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28 December 2020 - NW2547

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether her department awarded any tenders to any non-South African companies (a) in the past three financial years and (b) since 1 April 2020; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each business to whom the tender was awarded, (b) is the name of the country where each company is based, (c) is the amount of each tender that was awarded to each specified company and (d) was the service and/or product that was supplied by each business?

Reply:

I was advised by the department as follows:

1. (a) No, there were no tenders awarded in the past three financial years.

(b) No. No tenders were awarded to any non-South African companies since 1

April 2020.

(c) Not applicable.

(d) Not applicable.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2229

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

With reference to investigations conducted into governance and corruption in her department and all the entities reporting to her, what is the (a) total number of investigations that were referred to the (i) SA Police Service and (ii) National Prosecuting Authority, (b) date on which each specified case was handed over, (c)(i) status of each specified investigation and (ii) docket number for each investigation and (d) total number of cases that are being prosecuted?

Reply:

I have been informed by the Department and Entities as follows:

DEPARTMENT

(a)(i) Nil

(a)(ii) Nil

ENTITIES:

NEMISA, Broadband Infraco, Film and Publication Board, ICASA, Post Bank, ZADNA,

(a)(i) Nil

(a)(ii) Nil

South African Post Office (SAPO)

(a)(i) One incident of alleged corruption in relation to IT Software procurement was referred to South African Police Service

(a)(ii) No incident was reported to National Prosecuting Authority

(b) SA Police Service: 05 July 2017

(c)(i) The case is still under SA Police Service investigation.

(c)(ii) SA Police Service: Lyttleton CAS 200/07/2017

(d) There are no prosecutions as yet. The case is still being investigated by the SA Police Service.

South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC)

(a)(i) one (1) case was referred to the SA Police Service

(a)(ii) No incident was reported to National Prosecuting Authority

(b) Brixton SAPS Case 341/11/2019, the case was transferred to the Camps Bay SAPS jurisdiction where the crime was committed on 12/12/2019, Case 69/11/2019

(c)(i) The case is still under investigation.

(c)(ii) Case 69/11/2019

(d) One (1) Case

SENTECH

There is one case referred to the SAPS in April 2020, the case is still ongoing and the Station is Honeydew. The case number is CAS 456/04/2020, the matter to be referred to the National Prosecuting Authority by SAPS for decision.

State Information Technology Agency SOC (Ltd) (SITA)

(a)(i) 2017/2018: eight (8) case investigations were referred to the SAPS

2018/2019: one (1) case investigation was referred to the SAPS

2019/2020: one (1) case investigation was referred to the SAPS

2020/2021: one (1) case in progress

A total of ten (10) cases were reported to SAPS

(a)(ii) No case was referred to the National Prosecuting Authority.

(b) Date upon which case handed over

(c)(i) status of each specified investigation

(ii) docket number for each investigation

(d) total number of cases that are being prosecuted

August 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 408/8/2017

No cases are currently being prosecuted

September 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 318/9/2017

 

August 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 359/8/2017

 

June 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 22/6/2017

 

October 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 258/10/2017

 

May 2017

Under Investigation

Brooklyn Cas 146/5/2017

 

September 2017

Unable to contact Investigation Officer to be determined

Pietermaritzburg Cas 748/9/2017

 

October 2017

Unable to contact Investigation Officer to be determined

Brooklyn Cas 232/10/2017

 

May 2017

Under Investigation

Sunnyside Cas 334/5/2018

 

December 2017

Under Investigation

DPCI H/O Enquiry no. 1/12/2019

 

Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA)_

1. (a) Total number of total number of investigations that were referred to the:

(i) SA Police Services

(ii) National Prosecuting Authority

Date of which each specified case was handed over

Status of each specified investigation

Docket number of each investigation

Total number of cases that are being prosecuted

USAASA is not aware of any being reported to the SAPS.

One (1)

The proclamation was dated March 2014

SIU report was dated 16 April 2018

USAASA does not have this information

USAASA is not aware of any.

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2871

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of housing megaprojects does the Department of Human Settlements have in partnership with black-owned property developers and (b)(i) is the total value of each specified housing project and (ii) in which provinces are the housing projects located?

Reply:

Honourable Member, please note that the National Department of Human Settlements does not contract developers. The appointment of contractors are done by provinces, municipalities and entities reporting to the Department. The National Department of Human Settlements is in the process of collating this data and it will be verified before publication.

The Honourable Member will be well aware that as part of transforming the construction sector, the Department of human Settlements through the Human Settlements Development Grant (HSDG) and Urban Settlement Development Grants (USDG) has set aside 30% of the projects to be allocated to women-owned business entities and 10% to youth-owned businesses, which is being implemented by all Provinces and Metros.

We are proud to mention that the Limpopo Province and Ekurhuleni Municipality have already achieved their 30% target in this financial year. This means that they are likely to achieve the Presidential directive of 40% this year. 

I have requested my Department to work with Treasury on ring-fencing these targets to allow us to monitor our performance better.  Our entities have also aligned their procurement targets with sector charters. These targets are reflected in the annual plans and annual reports of the entities. 

24 December 2020 - NW741

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)What total number of (a) international and (b) domestic hotel bookings did her department make for (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister since they were appointed as members of the Executive; (2) what was the (a) date, (b) name of the hotel and (c) cost in respect of each booking?

Reply:

1. (a) Total number of international hotel bookings for the:

(i) Minister: 29

(ii) Deputy Minister: 11

(b) Total number of domestic hotel bookings for the:

(i) Minister: 241

(ii) Deputy Minister: 47

2. (a) Refer to the attached document.

(b) Refer to the attached document.

(c) Refer to the attached document.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

     

24 December 2020 - NW2601

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Van Damme, Ms PT to ask the Minister of Communications

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entities reporting to her sponsored any non-governmental organisations in the past two financial years; if not, what is the position in this regards; if so, for each specified organisation, what (i) was the monetary value of each sponsorship and (ii) were the reasons behind the awarding of the specified sponsorship?

Reply:

I was advised by the Department and Entities as follows:

1. (a)   No, the department did not sponsor any non-governmental organisation in the past two financial years.

    1. Nil
    2. Not Applicable

(b) Entities:

The Postbank, South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC), Broadband Infraco (BBI), Universal Service and Access Agency of South Africa (USAASA), State Information Technology Agency (SITA), Independent Communications Authority of South Africa (ICASA), Nemisa and South African Post Office (SAPO) did not sponsor any non-governmental organisation in the past two financial years.

Entity

Name of NGO

(i)Monetary Value

(ii)Reasons behind awarding

Film and Publication Board (FPB)

WebRangers Cyber Safety Project

2018/19:

R 346 166

 

The project is aligned with the Film and Publication Board’s mandate to protect the public, and especially children, from exposure to harmful content. The WebRangers project aims to create a cadre of cyber safety leaders and ambassadors amongst the youth of South Africa that are empowered on safe usage of the digital space. These youth leaders are equipped and developed during the year-long programme to bring the message of cyber security and cyber safety into their communities through peer-to-peer education. The project runs in 4 Provinces (Gauteng; Western Cape; North West and Limpopo).

 

2019/20

R 395 000

 

zaDNA

iWeek

2018/19 and

2019/20

R 49 205.87

To enable ZADNA to market its services to the core internet audience (stakeholders) in South Africa.

Sentech

2018/19

Itlotleng Early Learning Centre and

Sithandiwe Disabled Care Centre

Kutlwanong Centre for Maths, Science and Technology

2019/20

1. Makana Rape Survivors Support Group

2. Cuddles and Care ECD Centre)

R 235 000

R 3 000 000

R 470 000

Charity Golf Day (Funds were raised externally and divided between the two beneficiaries).

Maths and Science Centre - CSI Project

Charity Golf Day (Funds were raised externally and divided between two beneficiaries each awarded R 235 000).

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

24 December 2020 - NW2157

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether there have been any delays with payments of the Covid-19 Relieve Fund Voucher; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the progress made to date in payments, (b) is the total number of small-scale farmers who had their vouchers redeemed, (c) is the total amount paid since the end of July 2020, (d) are the reasons for any delays in payments, (e) plans does her department have to address the delays including timelines for each action and (f) steps has her department taken to support the current production input costs requirement while recipients wait?

Reply:

Yes.

a) R519 926 531 paid to date.

b) The Department is unable to determine the number of farmers who redeemed their vouchers as one farmer might have several vouchers but not redeem them all at once.

c) R482 930 327 paid as at end of July 2020.

d) Delays are mainly attributable to the process of reconciliation of each voucher and validating that the right person has redeemed the voucher.

e) Capacity for performing verification and reconciliation of invoices and supplier statements has been enhanced within the Department. Daily reconciliation is done with all invoices submitted.

f) The Department has extended the voucher validity period from 30 September 2020 to 31 December 2020 in order to afford suppliers an opportunity to replenish their stock levels as well as to afford farmers enough time to redeem their vouchers.

