Questions and Replies

Filter by year

25 March 2021 - NW316

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether his department has put in place measures and/or mechanisms aimed at ensuring that Batho Pele principles are fully entrenched in the public service; if not, why not; if so, what has been the impact of the specified measures and/or mechanisms on the public service and its ability to deliver services to our people?

Reply:

1. Yes, the DPSA has mechanisms to ensure Batho Pele principles are entrenched in the Public Service.

Chapter 10 of the Constitution mandates the MPSA to ensure professionalization of the Public Service with high standards of the professional ethics. To this effect, MPSA launched the Public Service Professionalization Consultation Process led by the National School of Government.

The Public Service Act 1994 empowers the MPSA to ensure transformation, reform, innovation as well as any other matters that improves the efficacy of the Public Service. Policy Frameworks such as The White Paper on Transformation of the Public Service (1995), The White Paper on Transforming the Public Service Delivery (1997) are central to the implementation of the Batho Pele Principles approach in the public service.

2. Amongst others, mechanisms to ensure Batho Pele principles are entrenched in the Public Service are:-

2.1. Public Service Charter (2013) which accelerates the Batho Pele policy as a social contract between the Public Service and organised labour in ensuring quality services to the citizenry.

2.2. National Batho Pele Forums consisting of both national and provincial departments coordinators.

2.3. Implementation of the “Khaedu” programme that is centred on the deployment of Senior Members Service employees to various frontline government department to monitor, ensure compliance and redress of the delivery of services to the people.

2.4. National Batho Pele Excellence Awards is one of the key mechanism that the DPSA host annually to celebrate those employees who has mastered the implementation of the Batho Pele principles.

3. Impact of the specified measures and/or mechanisms on the public service and its ability to deliver services to our people

3.1. The Department host the Integrated Government-Wide Public Service Month in September annually to lead the entire government in assessing the impact of public service delivery in line with the Batho Pele principles.

3.2. The major impact was demonstrated currently during the COVID-19 pandemic, where the public servants who are working in the front line were able to deliver quality public service by living the ethos of Batho Pele principles

END

25 March 2021 - NW384

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What (a) total number of directors-general (DGs) in the national departments are currently acting in their positions and (b) is the name of each department in which each specified DG is currently employed; (2) whether the DGs who are in acting positions have the correct and/or relevant qualifications; if not, in each case (a) what are their names and (b) in what departments are they currently employed; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The total number of Directors-General in national departments who are currently acting is ten (10).

(b) National Departments with acting Directors-General:

  1. Department of Social Development
  2. Department of Water and Sanitation
  3. Department of Military Veterans
  4. Small Business Development
  5. The Presidency
  6. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development
  7. Communication and Digital Technologies
  8. State Security Agency
  9. International Relations and Cooperation
  10. Office of the Public Service Commission

(2) In terms of the regulatory framework, Regulation 63 (2) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 states that, “an employee directed to act in another post in terms of section 32 (2) should have the necessary competency for the post to which he or she is appointed to act”. As defined in the Public Service Regulations, 2016, Competency means the combination of knowledge, skills, behaviour and aptitude that a person can apply in the work environment, which indicates a person's ability to meet the requirements of a specific post. For purposes of business continuity meeting qualifications for a post for purposes of acting is not a requirement however, noting the definition, competency to perform the duties are.

(a&b) The names of the acting Directors-General and the Departments in which they are acting:

  1. Department of Social Development: Mr L Mchunu
  2. Department of Water and Sanitation: Mr T Belzar
  3. Department of Military Veterans: Mr DM Mgwebi
  4. Small Business Development: Mr L Mkhumane
  5. The Presidency: Ms L Mxenge
  6. Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development
  7. Communication and Digital Technologies: Ms N Jordan-Dyani
  8. State Security Agency: Mr L Jafta
  9. International Relations and Cooperation: Nonceba Losi
  10. Office of the Public Service Commission: Ms IL Mathenjwa

End

25 March 2021 - NW315

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the average turnover rate for heads of departments and directors-general in government departments; (2) whether he has found that the turnover rate has had a negative impact on (a) service delivery in the Republic and (b) administration of the affected government departments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures and/or mechanisms has his department put in place in order to address the negative impact of the turnover rate?

Reply:

(1) The quarterly (October 2020 to December 2020) turnover rate is 5,7%.

(2)(a) Turnover does have an impact on the delivery of services however there when a Head of Department exits office, an official is appointed in an acting capacity for business continuity.

(b) The departmental impact is that there is a required transition period in which the acting official needs to be briefed on the deliverables of a department to manage the responsibilities whilst in an acting capacity.

Regarding mechanisms, research has been undertaken on the turnover of Heads of Department and includes recommendations on their retention. The recommendations are to be presented to Cabinet once finalised.

End

25 March 2021 - NW314

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

(1)What is the current vacancy rate in each government department for funded posts at (a) national and (b) provincial level, (2) whether he has found that the vacancy rate has had a negative impact on service delivery in the Republic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures and/or mechanisms has his department put in place in order to address the negative impact of the vacancy rate?

Reply:

(1) (a) At national government, the average vacancy rate is 9%.

(b) At provincial government, the average vacancy rate is 12%.

Disaggregation per department is as per the attached Excel Spreadsheet.

(2) The vacancy rate does impact negatively on service delivery and this is not unique to the Public Service. Posts that remain unfilled do have an impact on the operational efficiency of an organisation. The average vacancy rate in the Public Service is approximately 12% which is above the set 10% target. The Department of Public Service and Administration monitors the vacancy rate and communicates with departments on the urgent need to fill vacant posts.

The Minister for the Public Service and Administration has addressed FOSAD on this matter and the Director-General of the Department of Public Service and Administration has presented the compliance report regarding the vacancy rate. Presentations made to FOSAD as well as the GSCID Cluster articulate the impact of vacant posts on service delivery and the non-compliance with legal prescripts, norms and standards on the filling of vacant posts.

The 2020/21 APP highlights Annual Compliance Report as one of the deliverables. This report identifies areas of compliance and non-compliance and most importantly, design technical intervention measures to support struggling departments. A partnership is being sought with the Auditor-General of South Africa to include vacancy management in the areas being audited as part of elevating the matter.

REPLY ORIGINATOR

Name: Mr M Wilson

Designation: Acting Deputy Director-General: Human Resource Management Development

Contacts: 082 903 0552

Recommended / Not recommended

Recommended / Not recommended

_________________

Ms Yoliswa Makhasi

Director-General: Department of Public Service and Administration

Date:

Recommended / Not Recommended

______________________

Ms Sindisiwe Chikunga, MP

Deputy Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:

Approved/ Not approved

____________________

Mr Senzo Mchunu, MP

Minister for the Public Service and Administration

Date:

25 March 2021 - NW869

Profile picture: Gwarube, Ms S

Gwarube, Ms S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What is the breakdown of the R95 million allocated by the Government towards the development of COVID-19 (a) vaccines, (b) treatment and (c) therapeutics?

Reply:

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) has committed an amount of ~R95 million for COVID-19 biomedical research and innovation activities covering in the following fields of research:

Research field

Amount disbursed

a) Prevention and vaccines

R7 684 831

b) Repurposing of Drugs for Treatment

R8 483 130

c) Convalescent sera

R4 571 244

d) Understanding the disease

R2 877 495

e) Diagnostics

R16 491 509

f) Genomic Surveillance

R36 338 830

g) Wastewater Surveillance

R345 989

h) Surveillance /Epidemiology

R2 128 665

i) 501Y.V2 variant

R7 636 395

Total amount committed /disbursed

R86 558 088

Amount still to be allocated

R8 441 912

24 March 2021 - NW809

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the plan of her department to reclaim money that was spent on fraudulent and/or overpriced irregular tenders of personal protective equipment and (b) amount has been (i) retrieved and (ii) lost?

Reply:

a) There has not been any money spent fraudulently on the procurement of personal protective equipment.  The Department of Basic Education procured PPEs through the Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement with the Private Party as per Regulation 16 of the PFMA.  As the Private Party cannot make use of the transversal contracts for PPEs and purchased PPEs from the open market, the Department has engaged with the Private Party with the assistance of National Treasury and has resolved any future pricing risk.   

b)

(i) Not applicable 

(ii) Not applicable

24 March 2021 - NW890

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has recorded the total number of teachers who have been absent from schools since the reopening for the 2021 academic year; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the (a) total number of teachers who have been absent and (b)(i) name of the affected school and (ii) school’s location in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b) (i) (ii) No. The National Department does not collect information on teacher attendance as part of its monitoring framework and therefore has not set up systems to collect such information on a regular basis. The Honourable Member is requested to direct the question to the Provincial Education Departments.

24 March 2021 - NW798

Profile picture: Breedt, Ms T

Breedt, Ms T to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2176 on 21 December 2020, she will (a) indicate on what date her department intends to promulgate the draft of the Animal Welfare Bill for public participation, (b) furnish Ms T Breedt with a copy of the socio-economic impact assessment that was submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation and (c) further provide a list of the members of the working group responsible for drafting the specified Bill; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) The date for the gazetting of the draft Animal Welfare Bill has not been set yet. However, as responded to Honourable Winkler to the same question under parliamentary question 2995 in 2020; due to a number of technical capacity constraints, complicated by the issues related to the Covid-19 pandemic situation, the envisaged introduction of the Bill to Parliament in the 2021/2022 financial year was postponed by a year. Consultation with stakeholders on the Bill will be undertaken during the 2021/2022 financial year.

b) The Socio-Economic Impact Assessment that was submitted to the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation is hereby attached.

c) The Bill is drafted by the Animal Welfare Working Group, which consist of the following officials:

    1. Dr Mphane Molefe – DALRRD
    2. Ms Morongwa Senyatsi – DALRRD
    3. Dr Emmanuel Midzi – North West Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
    4. Dr Lea Shuda – Northern Cape Department of Agriculture and Land Reform
    5. Dr Christine Meintjes – KwaZulu Natal Department of Agriculture and Rural Development.
    6. Dr Themba Malatse – Limpopo Department of Agriculture
    7. Dr Faculty Baloyi – Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
    8. Dr Lungile Jali – Eastern Cape Department of Rural Development and Agrarian Reform
    9. Dr Thelma Mokgophi – Mpumalanga Department of Agriculture, Rural Development, Land and Environmental Affairs
    10. Dr Jurgens Barnard – Free State Department of Agriculture and Rural Development
    11. Dr Michael Swart – Western Cape Department of Agriculture.

