcadia

Environment House Building

Office Accommodation

25 years -

(Public Private Partnership Agreement)

Imvelo Concession Company ( RF) (PTY) LTD as the Private Party

R12 623 754.21

2

Gauteng

Kempton Park

OR Tambo International Airport

OR Tambo International Airport

Office Accommodation

5 years

Airports Company South Africa (ACSA)

R29 984.85

3

Mpumalanga

Nelspruit

31 Brown Street

Standard Bank Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

Delta Property Fund

R57 152.32

4

Free State

Bloemfontein

49 Charlotte Maxeke Street

Fedsure Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

Mendo Properties

R53 964.11

5

Limpopo

Polokwane

15 Landros Mare Street

15 Landros Mare

Office Accommodation

5 years

Wallstreet Trust

R88 683.26

6

Limpopo

Modimolle

35 Tamsan Street

5 Tamsan Street

Office Accommodation

5 years

Emerald Sky Trading 223 PTY Ltd

R13 240.34

7

North West

Mafikeng

15 First Street,

Mmabatho

Office Accommodation

5 years

Abdul Kader Kharbai

R17 285.76

8

North West

Potchefstroom

41 Nelson Mandela Drive

Santam Trust Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

Nomdimba and Tutuse Road Construction

R15 529.67

9

North West

Brits

27 Tom Street

Priminda Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

Tayob

R61 609.19

10

Kwazulu-Natal

Durban

85 On Field Street

Durban

Office Accommodation

3 years

West South House cc

R19 382.08

11

Port Elizabeth

East London

4 Muir Street

East London

Office Accommodation

5 years

Cedar Falls Properties 228

Pty Ltd

R35 702.61

12

Port Elizabeth

East London

2nd Floor, SKG building, Beacon Bay

Waverly

Office Accommodation

5 years

Hemipac Investment Pty Ltd

R55 068.11

13

uMthata

Umthatha

Broadcast House

Broadcast House

Office Accommodation

5 years

JHI Properties

R20 025.85

14

Western Cape

Rondebosch

Stonefontein

Stone House

Office Accommodation

5 years

Stonefountain Properties Pty Ltd

R15 468.94

15

Western Cape

Cape Town

East Pier Building, V&A Waterfront

East Pier Building

Office Accommodation

9 years 11 months

V and A Waterfront Holdings

R2 429 336.72

16

Western Cape

Cape Town

14 Loop Street

14 Loop Street

Office Accommodation

5 years

Kuper-Legh Property Management

R644 851.87

17

Western Cape

Cape Town

Island Centre

Island Centre

Stores

5 years

Inospace Pty Ltd

R146 141.92

18

Western Cape

Cape Town

80 Strand Street

80 Strand Street

Parking

5 years

Eris Property Group

R8 735.86

19

Western Cape

 Cape Town

63 Strand street, Nedbank Building

Nedbank building

Office accommodation

5 years

Rennie Property Management….

R478 648.36

20

Western Cape

Cape Town

PARKALOT

PARKALOT

Parking

5 years

Rabie Property Administrators

R22 210.16

21

Western Cape

Cape Town

Foretrust Building

Foretrust Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

Kuper-Legh Property Management

R19 647.52

22

Northern Cape

Kimberley

Assuranje Building

Assuranje Building

Office Accommodation

5 years

ZYCADEK Eiendomme (EDMS) BPK

R 8 736.97

23

Northern Cape

Springbok

Hopley Centre

Hopley Centre

Office Accommodation

5 years

Hopley Sentrum 4 CC

R39 696.79

---ooOoo---

14 December 2018 - NW3618

Profile picture: Dreyer, Ms AM

Dreyer, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether there are any plans in place to ban microbeads in the country; if not, why not; if so, by what date will the ban come into effect?

Reply:

The microbeads in cosmetics and disinfectants have been highlighted as having a negative environmental impact. The regulatory control of both cosmetics and disinfectants is administered by the Department of Health under regulations in the Foodstuffs, Cosmetics and Disinfectants Act, 1954
(Act 54 of 1972). The Department of Environmental Affairs is in engagement with both the Department of Health and South African Health Products Regulatory Authority, including providing comments on the amendment of cosmetics regulations to consider the phase-out of microbeads in cosmetics.

