Questions and Replies

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29 June 2022 - NW334

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the detailed progress made to date with regards to the building of the Foot and Mouth Disease facility at the estimated costs of R500 million?

Reply:

The first allocation for the FMD vaccine factory was made in the 2007/2008 financial year. A figure of R214 million was allocated by the National Treasury over a four–year period. An additional figure of R400 million was allocated over the MTEF beginning in 2019-2022.

The process of establishing a GMP compliant facility started with the development of new production methods. This process is to ensure that there is capability for production of GMP compliant vaccines at scale once the new factory is completed. This involves processes such as optimisation of cell culture production, optimisation of antigen production, production of master seed stocks, validation of antigenicity, scaling production to pilot amounts, optimisation of downstream processing and optimisation of formulation. This process is ongoing and will continue during the establishment of the new factory.

In preparing for the GMP compliant facility, construction preparatory work was undertaken. This process involved the management of land rights including necessary zoning, environmental, infrastructural/ external services, legal requirements in relation to such land rights (obtaining the title deed, Surveyor-General diagram, municipal account, and approval).

Currently, the project plan for the GMP compliant facility is at the stage of appointment of service providers. This process is to ensure that the specifications for the appointment of service providers to design various aspects of the project (process engineers, architectural designer, mechanical engineers, electrical and electronics engineers, quantity surveyors, civil and structural engineers as well as other key appointments such as fire engineers, occupational health safety and environmental practitioners is concluded. Appointment of service providers for the built environment has been approved by Council and is underway subject to service level agreements. Service providers will commence work immediately upon conclusion of these contracts.

29 June 2022 - NW2205

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) is the extent of the land that has been redistributed to black people in total as a result of the land redistribution programme of her department as at the latest specified date for which information is available, (b) is the breakdown of the redistributed land in respect of each province and (c) amount has it cost her department to buy land for redistribution since 27 April 1994?

Reply:

a) As at 31 March 2022, a total of 5 198 594 hectares has been redistributed to black people.

b) Provincial breakdown of redistributed land, in hectares:

Provinces

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NW

NC

WC

Redistributed Land

569 189

434 799

63 575

621 674

197 973

498 426

594 297

1 622 208

596 453

c) Since 27 April 1994, an amount of R 19 809 billion cost the Department to buy land for redistribution.

29 June 2022 - NW2326

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What measures have been put in place to contain the shortages in fuel availability as a major input to agricultural output, food production and supply chains?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development does not regulate fuel. The Department of Mineral Resources and Energy is best placed to respond to this question.

29 June 2022 - NW2325

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What measures have been put in place to deal with the limited availability of critical agricultural products such as (a) seeds, (b) fertilisers, (c) pesticides and (d) equipment (i) during and (ii) post the Russian-Ukraine conflict?

Reply:

(a),(b),(c),(d),(i),(ii) None. After consultation with the industry, there is no indication of supply shortages of critical agricultural products such as seeds, fertilisers, pesticides and equipment. However, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development will monitor the impact of the ongoing conflict.

29 June 2022 - NW2234

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

In light of the fact that her department spent R89 million buying Uitkyk Farm in Fezile Dabi District Municipality in the Free State and the very same farm is utilised by the previous owners who continues to exploit farmworkers who just continue to draw just a meagre salary at the farm whilst the owners make millions out of the farm, on what legislative provisions did her department rely when it appointed a certain person (name furnished) as Acting Chief Director for the Free State, despite the fact that the specified person was suspended for the mess during the sale of the Uitkyk Farm?

Reply:

The appointment was made in terms of Section 32(2)(b)(ii) of the Public Service Act, 1994, (as amended) and the Acting Appointments Policy of the Department

29 June 2022 - NW2203

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) number of the land restitution claims lodged by the 1998 deadline have been settled (i) to date and (ii) by means of (aa) restoration of land, (bb) granting of alternative pieces of land and (cc) financial compensation, (b) number of hectares of land has been transferred to claimants since the beginning of land restitution and (c) amount has each of the forms of restitution cost her department since the beginning of land restitution?

Reply:

(a)(i) 82 549 claims have been settled, the figure excludes the report on urban claims from 2006 to 2011/12, the verification of the statistics is work in progress because during the various stages of settling the claims counting changed from counting land claims forms to counting land rights restored.

(ii)(aa) 8 938 claims settled through land restoration (the number is not a reflection of the extent e.g one claim can represent 2 hectares in the Western Cape but 20 000 hectares in North West.

(bb) Falls away, the restoration of land includes both alternative and original restored.

(cc) 69 933 claims settled through financial compensation.

b) 2 892 966 hectares transferred and 3835167 hectares settled.

(c) Land cost is R24,578,801,491.71

Financial Compensation is R17,361,570,718.22

Approved Development Grants is R 4,018,918,373.87

END

 

29 June 2022 - NW2115

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)What is the total number of farms that have been successfully leased since the advertisement of pieces of land by her department; (2) whether any support was provided by her department to all farmers who were successful with their applications; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.Since the advertisement of pieces of land by the Department Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD), a total number of 204 farms are fully leased, while another 72 farms are partially leased (land units).

2. DALRRD has conducted farm assessments on 654 of these farms and provided training on 94 farms, covering 165 farmers. Skills audit has also been conducted, report of which informed the training priorities. Start-up support packages based on farm assessments have been developed to be implemented this current financial year. This planned support will be directed to the 165 farmers in 94 farms that were trained in business and entrepreneurship. The farms are distributed as follows:

  • Limpopo 40;
  • Mpumalanga 30; and
  • Northwest: 24.

This approach is in line with the recently approved National Policy on Beneficiary Selection and Land Allocation.

29 June 2022 - NW1874

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the Cathedral Peak Outgrowers Project in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, what are the details of all (a) government and (b) private persons and/or entities who (i) are currently participants in the project and (ii) have been participants in the project since its inception; (2) what are details of all contributions made to the project by each (a) government and (b) private person and/or entity; (3) what are details of any payments made to any persons and/or entities involved in the project; (4) what are details of all (a) consultants who are and/or have been involved in the project and (b) the services that they rendered?

Reply:

1. The tables below lists the stakeholders in the project and their participation over the years: (a) refers to government stakeholders and (b) to private person/ entities:

(a) Name of Govt Stakeholder

Years in Participation

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

(a) KZN-COGTA

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

N

(a) KZN-DARD

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

(a) KZN-ADA

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project Funding

N

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

(a) Okhahlamba Local Municipality

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(a) KZN-EDTEA

Project Steering Committee

N

N

N

N

Y

Y

N

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(b) Name of Private Stakeholder

Years in Participation

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

(b) Grain Hills Agri (Pty) Ltd- (Mentor)

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

Y

Y

Y

Y

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(b) Cathedral Peak Wine Estate- (Off taker for Winegrape’s)

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(b) Beneficiaries

(the Cooperatives in each site)

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(b) Traditional Council Representatives

Project Steering Committee

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

Y

 

Project implementing

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

 

Project Funding

N

N

N

N

N

N

N

(2)(a) The project in its entirety was an initiative of the Okhahlamba Local Municipality, with its concept and business plan used to source initial funding from COGTA. Funding was approved by COGTA for commencement with implementation in the 2015/16 financial year. COGTA therefore provided project initiation funding and could not fund the project beyond the first two years of implementation.

COGTA then effectively contributed 14% of the total project funding until year two of implementation.

At that time of funding approval, the KZN Provincial Agribusiness Development Agency (ADA) was appointed as the project implementing agent for the project on this site which was in the 2015/16 financial year.

The ADA is a provincial entity of the Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DARD) which implements commercial agribusiness projects for the department. The DARD through ADA, continued to fund the project from 2018/19 until 2020/21 when project review indicated that the project would not be sustainable without perpetual government support based on possible income expected from the wine grapes. The DARD then effectively contributed 86% of the total project funding until year five of implementation.

The ADA further appointed Grain Hills Agri (Pty) Ltd as mentor to provide overall capacity building and skills transfer to the beneficiaries including production and business management in relation to grapes enterprises.

Market for the wine grapes was secured with Cathedral Peak Wine Estate, a wine producer/processor in Winterton.

(b) No funding was received from private persons or entities for this project

3. Please refer to Annexure A.

4. (a),(b) Please refer to Annexure A which includes details of consultants who are, and/or have been involved in the project and the services that they rendered.

29 June 2022 - NW1691

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of the total number of 428 communal property associations (CPAs) in Mpumalanga are (a) compliant, (b) never compliant and/or (c) partially compliant with the provisions of the Communal Property Associations Act, Act 28 of 1996; (2) what are the reasons and/or factors as to why the CPAs are in the specified categories?

Reply:

The department is busy consolidating the figures and a detailed reply will be submitted once finalised.

 

29 June 2022 - NW1690

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of the total number of 1 707 established communal property associations are regarded as (a) functional and/or (b) operational?

Reply:

a) Of the total number of 1707 CPAs that have been registered, 1612 CPAs are functional.

b) Of the total number of 1707 CPAs that have been registered, 1612 CPAs are operational.

29 June 2022 - NW1034

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) has been the impact of the recent rainfalls on crop farmers who harvest their produce on a monthly basis and (b) measures has she put in place to assist farmers who may have been negatively affected?