It should be noted that the last two names on the list above have only recently joined the working group in 2020 and have not yet participated in the drafting of the Bill.

24 March 2021 - NW351

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total number of hectares of land is held in the name of traditional leaders for use by communities in Western Cape, (b) is the name of the responsible traditional leader in each of the areas and (c) government support has been provided in each area since 1 January 2014?

Reply:

a) There is no land held in the name of any traditional leader or traditional community in the Western Cape.

b)  Falls away.

c) Falls away.

24 March 2021 - NW288

Profile picture: Hill-Lewis, Mr GG

Hill-Lewis, Mr GG to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether her department has developed a plan for Erf 81, a site owned by the SA National Defence Force which is situated between Bo-Kaap and Tamboerskloof in the Cape Town City Bowl; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) master plan for the specified site, (b) timeline for development and (c) plan of her department for the (i) long-standing informal structures and occupants on the north-east side of the site, (ii) occupants of the military buildings on the south-east side of the site and (iii) unlawful occupiers?

Reply:

The Erf in question is curently the subject of discussions at the Inter Ministerial Committee on Land Redistribution and the response will be provided once the discussions are finalised.

I

24 March 2021 - NW866

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her; (2) whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (3) whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her;

ANSWER

a) The Ministerial Task Team (MTT) on the Selling of posts was commissioned in September 2014.

b) The MTT Report was finalised in April 2016 and

c) The report was handed over to the Minister on 20 May 2016. However, at the time of the handing over of this report, there were still some forensic investigations that were pending. They were later subjected to a second phase investigation of the MTT in order to complete the remaining Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report. Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report was finalised in June 2018.

 

2. Whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date;

ANSWER:

a) Subsequent to the release of the MTT Report on 20 May 2016, the Report was tabled at the Cabinet meeting to brief them on the report and its findings; the Portfolio Committee was also briefed on May 2016 and June 2017 about the findings and the actions to be taken by the Department to remedy the challenges emanating from the report. Lastly, presentations were made to both the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and Heads of Education Committee (HEDCOM).

b) Yes, the MTT Report was gazetted and also made public on the Department of Basic Education’s website for easy access.

3. Whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?  

ANSWER:                                 

The identified cases of the alleged illegal activities were sent to the affected Provincial Departments of Education (PEDs). Due to the fact that the PEDs are the Employers of educators in the respective provinces, they were requested to conduct investigations or follow-up investigations into these cases and provide reports on each of the cases to the DBE.

Since the provincial investigations were commissioned, the number of allegations subsequently dropped. Currently, the  DBE has not received any further complaints of such illegal activities or allegations of individuals who participated in one or other form of corruption or selling of posts.

24 March 2021 - NW956

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years, what (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, (iii) was the reason for each legal case, (iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose and (v) are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Reply:

                                

Response

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

 

2018-2019 financial year

Answer: The Department had 38 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case.In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 1 459 000 in litigation cost in the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

(iii) was the reason for each legal case, 

Answer: There were 8 cases relating to contractual disputes;9 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 10 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues;one case relating to pension payment of an educator; 2 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and five cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose 

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled three cases, won one and did not lose any case.

 

 (v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There are no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases. 

 

2019-2020 financial year

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

Answer: The Department had  42 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2019/2020 financial year

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case. In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 12 853 000  in litigation cost in the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

(iii)What was the reason for each legal case,

Answer: There were 11 cases relating to contractual disputes; 10 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 6 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues; 1 case relating to pension payment of an educator; 7 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and  4 cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled  two cases and lost one.

 

(v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There were no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases.

24 March 2021 - NW867

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the prescribed maximum class size of 40 learners per class in the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, (a) which schools do not comply with this prescript and (b) what are the reasons in each case for not complying; (2) (a) what actual steps have been taken to rectify the situation regarding classrooms and education, (b) by what date will the steps be implemented and (c) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

(1) and (2) The process to determine the learner-classroom ratio, as determined through the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, is conducted annually by provinces based on the learner enrolment received from Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) for that particular year.  Provinces are currently conducting the analysis for inclusion in the User Asset Management Plans for the 2021-22 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), including the costing thereof.  The main reason for schools not complying with the prescript, can include an increase in enrolment or an insufficient number of classrooms to cater for the number of learners.  In both instances, mobile classrooms are provided to schools to address the influx.  Further response to the question will be provided as soon as provinces conclude the analysis and submit the information.

24 March 2021 - NW808

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her reply to question 168 on 25 February 2021, what (a) are the details of the gender-based violence (GBV) programme found within the Life Orientation subject, (b) number of days and/or weeks are there that focus on GBV within the specified subject and (c) are the contents of the programme; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with the details of the programme?

Reply:

1(a) GBV is addressed through the provision of comprehensive sexuality education, access to sexual and reproductive health services implemented in secondary schools including a focus on prevention of alcohol and drug use and learner pregnancy (now also COVID-19) as risk factors to GBV. In primary schools, activities mainly focus on raising awareness of social justice and vulnerabilities such as reporting of abuse and support for GBV-affected learners.

(b) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education lessons broadly are delivered through a total of 80 lessons (implying 80 hours) in the Lifeskills and Life Orientation subject, throughout the schooling life from Grade 4 to 12. Of the 80 lessons, 29 (36%) of these specifically address GBV.

(c) In Primary Schools with younger learners, it starts with addressing bullying, safety of the body, protecting personal space, prevention of rape, reporting of sexual abuse and sexual harm, with the view of empowering the potential victim. Gradually, as the learners progress to higher grades, the topics in the Intermediate Phase begin to introduce issues of bullying, sexual abuse, sexual grooming, skills for bullies to change, this is coupled with identification and linking to services for learners at risk. In the Senior Phase, the lessons begin to introduce the construction of gender, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. In the Further Education and Training (FET) phase, the lessons address in depth the issues of gender construction, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. These messages communicate both to the potential victim and perpetrator with the view of challenging their attitudes in the communities.

2. Yes

24 March 2021 - NW868

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of schools for children with special educational needs (ELSEN) in each province, (b) are the norms and standards for funding the ELSEN sector and (c) is the current long-term plans of her department to improve the sector?

Reply:

a) Eastern Cape: 45; Free State: 21; Gauteng: 132; KwaZulu-Natal: 75; Limpopo: 35; Mpumalanga: 18; Northern Cape: 08; North West: 32; Western Cape: 67.

b) No, there are guidelines for the resourcing of inclusive education.

c) Yes.

24 March 2021 - NW513

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

1. The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development has reported as follows:

a) In the past five financial years, since 2016, a total number of 180 employees requested permission to perform remunerative work outside the public service or normal working hours, in terms of the Directive regulated by the Public Service Regulations of 2016. However, it should be noted that some of these employees applied for an approval more than once as the approval is only valid for a period of a year from the date of approval.

b) The table below provides a summary according to job title or work category for 2016/17 to 2020/21 financial years:

Item No.

Total number of applications received from officials requesting permission to perform work outside normal working hours

(ii) Total number of officials permitted to perform work outside normal working hours

 

(i) Job titles or Work Categories

Number of Approved Applications

Number of Disapproved Applications

 
1. 

Accounting Clerks

5

0

5

2. 

Administrative Clerks

57

0

57

3. 

Administration Heads (level 9)

1

0

1

4. 

Administrative Officers

11

0

11

5. 

Assistant Directors

14

0

14

6. 

Assistant Financial Operations Managers

3

0

3

7. 

Assistant Master

2

0

2

8. 

Assistant State Attorney

0

1

1

9. 

Audit Manager

1

0

1

10. 

Chief Accounting Clerk

1

0

1

11. 

Chief Administrative Clerks

4

0

4

12. 

Court Intermediaries

4

1

4

13.

Court Interpreters

6

0

6

14. 

Court Managers

7

2

7

15.

Deputy Directors

12

0

12

16.

Deputy Master

1

0

1

17.

Directors

4

0

4

18.

E-Scheduler Clerk

1

0

1

19.

Family Advocate

1

0

1

20.

Human Resource Practitioner

1

0

1

21.

Internal Auditors

3

0

3

22.

Legal Administration Officers

2

0

2

23.

Maintenance Investigators

2

0

2

24.

Maintenance Officers

2

0

2

25.

Master: Supreme Court

2

0

2

26.

Messenger

1

0

1

27.

Principal Legal Administration Officer

1

0

1

28.

Provisioning Admin Clerks

2

0

2

29.

Registrar

1

0

1

30.

Registry Clerks

2

0

2

31.

Secretaries

2

0

2

32.

Senior Secretaries

2

1

2

33.

Senior Assistant State Attorneys

2

0

2

34.

Senior Communication Officer

1

0

1

35.

Senior Court Interpreters

2

0

2

36.

Senior Human Resource Officer

1

0

1

37.

Senior Legal Admin Officer

1

0

1

38.

Senior Training Officer

1

0

1

39.

Social Workers

2

0

2

40.

State Accountants

3

0

3

41.

State Law Advisors

2

0

2

42.

