Questions and Replies

Filter by year

31 March 2021 - NW244

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has existing training programmes to capacitate local informal businesses based in the (a) townships and (b) rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) And (b) The Department of Tourism provides specific support programmes for both businesses in the townships and rural areas. Informal businesses that approach the Department for assistance are guided to platforms where they can obtain assistance and relevant support packages including being guided on the requisite compliance measures to access such support.

31 March 2021 - NW540

Profile picture: Shelembe, Mr ML

Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Whether any recommendations and/or advice on matters pertaining to the military veterans and their beneficiaries were submitted to her by the Advisory Council on Military Veterans in the past five years; if so, (2) whether those recommendations were implemented by her; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what amount was spent by members of the Advisory Council in the past five years that constitute their term of office?

Reply:

(1) Yes

(2) There are ongoing discussions on all aspects affecting military veterans and currently a task team is headed up by the Deputy President to attend to pressing matters affecting military veterans.

(3) R 4 852 145.00

31 March 2021 - NW931

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, in view of the construction of the new hydrographic vessel known as Project Hotel nearing completion, and the first of the three inshore patrol vessels known as Project Biro also nearing delivery date, (a) her department, (b) the SA National Defence Force and/or (c) Armscor is/are in a position to make the payments to the two contracting firms in terms of the two contracts; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) from what source will the specified contractual payments be made and (ii) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (2) whether any funding will and/or has been transferred to Armscor for any prime mission equipment acquisition payments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the penalties that will be imposed on her department in terms of the contracts if the agreed payments are not possible?

Reply:

1. (i) Sufficient budget allocation is available in the Special Defence Account to meet the contractual obligations related to Project HOTEL.

(ii) The department has however conducted a reprioritisation exercise to allocate the remaining SDA budget and to ensure that sufficient funding will be available to meet the contractual obligations on Project BIRO.

(iii) The Special Defence Account has been reduced by approximately R9 billion from 2018 after the Project BIRO contractual commitments were already finalised.

2. Funding is not transferred to Armscor for prime mission equipment acquisition. Armscor as the procurement agency for the department manages the procurement and contracting process on behalf of the department. The payment is then released directly to the supplier from the DOD account via the Reserve Bank. The payments are made after Armscor, as the contract manager, has confirmed the achievement of the specific milestone on the contract.

31 March 2021 - NW896

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury intends to take any action against government departments that fail to publish the details of personal protective equipment procurement on the website of the National Treasury in accordance with the instruction to all government departments by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of Instruction No.11 of 2020/21 (PFMA institutions) and Circular 105 (MFMA institutions), all institutions are required to report procurement transactions on a monthly basis. All procurement transactions related to the emergency procurement for COVID-19 PPE items, fabric masks as well as other goods, works or services that were procured to prevent an escalation of the national state of disaster, declared on 15 March 2020 (the Disaster) or to alleviate, contain or minimise the effects of the Disaster, must be reported. This includes, inter alia, expenditure for quarantine and isolation services, humanitarian relief, etc.

The reports are published monthly in the public domain and serves as a transparency mechanism to lay bare non-compliant government institutions. It is therefore the responsibility of the accounting officers and accounting authorities to ensure that the information provided to the National Treasury is credible, accurate and auditable.

National Treasury has thus far followed up with National Departments, in writing, to make the accounting officers aware of the non-compliance to Instruction no. 11 of 2020/21. It must, however, be noted that not all non-reporting is necessarily regarded as non-compliance as some departments do not procure on a monthly basis. There are instances where departments have not reported in a certain month because no procurement was done in that month.

National Treasury has also engaged the Auditor-General to request that AGSA follow up with selected government institutions whether any expenditure was actually incurred and whether the institutions reported the expenditure in accordance with Instruction no. 11 of 2020/2021 or Circular 105. This will be included in the next annual audit cycle.

31 March 2021 - NW817

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her department and its communication with local stakeholders about relaxing travel restrictions, (a) what communication has been undertaken, (b) with whom has her department communicated, (c) what were the contents of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each case?

Reply:

a) Communication undertaken related to implications of COVID19 outbreak, as well as clarification and awareness raising around the Ministerial directions issued in terms Disaster Management Act. The department’s engagements also focused on health protocols to give confidence to tourists and to ensure that the sector supports the country’s efforts to minimize the spread of COVID19 infection. Finally, the focus was also on recovery and long-term sustainability of the sector post the pandemic.

b) The communication was with the industry, media, other departments and organs of the state and the international community.

c) Please refer to (a) above for the contents

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

31 March 2021 - NW1000

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

In light of the scourge of violent crime in the Republic, how does the National Treasury justify the 5,27% nominal cut to Vote 28: Police for the 2021-22 financial year relative to the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

Parliament approved a fiscal framework that proposes significant adjustments to spending over the medium term in order to stabilize government debt and reduce the pace of growth in debt servicing costs in October 2020. This approval by Parliament meant all spheres of government and all department’s budgets would be reduced to achieve debt stabilization. Furthermore, Parliament passed the 2021 fiscal framework tabled by the Minister of Finance in February 2021 proposing the same fiscal consolidation through lowering the levels of expenditure. The decision to reduce departmental budgets was not a National Treasury decision but a Cabinet decision.

Table 1 provides a summary of expenditure trends and estimates for Vote 28: Police. Between 2020/21 and 2021/22, the department’s budget for compensation of employees is expected to decrease from R76.1 billion to R75.3 billion, while its budget for goods and services is expected to decrease from R19.2 billion to R16.3 billion. The main items influenced under goods and services are non-essential in nature, e.g. advertising, consultants, catering, and travel and subsistence, and will be managed through cost-containment. Reductions on compensation of employees will be managed through salary freezes and non-filling of less critical post vacancies.

                                   

Table 1. Expenditure trends and estimates: Vote 28 (Police)

Economic classification

 Audited outcome

 Adjusted

appropriation

Average

growth

rate

(%)

Average:

Expen-

diture/

Total

(%)

 Medium-term expenditure

estimate

Average

growth

rate

(%)

Average:

Expen-

diture/

Total

(%)

R million

 2017/18

 2018/19

 2019/20

 2020/21

 2017/18 - 2020/21

 2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2020/21 - 2023/24

Economic classification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current payments

82 469.3

86 118.7

92 232.1

95 366.4

5.0%

95.7%

91 570.7

92 036.9

92 097.1

-1.2%

95.2%

Compensation of employees

67 124.5

71 282.4

76 357.7

76 147.0

4.3%

78.1%

75 300.5

75 299.7

75 297.1

-0.4%

77.5%

Goods and services

15 344.8

14 836.3

15 874.5

19 219.4

7.8%

17.5%

16 270.2

16 737.2

16 800.1

-4.4%

17.7%

Transfers and subsidies

1 049.3

1 268.5

1 225.1

1 613.7

15.4%

1.4%

1 333.5

1 258.4

1 267.2

-7.7%

1.4%

Provinces and municipalities

44.5

49.5

52.8

53.2

6.1%

0.1%

55.6

57.6

61.4

4.9%

0.1%

Departmental agencies and accounts

39.7

45.6

52.9

51.0

8.7%

0.1%

49.9

51.4

53.5

1.6%

0.1%

Non-profit institutions

  –

1.0

  –

1.0

0.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

Households

965.1

1 172.5

1 119.5

1 508.5

16.1%

1.3%

1 228.0

1 149.4

1 152.2

-8.6%

1.3%

Payments for capital assets

2 947.9

2 894.7

2 440.6

2 580.8

-4.3%

2.9%

3 451.3

3 562.3

3 719.3

13.0%

3.4%

Buildings and other fixed structures

575.4

686.3

513.3

497.7

-4.7%

0.6%

946.7

960.9

1 003.2

26.3%

0.9%

Machinery and equipment

2 340.4

2 201.4

1 927.3

2 078.7

-3.9%

2.3%

2 497.3

2 593.8

2 708.2

9.2%

2.5%

Biological assets

5.9

7.0

  –

4.4

-9.2%

0.0%

7.3

7.6

7.9

21.4%

0.0%

Software and other intangible assets

26.2

  –

  –

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

0.0%

0.0%

Payments for financial assets

13.9

15.6

32.3

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

0.0%

0.0%

Total

86 480.4

90 297.5

95 930.2

99 560.9

4.8%

100.0%

96 355.5

96 857.6

97 083.6

-0.8%

100.0%

 

 

Over the medium term, compared to other departments in the Peace and Security function group, Table 2 confirms that the Police services baseline decreases least, i.e. a marginal rate of only 0.2 per cent. Government’s support to the attainment of the objectives and outcomes set out under priority 6 (social cohesion and safer communities) of the 2019-2024 medium term strategic framework is therefore corroborated.

Table 2. Peace and security function expenditure

 

2020/21

Medium term expenditure estimate

Percentage of total MTEF allocation

Average annual MTEF change

R million

Revised estimate

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

   

Defence and state security

53 968

46 656

47 811

48 132

22.5%

-3.7%

Police services

106 603

104 570

105 946

105 994

49.9%

-0.2%

Law courts and prisons

48 263

48 482

49 632

49 919

23.3%

1.1%

Home affairs

9 780

8 862

9 463

9 372

13.4%

-1.4%

Total

218 615

208 570

212 853

213 417

100.0%

-0.8%

31 March 2021 - NW822

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the modified Land Cruisers’ mobility packages that have been in service for three years as part of Operation Corona, (a) what number of these vehicles (i) were deployed and (ii) are still in use and (b) in what configuration are they in use (details furnished); (2) whether there have been any vehicle losses; if so, what (a) number and (b) were found to be the causes of the losses?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to Operational matters that are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW929

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What total number of (a) motorcycle-mounted infantry men are deployed along the borders of the Republic and (i) Zimbabwe, (ii) Mozambique and (iii) Lesotho, (b) men have been deployed, (c) men are still in service and (d) losses have been registered?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to matters of

Border Safeguarding and are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW653

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism, (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) what functions and services will be prioritised and (d) how will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism.

South African Tourism strictly monitors the appointment of consultants as evidenced by the fact that consultants may only be appointed after a comprehensive gap analysis has been approved by the Chief Executive Officer. The outsourcing model remains relevant as the entity requires specilised agency services like marketing content creation, production, creative, media, activation etc, as there are currently no internal human resource, systems capacity and expertise to carry out these services. In order to ensure the most effecient way of outsourcing marketing services, South African Tourism during the current year changed the agency fee model from fixed retainer to an activity based fee structure.

South African Tourism is currently in the process of reviewing all contracts in the ICT space with the aim of reducing reliance on external consultants especially in the helpdesk and support service as well as system support and database space.

b) What are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines.

The conversion for marketing services from a fixed retainer to an activity based fee will be concluded in the 2021/22 financial year.

(c) The following services in the ICT services wil be prioritised.

– helpdesk & support services and

– support and database services.

.

d) How will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured.

(i) Will be monitored through expenditure.

(ii) Measured through efficiencies.

31 March 2021 - NW930

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What total number of horseback-mounted infantry men from the SA Army Specialised Infantry Capability are deployed along the borders of the Republic and (i) Zimbabwe, (ii) Mozambique and (iii) Lesotho, (b) where are they deployed, (c) what number had initially been deployed and (d) what number of the soldiers are still in service?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to matters of

Border Safeguarding and are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW872

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date will the Rail Tourism Survey Report be completed and (b) what (i) is the objective of the Rail Tourism Survey and (ii) are the details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey?

Reply:

a) The Rail Tourism Survey Report will be completed on 31 March 2021

b) (i) Objective of the Rail Tourism Survey is:

To understand the rail tourism environment through exploring and assessing various aspects (nature of the concept, market demand and supply issues, planning and operational modalities, funding, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms with key stakeholders), with the objective to inform policy, viability processes, support rail tourism analysis functions, route utilisation strategies, regional planning assessments, rail tourism economic models, rail scheme assessments and station catchment analysis.

(ii) The details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey.

The approach covers the following steps:

(a) Project Orientation that lead to an Inception Report

(b) Literature Review and Survey Framework that lead to a Survey framework

(c) Data collection that lead to a data collection report

(d) Survey Analysis that lead to a Data Analysis Report

(e) Reporting and Project Closure that lead to the final Survey Report and close- out Report

31 March 2021 - NW130

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to his reply to question 2000 on 14 October 2020 wherein he required the identification numbers, will he now advise whether any public funding of any nature whatsoever has been paid to (a) a certain person (name and details furnished) and (b) a certain person (name and details furnished) since 27 April 1994; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether there was an application of any nature to obtain state funding and/or tenders by the specified persons; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1(a) National Treasury only has access to payments information from national and provincial departments using the BAS payment system. In order to search for information against individuals, the National Treasury would need the identification numbers as a search by names may result in inaccurate results.

1(b) A search was done on the BAS payment system for the period 1 April 2017 to date and no payments were found that were made to the entities or initiatives mentioned. (name and details furnished)

2 The National Treasury is not aware of any application of any nature to obtain state funding and/or tenders by the specified persons, entities and/or initiatives.

31 March 2021 - NW654

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is the new Marketing Investment Framework linked to the Tourism Recovery Plan, (b) what are the details of the new Marketing Investment Framework, particularly in response to the COVID-19 in the affected core markets, (c) how are travel restrictions going to affect the implementation of the new Marketing Investment Framework, (d) what are the new markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework and (e) what is the focus of the new Marketing Investment Framework with regard to (i) African, (ii) Asian, (iii) European, (iv) North American and (v) South African markets?