Reply:

a) The start of South Africa's 2021/22 summer crop production season was challenging for farmers and agricultural role players because of excessive rains that delayed planting in various regions and threatened crop yield prospects. But the past few weeks were calm with reasonably warm weather conditions in much of the country, thus supporting crops and easing concerns about the possibility of smaller yields due to excessive soil moisture. The data released by the Crop Estimates Committee on 28 February 2022 underscores this optimistic view of crop conditions. For example, while the 2021/22 first production estimate for maize is 14,5 million tons, down 11% year-on-year (previous season=16,3 million tons), this is well above the 10-year average harvest of 12,8 million tons and annual maize consumption of about 11,8 million tons. About 7,54 million tons is white maize, and 6,99 million tons is yellow maize. The yearly decline is mainly due to a reduction in area plantings, combined with expected lower yields in some districts. Importantly, this means that South Africa will likely remain a net exporter of maize in the 2022/23 marketing year, which starts in May (this corresponds with the 2021/22 production season). The exports for the 2022/23 marketing year is expected to be 2,8 million tons, which is 28% less than the 3,9 million tons of the 2021/22 marketing year.

The soybean's 2021/22 crop is estimated at 1,82 million tons, down by 4% year on year, and the second largest harvest on record. The expansion in area plantings, combined with expected better yields in some districts, are the major factors behind these expected relatively large harvests. On the upside, the 2021/22 sunflower seed production is forecasted at 914 350 tons, up by 35% year on year. This is the third-largest harvest on record, primarily due to an expansion in area plantings and expected better yields in some regions. Thus, there is enough supplies for South Africa and the neighboring Southern African Custom Union (SACU) countries for the foreseeable future, and therefore no need to panic that the country could experience shortages. We have benefitted from good harvests of a range of crops and fruits and have already imported a large share of products that we are import-dependent on, such as wheat and rice..

b) To date, the Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) of the United Nations and the World Food Programme (WFP) have reached out to DALRRD for possible collaboration in formulating and implementing a food security response to the situation as follows:

  • The FAO and WFP have availed immediate technical support towards strengthening the assessment of the impact to the agriculture sector. This support includes the rapid geospatial analysis that was undertaken by the FAO starting from the 11 to 20 March 2022 and work on finalising the Geospatial analysis draft report on the likely impact;
  • The WFP has also availed drones for conducting the assessment in areas that are not easily accessible. DALRRD is in the process of requesting the clearance from the Aviation Authority;
  • Both organisations are keen to work with the national and provincial government in planning and implementing the mid to long term food security interventions that are aimed at restoring livelihoods that have been disrupted by this situation; and
  • Task teams have been set up and response implementation plan developed and costed under National Disaster Management Centre to provide much needed support to affected farmers.

The following are the short-term interventions from DALRRD:

  • Rehabilitation of infields roads to the amount of R23 083 100;
  • Assistance to farm workers, dwellers and vulnerable households amounting to R56 930 000;
  • Soil fertility soil PH balance support (soil testing, liming and fertiliser support scheme to farmers) amounting to R1 238 000;
  • Supply household garden packages (household food security intervention): R5 million budgeted for this initiative;
  • Soil liming for R6 484 000;
  • Crop Maintenance to the value of R20 840 400;
  • Support re-enforcement of Bio security measures of farms to the value of R10 million;
  • R19 481 365 is budgeted for resuscitating livestock operations on affected farms; and
  • Sugar cane support initiative amounting to R71 590 400.

The budget required for these interventions is R214 647 265 and the reprioritised budget amounts to R60 524 000, resulting in a shortfall of R154 123 265.

The medium to long term interventions are the following:

  • Replanting programme (production input support for crop enterprises) 772 farmers to be assisted to the value of R75 257 000
  • Expansion of household food security programme (household garden packages), 1500 households, amount required here is R15 million
  • Rehabilitation of the tunnels, eight (08) projects with 35 tunnels to be erected to the value of R7 million
  • Rehabilitation of the fencing, 26 projects to be fenced for the distance of 33,5km costing R3 224 000
  • Rehabilitation of irrigation, 16 projects covering 57 hectares to the value of R5 670 000
  • 14 animal housing projects amounting to R3 038 000
  • 17 dipping tanks projects to the value of R2 707 300

It is envisaged that the above-mentioned projects will cost R111 896 300 in total.

29 June 2022 - NW981

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With regard to the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP) that plans to accelerate the opening of markets and better access conditions, (a) will she furnish Mr N P Masipa with a list of markets that were opened since 2019 and (b) what changes in conditions regarding market access were made to date as a result of the AAMP; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

Plant and Animal Products Export Markets from 2019 to date:

(a) Markets opened since 2019

  • Market access for the export of South African Pears to China was granted in 2021 and the protocol of sanitary and phytosanitary requirements for the export of pears from the Republic of South Africa to the People’s Republic of China was signed on 30 November 2021. The implementation date for the signed protocol was confirmed to be 17 January 2022.
  • Market access for the export of South African Citrus to the Philippines was granted in 2020. The protocol was signed on 20 July 2020.
  • Poultry meat market access to the United Arab Emirates (UAE) was granted in 2019.
  • The market for the export of raw beef to Malaysia was opened. The Malaysian Veterinary Authority approved an abattoir to start exporting in October 2020.
  • Wool, hides and skins were exported to the People’s Republic of China after a new health certificate was negotiated in 2020.
  • Live cattle, sheep, and goat health certificates were negotiated with Botswana in 2020.

(b) Changes in conditions regarding market access made to date:

The revised protocol of phytosanitary requirements for the export of South African citrus fruit to China was signed on 18 June 2021. South Africa has been exporting citrus to China under a protocol that was bilaterally agreed upon and signed on 21 June 2006. Under this protocol, the potential risk of a false codling moth (FCM), a pest of quarantine concern to the People’s Republic of China, was addressed through a cold treatment regime of 24 days at 0.6°C in transit which was not ideal for lemons. Currently, under the revised protocol, cold treatment for lemons will be 3°C or below for not less than 18 consecutive days.

  • Re-opened markets since 2019: Botswana, ESwatini and Namibia have been re-opened.
  • Poultry Meat markets in the process of negotiation: Saudi Arabia and the United Kingdom.
  • Beef markets re-opened since 2019 in Angola, Bahrain, Botswana, China, Egypt, Jordan, Kuwait, Lesotho, Mozambique, Qatar, Seychelles, eSwatini, UAE and Zimbabwe.

New Markets Opened for Imports

YEAR

COMMODITY

EXPORT COUNTRY

2022

Avocado fresh fruit (Persea americana)

Tanzania

2022

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

Peru

2021

Avocado fresh fruit (Persea americana) for processing

Tanzania

2021

Apple fresh fruit (Malus spp.)

Lesotho

2021

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

India

2020

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

Egypt

2020

Pineapple fresh fruit (Ananas comosus)

Angola

2019

Citrus fresh fruit (Citrus spp.)

Morocco

2019

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

Brazil

2019

Citrus fresh fruit (Citrus spp.) for processing

Spain

2019

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

Spain

Revised Phytosanitary Import Requirements (Plant Products)

YEAR

COMMODITY

EXPORT COUNTRY

2022

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Mozambique

2022

Mango fresh fruit (Mangifera indica)

Namibia

2021

Pepper (Capsicum spp.)

Namibia

2021

Watermelon (Citrullus spp.)

Namibia

2021

Melon and cucumber (Cucumis spp.)

Namibia

2021

Pumpkins (Cucurbita spp.)

Namibia

2021

Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum)

Namibia

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Eswatini

2020

Citrus fresh fruit (Citrus spp.)

Eswatini

2020

Avocado fresh fruit (Persea americana)

Eswatini

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Ghana

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Uganda

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Ivory Coast

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Zambia

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Zimbabwe

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Angola

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Ecuador

2020

Banana fresh fruit (Musa spp.)

Cameroon

Revised Sanitary and Phytosanitary Import Requirements (Animals And Animal Products)

YEAR

COMMODITY

EXPORT COUNTRY

2019

Porcine semen

France

2020

Frozen pork, porcine semen

Belgium

2021

Frozen pork

Germany

2022

Cured and heat-treated pork products

Italy

New Markets Opened for Imports Animal Product

YEAR

COMMODITY

EXPORT COUNTRY

2019

Heat treated pork and poultry

France

2019

Heat treated pork

Hungary

2021

Heat treated pork

Germany

(b) The Agriculture and Agro-processing Masterplan (AAMP) has recently been signed by the Government together with its social partners. Following the signing in May, branches in the Department initiated the process of incorporating the Master Plan into their Operational Plans. As a result, no conditions with regard to market access can be attributed to the AAMP as yet.

29 June 2022 - NW841

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total amount in Rand has been spent on (a) catering, (b) entertainment and (c) accommodation for (i) her, (ii) the Deputy Ministers and (iii) officials of her department since 29 May 2019?

Reply:

The department is busy consolidating the figures and a detailed reply will be submitted once finalised.