Vetting Administrator

1

0

1

GRAND TOTAL

174

6

174

2. As indicated in the table above, 174 of the application requests were approved and only six (6) were disapproved.

a) The Department is guided by the Directive on other remunerative work outside the public service issued by the Department of Public Service and Administration, together with the relevant legislation that include Public Service Act and Public Service Regulations. This directive is implementing section 30 of the Public Service Act (Act No. R103 of 1994). The Department may take appropriate disciplinary action in instances where contravention of the policy is established.

b) Applications are considered and approved or disapproved by the Deputy Director-General: Corporate Services in terms of the Departmental Delegations.

c) The Labour Relations Unit in the Department has confirmed that there was no disciplinary processes taken against any employee who contravened with the Directive on performing other remunerative work outside the public service without permission in the past five (5) years. And lastly, the Directive does not require the Head of Department to report to National Treasury on misconduct in relation to performing other remunerative work outside the public service. The Department reports statistical information to the Department of Public Service and Administration and Public Service Commission, as the normal process on reporting in terms of the relevant prescripts – in this instance, disciplinary matters by Director: Employee Relations.

24 March 2021 - NW780

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will she ensure that Harding Burgh Primary School in Matatiele is provided with proper classrooms and sanitation?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

23 March 2021 - NW765

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What total number of (a) students are financially excluded at each university for the 2021 academic year and (b) the specified students were funded by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme?

Reply:

(a) Institutions are currently finalising the 2020 academic year whilst others are busy with registrations for the 2021 academic year. At this stage, institutions are unable to provide data/information for 2021 until the above processes have been concluded.

(b) With regard to NSFAS students, the information will be available once registrations and funding decisions have been made including funding decisions appeals and the outcomes thereof.

23 March 2021 - NW304

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the monthly amount of (i) petrol and (ii) vehicle maintenance for the visits of the departmental official to Loeriesfontein, (b) is the number of times that the SA Social Security Agency official, who handles grant applications, visit Loeriesfontein in each month, (c) is the ratio for an official to grant beneficiaries for Loeriesfontein and (d) number of beneficiaries are helped on a daily basis or during each visit?

Reply:

a) The average monthly amount for petrol is

(i) R4 366.00

(ii) Maintenance is performed annually at an average cost of R7 000 if the vehicle is out of warranty.

b) The officials of Nieuwoudtville Local office visit the Loeriesfontein Service point on a weekly basis. More frequent visits are provided as informed by the number of people who need SASSA services.

c) The ratio is 1: 24 grant applications per day per single staff member

d) The average number of applications per day is between 10 and 15. This may increase to 40 on days when medical assessments are done for the disability related grants.

23 March 2021 - NW561

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the children's amendment bill relating to adoption services and in light of the fact that the Republic has had about 700 inter-country adoptions in the past five years, what mechanisms and/or measures are in place to monitor the safety of children in their adopted countries to prevent human trafficking; 2) what steps have been (a) taken against service providers who did not comply with the legal accreditation requirements in the past and/or (b) implemented to rectify the situation?

Reply:

1. The South African Central Authority have put measures in place to prevent child trafficking by entering into inter-country adoption working agreements with foreign countries. In the working agreements there are post adoption services that are expected to be rendered by the accredited foreign adoption agencies for a period of five years to the children and adoptive families.

The foreign accredited adoption agencies are expected to compile post adoption reports twice in the first year then annually which are forwarded to the SA accredited adoption agencies and the SA Central Authority. Engagements on progress are in place on the wellbeing, adjustment and functioning of children and their families.

The Central Authority and the accredited child protection organizations do visit the foreign adoption agencies, Central Authorities and adoptive families to ensure compliance to post adoption measures. During the financial year 2019/2020, some of the officials from the Central Authority and accredited CPO visited Belgium and Denmark.

(2) (a) There are no steps that were taken against any service provider as they all complied with the legal accreditation requirements, none of the service provider will be allowed to provide adoption services if they are non-compliant.

(b) No steps were taken to rectify as the applicants complied with the legal requirements.

National Assembly Written Reply: 561 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW696

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD Grant), her department has been able to conclusively establish the number of government employees who have fraudulently applied for the SRD Grant; if not, why not; if so, what (a) is the total number of government employees who actually received the SRD Grant and (b) is the total amount that the implicated government employees received from the SRD Grant?

Reply:

a) The total number of government employees who received the Covid-19 SRD grant payments as at February 2021 is 241.

b) The total amount paid is R 84 350.00, which was for the month of May 2020 only. Subsequent applications were declined after they were flagged as possible fraudulent applicants that were not eligible for the grant. Investigation regarding this matter is ongoing. Upon completion, SASSA will approach the relevant institution to recover the money, including requesting the institution to take appropriate disciplinary steps.

23 March 2021 - NW372

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of SA Social Security Agency (a) grant pay points and (b) open space pay points that are currently in operation?

Reply:

Currently, all social grant beneficiaries receive their social grants payments in their bank accounts, thus are able to transact electronically (including the withdrawal of funds) at any ATM or retail store with a point of sale device. Through the contract with the South African Post Office, additional access channels have been made available for beneficiaries who have a SASSA/SAPO card. These include post offices and mobile cash pay points.

(a) In addition to the transaction points in the National Payment System (NPS), SAPO also provides an additional 1 611 mobile pay points, and all SAPO branches in communities where the NPS access is limited.

(b) 713 of the 1 611 mobile cash pay points operate in open spaces, as indicated in the table below:

BREAKDOWN OF CASH PAY POINTS PER REGION

REGION

NUMBER OF MOBILE CASH PAY POINTS

NUMBER OF OPEN POINTS

Eastern Cape

507

 292

Free State

36

8

Gauteng

9

0

KwaZulu-Natal

334

192

Limpopo

482

203

Mpumalanga

60

14

Northern Cape

27

0

North West

143

4

Western Cape

13

0

TOTAL

1 611

 713

23 March 2021 - NW371

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

What is the total number of compliance monitors who have been appointed to monitor the norms and standards of COVID-19 compliance in the facilities managed by her department?

Reply:

The department has not appointed any compliance monitors to monitor the norms and standards of COVID-19 compliance in the facilities managed by her department. Monitoring of compliance to norms and standards of COVID 19 is an added responsibility to the current existing personnel. In some cases the established structures are used to monitor compliance of norms and standards for COVID 19, for example in facilities that provide services to victims of Gender Based Violence. These facilities utilises established Task Teams across nine provinces to monitor compliance with norms and standards for COVID 19.

National Assembly Written Reply: 371 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW697

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to the findings by the auditor-general that some government employees applied for the Social Relief of Distress Grant (SRD Grant), her department took any disciplinary and/or legal steps against the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; 2) whether any steps have been taken to recover the monies from the implicated government employees; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether any systems have been put in place to ensure that no government employee will be able to fraudulently and/or unlawfully apply for and/or receive the SRD grant; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. As at the 28th of February 2021, a total of 39672 government employees had applied for the Covid 19 SRD grant. No disciplinary or legal steps have been taken against these government employees because investigations have not yet been concluded. Once the investigations are concluded SASSA will recommend to the relevant Heads of Departments to institute disciplinary action and also to recover money paid over to the individuals.

SASSA has received numerous complaints from people whose ID numbers were used to apply for the Covid 19 SRD grant without their knowledge. Some government employees submitted applications in order to test the system or to assist applicants to apply as all applications were submitted electronically.

The Auditor General flagged 241 government employees who received the Covid 19 SRD grant payment for May 2020. This happened at the inception phase when SASSA did not have access to all the relevant databases. Some of the databases were not up to date, partly because of the lockdown.

2. SASSA has not yet concluded the investigation into the cases that have been flagged by the Auditor General of South Africa. Once the investigations have been concluded, the fraudulent cases will be referred to the relevant government departments and SASSA’s Debt Management unit to recover the money from implicated people.

3. SASSA has implemented a system to ensure that government employees do not receive the SRD grant. Through this system, the applications of 39,672 government employees who applied for the SRD grant were declined.

Monthly, ID numbers of approved and new applications for Covid-19 R350 SRD grant applicants are matched against various databases such as the databases of government employees, namely PERSAL and PERSOL. If the ID number of the Covid SRD grant applicant appears in the databases of government employees, the application is declined.

SASSA is still awaiting the Government Employees Pension Fund database which will strengthen the ability to verify applicants.

 

National Assembly Written Reply: 697 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW602

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether she has found that she has been able to strengthen relationships and support to (a) nongovernmental organisations and (b) non-profit organisations that provide vital services on behalf of the State; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development is mandated by the NPO Act 71 of 1997 to create an enabling environment that create opportunities for the NPOs to thrive.

Note that the country was ravaged by Covid -19 pandemic, the NPO sector could not spared either. During the Covid -19 Pandemic, the Department took major strides in ensuring that the sector is taken care of. The Department has been able to strengthen and provide necessary support to non-profit organisations rendering vital services to vulnerable South African citizens.

In relation to funding of non-profit organisations (NPOs), several interventions were made by the National Department including issuing a circular that was sent to all Provinces in May 2020.

The Circular outlined the measures to be taken in order to avert the delayed non-payment and to speed-up processing of claims and allocation of funds to the Non-profit organizations (NPOs) for the 2020/21 financial year. As part of our support to Provinces, Provinces were advised to use the 2020/21 Service Level Agreements (SLA) and extend them for six months to enable them to pay first trenches.

The Department encouraged provinces to consider a two-tranche payment method, with guidance sought from the National Treasury as a way to speed the transfer of funds to deserving NPOs. The proposed tranche payment significantly reduced the administrative burden associated with processing the transfer payments.

This is considered in the light that most of the NPOs funded by the Department are rendering on-going vital services and as such have a good compliance record with the Department.

Towards executing the function of administering the Non-Profit organisation Act 71 of 1997, the Department ensured that there is continued provision of registration and report submission by NPOs. Due to limitations posed by different Levels of National Lockdown in terms of gatherings and face to face interaction, the Department initiated and strengthened online platforms to ensure continued support for non-profit organisations in the country.

A social media platform was also created to provide NPO related information and to respond to immediate queries posed by organisations. The Department also supported the NPO sector through a social media platform wherein “Know Your NPO Status Campaign” was launched by the Minister in November 2020.