24 December 2020 - NW2520

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Matiase, Mr NS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Rural Development and Land Reform

Whether, since she had announced her department’s plan to release state-owned farms to aspirant farmers, her department conducted an audit of all the specified farms to ascertain the details of the (a) current occupiers, (b) rights of holders and informal rights holders and (c)(i) value and (ii) current use of any infrastructure on farms; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) Whether her department has made any projections regarding support to aspirant farmers; if not, why not; if so, will the support be quantified?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department conducted the assessment of the land in question to determine the state of occupation, immediately identifiable encumbrances and suitability for cultivation or grazing. It is through this work that about 300 000 hectares were identified for restitution, leaving about 700 000 hectares for release. This study further revealed that some pieces of land had occupiers, but the circumstances under which they had obtained possession of the land were not immediately ascertainable hence an enquiry would be necessary to establish, amongst other things, how they accessed the said land

(a),(b),(c)(i),(ii) Falls away.

2. Yes. Assessments and verification of the farms has been conducted by a team of engineers and other crop and livestock specialists. The aim is to assess the farms’ conditions in terms of infrastructure and input requirements. The analysis will be used to provide support in the form of start-up packages in accordance with available resources and in terms of each property’s needs. Support will be guided by the norms and standards for specified infrastructure on these farms. Training for successful beneficiaries is being prioritized and this will involve a skills audit which will be conducted, followed by relevant training. The Comprehensive Agricultural Support Programme (CASP) is geared to support the settled beneficiaries. There are 2 450 Extension Practitioners available in all Districts to support the settled beneficiaries with technological transfer of the latest agricultural production practices.

24 December 2020 - NW2521

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that on 11 April 2019, less than a month before the 2019 national elections, the President of the Republic of South Africa, Mr M C Ramaphosa, allegedly promised the people of Alexandra in Gauteng one million houses, (a) by what date does she envisage the building project of the one million houses will be completed, (b) is there enough land to accommodate the specified houses and (c) what total amount has she budgeted for the specified project?

Reply:

Honourable Member, the President of the Republic promised the residents of Alexandra proper and decent houses. My department, together with the Housing Development Agency are working with the Department of Human Settlements in Gauteng to realise this within available resources. More than 594 hectares of land has been identified and assembled for human settlements development within the Greater Alexandra Priority Human Settlements Housing Development Area. A preliminary allocation of R56 000 000 has been made for the planning process and the first units.

24 December 2020 - NW2941

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Communications

What was the total number of branches of the SA Post Office in each year from 2015 to 2020 (a) nationally and (b) in each province?

Reply:

I have been advised by the South African Post Office (SAPO) as follows:

(a) and (b)

Provinces

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

CURRENT

(from April 2020)

Eastern Cape

354

342

326

323

319

311

Free State

158

153

140

140

139

136

Gauteng

364

354

350

343

328

309

KwaZulu-Natal

329

320

310

310

307

277

Limpopo

326

324

260

259

259

255

Mpumalanga

192

194

206

207

207

205

Northern Cape

142

134

130

130

130

130

North West

262

247

209

209

207

206

Western Cape

321

300

288

288

284

279

Total

2 448

2 368

2 209

2 209

2 180

2 108

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

23 December 2020 - NW3088

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Stubbe, Mr DJ to ask the Minister of Social Development

What total number of persons who fall under the category of (a) pensioners, (b) child-headed households, (c) child support grants and (d) COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant recipients in Johannesburg, Gauteng relied on social grants during the period 27 March 2020 until 27 October 2020?

Reply:

The table below shows the number of social grants paid in Johannesburg during the period March to October 2020 to;

a) Pensioners who receive the Old Age Grant or War Veterans Grant.

b) NB: SASSA does not have information on child headed households.

c) Child Support Grant

 

 

Number of Grants in Johannesburg in 2020

 

 

 

 

Grant type

March

April

May

June

July

August

September

October

     

Care Dependency Grant

6,890

6,870

6,978

6,966

6,940

6,927

6,914

6,941

     

Child Support Grant

580,369

579,904

577,837

580,131

581,204

582,846

584,342

586,613

     

Disability Grant

34,570

34,365

35,678

35,563

34,270

35,089

34,899

35,008

     

Foster Care Grant

8,488

8,461

8,582

8,841

8,998

9,250

9,341

9,451

     

Grant-In-Aid

2,043

2,026

2,014

2,005

1,964

1,954

1,944

1,940

     

Old Age Grant

190,373

189,733

191,317

192,864

192,002

192,374

193,144

193,884

     

War Veteran’s Grant

7

7

7

7

5

4

4

4

     

Total

822,740

821,366

822,413

826,377

825,383

828,444

830,588

833,841

     

Please note that information on all the other types social of grants paid during the period in question has also been included in the table.

d) The table below shows the number of COVID-19 Social Relief of Distress grant recipients in Johannesburg and Gauteng during the period May 2020 until October 2020. Please note that only 7% of the Covid SRD recipients provided information on the districts in which they reside. Thus the information on the entire Gauteng Covid SRD grant recipients has also been provided. Also note that no Covid SRD grant payments were made in March and April 2020.

Table: Covid SRD grant recipients in Gauteng from May to October 2020

2020

May

June

July

August

September

October

Gauteng

961157

1088058

1180741

1253453

1261494

1270938

Johannesburg

27337

32189

35821

39169

40120

41127

23 December 2020 - NW2786

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

In view of the fact that one of the conditions attached to the child support grant (CSG) is that the recipient must be enrolled in and attend school, (a) how are the current conditions of the CSG being (i) enforced and (ii) applied and (b) what recourse and/or intervention is taken when a CSG recipient is not enrolled in, nor attends school regularly?

Reply:

In terms of Regulation 6(5)(a) to the Social Assistance Act, a primary care giver applying for a child support grant for a child aged between 7 and 18 years, has the responsibility to ensure that the child is enrolled at and attends school.

Regulation 6(5)(d) requires the National Department of Social Development to notify the Department of Education, if it is aware that any child benefitting from a child support grant does not attend school, and the Department of Education has a responsibility to take steps to ensure that the child does attend school.

a) Currently, when an application is taken for a child support grant, the primary care giver is requested to provide proof that the child is enrolled at school. This is in the form of a report card or a letter from the school. If the applicant does not have the required letter, the application is still taken and processed but the letter of award, if the grant is approved, requires the care giver to submit the required proof within a period of 6 months.

b) There is no provision in the Social Assistance Act or Regulations to suspend payment of the grant if the confirmation of school attendance is not provided. This is considered a “soft” condition, as there are no consequences for failure to meet the requirement. There is therefore no enforcement of this particular provision.

National Assembly Written Reply: 2786 of 2020

________________________

Approved by the Minister of Social Development

Date……………………….

Possible follow up questions from the ANC:

Question

What is the current position regarding school attendance by children in South Africa?

Response

School attendance, particularly for children younger than 16 years of age is relatively high. Generally, where children are not attending school, it is because there is no school available within their vicinity. The challenge with school attendance is generally with children older than 16 years, where attendance is not compulsory.

Question

Is there any incentive for care givers to keep their children in education?

Response

The Department of Social Development, working together with SASSA, has signed an agreement with the Departments of Basic and Higher Education to identify all children who benefit from social grants, to ensure that they are the first priority for funding from NSFAS for their further education and training. This project has yielded very positive results, with some of our grant beneficiaries doing extremely well in both the matric examinations as well as in the higher education environment.

It is believed that this is the first step towards breaking the cycle of poverty – through education, children who benefitted from grants are able to compete on an equal footing with their more privileged peers.

Possible questions from the opposition

Why is the requirement in legislation if it is not enforced?

Reply

The inclusion of school attendance in the Social Assistance Act was to raise the profile of the importance of school attendance in ensuring that all care givers are aware of the importance of creating a solid foundation for children. The linking of child support grant beneficiaries to NSFAS funding is a further incentive for care givers to keep children in school, and then to get financial support for their further education and training.

Despite the obligations which are placed on the Department of Education, this cannot be managed through the Social Assistance Act, 2004.

23 December 2020 - NW68

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Bagraim, Mr M to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What (a) type of performance and/or incentive bonuses exist in her department excluding the 13th cheque and (b) amount was budgeted for these performance and/or incentive bonuses in the (i) 2017-18, (ii) 2018-19 and (iii) 2019-20 financial years?

Reply:

a) The Public Service Regulations (PSR), 2016, provides for the Head of Department to establish a financial incentive scheme for employees or any category of those employees.

The Department of Defence pays a Performance Bonus in terms of its Performance Management and Development System (PMDS). The Performance Bonus is a financial reward granted to eligible officials in recognition of performance that is significantly above expectations provided that the official completes a continuous period of at least twelve months in his/her salary level on 31 March of a specific year.

(b) The amounts budgeted are indicated in the table below:

FY2017/18

FY2018/19

FY 2019/20

     

Budget Vote

Expenditure

Budget Vote

Expenditure

Budget Vote

Expenditure

R355,996,901

R191,601,890

R277,289,665

R200,571,892

R289,517,939

R224,545,442

23 December 2020 - NW1981

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Social Development

With reference to Civil Society Organisations (CSOs) listed on the published grant beneficiary list of the National Lotteries Commission for the (a) 2017-18 and (b) 2018-19 financial years and (c) Covid-19 Relief Projects by the Minister of Trade, Industry and Competition, Mr E Patel, on 27 July 2020, (i) which of the listed CSOs had nonprofit organisation (NPO) and/or nonprofit company (NPC) registration numbers at the time of receiving the grant, (ii) on what dates did the CSOs receive their first NPO and/or NPC registration numbers and (iii) what is their current NPO and/or NPC registration status?

Reply:

The Department of Social Development would not be in a position to have access of the list of the funded NPOs from Lotteries Commission.