---ooOoo---

22 November 2018 - NW3185

Profile picture: Robertson, Mr K

Robertson, Mr K to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Whether any land falling within any of the country’s national parks has been earmarked (a) for foreign investment projects and/or (b) to serve as security for deals with foreign business investments (i) in each of the past three financial years and/or (ii) since 1 April 2018; if so, (aa) what number of hectares of land has been earmarked in each case, (bb) where is each parcel of land situated and (cc) which foreign investment companies are involved in each case?

Reply:

(a) None.

(b) (i) None.

(ii) None.

(aa) Not applicable.

(bb) Not applicable.

(cc) None.

---ooOoo---

22 November 2018 - NW3172

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Why is the Government allowing a demersal longline fishery to catch an unlimited number of sharks along our coastline, whereas the economic benefit of the demersal shark longline fishery is minimal when compared with the adverse environmental impact on the greater coastal ecosystem including highly protected species such as Great White Sharks?

Reply:

The mandate of extractive fisheries resource use and management lies with the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF); Branch: Fisheries Management (BFA). The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) has a role in the management and maintenance of environmental and ecosystem health, integrity, as well as beneficial and sustainable use of environmental resources.

The demersal shark fishery constitutes a small-scale inshore fishery with a quantified impact which is limited to fish product based on size and species. The fishery is also restricted through regulating fishing effort, as well as spatial restrictions for operations.

The Department of Environmental Affairs does collaborate with DAFF on management areas for these species through initiatives such as the development and implementation of the National Plan of Action for Sharks (NPOA) published in 2012 by DAFF and the National Biodiversity Management Plan for Sharks (BMP: Sharks) published in 2015 by DEA.

---ooOoo---

15 November 2018 - NW3093

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)With regard to the Kruger National Park (KNP) District Court being accused of lenient sentencing for wildlife crimes, (a) does the department monitor the cases and comment accordingly and (b) has the department taken up this issue with the Chief Magistrate of Mpumulanga; (2) has bail been granted to repeat offenders; if so, (a) what are the details of cases in which bail was granted to repeat offenders in the past calendar year, (b) what is the conviction rate of the KNP District Court for the past calendar year and (c) is the department campaigning for stricter sentencing; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(1)

(a) Although the department does monitor the cases in the Kruger National Park (KNP) Court; the department is provided with the information related to these cases and does participate in the relevant structures and attends the Mission Area Joint Operational Centre (MAJOC) meetings where monthly feedback is provided on progress related to the deployment within the area, arrests, seizures, cases and other related matters are discussed.

(b) The department has not taken the issue regarding lenient sentencing in the KNP District Court up with the Chief Magistrate of Mpumulanga. However, the South African National Parks (SANParks) has engaged with the Judge President of Mpumalanga and expressed concerns around the drop in the nature of the sentences in the district court, aspects related to bail, transfer of cases and other aspects related to cases in the KNP.

(2) The department is aware that bail has been granted to repeat offenders in some cases.

a)The South African Police Service is the custodian of this informaiton.

b) The National Prosecuting Authority and the Department of Justice determine relevant conviction rates and should be approached in this regard.

(c) The department has not formally campaigned for stricter sentencing but is amending current legislation to make provision for priority crimes linked to wildlife trafficking and to increase penalties for such crimes.

---ooOoo---

15 November 2018 - NW3094

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)With reference to the release of the Thai kingpin of the illegal rhino horn trade from jail in South Africa after he served just six years of his 40 year sentence, was the department consulted or given an opportunity to comment in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

(1) The department was not consulted or given an opportunity to comment on the release of the Thai kingpin. It should however be noted that the sentence that he was serving was not 40 years. Although the Magistrates Court had sentenced him to 40 years imprisonment, this was reduced to 30 years in the Gauteng Local Division of the High Court in Johannesburg and then reduced to
13 years imprisonment by the Supreme Court of Appeal.

(2) The department has not found that there is a pattern of the appeal courts reducing sentences for wildlife crime.