Reply:

a) In 2016/17, SA Tourism, in partnership with the Tourism industry, developed a Marketing Investment Framework (MIF) that was focused on identifying markets, optimising marketing investments across the identified target markets, and distributing resources to help meet the set objectives. Every three to five years, SA Tourism then reviews its portfolio in order to improve its ability to dynamically and effectively allocate and manage its budgets and resources

In 2020, SA Tourism initiated a revision of the Marketing and Investment Framework using 2019 as the base year to review the portfolio. The review came at an opportune time as the global markets are facing the challenges presented by COVID 19 pandemic. The framework will further assist in the implementation of the strategic interventions of the recovery plan. The process of the review made use of key variables related to performance, outlook, South Africa’s ability to win in the market, return on past investments, and other criteria.

It should be noted that the Tourism Recovery Plan is currently in the process of being submitted to cabinet.

b) Details of the new Marketing Investment Framework. The framework process considered four (4) main stages of evaluating the markets. 

Level 0 - Data availability


For market prioritisation, the framework considered all the 54 countries in the continent, and shortlists markets based on their data availability across mandatory indicators such as Urban population, GDP PPP per capita purchasing power parity rates) , currency exchange rate, political stability index and education index.

Level 1 - Attractiveness (The size of travel in each country and what drives it)


The purpose of this stage is to quantify which macroeconomic indicators are important in driving travel. Considered indicators in the final model were political stability index, GDP PPP (purchasing power parity rates), Inflation rate, Unemployment percentage, Inequality in income, Currency exchange rate, education index, urban population, internet penetration and proximity to SA.

Level 2 Travel potential

The purpose of this stage is to rate countries based on their travel potential. A regression model is developed using the following indicators such as total outbound trips, size of domestic trips, passport index, tourist outbound expenditure, propensity to travel short haul vs long haul, business outbound trips, holiday trips, spend in SA and length of stay in SA.

Level 3 – SA’s ability to attract those markets

The purpose is to assess how easy would be for SA to operate in those countries. The indicators looked at visa regulation by SA. Furthermore, the model looked at SA’s presence in those countries, trading across border index, airports with direct flight, average cost of travel, hygiene index (covid19)

c) The challenges of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the ability of many of these source markets to travel to South Africa. Source market travel restrictions, international government regulations and slashed airline routes will continue to severely impact the ability of international travel to South Africa for several months to come.

Consequently, the relative priority of the 24 markets (as mentioned in (d)) must be considered, in conjunction with dynamic and up to date information of variables that will affect the likelihood of travel from each market. This includes:

  • COVID-19 pandemic severity and outlook: Which is detailed by the current total cases of COVID-19, the current growth rate of COVID-19 (measured as weekly change per 10 000 of the population), and the projected COVID19 growth rate for Quarter 1 of 2021.
  • Government Stringency Index: Source market government policies to control the pandemic, such as border control, travel advisories which include quarantine (isolation), and local movement regulations which will influence the readiness of individuals to external travel.
  • Accessibility: Level of impact of travel to and from South Africa (land, air and sea).
  • Vaccination rollout: The pace, impact and resultant confidence levels for traveld) New markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework.

In total, 24 markets / countries are identified for prioritisation, segmented into 16 “`Growth” and 8 “Defend” markets, with an additional set of markets ear marked as “Watchlist”. The 24 prioritised markets accounted for 92% of all international trips in 2019. The selection, to meet the 21 million target, comprises:

      • Eight (8) Africa Land markets
      • Two (2) Africa Air markets
      • Three (3) American markets
      • Seven (7) European markets
      • Four (4) Australasia and Middle East Markets (AAME )

The selection portfolio in 2019 accounted for

      • 83% of holiday arrivals,
      • 77% of MICE arrivals ( Meetings Incentives Conference and Exhibitions)
      • 92% of total international arrivals to South Africa in 2019

e) For the next 12-15 months, given the fast-changing dynamic of the COVID-19 pandemic and related uncertainty, the broader South African Tourism strategic focus is on domestic, regional and select global markets. In each market, a dual business and leisure focus will be adopted, as follows:

(i) South African Markets

Accelerate domestic demand and associated revenue for sustained growth

(ii) African Markets (Land and Air Markets)

Develop break through communication and content that drive brand positivity messaging to increase arrivals and spend for sustainable growth.

(iii) Global Markets (Europe, Americas and Asia)

Return the core business to marketing.

31 March 2021 - NW760

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What strategy does her department have to incentivise tourism to rural areas and not just in urban areas and metros, as global travel restrictions are lifted?

Reply:

In response to the lack of travel amongst South Africans especially the previously disadvantaged communities, the Domestic Tourism Scheme was developed to respond to the challenges highlighted in the DTGS and encourage group travel.

The Scheme is one of the tools that the department uses to promote and encourage domestic tourism, particularly amongst the previously disadvantages communities, thus increasing the number of domestic travellers. It is used to familiarise the new travellers with the services of tour operators, who can organise holiday trips on individual’s behalf and remove the burden from the unseasoned traveller. Often this traveller is not familiar with booking these services. The scheme makes it easier for ordinary South Africans to travel and know their country. The Department has developed a Domestic Tourism (incentive) Scheme, which has been piloted through partnerships with national parks and provincial reserves. The program is envisioned to design and galvanize different social tourism groups; from rural and urban areas; to buy in and participate in the program.

A Social Tourism Directory has also been developed with the most recent information on tourism attractions. The directory is targeting the previously untraveled communities which will include the youth, people with modest to low income, senior citizens, stokvels/social groups and people living with disabilities. This directory is a tool to make information available and accessible regarding tourism attractions, services and places of interest to the identified target groups. Its purpose is to encourage travel amongst South Africans by making the information available and accessible, so that more South Africans can travel and enjoy the benefits thereof.

Product diversification efforts that aim to enhance rural and township related experiences shall also serve as an incentive for rural tourism.

30 March 2021 - NW858

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether she has been informed of challenges posed to the professional standing of female councillors in the SA Council for the Architectural Profession, (SACAP), particularly by their male counterparts; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) steps is she taking to protect female councillors from harassment by their male counterparts in SACAP and (b) policies are in place to protect whistle-blowers in SACAP; (2) whether she has been informed of allegations against the current President of SACAP relating to an abuse of power; if not, (a) why not and (b) how does she intend to go about addressing the matter; if so, what (i) policies are in place to address the abuse of junior employees by senior employees and (ii) anti-bullying policies are in place in the institution; (3) whether she has been informed of the governance challenges besetting the effective and efficient functioning of SACAP as a professional body; if so, what steps is her department taking to provide support to the entity to ensure effective running of the organisation?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department of the alleged challenges in the SACAP and have:

a) Directed that an independent investigation of the allegations of harassment of the female councillors by their male counterparts be carried out. After receiving such allegations from the complainant, I have afforded the SACAP Council an opportunity to provide a report responding to the allegations and how the Council is dealing with the matter. After receiving the response from the Council President, I deemed it necessary to have an independent investigation conducted. Such a decision is however still to be communicated with the Council as part of consultation.

b) The powers of the Minister to perform an oversight responsibility over the SACAP are limited in terms of the Architectural Profession Act, 2000 (Act No. 47 of 2000). The SACAP Council has its own Code of Conduct, which all its members are supposed to comply with. Therefore, the Minister must rely on general good practice to perform this oversight role, as well as the framework for the oversight over public entities, albeit SACAP, like the other five built environment professions reporting to the Minister, are not listed as public entities, but rather statutory bodies that perform regulatory functions on behalf of the State.

 

2. Please refer to 1(a) above.

c) The Minister exercises oversight over the Council which in turn has oversight on the SACAP Executive Management. The Minister does not deal with the matters affecting the employees of SACAP, as this is the function of the SACAP Council and Executive Management.

d) There are no anti-bullying policies developed for the Professional Councils. Professional Councils develop their own policies which are approved by their respective Council members. In this instance, the SACAP Council has a Code of Conduct, which all its members must comply with.

3. The Minister has been informed about the governance challenges besetting the effective and efficient functioning of SACAP as a professional body and is in consultation with the Council to address those alleged challenges.

30 March 2021 - NW619

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Transport

By what date does he intend to commence with the building of a tarred road between Matatiele and Mount Frere in the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The road in question between Matatiele and Mount Frere is T15 and a portion of it was upgraded to surface standard. There is approximately 60km of this road that is gravel and is being maintained in its current form i.e. gravel. It is important to note that the Eastern Cape Department of Transport appointed a contractor in November 2020 for re-gravel the first 30km and the contractor is still on site. Furthermore, there are long term plans to upgrade the remaining 30km as phase 2 of this project however, the actual implementation date of the project depends on budget availability.

30 March 2021 - NW870

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)With regard to the budget for the 2021-22 financial year, wherein the Independent Development Trust (IDT) is identified as being operational, what plans has she drafted and/or implemented to ensure the financial viability of the entity for the 2021-22 financial year; (2) whether the IDT will remain the implementing agent for the Non-State Sector, Non-Profit Organisation and Extended Public Works Programme (EPWP) for 2021-22 financial year; if not, who will take over this responsibility; if so, what amount has been budgeted to ensure that the full complement of persons are appointed; (3) (a) on what date will the instruction to commence be given by her department to the IDT, (b)(i) what are the reasons for the delays and (ii) how will the delays be mitigated, (c) what progress has been made on the appointment of a functional board of the IDT and (d) what are the current projects, excluding the EPWP programmes, that the IDT is involved with; (4) whether the board will be empowered to fulfil their mandate, including employing the requisite staff to ensure that the IDT succeeds; if so, what are the relevant details; (5) whether the IDT will be given new projects from her department as an implementing agent for the 2021-22 financial year; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure :

(1) I have been informed by the Department that it has communicated with the National Treasury to seek concurrence to make available a sum of R115 million from its own baseline in order to fund the IDT for its operational cost shortfall. The management of this financial assistance will be monitored as part of the Executive Authority’s responsibility enshrined in Section 63(2) of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA) (Act no. 1 of 1999), as amended.

(2) Yes, the Independent Development Trust (IDT) is expected to implement the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) Non-State Sector (NSS) Non-Profit Organisations (NPO) programme for the duration of the EPWP Phase 4 covering the 2019/20 – 2023/24 financial years based on the signed five (5) year Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) with the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure and the Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) allocation framework for period 2021/22 – 2023/24 allocated to the DPWI Budget Vote.

However, there are engagements currently underway to determine the future of IDT which will inform on whether the IDT will remain the implementing agent for the NSS NPO Programme in the 2021/22 financial year;

Noting that the process for the consideration of the reconfiguration of the IDT is currently underway, the DPWI is considering the institutional arrangement for the management of the implementation of the EPWP NSS NPO programme. As such, at this stage the Department cannot advise if there will be changes to this responsibility.

The EPWP NSS NPO programme has been allocated an amount of R1 069 928 000, inclusive of an amount of R49 514 000 as the management/intermediary fees in 2021/22 financial year. From this budget, an implementing agent is supposed to ensure that a full complement of staff is appointed to manage the implementation of the EPWP NSS NPO programme in all provinces.

(3) (a) Currently, the Department is pursuing consultative and administrative processes to ensure the issuing of the instruction letter and signing of contractual arrangements with regard to the NPO Programme by Quarter 1 of 2021/22.

(b) (i) The DPWI is considering the institutional arrangement for the management of the implementation of the EPWP NSS NPO programme and undertaking the required consultations. (ii) Consultations are already underway with the legal unit of DPWI within quarter 4 of 2020/21 and the engagements prior to the start of the financial year is viewed as a critical component for mitigating the delays.

(c) A Selection Panel was appointed in January 2021 to undertake the process of the nomination of the new board for appointment by the Executive Authority. The Selection Panel has, in terms of clause 8.3.1 of the IDT Trust Deed caused the call for the nominations to be published in two national newspapers on 14 February 2021 and closed on 01 March 2021. The Selection Panel is now in the process of determining the suitable candidates to be recommended to the Executive Authority for appointment to the IDT Board of Trustees by way of shortlisting and interviews. Once the Executive Authority has considered the recommended candidates, they will be subjected to a further process of consideration by the Cabinet for the purpose of giving concurrence on the Executive Authority approved individuals to be appointed as the new Board of Trustees for the IDT. Following Cabinet concurrence the approved candidates’ particulars will be submitted to the Master of the High Court, who will issue them with letters of authority, which upon receipt will allow the new trustees to start with their board duties.

(d) Kindly refer to Part C, section 14 of the IDT Annual Performance Plan 2021/22 for the list of projects to be implemented by the public entity.

(4) The Executive Authority, by allowing the nomination process to take effect, has carefully considered the need for the IDT to have the Accounting Authority to assume its fiduciary responsibility and take full charge of the IDT to fulfil its mandate. Considering that there is a process to reconfigure the entity, the Executive Authority will work closely with the Accounting Authority to map the future of the IDT.

(5) Part of the process of reconfiguring the IDT is a consideration on ways for the public entity to be self-sustainable. Working with the new board of the IDT, we will establish whether the IDT has the requisite capacity to take on additional work, including projects from my Department.

30 March 2021 - NW593

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, envisages a role for traditional leadership in decision-making in the Republic’s constitutional democracy, and in view of her department’s indication that one of the District Development Model priorities is the acceleration of the implementation of Agrarian Revolution by ensuring that land is made available for agricultural projects by traditional leaders, what consultation has been undertaken with traditional leadership houses at (a) national and (b) provincial level in this regard?