However; in order to provide the requested information; the Department must be furnished with the information of grants paid out by Lotteries Commission.

Only on receipt of the list of beneficiaries from Lotteries Commission; the Department of Social Development will only be able to provide information about the NPOs that are registered in terms of NPO Act.

23 December 2020 - NW2844

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What (a) total amount did the Government spend on food parcels from 1 March 2020 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) are the details of each (i) supplier and (ii) price of each contract in each province?

Reply:

The total amount spent on food parcels was R176 807 844. The details per province is provided below:

1. KwaZulu Natal Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in KwaZulu-Natal spent R27 510 529.13 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in KZN:

(i) Name of Suppliers:

  • KTZ Trading Enterprise
  • Uzimatu J Events and Communication
  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Full Stop Logistics
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

  • KTZ Trading Enterprise was awarded 5751 food parcels at a total price of R7 013 429.13
  • Uzimatu J Events and Communication was awarded 5781 food parcels at a total price of R6 937 200.00
  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 5636 food parcels at a total price of R6 763 200.00
  • Full Stop Logistics was awarded 1575 food parcels at a total price of R1 890 000.00
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd was awarded 4089 food parcels at a total price of R4 906 800.00

REPLY: 2. Northern Cape Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Northern Cape spent R13 906 445.71 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in NC:

(i) Names of Suppliers:

    • Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects
    • Mamonyai Consulting
    • Bompembe Trading
    • Matiko
    • Mortar Board Trading Solutions

(ii) Price of each contract

- Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects was awarded 1683 food parcels at a total price of R2 041 345.94

- Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 2 582 food parcels at a total price of R2 994 076.25

- Bopembe Trading was awarded 3 084 food parcels at a total price of R3 865 032.38

- Matiko Holdings was awarded 2 601 food parcels at a total price of R3 164 634.36

- Mortar Board Trading Solutions was awarded 1 512 food parcels at a total price of R1 841 356.78

REPLY: 3. Eastern Cape Region

a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Eastern Cape Region spent R 47 295 882.62 on food parcels.

b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in the Eastern Cape

(i) Names of Suppliers:

  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Kwasa Food Supplies

(ii)) Price of each contract

  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 20 560 food parcels at a total price of R 24 784 936.69
  • Kwasa Food Supplies was awarded 18 703 food parcels at a total price of R 22 510 945.93

REPLY: 4. Mpumalanga Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Mpumalanga spent R6 546 600.00 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Mpumalanga:
  1. Name of Suppliers:
  • Machaka Harvest Enterprises
  • M2R Events Management
  • Molanco Trading Enterprises
  • Mandlakomoya Trading and Projects

(ii) Price of each contract

  • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD was awarded 1 505 food parcels at a total price of R1 757 100.00
  • Machaka Harvest Enterprise (PTY) LTD was awarded 1 535 food parcels at a total price of R1 816 800.00
  • Molanco Trading Enterprise (Pty)Ltd was awarded 1 013 food parcels at a total price of R1 196 400.00
  • Mandlakomoya Trading and projects was awarded 1 485 food parcels at a total price of R1 776 300.00

REPLY: 5 North West Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in North West spent R 6 359 392.45 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Mpumalanga:

(i) The details of each are:

  • Kokumo Holdings
  • Malakhiwe Akohlulwa Onwabo(Pty) Ltd,
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Mortarboard Trading Solutions
  • Ntlhaku Traders
  • Sweet Buss (Pty) Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

  • Kokumo Holdings was awarded 1 044 food parcels at a total price of R 1 251 400.00
  • Malakhiwe Akohlulwa Onwabo (Pty)Ltd was awarded 6 711 food parcels at a total price of R 808 724.70
  • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 1 262 food parcels at a total price of R 1 514 400.00
  • Mortarboard Trading Solutions was awarded 572 food parcels at a total price of R 686 400.00
  • Ntlhaku Traders was awarded 775 food parcels at a total price of R 795 400.00

REPLY: 6 Free State Region

The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Free State spent R13,286,994.16 on food parcels.

  1. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in FS:

(i) Name of each Suppliers:

  • Imvusa Trading 509 cc
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Soft Touch Tours and projects
  • Thengokhulu Investment Group holdings
  • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd

(ii) Price of each contract

    • Imvusa Trading 509 cc was awarded 1708 food parcels at a total price of R2,098,237.50
    • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 1667 food parcels at a total price of R2,012,926.40
    • Soft Touch Tours and projects was awarded 1945 food parcels at a total price of R2,334,000.00
    • Thengokhulu Investment Group holdings was awarded 1904 food parcels at a total price of R2,302,362.00
    • Duma Supplier Group Pty Ltd was awarded 1896 food parcels at a total price of R2,306,036.26

REPLY: 7. Limpopo Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Limpopo Region spent R35 112 000.00  on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in LP:
  3. Name of Suppliers:-
  • DMB Leisure Solutions
  • Mamonyai Consulting
  • Kitso Projects and event management
  • Mamoratwa Enterprice,Book shop,catering and Social Consultancy

(ii) Price of each contract

  • DMB Leisure Solutions was awarded 8000 food parcels at a total price of R9 600 000.00
  • Mamonyai Consulting was awarded 7050 food parcels at a total price of R8 472 000.00
  • Kitso Projects and event management was awarded 6200 food parcels at a total price of R7 440 000.00
  • Mamoratwa Enterprice,Book shop,catering and Social Consultency was awarded 8000 food parcels at a total price of R9 600 000.00

REPLY: 8 Gauteng Region

(a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Gauteng spent R14 708 400.00 on food parcels.

(b) The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in Gauteng:

(i) Name of Suppliers:-

  • Kualah Investments
  • Nakapedi Investments (PTY) LTD
  • Ramafoko Cleaning & Projects CC
  • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD
  1. Price of each contract
    • Kualah Investments was awarded 2 988 food parcels at a total price of R3 585 600.00
    • Nakapedi Investments (PTY) LTD was awarded 2 972 food parcels at a total price of R3 566 400.00
    • Ramafoko Cleaning & Projects CC was awarded 3 291 food parcels at a total price of R3 949 200.00
    • M2R Events Management 57 (PTY) LTD was awarded 3 006 food parcels at a total price of R3 607 200.00

REPLY: 9 Western Cape Region

  1. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) in Western Cape spent R12 081 600 on food parcels.
  2. The following are the details of each supplier and prices of each contract in WC:
  3. Name of Suppliers:-
  • Ithemba Labantu
  • Ciaca Primary Coorp
  • Bendalo Holdings
  • Mandlakamoya trading

(ii) Price of each contract

  • Ithemba Labantu was awarded 2697 food parcels at a total price of R3 236 400.00
  • Ciaca Primary Coorp was awarded 2458 food parcels at a total price of R2 949 600.00
  • Bendalo Holdings was awarded 2414 food parcels at a total price of R2 896 800.00
  • Mandlakamoya Trading was awarded 2499 food parcels at a total price of R2 998 800.00

23 December 2020 - NW2378

Profile picture: Ngwezi, Mr X

Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether, in view of the Free State asbestos roofing scandal (details furnished) and the arrests relating to it, and given that residents in the Free State continue to be exposed to asbestos and that long-term consequences may result in fatal health complications, her department alongside its provincial structures informed affected households about potential health effects resulting from long-term exposure; if so, what total number of residents have been reached and informed thus far; (2) whether her department has statistical data on the total number of (a) households and (b) residents who are experiencing health complications from long-term exposure to asbestos; if so, what (i) are the findings from the statistical data and (ii) assistance is being given to those persons affected by long-term exposure?

Reply:

1. The Department acknowledges that studies reveal that there are health effects of asbestos which are directly related to the condition of the asbestos-containing material. These studies further highlight that asbestos is dangerous when the material is broken thus increasing the amount of fibres that can be emitted from asbestos products. Whilst the need to inform the affected households exist, Section 3 of the Housing Act of 1997 differentiates the responsibility of the national and provincial government in respect of housing development. Therefore, the responsibility of developing houses and its related beneficiary administration processes rests with the provincial government.

Notwithstanding the above, I will ensure that the relevant MECs table reports on this matter at our MINMEC meetings where issues of concurrent functions are discussed. Further, it should be noted that the use of asbestos is against the norms and standards of the Department and it is also a violation of the existing government regulations, the regulation on the Prohibition of the Use, Manufacturing, Import and Export of Asbestos and Asbestos Containing Materials forms part of the Environment Conservation Act of 1989).

2. The department does not have the latest statistical data on the total number of households and residents that are experiencing health complications from long-term asbestos exposure. However, what the Honourable Member is raising is part of the joint work we are doing with the Departments of Environmental Affairs (the convenor) and Public Works and Infrastructure.

22 December 2020 - NW2361

Profile picture: Bergman, Mr D

Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to international travel restrictions under Level 1 of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, what methodology was used to identify (a) China as a low-risk travel country and (b) Maldives a high-risk country; (2) whether (a) non-residents, (b) persons employed abroad and (c) persons who will be relocating will be allowed to travel to identified high-risk countries; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1. The model that South Africa used to determine the red list of high-risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic is based on a scientifically robust and tested approach that was benchmarked with other countries. The benchmarking process assisted the country to understand how best other countries are implementing interventions to enable proactive risk categorisation processes. The model and the criteria applied were based on globally accepted standards taking into consideration the guidelines as set by the World Health Organisation (WHO). Several criteria and scientific data are utilised to design, develop and refine the RSA risk categorization model. The primary considerations include the following:

a) the number of new cases per 100,000 persons over 14 days;

b) the number of new deaths per 100,000 persons over 14 days; and

c) the total number of accumulated cases in the given country since the first case.