21 June 2022 - NW1953

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of the (a) costs to her department of building the 35 houses at Mtsweni-Letswalo Communal Property Association (CPA) in the Emakhazeni Local Municipality and (b) contractors who did the work if work was done through awarding tenders; (2) what are the details of the current farming and/or business activities regarding the purchase of the (a) Paardeplaats and (b) Rietfontein farms which add up to a total of 377 ha; (3) whether her department is considering to divide the farms and provide each owner with a title deed; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) Details of the cost of building 35 houses are:

DETAILS OF THE COST

Qty

Rate

Amount

Planning and design services by architectural, civil and electrical engineer. Including construction supervision and monitoring for 12 months

1

R1 813 440,05

R1 813 440,05

Construction of 64m2 house, with three-bedroom, open plan kitchen and living room, bathroom with shower and toilet,

35

R 433 297,31

R15 165 405,85

Off-grid 5Kva solar power producing 10KWh per day, with power bank for two days. Including 150L Solar Geysers installed on 35 houses and 1 RDP house built by Municipality for storm damage victim was also powered with solar

36

R 176 975,14

R 6 371 105,04

Sewer reticulation and septic tanks installed to two sites divided by national highway in Paardeplaats Farm

2

R 961 865,51

R 1 923 731,02

Sewer reticulation and septic tanks installed to two sites divided by river stream in Rietfontein

2

R 300 178,75

R 600 357,50

Water reticulation in two sites in Paardeplaats including two 20 000L Elevated tanks, drilling of two Boreholes equipped with refurbished of old windmills

2

R 635 216,26

R 1 270 432,52

Water reticulation in two sites in Rietfontein including two 10 000L Elevated tanks, drilling of two Boreholes equipped with new of solar pumps

2

R 486 695,00

R 973 390,00

Rehabilitation of 4KM gravel access road in Rietfontein and rehabilitation of site drainage in Paardeplaats Farm

1

R 797 421,00

R 797 421,00

b) The details of the contractors who did the work is Masikhane Civil Contractors CC of 855 Longclaw Flight Street, Hazeview 1242 with registration number 1999/011128/23 and CIDB registration number 110071.

(2) Details of current farming and/or business activities:

a) The Department purchased the Remaining Extent of portion 15 of the farm Paardeplaats 380 JT measuring 39.9301 in settlement of 6 labour tenants claims and secured land tenure of 59 farm dwellers. The current agricultural activities are subsistence farming in the form of crops and livestock. The Department is in engagement with the beneficiaries to assist with other development activities.

b) The Department purchased portion 7 of the farm Rietfontein 365 JT measuring 126.1129 and portion 17 of the farm Rietfontein 365 JT measuring 212.5430 which makes a total of 338.6559 in extent in settlement of 2 labour tenants claims and secured land tenure of 23 farm dwellers. The current agricultural activities are subsistence farming in the form of crops and livestock. The Department is in engagement with the beneficiaries to assist with other development activities.

(3) Yes. The Department has assisted the communities to establish legal entities namely; Siyaphumula Communal Property Associations for Paardeplaats community and Mtsweni-Letswalo Communal Property Associations for Rietfontein community. Should the CPAs take a resolution to allocate title deeds to each household, the Department will then assist with subdivision and transfer of land to individual households in title guided by policy provisions.

21 June 2022 - NW1395

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

By what date will the Government implement initiatives on digital agriculture ecosystems that target rural areas for increased food production and security?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has developed an electronic export certification system which already enables all farmers to apply for the inspection of orchards and of goods to determine if they adhere to the importing countries standards and food safety requirements, completely electronically. The system went live in November 2019, is used by more than 3000 agricultural sector clients throughout the country, including farmers or companies that do not have computer systems. This system is used by farmers, traders, logistics companies, Food Business Operators, Pack houses, exporters.

The Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture is collaborating with the eCert system in the development of the Export control office System (ECOS) system which is an animal meat export system which will enable the export of meat products. The system was tested in the Western Cape on 15 November 2021. The Northern Cape is busy with testing and piloting the system to be possibly rolled out later this year. The system focuses on the value chain from the abattoir onwards for meat and on the dairy milking parlour onwards. The system will work with/integrate with the Livestock Traceability System for South Africa (LITSA).

DALRRD in collaboration with the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) is busy developing a LITSA system which will manage the movement and traceability of cattle initially and later on all animals. This system affects all animal farmers but in particular the Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) affected provinces of South Africa and will help to manage the disease and facilitate trade in meat products once South Africa’s FMD free status has been re-instated. The system will integrate with the eCert System.

The Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative has resulted in a system being developed that allowed rural farmers to get electronic vouchers which could be redeemed once they received their agricultural inputs from service providers. The survey 123 system also enables georeferencing of departmental projects.

The Western Cape and Free State Provincial Departments of Agriculture have been doing extensive research and development on the use of drones. The Free State is using them to manage stock theft. Western Cape mainly use them to monitor crops and apply precision arial spray, amongst others.

21 June 2022 - NW1234

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What practical steps have been taken by her department recently to provide developmental assistance to persons living in rural, impoverished areas?

Reply:

The steps are as follows:

Government’s comprehensive support to farmers:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is part of the multispectral committee that is coordinated by the Presidency to implement the National Food and Nutrition Security Plan (NFNSP). There are a number of interventions implemented under the NFNS Plan towards ensuring food and nutrition security. Efforts are being strengthened on an ongoing basis to increase greater access to support for all farmer categories. The Presidential Employment Stimulus (PES) continues towards to support subsistence producer with the aim of ensuring food production at household level. Under this initiative more than 66 000 subsistence producers have been supported to retain self-employment in the agricultural sector, thereby contributing to food security and economic growth. The PES is implemented amidst deliberate efforts that are also made to transform the agricultural sector and allow new players from historically disadvantaged backgrounds. The number of Extension Officers in the 44 districts across the nine provinces is being increased to strengthen extension and advisory services to farmers.

Intensifying agricultural production:

The DALRRD continues to support agricultural producers and increasing domestic food production through departmental programmes such as the Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) / Ilima-Letsema.

Land development and post settlement support:

The Land development and post settlement is implemented within the current budgetary constraints. The current policy and programmes are being strengthened to ensure an inclusive and holistic approach to support provided and maximise food production on available land.

Rural Development:

The Department’s Rural Development Mandate Outcome 6: Integrated and inclusive rural economy. The department is engaged with the finalisation of the Draft Integrated Rural Development Strategy, building on the lessons learnt from the implementation of Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and the Integrated Sustainable Rural Development Strategy (ISRDS). The department continues to play its role to Initiate, facilitate, coordinate and act as a catalyst for the implementation of a comprehensive rural development programme leading to sustainable and vibrant rural communities working closely with provincial and other national department through the District Development Model and Rural District Plans working with all national and provincial government departments and Traditional Councils.

The National Development Plan (NDP) (2012) identifies the following four key points relating to rural development: (i) Rural communities require greater social, economic, and political opportunities to overcome poverty; (ii) To achieve this, agricultural development should introduce a land reform and job-creation/livelihood strategy that ensures rural communities have jobs; (iii) Ensure quality access to basic services, health care, education, and food security; and (iii) plans for rural towns should be tailor-made according to the varying opportunities in each area. Intergovernmental relations should be addressed to improve rural governance.

The Department remains the driver of the Agri-Parks Programme that aims to uplift impoverished rural communities into the Agricultural value chain. The Department provides critical infrastructure such as fencing and irrigation to rural communities to assist them, with improving their production. These communities are linked into Farmer Production Support Units, which are constructed in rural areas to provide communities with agricultural support services. The Department continues to construct Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) that provide rural communities with a range of facilities such as mechanisation, pelleting machines for feed, silos to store grain, pack houses with refrigeration, access to state vets and training. Many of these services was in the past only reserved for commercial farmers in rural areas. This allows for rural communities to improve their production and enter the agricultural value chain with their small-scale produce and creates a sustainable path out of poverty. The current programmes through which the department executives its work includes:

  • Socio-economic infrastructure projects to support Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs), Animal and Veld Management Programme (AVMP) and River Valley Catalytic Programme (RVCP). This includes mechanization such as: fencing, animal handling facilities, stock water dams, boreholes, canals, dip tanks, pump houses, pack houses, irrigation pipes and schemes, silos and storage facilities and rural roads. The road infrastructure remains a high priority in national, provincial, municipal and farm roads to promote economic viability through safer, swift transport logistics of agricultural produce. As part of the implementation of the Comprehensive Rural Development Programme (CRDP) and Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP), repair and rehabilitation of rural roads is critical to facilitate road logistics from farm to habour and to market. The Department is co-ordinating a Public-Private Partnership initiative which will include national, provincial and local governments as well as agricultural organisations;
  • Development and Implementation of Skills development opportunities to rural youth through the National Rural Youth Services Corps (NARYSEC) which aims to build capacity of rural youth through various skills development interventions and working with public and private sector partners to facilitate the transitioning of recruited youth into economic activities; and
  • Research of new innovative technologies, including Information and Communications Technology (ICT), and promote indigenous knowledge systems into rural communities to contributes towards improving the quality of lives of rural communities working in partnership and collaboration with institutions of higher learning, research agencies and technology agencies.