Reply:

During the opening of the National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL) on 25 February 2020, the President of the Republic of South Africa called on traditional leaders to lead in the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme. Through the NHTL, traditional leaders in all provinces were mobilized to make land available in their respective communities for agricultural programmes and projects.

In ensuring that traditional leaders acceded to the call of making land available for the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme, Traditional Leaders were consulted through Provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders and the Chairperson Forum. All Provincial Houses were requested to cascade information to respective Local Houses of Traditional Leaders. Furthermore, the Chairperson visited provinces where he encouraged traditional leaders to pledge land for agricultural purposes.

To date, as per the table below, one million five hundred thousand (1.5 million) hectares of land has been pledged by traditional leaders for agricultural programmes and projects in areas under the jurisdiction of traditional leadership. Working with the relevant government departments and stakeholders, the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme will be in line with the District Development Model (DDM).

The details of the land pledged are as follows:

PROVINCE

DISTRICT

HECTARES PLEDGED

TOTAL P/PROVINCE

Limpopo

Waterberg

684943

685043

 

Mopani

100

 

Mpumalanga

All Districts

 

66109

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe

4 410

4410

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyane

100

2100

 

Mangaung

2000

 

Eastern Cape

OR Tambo

804038

810 250

 

Chris Hani

4 300

 

Gauteng

City of Tshwane

2010

2010

KwaZulu-Natal

iLembe

30

30

TOTAL

   

1 569 952

30 March 2021 - NW325

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount did each provincial licensing authority receive in private charter licence fees for the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

The Provincial Authorities does not derive any revenue in respect of the license fees pertaining to Aviation license fees and private chartered flights.

As it relates to Chartered bus services, the permit fees are receivables for provinces. In this regard provinces shall be approached to provide the requisite information.

30 March 2021 - NW645

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the breakdown of the total amount in income that the tolls on the national road between Johannesburg and Durban generate per (a) month and (b) year?

Reply:

Important to note that toll income from toll roads are used to:

  • Repay the debt raised to fund the capital cost of the initial road construction works and other major capital costs implemented during the life of the project (typically 30 years) to ensure that there is sufficient road capacity to cater for increasing traffic demand.
  • Cover the cost of road maintenance including pavement rehabilitation and resurfacing to ensure the economic sustainability of this crucial national asset over the life of the project.
  • Operation and maintenance of the toll collection system, including the toll plazas over the life of the project.
  • Undertake routine maintenance including grass cutting, minor road repairs, road marking and signage over the life of the project.
  • Provide route patrols including incident management, emergency response and road user assistance over the life of the project.

(a)(b) Toll revenue along the National Route 3 (N3) per month and year are derived as follow:

  • SANRAL – Marrianhill toll plaza - This is state toll road driven by Government with no profit objective, and
  • N3TC Concession - De Hoek Plaza, Wilge Plaza, Tugela Plaza, Mooi River Plaza and associated ramp plazas. – This is a 30-year concession with the private sector to secure off balance sheet funding and investment into infrastructure, with the associated private sector investor Return on Investment (ROI) objectives. Returns are however regulated through the concession agreement.

The monthly breakdown for 2019/20 audited financial year is provided in the Table below. The 2019/20 audited financial year is used since 2020/21 audited figures are not yet available. The 2020/21 numbers are expected to be approximately 25% lower due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

(a) Month

SANRAL

Concession

Total

Jan-19

R 20 648 213.00

R 153 991 519.00

R 174 639 732.00

Feb-19

R 19 574 170.00

R 145 981 460.00

R 165 555 630.00

Mar-19

R 23 042 389.00

R 171 846 953.00

R 194 889 342.00

Apr-19

R 22 039 547.00

R 164 367 896.00

R 186 407 443.00

May-19

R 22 988 554.00

R 171 445 459.00

R 194 434 013.00

Jun-19

R 22 941 076.00

R 171 091 378.00

R 194 032 454.00

Jul-19

R 23 778 803.00

R 177 339 031.00

R 201 117 834.00

Aug-19

R 23 931 447.00

R 178 477 429.00

R 202 408 876.00

Sep-19

R 22 814 467.00

R 170 147 146.00

R 192 961 613.00

Oct-19

R 24 179 326.00

R 180 326 076.00

R 204 505 402.00

Nov-19

R 23 469 829.00

R 175 034 742.00

R 198 504 571.00

Dec-19

R 23 059 412.00

R 171 973 911.00

R 195 033 323.00

(b) Total 2019/20 FY

R 272 467 233.00

R 2 032 023 000.00

R 2 304 490 233.00

30 March 2021 - NW594

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What impact has the extent of fruitless, wasteful and irregular expenditure of over R20 million had on the progress of implementation of the District Development Model in the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

There is no fruitless, wasteful nor irregular expenditure linked to the MTEF allocation for the District Development Model for the 2020/21 Financial Year.

30 March 2021 - NW632

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount would it cost his department to (a) eliminate all pot holes and (b) keep maintaining the roads to ensure that they are free of pot holes?

Reply:

a) The funding requirement to sustain South Africa Road Network through pothole repairs is estimated at (a) R700 to R1500 / per square meter.

b) As an Honourable Member may be aware it is difficult to eradicate potholes on the road network as the emergence of new potholes depends entirely on the extent and nature of rainfall in that month or year. It is important to note that the road maintenance funding allocated from the National Fiscus is not sufficient to maintain the road network in the three spheres of Government as there are competing needs to all sectors.

It’s worth noting that most of our Provincial road network has reached its design life (25 years) and were never designed for the current increased traffic volumes and traffic configuration.

With that said, my Department ensures that roads are properly maintained through the Provincial Road Maintenance Grant (PRMG). The PRMG is ringfenced for the maintenance of the Provincial Strategic Road Network including rehabilitation, strengthening of paved roads, re-gravelling, gravel road blading and blacktop patching (potholes with an amount of just over R12 billion per annum to all provinces.

 

30 March 2021 - NW525

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes

(1) (b) Yes, The Application for Employee to Perform Other Remunerative Work in terms of Section 30 of the Public Service act; is valid for the period of twelve (12) months, thereafter the employee is expected to re-apply for new approval before he or she can continue to work again.

(1) (i)

Number of applications

Year

2

2014

2

2015

3

2016

10

2017

6

2018

9

2019

6

2020

Total = 38

(1)(ii)

Job / Work Categories

Year

Middle Management (2)

2014

Senior Management (1) and Middle Management (1)

2015

Middle Management (1), lower level (2)

2016

Senior Management (1) Middle Management (5) and lower level (Clerical) (3)

2017

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (3) and lower level (2)

2018

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (6), lower level (2)

2019

Senior Management (1), Middle Management (1) and lower level (1)

2020

(2) Yes

(2) (a) DPSA Directive/Guide on Managing of Other Remunerative Work in the Public Service;

(2)(b) According to HR Delegations: The Salary Level 1- 12 is considered and approved by the Director-General and the Salary Level 13 and above is considered and approved by the Minister

(2)(c) None

(2)(d) Not applicable

29 March 2021 - NW952

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What total number of fire trucks (a) does each municipality have and (b) are operational; (2) whether she will furnish Ms C V King with an itemised list of expenditure on firefighting equipment in the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Figure 1 below provides details of the municipalities across the country regarding (1) (a) total number of fire trucks that each municipality have (b) number of operational trucks and (2) itemised list of expenditure on firefighting equipment in the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years:

FIGURE 1: OPERATIONAL TRUCKS AND EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

City of Cape Town Metro

68 Pumpers (Fire Engines)

26 Water Tankers

19 Bush Tenders

24 Skid Units

3 Foam Tankers

3 All-Terrain Vehicles (Polaris)

3 Technical Rescue Vehicles

16 Rescue Vehicles

4 56m Ladder Units

6 Hydraulic Platforms

2 Hazmat/Breathing Apparatus Vehicles

2 Hazmat Vehicles

4 Jet ski’s

4 Rubber Ducks

68 Pumpers (Fire Engines)

26 Water Tankers

19 Bush Tenders

24 Skid Units

3 Foam Tankers

3 All-Terrain Vehicles (Polaris)

3 Technical Rescue Vehicles 16 Rescue Vehicles

4 56m Ladder Units

6 Hydraulic Platforms

2 Hazmat/Breathing Apparatus Vehicles

2 Hazmat Vehicles

4 Jet ski’s

R 2 537 984.81

Total cost of equipment – Items too many to itemize

R 2 154 397.84

Total cost of equipment – items too many to itemize.

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

 

5 Paramedic Vehicles

5 Command & Control

2 Command Support

3 Breathing Apparatus Vehicles

6 Diving Units

2 Kitchen Units

84 Service Bakkies

28 Service Cars

9 Service Trucks

20 Service Busses

16 Service Vans

SMALL PLANT

2 Tractor Trucks

2 35t Low beds

1 D6 Bull Dozer

1 Cat Digger Loader

1 930K Cat Front End Loader

40 Trailers

4 Rubber Ducks

5 Paramedic Vehicles

5 Command & Control

2 Command Support

3 Breathing Apparatus Vehicles

6 Diving Units

2 Kitchen Units

84 Service Bakkies

28 Service Cars

9 Service Trucks

20 Service Busses

16 Service Vans

SMALL PLANT

2 Tractor Trucks

2 35t Low beds

1 D6 Bull Dozer

1 Cat Digger Loader

1 930K Cat Front End Loader 40 Trailers

   

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

George LM

10

10

Thermal Camera

Hoses

Flashlights

“Bossiekapper”

Drone

Drill

Branches

Drip Torches

Hazmat Spades

Rakes

Portable Dam

Portable dam

Foam

Medical Equipment

Leave Blower.

Boat Equipment

AED defibrillator

Torpedo Boys

Compressor (Vehicle)

Rope Equipment

Nozzles

Go Pro Camera

Binoculars

SCBA Cylinders.

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Mossel Bay LM

Major Pumpers x 4

Bush Pumper x 1

Light Pumper x 1

LDV Skid Units x 5

Water Tankers x 2

Trailer skid unit x 4

Major Pumpers x 4

Bush Pumper x 1

Light Pumper x 1

LDV Skid Units x 5

Water Tankers x 1

Trailer skid unit x 4

R 4 155 000

R 2 074 425.28

Knysna LM

Major Pumpers x 2

Medium Pumper x 1

Water Tankers x 2

Skid Units x 3

Bush Pumper x 2

Utility x

Major Pumpers x 2

Medium Pumper x 1

Water Tankers x 2

Skid Units x 3

Bush Pumper x 2

Utility x 1

Procured one new fire engine and equipment

R 1 406 518.28

Procured two new fire engines

R 2 170 693.70

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Bitou LM

6 UD Tanker

Iveco Tanker Pumper

Mercedes Pumper

Tata Rural Pump

Buffel Rural Pump

Samil 50 Rural Tanker

3

Proposed in budget replacement, alternative as refurbishment projects

2004 Tata Rural Pump

Replace R1 800 000-00 refurbish and upgrade R250 000 (cab, lockers, Gearbox, monitor)

1995 Buffel Rural Pump

Replace R1 800 000-00 refurbish and upgrade R500 000 (New cab, Lockers, tanks, pump and monitor

1994 Samil 50 Rural Tanker Replace R2 600 000-00 refurbish and upgrade R500 000 (cab, Transfer case, Tank repair, Lockers, Monitor and respray

Operating Expenditure

R14 001 315,00

Capital Expenditure

R350 000,00 (R0,00)

Was not authorised to project for station upgrades, tender process was delayed and inevitably the funds were reallocated during the adjustment budgets.

The intentions were to replace steel roller engine bay doors in Kurland Sub Station, and finish off works at Kranshoek/Airport sub station

Operating Expenditure

R 14 123 909,00

Capital Expenditure

R0,00

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Hessequa LM

Medium Pumper x 4

Water Tankers x 0

Skid Units x 6

Medium Pumper x 4

Water Tankers x 0

Skid Units x 6

Thermal Camera

Hoses

Flashlights

“Bossiekapper”

Branches

Hazmat Spades

Rakes

Foam

Leave Blower

Halligans

SCBS’s

Cylinders

Hoe Rakes

Standpipes

Key and Bar

Foam Branch

Dividing Breach

Two-way radios

Chainsaw

Jump Bag

Snake Handling Equipment

Binoculars

Torches

Ceiling Hook

Hoses

Flashlights

Branches

Hazmat Spades

Rakes

Foam

Leave Blower

Halligans

SCBS’s

Cylinders

Hoe Rakes

Standpipes

Key and Bar

Foam Branch

Dividing Breach

Two-way radios

Chainsaw

Snake Handling Equipment

Torches

Ceiling Hook

Fire Hydrants

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Oudtshoorn LM

1 x Major Pumper

3 x Small water tankers

Only 3 x small water tankers are operations

R 168 587.92

8 x Self Contained Breathing Apparatus sets

65 mm Hoses

R 652 423.00

4 x 4 Bakkie Unit

25mm Hoses

65 mm Hoses

45 mm Hoses

2 x 65mm Branches

2 x 25 mm Branches

Hoe Rakes

Standpipes

Key and Bar

Foam Branch

Inline inductor

Dividing Breach

Collecting Head

Aerial Radios

Chainsaw

Jump Bag

Grabber Bags

Snake Handling Equipment

Camera

Binoculars

Torches

Ceiling Hooks

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Overberg District

20

20

1040 000

1475 000

Theewaterskloof LM

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Overstrand LM

16

3 Fire Engines

3 Pumps

3 Alpha Skid Units

R 990 639

R 955 167

Cape Agulhas LM

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Swellendam LM

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Firefighting function performed by Overberg District

Cape Winelands District

31 Firefighting trucks

31 Firefighting trucks

R4 860 962

R3 581 085

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Witzenberg LM

Water Tanker

Service vehicle

Medium Pumper

Light Veld vehicle

Water Tanker

Medium Pumper

Light Veld vehicle

Water Tanker

Service vehicle

Medium Pumper

Light Veld vehicle

Water Tanker

Medium Pumper

Light Veld vehicle

Hoses and small equipment –

R 75 000.00

R200 000.00 Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus (SCBA Compressor)

Drakenstein LM

  • 4 x Major Pumpers (Mercedes Benz)
  • 2 x Water Tankers
  • 2 x Medium Pumpers (Iveco’s)
  • 4 x Light bush firefighting vehicles (Landcruiser’s)
  • 1 x Turntable Ladder (Hydraulic Platform)
  • Trailer skid unit x 4
  • 4 x Major Pumpers (Mercedes Benz)
  • 2 x Water Tankers
  • 2 x Medium Pumpers (Iveco’s)
  • 4 x Light bush firefighting vehicles (Landcruiser’s)
  • 1 x Turntable Ladder (Hydraulic Platform)

R 1539 000.00 (Province)

Co funding on the purchase of an IVECO medium pumper

Capital funds: R55 000

BA Sets and firefighting hose and 4 nozzles.