Furthermore, the model also considers sensitivity analyses to assess the tolerance level rate to the RSA baseline. Other parameters such as testing data and active cases are considered. However, due to the absence of sufficiently updated data across different countries, it was recommended that these factors are not significantly relied upon. Based on all these factors, countries were classified according to three distinct categories: “Low Risk”, “Similar Risk” and “High Risk”. The “High Risk” category is what is used to create the red list of high-risk countries.

Therefore, the methodology outlined above is what was used to determine (a) China as a low-risk country and (b) the Maldives as a high-risk country. It must be noted that due to recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of using the red list of high-risk countries should be changed and instead use the 72-hour PCR test and the screening of incoming passengers to determine if they should be allowed into the country or not.

 

Based on recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of whether (a) non-residents, (b) persons employed abroad and (c) persons who will be relocating will be allowed to travel to identified high-risk countries should be based on the use of the 72-hour PCR test and appropriate screening interventions at both the departing border and those implemented in the destination country to which all individuals are expected to comply as per those countries’ COVID-19 prevention and screening protocols. This decision takes into consideration the WHO’s guidelines on public health considerations while resuming international travel as published in June 2020 and subsequently updated advisories.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2981

Profile picture: Dyantyi, Dr PP

Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

As the Republic enters the holiday season, and with malaria being an important public health consideration, with the World Health Organisation predicting more deaths due to the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, what (a) impact has the COVID-19 pandemic had on programmes aimed at mitigating against the malaria epidemic, such as Indoor Residual Spraying, community testing and treatment and (b) plans and measures will his department put in place to mitigate against the malaria epidemic?

Reply:

a) Malaria is a seasonal disease, transmission increases during the summer months, and is exacerbated when there is higher rainfall. The COVID-19 pandemic started in March and peaked in July this year- when the malaria transmission period was waning.

There was a timely start of the Indoor Residual Spraying (IRS) programme this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Spraying started as planned in September 2020 in each of the malaria-endemic provinces. As 18 November 2020, a total of 1,112,637 structures (624,365 structures in Limpopo; 410974 in Mpumalanga and 77298 in KwaZulu-Natal) have been sprayed of the targeted 2 059 979 structures for the 2020/2021 financial year. The current national spray coverage is 54% (51.94%, 54.29% and 76.53% in Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KZN provinces respectively), noting that spraying will continue into the early part of the new year.

Community testing and treatment was adopted as part of the malaria elimination strategy for South Africa and cross-border collaboration with eight malaria eliminating countries (E8) that form the SADC Elimination 8 countries. It mostly targets the border districts to prevent secondary transmission from malaria cases imported from the high malaria-endemic countries bordering the Republic of South Africa. The screening process was slow with only a few cases reported during the initial days of the COVID-19 pandemic due to level 5 Lockdown and border closures when travel was limited. The screening gradually improved and will continue in the border areas over the festive period. During the 2020/2021 financial year a total of 66 162 people suspected to have malaria have been tested in the community and a total of 517 have been found to be positive through active case detection. All the positive cases were treated with the recommended treatment for malaria.

b) The holiday season (Christmas and New Year) coincides with the malaria transmission season hence the Malaria programmes embark on spraying in September 2020 to protect the communities at risk in the three malaria-endemic provinces of Limpopo, Mpumalanga and KwaZulu-Natal. The provincial Malaria Programmes have updated their Epidemic Preparedness Plans to ensure that there are adequate stocks of diagnostics, treatment and insecticides.

In addition, health promotion and awareness campaigns are essential interventions for the prevention of malaria morbidity and mortality and were enhanced during the first week of November 2020 when the SADC Malaria Day was event was commemorated in the endemic provinces. These interventions will continue during the peak season covering December to April.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3015

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to a certain person (name furnished) who was appointed by his department, (a) what number of hours did the specified person work in the six months, (b) what was the total amount paid to the person in terms of the contract, (c) what other amounts, over and above the hourly rate, were paid to the person and (d) what legislative processes were followed in terms of the appointment of the specified person?

Reply:

a) 946 hours over 6-month period.

b) R1,740,632.26 over 6-month period.

c) R13,234.26 as reimbursement for use of private vehicle to and from the airport at a rate of R3,61 per km over a 6-month period.

d) A departmental tender (NDoH20/2019/2020) was awarded to the supplier.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2979

Profile picture: Dhlomo, Dr SM

Dhlomo, Dr SM to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What strides has his department made with the Public Health Infrastructure Refurbishment Programme which was one of the key focus areas for his department as part of implementing the pillars of the Presidential Health Compact; (2) whether the COVID-19 pandemic has disrupted or assisted to accelerate the specified programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The approved Health Compact raised a pillar that required the execution of an infrastructure plan to ensure “adequate, appropriately distributed and well maintained” health facilities. The Public Health Infrastructure Refurbishment Programme identified as the vehicle to do so and executed within the legislative framework of government facilities. This framework guides the maintenance of government faculties that includes health facilities and infrastructure as guided by strategies and guidelines driven from the national department of public works as the mandated department for all public properties in the country.

The National Department of Health (NDOH), together with National Treasury (NT) implemented a system which requires Provincial Departments to develop and submit what is called an User Asset Management Plan (U-AMP). This plan details the condition of each health infrastructure asset per province and their equipment. From the U-AMP, provinces are required to draw a three-year priority plan called an Infrastructure Programme Management Plan (IPMP). This is the plans that are submitted to the Implementing Agents (i.e. Public Works, Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA) etc.), who should provide the Provincial Health Departments with an Infrastructure Project Implementation Plan (IPIP). The IPIP indicate the readiness of the Implementing Agents to execute the projects listed and all of these plans are submitted to NDOH and NT for review and approval.

Provinces are allocated three-year Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) budget based on the needs identified and the money available and required to adjust their plan to fit within the approved budget. These adjusted plans are presented to Provincial Executive Committee (EXCO) for endorsement and implementation.

From a systems perspective thus, strides have been made to ensure that the programme is well executed and prioritised facilities where refurbishment is most needed. In addition to this, the National Department in partnership with the various Provincial Health departments and supported by DBSA, initiated not only the development of a Health Maintenance Strategy, but also appointed contractors to develop a 10-year Infrastructure Plan.

The Maintenance strategy developed under the aegis of the Department of Health, seeks to establish a consolidated maintenance management approach, that is specific to health infrastructure and includes the specialist field of health technology equipment that is vital for the effective and efficient health services across the country. On the other hand, the 10-year infrastructure plan aims to provide a development window to ensure that the distribution and planning of infrastructure refurbishments are in alignment with the needs of the provinces as identified through the various communities they serve.

2. COVID-19 has elevated the need for properly maintained and adequate health facilities and have thus contributed towards a reprioritisation of projects in order to facilitate the curbing of the spread. Towards this end the various maintenance projects related to oxygen and ICU wards were brought forward and expedited.

In the Eastern Cape for example eighty-five (85) contract awards, amounting to R578,902,253 million have been made to contractors for refurbishment of 67 Health Facilities across the province for COVID-19 purposes. Of these 85 projects, forty-eight (48) have now been completed at a total cost of R123,809,915.06 and have yielded 1259 Covid-19 isolation beds. A total of thirty-seven (37) projects are currently at advanced stages of construction within the province with a combined cost of R466,618,721.25. Upon completion, these projects will yield a total of 1179 Covid-19 isolation beds. The total cumulative expenditure to date on the 85 projects is R248,507,116.

For the primary health care facilities in terms of clinics and community health centres, various movable units were targeted for space augmentation to improve service delivery as part of the COVID-19 Treatment Surge and Resurgence. Post COVID-19 the units will be utilized for the HIV Treatment Surge in line with the project identified during the 2018/19 financial year under the auspices of the PEPFAR Facility Infrastructure Improvement Project.

In the hospitals, these units will be used to complement the screening and testing spaces needed during this COVID-19 Surge and Resurgence. Post COVID-19, the units will be mainly utilized for records storage. Currently patient files and general records are highly paper driven resulting in volumes of files that need to be appropriately kept for ease of retrieval and maintenance.

In Gauteng a Rapid intervention programme was launched to assess 32 hotspot facilities in the province to increase its COVID-19 surge capacity. This included the provision of P1, P2 and P3 level care related to administration of oxygen, especially high flow oxygen, provision of beds in terms of high and critical care beds and to identify problems in dealing with capacitation at these sites. As a result of these assessments, various projects were identified and now in planning, procurement and implementation to facilitate the improvement and refurbishment of surge capacity at these priority facilities.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2686

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

In view of recent reports of hospital administrators being investigated and/or suspended following misconduct and deteriorating security conditions in their hospitals leading to alarming cases of violence and rape between patients, what (a) total number of hospital administrators are currently under investigation leading to temporarily suspension throughout the Republic in the past five years, (b) are the names of the specified (i) hospital administrators and (ii) the respective hospitals and (c) is the nature of the specified investigations?