21 June 2022 - NW1529

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What plans have been implemented in the Poultry Sector Master Plan adopted in 2019, in order to mitigate the effects of the importation and/or dumping of chicken products from Brazil and European countries?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) contributes to the Poultry Master Plan mainly from the Sanitary and Phytosanitary point of view. Veterinary guidelines relevant to poultry have been updated. This is supplemented with training of developing poultry farmers to ensure their participation in the sector. Challenges that are identified with some importing countries’ legislation are constantly being addressed to ensure compliance.

DALRRD continues to encourage poultry producers to use existing compartments which are monitored on a regular basis. An important market that has been identified includes Saudi Arabia and the questions they are asking are being addressed. Heat treated poultry is now consistently being exported to the United Arab Emirates as a health certificate has now been agreed to.

The poultry industry and DALRRD are working on an acceptable residue monitoring programme to make it possible for more markets to be opened. Recently, the United Kingdom has provided guidelines that will be taken into consideration as negotiations begin. The Sub-Region has managed to open its doors for South African poultry despite concerns of outbreaks of Avian Influenza in some provinces.

There are response mechanisms in place which are triggered whenever; there is a case of dumping from any of the country’s trade partners. In the year since the Poultry Master Plan, a new tariff was put on imported poultry to provide protection to local production. Industry complaints with regard to the observed dumping of bone-in chicken meat imports in the Southern African Customs Union market received a positive response in the form of Provisional Anti-Dumping duties imposed on the products in question. Anti-Dumping duties were imposed on the following countries by the International Trade Administration Commission (ITAC) between January and June 2022:

No.

Country

Rate of Duty Prior to January 2022

New Anti-Dumping Duties from January 2022 to June 2022

1

Brazil

MFN Duty of 62%

265%

2

Denmark

Duty free

67.4%

3

Ireland

Duty free

158.4%

4

Poland

Duty free

96.9%

5

Spain

Duty free

85.8%

To support the implementation of the poultry master plan, DALRRD entered into a collaboration with the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) to provide blended funding to poultry producers and expand production to meet the local demand as well as for exports. The IDC has funded 5 black commercial producers to date at a combined value of R152 million of which R77 million was the grant portion, creating 149 jobs. The five applicants were from Gauteng, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal. Three of the approved transactions were poultry farm expansions with an average cycle of 430 000 chickens per cycle.

Furthermore, in the 2021/22 financial year, the DALRRD made available R130, 249 million from CASP and Ilima/Letsema as shown in the table below. This investment was meant to support 3 857 poultry farmers with poultry structures, feed and medication, and create 2 183 jobs; with an average cycle of 31 440 chickens per cycle. The table below further shows the planned outputs per province. The Provincial Departments of Agriculture implement these programmes and the 2021/22 annual reports are being audited.

Province

CASP Allocation R'000

Ilima/Letsema Allocation R'000

Total Invested in Poultry in 2021/22 through Conditional Grants

R'000

Planned Outputs

CASP Jobs

Ilima/Letsema Jobs

Total Jobs

Farmers Supported

Eastern Cape

4 300

3 600

7 900

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

23

0

23

15

Free State

3 500

1 522

5 022

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

4

0

4

2

Gauteng

11 491

14 500

25 991

3 Poultry structures; production inputs

6

70

76

35

KwaZulu Natal

22 682

0

22 682

3 Poultry structures; production inputs

348

0

348

386

Limpopo

1 544

14 370

15 914

1 Poultry structures; production inputs

23

1 589

1 612

1 046

Mpumalanga

30 150

0

30 150

4 Poultry structures; production inputs

55

0

55

9

Northern Cape

3 100

0

3 100

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

6

0

6

7

North West

10 600

0

10 600

2 Poultry structures; production inputs

22

0

22

2

Western Cape

 

8 890

8 890

1 Poultry structure; production inputs

22

15

37

54

Total

87 367

42 882

130 249

 

509

1 674

2 183

1556

21 June 2022 - NW1530

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Given that the Poultry Sector Master Plan indicates that the Republic needs to grow the poultry industry for both local and export production in order to expand local capacity, what plans and/or strategies does her department have in place to ensure that the Republic protects its poultry industry?

Reply:

The Department Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has drafted protocols to ensure that industry is able to export their poultry produce to a number of countries in Africa and to the Middle East from closed and bio secure facilities generally known as compartments. Compartments assist the poultry farmers to avoid introducing harmful poultry diseases in their farms. DALRRD continuously monitors these compartments.

21 June 2022 - NW1551

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What additional assistance will her department provide to farmers who have been under extreme pressure to sustain operations for a period of time now and (b) how has the farming sector been transformed to allow for black entrants to participate?

Reply:

a) Since the start of the lock down as a result of the Covid-19 pandemic on 27 March 2020, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) implemented strategic projects to assist farmers inclusive of the following:

  • The COVID 19 relief programme for smallholder producers;
  • The Presidential Employment Stimulus for subsistence producers with a focus on women, youth people with disabilities and veterans;
  • Working on the Blended Finance modalities and launching the industrial leg of the programme with the IDC;
  • Intensely working with partners in implementation of the Jobs Fund Project with National Treasury;
  • Continuous support through Programmes such as CASP and Ilima/ Letsema to focus on strategic impact of sustainability;
  • The finalisation of the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP) with additional emphasis on increasing support for grains, red meat value chain, citrus and cotton; and
  • Working with Provincial Departments of Agriculture to employ additional extension personnel who will support farmers with technical advisory services

b) The transformation of the agricultural sector is an ongoing process to include all black entrants across the subsistence, smallholder and commercial levels. Different transformation programmes target different farmer groups but with a focus for overall integration. The main effort being undertaken by DALRRD in relation to transformation is the Agriculture and Agro Processing Master Plan which is a social compact that aims to enhance existing and future transformation efforts.

21 June 2022 - NW1873

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the Cathedral Peak Outgrowers Project in the Okhahlamba Local Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal, what are the details of the funding provided by her department and the Agribusiness Development Agency (ADA) to the (a) Emaswazini vineyard, (b) Miya vineyard and (c) Amangwane vineyard for each year since the project started in 2015 up to the 2021-22 financial year; (2) what total number of (a) permanent and (b) casual jobs have been created since the project was implemented in 2015; (3) what is the extent of land used for each specified vineyard; (4) on what date is it envisaged that the first grapes will be harvested from each vineyard; (5) what are the details of the (a) beneficiaries of the proceeds from the project at each of the three locations and (b) benefits accrued to and/or paid to the beneficiaries at each of the three locations since the inception of the project in 2015? NW2209E

Reply:

1. The project, Cathedral Peak Outgrowers (3 sites) has over the years of implementation to date been allocated a total budget of R54, 9 million. Below is a summary of budget allocation and sources over time:

a) Amaswazini Vineyard total R19 831 198;

b) Amazizi Vineyard total R13 975 876; and

c) Amangwane Vineyard amount R20 287 882.

CATHEDRAL PEAK OUTGROWERS BUDGET & EXPENDUTURE

 

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

2020/21

2021/22

2022/23

COGTA Allocation

R2 500 000

R5 200 000

R551 978

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

Expenditure COGTA

R2 500 000

R4 979 352

R551 978

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

R0,00

ADA/DARD Allocation

R0,00

R2 500 000

R11 162 560

R14 000 00

R8 420 000

R7 925 200

R3 487 715

R431 909

Expenditure ADA/DARD

R0,00

R5 144 658

R11 162 360

R14 000 00

R8 420 000

R4 437485

R3 355 806

R37 355

                 

Total Expenditure to date/annum

R2 500 000

R10 124 011

R11 714 338

R14 000 000

R8 420 000

R4 437 485

R3 355 806

R37 355

Expenditure to date is up to 12 May 2022. Total Allocation to date: R54 959 738. Total Expenditure to date: R54 588 994. Percentage budget spent 99%

(2)(a) There were no permanent jobs created over the period, all jobs created were linked to projects which ultimately came to an end.

(b) A total of 203 casual jobs were created including annually sustained over the period of project implementation (2015/16 to 2021/22).

3. Each vineyard is 15ha in extent, thus a total of 45 hectares altogether.

4. Date of first harvest was expected in each site as per table below:

Amaswazi Site

Amangwane site

Amazizi site

Feb 2021

Feb 2021

Feb 2023

5. Beneficiaries of the proceeds from the project at each of the three locations:

a) The intended beneficiaries of proceeds from the grape enterprise are the nominated cooperatives per site that the project was implemented with and funds transferred to over the period of implementation. These are:

  • Inkosi Mthethwa Cooperative for Amazizi Site;
  • Amangwane Primary Cooperative for the Amangwane Site; and
  • Madlangampisi Cooperative for the Amaswazi site.

b) The employment opportunities created in each site and for the overall project can be considered a benefit for those who were employed over the period of project implementation. From an accumulated budget of R54,9 million an estimated total of R30.3 million served to pay for labour and working capital. An estimated total of 203 employment opportunities of the amount over the years. All labour was compensated at sectoral determined rates per annum. These are not new jobs per annum but sustained opportunities per annum.