Capital Budget:

R35 000.

Firefighting hoses, nozzles and hose fittings

Stellenbosch LM

  • 12 – Pumpers (major/medium)
  • 5 x Landcruiser’s/light

11

R 300 000 – Various rescue tools and equipment

R 300 000 – Various rescue tools and equipment

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

 

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Langeberg LM

2 X Major Pumpers Mercedes Benz Atego

1 X Grass/Bush, Land cruiser light pumper.

2 x off road 4x4 Tata, medium pumpers.

2 x 4x4 Isuzu Bakkies used as service vehicles

1 x Nissan (champ) Bakkie used as service vehicle

  • All vehicles operational

No information available

Capital Budget=R 356 000,00

Operating Budget=R6 797 620,00

West Coast District

Command and Control – 7 x 4 x 4 LDV

Skid Units – 9 x 4 x 4 Vehicles

Medium Bush Pumpers – 2

Major Pumpers – 3

Medium Pumpers – 3

Tankers – 3

Light Hazmat – 1

I Command Bus - 1

Command and Control – 7 x 4 x 4 LDV

Skid Units – 9 x 4 x 4 Vehicles

Medium Bush Pumpers – 3

Major Pumpers – 3

Medium Pumpers – 3

Tankers – 4

Light Hazmat – 1

I Command Bus - 1

R 1 512 800, 00

R 2 642 246, 00

NAME OF PROVINCE: WESTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

     

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

List of expenditure on firefighting equipment

Matzikama LM

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

Cederberg LM

One 4-ton truck sponsored by province

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

Medium Pumper – 1

Firefighting function performed by West Coast District

No expenditure information available

No expenditure information available.

Central Karoo LM

Land cruiser (BT) x1

HAZMAT Vehicle x1

1000 litre Skid Unit Trailer X 1

No vehicles and equipment

Landcruiser (BT) x1

HAZMAT Vehicle x1

1000 litre Skid Unit Trailer X1

No vehicles and equipment

No expenditure information available

No expenditure information available

Laingsburg LM

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

No expenditure information available

No expenditure information available

Prince Albert LM

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

Landcruiser (BT) x1

1 Tonner (BT) x1

1000 litre Skid Unit Trailer

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

Landcruiser (BT) x1

Isuzu 1 Tonner (BT) x1

1000 litre Skid Unit Trailer

No expenditure information available

No expenditure information available

Beaufort West LM

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

Landcruiser (BT) x1

1 Tonner (BT) x1

4 Tonner Medium Pumper x1

Landcruiser (BT) x1

1 Tonner (BT) x1( Skid pump faulty)

No expenditure information available

No expenditure information available

NAME OF PROVINCE: GAUTENG

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

City of Tshwane

42

25

R5 911 587,65 (Equipment)

R3 582 799,00

(Equipment)

City of Johannesburg

21

6

R10 849 220,08

(Equipment)

R4 391 231,42

(Repairs and maintenance)

R10 915 354,70

(Equipment)

R5 188 473,00

(Repairs and maintenance)

City of Ekurhuleni

108

57

R27 608 586,00

(Equipment)

R5 726 669,27

(Equipment)

West Rand District Municipality

14

8

R00.00

R6 596 103,27

(Equipment)

Sedibeng District Municipality

No firefighting function

N/A

N/A

N/A

Lesedi Local Municipality

4

2

R32 550,75 (servicing of fire extinguishers);

R141 035,63 (Uniform)

R639 836,51 (Rescue equipment)

R226 842,28 (Fire extinguisher service and protective equipment)

Midvaal Local Municipality

4

3

R1 500 000,00 (Fire engine refurbishment)

R800 000 (Grass skid unit vehicle)

R100 000 (equipment)

Emfuleni Local Municipality

12

3

R687 130,01 (Maintenance of fire vehicles)

R34 789,45 (Repairs of fire equipment)

R00.00

NAME OF PROVINCE: LIMPOPO

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Waterberg District Municipality (covering entire district)

8x fire engines/trucks

7x Water Tenders/Tankers

2x hazmat response trailers

5x Grass Tenders

8x Skid Units

5x Rapid Intervention Vehicles

8x fire engines/trucks

5x Water Tenders/Tankers

2x hazmat response trailers

5x Grass Tenders

8x Skid Units

5x Rapid Intervention Vehicles

R218 391.31 (Fleet maintenance)

R325 116.57 (Fuel cost)

R380 043.52 (Uniforms and Personal Protective Equipment)

R293 705.34 (Vehicle Repairs)

R775 196.10

(Fleet maintenance)

R294 946.57 (Fuel cost)

R247 693.36

(Uniforms and Personal Protective Equipment)

R48 315.06 (Vehicle Repairs)

Vhembe District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

Sekhukhune District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

Capricorn

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

Mopani District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

NAME OF PROVINCE MPUMALANGA

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Ehlanzeni District

City of Mbombela

5 fire engines

5 Fire engines

R 350 074.00. (Fuel)

R 657,723.00 (vehicle maintenance)

R 150 000.00 (equipment maintenance)

R 530 65.00 (personnel Uniform)

R529 161.00 (PPE)

R 95 818.00 (Fire Protection Association [FPA] membership)

R 321 702.00 (servicing of fire extinguishers)

R 400 000.00 (Fuel);

R 836,436.00 (Vehicle maintenance)

R200 000.00 (Equipment maintenance)

R 1 000 000.00 (personnel Uniform)

R 2,438,001.00 (PPE)

R 200 000 (FPA membership)

R 1 000 000.00 (servicing of fire extinguishers)

Gert Sibande District

Msukaligwa LM

5 fire engines

1 heavy duty hazmat response truck

1 hazmat response trailer

2 fire engines

1 heavy duty hazmat response truck

1 hazmat response trailer

R 3,280,000 (Aerial Support)

R 899,000 (Fleet maintenance)

R 170,000 (Fuel)

R 250,000 (Uniforms & PPE)

R 368,929 (Repair of tools and equipment)

R 112,000 (FPA membership)

R 3 558,000 (Aerial Support)

R 837 453 (Fleet maintenance)

R 229 350,00 (Fuel) R638 786,00 (Uniforms & PPE)

R 361,843 (Repair of tools and equipment)

R 112,000 (FPA membership)

NAME OF PROVINCE MPUMALANGA

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Nkangala District

 

Steve Tshwete LM

08 Fire trucks

02 Tankers

01 Hazmat

12 Veld Fire Vehicle

07 Fire trucks

02 Tankers

01 Hazmat

10 Veld Fire Vehicle

R500 000 (Replace Jaws Rescue set)

R1 100 000 (Replace 4X4 veld fire Vehicle)

R155 000 (Replace Skid-Units)

R180 000 (Replace Fire Equipment)

R120 000 (Work Station Control Centre)

R440 000 (Replace Jaws Rescue set)

R750 000 (Replace 4X4 veld fire Vehicle)

R160 000 (Replace Skid-Units)

R190 000 (Replace Fire Equipment)

NAME OF PROVINCE: KWAZULU-NATAL

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Ugu District

Umziwabantu LM

None

None

R300 000.00

R300 000.00

Mdoni LM

None

None

R 5 465 783.00

R 7 681 919.00

Mzumbe LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire Engine

R 1 000 000.00

R 3 600 000.00

Ray Nkonyeni LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire Engine

R 500 000.00

R 500 000.00

uMgungundlovu DM

5 fire Engine

4 Fire Engine

R1 700 000.00

R 6 400 000. 00

Msunduzi LM

4 fire Engines

2 Fire Engines

00

R345 000.00

King Cetshwayo DM

Umfolozi LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire Engine

R 200 000.00

R 200 000.00

Umhlathuze LM

8 Fire Engine

8 Fire Engine

R 9 000 000.00

R 7 000 000.00

Umlalazi LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire Engine

R 2 267 000.00

R00. 00

Mthonjaneni LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire Engine

00

R500 000

Nkandla LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire Engine

00

00

iLembe District

 

KwaDukuza LM

4 Fire engines

3 Fire engines

R200 000

00

Ndwedwe LM

No fire service

No fire service

00

00

Maphumulo LM

No fire service

No fire service

00

00

Mandeni LM

1 Fire engine

1 fire engine

R5 000 000.00

R500 000

NAME OF PROVINCE: KWAZULU-NATAL

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Harry Gwala District

Ubuhlebezwe LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire Engine

R 515 000.00

R 450 000.00

Nkosazana Dlamini Zuma LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

R1 500 000.

R600 000

uMzimkhulu LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

R2 000 000

R5 000 000

eThekwini Metro

44 Fire engines

44 Fire engines

R11 000 000

R8 000 000

uThukela District

Alfred Duma LM

4 Fire engines

4 Fire engines

00

00

Inkosi Langalibalele LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

00

00

Okhahlamba

2 Fire engines

2 Fire engines

R100 000

00

Amajuba District

Newcastle LM

7 fire engines

7 fire engines

R45 321.50

R29 584.13

Emadlangeni LM

00

00

00

00

Danhauser LM

00

00

00

00

Zululand District

Dumbe LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

00

00

Phongola LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

00

00

Abaqulusi LM

4 Fire engine

4 Fire engine

00

00

Nongoma LM

00

00

00

00

Ulundi LM

1 Fire engine

1 Fire engine

00

R6 000 000

NAME OF PROVINCE: KWAZULU-NATAL

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

uMzinyathi District

Umvoti LM

3 Fire engines

3 Fire engines

00

00

Msinga LM

00

00

R70 000

R70 000

Nquthu LM

4 Fire engines

4 Fire engines

R210 000

R2 183 000.00

Endumeni LM

1 Fire Engine

1 Fire engine

R1 800 000.00

R800 000.00

uMkhanyakude District

Jozini LM

1 Fire engine

1 fire engine

00

00

Umhlambuyalingana LM

1 Fire engine

1 fire engine

R60 000

R190 000

Big 5 Hlabisa LM

1 Fire engine

1 fire engine

   

Mtubatuba

1 Fire engine

1 fire engine

R150 000

R150 000

NAME OF PROVINCE: NORTH WEST

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Bojanala District

Rustenburg LM

14 (1X Hydraulic Platform, 7x Major Pumpers, 1xMedium Pumper, 2x Skid Units, 1x Rescue Unit, 1x Hazmat Unit, 1x Dive Unit)

8 (3xMajor Pumpers, 2x Skid Units, 1x Rescue Unit, 1x Hazmat Unit, 1x Dive Unit)

R900 000 Consumables, Repair and Maintenance of fleet and equipment.

R800 000 Procurement of PPE

R1m Consumables, Repair and Maintenance of fleet and equipment.

R1.1m Procurement of PPE

Madibeng LM

5 (Turntable Ladder, Major Pump, Water Tanker, Rapid Intervention, Grass Unit) Hazmat Trailer

5 (Turntable Ladder, Major Pump, Water Tanker, Rapid Intervention, Grass Unit) Hazmat Trailer

R 400 .000 Procurement of Equipment

R 800 000 for PPE

Moretele LM

3 (Rescue Pumper, Water Tanker, Major Pumper)

2 (Rescue Pumper and Water Tanker)

None

R180 000.00 Repair and Maintenance of Fire Service Fleet and Equipment.

R20 000 installation of back-up water supply.

Moses Kotane LM

4 (Medium Pumper, Rescue Vehicle and Water Tanker, Major Pumper)

2 (Medium Pumper, Rescue Vehicle)

None

R123 000 Repair and Maintenance of Fire Service Fleet and Equipment.

Kgetleng LM

4(Tanker; Medium Pumper Major Pumper; Rescue Vehicle)

2 (Medium Pumper, Rescue Vehicle).

None

R45 000.00 Repair and Maintenance of Fire Service Fleet and Equipment.

