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19 March 2021 - NW157

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) is the total number of water tankers that have operated in the KwaMashu area in each year since 2010 and (b) is the total amount spent on the (i) water tankers and (ii) bulk infrastructure in the above mentioned area in each specified year?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is unable to provide the total amount spent on water tankers in the KwaMashu area in eThekwini since 2010 as this responsibility falls within the mandate of eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.                                      

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for the oversight of municipalities.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW156

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Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the total amount that has been spent on (a) water tankers and (b) bulk infrastructure in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each financial year since 2010?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation is unable to provide the total amount spent on water tankers and bulk infrastructure in Umzinyathi in eThekwini since 2010 as this falls within the responsibility of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for the oversight of municipalities.    

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW155

Profile picture: Gumbi, Mr HS

Gumbi, Mr HS to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What is the total number of water tankers that operated in Ward 3, uMzinyathi, in eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality in each year since 2010?

Reply:

The matter raised by the Honourable Member falls within the ambit of the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality.

The Honourable Member is therefore advised to address the question to my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA), as that Department is responsible for oversight over municipalities.

Honourable Member, it is important to distinguish the functions of various government departments and the different spheres of government when it comes to access to water and sanitation services.

  • The Department of Water and Sanitation is the custodian of water and in terms of the National Water Act is responsible for ensuring that water as a resource is allocated equitably and used beneficially in the public interest, while promoting environmental values.
  • Schedule 4B of the Constitution places the function of provision of water services to local government (municipalities).
  • Section 154 of the Constitution places a responsibility on national and provincial government to support and regulate local government in carrying out this mandate.
  • Section 3 of the Water Services Act outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.
  • Section 4 of the Water Services Act sets conditions for the provision of water services.
  • Section 9 of the Water Services Act prescribes that the Minister may from time to time develop compulsory national norms and standards for water services which outline the exact levels of services that municipalities must provide.
  • Section 10 of the Water Services Act provides norms and standards for setting tariffs for the provision of water services.
  • Section 11 of the Water Services Act mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”
  • Section 84(1) d of the Municipal Structures Act mandates that municipalities are responsible for the provision of potable water and domestic waste water disposal systems.

19 March 2021 - NW102

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With regard to the Nzhelele Water Scheme Project in the Musina Local Municipality in the past 12 months, what (a) maintenance was done by her department on the water canal, (b) was the financial implication to her department thereof, (c) is the maintenance backlog on the canal and (d) is the projected cost of the maintenance backlog?

Reply:

a) I have been informed that in the last 12 months the Department of Water and Sanitation’s Northern Operations has carried out repairs to the Nzhelele Mount Steward Syphon 2/3. In addition, maintenance activities of the irrigation system are scheduled as indicated below:

  • Canal D (total length 7.10 km),
  • Canal E (total length 2.7 km)
  • Canal A (total length 2.74 km)
  • Clearing of vegetation and cutting of branches overhanging above the canal
  • Application of herbicide
  • Removal of debris, algae and sediment from the canal
  • Grading of the access roads
  • Construction of gabions
  • Repairing of damaged sluices
  • Earthwork in dispersive soil at E Canal

b) The budget for the rehabilitation and maintenance of the canal is R 2.4 million.

c) The maintenance backlog will be addressed through ongoing rehabilitation and maintenance of the canal as indicated above.

d) The budget for these activities is R 2.4 million.

19 March 2021 - NW298

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

With reference to the Iziko Museum, (a) how long has the Michaelis Collection been stored, (b) where is it stored and (c) what is it worth?

Reply:

(a). The Collection has been in storage since 31 December 2015.

(b). The Michaelis Collection is stored in the Iziko storerooms for security reasons.

(c). For security reasons, the Iziko Museums would not like to disclose the value of the said Collections.

19 March 2021 - NW189

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

a) In light of the fact that numerous Home Affairs offices in different provinces experience ongoing information, communications and technology (ICT) system challenges, what (a) is the ICT licensing agreement in terms of daily applications to be processed, (b)(i) total number of Home Affairs offices were fully operational in the period 1 March 2020 to 31 December 2020 and (ii) were the reasons for closure of offices in each case and (c) is the total number of staff according to the organogram compared to the actual number of staff at Home Affairs offices in each province?

Reply:

a) There’s no maximum limit on the number of daily applications to be processed in terms of licence agreements. The performance is dependent on systems and personnel numbers.

b) It should be noted that no office could be fully operational due to the effect of Covid-19 lockdown restrictions and capacity challenges. Please refer to the attached Excel Annexure

(b)(i)

PROVINCE

b(i) total number of Home Affairs offices were fully operational in the period 1 March 2020 to 31 December 2020

EASTERN CAPE

12 were fully operation of 53

FREE STATE

23

GAUTENG

33 Offices

KZN

13 offices operational of which 3 offices only operational at level 1 lockdown

MPUMALANGA

37 out of 58

LIMPOPO

42

NORTH WEST

8

NORTHERN CAPE

15

WESTERN CAPE

28

(b)(ii) It should be noted that offices were not entirely closed due to ICT challenges

PROVINCE

b(ii) what were the reasons for closure of offices in each case

EASTERN CAPE

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour

FREE STATE

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour

GAUTENG

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour

KZN

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, and scarcely electricity challenges and renovations

MPUMALANGA

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour and water outages

 

LIMPOPO

None

NORTH WEST

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour and water outages

NORTHERN CAPE

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices, scarcely electricity challenges and renovations, closed by organised labour and water outages

WESTERN CAPE

Mainly COVID-19 case detection and decontamination of offices
Prohibition orders issued by the Department of Labour

(c) Number of staff according to the organogram (approved posts) compared to the actual number of staff at Home Affairs offices in each Province, at 31 January 2021.See the table below:

PROVINCE

POSTS ACCORDING TO ORGANOGRAM

ACTUAL NUMBER OF STAFF

Eastern Cape

1699

630

Free State

755

349

Gauteng

3185

1207

Kwa-Zulu Natal

1915

602

Limpopo

1379

604

Mpumalanga

1233

394

North West

919

412

Northern Cape

568

244

Western Cape

1090

509

Grand total

12743

4951

END

19 March 2021 - NW29

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(a)(i) What total number of refugees from the Southern African Development Community countries have received refugee status in the Republic and (ii) where are they housed and (b) are all the refugees receiving (i) social assistance and (ii) medical assistance?

Reply:

(a)(i) According to DHA system, there are currently 40 455 persons from the SADC region with the recognised refugee status.

(ii) South African government has signed the 1951 United Nations Convention without any reservations, including settlement and encampment, whilst other Member States have signed the Convention with the obligation to settlements and encampment in order to house and control the movement of refugees and asylum seekers. Therefore, in South Africa asylum seekers and refugees reside where they wish to, if there are those that are indigent they are able to approach UNHCR to seek assistance for accommodation, whilst refugees do qualify to apply for RDP houses.

(b)(i) Not all refugees are indigent and dependant on social grants. Those who require such assistance do approach the Department of Social Development that would subject them to the necessary means test like South African citizens and receive grant if they qualify.

(ii) Section 27(1) (a) of the Bill of Rights provide that; everyone has the right to have access to ¬health care services, including reproductive health care. Therefore, the Department of Health has its protocols and procedures to deal with persons who attend their health facilities.

END

19 March 2021 - NW262

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) total number of cases of gender mislabeling mistakes has his department made over the past five years, (b) number of the specified cases have been resolved and (c) is the normal turnaround time for resolving the cases?

Reply:

(a&b) The Department does not promote gender mislabelling mistakes hence there is no discriminatory practice by the Department on the basis of colour, race, religion or gender. Our officials have been duly trained to be humane, caring and responsive in delivering quality services to the all the applicants in a fair-minded manner. The Department will investigate and resolve any case reported immediately upon receipt thereof, where required. Accordingly, the Department urges members of the public who may have thus been affected, should not hesitate to report such cases.

The Department cannot specify the gender mislabelling mistakes per se, however the response outlined per annum below is an indication of the total number of gender cases finalised which is inclusive of amendment and rectification applications over the past five years:

2016: 18155

2017: 18820

2018: 11301

2019: 11948

2020: 5255

(c) The normal turnaround time for resolving such cases is six (6) to eight (8) weeks.

END

19 March 2021 - NW231

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether, in light of the fact that the residents of Ndwedwe Local Municipality, KwaZulu-Natal, have raised the alarm that for eight years they have not had safe sources of water and as a result they are forced to share storm water with cattle and at times have been forced to utilise urine-contaminated water (details furnished), her department (a) intends to conduct onsite inspection of water infrastructure in Ndwedwe and (b) has any plans to repair and upscale water and sanitation infrastructure in Ndwedwe; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details of the plans and estimated project timeline?

Reply:

(a) The Ndwedwe Local Municipality (LM) falls under iLembe District Municipality (DM) which is a water service authority within its area of jurisdiction. This entails that its mandate is to provide both water and sanitation services to all of its four local municipalities (Ndwedwe LM, Mandini LM, KwaDukuza LM and Maphumulo LM). The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) will work together with the iLembe DM to conduct an investigation regarding the residents’ complaint of not having safe water sources for domestic use. This approach will allow a coordinated solution to resolving the alleged water insecurity within the Ndwedwe LM areas. Our regional office in Kwa-Zulu Natal will conduct an onsite inspection to verify the current status of water supply in the area.