The Campaign was launched through a Webinar and attended by the NPO Sector. The online interaction provided an opportunity for the Minister to engage with the Sector on pertinent issues affecting NPOs including mechanisms to improve compliance with NPO’s related legislations.

In addition; the Department also ensured that prioritisation for registration and issuing of compliant letters was given to organisations that intended to provide COVID related services to communities. Prioritisation of support to such organisations ensured that communities under distress due to COVID 19 pandemic were provided with required services.

National Assembly written Reply: (Question 83 for oral reply converted to written Question 602) of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW498

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With reference to the Early Childhood Development-Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF), (a) what are the reasons that the ECD Covid-19 relief package decreased significantly from R1,3 billion announced in July 2020 to R588.8 million announced in November 2020 to R496 million announced in February 2021; (2) whether these funds were not ring-fenced for the ECD sector; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) (a) what amount of funding did each provincial social development department receive and (b) how were these amounts determined?

Reply:

(1) (a) The initial indication of R1,3 billion announced in July 2020 was subsequently revised based on the outcome of the assessment of the bid process through the National Treasury. The department received an amount of R588 728 000 from National Treasury. This included an amount of R380 million is allocated for unemployment risk support that will benefit 83 333 existing ECD related workers; R116 million allocated for the support of 25 500 compliance support officers, who are existing staff members at early childhood development programmes that will play a compliance support role within their ECD programmes; R16.5 million for registration support officers who will assist in scaling up registration and R76 million to sustain 1 809 social workers who have been appointed on contract. The R496 million is the total allocated to provide 108 833 ECD workers with income support through existing ECD services (unemployment risk support and compliance support officers).

(2) These funds were ring-fenced for the ECD sector under ECD Conditional Grant.

(3) (a) The Presidential Employment Initiative

funds are allocated as follows:

  • Eastern Cape: R60 million
  • Free State: R39 million
  • Gauteng: R78 million
  • KwaZulu-Natal: R90 million
  • Limpopo: R58 million
  • Mpumalanga: R42 million
  • Northern Cape: R42 million
  • North West: R34 million
  • Western Cape: R53 million

(b) In the absence of workforce data in the ECD sector, the department used the children’s population and the current formula for ECD conditional grant to determine allocations per province which were just the estimates.

National Assembly Written Reply: 498 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW303

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) is the total number of towns that do not have a physical SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) access point or office in the Northern Cape and (b) will she furnish Mrs G Opperman with a list of the specified towns; (2) what are the reasons that Loeriesfontein in the Hantam Local Municipality does not have a SASSA office despite many beneficiaries living there?

Reply:

1(a) currently, there are Seven (7) towns that do not have a physical SASSA access point or office in the Northern Cape.

(b) These are Okiep, Concordia, Nababeep, Carolusberg, Matjieskloof, Fonteintjie and Kleinzee

2. Loeriesfontein is a small town with a population of 2 744 people (Census 2011) and 855 social grant beneficiaries. The town is serviced by the Niewoudtville SASSA Local office staff who visit the area on a weekly basis. On average, 10 -15 people visit the SASSA office per week therefore the weekly visits by the Niewoudtville local office staff is sufficient to take care of the needs of the people of Loeriesfontein.

23 March 2021 - NW563

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether, with reference to night and Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) shelters available to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and other sexuality and gender diverse (LGBTQI+) community, she will provide Ms N K Sharif with a list of (a) contact details and (b) physical addresses of night and VEP shelters which are (i) operated and (ii) funded by her department in each province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) which from the provided list of night and VEP shelters are for the sole use of vulnerable members of the LGBTQI+ community?

Reply:

1. Based on the list provided previously on night and Victim Empowerment Programme (VEP) shelters, the Department of Social Development (DSD) in response to question (a) and (b) does not have shelters neither any plans to establish exclusive shelters to accommodate Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex and other sexuality and gender diverse (LGBTQI+) victims of GBV. (i)Therefore there is no LGBTQI+ specific shelter in operation and (ii) nor any funded by the department.

The DSD subscribes to its obligation to provide psychosocial services, social protection, and respect for human dignity as well as promoting rights of all victims of GBV including LGBTQI+ community. Any shelter exclusive to accommodate LGBTQI+ community will therefore perpetuate forms of discrimination, including labelling, stigmatization and stereotyping thus exposing the said community to unnecessary victimisation. Furthermore, the DSD strives to ensure that services that are provided upholds the principle of no discrimination based on gender, sexual orientation, race, religion, culture, ethnicity and disabilities.

2. None, as all shelters on the list that was provided previously can accommodate LGBTQI+ community. The DSD recommends that the admission criteria in all shelters across the country be inclusive and not discriminate against anyone due to a person’s gender, sexual orientation, disability, race, culture, ethnicity or expression of gender identity. There are therefore no shelters that are for the sole use of the vulnerable members of the LGBTQI+ community that have been established by DSD. This approach is also based the principle of building social cohesion amongst diverse groups and minimize risk related to safety and security of an exclusive LGBTQI+ shelter in a community.

National Assembly Written Reply: 563 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW86

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the tender that has been awarded to a company in order to boost capacity to the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) National Call Centre as well as the communications Company to render support to SASSA, what is the (a) name of the company that was awarded the communications tender and (b) cost of the tender, (2) whether the communications tender was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) was due process followed in awarding the tender; (3) what is the (a) name of the company that was awarded the call centre tender and (b) cost of the tender; (4) whether the call centre tender was advertised; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date and (b) was due process followed in awarding the tender; (5) (a) what number of (i) call centre agents are manning the national SASSA call centre, (ii) employees are employed at each provincial call centre and (b) on average, how long does it take for them to answer a call?

Reply:

1. (a) The company that has been appointed to assist SASSA with the call centre is Altron TMT trading as Bytes People Solutions.

(b) The cost of the tender for a 6 month period is R29 497 500 (VAT inclusive).

2. The communications tender was not advertised but followed a closed bid process. SASSA participated in GCIS RFB 005 2017/2018 and appointed a service provider from the GCIS approved panel of agencies.

a) As indicated above, the tender did not follow an open tender process, but a request for quotations, following a closed bid process, was sent to service providers listed on the GCIS Panel of Agencies on 21 July 2020.

b) Due process was followed in awarding the tender. A request for approval to deviate from a competitive bidding process was submitted to the SASSA Bid Adjudication Committee, where support was obtained. The request was then submitted to National treasury for approval prior to the process being implemented, in accordance with recognised supply chain processes. Approval was granted. The specifications for the service required as well as the bid evaluation process followed approved processes.

3. (a) As indicated under point 1, the company appointed for the call centre is Altron TMT T/A Bytes People Solutions.

(b) The cost of the tender is R29 497 500 (VAT inclusive)

4. The call centre tender was advertised.

a) The tender was advertised on 28 August 2020.

b) Due process was followed in awarding the tender. The tender was advertised, allowing for an open and transparent process. An appointed Bid Evaluation Committee undertook the evaluation of all bids received, the results of which was presented to the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC). On recommendation of the BAC, the appointment of the recommended company was approved by the Chief Executive Officer, and the award letter signed. The company then accepted the award.

(a) (i) The number of call centre agents in the national SASSA call centre is 30. This includes 9 back office call centre agents who are responsible for the management of all enquiries which come in through email as well as the more challenging enquiries; and 21 front office agents who are directly responsible for manning the telephone lines. This capacity is now supplemented by an additional 300 call centre agents provided by the contracted company, Altron Bytes People Solutions.

(ii) The provision of support in the respective regions is not through regional call centres, but rather help desks, which are manned by SASSA staff members. The number of staff per region is indicated below:

Eastern Cape 4

Free State 5

Gauteng 2 with 5 EPWPs

KwaZulu-Natal 6

Limpopo 4

Mpumalanga 1 with 2 part time staff

Northern Cape 3 and 1 intern

North West 5

Western Cape 3 interns

c) The international standard for responding to calls is that 80% of calls will be responded to within 20 seconds. SASSA does not achieve this standard.

Currently, once a call is accepted in the national call centre, the average time to respond is 5 minutes. However, this does not take into account the time it takes for a call to be accepted, which can be much longer than this. It is a concern that only approximately 35% of the calls made to the call centre are answered. It is this challenge that is being addressed with the contracting of the service provider, to ensure that all calls made to the 0800 60 10 11 number are responded to.

National Assembly Written Reply: 86 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW836

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What (a) is the total number of learners who are not funded by National Students Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) for the 2021 academic year, (b) number of students have been funded by NSFAS for the 2021 academic year, (c) is the total number of students who have enrolled in each institution of higher learning for the 2021 academic year and (d) number of students have been financially excluded for the 2021 academic year?`

Reply:

(a) All continuing NSFAS qualifying students who meet the academic and financial criteria will be funded for the 2021 academic year.

(b) Funding decisions for first-time entering students are still in the process following the announcement of the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation on 11 March 2021.

(c) The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021 from Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) colleges. Preliminary unaudited data will only be received at the end of April 2021.

Enrolments and registrations are still underway at many universities. The Department has not yet received enrolment data for 2021. Preliminary unaudited 2021 enrolment data will only be received at the end of April 2022 and final audited data at the end of July 2022.

Below are the approved Ministerial enrolment planning targets for 2020 and 2021.

Institution

Projected Targets

 

2020

2021

Cape Peninsula University of Technology

35 498

37 027

University of Cape Town

28 037

28 174

Central University of Technology

18 255

19 098

Durban University of Technology

30 219

30 439

University of Fort Hare

17 310

17 673

University of Free State

40 271

40 519

University of Johannesburg

49 727

49 969

University of KwaZulu-Natal

47 726

46 829

University of Limpopo

21 995

22 561

Mangosuthu University of Technology

12 980

13 391

Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University

29 792

30 461

North-West University

63 065

61 054

University of Pretoria

51 978

52 134

Rhodes University

8 714

8 866

University of South Africa

376 000

376 468

University of Stellenbosch

31 690

32 380

Tshwane University of Technology

61 814

62 439

Vaal University of Technology

20 992

22 154

University of Venda

16 992

17 332

Walter Sisulu University

30 269

29 544

University of the Western Cape

24 800

25 060

University of the Witwatersrand

40 935

41 003

University of Zululand

17 920

18 636

University of Mpumalanga

4 218

5 217

Sol Plaatje University

2 512

3 278

Sefako Makgatho Health Science University

6 640

6 820

Total

1 090 350

1 098 526

(d) Institutions have different financial clearance concessions in place to deal with outstanding debt before students are able to be registered and to continue with their studies. The registration at various institutions is currently underway as are consultations with students. This information can only be provided upon the conclusion of these consultations and finalisation of the registration processes at each institution.