NAME OF PROVINCE: NORTH WEST

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District

Lekwa Teemane LM

6 (2xWater Tankers, 2xRescue Pumpers, 2xSkid Units)

5 (1xWater Tanker, 2xRescue Pumpers, 2xSkid Units)

R125 000

R175 000

Mamusa LM

4 (2x Water Tankers, 1x Rescue Pumper, Skid Unit)

4 (2x Water Tankers, 1x Rescue Pumper, Skid Unit)

R125 000

R175 000

Greater Taung LM

4 (1xWater Tanker, 1x Rescue Pumper, 2xSkid Units)

4 (1xWater Tanker, 1x Rescue Pumper, 2xSkid Units)

R125 000

R175 000

Kagisano-Molopo LM

5 (2xRescue Pumpers, 1x Water Tanker, 2x Grass Units)

3 (2xRescue Pumpers, 1x Water Tanker)

R125 000

R175 000

Naledi LM

4 Pumpers

3 LDV Grass Fire Units

3 Pumpers

2LDV Grass Fire Units

R366 054.16

R545 655

Ngaka Modiri Molema District

Mahikeng LM

6 (1X Water Tanker, 3xRescue Pumpers, 2x Skid Units)

1x Rescue Pumper

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Ratlou LM

2 ((1xRescue Pumper, 1xSkid Unit)

None

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

NAME OF PROVINCE: NORTH WEST

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Ramotshere Moiloa LM

6 (1xWater Tanker, 2xRescue Pumpers, 2xSkid Unit, 1x Hazmat Unit)

4 (1xWater Tanker, 1xRescue Pumper, 1xSkid Unit, 1x Hazmat Unit)

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Ditsobotla LM

3 (2xRescue Pumper, 1xSkid Unit)

1xSkid Unit

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Tswaing LM

2 (1xRescue Pumper, 1xSkid Unit)

None

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Budget centralised at the fleet management Unit.

Dr Kenneth Kaunda District

JB Marks LM

12 (3X Water Tankers, 2xRescue Vehicles, 3x Pumpers, 4x Skid Units,

9 (3X Water Tankers, 1xRescue Vehicles, 2x Pumpers, 3x Skid Units,

R213 603.00

R3 258 856.00

Matlosana LM

6 (3X Water Tankers, 3xRescue Pumpers)

6 (3X Water Tankers, 3xRescue Pumpers)

R200 000.00

R320 000.00

Maquassi Hills LM

4 (1x Medium Pumper, 1x Mini Pumper, 2x Skid Units)

3 (1x Medium Pumper, 1x Mini Pumper, 1x Skid Unit)

R252 600

R337 900

Z.F.Mgcawu District

 

Dawid Kruiper LM

02 Fire truck/engine

01 fully equipped LDV

01 Water Tanker

01 Fire truck/engine

01 fully equipped LDV

01 Water Tanker

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

Frances Baard District

02 Fire Trucks

02 Fire Trucks (no personnel to operate the trucks)

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

Sol Plaatje

03 Pumpers (fire engine)

02 Water tankers

01 Aerial Platform (Snorkel)

03 Pumpers (fire engine)

02 Water tankers

01 Aerial Platform (Snorkel)

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

NAME OF PROVINCE: NORTH WEST

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Namakwa District

Nama Khoi

01 Fire Truck / engine

01 LDV

01 Fire Truck / engine

01 LDV

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

John Taolo Gaetsewe District

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

Pixley Ka Seme District

Emthanjeni LM

01 Old Fire truck/ Engine

01 Operational fire truck engine

Information not submitted

Information not submitted

NAME OF PROVINCE: FREE STATE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Mangaung Metro

  • 6 X Major Fire Pumpers;
  • 1 X Aerial Appliance (Taken out of commission: to be replaced by 31 April 2021);
  • 1 X HAZMAT Unit;
  • 1 X Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) Unit;
  • 7 X LDV 4 X 4 Grass Fire Units;
  • 2 X Motorized Water Rescue Boats
  • 6 X Major Fire Pumpers;
  • 1 X Aerial Appliance (On order: delivery expected by 31 April 2021);
  • 1 X HAZMAT Unit;
  • 1 X USAR Unit;
  • 2 X LDV 4 X 4 Grass Fire Units (5 out of commission);
  • 2 X Motorized Water Rescue Boats

Nil (Zero) Capital Expenditure

R 352 725 for equipment i.e. 5 X Level “A” HAZMAT Suits; 8 X Fire Fighting / Rescue Extension Ladders; (8 X petrol Powered Blowers; Petrol Powered Chain Saws; 2 X Portable Fire Fighting Pumps)

R 14 000 000 (2 X Major Fire Pumpers).

Lejweleputswa District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

Thabo Mofutsanyane

0

0

R2 000 000 (firefighting equipment donated by Santam)

00

Dihlabeng LM

4 Fire engines

2 fire engines

00

00

Phumelela LM

00

0

00

00

Maluti LM

4 Fire engines

0

00

00

NAME OF PROVINCE: FREE STATE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Setsoto LM

None

None

None

None

Nketoana LM

None

None

00

00

Mantsopa LM

1 fire truck

1 fire truck

00

00

Fezile Dabi District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

Xhariep District

No submission

No submission

No submission

No submission

NAME OF PROVINCE: EASTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Amathole District

23 in total

14 x fire engines

9 x bakkies with skid unit

6 operational trucks

3 x operational skid units

unknown

unknown

Amahlathi LM

5 vehicles

3x Medium pumpers,

1x skid unit and

1x rescue unit

Nil/Zero

Nil/Zero

Raymond Mhlaba LM

2 vehicles

1x Medium Fire Engine

1x Firefighting LDV Skid unit

unknown

unknown

Great Kei LM

5 vehicles

2x Medium fire engines,

1x skid unit,

1x Major pumper,

1x Response vehicle

unknown

unknown

Mbhashe LM

3 vehicles

1x major pumper,

1x Skid unit bakkie,

1x Response vehicle

unknown

unknown

Mnquma LM

6 vehicles

3x Skid Units,

1x Major pumper

1x medium pumper

1x Response vehicle

unknown

unknown

Ngqushwa LM

4 vehicles

2x Medium pumper

1x rescue unit

1x Response vehicle

Unknown

Unknown

NAME OF PROVINCE: EASTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Alfred Nzo District

Matatiele LM

6 vehicles

3x Firefighting LDV Skid units,

1x Medium fire engine,

1x Fire tanker

1 x Rescue & Extrication with jaws of life, fire pumper (less capacity than fire engines).

no response

no response

Umzimvubu LM

3 vehicles

1x Fire-Tanker (not in good condition),

1x Skid Unit and

1x Medium Fire Engine

no response

no response

Ntabankulu LM

1 Skid Unit (Toyota Double Cab)

1x Skid Unit Toyota Hilux

no response

no response

Mbizane LM

4 vehicles

2x Firefighting LDV Skid units

1x Medium fire engine

1x Response Vehicle

no response

no response

Chris Hani District

Emalahleni LM

1 Vehicle

1x LDV Skid unit (Land cruiser)

no response

no response

Engcobo LM

4 Vehicles

2x LDV Skid units and

1x Medium Pump

1x Firefighting trailer

no response

no response

Intsika Yethu LM

2 Vehicles

1x LDV Skid unit and

1x Medium Pumper

no response

no response

Inxuba Yethemba LM

2 Vehicles

2x Medium Pumpers

no response

no response

Sakhisizwe LM

0

None

no response

no response

NAME OF PROVINCE: EASTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Enoch Mgijima LM

10 Vehicles

2x Medium pumper

3x Firefighting skid units

1x Rescue vehicle

1x Hazmat Vehicle

1x Light vehicle

1x Major pumper

1x Fire Fighting trailer

no response

no response

Joe Gqabi District

Elundini LM

1 vehicle

1 Skid Unit

no response

no response

Walter Sisulu LM

6 vehicles

3x Skid Unit

2x Medium Pumpers

1x Rescue

no response

no response

Senqu LM

3 vehicles

2x Medium Fire Engines

1x Firefighting skid unit

no response

no response

OR Tambo District

Ingquza Hill LM

1 Tanker

1x Water tanker

no response

no response

King Sabata Dalindyebo LM

6 Vehicles

1x Water Tanker (OOC)

1x Medium Pumper (OOC)

2x Major Pumpers (OOC)

1x Hazmat LDV (new)

1x Skid unit

no response

no response

Mhlontlo LM

2 Vehicles

1x Medium Pumper

1x Skid Unit (OOC)

no response

no response

Nyandeni LM

2 Vehicles

1x Major Pumper

1x Skid Unit (OOC)

no response

no response

Port St. Johns LM

2 Vehicles

1x Major Pumper

1x Skid Unit (Rescue Tools)

no response

no response

NAME OF PROVINCE: EASTERN CAPE

NAME OF MUNICIPALITY

TOTAL NUMBER OF FIRE TRUCKS

TOTAL NUMBER OF OPERATIONAL FIRE TRUCKS

ITEMISED LIST OF EXPENDITURE ON FIREFIGHTING EQUIPMENT

     

2018/2019 FY

2019/2020 FY

Sarah Baartman District

nil

nil

R1,246,343

R753,053

Blue Crane Route LM

1

1

nil

nil

Dr Beyer’s Naude LM

3

3

nil

nil

Makana

3

3

nil

nil

Koukamma

1

0

nil

nil

Sunday's River Valley

2

2

nil

nil

Kouga

9

9

nil

R518 218.40

Nelson Mandela Metro

44 Fire trucks

17x Rescue pumps,

6x Hazmat unit,

1x Heavy rescue vehicle

4x LDV firefighting Skid units

1x Firefighting trailer

4x Water tankers,

1x Medium Pumper

No submission

No submission

BACKGROUND INFORMATION:

a) The National Disaster Management Centre (NDMC) interacted with all Provincial COGTAs through their Head of Department offices requesting them to facilitate, collate and consolidate information regarding this Parliamentary Question (PQ). Accordingly, the NDMC developed a generic template, in line with the PQ and its sub-elements in order to facilitate packaging of responses by the municipalities through their respective Provincial Disaster Management Centres (PDMCs).

b) The NDMC has interacted with all provincial COGTAs on numerous occasions regarding the submission of the required information and only five (5) provinces i.e. Gauteng, North West, Western Cape, KwaZulu Natal and Eastern Cape (to some extent) submitted comprehensive reports in this regard. The other provinces submitted information with gaps from districts that did not submit the required information.

c) The NDMC has noted that the provinces i.e. Free State, Northern Cape, Limpopo and Mpumalanga without dedicated and fulltime capacity for the coordination of Fire Services struggled to provide comprehensive reports. The NDMC is concerned about effects of the weak institutional capacity in these provinces on effective national coordination of fire services work and on the provision of support to municipalities respectively.

d) It is important to note that the PQ is somewhat vague as it refers to fire trucks rather than fire engines. In view of this, most municipalities have chosen to provide specifics about the various appliances (firefighting vehicles) that are at their disposal.

e) While the Firefighting function is performed by all the metros, there are some category B and C municipalities without the authority to render this service. This is in line with the adjustment of powers and functions provided for in section 85 of the Municipal Structures Act, 1998. Thus, some municipalities (either districts or locals) did not provide information as they are not authorised to render a function. The NDMC is confident that the approval of the White Paper on Fire Services will provide impetus for municipalities to build capacity to manage fire risks in their respective jurisdictions.

29 March 2021 - NW710

Profile picture: Mileham, Mr K

Mileham, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)What is the position of her department regarding the appeal by the Makana Local Municipality and the Provincial Executive of the Eastern Cape to appeal the judgment of the Grahamstown High Court to dissolve the Council; (2) whether she has been informed of the numerous service delivery issues affecting the residents of the Makana Local Municipality, including landfill management, water availability, road repairs and sewerage leaks, which have not been resolved and for which numerous court cases have found against the municipality, resulting in several criminal cases being opened against the mayor and the municipal manager; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (3) what action will she take to ensure that the residents of Makana receive the services they are entitled to; (4) whether she will consider invoking section 139(7) of the Constitution, read with sections 139(1)(c) and 139(5)), given the failure of the Provincial Executive to adequately deal with their obligations in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW829E

Reply:

1. What is the position of her department regarding the appeal by the Makana Local Municipality and the Provincial Executive of the Eastern Cape to appeal the judgment of the Grahamstown High Court to dissolve the Council;

I cannot comment on the matter regarding the appeal by the Municipality and Provincial Executive because it is in the courts at the moment to deal with concerns about the interpretation and application of vitally important provisions of the Constitution.

2. whether she has been informed of the numerous service delivery issues affecting the residents of the Makana Local Municipality, including landfill management, water availability, road repairs and sewerage leaks, which have not been resolved and for which numerous court cases have found against the municipality, resulting in several criminal cases being opened against the mayor and the municipal manager; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so,

I am aware of the service delivery challenges facing the municipality. The Department is providing support to the Municipality to deal with some of the challenges while building capacity for the municipality. These challenges are also compounded by the drought conditions and dilapidated infrastructure that has been prevalent for over five years to date.

The challenges were escalating at a very high pace, which led to the Municipal Manager (MM), Mr M Mene to convene various special council meetings to address service delivery matters since 2019. These meetings were attended by several stakeholders representing the residents of the Makana Municipality and representatives of government departments. In these meetings it was resolved that the Water Crisis Disaster Management Plan should be compiled outlining interventions to mitigate the water crisis in the area. A Water Crisis Joint Operations Committee (WCJOC) was established to develop and implement the Disaster Management Plan.