Reply:

According to the Provincial Departments of Health, the responses to these questions are as follows:

1. Eastern Cape

The Eastern Cape Department of Health does not have a hospital administrator (CEO) that is currently under investigation leading to temporal suspension. In 2018, the CEO of Livingstone Hospital was suspended and subsequently resigned and left the service. He was on a precautionary suspension and investigated on allegations of fraud and corruption.

2. Free State

NAME OF EMPLOYEE

RACE

SALARY LEVEL

GENDER

NAME OF THE INSTITUTION

DATE OF THE SUSPENSION

DATE SUSPENSION LIFTED

REASON FOR SUSPENSION

TYPE OF TRANS-GRESSION

REASON FOR DELAY / FINALISATION

HIGHLIGHTS / CHALLENGES OR TRENDS

Noge SR

A

7

F

Bongani Regional Hospital

27 March 2019

10 May 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Charge sheet is complete the role players to be appointed

N/A

Tau LW

A

11

M

Bongani Regional Hospital

27 March 2019

10 May 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Charge sheet is complete the role players to be appointed

N/A

Mfanta X

A

12

M

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

27 April 2019

23 October 2019

Misconduct

Sexual Harassment and Irregular Expenditure

The case was set down for the first time on the 27th November 2020.

N/A

NAME OF EMPLOYEE

RACE

SALARY LEVEL

GENDER

NAME OF THE INSTITUTION

DATE OF THE SUSPENSION

DATE SUSPENSION LIFTED

REASON FOR SUSPENSION

TYPE OF TRANS-GRESSION

REASON FOR DELAY/

FINALISATION

HIGHLIGHTS/

CHALLENGES OR TRENDS

Kgaile P.I

A

11

M

Mangaung Metro

20 May 2019

30 August 2019

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Investigations has been Finalized and the charge sheet is still being Formulated

N/A

Christou A

W

10

F

Mangaung Metro

30 May 2020

30 August 2020

Misconduct

Irregular Expenditure

Investigations has been Finalized and the charge sheet is still being Formulated

 

Ramodula BS

A

14

F

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

31 March 2020

29 May 2020

Misconduct

Failure to put measures in place for management of COVID-19 ward

Case Finalized and Final Written Warning issued on the 29 May 2020.

N/A

Molefe M

A

11

F

Pelonomi Regional Hospital

31 March 2020

29 May 2020

Misconduct

Failure to put measures in place for management of COVID-19 ward

Case Finalized and Final Written Warning issued on the 29 May 2020. The appeal of the Final Written Warning was upheld.

N/A

Seboko JM

A

13

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

Marefeka MJ

A

12

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

Moshao IN

A

11

F

Free State Psychiatric Hospital

16 May 2019

19 July 2019

Misconduct

Gross negligence

Waiting for the Investigations to be finalized.

N/A

3. Gauteng

INSTITUTION

FINANCIAL YEAR

DATE OF THE INCIDENT

SURNAME & INTIALS

JOB TITLE

SALARY LEVEL

RACE

GENDER

TYPE OF MISCONDUCT

SANCTION

STATUS

Dr Yusuf Dadoo

2018/2019

19/02/2018

Maanwane KM

Session Doctor

Session

African

male

Rape

contract expired

Closed- the perpetrator left the Department

4. Kwa-Zulu Natal

There are no investigations that are currently being conducted on hospital administrators for alleged maladministration.

5. Limpopo

There are no investigations that are currently being conducted on hospital administrators for alleged maladministration.

6. Mpumalanga

  1. The Mpumalanga Department of Health has not experienced any case of violence and or rape between patients and therefore, there are no Hospital administrators who are being investigated or temporarily suspended regarding this matter.
  2. As stated in paragraph (a) above, none of the Hospital Administrators are under investigation nor suspended, therefore there are no investigators taking place for the past five years up to the current financial year.

7. North West

 

The North West Department of Health does not have such cases. The only CEO currently under investigation and on suspension has not relationship whatsoever with security concerns, violence and/or rape.

8. Northern Cape

The Northern Cape Department of Health does not have CEOs that are currently suspended from the hospitals for any of the allegations as contained in this question.

9. Western Cape

The Western Cape Department of Health does not have such cases for the last five years neither do we have current or pending cases.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3012

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Health

(a) What (i) criteria and (ii) scientific data are used to create the red list of high-risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic, (b) on what date is the list updated and (c) what criteria determine that the list needs to be updated?

Reply:

a) (i) The model that South Africa used to determine the red list of high risk countries from where persons are permitted to travel to the Republic is based on a scientifically robust and tested approach that was benchmarked with other countries. The benchmarking process assisted the country to understand how best other countries are implementing interventions to enable proactive risk categorisation processes. The model and the criteria applied were based on globally accepted standards taking into consideration the guidelines as set by the World Health Organisation.

(ii) Several criteria and scientific data are utilised to design, develop and refine the RSA risk categorization model. The primary considerations include the following:

(1) the number of new cases per 100,000 persons over 14 days;

(2) the number of new deaths per 100,000 persons over 14 days; and

(3) the total number of accumulated cases in the given country since the first case.

Furthermore, the model also considers sensitivity analyses to assess the tolerance level rate to the RSA baseline. Other parameters such as testing data and active cases are considered. However, due to the absence of sufficiently updated data across different countries, it was recommended that these factors are not significantly relied upon. Based on all these factors, countries were classified according to three distinct categories: “Low Risk”, “Similar Risk” and “High Risk”. The “High Risk” category is what is used to create the red list of high risk countries.

b) The list was updated fortnightly, that is, every 14 days. Given the nature of the pandemic and the evolving data dynamics in every country, the model that was utilised could not be static as the baseline was expected to change over time. The considerations include the 10% tolerance level on the South African baseline which are used to compare against other countries. Countries with an estimated baseline of +/-10% to South Africa were considered “Similar Risk”; those with a score that was higher than the baseline + 10% were classified as “High Risk”; and all other countries with a population of less than 1 000 000 people were classified as low risk (or ignored). All countries in Africa were classified as low risk (or their high scores are ignored).

c) Taking into account recent global developments and trends, the Cabinet resolved that the strategy of using the red list of high-risk countries should be changed and instead use the 72 hour PCR test and the screening of incoming passengers to determine if they should be allowed into the country.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2722

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all advisory committees and/or advisory bodies reporting to (a) her, (b) any structure, (c) employee, and/or (d) entity of the national departments of (i) Human Settlements and (ii) Water and Sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, on what date; (2) what is the (a) name and (b) highest qualification of each person serving in such advisory committee and/or advisory body; (3) what are the details of the legislative prescripts which empower the establishment and functioning of each advisory committee and/or advisory body; (4) what are the details of the remuneration and bonuses paid to each member in each week, month and year?

Reply:

The Honourable Member is referred to the reply I provided to her question, number 657. Further, there are no bonuses payable to the members of the Advisory Panel in the Department of Human Settlements and the Advisory Committees in the Department of Water and Sanitation.

22 December 2020 - NW2998

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the 2019-20 Annual Report (details furnished) of his department wherein it is stated that R5 000 of registered irregular expenditure was for repairs to his DStv, he will provide the relevant information as to why his department is paying for the repairs to his DStv; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) who is the person and/or persons who authorised the payment of the repairs; (3) whether he is prepared to pay back the R5 000 paid to repair his DStv, and provide proof thereof; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the costs in question were incurred by Department, however it serves to be mentioned that the total cost of R 5000.00 was incurred by the Department as a result of Chapter 8 paragraphs 2.9 and 7 of the Guide for Members of the Executive that came into effect on the 20th of November 2019 which states that:

2.9 “Where a Member moves from a State-owned Residence to a Private Residence to be used for official purposes in the same seat of office, personal effects may be packed and transported at the expense of the relevant Department. This is a non-recurring concession and cannot be utilised more than once during the Member’s term of office”.

7. The relevant department shall be responsible for the costs of installation and maintenance of fax, internet/wifi facilities, computer equipment and relevant television subscription services for official use by the Member at the Official Residence

2. The service in question was initiated and sanctioned by the support staff in the Office of the Minister and it took place based on the call out fees and diagnostic services. Once the service provider has submitted the invoice, proper procedures will have to be undertaken through Supply Chain for the purpose of processing the payment. It also serves to be mention that services of this nature are not easy for three (3) quotations to be sourced due to the fact that a diagnosis to determine the nature of work to be done must be concluded prior to rendering a service. Sourcing three (3) quotations will require that three providers must go on site of which they will all charge a call out and diagnostic fees which may result to fruitless and wasteful expenditure, hence one (1) quotation was sourced.

3. Based on Chapter 8 paragraphs 2.9 and 7 of the Guide for Members of the Executive, the Minister is not liable for the cost but it for the account of the Department.

Lastly, this transaction has to be subjected to a determination process which includes an investigation to determine the cause, the impact of the transgression and who must be held accountable in terms of Irregular Expenditure Framework issued by National Treasury.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2978

Profile picture: Dhlomo, Dr SM

Dhlomo, Dr SM to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the recent report by the Minister of Police, Mr B H Cele, wherein he stated that the highest number of rape cases are in the areas of Inanda and Umlazi and that rape is usually associated with violence and the killing of women and children, what full, detailed information can his department provide for the period 1 January 2019 to 30 June 2020 from four forensic pathology services mortuaries (names and details furnished) with regard to the (a) total number of (i) women, (ii) men and (iii) children admitted, (b) breakdown of the specified women, men and children according to race, (c) total number of (i) women and (ii) men admitted with gunshot wounds, (d) total number of victims admitted with (i) stab wounds and (ii) soft tissue injuries suggestive of trauma inflicted and (e) total number of victims of motor vehicle accidents?