Year

Amaswazi Site

Amangwane Site

Amazizi Site

2015/16

65

73

0

2016/17

30

35

0

2017/18

30

30

60

2019/20

30

30

35

2020/21

30

30

37

2021/22

16

26

12

 

21 June 2022 - NW1880

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) are the relevant details of the costs incurred thus far for the implementation of Onderstepoort Biological Products’ Good Manufacturing Practices project and (b) are the projected costs to complete the whole project?

Reply:

(a),(b) The Department has consulted with the Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP) and requests that the OBP be given more time to provide the information necessary to respond to the questions. This will assist the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) to respond to the questions with certainty and accuracy, which it undertakes to do by 30 June 2022.

21 June 2022 - NW2028

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of land reform projects have been tied to strategic partners to help manage production on the land received through land reform, (b) has been the impact of the strategic partnerships over the past 15 years in the Republic and (c) are the names of the companies that are currently employed as strategic partners to land reform beneficiaries?

Reply:

a) 845.

b) To date the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has commissioned two independent studies on the Recapitalisation and Development Programme (RADP). In 2013 the Department of Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) was requested to conduct a mid-term review and six provinces (Eastern Cape, Free State Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo and North West) were selected and the outcomes were as follows, but not limited to these:

  • The intervention seemed to have worked well in some provinces, whereas in others there were challenges. Overall 67% of the beneficiaries were effectively capacitated in the following areas:
  • technical expertise 66%; farm management 71%;
  • market output 88%;
  • funding 76% and market input 62%; and
  • in conclusion, it has been established that economic situation of farmers have improved significantly at about 72%.

c) Currently the intervention used to support farmers does not make use of strategic partners.

21 June 2022 - NW2078

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has strategies in place to (a) support and (b) create a platform in which rural farmers can meet new opportunities and grow and create pockets of success within the agricultural sector; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a),(b) Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is implementing various strategic initiatives catering for farmer support. These include the Farmer Production Support Units (FPSUs) as a rural smallholder farmer outreach and capacity building unit. FPSUs provide primary production inputs, mechanization support, extension services, storage facilities and training to producers. FPSU serves as a one-stop service centre for rural smallholder farmers within the catchment area of the FPSU.

Production infrastructure in a form of irrigation infrastructure, livestock handling facilities, storage facilities, livestock water systems and fencing are amongst those provided to enhance productivity of the farmers.

Through conditional grants in a form of Ilima/Letsema and Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme, DALRRD also provide smallholder farmers with production support working closely with Provincial Departments of Agriculture. Land Development Support and Jobs fund initiative are the two other strategic interventions DALRRD is implementing targeting smallholder farmers.

21 June 2022 - NW2082

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) are the ownership patterns for the Vaalharts Katoen, (b) amount has her department spent on the projects and (c) is the role of (i) monitoring and (ii) evaluation in her department if they fail to ensure that farmers benefit from transactions that Government has spent money on?

Reply:

a) Vaalharts Cotton Workers Trust was established in 2004 and its workers became beneficiaries. The Vaalharts Katoen Produsente (Pty) Ltd (“the Company”) owns and operates the Cotton Gin in Hartswater town of Phokwane Local Municipality, Frances Baard District of the Northern Cape Province. The Company does not conduct any farming activities. The Company has two shareholders, namely Vaalharts Cotton (Pty) Ltd and the Vaalharts Cotton Permanent Workers Trust (“the Trust”). The ownership of the assets and shareholding in the Company was partly (49%) financed by the Industrial Development Corporation (IDC) in terms of a set of loan agreements. The payment of the IDC by the Company and the IDC’s requirements regarding shareholding of the Trust in the Company is well documented and the Trust has copies of the relevant documents as it was a signatory to the settlement agreements in terms of which the Company’s indebtedness to the IDC was settled (see attached copies).

b) The Department did not, in any form or manner, provide any funding or other assistance to the Company or its shareholders in acquiring and operating the Cotton Gin.

(c) (i),(ii) In view of the latter, Monitoring and Evaluation was not carried out since the contention from the company is that the Department had not provided any financial assistance during the acquisition process. However, workers have raised concerns with the Department, including the lack of participation in the operations of the company, power relations between management and worker-shareholders, skills transfer and labour relations, and tenure security. The Northern Cape Office of the Department has tried to mediate between management and workers.

21 June 2022 - NW2206

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to her reply to question 769 on 31 March 2022, (a) what progress has been made to date with the verification of beneficiaries of the land claim of the Lower Zingcuka in Keiskammahoek in the Eastern Cape and (b) on what date does she anticipate the conclusion of the verification process; (2) whether she has found that her department will meet its target of settling the land claim by the third quarter of the 2022-23 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.

a) The verification process was conducted on the 8th -14th May 2022 in Lower Zingcuka. Out of the original list of 160 households /ODIs that was submitted as the families that were affected by the dispossession, the Commission has verified 154 households that have submitted the necessary documents and 6 households have not been verified.

The outstanding 6 families have outstanding documents which have not been submitted to the Commission, it is however alleged that the list of ODIs is not comprehensive and the Commission will not entertain the allegations without comprehensive documentation submitted as evidence.

The Commission has scheduled a follow up visit for 22 July 2022 for the second phase to collect documents from the 6 families and receive any other information and records from any other party alleging that they are part of the claim.

b) It is anticipated that the verification process will be completed by 30 August 2022 barring any challenges that emanate from the community concerned.

2. The claim is projected to be settled in Quarter 3 of 2022/23 Financial Year, on condition that the Commission receives full co-operation from the community in submitting all the required documentation.

END

21 June 2022 - NW2323

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of (a) agricultural extension officers (i) have been employed in (aa) Limpopo and Mpumalanga (bb) the Eastern Cape and Northern Cape, (cc) KwaZulu-Natal and (dd) North West in the past two financial years and (ii) qualified through government-funded bursary schemes in each province and (b) black emerging farmers were (i) provided with extension officers in the past two financial years and (ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years in each province?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii),(aa),(bb),(cc),(dd) Agricultural Extension Officers: Please refer to the table below.

 

(a)(i) employed in the past two years

(a)(ii) qualified through bursary schemes in each province

(aa) Limpopo: 0 and Mpumalanga: 53 Extension Officers were on contract and were permanently absorbed during 2021/22 financial year

 

DALRRD employed Extension Officers:

Limpopo: 6 and Mpumalanga: 4 on contract for 3 months

 

Limpopo: 0

Mpumalanga: 0

(bb) Eastern Cape: 21 and Northern Cape: 0

 

DALRRD employed 3 Extension Officers in

Eastern Cape and 6 in Northern Cape on contract for 3 months

Eastern Cape: 0

Northern Cape: 0

 

(cc) KwaZulu-Natal:71

 

DALRRD employed 4 Extension Officers in

KwaZulu-Natal on contract for 3 months

KwaZulu-Natal: 8

(dd) North West:46

 

DALRRD employed 6 Extension Officers in North West on contract for 3 months

North West: 0

 

 

 

 

 

(b)(i),(ii) Black emerging farmers: Please refer to the table below.

 

(b)(i) provided with extension officers in the past two years

 

(b)(ii) assisted with funding in the past two financial years

 

A total of 38 203 smallholder producers were supported over a period of 2020/21 and 2021/22.  These are figures as reported by provinces on the Electronic Quarterly Report System (e-QPRS)

 

Province

2020/21 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

EC

0

240

3616

4169

8025

FS

0

0

58

228

286

GP

14

39

116

66

235

KZN

1797

1985

1205

1058

6045

LP

878

 

1927

1512

4317

MP

52

83

282

115

532

NC

0

12

711

298

1021

NW

0

110

95

160

365

WC

16

23

9

13

61

Total

 

 

 

 

20887

 

Province

2021/22 Smallholder producers supported as reported in eQPRS

Total

Q1

Q2

Q3

Q4

EC

753

917

479

3717

5866

FS

0

0

5

98

103

GP

73

37

90

46

246

KZN

0

1849

2259

1894

6002

LP

312

354

286

246

1198

MP

438

198

660

287

1583

NC

0

0

1237

795

2032

NW

0

0

61

182

243

WC

8

20

12

3

43

Total

 

 

 

 

17316

 

(aa)

 

Limpopo: 13 444, and

Mpumalanga: 5 100

 

 

(bb)

 

Eastern Cape: 18 351, and

 

Northern Cape: 3 075

 

 

(cc)

 

KwaZulu-Natal: 11 984

 

 

(dd)

 

North West: 14 356

 

 

 

20 June 2022 - NW2204

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Taking note of the Land Access Movement of South Africa 2 judgment by the Constitutional Court, in terms of which the processing of land claims lodged between 2014 and 2016 was put in abeyance until all land claims lodged by December 1998 are settled, (a) by what date will the land claims lodged by the December 1998-deadline be finalised, (b) on what date will the processing of the claims lodged between 1 July 2014 and 28 July 2016 begin and (c) what amount would it cost the State to settle the claims?

Reply:

a) The Commission has created a 5 year project plan which will be concluded depending on available resources.