The WCJOC is mandated to invite stakeholders at an ad hoc basis to assist with the implementation of the Disaster Management Plans. The WCJOC described above is a decision making and planning entity whose primary goal is to limit and contain the impact of the current disaster situation to the community. The Committee still meets every week in the Makhanda Municipality to assess and get update on the responses to the water crisis and provision of basic infrastructure.

WATER AVAILABILITY:

The Makana Local Municipality is one the heavily affect municipalities by drought conditions. As a result, Makhanda community relies only on the water supply from mostly Glen Melville Dam that is on the Fish River Catchment. This water is treated in the James Kleynhans Water Treatment Works (JKWTW), treating 10Ml/d. The other source is rather unreliable due to the low dam Levels (about 25%) and can only treat about 5Ml/d relative to its full capacity of 7.5Ml/d. The normal daily demand for Makhanda is 18Ml/d and that puts a burden as the demand is higher than supply. As a result, they are currently implementing water restrictions between 20h00 to 05h00 every day. To ensure reliable water supply, the following infrastructure projects are currently being implemented:

(i) Supply and Installation of 2 Pumpset for JKWTW to enable pumping redundancy so to avoid unnecessary water supply disturbance,

(ii) Replacement of Asbestos pipelines with PVC pipe Phase 1 and Phase 2 to help with reduction of pipe leakages,

(iii) Water Conservation and Water Demand Management Phase 2 and 3, this is to assist with early pipe leak detection and reduction of water losses,

(iv) Installation and replacement of old Zonal Water Meters to help with monitoring of water usage.

MISA is providing technical support relating to civil work on infrastructure and the electrical engineer is normally on site at the James Kleynhans Water Treatment Works. The support is also given to municipality on MIG projects planning, implementation and monitoring processes and to ensure the development of response plan to service delivery challenges.

The National Department of Cooperative Governance allocated MIG funding to deal with all the persistence service delivery challenges including water and sanitation challenges.

SEWER:

(i) Upgrade of Mayfield Gravity Sewer is underway to enable smooth transportation of sewerage to the treatment works therefore unlocking bottlenecks on the sanitation conveyance system, especially after the completion of the upgrade of Makana Sewer Pump Stations.

(ii) Makana Bulk Sewer Treatment Works is being upgraded to unlocking bottlenecks on the sanitation upgrade that enable smooth transportation of sewerage to the conveyance system, especially after the completion of the Upgrade of Makana Sewer Pump Stations.

ROADS:

(i) Upgrade of Ncame Street: This will focus on the main taxi route and therefore improving the state of the roads, and

(ii) Resurfacing of Somerset, High, New and Hill Street to reduce and improve roads infrastructure

MISA has provided funding for the rehabilitation and maintenance of roads. This includes Grahamstown CBD road, Somerset, Hill and New Road.

(3) What action will she take to ensure that the residents of Makana receive the services they are entitled to:

The above processes taken by the Municipality will ensure that reliable and quality services are rendered to the residents. Also with the completion of the above mentioned projects, Makana will have more sustainable and reliable provision of services putting more emphasis on operations and maintenance as a result of the aged infrastructure.

(4) Whether she will consider invoking section 139(7) of the Constitution, read with sections 139(1)(c) and 139(5), given the failure of the Provincial Executive to adequately deal with their obligations in this regard; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW829E

The invocation of section 139(1), (4) and (5) of the Constitution are a prerogative of the provincial executives. On the other hand, section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 follows from lack of or inadequate invocation of a mandatory section 139(4) or (5) of the Constitution. Section 139(7) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 provides that if a provincial executive cannot or does not adequately exercise the powers or perform the functions referred to it in subsection 139(4) and (5) of the Constitution, the national executive must intervene in the stead of relevant provincial executive.

The interventions invoked in terms of the two subsections (4) and (5) of section 139 of the Constitution are mandatory financial interventions, and the provincial executives must invoke these subsections if the municipalities satisfy the criteria outlined in those two subsections. The only time when the national executive may intervene in these scenarios are when:

(i) the provincial executive cannot, or

(ii) the provincial executive does not, or

(iii) the provincial executive does not adequately exercise the powers or perform the functions referred to in subsection (4) or (5) of section 139 of the Constitution, then the national executive must intervene in the stead of the provincial executive.

A regulatory framework on interventions will provide further detailed obligatory criteria on the invocation of section 139(7) of the Constitution by the national executive.

29 March 2021 - NW1009

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether the 6 South African Infantry Battalion training area in Grahamstown is fenced; if not, (a) why not and (b) on what date will it be fenced; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she has been informed of disputes and/or complaints by the surrounding farmers regarding illegal hunting and stock theft allegedly by persons making use of the grounds of the training centre; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the SA National Defence Force and/or any company contracted to her department patrols the perimeter of the training centre grounds; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1.(a) The eastern part of the fence of the 6 South African Infantry Battalion (6 SAI Bn) training area is absent as it has been stolen. (b) A Project was registered and sent out for tender via the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI), but the process was placed on hold by DPWI due to insufficient funding.

2.The SA Army is aware of complaints by farmers adjacent to the 6 SAI Bn training area, centred on stock theft and illegal poaching, exacerbated by the absent perimeter fence, and has reported this to the SANDF. The Defence Works Formation is co-ordinating the restoration of the absent perimeter fence with the provincial Department of Public Works and Infrastructure, on behalf of the Department of Defence.

3. Static and Roving guards from 6 SAI Bn are in place and patrolling the vast training area.

29 March 2021 - NW773

Profile picture: Shaik Emam, Mr AM

Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, with regard to more municipalities being put under administration, the increasing protest actions and poor service delivery as a result of public representatives reporting to their political parties, she will put measures in place to ensure that all public representatives (a) account to the structures they are employed under and (b) are indeed in touch with the persons that they serve, so that the persons in turn are able to lodge complaints if they are not able to reach those public representatives; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

a) Councillors, as public representatives and as members of municipal councils, must adhere to a Code of Conduct for Councillors and must ensure strict compliance with all legislation when performing their responsibilities. The Municipal Structures Act presently provides for the establishment of portfolio committees to deal with specific focus areas, as well as an oversight committee, commonly referred to as the Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPACs). The functions of the MPAC are to, in the main, review reports of the Auditor-General, the management committee, and the audit committee, and to then make recommendations to the municipal council on any matter affecting the municipality. The MPAC is also required to initiate and develop the oversight report on the annual report of the municipality, as required in terms of section 129 of the Municipal Finance Management Act.

b) Metropolitan and local municipalities that have established ward committees also use these committees to attend to community concerns and complaints. Ward committees are community representative structures meant to serve as official participatory structures in municipalities. These committees are chaired by ward councilors and serve as formal communication channels between the community and municipal councils. Ward committees are constituted by diverse interest groups to ensure inclusion of all sectors and vulnerable groups such as youth, women, religious groups, senior citizens, and community-based organizations. The Department supports the functionality of these structures through disbursement of the Local Government Equitable Share to cover Out of Pocket expenses for qualifying municipalities, capacity building for ward committee members and monitors the functionality of these structures on an on-going basis. In the absence of the ward councillor, members of the ward committees become a bridge between the municipality and communities.

In addition to ward committees, the Department is rolling-out GovChat, a social media-based community engagement platform that is implemented through an Open Government Partnership. Through GovChat, users can drop a location pin or physical address to know their public representative/ward councillor, lodge municipal service requests as well as rate and report service delivery in government facilities. The platform allows the public to lodge complaints and receive real-time feedback. Such will include service delivery complaints, non-adherence to covid-19 regulations as well as gender-based violence and femicide.

29 March 2021 - NW882

Profile picture: Walters, Mr TC

Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional AffairsQUESTION

(1)Whether any drought relief funding has been provided to the (a) Ndlambe Local Municipality, (b) Makana Local Municipality and (c) Ngqushwa Local Municipality over the past three financial years; if not, why not; if so, (i) what total amounts were provided in each case and (ii) what was the intended usage of such funds; (2) whether the funds were utilised for the purposes intended; if not, in each case, why not; if so; what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether the projects for which the funds were intended were completed successfully; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) what assistance is her department providing to the municipalities to assist with their water shortage problems? NW1049E

Reply:

1. Yes, drought relief funds were provided by the Department of Cooperative

Governance (DCOG) during the national financial year 2017/2018 to (a) Ndlambe Local Municipality, (b) Makana Local Municipality and (c) no funds were provided to Ngqushwa Local Municipality.

(i) The total amounts provided to the municipalities were as follows:

  • Ndlambe Local Municipality – R950 000
  • Makana Local Municipality – R810 000

(ii) The intended purpose for funds allocated to Ndlambe and Makana Local Municipalities was for drought intervention projects, particularly the recommissioning of boreholes and related water infrastructure that were not functional within the municipalities.

2. the reports from both municipalities indicated that the funds were used for the intended purposes for drought interventions within the municipality;

3. the projects for which the funds were intended were completed successfully as per the reports submitted by the municipalities;

4. the DCOG continues to support all municipalities within the country, including the mentioned municipalities through normal existing departmental programme, particularly the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) regarding annual funding allocations for water and sanitation infrastructure for development and service delivery enhancement within the municipalities.

 

26 March 2021 - NW854

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What (a) are the reasons that her Office has been so slow in implementing the National Strategic Plan and (b) plan does her Office have in place to ensure that the implementation of the National Strategic Plan is fast-tracked?

Reply:

a) It is worth noting that there is reasonable progress in some of the interventions of the NSP on GBVF. However, reporting on progress has been mainly based on outputs of activities rather than outcomes. The NSP on GBVF is still in its early stages of implementation and outcomes and impact takes time.

b) The department has been working with national departments, provinces, districts and local municipalities towards integration of NSP on GBVF priorities in strategic plans. As part of localising the NSP on GVBF, provinces are working on their implementation plans and establishing structures aligned to the principles of the NSP on GBVF with the guidance of the department. The department is also conducting information sessions across all nine provinces. Between February and March 2021 eight (8) provinces have been covered with KwaZulu-Natal being the only outstanding province.

___________________________

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister

Date:

26 March 2021 - NW676

Profile picture: Hinana, Mr N

Hinana, Mr N to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

No the Department of Correctional Services does not make use of private security firms.

END

26 March 2021 - NW733

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

(1)    In light of the fact that the report of the auditor-general noted that irregular expenditure in her department increased from R1,318 billion in 2019 to R1,330 billion in 2020, what corrective measures have been taken to address irregular expenditure; (2) whether any person has been held accountable for her department’s failure to address irregular expenditure; if not, why not; if so, (a) who and (b) what action has been taken against the specified person(s)?

Reply:

1. The irregular expenditure cases are being investigated in line with the Irregular Expenditure Framework issued by the National Treasury in 2019. Upon finalization of these investigations, reports will be considered by the Loss Control and Asset Disposal Committee whereafter recommendations will be submitted to the Accounting Officer for further processing. At this stage, the department is not yet at the stage where it can concisely indicate how many cases will be recommended for condonement, and how many will be recommended for recovery in instances where loss was suffered by the department.

2. The final determination of irregular expenditure and the related outcomes such as recovery, condonement and consequence management can only be concluded once the investigation reports are finalized. These reports are currently being finalized.

26 March 2021 - NW640

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What is the current statistics in terms of the employment of foreign nationals in the (a) trucking, (b) restaurant, (c) private security, (d) agriculture, (e) mining, (f) transport, (g) e-hailing, (h) delivery, (i) hair and beauty and (j) domestic industries?

Reply:

The Department of Employment and Labour maintains statistics of registered local and foreign nationals for the purposes of Unemployment Insurance Fund collection and payments, those who were recommended for individual or corporate work visas, Compensation Fund collection and payments and for monitoring transformation in the labour market through our Employment Equity Reports.

The Economic Sectors are broad and may not necessarily align with Honourable van der Merwe’s list as it also contains economic sub-sectors and or industries.

Our statistics may not provide a true picture of the total number of people employed in some of the economic sectors and sub-sectors as it is not possible to maintain statistics of those that are not registered especially undocumented foreign nationals.

26 March 2021 - NW855

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to his department’s latest Estimates of National Expenditure (details furnished), (a) why does the estimated number of personnel exceed the number of 2987 funded posts within the department in every single fiscal year?

Reply:

In terms of the enabling Legislation of the Unemployment Insurance Fund (UIF), the Compensation Fund (CF) and Supported Employment Enterprises (SEE), the Minister of Labour (now Employment and Labour) appoints a Commissioner and support staff to perform the functions of the Funds and seconds such to the Funds.

As a result of this, it is the Department that is the registered employer and all appointments are made in line with the Public Service Act and accompanying Regulations. The Department therefore performs all payroll functions for the Department, the UIF, CF and SEE as one employer.

In terms of Compensation of Employees (CoE or payroll), the allocation of expenditure is governed by an Organisational Development (OD) exercise determining the functions and the level of such functions performed by positions contained in the approved establishment. This is commonly referred to as the “Approved Percentage Split”. This information is captured against positions on the establishment and is monitored and controlled by the Human Resource Management units within the Department as well as the UIF, CF and SEE.

The establishment is confirmed as being correct at regular intervals as it is this establishment which determines the value of CoE that is expensed against the Vote or alternatively recovered from the respective Fund.