(b) I am informed that Ndwedwe LM has nineteen (19) wards and the level of service in these wards ranges from rudimentary to more reliable bulk water supply systems. Wards 1 to 9, 16 and 17 are supplied through small localized water supply schemes or stand-alone water schemes. The iLembe DM is aware that some of the water sources have been vandalized in some of the infrastructure of these small schemes and that has led to some not being able to supply water sustainably. In cases where the normal supply is affected, water shedding is applied and water tankers are used to augment the supply. These are monitored by the ward committee members and councillors

(c) For wards 10 to 15, 18 and 19, these areas are supplied through the existing bulk water supply scheme. Communities under wards 13 and 14 are supplied from the Umgeni Water bulk water supply system. Currently, these areas are receiving water intermittently due to shortages from the Umgeni bulk supply. As a result, the municipality is receiving 9 ML instead of 12 ML, and the 9 ML is distributed to wards 10 to 15, 18 and 19. Umgeni Water has completed the upgrade of the pumping system from the Hazelmere Waterworks, and is awaiting an upgrade of the electrical transformer to supply pump station 1, which will be done by eThekwini Metro (anticipated to be completed during 2021). To ensure there is sufficient storage, the iLembe DM has completed reservoirs 3 and 4 so that, once the transformer to supply the pump station 1 is completed, the system will be back to its normal supply. In addition, areas affected by the current construction were informed by the iLembe DM, water tankers are made available to augment the supply and are monitored by the ward committee members and councillors.

19 March 2021 - NW283

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with all the relevant details of all (a) consequence management, (b) punitive action and (c) disciplinary action taken against (i) public representatives, (ii) Human Settlements Command Centre executive members, (iii) provincial officials, (iv) municipal officials and (v) employees of the Housing Development Agency in the instances that the specifications of the National Housing Code: Volume 4: Part 3: Emergency Housing Programme were not adhered to in the provision of Temporary Residential Units in the period 1 March 2020 and 1 October 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

The Honourable member is referred to my reply to her questions 90 and 113, which are attached for ease of reference.

I also wish to remind the Honourable Member that the National Department of Human Settlements (NDHS) is not responsible for the implementation of Human Settlements Programmes. These are implemented by provinces and municipalities. The NDHS is responsible for developing policy and set norms and standards for the human settlements sector.

However, challenges encountered in the implementation of human settlements programmes are discussed at Human Settlements MinMEC and Joint MinMEC meetings with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA).

19 March 2021 - NW32

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What steps has his department taken to address the complaints of the Clewer Community in the eMalahleni Local Municipality, Mpumalanga, as submitted to his department on 1 August 2020, with regard to the blasting operations and dust at the Anglo American Khwezela Colliery which causes cracks in houses in Clewer? NW34E

Reply:

 

The Department investigated the complaints. The outcomes of the investigation were that Khwezela Colliery air blast and ground vibration exceeded the limits of 125dB and 5mm per second, respectively.  

The Department issued Khwezela colliery with instruction to comply with the air blast limit of 115 dB and ground vibration limit 5 mm per second. Secondly, colliery was instructed to conduct a follow up structural survey on all the affected houses in proximity of the mine, determine if the damages to the houses were caused by blasting from the mine and fix all the houses that were damaged due to mine blasts. The mine must also review their blast design to ensure that they are able to comply with the air blast and ground vibration limits. The mine was also issued with an instruction to reduce the dust levels that were emanating from the dragline.

19 March 2021 - NW73

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

In light of the discovery of a second major gas find off the coast of South Africa that has put the Republic on the global energy map with even more discoveries expected in the future, how does his department intend to ensure that (a) it takes full advantage of the discovery and (b) the gas finds will be a significant boost for energy production in the Republic?

Reply:

a) The department is finalising the Upstream Petroleum Bill to further augment the regulations governing the oil and gas sector.

b) As per the Integrated Resource Plan (IRP 2019), South Africa continues to pursue a diversified energy mix that reduces reliance on a single or a few primary energy sources. Natural Gas forms part of the country’s energy mix.

19 March 2021 - NW255

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the communities of (a) Mpeko, (b) Mgababa, (c) Qheto and (d) Ntloko in Ngqushwa in the Eastern Cape have access to clean water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) has confirmed that the mentioned villages of Mpeko, Mgababa, Qeto and Ntloko in Ngqushwa Local Municipality have existing infrastructure, although it is compromised by illegal connections. The water supplied to the villages is being treated at Peddie Regional Scheme which is operated by the Amathole District Municipality.

Furthermore, Amathole District Municipality (ADM) is currently embarking on a number of initiatives to improve the reliability of water supply to the Ngqushwa area through the Infrastructure Services Grant (WISIG) funded by DWS. The initiatives include water conservation and demand management initiatives, Implementation of the Rural Yard Connection Policy (in order to control the illegal connections) and refurbishment of existing infrastructure. The Refurbishment Project includes the following:

Remedial Works to the Chalumna Bulk Gravity Main:

  • Replacement of approximately 2400m of existing 250mm to 450mm diameter AC pipe with new mPVC pipe of equivalent or better class and size to that of the parent pipe
  • Construction of 21 No air valve installations;
  • Repair or replacement of 18 No. existing damaged air valve installations; Reconstruction of 3 No. existing scour valve installations;
  • Construction of 1 No. new scour valve installation;
  • Construction of 2 No. new in-line isolating valve installations; and
  • Construction of 10 no. cross connection chambers.

Augmentation of the Wesley Bulk Main:

  • Construction of approximately 6500m of new 160mm diameter pipe, in parallel to the existing 110/160 mm diameter Wesley Bulk Main; complete with associated fittings and structures.

Completion of the Glenmore Bulk Main:

  • Construction of approximately 20m of new 200 mm diameter pipe, to join the existing Glenmore main to the Glenmore Rural Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) command reservoir; complete with associated fittings and structures.

New Connections to the Bulk Mains:

  • Construction of 7 No. new connections to the existing bulk mains.
  • Road Crossings:
  • Directional drilling and installation of water pipes under the N2, R72 and R345 roads respectively.

Flow Control Valves:

  • Installation of 10 No. flow control valves, varying in size from 50mm to 110 mm, at the entrances to existing reservoirs, complete with chambers; and
  • Construction of new and/or repair of existing pipework and fittings, as well as chambers.

New Pipework and Connections:

  • Install new pipework and complete with fittings, connections, cross-connections and the likes to unlock capacity bottlenecks at Peddie town and to various rural villages supplied from the Sandile RWSS.

Village Reticulation:

  • Construction of some 2400m of new buried reticulation pipelines, varying in size from 50mm to 110mm in diameter, complete with the requisite fittings, chambers; and
  • Construction of 20 No. new communal standpipes, complete with the requisite fittings and chambers.

While these interventions will bring some relief, it is has been determined that the water demand exceeds the water supply, and therefore a second phase of the project, which is still at a planning phase, has been initiated to further address water shortages. In the interim, Amathole District Municipality will continue to ration water in order to distribute the water equally to all villages. When necessary, ADM will cart water in trucks to any community where water is disrupted beyond the current operational plan.

19 March 2021 - NW18

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Shaik Emam, Mr AM to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, given the fact that citizens of Israel are able to travel to the Republic without a visa, but that Palestinians are not allowed the same privileges, as they have to apply for visas and comply with stringent conditions, he will elaborate on the (a) reasons why Israel is being treated differently and (b) measures that his department intends to implement in order to remedy the situation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

It is correct that passport holders of Israel are not required to be in possession of port of entry visas for holiday and business visits. This decision was, however, not taken by the Minister of Home Affairs, but by Cabinet. The decision and the countries who benefitted from the decision is documented in Cabinet Memorandum number 8 of 1992, dated 23 April 1992. In so far as Palestine is concerned, the Minister of Home Affairs has already approved a submission seeking a waiver of visa requirements for diplomatic and official/service passport holders. Currently the necessary protocols are being applied in order to conclude a reciprocal visa waiver agreement between the two countries. In so far as normal passport holders are concerned, the Department of Home Affairs is exploring ways in which to lower the restrictive travel measures which applies to Palestine nationals. The latter process is more extensive and requires wider consultation which is not the case with diplomatic and official/service passport holders

END

19 March 2021 - NW234

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Nxumalo, Mr MN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, with reference to the recent research by energy experts which found that there is currently 5000 MW that can be added to the grid and which can go a long way to stave off loadshedding, his department has plans to procure new capacity; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details? NW237E

Reply:

The 5000 MW referred to in the question is in relation to potential from users generating their own power and not power available to be procured by the State.

With regard of procurement of additional power by the State, the Department is currently finalising the evaluation and appointment of preferred bidders for 2000 MW of power under the Risk Mitigation Independent Power Producer Programme.

The Department also plan to procure additional power in line with the already gazetted Section 34 Determination as follows:

19 March 2021 - NW254

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Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the residents who were evicted from the Jacaranda informal settlement, Ward 15 in the Matlosana Local Municipality in the North West, are either returned to the land from which they were evicted and/or provided with alternative accommodation?

Reply:

Honourable Member, I have been informed that the City of Matlosana will first undertake the capturing of the affected residents on the National Housing Needs Register (NHNR). This will be followed by a socio-economic study to determine their various levels of needs. Qualifying residents will be re-allocated housing opportunities under appropriate programmes of the Department of Human Settlements.

Further, I have been informed that Jacaranda Extension 11 has been included under the Special Presidential Infrastructure Programme (or Catalytic Human Settlements Project). The Municipality will conclude all the aforementioned processes of pre-qualification and allocation of stands by 16 April 2021.

 

I wish to state that queue-jumping by invading the land will not be permitted, and the Court Order will be executed. Residents are urged not to invade the land and to allow all construction activities to be completed so that units can be delivered for all qualifying beneficiaries.

19 March 2021 - NW327

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether any (a) sports teams and/or (b) individuals participating in the Tokyo Olympic Games will have to pay fully and/or partially for the cost to participate in the games; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) to which teams and/or athletes does this pertain, (ii) what number of persons are affected, (iii) what are the reasons that the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee will not be covering the full cost for each team and/or individual to participate and (iv) what is the breakdown of the costs for each team and/or individual, including (aa) flights, (bb) accommodation and (cc) any other specified costs? NW331

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in its response indicated the following;

a). No, sports teams and/or individuals as members of Team South Africa participating in the Tokyo Olympic Games will not have to pay fully and/or partially for the cost to participate in the games.