23 March 2021 - NW703

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether the Vangasali early childhood development campaign has been able to determine if any (a) previously registered, (b) conditionally registered and/or (c) or unregistered early childhood development centres in each province have (i) temporarily and/or (ii) permanently closed their doors since 27 March 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what monitoring mechanism does her department have in place to determine what number of registered, conditionally registered and/or unregistered early childhood development centres in each province have temporarily and/or permanently closed their doors?

Reply:

(1) The Vangasali early childhood development campaign was not intended to determine if ECD services are temporary or permanently closed. It was aimed at confirming ECD services that are (a) registered (fully or conditional) and establish a database of those that are (b) unregistered in each province.

(i) National Treasury granted the department an allocation of R496 million as an ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF). The allocation seeks to minimise the loss of income, support continued operation and reduce the risk of permanent closure. This is implemented through ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF) with a focus on providing additional financial support towards the ECD workforce as part of a once-off temporary intervention, through ECD programmes. The ECD-ESRF will provide 108,833 ECD related workers with income support through about 28,283 existing ECD programmes (registered and unregistered centres and programmes) that applied to this Fund.

(2) The provincial departments of social development continue to submit monthly reports indicating the number of ECD programmes that have reopened. This include registered, conditionally registered and unregistered early childhood. These reports are consolidated and presented at Heads of Social development structure constituted by EXCO and provincial Heads of Department, chaired by the accounting officer of the department.

With the implementation of the ESRF, provincial social development offices will be monitoring the ECD programmes to determine whether the paid ECD programmes have reopened 60 days after receipt of the funds.

23 March 2021 - NW702

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to the Vangasali early childhood development campaign, what (a) is the current status of (i) registered, (ii) conditionally registered and (iii) unregistered early childhood development centres in each province and (b) has she found to have been the (i) successes and (ii) challenges of the Vangasali early childhood development campaign to date?

Reply:

The Vangasali campaign is progressing fairly well and is scheduled to continue until at least end of March 2022. There are three phases to Vangasali, the first was data collection which happened between June and October 2020 and resulted in a database of 52,288 ECD services which includes centre and non-centre based services.

Phase 2 focussed on orientation of provincial, district and local officials from DSD and Environmental Practitioners at local level in preparation for phase 3.

The Phase 3 will then focus on the registration massification which will commence in 2021/22 financial year.

(a)Current status on registration:

PROVINCE

(i) NUMBER OF FULLY REGISTERED

(ii)NUMBER OF CONDITIONALLY REGISTERED

(iii)NUMBER OF UNREGISTERED

SERVICES

EC

1 174

1 816

1 685

FS

310

972

1 674

GP

1 242

624

13 717

KZN

1 696

1 854

4 516

LP

478

3 021

2 695

MP

578

919

3 011

NC

95

197

660

NW

386

842

2 188

WC

850

635

4 839

TOTAL

6 423

10 880

34 985

 

(b)(i) The campaign was a success as the department was able to get the data base of the majority of ECD services that are not registered. This will assist the department in planning on assisting those services to be supported to register.

This database will be used in phase 2 of the project to drive registration massification and verify the existence of all these services.

Phase 2 began in October 2020 and builds on the great collaboration with Department of Health, Environmental Health Directorate that has been ongoing over the last four years. Phase 2 has so far resulted in the following:

  • Orientation of 474 DSD officials and 160 Environmental Health officials on the Vangasali Registration Toolkit in all 52 districts/metropolitan municipalities
  • Vangasali Social Service Professionals Manual on ECD Registration has been developed.
  • 22,000 Standardised Vangasali ECD Registration Application Packs (available in 7 official languages) were printed and will be distributed to DSD Districts by end March 2021.
  • ECD Registration Framework Rollout for ECD Service Assessment Visits has been developed
  • Online ECD Registration Management Tool has been developed.
  • Registration Jamborees have begun in 4 provinces and the remaining provinces will begin registration Jamborees this month once the ECD stimulus administration is complete. We are targeting 10,000 new ECD services to enter the registration system in the next 12 months.

Phase 3 of Vangasali is in the planning phase and involves bringing sector wide collaboration on resourcing and improving infrastructure at ECD services, drawing in the private sector, civil society and government resources into a focused effort on improving ECD services directly in line with norms and standards.

(ii) Some of the challenges that have been identified during the campaign include amongst the other:

  • Duplications
  • Missing information on the data base that makes it difficult to follow up on the service to be assisted.

The data has been cleaned to deal with the duplicates. The data is now instrumental during verification process on the ECD Stimulus Relief Package to check the applicants against the Vangasali data base.

23 March 2021 - NW374

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What are the conditions and the state of the kitchen at the Palm Ridge Alcohol and Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Day Clinic in Gauteng; (2) whether the staff at the clinic have been paid their full salaries and timeously in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) months in 2020 were the tranches disbursed on time?

Reply:

1. The kitchen of SANCA EG currently have no food and medication for detoxification. The staff alternate to assist with admissions on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. Referrals are done to other Clinics for clients where services cannot be rendered. The Clinic do provide porridge from donations received.

2. (a) The staff a SANCA Eastern Gauteng: Palmridge Clinic were paid their salaries in full, however temporary staff employed for a certain period were paid accordingly. The permanently employed staff were paid on time. However the when Quarterly tranches were delayed and paid in June 2019 and December 2020 respectively, Staff salaries were delayed however was backdated and paid accordingly. This was verified through bank statements and quarterly expenditure reports submitted to the Department by the NPO as part of its compliance documents.

(b) (i) During 2020 financial year, all permanent staff were paid their salaries on time except for salaries of July 2020 which was paid in August 2020. Salaries for October and November 2020 were paid in December 2020 as the NPO only received their tranche on the 07th December 2020. This was verified through bank statements and quarterly expenditure reports submitted to the Department by the NPO as part of its compliance documents.

(b) (ii) The following amounts and dates indicate how funds were disbursed to SANCA EG:

Date

Amount

18 May 2020

R 1 960 388

05 August 2020

R 1 960 337

07 December 2020

R 1 960 337

Attached is the annexure indicating staff salaries and payments for 2019/2020 and 2020/2021 financial years

National Assembly Written Reply: 374 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW635

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department has provided any support to early childhood development (ECD) centres that could not generate any revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, what total number of ECD centres did her department provide support to?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development has provided support to early childhood development (ECD) centres, which include ECD centres that could not generate any revenue due to the COVID-19 pandemic, in 2020 and 2021 in the following ways to mitigate the impact of the minimum health, safety and social distancing measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 (including lockdowns) due to the national state of disaster:

  • The provincial Departments of Social Development, by direction of the Minister of Social Development continued with the payment of subsidy to 626 574 children accessing registered funded ECD programmes through equitable share and conditional grant, irrespective whether they were open or not.
  • The conditional grant for ECD’s infra-structure component (as this could not proceed under the lockdown restrictions) was repurposed to provide essential protective personal equipment (PPEs) to assist ECD centres to comply with COVID 19 health and safety requirements. A total of 13 780 ECD centres were supported.
  • The Department of Social Development also applied for the Presidential Employment Stimulus as a measure to support the ECD sector, an amount of R496 million was received from the National Treasury in this regard. The allocation seeks to minimise the loss of income, support continued operation and reduce the risk of permanent closure. This is implemented through ECD Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF) with a focus on providing additional financial support towards the ECD workforce as part of a once-off temporary intervention, through ECD programmes. The ECD-ESRF will provide 108,833 ECD related workers with income support through about 28,283 existing ECD programmes (registered and unregistered centres and programmes) that applied to this Fund. The process for the payment of those who applied and verified is currently underway.

23 March 2021 - NW376

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) is the total number of children who are living with disabilities in each town in (i) Hantam and (ii) Karoo-Hoogland Municipalities and (b) kind of disabilities are the children living with mostly in Calvinia?

Reply:

The Department renders, as one of the programmes, services to Parents and Children with severe and profound Intellectual disabilities accessing Day-care centres (Partial care services). We work in a co-ordinated manner with provinces in ensuring the mobilisation of Parents and identification of children with disabilities. Whilst the information provided in response to this parliamentary question was sourced from the DSD disability programme and SASSA, the DSD programme is hard at work with the identification and mobilizing parents to ensure an updated database.

The shared information is the consolidated data inputs from DSD disability programme and the SASSA Provincial office.:

a) Total number of children with disabilities:

NO

MUNICIPALITY

LOCAL OFFICE AREA

NUMBER

(i)

Hantam

Calvinia

18

   

Brandvlei

12

   

Niewoudtville and Louriesfontein

16

TOTAL

   

46

       

(ii)

Karoo Hoogland

Williston

20

   

Frazerburg and Sutherland

19

TOTAL

   

39

GRAND TOTAL

   

85

b) Types of disabilities in identified children in the Calvinia Area:

8 Physical Disabilities

2 Cerebral Palsy

2 Multiple disabilities

6 Intellectual Disability

Total: 18

                                                                                           

National Assembly Written Reply: 376 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW863

Profile picture: Abrahams, Ms ALA

Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

Of the applications received for the Early Childhood Development Employment Stimulus Relief Fund (ECD-ESRF), (a) what number of applications are ECDs that are currently closed and have committed to open within 60 days, (b) where are the ECDs located and (c) how will her department assist the ECDs within the prescribed period of 60 days?