As a result of this symbiotic relationship, the Department reflects an approved establishment of 9,990 on PERSAL however, only expenditure in respect of 2987 positions are expensed against the CoE allocations reflected in the Estimates of National Expenditure, and not 9,990 positions as per the approved establishment.

26 March 2021 - NW846

Profile picture: Steyn, Ms A

Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)(a) What reasons did the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) give to the National Treasury for spending only 49% or R1,3 billion of its allocated funds for its Agricultural Land Holding Account (ALHA), which was allocated R2,7 billion, by the end of the 2019-20 financial year when it requested a rollover of the unspent funds and (b) what proposed spending changes did the DALRRD provide in their application to the National Treasury for a rollover of funds that were originally meant for the ALHA; (2) whether the DALRRD provided the National Treasury with a schedule indicating the month(s) in which the expenditure is expected to be incurred; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) The DALRRD’s requested the National Treasury to retain the surplus from the 2019/20 financial year due to underspending on a number of projects for the following reasons.

  • Recapitalisation and development projects: Non- Accountability of previous disbursements.
  • Guarantees on Land Acquisition: The DALRRD indicated that there were lengthy negotiations on some projects between sellers of land and the department which concluded at the end of quarter 3 and beginning of quarter 4. After conclusion of agreements, the projects had to go for conveyancing and registration process by Deeds Office which delayed the payments.
  • Contracted one Hectare one Household projects: were not completed due to slow mobilization of the projects due to lengthy stakeholder consultation process, and disputes amongst beneficiaries.
  • Contracted Land Development Support: The DALRRD indicated that they had to request Section 66 and Section 72 approvals (PFMA restrictions on borrowing, guarantees and other commitments) from the National Treasury to enter into contracts with ABSA and FNB for the purpose of mitigating the risk of farmers misusing the funds as experienced in the past with the Recapitalization and Development Programme (RADP) program. The approval was granted during December 2019. A team of agricultural engineers from former the Department of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries (DAFF) were assembled and deployed to the farms to reassess the infrastructure. Transfers were made after receipt of the assessment reports of relevant infrastructure required on farms, and some of these project assessments were only concluded during the 2020/21 financial year.
  • Contracted forensic audit: delays due to ongoing forensic audit. The DALRRD indicated that the amount would be paid after close up report is received on forensic audit performed. The expenditure was expected to be disbursed within 30 days after receipt of invoice.
  • Open orders: Valuations for land acquisition projects not yet concluded at the end of the financial year.
  • Further ALHA received an additional R277 million towards the end of March 2020 (end of 2019/20 financial year) for COVID-19 Disaster Fund.

2. 

(b) The DALRRD, did not provide any proposed spending changes. The retained surplus is supposed to be spend during the 2020/21, during which the approval would be valid.

  • The DALRRD provided the cash flow / expenditure disbursement terms, which ranges from 2 days after registration of land by Deeds Office; 30 days after receipt of invoice; and some projects expenditure to be disbursed within 1 year.
  • The table below indicates the disbursement terms, project values and project terms.

Table 1: List of commitments at the end of 2019/20

Commitment description

Project term (years)

Cash flow disbursement term

Reason for slow spending

Project budget (R’000)

Project Surplus (R’000)

Recapitalisation and Development projects

5

1 year

Non Accountability of previous disbursements

122 436

122 436

Guarantees on Land Acquisition

0.5

2 days after land registration by Deeds

Lengthy negotiations on some projects between seller and department which concluded end of quarter 3 and beginning of quarter 4, after agreement projects have to go for conveyancing and registration process by Deeds Office.

146 436

146 436

Contracted one Hectare one Household projects

unlimited

1 year

Slow mobilization of the projects due to lengthy stakeholder consultation process. Disputes amongst beneficiaries These commitments are mainly second or third tranches, which are earmarked to be finalised this financial year.

28 257

28257

Contracted Land Development Support

5

1 year

The Department had to request Section 66 and Section 72 approvals from Treasury to enter into contracts with ABSA and FNB for the purpose of mitigation the risk of farmers misusing the funds as experienced in the past with the RADP program. The approval was granted during December 2019. A team of Agricultural Engineers from DAFF were assembled and deployed to the farms to reassess the infrastructure. Transfers were made after receipt of the assessment report of relevant infrastructure required on farms. Some of these project assessments were only concluded in the current financial year.

716 990

716 990

Contracted forensic audit

1

I year

Retention amount will be paid after close up report is received on forensic audit performed.

1 710

1 710

Contracted project management

1

30 days after receipt of invoice

Balance for project will be paid after final review and sign off the close up report.

477

477

Open Orders

0.5

30 days after receipt of invoice

Valuations for land acquisition projects not yet concluded.

2 828

2 828

Total

     

1 019 135

1 019 135

COVID Disaster Fund

0.5

30 days after receipt of invoice

Current financial year, funds received from department during 2019/20.

513 844

513 844

Grand Total

     

1 532 979

1 532 979

26 March 2021 - NW832

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

How does her department involve the youth living in rural areas so that they are not excluded at the youth machinery meetings, given that most interactions are now virtual?

Reply:

The National Youth Machinery meeting has been established at the national sphere of government, to coordinate youth development by all relevant stakeholders within the youth sector. It is a professional space to share information and showcase good practices. The meeting provides a platform to different stakeholders, to share information about their strategies, plans, programmes, and projects. The participants are youth workers who are mainly youth focal points from youth led and youth serving organisations.

The National Youth Machinery meeting consist of representatives from:

a) the National Youth Development unit in the DWYPD; to serve as the Convenor, Chairperson and Secretariat of the meeting;

b) the line function department responsible for youth development at the national sphere;

c) the youth units in the Offices the Premiers (representing each province);

d) the NYDA;

e) Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs;

f) the South African Local Government Association (SALGA);

g) the South African Youth Council (SAYC);

h) non-government youth led organisations; and

i) Representatives of the private sector.

There are similar structures at provincial and local levels, where provincial and local youth focal points representing Offices of the Premiers, provincial sector departments as well as district and local municipalities, also participate. The meeting participants are expected to engage directly with the clients they are servicing. This would mean that at provincial and local level, the youth workers (youth focal points), cascade information to majority of young people they are servicing including those residing in rural areas.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

26 March 2021 - NW769

Profile picture: Denner, Ms H

Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

With reference to the call centre of the Unemployment Insurance Fund, what (a) total number of call centre agents are actively working for the call centre at any given time, (b)(i) total number of calls are received on a monthly basis and (ii) number of the specified calls are successfully resolved and (c) is the average time it takes to answer a ringing call that comes in to the call centre?

Reply:

a) There are 291 active call centre agents.

b) (i) The UIF call centre receives on average 253 312 calls per month.

(ii) 236 903 (93,5%) are successfully resolved by the 291 active call centre agents.

c) The average wait time call to be responded to is 28 seconds

26 March 2021 - NW682

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

The NSG is one of the entities that reports to the Minister for Public Service and Administration and has its own premises that it leases from DPWI (PIC) situated at ZK Matthews, Trevenna Bld, 70 Meintjies street Sunnyside PRETORIA and utilise the following security firms.

(i) Name of the Company

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Contract Value

(iv) Duration of the contract

Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise cc (Reg 2003/034074/23)

To provide physical security services to safeguard NSG personnel and property

R 17, 538, 566,28

Five (5) years

(01 November 2018 – 31 October 2023)

Vox Telecommunications (Pty) Ltd (Reg 2011/000797/07)

To provide management and maintenance service for CCTV surveillance, Access Control and Intruder Alarm System

R2,128,829.36

36 months

(01 January 2020-31 December 2023)

REPLY: PSC

The Office of the Public Service Commission (OPSC) has appointed private security firms for four Provincial Offices as set out in the table below:

i) Name of service provider

ii)Purpose

iii) Value

iv) Duration of each contract

Tyeks Security Services

Alarm Monitoring and Guard Services (day and night) for the Eastern Cape Provincial Office

R614 477.76

01 November 2019 to 31 October 2021

Divergent OPS (Pty) Ltd

Alarm Monitoring for the Mpumalanga Provincial Office

R40 986.00

01 March 2020 to 28 February 2022

National Security and Fire

Alarm Monitoring for the Limpopo Provincial Office

R44 683.35

01 November 2019 to 31 October 2022

Defensor Electronic Security System

Alarm Monitoring for the Free State Provincial Office

R11 098.41

01 October 2020 to 30 September 2021

REPLY: DPSA

a) Yes

Department of Public Service and Administration:

  1. Jackcliffy Trading Cc
  2. Security guarding services during week days, weekends, Public Holidays and nightshift.
  3. R2 589 998.80
  4. Two year contract

b) Thusong Service Centre

  1. Masutha Training & Security Services (Pty) Ltd
  2. Security Guarding Services during week days and on Saturday only.
  3. R4 524 399.72
  4. Three year contract

REPLY: CPSI

a) The CPSI does not make use of private security firms. The organisation has 3 permanently employed Security Officers on the staff establishment.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) NA

(iv) N/A

End

26 March 2021 - NW587

Profile picture: Stubbe, Mr DJ

Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

With reference to her reply to question 1918 on 13 December 2020, what (a) is the (i) Rand value and (ii) distance in kilometres with regard to the (aa) backlog, (bb) resurfacing and (cc) rehabilitation of roads and (b) amount has been set aside for this purpose in the current budget?

Reply:

a) (i) & (ii) The rand value of the backlog is indicated in the table below:

No

Type

Kilometres

Rand value (approx.)*

1

Backlog of Resurfacing/Rehabilitation

1352

R3.1 billion

*costs for rehabilitation and resurfacing increase year on year

b). The budget that has been set aside to deal with the above is as follows:

No

Type

Budget

Kilometres

1

Resurfacing/Rehabilitation

R248 million

106

The budget of R248 million has already been spent in the current financial year (2020/2021) for rehabilitation/resurfacing of 106km. Resurfacing is one of different methods of rehabilitation hence the two have been merged.

26 March 2021 - NW843

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(a) With what amount is the SA Social Security Agency in arrears for hiring the offices in Williston in Karoo-Hoogland Local Municipality and (b) what are the reasons that they are behind in paying the rentals?

Reply:

a) The lease for the Williston Office is entered into and managed by the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (NDPWI). SASSA is the User Client. As a result, SASSA pays all the rentals payable to DPWI and not directly to the landlord. All amounts due for rental for this office have been paid to DPWI.

b) Payment was due and payable by NDPWI for the months of October, November and December 2020 respectively amounting to R28 339.95 (R9.446.65 per month). This balance was duly settled in February 2021 by DPWI.

It is reported that DPWI was paying the rental into the bank account of the deceased Lessor/Landlord. DPWI received an instruction from the Attorneys of the deceased Lessor/Landlord, to change the banking details accordingly. This was not done timeously and the payments were returned as this bank account was closed. Subsequently NDPWI processed the new banking details as instructed and has paid the outstanding amounts, thereby putting this matter to rest.

26 March 2021 - NW853

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

In view of the fact that gender-based violence and femicide is indeed a pandemic in the Republic and violence against women and the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex, Queer, Asexual+ community goes unabated, (a) what are the reasons that the Comprehensive National Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) Prevention Strategy has not been prioritised, (b) what are the plans of her Office’s to speed up the implementation of the strategy and (c) how will her Office hold officials accountable for failing to implement the Comprehensive National GBVF Prevention Strategy?

Reply:

(a) The Comprehensive National GBVF Prevention Strategy was prioritised. The department divided the prioritisation of the Prevention Strategy into two phases; The 1st phase involved the development of a communication strategy. This was based on the understanding that over the years, public dialogue and visibility of GBVF around social behavioral change programmes has not transpired on communication platforms. The communication strategy was developed and concluded last year to inform and raise awareness and influence behavioral change. The GBVF Communication Strategy was developed with men and boys as the core target audience. The goal is to change the norms and stereotypes that perpetuate violence against women, children and the LGBTQIA+ sector.

The communication strategy was the first step towards the development of a comprehensive national prevention strategy

Below is the response for phase 2:

(b) Due to a lack of resources the Department has partnered with four UN agencies, namely UN Office on Drugs and Crime; UN Women; United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF); and UN Development Programme (UNDP) in the development of a Comprehensive National Gender-Based Violence and Femicide Prevention Strategy.

This partnership also includes the GIZ which is the German development cooperation with South Africa. This has been done to ensure that the implementation of the Prevention Strategy is not hindered.

It should be noted that the Prevention Strategy will be concluded in the 2021/22 financial year.

(c) The inability of the officials to develop the prevention strategy is based on the inadequate resources in terms of personnel and funding and not due to incompetency. It is the very officials that reached out to UN agencies in forging a partnership. This does not require consequences management. The partnership forged already is strategic enough and it will enhance existing capacity and yield the desired results.

___________________________

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister

Date:

26 March 2021 - NW601

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Finance

In view of the Government’s plans to launch a state-owned bank and whilst interest-free banking services may be the first step to reduce the draconian interest choking every South African, (a) what total amount was budgeted to fund interest on debt in the (i) 1995 budget and (ii) latest budget and (b) has he found this to be in line with inflation and/or poor fiscal frameworks year after year?

Reply:

It is generally not possible in South Africa for the state, or any bank or company, to secure loan funding without paying interest except, possibly, for small amounts of concessional funding. No bank in South Africa is likely to lend to customers without covering the full cost of capital, including interest. Some institutions may be able to structure a small part of their loan market for non-interest or sharia-related lending but such lending is very limited, and uses other mechanisms to recover their costs.