(i)(ii).The position in this regard is that the SASCOC mandate is to deliver Team South Africa to multi-coded games and therefore funding must be sourced to cover the cost for Team delivery. SASCOC is working hard to secure the necessary funding to deliver the team to Tokyo.

(iii). However, if SASCOC is not successful in raising all the required funding to deliver the team to Tokyo the SASCOC General Assembly, at its AGM on 23 November 2019 resolved that should SASCOC not raise all the required funding, the participating National Federations will raise the necessary funding to assist SASCOC to deliver Team South Africa to Tokyo.

(iv). The budget is being reworked based on sponsors being signed and other potential funders so a cost per team member should be available mid-March 2021.

 

19 March 2021 - NW270

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Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

What (a) are the relevant details of his department’s plan for distributing the relief grant to artists and (b) have been the major stumbling blocks towards ensuring that the relief grant reaches as many artists as possible?

Reply:

A). The department had reprioritized funds and set aside R150 million towards relief efforts for arts practitioners. The disbursement of these funds was implemented through calls for applications. To date, three phases of call outs have been made, with the third one still in process. It is anticipated that no less than 9000 artists would have benefitted from the interventions.

b). The challenges experienced have mainly centred around verification of applicants by different state structures that are offering similar benefits in order to avoid double dipping to ensure the limited funds reach as many beneficiaries as possible.

19 March 2021 - NW104

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)With regard to the Nzhelele Water Scheme Project in the Musina Local Municipality, (a) who are the specific beneficiaries of the Nzhelele water scheme and (b) what is the water allocation for each beneficiary; (2) whether there are any costs for the account(s) of the beneficiaries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the costs; (3) whether there are any accounts that are in arrears; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount is in arrears; (4) whether there are any considerations to introduce a pipeline with flow meters, if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

(1) The details of the beneficiaries and allocations is attached as Annexure A

Further, the Honourable Member will be aware that the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” prohibits Members of Parliament, including Members of the Executive, from providing names of people or companies. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(2) The status of the accounts is indicated in Annexure B

(3) The status of the accounts in arrears is indicated in Annexure C

(4) The replacement of concrete lining for the E canal (length 2.70 km) where the soil around the canal is very dispersive and often obstructs the canal when rainfall occurs with pipeline is being considered. The repair of flow measurement structures at water delivery points will be addressed through the ongoing rehabilitation of Nzhelele Water Canal.

ANNEXURE A

No.

Customer Type

WU Sector

Registered Volume

Volume MU

Interval Type

1

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

4,317,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

2

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,902,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

3

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

4

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

36,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

5

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

87,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

6

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

7

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

108,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

8

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

9

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

122,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

10

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

80,640.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

11

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,651.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

12

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

431,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

13

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

14

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

288,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

15

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

612,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

16

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

360,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

17

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

180,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

18

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

2,144,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

19

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,430,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

20

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

21

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

22

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

3,597,720.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

23

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

24

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

14,280.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

25

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

237,720.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

26

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

624,120.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

27

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

571,200.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

28

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,619,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

29

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

466,200.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

30

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

182,500.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

31

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

189,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

32

Company

Industry (Non-Urban)

3,650.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

33

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

201,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

34

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

57,960.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

35

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

86,520.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

36

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

648,480.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

37

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

580,440.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

38

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

719,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

39

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

71,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

40

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

41

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

66,360.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

42

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

504,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

43

Individual

Agriculture: Irrigation

461,160.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

44

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,186,920.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

45

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,070,160.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

46

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

176,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

47

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

180,600.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

48

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

49

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

336,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

50

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

504,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

51

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

52

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

1,187,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

53

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

72,240.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

54

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

50,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

55

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

57,960.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

56

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

126,000.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

57

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

431,760.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

58

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

153,400.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

59

Company

Agriculture: Irrigation

215,880.00

Cubic Metres

Per Year

ANNEXURE B

 

BP Type

30+ Days

60+ Days

90+ Days

120+ Days

150+ Days

180+ Days

Total

 

Company

-

-

-

- 2,986.37

-

-

- 2,986.37

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

27.60

-

-

- 32,673.14

-

-

- 32,645.54

 

Company

718.61

-

359.30

33,951.44

-

- 3,021.04

32,008.31

 

Company

-

-

-

0.45

-

-

0.45

 

Company

164.05

-

82.03

14,144.17

-

-

14,390.25

 

Company

-

-

-

- 968.12

-

968.12

-

 

Individual

2,504.05

-

1,252.02

38,406.81

-

219,123.06

261,285.94

 

Individual

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Individual

12,997.23

-

6,498.60

205,154.72

-

1,201,862.90

1,426,513.45

 

Company

16,823.39

-

8,560.52

324,481.32

-

1,343,869.73

1,693,734.96

 

Company

6,147.03

-

3,127.59

115,679.11

-

495,568.80

620,522.53

 

Company

8,432.73

-

4,290.87

162,451.34

-

673,679.88

848,854.82

 

Company

1,628.63

-

827.47

33,401.07

-

127,006.20

162,863.37

 

Company

50,118.15

-

25,176.02

693,156.36

-

3,826,074.30

4,594,524.83

 

Company

81,048.01

-

41,266.44

1,626,484.69

-

6,354,486.23

8,103,285.37

 

Company

20,379.57

-

10,343.64

334,519.49

-

1,638,799.85

2,004,042.55

 

Company

4,610.61

-

2,305.32

102,541.76

-

329,411.81

438,869.50

 

Company

19,824.05

-

9,912.02

280,137.91

-

1,874,860.81

2,184,734.79

 

Company

44,646.13

-

22,323.07

729,356.92

-

3,124,191.93

3,920,518.05

 

Company

101,379.04

32,488.69

28,349.17

51,585.90

8,664.64

463,720.23

686,187.67

 

Company

741.39

-

370.70

30,025.38

-

- 91,791.17

- 60,653.70

 

Individual

14,479.56

-

7,239.78

273,654.30

-

1,157,180.89

1,452,554.53

 

Company

2,755.19

-

1,377.65

31,273.11

-

283,852.64

319,258.59

 

Company

10,833.99

-

5,417.00

113,544.15

-

1,130,532.39

1,260,327.53

 

Individual

3,470.47

-

1,735.21

44,216.71

-

438,707.39

488,129.78

 

Individual

14,739.02

-

7,369.51

83,441.25

-

1,868,118.97

1,973,668.75

 

Individual

1,035.81

-

517.90

27,860.29

-

66,319.89

95,733.89

 

Individual

16,525.18

-

8,262.58

229,294.95

-

1,586,307.39

1,840,390.10

 

Company

7,830.50

-

3,915.25

415,801.96

-

314,324.53

741,872.24

 

Company

193.69

-

116.77

20,019.17

-

-

20,329.63

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

127.45

-

82.77

14,190.05

-

-

14,400.27

 

Individual (I)

520.40

-

260.21

7,514.83

-

46,090.25

54,385.69

 

Company

1,734,563.96

-

-

-

-

-

1,734,563.96

 

Company

29,946.91

-

14,973.46

2,581,874.50

-

-

2,626,794.87

 

Individual

36.91

-

18.44

691.82

-

3,026.83

3,774.00

 

Company

1,972.15

-

986.09

33,365.49

-

163,750.62

200,074.35

 

Company

25,247.35

-

12,623.70

521,175.36

-

1,944,691.78

2,503,738.19

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

Company

12,127.11

-

6,063.54

209,014.96

-

992,889.57

1,220,095.18

 

Company

4,801.79

-

2,400.92

95,994.37

-

363,046.40

466,243.48

 

Company

3,393.55

-

1,696.75

68,241.16

-

256,096.63

329,428.09

 

Individual

15,852.86

-

7,926.44

168,519.86

-

1,704,002.34

1,896,301.50

 

Individual

35,585.32

-

17,792.63

405,605.78

-

3,841,617.95

4,300,601.68

Total Outstanding

 

2,308,229.44

32,488.69

265,821.38

10,084,145.28

8,664.64

37,739,368.10

50,438,717.53

 

ANNEXURE C

 

30+ Days

60+ Days

90+ Days

120+ Days

150+ Days

180+ Days

Total

 

-

-

-

2,986.37

-

-

2,986.37

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

27.60

-

-

32,673.14

-

-

32,645.54

 

718.61

-

359.30

33,951.44

-

- 3,021.04

32,008.31

 

-

-

-

0.45

-

-

0.45

 

164.05

-

82.03

14,144.17

-

-

14,390.25

 

-

-

-

968.12

-

968.12

-

 

2,504.05

-

1,252.02

38,406.81

-

219,123.06

261,285.94

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

12,997.23

-

6,498.60

205,154.72

-

1,201,862.90

1,426,513.45

 

16,823.39

-

8,560.52

324,481.32

-

1,343,869.73

1,693,734.96

 

6,147.03

-

3,127.59

115,679.11

-

495,568.80

620,522.53

 

8,432.73

-

4,290.87

162,451.34

-

673,679.88

848,854.82

 

1,628.63

-

827.47

33,401.07

-

127,006.20

162,863.37

 

50,118.15

-

25,176.02

693,156.36

-

3,826,074.30

4,594,524.83

 

81,048.01

-

41,266.44

1,626,484.69

-

6,354,486.23

8,103,285.37

 

20,379.57

-

10,343.64

334,519.49

-

1,638,799.85

2,004,042.55

 

4,610.61

-

2,305.32

102,541.76

-

329,411.81

438,869.50

 

19,824.05

-

9,912.02

280,137.91

-

1,874,860.81

2,184,734.79

 