(3) The department is of the view that generally the penalties provided for relating to wildlife crimes in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 2004 (Act No. 10 of 2004) (NEMBA) are sufficient, which are currently as follows:

a) A person convicted of an offence in terms of NEMBA is liable to a fine not exceeding
R10 million, or an imprisonment for a period not exceeding ten years, or to both such a fine and such imprisonment; and

b) If a person convicted of an offence, involving a specimen of a listed threatened or protected species, or an alien species or commencing the commercialisation phase of bioprospecting without a permit issued in terms of NEMBA, a fine may be determined. This may take place either in terms of (a) or equal to three times the commercial value of the specimen or activity in respect of which an offence has been committed, whichever is the greater. The department is however, strengthening national legislation by adding a category for those species that are specifically threatened by wildlife trafficking and which require preferential protection and stricter penal provisions. In addition, the department continues to support structures (Justice College and the South African Judicial Education Institute (SAJEI)) which are responsible for training of prosecutors and magistrates.

---ooOoo---

15 November 2018 - NW2953

Profile picture: Xalisa, Mr Z R

Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

With reference to the reply to question 161, on 10 April 2018, what were the consequences in instances where conditions were contravened?

Reply:

The non-compliances that were reported in the response to Parliamentary Question 161, on 10 April 2018, were initially investigated by the Compliance team in the Department, and the matter was then referred to the Chief Directorate: Enforcement, around July 2018, to take enforcement action. An enforcement notice, as contemplated in section 31L of the National Environmental Management Act, has been prepared and is in the process of being reviewed, before it is issued. In order to undertake this process, the Department must comply with the provisions of the Promotion of Administrative Justice Act (PAJA), as well as sub-regulation 8(2) of the EMI regulations contained in GNR 480 of 31 May 2017, by providing SANRAL with an opportunity to make representations in response to the allegations of non-compliance as well as the intended instructions prior to moving forward with further enforcement action. The decision as to whether the non-compliances have or have not been addressed and so forth, and also what type of final enforcement action will be taken, is dependent on various factors such as the submissions that are made by SANRAL in response to the enforcement notice.

 

15 November 2018 - NW2652

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

What are the details of (a) all litigation between her department and the National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018, (b) the issues, charges and details of the case of each litigation and (c) the timeframes of each litigation?

Reply:

THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS REPLIES:

FINANCIAL YEAR

NO. OF MATTERS

DETAILS

RELIEF SOUGHT

TIME PERIODS

2015/2016

nil

n/a

n/a

n/a

2016/2017

nil

n/a

n/a

n/a

2017/2018

1

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF SOCIETIES FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO ANIMALS VS THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND ANOTHER (LION BONES QUOTA)

This is an application brought by the National Council of Societies for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (NSPCA). It is an application which seeks to review and set aside the decision made by the Minister of Environmental Affairs in respect to setting a quota (2017, 2018) on the number of lion bone skeletons, with or without the skulls that may be exported in a calendar year. The application is a PAJA review, alleging that the decision made on the quotas is administrative action.

The application is seeking an order in the following terms:

PART A

1 Prohibiting the first respondent and/or the second respondent from issuing permits for the exportation of lion bone pending the finalisation of Part B of the application,

PART B

1 Declaring unlawful and unconstitutional the determination of the quota for 2017, 2018 and any further extension of the lion bone exportation quota as indicated and presaged in the notice, issued on 28 June 2017.

2 Reviewing and setting aside the quota under PAJA, alternatively under the Constitution.

Application received: 10.01.2018

Notice to Oppose: 12.02.2018

Record filed: 22.03.2018

(by agreement

with applicants)

The record of decision has been filed, along with a supplementary record. The NSPCA has not indicated formally whether they intend supplementing their papers. A “without prejudice” meeting was held between the Department of Environmental Affairs and its legal representatives, and the NSPCA and their legal representatives. The purpose and intention of the meeting was to explain to the NSPCA how the 2018 quota for the export of lion bones was established and to possibly reach a settlement out of court, however this could not be achieved.

The NSPCA has since indicated its intention to supplement its papers and to join all the relevant permit holders and applicants for permits for the export of lion bones and to have the matter set down and to bring an urgent application in terms of Part A of the original application. We await such supplementation and set down from the NSPCA.