Output

Indicator

 

PROVINCES

Outstanding land Claims

Pure Outstanding

Phased

Number of outstanding land claims

Eastern Cape

657

597

60

 

Free State

5

5

0

 

Gauteng

379

370

9

 

KwaZulu-Natal

2124

2045

79

 

Limpopo

1349

1073

276

 

Mpumalanga

1588

1170

418

 

Northern Cape

37

22

15

 

North West

208

22

186

 

Western Cape

338

326

12

 

TOTAL:

6685

5630

1055

b) When Parliament enacts new legislation to allow the processing of these New Order Claims.

c) It would be difficult to forecast for the 163 383 new order claims as we have not conducted any analysis because of the LAMOSA judgment which interdicted the Commission from processing these New order claims.

END

20 June 2022 - NW2116

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department provided a certain person (name and details furnished) with the production input costs that go with farm allocation to the farmers; if not, (2) whether her department is considering providing the specified person with production input costs; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. No. However, at the time of allocation of the farm to this certain person, various movable assets in the form of mechanization, implements and equipment to the value of R6 900 000.00 as well as biological assets (sheep) to the value of R3 933 000.00 with a combined total of R10 833 000.00 were in the register of the farm.

2. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has received a Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) application through the Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture which is being considered for provision of production inputs following its assessment of the farm and the farmer’s needs.

(a) The application is for the 2022/23 financial year. If this application is approved, funds are to be transferred to the Western Cape Provincial Department of Agriculture as per the approved business plan.

(b) The application under consideration is for production inputs to the value of R2 124 270 and maintenance of farm implements at a cost R147 576.

08 June 2022 - NW869

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Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) is the total number of incidents of (i) sexual harassment and (ii) sexual assault that were reported in her department (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2021, (b) number of cases (i) were opened and concluded, (ii) were withdrawn and (iii) remain open or pending based on the incidents and (c) sanctions were meted out against each person who was found guilty?

Reply:

(a)

2018/2019

2019/2020

2020/2021

Since 1 April 2021

(i) (aa)

0

1

0

0

(i) (bb)

0

0

0

0

(ii) (aa)

0

0

0

0

(ii) (bb)

0

0

0

2

(b)

2018/2019

2019/2020

2020/2021

Since 1 April 2021

(b) (i)

0

1

0

0

(b) (ii)

0

0

0

0

(b) (iii)

0

0

0

2

(c) No sanction meted out at this stage. However, one case was closed due to lack of evidence.

08 June 2022 - NW1968

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will appeal the court judgment in the Ingonyama Trust Board case; if not, what steps did she take to ensure that the tenure rights of the residents of KwaZuluNatal who are living on the Ingonyama Trust land are secured; if so, what are the reasons for appealing the judgment?

Reply:

No. The Minister will not appeal the Judgment. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) filed an implementation plan in court to address the order against the Minister. Furthermore, DALRRD is also filing three-monthly reports with the court as ordered.

08 June 2022 - NW1980

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she has considered involving compliant private sector laboratories in the production of the African Horse Sickness vaccines on behalf of Onderstepoort Biological Products; if not, why not; if so, with whom has she communicated from the equine and horse racing industry in relation to the availability and distribution of the African Horse Sickness vaccines for the new vaccination season commencing on 1 June 2022?

Reply:

No. The Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP) is currently producing African Horse Sickness vaccine in order to ensure sufficient doses.

The Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (DALRRD) communicated with the South African Equestrian Federation (SAEF) in relation to the availability and distribution of the African Horse Sickness vaccines for the new vaccination season which commenced on 1 June 2022.

08 June 2022 - NW1979

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Engelbrecht, Mr J to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 142 on 23 March 2022, she has found that there are sufficient available supplies of African Horse Sickness vaccines as the African Horse Sickness vaccination season will start on 1 June 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) whether Onderstepoort Biological Products has a functioning freeze-drying unit for the production of vaccines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP) is currently producing African Horse Sickness vaccine in order to ensure sufficient doses for the vaccination season. The OBP is continuously keeping the Equine Industry informed of the status in this regard.

(2) Yes. OBP has a functioning Freeze-Dryer.

08 June 2022 - NW1393

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department (a) supports organic farming in the current financial year and (b) had supported organic farming in the past two financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) how and (ii) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Yes

b) Yes

(i) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development provides support to all farmers regardless of the production system that they use to produce their crops. This includes financial and non-financial support. There is no dedicated funding for organic farming. Organic farming is one of the production systems that farmers in South Africa use. It is relatively small compared to dominant systems like conventional farming, conservation agriculture, natural farming, agro ecology, and others. The growth of organic farming in South Africa is slowed down by factors like lower yields compared to products from other systems, pest and disease control as well as market access. There is also a perception that organic products are for high-income groups and the rich.

(ii) Funding for farmers is done through two conditional grants, namely the Comprehensive Agriculture Support Programme (CASP) as well as Ilima/Letsema. The farmers get funding if they qualify and meet the requirements. Non-financial support that DALRRD had been providing over the years includes information and advice on best practices regarding organic farming.

Crops produced through organic farming in South Africa include the following:

  • Vegetables are considered the most common organic commodity, with a range of leafy vegetables, legumes, brassicas, squashes and root crops. Most western vegetables are produced locally, as well as vegetables from the east. High-value vegetables were typically exported to Europe.
  • Herbs, including culinary medicinal and aromatics are grown organically in South Africa. The range of plants grown is very wide and indigenous cultivated plants are included in this category.
  • Deciduous fruits. Organic apples are produced for export to Europe. One group of farmers has received certification for olives. Passion fruit is available in the local market. Grapes are primarily used to produce organic wine for local and export markets, while table grapes are sold locally. Berries included strawberries for local markets and blackberries for export markets.
  • Citrus included oranges, lemons and clementine, the bulk of which are exported and represent a significant organic export market.
  • Sub-tropical fruit consists primarily of avocadoes and constitute a significant export market. Guavas are grown for pulping and export and bananas have recently become available on the domestic market.

07 June 2022 - NW1752

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to municipalities being required to have a pound, as stated in the Municipal Pound By-Law, 2019 which commenced on 21 October 2019, and because municipalities do not pay the monthly payments to the pound or branches of the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), leading to many pounds and/or branches of the SPCA having to close their doors, by what date is it anticipated that the City of Mbombela will settle the debt of R3 112 465 that is owed to the SPCA in Umjindi for the financial year of 2019-20; (2) whether, with reference to the property of the SPCA in Umjindi, Mpumalanga, being irreparably damaged in a storm recently leading to the property being vacated after which the SPCA applied and paid for the application of new land, but no response from the City of Mbombela, she will intervene to ensure that the (a) specified municipality will have a pound and/or branch of the SPCA in Umjindi and (b) money that is owed is paid; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) which municipalities will be closing the pounds and/or branches of the SPCA in this financial year?

Reply:

1. None. The information requested may be obtained from the concerned municipalities.

2. (a),(b) No. The Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development will not be able to intervene on the matter as the municipalities concerned are best placed to respond to the question.

3. The information requested may be obtained from the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and the concerned municipalities.

07 June 2022 - NW1571

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

However, a bilateral agreement on cooperation in the field of agriculture was signed in 2018 between this Department and the Ministry of Agriculture of the Russian Federation.

The agreement prioritizes the following areas of cooperation:

  • Livestock farming and veterinary medicine;
  • Plant cultivation and phytosanitation;
  • Personnel training development in the field of agriculture;
  • Agricultural products marketing;
  • Investment in agriculture; and
  • Cooperation in the field of agriculture within the framework of international organizations and unions.

AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH COUNCIL

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

Perishable Products Export control Board

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

NATIONAL AGRICUTLURAL MARKETING COUNCIL

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

Ingonyama Trust Board

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

ONDERSTEPOORT BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS (OBP)

(a) No (i) no

(b) No (ii) no

07 June 2022 - NW1528

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What is the reason that her department has not taken any steps to protect South African agricultural products in the face of unfair and hostile competition, including adjusting the general tariffs that they charge all countries, except those with whom they share preferential trading blocs?

Reply:

The question does not specify which agricultural products are unprotected in the face of unfair and hostile competition, nor does it provide details regarding tariff adjustments; countries are also not specified. As a result, the Department finds it challenging to provide a specific response to the question.

South Africa is a member of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) and abides by the rules as agreed by the Member States within the organisation. The primary task of WTO is to facilitate the rules of trade among the nations. Amongst others, the rules of trade within the organisation hinges on the principles of reciprocity and non-discrimination among the trading partners. This avoids a situation where the single (dominant) decision-maker takes decisions that leave the individuals in the group with an outcome that is less than optimal for individuals as a group. South Africa therefore, has to be cautious in its approach when trading with other nations such that it does not come across as overly protective through tariff and non-tariff barriers. If perceived to be overly protective, which amounts to breaking the rules of WTO, the trading partners may reciprocate, to the detriment of the economy. Alternatively, partner countries may retaliate by seeking alternative markets.

DALRRD considers circumstances as they emerge and makes appropriate policy recommendations in line with trade remedies prescribed by existing agreements in advancing and defending national interests.

07 June 2022 - NW1954

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the relevant details of the (a) progress made with regard to the Karoo Regional Spatial Development Framework and (b) outcome thereof?