44,646.13

-

22,323.07

729,356.92

-

3,124,191.93

3,920,518.05

 

101,379.04

32,488.69

28,349.17

51,585.90

8,664.64

463,720.23

686,187.67

 

741.39

-

370.70

30,025.38

-

- 91,791.17

- 60,653.70

 

14,479.56

-

7,239.78

273,654.30

-

1,157,180.89

1,452,554.53

 

2,755.19

-

1,377.65

31,273.11

-

283,852.64

319,258.59

 

10,833.99

-

5,417.00

113,544.15

-

1,130,532.39

1,260,327.53

 

3,470.47

-

1,735.21

44,216.71

-

438,707.39

488,129.78

 

14,739.02

-

7,369.51

83,441.25

-

1,868,118.97

1,973,668.75

 

1,035.81

-

517.90

27,860.29

-

66,319.89

95,733.89

 

16,525.18

-

8,262.58

229,294.95

-

1,586,307.39

1,840,390.10

 

7,830.50

-

3,915.25

415,801.96

-

314,324.53

741,872.24

 

193.69

-

116.77

20,019.17

-

-

20,329.63

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

127.45

-

82.77

14,190.05

-

-

14,400.27

 

520.40

-

260.21

7,514.83

-

46,090.25

54,385.69

 

1,734,563.96

-

-

-

-

-

1,734,563.96

 

29,946.91

-

14,973.46

2,581,874.50

-

-

2,626,794.87

 

36.91

-

18.44

691.82

-

3,026.83

3,774.00

 

1,972.15

-

986.09

33,365.49

-

163,750.62

200,074.35

 

25,247.35

-

12,623.70

521,175.36

-

1,944,691.78

2,503,738.19

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

 

12,127.11

-

6,063.54

209,014.96

-

992,889.57

1,220,095.18

 

4,801.79

-

2,400.92

95,994.37

-

363,046.40

466,243.48

 

3,393.55

-

1,696.75

68,241.16

-

256,096.63

329,428.09

 

15,852.86

-

7,926.44

168,519.86

-

1,704,002.34

1,896,301.50

 

35,585.32

-

17,792.63

405,605.78

-

3,841,617.95

4,300,601.68

Total Outstanding

2,308,229.44

32,488.69

265,821.38

10,084,145.28

8,664.64

37,739,368.10

50,438,717.53

19 March 2021 - NW179

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What measures have been taken since 27 March 2020 to provide special assistance for South African citizens abroad who were unable to renew their passports due to lockdown regulations, particularly to investigate the issues being faced by these citizens; (2) has any contact been made with governments of countries with large expatriate communities of South African citizens to find solutions to the problems created by the inability to renew passports; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) given the slow appointment systems to accept passport renewal applications at South African missions abroad that have been in place from time to time, have any measures been put in place to transport manual applications quicker; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) with the e-visa system needing to be in place in every mission by 2024, are there any plans in place to allow e-home affairs applications with biometrics to be done at the South African mission or visa partner in order that manual applications do not need to be posted to South Africa via the diplomatic pouch; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW182E

Reply:

1. South African Missions abroad provided limited services to South African citizens during lockdown. This included applications for passports and emergency travel certificates for those who wanted to return to South Africa.

2. No contact was made with governments of countries with large expatriate communities of South African citizens because South African citizens abroad were allowed to apply for passports during lockdown.

3. The transportation of applications and official correspondence from South African Diplomatic Missions abroad is done in term of Article 27 of the Vienna Convention on Diplomatic Relations, 1961and is done via Diplomatic Bag which is administered by the Department of International Relations and Cooperation.

4. Yes, the Department is considering the installation of the eHome Affairs and Live Capture System in the Missions abroad in order to reduce the turnaround times for South Africans living abroad. In July 2019, an IT team visited the UK Mission and concluded that before such installation is done a network security review should be conducted by the State Security Agency (SSA) before implementation, in order to prevent vulnerabilities and cyber-attacks and the implementation plan will be finalized during the 2021/2022 financial year.

END

19 March 2021 - NW85

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With regard to the vaccination programme of the Republic and the goal of vaccinating 60% of the population in order to achieve herd immunity against COVID-19 and considering that the Minister of Health has identified undocumented migrants as posing a risk towards achieving the specified goal, how does he plan to go about (a) identifying and (b) documenting all undocumented migrants in line with the mandate of his department?

Reply:

(a–b) Primary function to vaccinate is that of the Department of Health. However, the DHA’s Inspectorate Unit is provided for within the Immigration Act 2002, has the mandate to conduct investigations and enforcement operations that will assist with the identification of persons who are undocumented or have an illegal status in the Republic. Such persons may be detained and dealt with under Departmental Regulations.

END

19 March 2021 - NW328

Profile picture: Lotriet, Prof  A

Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1).Whether the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee intends to send any officials to the Tokyo Olympics; if not, why not; if so, what (a) total number of officials, (b) are their names and positions in each case and (c) will be the cost to send each specified official, including (i) flight costs, (ii) accommodation costs and (iii) any other specified costs; (2). Whether any of the specified athletes will be subsidising any official; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, which officials will be subsidised?

Reply:

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee in its response indicated the following;

1). As per the IOC/Tokyo accreditation guidelines, officials (management, coaches, mechanics, grooms, doctors, physiotherapists and administrators) form part of the overall team and are essential to ensure athlete performance.

(a). SASCOC will only know the final number of officials once all athletes and teams have qualified.

(b). The names and positions of the officials will only be known by mid-June 2021 at final team announcement.

(c). All countries receive a travel grant from Tokyo to cover all team members (athletes and officials). All team members stay at an Athlete Games Village at no cost. This includes full board and lodging.

2). Athletes will not be subsiding any official that is part of Team SA. Officials are part of Team South Africa as part of support to the athletes. As per IOC/IF Guidelines all teams, need support of management, coaches and medical to enable athletes to focus on their optimal performance.

The South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee provided the tables below illustrating the breakdown of athletes and officials.

 

19 March 2021 - NW182

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

With reference to the informal settlement on Main Reef Road, in Brakpan, Gauteng, known as Plastic City what: a) steps are being taken by his department to seal off the old and inactive mines in the area, considering that it has become a hotbed of illegal mining and associated criminal activities, b) steps are being taken (i) to protect critical infrastructure from illegal mining in this area and (ii) jointly by his department and the Ekurhuleni Metropolitan Municipality to ensure that mineral rights and environmental legislation obligations are being met; and c) steps will his department be taking in future to stop illegal mining in the area? NW185E

Reply:

a) The department has sealed three shafts in and around Plastic City informal settlement in 2019.

b) Through the Department’s continuous monitoring and evaluation initiatives, it has been made aware that illegal miners have mined under some roads, causing it to collapse. To this end, the Department with the assistance of MINTEK is investigating this issue further. Furthermore, the SAPS together with Ekurhuleni Municipality will be consulted to have a lasting solution in this regard.

c) The Department will continue enforcing the laws that prohibit mining without the necessary authorisations (mining right and environmental authorisation) together with other law enforcement agencies. The Department is also participating in joint law enforcement forums aimed at strengthening investigations and prosecutions of these types of organised crimes that deprives the country of its mineral resources-based revenues, causing massive environmental damage with impacts on society.

19 March 2021 - NW299

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(1). With reference to the Iziko Museum, on what date (a) will the electrical and other problems of the Old Town House be fixed and (b) will the building be reopened to the public; (2).(a). who is the person responsible for maintenance of the specified house and (b) what are the reasons that it has not been done; (3). whether there is a timeline to finish the upgrading; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1)(a). The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) is the custodian in terms of section 4 of the Government Immovable Asset Management Act (GIAMA), 2007 (Act no. 19 of 2007 and in terms of the Day to Day Maintenance Guidelines must pay “for services which falls within the scope of the Day to Day Maintenance Services obliged for an amount exceeding R100 000”, this amount was previously R30 000.

In terms of GIAMA, the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture (DSAC) is the user and is required to fund day to day maintenance of R100 000 and less for buildings, including Iziko Old Townhouse (IOTH), occupied by Iziko Museums, one of its public entities. So when there were two electrical fires at IOTH that caused the closure of the building, Iziko Museums immediately attended to the repairs required which amounted to about R55 000.00 and due to the age of the building also commissioned an Architect to inspect and estimate the scope of work further electrical work required. The assessment was that the electrical wiring needed to be replaced as it was a fire hazard. DPWI was informed accordingly.

An Architect with heritage experience was appointed to manage the repair and maintenance project to address safety issues to ensure that the IOTH infrastructure is compliant with health and safety requirements.

(b). The building will be reopened to the public once the building has been declared compliant in terms of health and safety requirements.

2(a). As indicated in paragraph (1)(a) above, the Minister of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has been appointed as the custodian of the immovable assets which vest in the national sphere of government and is thus the caretaker of the state-owned building IOTH in terms of GIAMA. In terms of the Day to Day Maintenance Guidelines, DPWI is responsible for all work exceeding R100 000 and as the user, DSAC is responsible for all work costing R100 000 and the Department has delegated this responsibility to Iziko Museums.

(b). This work exceeds R100 000, so this question should be posed to the Minister of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) who is appointed as custodian of state-owned buildings and, in terms of GIAMA section 4(2), is the caretaker of state-owned buildings such as the IOTH and thus responsible for repairs and maintenance of R100 000 and more and specifically those projects related to health and safety.

(3). As indicated in paragraph (1)(a) above, the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture is not the custodian of state-owned buildings and as user is only required to fund repairs and maintenance projects of R100 000 and below, but DSAC has nevertheless previously allocated R9.51million to develop a five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan for the nine state-owned buildings occupied by Iziko Museums so Architects developed the following documents for each of the nine buildings:

  • As-Built Drawings;
  • An Existing Building Condition Report;
  • A Conservation Management Plan; and
  • A five-year Conservation and Maintenance Plan.