From 01 April 2018

nil

 

n/a

n/a

---ooOoo---

08 November 2018 - NW2536

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1) (a) Does the Waste Bureau intend to own, operate and commercialise the Tyre Derived Fuel (TDF) industry, and (b) will the Waste Bureau (i) allow private companies to process tyres commercially for the waste-to-energy sector and (ii) implement any trade barriers or restrictions on private companies supplying TDF on a commercial basis to the waste-to-energy sector; (2) (a) why has the Waste Bureau set a zero price point for whole tyres delivered to the cement industry, (b) does a zero price point not provide restrictive trade practices and, as such, ensures that the commercialisation of waste to energy is not possible, and (c) how can TDF be commercialised when the Waste Bureau has set a zero price point for delivered tyres; (3) was it the intent of the Waste Bureau to impose restrictive trade practices for the supply of TDF at no cost to cement kilns; (4) what price point has been set for processed waste tyres (TDF) to the cement industry; (5) (a) will the Waste Bureau allow a certain company to enter the waste-to-energy sector, and (b) is the specified company regarded as a competitor by the Waste Bureau?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Waste Bureau supplies waste tyres that are used as TDF, and this is currently to cement kilns and brickworks. TDF plays a major role in ensuring the diversion of waste tyres from landfills, and the Waste Bureau will continue to use TDF opportunities in order to continue improving waste tyre diversion rates. The Waste Bureau may also, from time to time, explore TDF related commercial opportunities as mandated in the National Environmental Management: Waste Amendment Act, 2014 (NEM:WAA 2014).

(b) (i) There is nothing preventing private companies from processing waste tyres for the waste to energy sector, and the Waste Bureau is aware of one private company that already supplies TDF.

(ii) The Waste Bureau does not intend to implement trade barriers or restrictions on private companies supplying TDF on a commercial basis to the waste-to-energy sector

(2) (a) cement kilns gain a cost benefit from replacing coal with tyres.

(b) No

(c) See (a) and (b) above

(3) No

(4) The Waste Bureau, up until now, has only supplied whole passenger tyres to the cement industry (unprocessed), and, therefore, there is no price point that has been set for processed waste tyres (TDF).

(5) (a) The Waste Bureau does not have powers to decide which companies should or should not enter the waste-to-energy sector.

(b) No

---ooOoo---

05 November 2018 - NW2537

Profile picture: Hadebe, Mr TZ

Hadebe, Mr TZ to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Will she provide Mr T Z Hadebe with a list of all historical and/or legacy tyre storage sites, including the (a) volumes of tyres and (b) contact details of the owners in each case?

Reply:

The following information is currently available. Some data is still to be verified and will be made available as soon as the information can be verified by the department.

The registration information, received stockpile abatement plans and engagements with stockpile owners indicate the following:

a) Number of tyres and/or area of historical and/or legacy stockpiles storage

b) Contact details of the owners

 

Owner’s name

Tel

Cell

To be verified

1. SA Tyre Recyclers (Pty) Ltd

021 577 1704

------------------

Estimated at 6000 tonnes but not yet verified

2. Makhubu Logistics (Pty) Ltd

021 854 7904

------------------

170 tyres covering 3525 m2 area

3. Foskor (Pty) Ltd

015 789 2000

 

To be verified

4. Highveld Steel and Vanadium Corporation Ltd

013 690 8880

-------------------

Estimated at at least 12000 tonnes but to be verified

5. Finsch Diamond Mine (Pty) Ltd

053 385 2345

-------------------

0.048 ha

6. Afrisam Dudfield Factory 4

018 633 6026

------------------

820 m2 (0.082 ha)

7. Afrisam Dudfield Factory 3

018 633 6026

------------------

962 m2

8. Afrisam Dudfield Factory 2

018 633 6026

------------------

To be verified

9. Afrisam Dudfield Factory 1

018 633 6026

------------------

To be verified

10. Tyreking Worcester

023 347 4214/5

 

To be verified

11. De Beers Consolidated Mines - Namaqualand

027 807 3252

------------------

2 000 tyres covering 9 973 m2

12. Cullinan Diamond Mine (Pty) Ltd

012 305 2911

 

To be verified

13. Middelburg Mine Services

013 249 3232

082 776 6616

To be verified

14. Middelburg Mine Services (North Hard Park)

013 249 3232

-------------------

396 tyres covering 10 000 m2 area

15. Sishen Iron Ore, Thabazimbi Mine

014 777 3137

-------------------

To be verified

16. D Nienaber

 