Reply:

(a) Of the applications received, thus far no ECD programme has been identified as being closed with the requirement to commit to open within 60 days. However, the national Department of Social Development together with the provincial Departments of Social Development are currently in the process of conducting document and physical verifications. Thus, only after the conclusion of this process, the department will have an indication of the number ECDs that are currently closed and have committed to open within 60 days.

(b) Thus far, no ECD programme has been identified as being closed with the requirement to commit to open within 60 days.

(c) The Provincial Departments of Social Development will continue to provide assistance upon request where needed within their mandate to ECD programmes, including those, if any, that were closed and need assistance towards their re-opening.

23 March 2021 - NW474

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether the post of Senior Manager: Human Resource Capital in the SA Social Security Agency is vacant, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for how long has the post remained vacant; (2) whether the specified post is a critical position for her department; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) are the reasons that it has not been filled?

Reply:

1.The post of Senior Manager: Human Resource Capital does not exist on the approved structure of SA Social Security Agency, however there is a vacant post of Senior Manager: Human Operations Management which has been vacant since 01 July 2019.

2. The post is critical, however due to CoE budget cut during the 2020/2021 financial year, the post could not be prioritised for filling. The post of Senior Manager: Labour Relations was prioritised due to a need to promote and ensure sound working relations, manage the collective bargaining processes and facilitate labour relations, dispute resolutions in cases of grievances and discipline. The post was filled with effect from 04 January 2021

National Assembly Written Reply: 474 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW766

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

What measures will be put in place to (a) assist students who were unable to write exams due to the challenges brought by lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 with no access to (i) data, (ii) laptops and/or (iii) learning material and (b)(i) ensure that the specified students do not repeat the academic year and (ii) support the students during the continued lockdown?

Reply:

a) Universities have each put in place different measures to support students during the COVID-19 lockdown period that affected the 2020 academic year.  The information provided below is not specific to any one institution, but rather provides a system overview. Specific information would have to be obtained from individual institutions. 

According to the February COVID-19 lockdown monitoring report received by the Department, there were few students who remained disengaged from their studies. Universities adopted emergency remote multi-modal teaching and learning methodologies in line with their own resources and circumstances. In some institutions, this meant online learning and teaching support and in others the delivery of print-based teaching and learning materials. Many universities also assisted students with the acquisition of laptops and in the provision of data.  

Universities also utilised different strategies for assessments and put in place a number of different strategies to engage students. These include:

  • Designating the first two to three months of 2021 to be an adjustment period (a catch-up period) including the identification of students with one or two modules outstanding for the completion of their degrees with the focus to provide additional support to students who were left behind in 2020. 
  • Students received tuition and assistance and were also allowed the opportunity to resubmit assignments where applicable as well as sit for deferred activities or reassessments.
  • Students who had not been in regular contact with lecturers were contacted through telephone calls, emails, and SMS. 
  • Student leaders in some institutions also assisted to contact students who had been out of regular contact with universities. 
  • Students who had struggled to engage with their studies during lockdown were able to return to campus when it was possible to return. 
  • Some institutions scheduled supplementary examinations for February - March 2021. 
  • Some institutions provided additional assessment opportunities for students who could not complete their assessments. 
  • Extensions for the submission of continuous assessment tasks for students who were delayed by the late arrival of laptops.

b) During the 2020 academic year, the Department monitored teaching and learning at universities through a monitoring report, which will be redesigned for the 2021 academic year. This will allow the Department to report at a high level on some of the indicators, including access to data and devices. 

Three main types of programmes are offered at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges, i.e. NATED Report 191 Engineering Studies which are offered in Trimesters, NATED Report 191 Business and Services Studies which are offered in Semesters, and the National Certificate (Vocational) [NCV] which are offered as year programmes. In 2020, the Department took a decision to reduce the number of Trimesters offered from 3 to 2 and Semesters from 2 to 1 in order to cater for the loss of teaching and learning time during the COVID-19 pandemic lockdown periods. The academic calendar for the NCV was extended.

For Report 191 programmes, those students who would not have managed to write their examinations in any of the trimesters and semester in 2020 would be accommodated in the normal academic trimesters and/or semesters in 2021. The NCV students who could not write their examinations in 2020 will have an opportunity to write their examinations during the supplementary period which runs from 08 March 2021 to 01 April 2021.

23 March 2021 - NW522

Profile picture: De Villiers, Mr MJ

De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a) Yes, there were staff members performing remunerative overtime duty during the past five financial years.

(1)(b) Information pertaining to staff members who have been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to 28 February 2021is depicted in the attached Annexure A.

(2)(a) Remunerative overtime duty is permitted when prior approval is obtained on the pro forma “Request for approval to work remunerated overtime duty”; work performed is in excess of normal working hours; in circumstances where an abnormal high workload cannot be managed by other more cost-effective arrangements; or when an employee must perform the duties over and above his/her normal duties as a result of another employee who is on prolonged sick leave or maternity leave. Members of the Senior Management Service are not entitled to compensation for overtime duty. Employees may only perform remunerative overtime duty from date of approval by the delegated authority. The monthly compensation for authorised overtime duty may not exceed 30% of the employee’s monthly basic salary.

(2)(b) The authority to approve remunerative overtime duty has been delegated to the Chief Director: Human Capital Management.

(2)(c) None.

(2)(d) Not applicable.

National Assembly Written Reply: 522 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

23 March 2021 - NW672

Profile picture: Marais, Mr EJ

Marais, Mr EJ to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation

Whether (a) his department and/or (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND INNOVATION

Whether (a) his department makes use of private security firm

Whether (b) any entity reporting to him makes use of private security firm

If not, what is the position in this regard

If so, in each case, what is the:

     

(i)

name of each firm

(ii)

purpose

(iii)

value

(iv)

duration of each specified contract?

The Department of Science and Innovation (DSI) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

N/A

G4s Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

To provide 24 hour guarding security services.

The costs payable increase annually as per the Sectorial Determination. Total amounts paid from date of contract to September 2021 will be as follows: R1,344 million in 2018/19, R1,451 million in 2019/20 and R1,569 million in 2020/21.

Apr 2018 – Dec 2022

N/A

The Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

G4S Security Solutions (Pty) Ltd.

Provide security services to all CSIR sites to protect people, knowledge, assets and property in cost effective and sustainable manner.

R67,2 million (excluding Value Added Tax).

Five years.

N/A

The Technology Innovation Agency (TIA) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

ELDNA Security Services.

Security services.

R3,134 million.

Three years.

N/A

The South African National Space Agency (SANSA) makes use of private security firms at two of its sites.

N/A

Site 1: Securi-Team.

Provide 24 hours guarding and monitoring services

R1,857 million.

Five years.

     

Site 2: Eulesaki

Provide security for the site, being a National Key Point.

R104 000 per month

Two years.

N/A

The National Research Foundation (NRF) makes use of private security firms at seven of its Business Units.

N/A

NRF Pretoria Head Office: Phuthadichaba Trading Enterprise.

Security and guarding Services at the NRF Pretoria Campus.

R3,159 million.

Five years.

     

South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity (SAIAB) Business Unit: Hi-Tec Security.

After hours alarm monitoring of buildings.

R45 312.

Three years.

     

South African Agency for Science and Technology Advancement (SAASTA) and South African Environment Observation Network (SAEON) Business Units: Red Alert.

Guarding Services at two separate sites.

R6,349 million.

Three years.

     

SAEON Business Unit: Palsecurity Services (Pty) Ltd and Top Security Systems (Pty) Ltd.

Alarm system monitoring.

R15 057.

Two years and six months.

       

Office security services in Kimberley.

R5 916.

One year.

     

South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO) Business Unit: Virtual Security.

Protection of grounds, access control, perimeter guarding and off-site monitoring.

R820 335.

Three years.

     

South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO) Business Unit: Khulaluntu Security Hlokomela and Transport 2006

Guarding of premises.

R442 801.

One year.

N/A

The Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC) makes use of private security firm.

N/A

Khensani Security Services.

24-hour security services at the HSRC Pietermaritzburg and Cape Town Offices.

R3,869 million.

Three years.

N/A

The Academy of Science of South Africa (ASSAf) does not make use of private security firm.

ASSAf’s Office is located in Persequor Park, Pretoria. Security is provided by Eris, the property

managers.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

DEPARTMENT OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING

(a)

Departm ent

(a) Whether your Department makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) Name of firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii)Value

(iv) Duration

 

Yes

Static Protection

Services (National

Skills Fund - NSF)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R464 000.00

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

 

Yes

Ebukhosini TP Security (INDLELA)

To render a 24/7 security guarding services, which includes access control, monitoring and patrol services

R253 863, 72

4 months – 01

January 2021-

30 April 2021

(b)

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

CHIETA

No. Security is provided by the landlord.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

MICT SETA

No. Security services is

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

included in the lease agreement with the landlord.

       

CHE

Yes

Titanium Security Services

Provision of security services: Guarding and armed response, with one security personnel during the day and one at night, the service is for 24 hours and 7 days a week.

R 1 055 092.44

1 April 2019 to 31

March 2022

FOODBEV

Yes

Selkirk Security Services Ltd

Access control services, such as:

  • Preventing

unauthorized entries

to the office premises.

  • Monitoring and

recording all activity around a protected facility 24 hours a day.

R 347 912.35 (annualised value)

R 317 552.35

(to date: 28

February 2021)

1 April 2020 to 31

March 2021

SAQA

Yes

  1. Dikgaetsedi Security Services

(Pty) Ltd

  1. Letiqa Twins

Trading (Pty) Ltd

To protect SAQA’s building, movable assets, employees and clients.

The risk is linked to the insurance premium.