Reply:

According to the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Health, the following tables reflects the details in this regard:

(a)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted

number of (ii) men admitted

number of (iii) children admitted

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-June 2020

(i) Pinetown,

263

94

1 148

542

134

45

(ii) Gale Street,

452

74

1 872

340

129

36

(iii) Phoenix,

256

159

1 265

652

121

70

(iv) Park Rynie

92

34

426

196

41

9

(b)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

221

70

23

10

3

2

16

11

0

1

(ii) Gale Street,

338

55

41

8

20

2

31

4

22

5

(iii) Phoenix,

190

124

49

30

3

2

14

3

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

89

30

2

2

0

0

1

2

0

0

Mortuary

number of (ii) men admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

986

464

116

45

4

9

41

24

1

0

(ii) Gale Street,

1 563

292

135

25

65

8

93

15

16

0

(iii) Phoenix,

1 031

536

193

83

11

5

30

28

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

403

189

9

4

0

0

14

3

0

0

Mortuary

number of (iii) children admitted

 

African

Asian

Coloured

White

Other

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

132

43

1

2

0

0

1

0

0

0

(ii) Gale Street,

120

35

8

1

0

0

1

0

0

0

(iii) Phoenix,

106

62

12

6

1

1

2

1

0

0

(iv) Park Rynie

35

9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

(c)

Mortuary

number of (i) women admitted with gunshot wounds

number of (ii) men admitted with gunshot wounds

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

31

13

292

160

(ii) Gale Street,

42

3

391

82

(iii) Phoenix,

26

12

320

133

(iv) Park Rynie

9

2

76

65

(d)

Mortuary

total number of victims admitted with (i) stab wounds

total number of victims admitted with (ii) soft tissue injuries suggestive of trauma inflicted and

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

157

59

181

91

(ii) Gale Street,

282

33

223

73

(iii) Phoenix,

188

81

148

104

(iv) Park Rynie

68

24

69

44

(e)

Mortuary

total number of victims of motor vehicle accidents

 

Jan-Dec 2019

Jan-Jun 2020

(i) Pinetown,

232

67

(ii) Gale Street,

490

80

(iii) Phoenix,

280

136

(iv) Park Rynie

130

27

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2983

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Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

In view of the important role that public-private partnerships have played in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, (a) are there any other initiatives that he and/or his department have to continue in co-operation with the public-private partnerships and (b) how will the co-operation be taken forward to achieve a unified healthcare system under the National Health Insurance?

Reply:

a) The emergence of the COVID-19 pandemic necessitated the need for a concerted societal response to design and implement innovative, quick and practical solutions to address the impact of the pandemic on the national health system. A key element of this response was the interactions between the public and private sector stakeholders of different kinds (most importantly private healthcare professionals) to collaborate with Government at various levels. This collaboration and open engagement allowed for some innovative solutions, such as the Private Laboratory network (22 Laboratories) agreeing to work with the National Health Laboratory system (27 Laboratories) to scale up testing capacity; the private health facilities availed their beds and ICUs for the management of cases; as well as establishing platforms for the coordination and sharing information with the private sector which was essential in monitoring ICU capacity and where additional patients could be referred particularly during periods of the pandemic peaks in some provinces.

b) The National Department of Health continues to cooperate and regularly engages the private health sector on a variety of matters pertaining to priority programmes for the sector. This engagement and cooperation will continue to be followed through as we make progress towards the implementation of National Health Insurance (NHI), through ensuring a coherent and sustainable plan as outlined in the White Paper on NHI and the NHI Bill. Some of the core areas for continued engagement with the private sector include how best to incorporate the skills and clinical insights of the private sector into both the primary and hospital-based health care services, the role to be played by the multidisciplinary district health teams; and the development and implementation of alternative reimbursement strategies. Equally important is the aspect of digital integration of private health information platforms into the Health Normative Standards for Interoperability with the systems that are being designed and implemented as part of the NHI Fund’s information system.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2275

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What total number of water boards have had their boards dissolved in the current financial year, (b) on what date will the boards be appointed again and (c) what has she found to be the causes of so much instability in the water boards?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, three (3) Water Boards were dissolved during the current financial year and these are: Sedibeng Water, Amatola Water and Umgeni Water.

(b) The process of appointing the Boards for these water entities is currently underway.

(c) I am not aware of any instability in the water boards.

22 December 2020 - NW3067

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether the appointment of a certain person (name furnished, Advocate Terry Motau) to investigate fraud and corruption in the water boards and in her department is not a duplication of the investigation done by the Special Investigating Unit (SIU); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps has her department taken to implement the recommendations of the SIU investigations?

Reply:

No, there is no duplication. The Terms of Reference for the person referred to by the Honourable Member are specific and indicate that those cases investigated by the SIU will not be included in his scope of work.

A joint media statement was issued by the Department of Water and Sanitation and the Special Investigation Unit (SIU) on 26 November 2020. It highlighted all the work that the Department and the SIU are doing related to the fight against fraud and corruption as well as the outcomes of some of the investigations.

The joint statement referred to above is attached for the Honourable Member’s ease of reference.

22 December 2020 - NW2982

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Dyantyi, Dr PP to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to the issue of personal protective equipment (PPEs) which came under the spotlight in the fight against the COVID-19 pandemic, what (a) actions and/or measures has he and/or his department taken to address the (i) availability, (ii) quantity and (iii) quality of PPEs and (b) role has the relationship between his department and the labour unions played to improve the situation and to ensure that frontline healthcare workers, including community health workers, are well protected against the pandemic?

Reply:

1a)  Actions and/or measures has he and/or his department taken to address the

 

(i) Availability of PPEs

The National Department of Health developed an Infection Control and Prevention (IPC) Guideline that identifies in detail what PPEs are required in by health care and support personnel require in the different health care service delivery settings. This document formed the basis of determining what PPE’s and in what quantity each health care worker and support personnel will require.

(ii) Quantity of PPEs

The IPC Guidelines informed the PPE demand forecast, initially projected for a 6-month period and subsequently the PPE forecast was projected until March 2021. The PPE demand forecast projections are utilised to identify resources required to procure PPEs, finalise transversal contracts with National Treasury, secure and negotiate availability of PPEs with suppliers.

A PPE module was also added to the stock visibility system (SVS) used to monitor medicines. This enabled health facilities and depots in provinces to report PPE stock on hand against forecasted demand and identify shortfalls and surpluses. The SVS system is used by provinces to monitor PPE availability and to address shortfalls at a health facility level.

(iii) Quality of PPEs

The National Department of Health in collaboration with South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) sets the quality standards for the various personal protective equipment items. Each province is responsible for ensuring that the quality standards of PPE’s procured are maintained.

The National department of Health has also supported the provinces with availing a Policy on Respiratory Protective Equipment and a list of PPE specifications that provinces can utilise to guide the PPE procurement process. In addition, PPE quality assurance training was conducted for provinces. The Department of Trade and Industry also provides support to local manufacturers and distributors in respect of compliance with applicable standards and conformity assessments to assist them to prepare for the licensing and approval process.

Meetings with provincial PPE coordinators, depot managers and PPE supply chain officials are convened bi-weekly to monitor and address availability, security of supply and quality assurance of PPE.

b) The labour unions participate in the weekly Project Management Office meetings chaired by the Director-General where updates are given on personal protective equipment (PPE) availability and quantity at facility level through analysis of data on the Stock Visibility System (SVS). The SVS also allows for access to trade union representatives to sign-off on the quantity of PPE at the facility level. I have convened meetings with the trade unions to update them on PPE availability and quantity. In addition, PPE and Occupational Health and Safety are standing agenda items on the Tech-NHC and NHC meetings.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW3047

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) is the total number of ICU and high care nurses who have been recruited, trained and have been assigned to work in COVID-19 sites in KwaZulu-Natal thus far and (b) are the full details of the sites the specified nurses have been dispatched to; (2) whether his department intends to employ the nurses permanently once the COVID-19 pandemic has ended; if not, why not; if so; where will the nurses be assigned to work; (3) how does his department intend to deal with the shortfall in clinical psychologists and physiotherapists in the province as they indicated that funds were unavailable to recruitment?

Reply:

1. According to the KwaZulu Natal Provincial Department of Health, there is a total of 153 Nurses which is inclusive of nurses employed on contract basis and permanent employees. Nurses were from the following sites:

  • Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital
  • Greys Tertiary Hospital
  • King Edward Hospital
  • Prince Mshiyeni Memorial Hospital
  • RK Khan Regional Hospital
  • Mahatma Gandhi Regional Hospital
  • Port Shepstone Regional Hospital
  • Newcastle Hospital
  • Madadeni Hospital
  • Addington Regional Hospital
  •  Ladysmith Regional Hospital
  • General Justice Gizenga Memorial Regional Hospital
  • Ngwelezane Tertiary Hospital

2. These nurses have been employed on contract up until 31 March 2021. No decision has been taken regarding the retention of these healthcare personnel on permanent basis after Covid-19 pandemic. The decision will be based on need and availability of budget.