Reply:

a) The Karoo Regional Spatial Development Framework (KRSDF) has now entered its final phase, following the conclusion of the public participation period on 15 May 2022. All the comments received will be assessed and where applicable, amendments to the spatial plan will be captured. Once all the amendments have been considered, the final draft document will be presented to all key stakeholders, who will then sign off the final KRSDF. The final document will be presented to the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development for approval.

b) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development presented the Karoo Regional Spatial Development Framework at the Karoo Small Town Regeneration conference on 16 and 17 May 2022. The conference was hosted by the South African Local Government Association and attended by all the municipalities and provinces involved in the generation of the KRSDF. The conference expressed support for the KRSDF and recorded a resolution to that effect.

07 June 2022 - NW1981

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1) What is the extent in hectares of (a) unsurveyed and (b) unregistered State land in the Republic; (2) which department is responsible for (a) surveying and (b) registering the State land; (3) what is the extent of the land that has been (a) surveyed and (b) registered in hectares since 1994? NW2321E

Reply:

(1) (a),(b) The result of the 2017 Land Audit indicated a figure of 7 701 605 hectares of land that is unregistered trust state land. This figure consists of both un-surveyed and unregistered land in the Republic. It should be noted that this figure includes national parks, forest reserves, rivers and estuaries and many road and railway reserves amongst others.

(2) (a) Any state department with immovable assets such as land may sanction surveys of such land as and when the need arises. The role of the Chief Surveyor-General (within the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development) is to regulate the survey of land in South Africa. This includes the standards and manner in which land surveys should be carried out as well as the manner in which such survey records should be kept. The regulation of land surveying in South Africa is done through the Land Survey Act, 8 of 1997, and the regulations framed thereunder.

(b) The registration (transfer/vesting) of state land occurs when there is a need for such state land to be transferred from the current custodian government department to the relevant user department, in line with the Government Immovable Asset Management Act, 19 of 2007 read together with Schedule 6 item 28(1) of the Constitution. The transfer of state land may also occur from the state to beneficiaries, and in instances where the state acquires the land. The role of the Chief Registrar of Deeds (within the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development) is to regulate the registration of land in South Africa in accordance with the Deeds Registries Act, 47 of 1937, and the regulations framed thereunder.

(3) (a) Statistics on the survey of state land between 1994 and 2001 are not readily available and would require extensive research. Available records indicate that 356 360.8991 hectares of land has been surveyed since 2001.

(b) 262 175.3100 hectares of the land mentioned in part (3)(a) has been confirmed as registered.

07 June 2022 - NW1982

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether any land in Ekangala is registered in the name of her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is it being used for; (2) whether it will be made available for use by the community; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. No.

2. Falls away.

07 June 2022 - NW982

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With regard to the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan, will she furnish Mr N P Masipa with detailed information since 1 April 2019 pertaining to the (a) target and (b) performance regarding the (i) training and coaching provided to the farmers, (ii) services providers used, (iii) number of farmers who were trained and coached against the target, (iv) infrastructure and logistics support that were provided to farmers in need and (v) update on the development of technology and R&D capacity as envisaged in the master plan; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

No. There has been no details to the Agriculture and Agro-processing Master Plan (AAMP) since 1 April 2019 as the AAMP was recently signed. An implementation plan is being developed and will be reported on periodically, after Cabinet’s endorsement of the AAMP Social Compact.

(a),(b),(i),(ii),(iii),(v),(iv) Falls away.

07 June 2022 - NW1878

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the details of all vaccines that are available at Onderstepoort Biological Products (OBP), in view of the fact that various cooperatives and animal pharmaceutical companies receive their supplies from the OBP for farmers’ usage in provinces across the Republic; (2) whether she has found that the current vaccine stocks at the OBP are adequate to cater for the management of livestock; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Please refer to Table 1 below.

2. Current vaccine stock levels of certain products at the OBP might not be adequate to cater for the management of certain livestock diseases. However, the Board and Management of the OBP have assured that measures are being put in place to mitigate this risk.

Table 1: Available vaccines

Product

Availability

Product

Availability

Anthrax 100ml

Available

Lumpy Skin Disease 100ml 50 Dose

Available

Black Quarter 100ml

Available

Lumpy Skin Disease 50ml 25 Dose

Available

Blue Tongue

Available

Pastuerella Sheep 100ml

Available

Botulism 100ml

Available

Pastue rella Cattle 100ml 50 Dose

Available

Botulism/Black Quarter 100ml

Available

Pulpy kidney (Alum)

Available

Brucella Abortus S19 25 dose

Available

Redwater Africa

Available

Brucella CFT

Available

Redwater Asiatic

Available

Brucella RB

Available

Rift Valley Fever Inact 100ml

Available

Brucella Rev 1

Available

Rift Valley Fever Live 100ml

Available

Brucella Std Serum

Available

Swelled Head

Available

Elephant Skin Disease

Available

Tetanus

Available

Gas Gangrene

Available

Tuberculin Avian

Available

Horse Sickness

Available

Tuberculin Bovine

Available

Leukopast 3 (cattle)

Available

   

07 June 2022 - NW1751

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With municipalities being required to have a pound, as stated in the Municipal Pound By-Law, 2019, that commenced on 21 October 2019 and because municipalities do not adhere to their end of the deal and do not pay the monthly payments to the pound or Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (SPCA), what (a) number of pounds and/or SPCAs had to close their doors in the past three years and (b) are the names of all municipalities in each province that do not have a pound and/or SPCA; (2) whether she will furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) names of all the municipalities that owe money related to pounds and (b) amount of money owed by each municipality?

Reply:

1. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) is not responsible for the National Animal Pounds Act, this is mainly under the jurisdiction of the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA). The information required on the implementation of this act may therefore be obtained from COGTA.

(a),(b) Falls away.

2. No.

(a),(b) Falls away.

23 May 2022 - NW1394

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has any plans to support local fertiliser production companies especially those that produce mono-ammonium phosphate; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) amongst others; regulates the manufacturing, distribution, importation, sale and use of fertilizers in terms of Fertilizers, Farm Feeds, Agricultural Remedies and Stock Remedies Act, 1947 (Act No. 36 of 1947).

To be able to manufacture, import, sell and export; the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizer must be registered in terms of the said Act. Thus, DALRRD provides support to local fertiliser production companies by ensuring that the mono-ammonium phosphate fertilizers they produce are registered in terms of the said Act to enable them to sell and export the products.

23 May 2022 - NW1550

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she intends to relook the curriculum offered by agricultural colleges which offer part time and/or short courses that are currently offered by the Agricultural Research Council (ARC), as that will assist farmers to reduce the costs associated with travelling to the ARC in Pretoria?

Reply:

No. The programmes offered by the 11 Colleges of Agriculture are divided into two sub - programmes, namely Higher Education (HET) providing agricultural training from NQF level 5 to 7, and formal and non-formal training on NQF level 1 to 4 (except for Taung College of Agriculture and Potchefstroom College of Agriculture where farmer training is done at Kgora Training Centre). The NQF Level 1 to 4 programmes have emphasis on farmer training i.e. smallholder, subsistence and commercial farmers, and in most cases, they collaborate with Agricultural Research Council (ARC).

The Colleges of Agriculture (CoAs) through the Provincial Departments of Agriculture (PDAs) have existing working relationship with the ARC, mostly though signed Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) and some of the Colleges also host the ARC within their premises. The relationship allows the two parties to collaborate in offering short courses either through sharing of premises or expertise. Farmers only travel to ARC premises in instances where a specific or specialised infrastructure is needed for practical training.

23 May 2022 - NW1832

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) invader species and/or trees that take up grazing spaces have been identified in each province and (b) plans have been put in place to deal with the identified invader species in each province?

Reply:

a)  Invader species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act No 43 of 1983 (CARA), refers to both indigenous and alien invader species which have beneficial properties that warrant continued presence under certain circumstances. The objective of the Act with respect to invaders species that may lead to bush encroachment (indigenous species) on grazing areas, is not always aimed at eradication but the focus is on thinning and reducing them to normal and acceptable levels. Invader species that occur outside the demarcated areas are however eradicated to minimise undesirable species which may degrade the veld. The type of problematic invader plants that are found across the country covers the whole spectrum of declared species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983). The occurrence of these species varies from province to province due to various factors including climatic conditions.

The invader species identified as dominant include the following:

Table 1: List of invader species per province:

PROVINCE

DOMINANT INVADER SPECIES

EASTERN CAPE

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle), Lantana camara (Lantana), and Opuntia species (prickle pear) and blue bush (recently identified and more work is being done to acquire information on this plant)

KWAZULU-NATAL

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Lantana Camara (Lantana), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle)

MPUMALANGA

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush - indigenous), Lantana Camara (Lantana), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle) and Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous).

GAUTENG

Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush-indigenous), Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous), Silver dealbata (Silver wattle) and Acacia mearnsii (Black Wattle) and Cereus Jamacaru (Queen of the night)–Bio control agent has been released on it and it is found to be under control.

LIMPOPO

Dichrostachys cineria (Sickle bush-Indigenous), Prosopis spp. (Mesquite) in communal grazing areas and Lopholaena coriifolia (small-leaved fluff-bush).