R 4 066 214.04

R 5 055 553.26

1 March 2018- 28 February 2021

1 March 2021 – 29 February 2024

INSETA

Yes

Gilija Tactical

To provide security services to INSETA that

R 358 800.00

01 April 2020 to

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Response

includes:

  • Guarding INSETA premises and assets.
  • Patrol services
  • Screening staff and visitors for Covid-19
  • Doing other security screening to visitors
 

31 March 2021

   

National security

To provide armed response and CCTV

services

R 367 768.91

July 2020 to June 2025

PSETA

No

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

EWSETA

Yes

Imvula Quality

Protection Services

Safeguarding Cape

House building in

Marshalltown

Johannesburg which is currently vacant

R 946 129.09

01 August 2020 to

31 August 2021

FASSET

Yes

ADT

Alarm system with response to the office building.

R 37 900.04

12 months

CATHSSETA

Yes

Jubzin Security Services

Provision of security services at its Head

Office in Killarney

(Johannesburg) and two

(2) regional offices in the Kwa-Zulu Natal and

Western Cape

R 848 240.00

8 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

provinces

   

Services

SETA

Yes

Good Work Security (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm and electrical fence at Services SETA Head Office.

R 2 916 000.00 per annum

 
   

Exodec 365 cc

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA North West (Klerksdorp) provincial office

R 342 240.00 per annum

 
   

Rise Security

Services (Pty) Ltd

Bohlale Risk

Protection

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA

Mpumalanga

(Nelspruit) provincial office

R 340 313.82 per annum

 
     

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm

R 338 934.86 per annual

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

at Services SETA free state (Bloemfontein) provincial office

   
   

Red Alert TSS (Pty) Ltd

To provide physical security, armed response, maintenance, and repairs of the alarm at Services SETA (Western Cape) provincial office.

R 308 221.90 per annum

 
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (Port Elizabeth) provincial office

R 291 000.00 per annum

 
   

Fuyatha General Trading

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and repairs of the alarm at

Services SETA KZN (Durban) provincial office.

R 326 530.56 per annum

 
   

TJ Protection Services

To provide physical armed response, maintenance, and

R 288 475.00 per annum

 

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Northern Cape office (Kimberly) provincial Office.

   
   

Nguwo Security Services

To provide physical security, armed response and maintenance and

repairs of the alarm at Services SETA Eastern Cape (East London) provincial office.

R 291 000.00 per annum

 

FP&M SETA

Yes

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7042)

  • Office Security - Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature

R 289 104.05

6 months

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

     

monitoring

 Administration

   
   

Masutha Training and

Security Services

(PO/2020/7372)

  • Office Security Covid-19

Management

  • Covid-19

Management of IE

  • Safety of Employees
  • Managing

Attendance of Staff and visitors

  • Record keeping of who enters our offices, staff and visitors
  • Sanitizing everyone
  • Temperature monitoring
  • Administration

R 278 754,05

6 months

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

(PO/2020/6950)

Arlam System and Arm

Respond Services -

Durban Office

R 13 456.56

24 Moths

   

Cortac (Pty) Ltd

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services – Head office

R 10 532.88

Month to Month

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

National Security and Fire

Alarm System and Arm

Respond Services –

Cape Town office

R 11 711.88

Month to Month

SASSETA

Yes

Sinqobile Equestrian Security Services

Provision of security services

R 2 319 669.27

13 August 2018 -

31 October 2020

   

Mphosha Security Services

Provision of security services including CCTV monitoring and armed response

R 5 724 590.47

28 October 2021 -

31 March 2023

AgriSETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

To render Security Services at AgriSETA premises

R 1 196 436.57

1 April 2020 –

31 March 2023

HWSETA

Yes

ADT

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 2 298.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

Adams Analytical

Detection and security

Security and monitoring - Nelspruit

R 4 073.91

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 1 476.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

National Security

Security and monitoring - Mafikeng

R 4 740.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Bloemfontein

R 2 637.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

National security

Security and monitoring -Bloemfontein

R 5 320.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring – East London

R 1 045.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

   

Hartwig and Henderson

Security and monitoring - East London

R 3 805.00

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Kimberley

R 2 259.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

   

Top Security

Security and monitoring - Kimberly

R 3 428.67

01 August 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 1 546.00

01 April 2020 –

31 May 2020

   

Mzansi Fire and Security

Security and monitoring - Durban

R 3 059.94

01 June 2020 –

31 March 2021

   

Axon Security

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 2 414.00

01 April 2020 –

31 July 2020

   

ADT

Security and monitoring - Midrand

R 3 778.00

01 October 2020

– 31 March 2021

   

Chubb Security

Security and monitoring - Polokwane

R 2 108.00

01 April 2020 –

31 June 2020

W&RSETA

(Head

Office)

No. 24 Hour security is provided by the landlord for the Office Park.

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(Eastern

Cape)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Red Alert

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 582.52 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Hartwig & Henderson Alarms (provided by the Landlord through

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 2 127.50 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Free State)

 

the lease agreement)

     
 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Imvula Security

Bloemsec

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Guarding, Monitoring and Armed Response

R 1 011.15 monthly for Guarding

R 309.01 monthly for armed response

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Nkanga Security,

Cleaning & Training

Provision of guarding services. This includes armed guarding

R 449 779.00 per annum

O1 February 2021

- 28 February

2022

(Kwa-Zulu

Natal)

(Gauteng

North – Pretoria)

(Limpopo)

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 850 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

2. Yes, in the new premises

Fidelity ADT

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 6 607.90 Monthly

12 Months ending 30 September 2021.

 

1. Yes, for the old premises. The lease agreement expired on 30 September

2020

Ubuntu Security Services

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 526.00 Monthly

The contract ended on 30 September 2020

 

Yes

National Security

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 340.00 Monthly

On a month-tomonth contract until moving to new premises which is planned for June 2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

(Western

Cape)

Yes, at the new premises.

Mastiff Security Services

(provided by the Landlord through the lease agreement)

Monitoring and Armed Response

R 3 140.00 monthly

01 October 2020 - 30 September

2025

LGSETA

Yes

  1. Broubart Alarms
  1. National Security and Fire

For alarm system

R 3 372 annually

R5 622 annually

3 years

ETDP SETA

Yes

Hlanganani Ezweni Trading and Projects, registration number: 2009/206402/2

General security services at North West

Provincial Office

R 322 179.12

1 August 2018 to

31 December

2020

   

Vuyani and Socks Security Reg no.

2006/162205/23

General security services at North West Provincial Office

R 96 000.00

1 January 2021

- 30 June 2021

   

National Security and Fire Reg no.

1950/036293/07

Armed response

security services at the

Limpopo Provincial

Office

R 11 508.96

Month to month until 30 June 2021 while the organisation is finalising process of appointing a new service provider

MQA

Yes. Our offices make use of a private security company, however the security contract is managed and paid by the

Anerley Road Body Corporate

Security company

Guarding of premises

R 540 192.00 for 2020/21. This is the

MQA portion of

1 year on an annual renewal basis

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

 

Body Corporate. We then pay

our portion via our monthly

management fee

name: 24/7

 

the annual expense

 

QCTO

Yes

i. Bidvest Protea

Coin ii. PABC Security

Solution

  1. For the Alarm system
  1. One (1) physical

security at the entrance of the building

  1. R 852 per month
  1. R 12 800 per month
  1. Month by month
  1. 5 years,

(linked to the contract duration of the lease)

TETA

Yes

Eldna Security Services CC

Provision of Security to TETA Randburg offices

R 1 409 160.00

01 April 2019 –

31 March 2021

CETA

Yes

Bredasdorp Armed Response

Provision of Security

Services including

Armed response for

Bredasdorp office

R 334 926.15

23 September 2020 -

23 September

2021

   

CKN Security Services CC

Provision of Security

Services for CETA Head

Office

R 373 328.09

R 50 830.00

30 October 2020 -

28 February 2021

25 February 2020

- 15 March 2021

   

HM Security and Armed Response

Provision of Security Services including armed response for Bethal (CETA -Gert

Sibande Skills

Development Centre)

R 475 629.00

5 November 2020

- 5 December

2021

Entity

(b) Whether your entity makes use of private security firms in the 2020/21 financial year, if not, what is the position in this regard?

(i) What is the name of each firm?

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specific contract?

NSF

Yes

  1. Cannabe Security and Projects
  1. Static Protection

Services (Pty)

Ltd

Physical Security

R3 196 800.00

R 464 400.00

1 June 2017 - 31 May 2020

The contract was extended from

1 June 2020 to

31 December 2020 at an amount R799 200.00

01 January 2021

– 30 April 2021

BANKSETA

 

Yes

Fidelity ADT Security (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm

system for East London office

R 17 604.50

 
   

4B Protection

Services (Pty) Ltd

Monitoring and response of alarm system for Head Office -

Vorna Velley

R 154 985.78

 

23 March 2021 - NW564

Profile picture: Sharif, Ms NK

Sharif, Ms NK to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether her department funds any (a) programmes and (b) non-governmental organisations that offer services to the Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex community; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what (i) services are rendered and (ii) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

a) The Department of Social Development provide funding to various programmes targeting all vulnerable group in society in terms the legislation and policy prescripts. (b) The criteria that is utilised for funding non-governmental organisations is designed to ensure that funded organisations (i) render services to the benefit of all vulnerable groups. There is no specific sets of rules that are for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer and Intersex community. But the emphasis is on ensuring that services rendered are equitable, accessible, and transformative and promote social cohesion in the broader community. (ii) For example in relation to LGBTQI+ Community, the DSD provide ongoing sensitization training to frontline staff both the DSD and from non-governmental organisations as part of promoting non-discriminatory practices as well as mainstreaming of service delivery to respond to the needs of all vulnerable group.

National Assembly Written Reply: 564 of 2021

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

21 March 2021 - NW399

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Social Development

In light of the fact that many SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) grant recipients are still experiencing numerous problems with unauthorised deductions from their grants, and in view of the fact that when the gold SASSA cards were introduced grant recipients were told that the cards are totally safe and cannot be duplicated, what (a) measures does the department intend to put in place to resolve the ongoing problem of illegal deductions from grant recipients, (b) total number of SASSA officials have been prosecuted for their involvement in fraud over the past 12 months and (c) total amount has SASSA lost due to fraud during the past 12 months?