In terms of the South African National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act No. 25 of 1999), all heritage buildings must be managed in terms of a Conservation and Maintenance Plan (CMP) to protect the heritage resource. The CMP for the nine buildings submitted to the provincial authority Heritage Western Cape (HWC) for approval, but only eight were approved as the CMP for one building had been mislaid.

Although not required, DSAC also allocated R1 509 248, 00 for the repair and maintenance of buildings occupied by Iziko Museums. A Project Manager with architectural and heritage experience was appointed and applications for repair and renovation permits were submitted to HWC in terms of the South African National Heritage Resources Act, 1999 (Act No. 25 of 1999).

A project implementation plan was developed and the project brief for the tender to appoint a Contractor to carry out repair and renovation, including painting services, at IOTH and other buildings occupied by Iziko. The Contractor for the repair and renovation and painting services for buildings occupied by Iziko Museums, including IOTH, will be appointed by 30 April 2021.

As DPWI did not allocate funding for this health and safety project, DSAC also allocated the amount of R4 395 212 for the electrical wiring that must be replaced at IOTH as it was a fire hazard.

Although HWC had approved a permit for repair and maintenance as well as the CMP for IOTH, Iziko Museums was informed that a further permit application is required for the electrical repairs. The tender documentation to appoint a Contractor to do the electrical repairs has been prepared, but it cannot be advertised until the permit approval is received as there might be further stipulations from HWC that would need to be incorporated in the scope of work, as was the case with the permit applications for painting the buildings.

HWC issued permits for the repair and renovation of IOTH as well as other buildings occupied by Iziko more than a year after Iziko Museums had submitted the applications, so timelines are dependent on how long HWC will take to issue a permit for electrical work to be carried out at IOTH.

19 March 2021 - NW8

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Given the reports of persons illegally entering the Republic due to corruption at the border gates and a lack of physical border infrastructure in some areas, (a) what steps has he taken to ensure that the physical infrastructure of borders will be properly set up to prevent illegal entry into the Republic and (b) by what date does he envisage the process will be finalised?

Reply:

a) The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure is currently responsible for Border infrastructure at Ports of Entry and along the borderline, however the Border Management Authority is putting plans to address Infrastructure challenges which impact on the processing of people and goods at Ports on Entry as part of its legal mandate.

The plans include the redevelop of six land Ports of Entry as One-Stop Border Posts (OSBP). It is intended that these infrastructural improvements will enable the secure and efficient processing of people and goods at Beit Bridge; Maseru Bridge; Ficksburg; Oshoek; Kopfontein and Lebombo Ports of Entry.

b) It is anticipated that the OSBPs will be operational by 2024.

END

19 March 2021 - NW108

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

a) What initiatives and/or programmes does his department offer to homeless persons in the Republic to ensure that they have (i) identity documents and their children have (ii) birth certificates and (b) is this service free of charge for homeless persons?

Reply:

a) (i) & (ii)

The Department of Home Affairs does not have specific initiatives and/or programmes for homeless persons.

However, the department assists only in cases of disaster wherein the disaster management from various municipalities provides a disaster management report and certificate in order for the department to determine the kind of service required as well as the cost element attached to it. Upon receiving of the latter mentioned documents, the department may waive the fees of those affected.

(b) The services for registration of first issuance of identity documents and birth certificates is free of charge.

END

19 March 2021 - NW169

Profile picture: Khanyile, Ms AT

Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

With reference to the Performance Agreement that he signed with the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa, what (a) programmes have been put in place to date to tackle gender-based violence (GBV) in his department, (b) change interventions, such as men against GBV sessions, have been implemented within his department (c) is the total number of officials that have been vetted against the National Register For Sex Offenders?

Reply:

a) Employee Wellness programmes dealing with Gender Based Violence and Femicide implemented.

(i) Counselling services for employees and their immediate families offered

(ii) Awareness campaigns conducted throughout the provinces.

b) Men’s forum established as an agent of change and capacity awareness programmes for men implemented on combating GBV and Femicide conducted throughout the Provinces issues including sexual harassment in the workplace.

c) Officials have been vetted within the Department but not against the National Register of Sex Offenders.

END

19 March 2021 - NW256

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What are the reasons that only 10 houses were built in the R92 million housing project which was aimed at building houses for the residents of the KwaZenzele informal settlement near Endicott in the Lesedi Local Municipality, which was started 13 years ago?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements has advised that the total planned units for Kwazenzele Ext 1 is 6424 housing units. However, the current available bulk capacity can only cater for 345 housing units in the first phase of development. The budget for the implementation of the first phase of development (i.e. 345 housing units) is R92 725 175. This amount includes the installation of services such as water and sewer as well as the construction of roads and storm water drainage.

Further, I have been informed that the Developer was appointed in 2018 to start with the construction work. The construction of services required that High-Density Polyethylene (HDPE) be installed as the area is dolomitic. The installation of these pipes takes time and require specialised skill to install because any future leak can create sinkholes. The Developer appointed to complete the project was given ample time to complete the project but due to unsatisfactory performance, the Gauteng Department of Human Settlements decided not to extend the contract when it lapsed on the 31st March 2020. The process for the appointment of a replacement contractor is at a final stage. To date, R13 655 175.00 has been spent on the project.

19 March 2021 - NW297

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Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture”

(1). With reference to the Iziko Museum, (a) what are the relevant details of the Court Yard project, (b) on what date was the project approved, (c) what was the budget allocation, (d) what work needed to be done, (e) on what date was it supposed to be completed and (f) what is the total amount that has been spent; (2). whether the project (a) has been completed and (b) is currently in use; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1). (a).

Project Name : COURTYARD PROJECT

Public Entity : IZIKO SOUTH AFRICAN MUSEUM

Location : The Company Gardens, Queen Victoria Street, Cape Town, Western Cape.

The Museum building complex is sited within the Company Gardens and comprises several interlinked buildings which range from the historically significant, main entrance building, (Block A), through the various infill additions and extensions to the early 1980’s, heavily serviced, late brutalist Courtyard Building, (Block C).

Work under this contract extends throughout this complex and involves specialised heritage work in the oldest building on the entrance side, incorporates work to some of the earlier interlinking buildings previously altered and extended, includes work to the high ceilinged Whale Well. The work focusses mainly on the mountain side Courtyard Building (Block C) which is extensively updated, upgraded, structurally strengthened and extended with construction of five floors on piled foundations within the internal courtyard carrying new sixth and seventh floors which cantilever over the original building.

Project Description, scope and objectives:

The project was undertaken to increase the research collections’ storage capacity, to update safety services and to expand the visitor experience.

Alterations and additions were undertaken to update, extend and complement existing museum facilities, including those for the receiving, preparation, research, safe keeping, conservation and select display of scientific natural history specimens. Considerable additional specialized protected storage has been provided, much with close climate control. Also provided are new education and conference facilities, laboratories and management facilities. All services within Blocks C and D have been updated and fire safety in particular has been significantly improved with the range of fire suppression systems implemented including water, foam and inert gas systems. Electronic access control, monitoring and low UV energy efficient lighting is provided.

Work comprised alterations and restoration of various areas within the historic buildings (comprising Blocks A and B) of the Museum Complex; installation of digital display lighting and construction of a new plant room at roof level within the Whale Well (Block B); stripping, alterations and extensive reconstruction of the 1980’s research and collection building, (Block C) and the construction within its courtyard of a new five storey infill structure on extensive piled foundations.

This infill structure supports the new sixth floor which cantilevers over the existing building and houses a multi-purpose, sub-divisible conference facility with breakaway and entertainment areas and a full catering kitchen. Above this the new top, seventh floor accommodates meeting rooms and the executive offices of the eleven national museums in Cape Town, Iziko Museums of South Africa.

Block D, (the building with its two courtyards, which link Block C and the Planetarium) is extensively reconfigured for education facilities and offices, with one light well repurposed as a usable, planted courtyard and the other courtyard roofed, provided with Amphitheatre style seating and integrated with the adjacent classrooms and meeting areas.

New fire protection services installed as part of the works include fail-safe pumped water storage, gas, foam and sprinkler fire suppression systems; energy efficient reverse-cycle heating, ventilation and air conditioning; interactive digital touch-screen displays, two new passenger lifts and a new goods lift; computerised bio-metric access control, digital security cameras, a stand by generator and new electrical, security and alarm infrastructure. Low energy consumption lighting with minimal damaging ultra-violet light output has been installed.

Facilities includes:

  • specialised storage and conservation facilities for specimens preserved in volatile, flammable and hazardous substances which make extensive use of mobile racking to maximise efficiency, and
  • specialised, separate safe marine mammal and terrestrial vertebrates wet dissection areas with purpose made tables incorporating down draft extraction for health and safety reasons, served by a travelling mono-rail crane which links to new cold and freezer rooms, the high hazard tank storage facility and vehicle loading docks,
  • the fossil specimen preparation laboratory,
  • taxidermy, maceration and specimen preparation areas,
  • workshop, display preparation, spray-room and associated design facilities,
  • conference facilities, breakaway rooms, catering facilities and support functions,
  • education facilities and classrooms, including roofing and internalising a courtyard for teaching purposes,
  • removal of redundant facilities and structure to provide additional display and teaching facilities in Blocks A and B,
  • the executive, finance and administration offices,
  • the research and special collections library,
  • the bio-diversity teaching and demonstration laboratory,
  • scanning electric microscope room and digital X-ray room.

Inert gas, foam or water fire suppression systems, appropriate to the various collections protect these areas and two on-site water storage tanks on piled foundations with autonomous pumps ensure adequate supply, independent of external power or water to separate fire hydrant, hose reel and sprinkler systems. Ground water has been tapped for reticulated for irrigation purposes.