NORTH WEST

Seriphium plumosum-Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush - indigenous), Acacia Mellifera (Swarthaak) indigenous and Prosopis spp. (Mesquite).

FREE STATE

Seriphium plumosum - Stoebe vulgaris (Bankrupt bush), Cestrum laevigatum (Inkberry), Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle) and Opuntia species (Prickle pears)

NORTHERN CAPE

Acacia Mellifera (Swarthaak) and Prosopis spp. (Mesquite), Rhigozum trichotomum (Driedoring)

WESTERN CAPE

Acacia mearnsii (Black wattle), Acacia saligna (Port Jackson), Eucalyptus spp (Blue gum)

Hakea spp and Pinus spp

b) The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) has put in place the following measures to manage and control invader species and/or trees in all Provinces:

  • A dedicated resource monitoring unit that audits veld infested by invader species in terms of the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983), CARA is in place. The mandate of the team is to assess the status of veld in collaboration with provinces to identify invader species that threaten the productivity of grazing areas. The team also provides advice on control measures to land users. Directives are only served to land users as a last resort to facilitate compliance with CARA legislation;
  • Through its Landcare programme, the Department collaborates with relevant research institutions to support control of invader species across the country. Provincial Departments of Agriculture are also involved. Collaboration includes provision of technical and governance advice in areas affecting veld management for improved grazing and livestock production;
  • Where applicable, partnership with relevant stakeholders are put in place to facilitate the control of Bankrupt Bush and Prosopis in various communities through the Landcare programme;
  • Awareness campaigns have been conducted and DALRRD has coordinated the development of a database to record bush encroacher species in the veld. To date, surveys have been conducted where bankrupt bush encroachment was dominant in grazing areas. The strategy on management of invader indigenous species is currently being developed; and
  • DALRRD will continue conducting capacity building sessions for land users and farmers on management of invader species per biome during the 2022/23 financial year. Guidelines on possible management of invader species and veld improvement will be developed and shared with relevant stakeholders.

23 May 2022 - NW1656

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Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with regard to the ongoing unlawful land invasions at the Knoflokskraal site that continue to pose significant challenges to the Grabouw plantation and the surrounding communities, and considering the financial and security impacts, she has launched an investigation into the alleged involvement of political parties in the invasions in the past year; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what were the findings; (2) whether she will consider laying charges against organisations and/or political parties found to have encouraged or facilitated unlawful occupations of the specified plantation; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total number of unlawful occupants are currently residing on the site and (b) are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) established that the specified property at the Knoflokskraal site does not fall under its custodianship but is under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI). DALRRD therefore, has not launched any investigation on this property.

(2)(a),(b) Falls away.

23 May 2022 - NW784

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she will provide Mr N P Masipa with the details of the communal areas in (a) Northwest and (b) Northern Cape in terms of the (i) number of dipping tanks for sheep and cattle, (ii) districts and/or areas where they are located, (iii) distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities, (iv) details of the dipping committees and (v) frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) North West Province (pages 2-4)

(i) 23 dipping tanks for cattle. There are no dipping tanks for sheep.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 1 below.

(ii) Northern Cape Province (pages 4-11)

(i) 96 dipping tanks for sheep and 1 dipping tank for cattle.

(ii),(iii),(iv),(v) Please refer to Table 2 below.

TABLE 1: NORTH WEST PROVINCE

Categories

No. of Dipping Tanks

  1. Districts

Local

Village

(iii) Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv) Details of the dipping committees

(v) Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years.

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Ditloung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Mayaiyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane1

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Seatlhane2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong boo Ratlou boo Mariba traditional council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Manthe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Tlapeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Matsheng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Longaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Morokweng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Dikhwiting

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Molelema

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Graspan

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Khudutlou

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Mothanthanyaneng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Kokomeng

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Batlhaping ba ga Maidi tribal Authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati

Greater Taung

Ga-modisenyane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Tlakgameng Tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Mofufutso2

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mofufutso tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Tswaing

Middleton B

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Middleton B tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Mogosane

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Mogosane tibal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Makhubung

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Makhubung tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Mahikeng

Tsetse

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Bakwena tribal council

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Setlhwatlhwe

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

Cattle

1

Ngaka Modiri Molema

Ratlou

Madibogo

Installed right in the middle of the village+-1KM

Barolong bo Ratlou tribal authority

Administered by the tribal authority

TABLE 2: NORTHERN CAPE PROVINCE

Categories

(i)No. of Dipping Tanks

(ii)Districts

Local

Village

(iii)Distances that the animals travel to reach the dipping facilities

(iv)Details of the dipping committees

(v)Frequencies of dipping in the past 10 years

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ditshoswaneng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Mapoteng

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Seoding

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

2

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Batlharos x 2

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Maruping

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Witputs

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Legobate

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Galotlhare

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gadiboe

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Ezperanza

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Gantatelang

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Lophalaphala

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Tshukudung

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Vergenoeg

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Gasegonyane (Seoding Ward)

Permonkie

10 km

Ms Kgopodithata

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kamden

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bushbuck

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bailybriths

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Itireleng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Kikahela

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Motlhoeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Bothetheletsa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Matlhabanelong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zaneen

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tamros 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Dikhing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Colston

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Pietersham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Zero

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong Kamden South Ward

Tokolaan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 1

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 4

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 3

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 5

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 7

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 8

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk 9

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Gasehunelo Wyk2

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Deurward

Ward)

Deerward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Heuningvlei

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Greenwich

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Halifax

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Hove

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Conway

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tauton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Deal

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Harrow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Makhubung

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Shalaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Tsiloane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Leeds (

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Perth

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Glyde (Sesipi)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Heuningvlei

Ward)

Berwick

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Madibeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Abbey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Eiffel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Klein Eiffel (Avon)

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Argyle

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Tay

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong

(Madibeng Ward)

Sark

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Cahar

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Deurward

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Magwagwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Slough

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Padstow

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Laxey

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Rooipomp

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Garapoana

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gamokatedi

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Gapitia

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Cattle

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Loopeng Ward)

Occidental Range

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Deurham

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Bendel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Battlemount

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Gamorona

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Magobing

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Shipton

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Ellendale

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Fairfield

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Mathanthanyan

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Maketlele

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kokfontein

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Radiatsongwa

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Cardington

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Logaganeng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Metswetsaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Molapotlase

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Bendel

Ward)

Kgabetlwane

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Dithakong

     

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Segwaneng

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Cassel

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Danoon

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Gahuwe

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Glenred

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

Sheep

1

John Taolo Gaetsewe

Joe Morolong (Glenred

Ward)

Bothithong

12 – 20 km

Mr Mocwari

Every 6 months

23 May 2022 - NW1785

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in anticipation of the disaster and/or loss that the farmers who plant along the Pongola River between the Jozini and Umhlabuyalingana Local Municipalities will surely suffer as a result of the unplanned opening of the Jozini Dam as it is filled to its capacity, any provision will be made to compensate the farmers as they solely depend on the farms for a living; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No. Farmers are encouraged to practice best farming practices and avoid farming in high risk areas such as along the rivers, to prevent and mitigate impacts of disaster risks such as floods.

The dams are monitored by the Department of Water and Sanitation and in cases where they must be opened a communication is made to the communities located downstream. The farming communities are advised to remove the equipment used to collect water when opening of dams is anticipated to avoid losses.

 

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development addresses disasters in line with the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) and the National Disaster Management Framework of 2005 as amended. Farmers who are affected by the impacts of disasters are considered in line with the Disaster Management Act, 2022 (Act No. 57 of 2002) following the assessment of damages, which unfortunately makes no provision for compensation of losses. Additionally, in encouraging good farming practices, farming along the riverbanks is a risk on its own and cannot be supported through disaster relief assistance as it is against the Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 1983 (Act No. 43 of 1983). The Farmers are always encouraged to implement risk reduction measures as communicated through monthly advisories.

23 May 2022 - NW1814

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of (a) land claims were lodged in the Chief Albert Luthuli tribal area in Mpumalanga and (b)(i) the specified land claims have been settled to date and (ii) by what date does she envisage that the rest will be settled?

Reply:

(a) 351

(b)(i) 295

(b)(ii) Most of the claims that remain within this municipality have disputes that are referred to court for adjudication; the finalization dates are therefore dependent on conclusion of court processes.

END

 

19 May 2022 - NW1549

Profile picture: Montwedi, Mr Mk

Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What additional assistance will her department provide to farmers, who are required to do costly pregnancy diagnosis of their cattle more often as part of the breeding season?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) in collaboration with the Agricultural Research Council-Animal Production (ARC-AP) provides support service to farmers through provision of a mobile laboratory (gamete mobile laboratory). This provides for the delivery of assisted reproductive technologies such as synchronization, artificial insemination, pregnancy diagnosis to farmers in the most remote parts of South Africa.

Participants in the sector also receive one-stop services of readily available database of registered reproduction operators within the department to help with artificial insemination and pregnancy diagnosis. Farmers requiring assistance may contact the Registrar for the Animal Improvement Act, 1998, (Act N0. 62 of 1998), Mr Joel Mamabolo contact number (012) 319 7597/7424 Email: JoelM@Dalrrd.gov.za