Reply:

a) The introduction of the SASSA/SAPO card has addressed the issue of unauthorised deductions. Unauthorised stop orders or debit orders are not allowed off the SASSA/SAPO card account. The only deductions which are allowed off social grants are premiums for funeral policies, in accordance with Regulation 26A to the Social Assistance Act.

These deductions are managed by SASSA, before the social grant is paid, and are only effected with the consent of the beneficiary. The system is secure, and it is very unlikely that any unauthorised or illegal deductions are occurring; however, should this be the case, details can be forwarded to SASSA for further investigation.

In instances where social grant beneficiaries elected to receive the social grant into their personal bank accounts, they are able to authorise deductions and stop orders; and cancel these if needed, with their bank.

It is possible that abuse of deductions may occur in this commercial banking space. However, SASSA does not have any control over accounts held with commercial banks. Should a beneficiary have challenges with their bank, they can choose to have their grant paid via the SASSA/ SAPO payment system, which does not allow for deductions.

b) To date, 17 SASSA staff have been prosecuted for their involvement in fraud over the past 12 months.

c) The total amount that is attributed to fraud during the last 12 months from February 2020 to January 2021 is reported to be R17,279,523.95.

This amount mainly consists of money lost through SASSA cards that were fraudulently re-issued within the South African Post Office environment. This loss is covered SAPO which is responsible for the reimbursement of social grant beneficiaries who have been negatively affected by these fraudulent transactions.

19 March 2021 - NW751

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

With regard to the Construction Health and Safety Examinations offered by the SA Council for the Project and Construction Management Professions, (a) what total number of persons are (i) waiting to write the examinations and (ii) in the process of registering for the examinations, (b) what are the reasons for the delay in the examinations, (c) what steps have been taken to address the delay, (d) how often are the examinations offered and (e) on what date will the next examination take place?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(a)(i) I have been informed by the Department that the total number of the persons waiting to write the examinations is 1138.

(ii) The total number of persons in the process of registering for examinations is 2243.

(b) The examinations were delayed by the advent of the Covid-19 pandemic and the resultant lockdowns which had restrictions on gatherings.

(c) The Council adopted the principle of first in first out (FIFO) to address the backlog of those who need to sit for examinations. In addition, the Council is currently developing an online examination portal which will be operational in the new financial year.

(d) Notwithstanding the Covid-19 challenges, under normal circumstances the examinations are conducted monthly.

(e) The next examinations will be conducted from 24 March 2021.

19 March 2021 - NW801

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether the areas that are both supplied in bulk and billed by Eskom for energy provision are entitled to and receive a subsidy for the installation of prepaid meters as per relevant government programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW958E

Reply:

The only subsidy available from government is the electrification subsidy which is targeted at the electrification of indigent households. The subsidy covers the connection to the grid including the ready board and associated metering as per the technical designs of Eskom.

19 March 2021 - NW737

Profile picture: Bryant, Mr D W

Bryant, Mr D W to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

Whether, in light of the fact that the dumping of used tyres appears to have increased across the Republic over the past few years with a significant negative impact on the environment, particularly in parts of Durban as well as in stormwater drains in Cape Town and elsewhere, her department has undertaken any research into the correlation between the tyre levy which was instituted in 2017 and dumping of tyres that could otherwise be reused; if not, (a) why not and (b) what systems are currently in place to address the recycling of used tyres; if so, what are the relevant details;

Reply:

 

  1. No research has been undertaken into the correlation between the Tyre levy and the dumping of tyres.
    1. There has not been evidence to suggest that an in-depth study on correlation of the tyre levy and waste tyre dumping can assist with managing waste tyre environmental pollution. However, some of the funds collected from the tyre levy by the South African Revenue Service (SARS) are made available to the Waste Management Bureau through the Department of Environment, Forestry, and Fisheries for the management of waste tyres.
    2. The Waste Management Bureau supplies waste tyres to processors to facilitate the reuse, recycling and energy recovery.

The Department has appointed the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) in terms of Section 29 of the National Environment Management: Waste Act, No. 59 of 2008 to prepare an Industry Waste Management Plan (IndWMP) for tyres. The IndWMP’s intention seeks to address the current challenges that are being experienced with regard to collection, storage and processing.

One of the key objectives of the IndWMP aims to support the establishment of a viable waste tyre processing sector in South Africa which will reduce the negative environmental impacts of waste tyres. The specified actions that would be undertaken as part of the implementation of the IndWMP is to ensure that the following objectives are achieved:

      1. providing surety of supply contracts to processors to support investment in the sector;
      2. supporting investment in pollution abatement technologies and equipment through

incentives on a cost sharing basis;

      1. creating pre-processing capacity at depots;
      2. free delivery of feedstock to processors including the cement and brick-making facilities;
      3. payment of a subsidy in the form of a processing fee to all waste tyre processors, including the cement and brick-making facilities and
      4. development of markets including but not limited to:
        1. Road-building;
        2. Applications in public open spaces; and
        3. Tyre-derived fuels.

At present, the tyre levy goes into the fiscus and the Waste Management Bureau gets an allocation through the Department of Environment, Forestry and Fisheries from National Treasury. The Waste Management Bureau uses the budget that has been allocated to collect waste tyres and promote recycling.

Storage facilities in a number of areas are full. As a temporary measure while awaiting the finalisation of the Section 29 lndWMP, the department is focusing on the following for 2021/22:

  1. To expand storage on a short-term basis through engagement with cement manufacturers, provinces and municipalities.
  1. To increase the number of processing plants that want to use waste tyres for fuel or recycling purposes.

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW726

Profile picture: Lorimer, Mr JR

Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether, as part of the mechanisms to combat corruption and state capture and thereby increasing the attractiveness of the mining industry of the Republic to investors, he intends to apply for the Republic to be an implementing country of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW847E

Reply:

No.

South Africa has not taken a decision to be part of the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative.

19 March 2021 - NW713

Profile picture: Phillips, Ms C

Phillips, Ms C to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

(a) What is the size of the administration building at the isimangaliso Wetland Park, including all outbuildings, garages and/or carports, (b) what is the total budgeted cost of the building and (c) what number of staff members will be accommodated in this building on a daily basis?

Reply:

(a). ISimangaliso has been using prefabricated containers as administration offices since 2004. In 2019/20, approval to build an administration block was granted and funds were allocated. Construction started on 09 January 2020 and is anticipated to be completed in August 2021.

(b). The size of the building constitutes 840 square meters of the ground floor, 600 square meters of the second floor, 120 square meters of the archives room and 75 square meters of the ablution block. There is no parking or garages at the building and parking will be in the existing carports, outside the building.

The total budgeted cost of the building is R35 000 000.

©. The building will accommodate 46 staff members of isimangaliso Wetland Park Authority.

MS B D CREECY, MP
MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE
: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW722

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

1.What criteria and process was followed to appoint a certain person (name and details furnished); 2. whether she has found that the correct procedures were followed in order to fill the vacancy; if not, why not; if so, 3.whether the position was advertised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) actual advertisement of the position, (b) list of names of the applicants attending the interviews and (c) minutes of when the process was completed?

Reply:

 

  1. A recruitment and interview process was followed in accordance with the recruitment policy of the South African National Parks (SANParks).
  2. The Minister has written to the SANParks Chairperson to ascertain whether the recruitment process followed was in line with the SANParks recruitment policy.
  3. a) The position was advertised nationally, with a closing date of 18 February 2014
    b)There were four applicants who attended interviews: Mr J. De Ru, Ms S. Bokwe, Ms. M. Bokaba and Ms. V.N. Malematsa.
    c) The formal process was duly approved on 3 July 2014, with the panel indicating that the candidate (name furnished) had received the best scores during the interview process and displayed the sufficient, knowledge, experience and competency for the position

Regards

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FOSTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT

DATE:: 18/03/2021

19 March 2021 - NW745

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether, in light of the fact that in the 2019-20 financial year a total amount of R10,6-million meant for bus transportation was allocated to the Parliamentary Villages Management Board, and in view of the fact that Parliament operated on a hybrid system as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, any of the money was re-appropriated to cover the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) was the exact amount re-appropriated to the COVID-19 fund and (b) exactly has the re-appropriated money been used for?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. I have been informed by the Department that none of the funds appropriated to the Parliamentary Villages Management Board meant for transport for the 2019-2020 financial year were re-appropriated to cover the COVID-19 pandemic. The transport service was and is still provided to Members of Parliament as and when required and any money not used, remain in the account of the Parliamentary Villages Management Board.

a) Not applicable.

b) Not applicable.

19 March 2021 - NW724

Profile picture: Weber, Ms AMM

Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Forestry, Fisheries and the Environment

What criteria and process was followed to appoint a certain person (name and details furnished);whether she has found that the correct procedures were followed in order to fill the vacancy; if not, why not; if so, whether the position was advertised; if not, why not; if so, will she furnish Ms A M M Weber with the (a) actual advertisement of the position, (b) list of names of the applicants attending the interviews and (c) minutes of when the process was completed?

Reply:

  1. An interview process was followed in accordance with the Recruitment Policy of the South African National Parks (SANParks).
  2. I have written to the SANParks Chairperson to ascertain whether the recruitment process followed was in line with the SANParks recruitment policy.
  3. a) The position was advertised nationally, with a closing date of 2 June 2015.
    b) There were five aplicants who attended interviews: Ms B. Mabandla, Ms. T. Kunene, Mr D. Erasmus, Ms. H. Sello and Mr B. Mhlongo
  4. The formal process was duly approved on 6 October 2015, with the panel indicating that the candidate (name furnished) had received the best scores during the interview process and displayed the sufficient, knowledge, experience and competency for the position

MS B D CREECY, MP

MINISTER OF FORESTRY, FISHERIES AND THE ENVIRONMENT
DATE: 18/03/2021