(b). The project was approved on the 20th May 2005 (as per Procurement Instruction document)

(c). The budget allocated was R 339 303 043.19

(d). The work needed to be done was specialised storage and the other facilities noted above were required, obsolete infrastructure and services needed to be updated, fire and general safety and security improved and the structure of the building strengthened as this was showing stress cracks and signs of overloading before any new facilities were added. Some inappropriate modifications to the buildings needed to be removed, original spaces reinstated and their building fabric restored.

Inadequate fire suppression systems in Blocks C and D needed upgrading and replacement with energy efficient systems.

(e). The Original Practical Completion Date was 30 June 2014

Contract Commencement Date and duration: 29 June 2012. (24 months) Site Handover Date: 14 January 2013 (Award delayed due to adjudication process & non-availability of site).

(f). The total amount that has been spent including professional fees is R 319 403 705, 55

2.(a). The project/works reached the stage of practical completion in terms of the building contract on 14 August 2020 when the last few areas of the works were handed over to the User Department. The contractor is currently attending to snags prior to achievement of the contractual stage of Works Completion, anticipated to be achieved by end March 2021 with Final Completion early in July 2021.

(b). Yes, it is currently in use

18 March 2021 - NW606

Profile picture: Shivambu, Mr F

Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether procurement legislation will be adhered to in the procurement of COVID-19 vaccines; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Please note that the procurement of the Covid-19 vaccines is a line function responsibility of the Department of Health. The Department of Health is the sole procurer of Covid-19 vaccines in South Africa on behalf of the public and private sector.

The National Treasury plays an advisory; compliance monitoring; and oversight role in the procurement of the Covid-19 vaccines.

Insofar as the role of the National Treasury in this regard is concerned, the NT will ensure that procurement legislation is complied with which includes the appropriate requests and approvals for departures from procurement procedures in line with Treasury Regulation 16A6.4 and SCM Instruction Note 3 of 2016/2017 (Preventing and Combating Abuse in the SCM System).

The National Treasury engages with the Department of Health on an ongoing basis prior and during the vaccine procurement process, particularly in respect of departures from procurement procedures.

The funding and procurement of the vaccines are kept central (through the National Department of Health). This allows for comprehensive central control of procurement, governance and the spending of funds. This approach also minimizes the opportunities for corruption, provides for central record keeping of agreements and centralised contact with manufacturers.

18 March 2021 - NW89

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the total number of (i) land reform claims that have been finalised since inception and (ii) cases that are still in court, (b) will she furnish Ms A Steyn with a list indicating each case and (c) since what year has each case been in court?

Reply:

THE MINISTER OF AGRICULTURE, LAND REFORM AND RURAL DEVELOPMENT:

(a)(i)

PROVINCE

TOTAL FINALISED

   

E CAPE

17,663

F STATE

3,278

GAUTENG

11,323

KZN

1,243

LIMPOPO

4,485

MPLANGA

2,999

N CAPE

3,193

N WEST

2,216

W CAPE

17,070

TOTAL

64,422

(ii) 359 cases are in court

(b) Lists attached per Province

(c) Refer to each Provincial list where the year that each case has been in court is captured.

 

END

18 March 2021 - NW785

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of land restitution claims are in areas that have been declared national parks and/or provincial nature reserves in the Republic, (b) are the names of the restitution claims and (c) settlement arrangements has her department put in place to settle the specified land claims?

Reply:

a) 140

(b) (c) Attached as Annexure A

18 March 2021 - NW667

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Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

OFFICE OF THE MILITARY OMBUD

Ser No

Question

Response

 

a.

b.

1.

Mr T C R Walters (DA) to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans: Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

The Office of the Military Ombud is utilising a private security firm. The details wrt the question posed are as follows:

a) Name of Security Firm: Wenzile Phaphama Trading and Projects.

b) Purpose: A security assessment was done and according to the recommendations received it was essential for the Office to acquire the services of a physical security.

c) Value: R854,324,60

d) Duration of Contract. 01 September 2019 – 31 August 2021

ARMSCOR

Yes Armscor SOC Ltd and the R&D Facilities do make use of private security

For the Gauteng area (HQ building, Protechnik and Gerotek)

-Tyeks Security Services

- Guarding services

- R24 886 076.16

- 3 years from 1 October 2020

Westen Cape (IMT building)

- TDP Enterprise and Projects

- Guarding services

- R 3 125 021.76

- 3 years from 1 November 2020

Northen Cape (Alkanpan test range)

- Bomogale Enterprise (Pty) Ltd

- Guarding services

- R11 088 255.20

- 3 years from 1 October 2020

CASTLE CONTROL BOARD

The Castle Control Board (CCB) does not utilise private security.

DEPARTMENT OF MILITARY VETERANS

Curretly the Department of Military Veterans is not making use of the private security firm. The DMV Head Office is guarded by the SANDF Reserve Force members with effect from 01 April 2020 to date as a temporary measure. The landlords provide security services for Provincial Offices.

The department has commenced with the process of procuring the Private Security Service Provider for the DMV Head Office.

DEPARTMENT OF DEFENCE

The Department of Defence is house within ARMSCOR and all security needs of the Department are taken care of by ARMSCOR.

DEFENCE FORCE SERVICE COMMISSION

The Defence Force Service Commission does not make use of a private security company.

18 March 2021 - NW84

Profile picture: Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN

Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Finance

What are the full relevant details of the shortfall in businesses receiving 40% of the R500 billion stimulus package in loan (details furnished)?

Reply:

I presume that the Honourable Member is referring to the R200 billion Loan Guarantee Scheme (LGS), which is 40 per cent of the broader government-led R500 billion package that was announced by the President on 20 April 2020.

Firstly, there is no shortfall, or grant or loan, that any business is entitled to receive directly from the R200 billion scheme. Since it was introduced on 4 May 2020, the purpose of the loan guarantee scheme was to assist financially distressed businesses due to the Covid-19 pandemic. As stated in my response to a previous Parliamentary Question, No 1346 [NW1716E] on 24 August 2020, National Treasury entered into a partnership with the South African Reserve Bank (SARB) and the Banking Association South Africa, to launch the Covid-19 loan guarantee scheme on May 2020, to make it easier for banks to lend more than they normally would have, to small businesses during the lockdown, to assist them in their efforts to survive the pandemic. When the scheme launched, it applied to small businesses with a turnover below R300 million. On 27 July 2020, the scheme was improved and this turnover limit was abolished and replaced with a maximum loan R100 million per loan to qualifying businesses. Banks were to fund such loans from their own funds, using their own balance sheets. Government would only pay from the fiscus if these small businesses defaulted on their payments to their bank, and only after the bank had taken the initial losses, as follows:

  • First loss is absorbed by the lending bank, 2% on each Covid-19 guaranteed loan;
  • Second loss is indirectly absorbed by the lending bank – there is a guarantee fee with the SARB of 0.5%;
  • Third loss is also absorbed by the lending bank to a maximum of 6% of the Covid-19 guaranteed loans; and
  • Fourth loss is the guarantee provided, to be paid by Government.

As of February 2021, banks had provided R17.8 billion in relief to 13 173 approved beneficiaries. It should be noted that the actual take-up was lower than initially expected, as the demand for such loans was low, possibly because many small businesses were reluctant to take up additional debt, given the uncertainty around how long the pandemic would last. Companies may not want to re-invest and borrow more until they feel more confident about the future strength of the economy. In addition, even before the loan guarantee scheme took effect, many banks took their own initiatives to assist their customers, by allowing for payment holidays and other forms of forbearance, which provided significantly more relief than the loan guarantee scheme.

It is important to note that the National Treasury and the SARB never intended for the guarantee to be called in full, and expected only a relatively small portion of the R200 billion to be paid. Any call on the guarantee would impact negatively on our fiscal framework and our efforts to stabilise the debt-to-GDP ratio. As such, any underutilized portion of the scheme cannot be regarded as a “shortfall” nor should there be any expectation that it can be used to fund other programmes, as it would effectively increase such debt-to-GDP.

There is regular information on the take-up of the loan guarantee scheme, which is published in Treasury documents like the 2021 Budget Review, as well as on the website of the Banking Association South Africa at https://www.banking.org.za/news/jan-loan-scheme-update/ .

18 March 2021 - NW580

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury has undertaken any studies and/or assessment projects to determine the reason why certain municipalities consistently fail to collect more than 80% of debt owed to them by consumers in any given financial year; if not, why not; if so, what (a) were the main findings of the assessment and (b) measures do municipalities have to put in place to ensure consistent and effective debt collection?

Reply:

Yes, National Treasury has appointed Revenue and Budget Advisors in seven (7) provinces. These advisors have undertaken a baseline assessment on revenue and budget management in municipalities in each of the seven Provinces through a tool called the “Survey Monkey” which is a questionnaire based assessment. The results of the assessments are collated into a support plan for the respective municipality.

a) The following are the main findings impacting on the revenue potential of the municipality:

Covid-19 impact - During the total lockdown some businesses had to close and a large number of customers lost their jobs and did not earn an income, consequently, their ability to honour the municipal account was affected, thus, increasing the consumer debt drastically. As the result unemployment increased and these consumers failed to register as indigent beneficiaries, causing the outstanding debt to increase.

On the municipal operations side:

Effective Credit Control - Although municipalities have Credit Control Policies in place, the ability to implement them efficiently is a challenge. The officials are reluctant to implement the credit control for various unethical benefits and there is no political will to support the implementation thereof. Additionally, municipalities lack of resources to implement the credit control policy effectively.

Bad Debt Write-off – Where the situation warrants a debt write-off, municipalities fail to correct their records timeously especially in cases where there is uncollectable debt due deceased estates and indigent households.