-------------------

3961 tyres covering 19 818 m2 area

17. PMC Palabora Mining Company

015 780 2537

-------------------

To be verified

18. Leslie David Woest

 

--------------------

54 tyres on 1 200 m2 area

19. PPC Lime Ltd

053 385 8200

--------------------

To be verified

20. Exxaro Coal (Pty) Ltd Grootgeluk Coal Mine

014 763 9288

--------------------

Estimated to be at least 700 tyres but not yet verified

21. Sishen Iron Ore Company

053 739 2800

--------------------

To be verified

22. Marico Chrome Corp

018 350 9906

--------------------

1245 tyres

23. Transhex Group (Ltd)

027 831 8138

--------------------

To be verified

24. L A Crushers (Pty) Ltd

015 781 6000

--------------------

To be verified

25. Emmerentia S.M. Pretorius

 

--------------------

To be verified

26. Transnet National Ports Authority Saldanha

022 703 5450

--------------------

To be verified

27. Transnet National Ports Authority Richards Bay

035 905 3310

--------------------

To be verified

28. Assmang Limited Black Rock Mine Operations

053 751 5555

--------------------

Estimated at 2 000 tyres but not yet verified

29. Anglo Operation (Pty) Ltd

013 693 0256

--------------------

To be verified

30. Isibonelo Colliery

017 620 2714

--------------------

To be verified

31. Anglo American Ltd: Mogalakwena Platinum Mine

015 418 2518

--------------------

To be verified

32. Venetia Mine (Pty) Ltd

015 575 2004

--------------------

To be verified

33. Wolvekrans (36)

013 689 4028

--------------------

To be verified

34. Wolvekrans (37)

013 689 4028

--------------------

2332 tyres

35. Black Mountain Mining

054 983 9687/66

--------------------

810 tyres covering an area of 895 m2 area

36. Dwarsrivier Chrome Mine

013 230 4877

--------------------

---ooOoo---

01 October 2018 - NW2651

Profile picture: Purdon, Mr RK

Purdon, Mr RK to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) What is the name of each (i) organisation and/or (ii) association that her department met with regarding (aa) the sale of lion bone and (bb) lion hunting (aaa) in each of the past three financial years and (bbb) since 1 April 2018, (b) what format did each meeting take, (c) on what date did each meeting take place, (d) what is the name of each person who was present at each meeting and (e) what were the outcomes of each meeting?

Reply:

(a) (i) and/or (ii) (aa)

It is assumed that this question relates to the lion bone export quota allocation.

The decision on lion bone export quota arose from the 17th meeting of Parties to the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), in 2016. The initial determination of the quota was in 2017, whereby an export quota of 800 skeletons (with or without skull) was determined. The quota was subsequently implemented as such.

As part of the quota determination, the Department conducted a meeting with various stakeholders as listed below:

  • Provincial conservation departments
  • South Africa Breeders Association
  • NGO (anti sustainable use and pro sustainable use NGOs)
  • Media
  • Hunting organizations
  • Lion bone traders
  • Lion breeders
  • Private individuals

(bb) Hunting of lions is regulated in terms of the National and Provincial legislations. Due to the fact that hunting permits are issued by the Members of Executive Council (MECs) at the Provincial level (regulation of hunting occurs at the Provincial level), the Department is not actively involved in decision making of hunting activities.

It is for this reason that the Department had not had a meeting with an organisation or association specifically regarding lion hunting in the past three financial years and since 1 April 2018.

(b) Presentations were made by the Department (as the CITES Management Authority) and the Chair of CITES Scientific Authority (South African National Biodiversity Institute – SANBI). Organisations who were willing to make presentations at the consultation meeting, were also afforded an opportunity to present (such as EWT, Linda Tucker Foundation and Save the Rhino). In addition, the meeting was open for discussions, the participants were given an opportunity to voice their views.

 

(c) On 17 January 2017 there was a meeting between the National Department of Environmental Affairs, Scientific Authority and relevant Provincial Departments. On 18 January 2017 there was a consultation session between all the organisations mentioned in (a)(aa) above and the Department, including the Scientific Authority.

(d) Please refer to the attached attendance register for both the meetings.

(e) The comments raised were considered when determining the 2017 and 2018 lion bone export quota. The decision on the quota was also communicated to the public.