The question of whether any state bank can lend at lower interest rates than commencial banks, and whether such a business model will be sustainable, and bring no additional risk to the fiscus, is a separate question that the management of each state bank has to consider, including the extent of non-performing loans and affordability of its customers. It is imperative that no state bank must be a burden on the fiscus and that all state banks must be able to generate sufficient own-revenue to fund their operations. State banks which engage in lending activities need to develop robust lending and risk management models, so that they do not depend on fiscal transfers, or impose losses on depositors. As such, no funds have been budgeted to fund any interest-free lending, by any bank.

a) The amount of funds budgeted to fund interest on the national debt is available in the annual Budget documentation, including the Budget Review.

(i) The total amount of funds that was budgeted to fund interest on the national debt in the 1995 Budget for 1995/96 was R39,5 billion.

(ii) The total amount of funds budgeted to fund interest on the national debt in the latest, 2021 Budget is R232,9 billion for 2020/21.

b) As announced in the 2021 National Budget, the cost of servicing government’s debt, at R232,9 billion or 11,3% of consolidated expenditure in 2020/21, and rising in the next few years, is not sustainable. Hence, in the 2021 Budget, government has undertaken several measures which are expected to stabilise government debt at 88,9% of GDP in the 2025/26 financial year, and for the ratio to decline thereafter.

26 March 2021 - NW486

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) total number of children without birth certificates were paid grants by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) in the December 2020 pay-run and (b) is the breakdown of the specified number for each province; (2) what (a) total number of children without birth certificates were paid grants by SASSA in January 2021 and (b) is the breakdown of the specified number for each province; (3) what (a) total number of these children had their grants stopped on 31 December 2020 due to SASSA enforcing its internal 3-month rule in terms of which the caregiver must submit the outstanding identity document (ID) and/or birth certificate or proof that she has applied to Home Affairs for these documents and (b) is the breakdown of the specified number for each province; (4) taking into account that the country is under lockdown level 3 to curb the spread of COVID-19 and the Department of Home Affairs is not processing new ID applications or late birth registrations, what are the reasons that SASSA allowed the grants to lapse at the end of 2020; (5) whether SASSA intends to reinstate these children’s grants; if not, why not; if so, for how long will they remain in payment before they lapse again?

Reply:

1(a) The total number of children in payment in December 2020 without birth certificates was 24 756.

(b) The numbers per province are indicated below:

 

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

1 967

Free State

161

Gauteng

14 696

KwaZulu-Natal

1 637

Limpopo

275

Mpumalanga

584

Northern Cape

358

North West

99

Western Cape

4 979

2(a) The total number of children in payment in January 2021 without birth certificates was

28 178.

(b) The numbers per province are indicated below:

 

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

2 064

Free State

418

Gauteng

15 852

KwaZulu-Natal

2 080

Limpopo

353

Mpumalanga

665

Northern Cape

1 124

North West

193

Western Cape

5 429

3(a) The total number of grants for these children which were lapsed at the end of December were 1 792.

(b) The breakdown per province is as follows:

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

73

Free State

155

Gauteng

358

KwaZulu-Natal

302

Limpopo

37

Mpumalanga

32

Northern Cape

87

North West

575

Western Cape

173

4. Applications for social grants are accepted, where the applicant does not have the required critical documents, The applications are conditionally approved, with the applicant required to show proof of having applied for the required documentation, within a 3 month period of have applied for the grant. It is important to note that the applicant does not necessarily have to produce the required document within the 3 month period, but just produce proof of having approached the Department of Home Affairs to apply for the required documents. Should the applicant not provide that proof, then the grant is lapsed.

This action is taken to mitigate the risk of continuing to pay a grant to someone who does not qualify to obtain South African identity documents. However, SASSA is working closely with the Departments of Social Development and Home Affairs to determine alternative methods to mitigate these risks, without necessarily putting the responsibility on individual citizens.

The lapsings of the grants for the above children were initiated when the country was under level 1 of lockdown restrictions. However, as soon as the country moved back to level 3, discussions were entered into with the Department of Social Development to obtain approval to reinstate these grants. In addition, an agreement has been reached not to lapse any grants for any beneficiaries who do not have the relevant critical documents (both ID documents for adults as well as birth certificates for children) for as long as the state of disaster persists, regardless of the lock down level.

 

5. All 1 792 children’s grants which lapsed at the end of December were reinstated, with back pay for the month of January and paid in February 2021.

The total number of children’s grants for children without birth certificates in payment for February 2021 has increased to 29 064, as indicated below:

Province

Number

Eastern Cape

2 074

Free State

431

Gauteng

16 585

KwaZulu-Natal

2 108

Limpopo

367

Mpumalanga

671

Northern Cape

1 153

North West

203

Western Cape

5 472

26 March 2021 - NW717

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

In view of the fact that her Office has been discouraged on the use of consultants by the Portfolio Committee on Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities due to severe budget cuts that require limited use of consultants, what steps has her Office taken to ensure that all targets and the mandate of her Office are met without the use of consultants?

Reply:

The Portfolio Committee on Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities has regularly indicated its concern with the use of consultants by the department due to budgetary constraints.

It must be emphasised that due to budgetary cuts, especially in the allocation for compensation of employees, it has impacted on the ability of the Department to recruit and hire suitably technically skilled persons to carry out certain specific tasks and activities. Unfortunately the Department has been placed in a situation where it is forced to use short-term, temporary skilled personnel to assist in these areas of work.

One such area is in the development of an evidence-based knowledge portal, which requires high technical skills in conceptualising and developing a model for an electronic platform. Furthermore there is also an element of IT Skills that are needed to develop and undertake the back-end processes of such an electronic platform. These skills are not available within the current personnel in the department. Thus the Department has been working with the University of Johannesburg since 2019 towards this end. However due to the budget reprioritisation process redirecting government spending towards the response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the country, this project was reprioritised for implementation in the 2021/22 financial year.

In order to reduce the use of consultants, the Department has also embarked on collaborative efforts with UN agencies in an effort to increase its capacity on areas that requires technical expertise. Two technical experts have been secured from UNFPA in respect of the development of a comprehensive M&E framework for the Sanitary Dignity programme, and the development of a comprehensive M&E Framework for the National Strategic Plan on Gender Based Violence & Femicide.

It must be noted that in the use of these external technical expertise in these three programmes of the department, there is a level of ongoing skills transfer as well. However in achieving the majority of the targets in the Annual Performance Plan, the Department has been undertaking the work in-house, and meeting the necessary quarterly targets. The Department is therefore on course to meet its targets for the year with the work done by the officials in the department itself.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

26 March 2021 - NW850

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) number of shelters are currently operating in the Hantam Local Municipality and (b) are the relevant details of the persons and/or institutions assisting homeless people with food and shelter in the municipality; (2) (a) what number of shelters that are supported by her department are within the Northern Cape and (b) in which towns are the shelters situated; (3) whether all the shelters in the Northern Cape are operating and/or functional; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a) There are currently no shelters for the homeless operating in the Hantam Local Municipality. During Level 5 Lockdown shelters were operational in Calvinia and Brandvlei respectively. Buildings at the Sport Grounds were utilized. A total of thirteen (13) individuals made use of the services during this time, (11 in Calvinia and 2 in Brandvlei). Upon investigation, it was found that eleven (11) of the beneficiaries were residents of the area, but were refused accommodation with their families, where they usually reside, due to disruptive behaviour. Family preservation services were rendered, and all persons were re-united with their families within three(3) months. Two (2) of the residents were from outside the Northern-Cape and were transported back to Pretoria and the Eastern Cape, respectively, as soon as restrictions on travel were relaxed.

(1)(b) No assistance or services are currently required.

(2)(a)(b) No shelters for the homeless are currently operational.

(3) No shelters for the homeless are currently operational in the Province. The approach of the Department of Social Development is to render psycho-social and family reunification services. If cases are reported the circumstances under which an adult male would report himself as homeless will be investigated. In most cases it is found that he has accommodation, but due to conflict or unacceptable behaviour could no longer stay there. Through family group conferences and other interventions, the matter is usually resolved and there is no need for accommodation in a shelter.

There are six (6) shelters available for women who need temporary shelter, or became homeless due to violence. Support and counselling are given in order to return these victims to a safe family environment as soon as possible. All these shelters are operational and funded by the Department of Social Development.

In cases of homeless children, one of the ten (10) funded Child and Youth care Centres are utilized for the placement of these children - if they cannot be returned to their families.

Maintaining shelters in the Province (at least one per District) will require a large budget. If only one (1) shelter is operational, beneficiaries might have to be transported up to 800 km to stay at a shelter for a few days, which is also not cost effective.

The number of adult males (the target group of shelters) reporting to be homeless is very low, and matters relating to their temporary housing problems can usually be resolved in a short space of time. The available budget in the Province will be much better utilized by funding existing VEP Shelters and Child and Youth Care Centres.

26 March 2021 - NW768

Profile picture: Denner, Ms H

Denner, Ms H to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

(1)What was the reason for the technical problems experienced by the call centre of the Unemployment Insurance Fund as announced on Tuesday, 2 March 2021; (2) whether the specified technical problems were resolved; if not, (a) what is the reason for the delay and (b) by what date will the call centre be operational again; if so, (i) how long did it take to resolve and (ii) from what date was the call centre fully operational again?

Reply:

  1. Telkom terminated the service of the 0800 call centre number as a result of the non-extension of the telephone line contract. 
  2. This was resolved on the 4th March 2021 and the call centre was fully operational from the afternoon of 4 March 2021. 

26 March 2021 - NW680

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr JN

De Villiers, Mr JN to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Whether (a) her Office and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

 

Department: DWYPD

Entity: NYDA

(a)

Yes, Her office makes use of private security firm.

 

(b)

N/A

Yes, the NYDA makes use of a private security firm:

(i)

Idlangamandla Security Protection & Project cc

Rise Security Services (Pty) LTD

(ii)

The purpose is to provide physical (guarding) services to protect the DWYPD infrastructure and assets.

The purpose is to provide physical security services to twenty-one (21) NYDA branch offices and thirty-one (31) district offices in terms of access control, guarding, alarm services and emergency response to protect the NYDA infrastructure and assets.

(iii)

R2 378 660, 48

R18 551 388.66

(iv)

24 months from 01 January 2021 – December 2022

36 months from 1 November 2019 to 31 October 2022.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

26 March 2021 - NW852

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) What are the details of the new model that will be adopted for the National Gender-Based Violence and Femicide Council since Cabinet had initially agreed and adopted the SA National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependency (SANCADD) model that will no longer be used (details furnished) and (b) how does her Office intend to make up for the time that has been lost due to the incompetency in establishing the National Gender-Based Violence and Femicide Council?

Reply:

a) The draft Bill that the Department is developing will guide inter alia, the establishment of the NCGBVF, which will outline the details of the model in line with the Gender-Based Violence and Femicide (GBVF) NSP and the declaration.

b) The process to establish the National Gender-Based Violence and Femicide Council requires enactment of a founding legislation first. The department is in the process of developing the draft Bill.

___________________________

Approved by:

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Minister

Date:

26 March 2021 - NW793

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total amount has the SA Social Security Agency lost as a result of cash-in-transit heists over the past five financial years?

Reply:

SASSA has not lost any money as a result of cash in transit heists. Over the past 5 years, there have been two payment contractors. For the period from 2016 to 2018, payments were made by Cash Paymaster Services and for the period from 2018 to date, social grant disbursement services have been made by the South African Post Office.

In terms of the contracts entered into, the contracted service providers have to carry insurance against losses as a result of cash in transit heists. The risk is therefore transferred from SASSA to the service providers.

26 March 2021 - NW847

Profile picture: Cardo, Dr MJ

Cardo, Dr MJ to ask the Minister of Employment and Labour

What (a) total number of claims submitted to the Compensation Fund arose from injuries incurred during the journey to and from the workplace in the past five financial years and (b) proportion of overall claims did these claims constitute in each specified financial year?

Reply:

Section 22 (4) of the COID Act indicates that compensation will be considered for accidents that has ‘arisen out of and in the course of employment’. The Compensation Fund does not consider claims for accidents that occurred during the journey to and from work if they do not meet “arising out of and in the course of employment”.

Section 22 (5) does provide for consideration of claims in the event of accidents that have arisen where the employer provides free transportation to commute to and from work for the purposes of employment.

However, the Fund does not keep information in such a way that we can distinguish motor vehicle accident claims between those where it was transport provided by the employer to and from work as well as those that occurred while the worker was executing his/her duties.

26 March 2021 - NW810

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with proof of all deviations for the purposes of personal protective equipment procurement that was authorised by the National Treasury in respect of the Travel With Flair (2004/028611/07) tender contracted by the Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation from 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2021?

Reply:

National Treasury has not received nor approved any requests for deviations from procurement processes from the Department of Human Settlements (DHS) or Department of Water & Sanitation (DWS) for the procurement of personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair (2004/028611/07) for the period 1 January 2020 to 31 January 2021.

The National Treasury does, however, notice the Covid-19 transactions that were reported by DHS against Travel with Flair to the amount of R939 349.00. These transactions were undertaken by the authority of the accounting officer and not as a result of any deviation that NT approved.

National Treasury did not find any transactions for DWS against Travel with Flair on the Covid-19 Reporting Dashboard.

Human Settlements – Extract from the Covid-19 Reporting Dashboard