3. The Department intends to prioritize appointing post-community service personnel into permanent existing posts of clinical psychologists and physiotherapists. Plans are also in place to advertise more bursaries in these professional categories. The Department also intends to target students who are pursuing Honours and Master’s Degree to address the shortfall.

END.

22 December 2020 - NW2720

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Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether he will furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (a) total cost to company salaries and (b) bonuses of executive employees, including the chief executive officers in all entities reporting to the national Departments of Water and Sanitation and Human Settlements for the past five financial years?

Reply:

The information requested by the Honourable Member is provided in Annual Reports tabled yearly in Parliament by departments and public entities.

21 December 2020 - NW2991

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether she still intends to proclaim a date of commencement for the Animal Health Act, Act 7 of 2002; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the time frame in which the proclamation can be expected?

Reply:

The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development does not have immediate intentions to proclaim the Animal Health Act, 2002. Despite the fact that the Department has continued work on the draft regulations to accompany the Animal Health Act, 2002, developments such as the assessment of the Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have indicated conflicting and often limited legislative considerations. Based on these developments, the Department is currently consulting with Legal Services on how to further address the current challenges, including the possible repeal of the Animal Health Act of 2002. Timeframes will be considered when the legal consultations have been completed.

21 December 2020 - NW3032

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(a) What is the name of the registered owner of the (i) Berg River Dam outside Franschhoek in the Western Cape and (ii) land immediately surrounding the dam, including Farm Number 1145 and Farm Number RE/1339, and (b) under what zoning does the specified land fall; (2) what is the name of the person who owns the dwellings on the land immediately surrounding the Berg River Dam? NW3860E

Reply:

(1)(a) (i) The basic footprint of the Berg River Dam falls on Farm 1716 (SG No. 447/2007) and is unregistered. There is also a subdivision of the above farm, being Portion 1 of Farm No. 1716 (SG No. 1628/2007).

(ii) The following farms surround the Farm 1716. It appears that many of the farms and portions are not yet registered.  All unregistered land belongs to the State.

Property Description

Ownership

Zoning (according to Stellenbosch Zoning Maps)

Farm 1145

 Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone (Still part of Farm 1716/0 on Zoning Map)

Remainder Farm 1339

 Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone (Still part of Farms 1339/8, 1339/5, 1339/6, 1339/1)

Remainder Farm 1619 (SG No. 3436/1999

Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Farm 1235 (SG No. 1052/1974):

Republic of South Africa

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Portion 1 of Farm No. 1339 (SG Mo. 3423/1999)

Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Portion 1 of Farm No. 1147 (SG No. 3421/1999

Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Farm No. 1150 (SG No. 204/1831) 

Islanmore Estates Pty Ltd

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Farm No. 1151 (SG No. 249/1880) 

Islanmore Estates Pty Ltd

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Remainder Farm No. 1659 (SG No. 6211/2001) 

unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Portion 5 of Farm No. 1339 (SG No. 3427/1999)

unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Portion 8 of Farm No. 1339 (SG No. 9216/2006)

Unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Farm No. 1023

Republic of South Africa  unalienated state land

Agriculture and Rural Zone (still part of Farm 1618/0 on Zoning Map)

Farm No. 1712 (SG No. 1627/2007)

unregistered

To be confirmed with Municipality

Farm No. 1711 (SG No. 1626/2007) 

unregistered

To be confirmed with Municipality

Portion 3 of farm No. 1145 (SG No. 9215/2006)

unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

Portion 1 of Farm No. 1629 (SG No. 9217/2006)

unregistered

Agriculture and Rural Zone

(b) Unregistered Farm No. 1716, Paarl Division is deemed to be zoned a natural environmental zone in terms of the Stellenbosch Municipal Zoning Scheme By-law, 2019 - [Source: NGMS]. Please refer to page 118 of the Zoning Scheme By-law which is attached.

“Natural Environment (natuurlike omgewing) means an area which is undeveloped, not necessarily restricted to wilderness or mountain areas and primarily consists of vegetation in a natural state. Vegetation may be indigenous or alien, the area may be rehabilitated to its indigenous state for the purpose of preserving the biophysical characteristics of the area, including flora and fauna living in the area, and may include river corridors, wetlands, water bodies, man-made dams, proclaimed nature areas, biosphere reserves, undeclared conservation or critical biodiversity areas, and may be in public or private ownership or managed under stewardship and it includes buildings which are reasonably connected with the management and maintenance of the area;”

(2) The Branch Deeds Registration is unable to determine the ownership of the dwellings surrounding the dam. The details of the dwellings are with the local municipality. Ownership information on the land can only be provided once the dwellings are identified which information can be obtained from the local municipality. The two identified private properties are owned by Islanmore Estates Pty Ltd

21 December 2020 - NW2890

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

By what date will she ensure that the community of Ga-Machacha in Ward 25 at Makhuduthamaga in Limpopo are provided with bulk infrastructure to which they can connect for clean drinking water?

Reply:

The Department of Water and Sanitation has allocated R53 million to the Sekhukhune District Municipality for the 2020/21 financial year through the Water Service Infrastructure Grant (WSIG) for the implementation of the following projects to ensure access to clean water in the Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality:

  • Mogoroane Water Supply Project
  • Uitspanning Water Supply Intervention
  • Tukakgomo Water Supply Intervention Phase 3
  • Mapodile Water Conservation and demand Management
  • Rutseng Water Intervention Phase 2
  • Construction of VIDP Toilets in Legolaneng
  • Brooklyn (Phokwane) Water Intervention
  • Maebe (Mohlaletsi) Water Supply Phase 3
  • Nkosini Water Supply & Package Plant
  • Laersdrift Water Supply
  • Mashamthane Water Intervention

It should be noted that legislative mandate of the Department of Water and Sanitation is to ensure that the country’s water resources are protected, managed, used, developed, conserved and controlled in a sustainable manner for the benefit of all people and the environment.

The Water Services Act, 1997 refers to municipalities as Water Service Authorities (WSAs) responsible for distribution (reticulation) of water and to supply sanitation services. The Water Services Act in section 3 outlines the right of access to basic water supply and sanitation which mandates that “everyone has a right of access to basic water supply and basic sanitation” and places the responsibility on Water Services Authorities to ensure that they develop a Water Services Development Plan (WSDP) to ensure the realisation of this right.

Section 11 of the Water Services Act, 1997 mandates that “every Water Services Authority has the duty to all consumers or potential consumers in its area of jurisdiction to progressively ensure efficient, affordable, economical and sustainable access to water services.”

21 December 2020 - NW2845

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

Whether she has investigated allegations that a certain company (name furnished) in Bellville, Western Cape, lock homeless persons in cages?

Reply:

The temporary Homeless Shelter at Paint City in Bellville are managed by an NPO funded by the City of Cape Town and not by the Western Cape Provincial Department of Social Development. The City of Cape Town’s forensic unit is investigating the allegations.

21 December 2020 - NW3054

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Hlengwa, Mr M to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In view of the fact that her department’s foreign policy principles are centered on promoting peace, human rights and dignity for all people, (a) what is her department’s official position on internet shutdown and interruptions in Africa which have been linked to the countries with records of human rights violations and implicated in the practice of authoritarian regimes (details furnished) and (b) how has her department sought to engage with other countries in the African Union to deter the authoritarian and undemocratic practises?

Reply:

a) As a Member of the African Union (AU), South Africa respects the sovereignty of AU Member States as enshrined in Article 4 of the Constitutive Act of the AU. South Africa also encourages Member States through, inter alia, the AU and its Organs, to adopt a culture of human rights as a prerequisite to achieving the Africa We Want, envisaged in Aspiration 3 of Agenda 2063 which envisions “An Africa with good governance, democracy, respect for human rights, justice and the rule of law.”

b) In November and December 2020, South Africa participated in the 67th Ordinary Session of the African Commission on Human and Peoples’ Rights (ACHPR), in

21 December 2020 - NW2794

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Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)What (a) are the conditions and (b) is the state of the kitchen at the Gauteng Drug Abuse and Rehabilitation Clinic; (2) whether the staff at the clinic have been paid their salaries in full and timeously in (a) 2019 and (b) 2020; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what months in 2020 were the tranches disbursed on time?

Reply:

The Gauteng Department of Social Development does not have a registered treatment centre called “Gauteng Drug Abuse and Rehabilitation clinic” on its database.

The Department is kindly requesting the Member to provide more details.

21 December 2020 - NW2817

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 479 for oral reply on 4 November 2020, she has been informed that the R35 million that was allocated for drought relief in the Northern Cape did not reach the farming community; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps does she intend taking to address the issue; (2) on what date does she intend following up with the province to address the drought crisis to relieve the negative impact caused by the drought condition?

Reply:

1. The drought relief funds were transferred to the provinces in July 2020. Due to Covid-19 restrictions, progress in implementing the required interventions has been low. Verification of the affected farmers was also impacted. The Northern Cape Province distributed drought relief vouchers from 9th November to 4th December 2020 to qualifying farmers.

2. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development will visit the Northern Cape Province in January 2021 for monitoring purpose.

21 December 2020 - NW2879

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Social Development

What steps has her department taken to ensure that the quality and standards of early childhood development (ECD) centres in townships and villages is equal to that of ECD centres in more affluent areas?