An effective Customer Care strategy is most neglected in municipalities. This unit is not well capacitated and lack the prerequisite skill to manage a “Help Desk” with a proper control over the handling of queries. Subsequently, feedback to the customer regarding their queries are very poor resulting in a very unhappy customer.

Poor Infrastructure (Water and Electricity Networks) - Due to the poor and dilapidated infrastructure, proper credit control cannot be implemented. With poor infrastructure, illegal connections cannot be controlled. The Free Basis Services of the indigent households cannot be monitored and the indigent household cannot be restricted or disconnected when the allocated consumption is exceeded.

Billing System and Inaccurate Billing - Incorrect and inaccurate billing pose a challenge in the municipalities. The communities in the various municipalities are dissatisfied with the municipal bills and public confidence suffers, communities are unwilling to pay for the bills issued and as such, municipal debt gradually accumulates and the municipal collection rates fall.

Illegal Connections is a huge area of concern. A lot of consumers use adverse methods not to pay for the consumption. In some municipalities the technical staff seems to promote illegal connections by bypassing the system for a bribe. This behavior is unacceptable and seriously impacts on the finances of the municipality.

Indigent management – The observation is that most municipalities do have an approved and adopted Indigent policy. Indigents are not properly vetted and several households that can afford to pay for services are benefiting unjustly.

Customer information – Capturing of customer information is a critical task in municipalities. Incorrect information and outdated information makes it difficult to implement credit control when required. Equally, credit checks are not adequately undertaken and municipalities lack the methodology to do credit check for new accounts.

Non-payment Culture - Culture on non-payment for municipal services is throttling the finances. Even customers that can afford to pay are reluctant to pay due to fear that municipal finances will be misappropriated.

b) The first and foremost the responsibility rests with the municipality to self-correct, put in efficient processes and procedures. These are underpinned by adequate policy formulation and oversight responsibilities. This means that governance and leadership is essential and critical to ensure that prudent financial management practices are carry out. This is complimented with well-functioning system as an enabler to bill and collect what is due to the municipality. Proper asset management serves as a conduit for efficient revenue generation in municipalities. Many municipalities underperform on their budgets for repairs and maintenance which is allocated to ensure that their revenue generating infrastructure are optimized thus impacting on a sustainable and reliable delivery of service.

18 March 2021 - NW507

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Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)Whether any staff member in the National Treasury (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of the National Treasury in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1) (a) Yes

(b) The Public Service Regulations in this regard came into effect in August 2016. It should further be noted that the approval is only valid for a period of one year from date of approval. Below are the current valid cases:

(i) Number of Staff Members (25)

(ii) Job or work categories are the specified staff members employed

11

Economic Cluster

1

Human Resources

1

Security Management

11

Financial Cluster

1

Information Technology

(2) Approval was granted to all employees doing other remunerative work outside public service.

a) National Treasury is guided by the provisions of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and associated procedures

b) All cases are sent to the Director-General for consideration and approval

c) No contraventions were identified following an investigation of such cases

d) There were no transgressors

18 March 2021 - NW90

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What number of hectares have been (a) claimed under restitution and (b) transferred in each province; (2) what (a) number of hectares were transferred to claimants where title deeds registered in the names of the claimants were issued and (b) are the reasons where a title deed has not been transferred into the names of beneficiaries in each case

Reply:

1. (a) Project Kuyasa is in the final stages of consolidating and updating the database on statistics on the work of the Commission including the determination and confirmation of the hectares claim on number of outstanding claims lodged.

(b)

Province

Hectares transferred

Eastern Cape

18 811

Free Sate

60 828

Northern Cape

633 791

Gauteng

6 191

North West

507 475

KwaZulu-Natal

504 391

Limpopo

558 650

Mpumalanga

346 220

Western Cape

10 832

TOTAL

2 647 189

2. (a) 2.6 million hectares

(b) Attached as Annexure A

END

17 March 2021 - NW253

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Transport

What has he found to have been the impact of the relaxation of COVID-19 restrictions on public transport;

Reply:

(1) Since the move to alert level 3 public transport operators operating shorter trips were allowed to carry 100% of the loading capacity of their vehicles whereas for longer trips the permissible loading capacity remained at 70%. These relaxations were coupled with other mitigating factors such as the mandatory wearing of masks and allowing for ventilation. To this end there has been no indication that public transport has been the main contributor in the spread of the virus. This, therefore, implies that measures put in place when the carrying capacity restrictions were relaxed yielded positive results.

(2) The fact that public transport has thus far not been detected as the main contributor to the spread of the virus, is to a large extent proof that operators are generally complying with specified regulations.

 

17 March 2021 - NW207

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Transport

(1)With reference to the property situated at 265 Pasteur Road, Blackheath, Johannesburg, (a) which (i) division of SA National Roads Agency SOC Ltd (SANRAL) and/or (ii) other entities reporting to him were responsible for selecting this site for operation and for signing the lease and (b) what is the period of the lease and total amount of rental being paid; (2) whether (a) SANRAL or (b) entities reporting to him are conducting any operations at 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so (3) whether the owners of the property are (a) employed by SANRAL and/or other divisions and/or entities of the Transport Department, (c) senior members of government and/or (d) former senior members of government; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the further relevant details in each case? NW210E

Reply:

1 (a) (i) SANRAL was not involved in selecting the site.

1 (a) (ii) SANRAL appointed service provider VEA Roads was responsible for selecting this site and entered into the lease agreement.

1 (b) Minimum lease period is 36 months with monthly lease of R20,000 per month.

2 (a) No operations conducted by SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

2 (b) No operations conducted by entities reporting to SANRAL from 266 Harley Rd Blackheath, Johannesburg.

SANRAL has no position in terms of operations form 266 Harley Rd Blackheath.

3 (a) According to SANRAL records the registered owner of the property is not employed by SANRAL and/or entities/Department of Transport

3 (b) (c)(d) Falls way

17 March 2021 - NW252

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

Whether there is any research that states and shows where variant 501.V2 of the novel coronavirus is more prevalent and less prevalent; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details on compiled research on the (a) prevalence of variant 501.V2 first recorded in the Republic in each (i) province, (ii) region and (iii) district in graph form and (b) total number of (i) infections and/or (ii) deaths as reflected in each case?

Reply:

The laboratory assessments indicate that the variant is more prevalent, now. The prevalence of the variant grew from 11% in October 2020 to 98% in February 2021.

a) The prevalence of the variant is consistent across all provinces sampled, KZN (>95%), EC (>95%), WC (>95%), NC (>90%), GP (>80%). Reports from neighbouring countries suggest that the prevalence of the variant is similar to South Africa.

b) (i) number of infections with the 501Y.V2 variant will be similar to the number of infections in the population, given that the variant has a prevalence > 90%.

(ii) There is no evidence to suggest that the variant is more deadly than the previous lineage. It is more transmissible hence more people are infected. Even though the proportion of people hospitalised (compared to being infected) has not changed - the number of hospitalisations and deaths has been higher due to a greater number of people being infected. There has been no reported difference in the clinical response to usual treatment.

The graph below provides the temporal emergence of the 501Y.V2 (B.1.351) variant

 

Table 1: The temporal emergence of 501Y.V2 (B.1.351) variant in SA over time

END.

17 March 2021 - NW412

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What are the relevant details of the exact process that ordinary citizens should follow when registering for the COVID-19 vaccination?

Reply:

The Electronic Vaccination System is built to be agile and responsive to the Vaccine Roll-out programme within the principles of inclusion – the system should not be excluding anyone that wants to be vaccinated. The registration system for beneficiaries is built to respond to the phases of the Vaccine Rollout programme and the sequencing of the population within the phases.

The enormity and importance of the vaccination programme requires that the administration of vaccines be appropriately captured and monitored. The Electronic Vaccine Data System (EVDS) has been developed to capture vaccination events digitally and provide data to its data analytics platform to monitor and report on vaccinations.

The EVDS, which is a web-based application accessible through multiple devices, including mobile and desktop devices, is critical to the success of the vaccine roll-out programme. It should be noted that although digital systems will be used and all vaccinations will be digitally recorded, those without access to digital technology must not and will not be excluded. All steps of the vaccination process will also be available through walk-in services where members of the public will be assisted for registration.

To streamline the vaccination, process a vaccination beneficiary register is required. A pre-vaccination registration functionality forms part of the EVDS., This pre-registration component of the EVDS is providing the public with two options for registration, i.e Self-Registration and Assisted Registration:

  • The Self Registration will require the members of the Public as identified per phase and sequencing to log into a web portal and register themselves;
  • For those members of the public that do not have the means and ability to do self-registration, the function of assisted registration will be made available in walk in centres and at vaccination sites.

END.

16 March 2021 - NW736

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Julius, Mr J to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether his department has released the Guidelines for the Bursary Scheme for Students in Public Universities 2021 to universities and colleges in all provinces; if not, (a) why not, (b) on what date will the guidelines be sent to the institutions and (c) what is the impact of his department’s failure in this regard on the commencement of classes at the institutions awaiting the guidelines; if so, on what date were the guidelines sent?

Reply:

(a) The university funding guidelines could not be finalized given the uncertainties about the demand for funding and the available budget, which was addressed by Minister Nzimande in his media statement on 8 March 2021. The Bursary Rules and Guidelines policy document, which governs the administration and management of bursaries in Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges, were distributed to colleges in November 2020.

(b) The funding guidelines for universities for 2021 will be finalised as soon as Cabinet has made a determination in this regard. The Department, in collaboration with the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, conducted regional capacity-building workshops for college officials on the revised policy document from November 2020 to December 2020.

(c) The 2021 Guidelines have been kept as close as possible to the 2020 Guidelines.