The meeting on 17 January 2017 agreed that government stakeholders will provide comments. The wider stakeholder meeting on 18 January agreed to provide comments to the Department by 2 February 2017 and it was agreed that the Department forward those comments to the Scientific Authority for consideration in order to establish the quota.

 

It was therefore agreed that the Department will meet with the Scientific Authority by end of February 2017 and the quota be set by the beginning of March 2017.

---ooOoo---

21 September 2018 - NW2532

Profile picture: Steenkamp, Ms J

Steenkamp, Ms J to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(1)Did Recycling and Economic Development of South Africa purchase two shredders (details furnished); if so, (a) are these units located at the Anglo American Mogalakwena open-pit platinum mine site and Ferrobank and (b) who currently owns the specified machines; (2) (a) were the machines ever sold and/or leased to any private individual or company and (b) has any contract to lease/own or operate the machines ever been awarded to any individual or company; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) (a) will the Waste Bureau be disposing of the two assets, (b) who operates each of the machines and (c) was any contract to supply waste tyres awarded to the operator of each of these machines; if so, (i) what is the tonnage of waste tyres allocated to each operator and (ii) who pays the owner/operator of the machine located at Implats; (4) whether she has found that the supply and operation of the shredders are imposing restrictive trade and business practices to any new entrants to the off-the-road processing, thereby compromising their ability to commercialise processing and provide employment; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a)

Yes

(b)

The machines are owned by Recycling and Economic Development Initiative of South Africa (REDISA) (in liquidation).

(2) (a)

The department has no knowledge of the machines ever being sold and/or leased to a private individual or company.

(b)

The Waste Bureau through its service providers operates these machines at Mogalakwena mine and Ferrobank.

(3) (a)

No, the machines are owned by REDISA (in liquidation) and are under the control of the liquidators.

(b)

Waste Bureau is contracted with Waste Beneficiation which is a company that was contracted previously by Redisa currently in the use of the equipment on its behalf at Mogalakwena mine, and with TMT Projects and Consultations (Pty) Ltd for the equipment at Ferrobank depot.

(c) the contract was entered with after approval by national treasury.

(i)

The contract with Mogalakwena mine is for a maximum of 10 800 tons. There is no set maximum for Ferrobank depot.

(ii)

The Waste Bureau pays operators.

(4) The operation of the shredders is not imposing any restrictive trade and business practices to new entrants. The Waste Bureau is mandated to collect post-levy Off The Road (OTR) waste tyres from wherever they are generated and divert them away from landfills. The OTR waste tyres, due to their extra-large size, require downsizing before transportation (some OTR tyres require abnormal load vehicles for transportation) and further on-processing. The current waste tyre recycling operations are not designed to handle OTR waste tyres, hence it is important to downsize in order for them to be recycled. The Waste Bureau is therefore shredding post-levy OTR waste tyres so that they can be transported and recycled. As stipulated in Waste Tyre Regulations 2017, the owners of pre-levy historical stockpiles are responsible for the abatement of these stockpiles, and private sector participants can approach and assist the owners with the abatement of these stockpiles without the involvement of the Waste Bureau.

---ooOoo---

21 September 2018 - NW2538

Profile picture: Matsepe, Mr CD

Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

Who will (a) benefit from the additional shredding machines sourced by the Waste Management Bureau at significant cost and (b) be the recipient of the processing machines?

Reply:

a) The beneficiaries will be the citizens of South Africa through continued downsizing and recycling of OTR (Oversized Tire Reduction) waste tyres, irrespective of the outcome of the liquidation process.

b) The Waste Bureau is the recipient of the processing machines.

---ooOoo---

21 September 2018 - NW2212

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs

(a) Whether she will advise of the reasons why the update of the status of the norms and standards for leopards and hunting quotas have not yet been released and (b) by what date will the 2018 leopard hunting quotas be released?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Environmental Affairs (DEA) is finalising the assessment of comments received during the public participation process. Subsequently, the draft norms and standards for the management and monitoring of the hunting of leopard in South Africa for trophy hunting purposes will be processed for approval and implementation. Such a process will involve cooperative governance arrangements and consultations with Provinces, national departments like Agriculture Forestry and Fisheries and parliament.

(b) The 2018 leopard hunting quota has already been allocated and a media statement informing the public about this was published on 12 August 2018.

---ooOoo---