16 March 2021 - NW821

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she will furnish Mr S J F Marais with the minutes of the meeting that she and her Zimbabwean counterpart, the Minister of Defence and War Veterans' Affairs, Ms Oppah Muchinguri-Kashiri, are reported to have held on 9 September 2020 in order to prepare for a Southern African Development Community troika meeting and the United Nations Security Council configuration of the Force Intervention Brigade; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

In response to a request made by the Honourable Member under the Promotion of Access to Information Act, the Honourable Member was informed in 2020 that the meeting was a verbal meeting and no minutes were recorded.

16 March 2021 - NW491

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Will she furnish Ms E L Powell with (a) an update on progress at the Dodoma Avenue Housing Development in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) the details of (i) any project timeline delays, (ii) the primary construction contractor, (iii) any sub-contractors, (iv) the name of site engineers, (v) the name of the design architect, (vi) costs initially budgeted for the development, (vii) full costs incurred to date including the estimated date of beneficiary hand-over and (viii) reasons for delays and additional costs incurred?

Reply:

(a) The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Human Settlements has indicated that the Dodoma Avenue Housing Development forms part of a sub-phase of the broader Kennedy Road Housing Project. The project consist of 45 units. Currently, all 45 units are at roof level.

(b)(i) The unforeseen reasons for the delay of the construction programme by a further 12 months include the following:

  • objections received from ratepayers in the surrounding area;
  • disputes over labour rates resulting in work stoppages;
  • social challenges from adjacent informal settlements;
  • Covid-19 impact, and
  • Geotechnical constraints.

(ii) to (v) I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the names of the primary contractor, the sub-contractors, site engineer, and the design architect as requested. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(vi) I am informed that the original budget for the implementation of the project was R 14 613 997, 57.

(vii) The cost incurred to date is R 10 440 174, 08 and the beneficiary handover will take place on a phased basis on completion of sections of the project, which will be completed by July 2021.

(viii) The additional cost of approximately R2 000 000 was incurred due to the following:

    • the need for stabilizing work, retaining structures as recommended by an independent assessment of soil conditions;
    • additional time related costs and remedial works due to stoppages and invasions of completed housing units, and
    • additional assessments due to claims of ancestral graves at the Dodoma Avenue site.

 

 

16 March 2021 - NW538

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Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

1. What position does a certain person (name furnished) occupy at the SA Post Office? 2. Whether the specified person is authorised to (a) enter into contractual agreements and/or (b) contract or appoint official representatives on behalf of the SA Post Office; if not, what is the position in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SAPO as follows:

1. Acting Group Executive Sales/Commercial

2. (a) In terms of the Board approved Generic Delegation of Authority, Group Executives (EXCO members) have the authority to sign off contractual agreements on behalf of SAPO, depending on the value, nature, complexity and type of contract and delegation of Authority or sub-delegation of authority (if permitted).

(b) See reply (a) above in as far as it relates to contract/s. It further depends on the nature, type etc and exigency of the appointment of the official representatives and in which capacity such official is officially appointed by SA Post Office SOC Ltd.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

16 March 2021 - NW503

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Communications and Digital Technologies

(1)      Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

The Department has advised me as follows:

(1)(a) Yes

(b) By completion and submission of application of approval for Other Remunerative Work and financial disclosures on an annual basis

(i) It differs each year based on the number of applications received each year. (refer to the table below developed from the actual applications and disclosures).

(ii) It differs each year based on the applications received and disclosures made. (refer to the table below developed from the actual applications and disclosures).

Table 1: This table provides the employees that have applied for and disclosed their other remunerative work performed in the past five years:

No

Level

Other Remunerative Work approved and disclosed in the financial disclosures

   

2019/20

2018/19

2017/18

2016/17

2016/15

 

Chief Director

2

3

3

3

1

 

Director

5

1

4

3

5

 

Deputy Director

2

2

2

2

1

 

Assistant Director

2

2

1

1

1

 

Other lower levels

1

1

1

3

1

(2)   Yes

(a) The policy is in line with the Public Service Act section 30 and Public Service Regulations 2016. The Financial Disclosures Policy further requires employees that are required to complete financial disclosures to disclose any other remunerative work performed. In line with the policies and legislation including section 195 of the RSA Constitution, employees are made aware that they have to complete the relevant forms to request permission to perform other remunerative work, disclose any other remunerative work in their financial disclosures and to ensure:

  • The Work of the Department is prioritised (comes first);
  • They cannot use the Department’s resources to conduct the other remunerative work;
  • They are prohibited from doing business with an organ of state (Regulation 13(c) of the Public Service Regulations 2016; and
  • They cannot perform the work during office hours.

(b) There are different levels where they are considered such as:

  1. Supervisor: - to consider if the work will not interfere with the employee’s Departmental duties and recommend for approval;
  2. Ethics Officer: - to ensure the correctness of the form and compliance with the relevant legislation and policies; and
  3. Executive Authority or Delegated Authority: - Approval.

(c) None

(d) N/A

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

16 March 2021 - NW750

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the President of the Republic

Whether, at the time that he appointed a certain person (name and details furnished) on 29 May 2019, he was informed of the serious allegations of sexual harassment levelled against the specified person by an employee of a certain political organisation (name furnished) prior to the 2019 general election; if not, what steps will he be taking now that the allegations have become public; if so, what (a) measures did he put in place to investigate the allegations and (b) were the appropriate reasons for appointing the specified person in the face of the allegations?

Reply:

I was not aware of the allegations at the time of the appointment of the person.

I am informed that the relevant internal processes of the political party concerned were followed with respect to these allegations, in line with the law applicable to such complaints by an employee as well as the political party’s policy on sexual harassment, and that this process was concluded.

16 March 2021 - NW762

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) On what date will the outstanding laptops promised to the National Student Financial Aid Scheme students be rolled out, (b) what is the time frame and (c) how will students who have not received their laptops be assisted in the interim?

Reply:

(a)  NSFAS is expecting the first batch of laptops to arrive on 18 April 2021. 

(b)  Distribution to students who have opted to participate in the digital learning device scheme will commence once institutions have confirmed registration data of students with NSFAS.

(c)  All universities have developed multimodal teaching and learning plans and are putting in place several measures to support students.

16 March 2021 - NW767

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(a) Who were the service providers who received contracts in respect of the R45,7 million budget for cleaning services in community education colleges and (b) on what date did the service providers (i) start and (ii) complete their services in each case?

Reply:

(a) The cleaning services allocation of R45.7 million is for the 2021/22 financial year, which is effective from 1 April 2021. The appointment of service providers will be done by each Community Education and Training (CET) college following their supply chain management policies and processes for procurement. The cleaning services are for Community Learning Centres and Satellite Centres that fall under each CET college.

(b) (i) Each CET college will appoint a service provider in the 2021/22 financial. The first tranche of funds, i.e. 25%, will be transferred to CET colleges in April 2021.

(b) (ii) The colleges will contract the services for a period of 12 months, i.e. April 2021 to March 2022, as the funds are for the 2021/22 financial year. There are preliminary funding allocated for the 2022/23 and 2023/24 financial years amounting to R54.5 million and R51.2 million, respectively.

16 March 2021 - NW509

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

1(a) Yes employees on salary levels 4 to 12 performed approved remunerated overtime and standby duty.

1(b) The information is available in the employee’s personal files and it is reported in the annual report.

(i) 51 staff members.

(ii) 11 Deputy Directors.

14 Assistant Directors.

1 Senior Administrative Officer.

1 Supply Chain Management Practitioner.

2 Senior Administration Clerk.

14 Security Officers.

2 Maintenance Officers.

1 Auxiliary Services Practitioner.

3 Human Resources Practitioners.

2 Senior Secretaries.

2(a) The departmental overtime policy provides for 15 hours per week of pre-authorized overtime work. Standby duty is regulated by Public Service Co-ordination Bargaining Chamber (PSCBC) Resolution 3 of 1999 and is also pre-authorized.

2(b) The authority is delegated to the Chief Director: Human Resources.

2(c) No contraventions of both the policy and PSCBC regulations were identified by the Auditor-General and reported to National Treasury.

2(d) No transgressions were identified.

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(1) (a) Yes, there are employees who have performed remunerative work outside the public service.

(b)   It is through the mandatory disclosure of financial interests, where officials disclose all their financial interests, and information obtained from other governmental structures such as the Public Service Commission, National Treasury database, Department of Public Service and Administration, and Auditor-General.

2015/16 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight officials requested approval, seven were approved and one was withdrawn. Five officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service.

2016/17 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, six officials requested approval and all were approved. Eight officials did not apply for permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service

2017/18 financial cycle: According to departmental records, five officials requested approval, four were approved and one was withdrawn. 

2018/19 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, eight applications were received and all were approved.

2019/20 financial cycle:  According to departmental records, fifteen officials requested approval and all were approved.

2020/21 financial cycle:  There are twenty applications that are being processed.

(i) A total number of 62 applications were received for remunerative work outside public service.

(ii) According to the analysis, most of the applications are related to lecturing in private institutions, invigilation, counselling and some working for their own private businesses.

(2) According to information at the Department's disposal, the majority of employees who perform remunerative work outside the public service do apply for and obtain approval in line with the DPSA determination. However, those who do not apply are subjected to consequence management.
(a) The Department applies the Public Service Act, 1994, the Public Service Regulations, 2016 and its applicable determinations.  Employees can perform other remunerative work provided that they have obtained written permission to do so from the Executive Authority/Accounting Officer, in terms of Section 30 of the Act. If any employee did not obtain written permission to perform other remunerative work, disciplinary action against such an employee will be instituted as consequence management.

(b) According to the Public Service Regulations, the delegated powers are vested with the Director-General of the Department.

(c) No contraventions were brought to the attention of the National Treasury as it is not required; however, all contraventions are reported to the Minister for the Public Service and Administration.

(d) The Department has invoked appropriate disciplinary steps in line with the misconduct provisions of Section 16A (2) of the Public Service Act of 1994.