Reply:

The Children’s Act and regulations outlines the general norms and standards for all ECD programmes wherever they are. The Act also prescribes that ECD services can be registered conditionally. To address this, the department developed the registration framework which gives effect to the registration of the services conditionally. The framework recommends registrations in three levels, that is bronze, Silver and gold. The bronze and silver level gives programmes the opportunity to register even when they do not comply with all the norms and standards. This is a developmental approach that has been taken to assist the programmes for the department to assist them to ultimately move to full registration (gold). This quality standards apply to all programmes whether in urban, settlements, rural and farm areas.

21 December 2020 - NW2918

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1373 on 6 August 2020, she has seen the need to conduct a study of the farms to (a) understand the level of productivity of each farm, (b) ascertain the reason for the productivity problems of each farm where there is no productivity and (c) establish the required targeted approach to address issues faced by each farm and the beneficiaries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) Yes. The Department has appointed service providers to conduct a full assessment of all farms acquired since the inception of the Land Reform Programme in 1994 which will determine the production levels. The drafted terms of reference confirm that the study will cover the level of productivity of each farm, the reason for the productivity problems of each farm where there is no productivity and the required targeted approach to address issues faced by each farm and the beneficiaries

To date, the Department has conducted a study on PLAS farms to determine the assets verification and suitability, post-acquisition support and enable monitoring of progress of these farms. Although the study did not focus exclusively on productivity, the variables within the questionnaire triggered the response on the actual productive status of the farm to provide a baseline performance statistic.

21 December 2020 - NW2908

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the reasons for the failure to proclaim a commencement date for the Animal Health Act, Act 7 of 2002, since 24 July 2002 to date; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs A Steyn with a detailed list of the reasons with specified timeframes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information provided for NA Question No 2991 is sufficient for response to this Question as well.

21 December 2020 - NW2886

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

With reference to her reply to question 118 on 19 June 2020, what steps has her department taken to ensure that the Rustenburg Local Municipality has used the Water Infrastructure Grant of R88 million provided by her department to complete the projects that will provide the community of Marikana in the North West with access to clean quality water?

Reply:

(a) Honourable Member, the Department of Water and Sanitation allocated R88 million through the Water Services Infrastructure Grant WSIG), to the Rustenburg Local Municipality as the Water Services Authority to implement water infrastructure projects within the jurisdiction of the municipality. The R88 million was not only allocated for the Marikana Project. Of the total allocation of R88 million, the Marikana Project was allocated R12 513 355.

(b) The Marikana Project is being implemented by the Rustenburg Local Municipality and is currently at 90 % completion. The Department of Water and Sanitation is monitoring the project through site visits and receives progress reports for its provincial office on a monthly basis. The projected completion date provided is March 2021.

21 December 2020 - NW2993

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to both the agriculture and land reform departments, what (a) total number of formal investigations has her department undertaken since 1 April 2014 and (b) are the reasons for each specified investigation; (2) whether any of the investigations led to (a) criminal charges and/or (b) disciplinary hearings; if not, why not; if so, (i) in which cases and (ii) what was the outcome of the charges; (3) whether she will furnish Mrs A Steyn with a copy of all the reports of the investigations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) 120

(b) Please refer to Annexure A.

2. (a),(b),(i),(ii) Please refer to Annexure A.

It should be noted that criminal action is not recommended where the investigation’s findings and conclusions could not reveal any element of criminality by all involved in the transaction, being officials or third parties; and disciplinary action is not recommended where no fault or culpability could be found on the part of any official of the Departments.

3. The investigation reports of the Department are confidential in nature and where there is some further action that needs to be taken, release of the reports can jeopardise these actions. The forensic reports are generally not shared, unless a request for access to the reports is made in terms of the applicable law, notably Promotion of Access to Information Act 2 of 2000.

21 December 2020 - NW2864

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, in view of the historical relationship between the Republic and Palestine (details furnished) and the enormous challenges and burdens that Palestinians are faced with when travelling abroad, even in the Republic, as the old apartheid policy of restrictive travel measures for visa requirements are still being enforced on Palestinians travelling to the Republic, he intends to scrap restrictive measures for Palestinians such as proof of medical insurance, hotel bookings and sufficient funds; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Home Affairs has already approved a waiver of visa requirements for diplomatic and official/service passport holders of Palestine. Currently the necessary protocols are being applied in order to conclude a reciprocal visa waiver agreement between the two countries. In so far as normal passport holders are concerned, the Department is currently exploring ways to lower the restrictive travel measures which applies to Palestinian nationals. The latter process is more extensive and requires wider consultation with various Government Clusters prior to conclusion.

END

21 December 2020 - NW2909

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

(1)What specific interventions has her department, in collaboration with The Presidency, put in place to resolve the problems standing in the way of the proclamation of commencement of the Animal Health Act, Act No 7 of 2002; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs A Steyn with a list of all interventions spanning the period since the date of assent on 24 July 2002; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Presidency has not yet been approached to proclaim the Animal Health Act, Act 7 of 2002.

2. The Department has been working on the draft regulations and assessing appropriate cooperative governance structures and delegation of the veterinary authority. The Department continued this work over an extended period of time. However, a number of delays have been experienced and other processes such as the assessment of the Performance of Veterinary Services (PVS) by the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE) have indicated conflicting and often limited legislative considerations. Based on these developments, the Department is currently consulting with Legal Services on how to further address the current challenges and could possibly consider repealing the Animal Health Act of 2002.

21 December 2020 - NW2992

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, following her announcement (details furnished) on 1 October 2020 to release 700 000 hectares of underutilised and/or vacant state land for agricultural purposes and the resultant panic from emerging farmers after their farms were listed under the specified programme, she will provide (a) clarity on why productive farms were listed, (b) relevant details of whether existing farm occupants were consulted on the Government’s intention to place the property on the list, (c) reasons for listing a farm whose occupant already possesses a lease agreement and (d) documented evidence of the reasons that informed the inclusion of each of the 896 farms on the list; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

a) Yes. The focus was on underutilized and vacant land; productivity of the land was not the determining factor for advertisement.

b) Yes. On 1 October, the Minister informed the public through a briefing that was streamed live on SA Government Facebook page, Twitter and You Tube channels about the whole process before any advertisement.

c) Yes. There was no intention from Government to advertise a farm with a current and legal lease agreement in place; if this was done, it can be regarded as an error. Details should be brought to the attention of my office to resolve the matter.

d) No. The farms that were listed for advertisement were those that were vacant or underutilised or were without any valid agreement with the state in place regarding their occupancy. A Land Rights Enquiry will determine each case and the rights of those that are on the farms will be protected through formalization and regulation of their occupation. Land that was abandoned or vacant will be allocated and land that is underutilised will be assessed and each case will be treated according to its own circumstances.

21 December 2020 - NW2976

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she will approach the African Union to intervene and stop the fighting in Ethiopia; if not, why not; if so, what steps have been taken to date?

Reply:

President Cyril Ramaphosa in his capacity as Chairperson of the African Union (AU), appointed former President Joaquim Chissano of the Republic of Mozambique, former President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf of the Republic of Liberia, and former President Kgalema Motlanthe of the Republic of South Africa, as African Union Special Envoys to Ethiopia in order to assist the Government and people of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia in finding a solution to the recent conflict that had occurred in the Tigray Region of that country.

The AU Special Envoys visited Ethiopia and held meetings with a range of interlocutors from 26 to 28 November 2020, including President Sahle-Work Zewde, Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed Ali, the leaders of important Democratic Insitutions, and the leaders of opposition political parties. Subsequently, the AU Special Envoys have briefed President Ramaphosa on the outcomes of their visit to Ethiopia. The President will remain seized with the issue and future action will be decided in consultation with the Government of Ethiopia, the African Union Commission, and the AU Special Envoys to Ethiopia.

21 December 2020 - NW2857

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to news reports which indicated that over 400 cattle in northern KwaZulu-Natal have tested positive for brucellosis, a bacterial disease transmittable to humans and which may cause infertility, miscarriages, birth complications and sore joints (details furnished), her department intends to co-operate with the national and provincial departments of health, to raise awareness of the effects of such a disease which disproportionately affect maternal health of rural women; if not, why not; if so; what are the relevant details of the initiatives?

Reply:

As per the media release of 18 November 2020, the Minister of Agriculture, Land reform and Rural Development (DALRRD) Ms Thoko Didiza, MP has been made aware by the MEC of Agriculture and Rural Development in KwaZulu-Natal Ms Bongi Sithole-Moloi, MPL of the brucellosis situation in the northern parts of Kwa-Zulu Natal.

DALRRD intends to co-operate with the National and Provincial Departments in raising awareness of the impact brucellosis in humans. Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease (can be transmitted from animals to humans) and it is crucial to follow a One Health approach involving Veterinary and Health Services.

DALRRD participates in the monthly Multisectoral National Outbreak Response Team (MNORT) meetings hosted by the Department of Health, where information on zoonotic diseases is shared between stakeholders. Provincial Veterinary and Health Services are mandated to work in close communication with each other when brucellosis is diagnosed in animals or in humans.

When brucellosis infection is identified in cattle or other animals, Veterinary Services are responsible for informing the owner of the animals that the disease can also be transmitted to humans. They are advised either not to drink milk from these animals, or to boil it first. Owners are advised to consult their clinic or doctor should they show any of the following non-specific flu-like symptoms: recurrent fever, flu-like symptoms, body aches and pains, headaches and depression. The disease in humans can become chronic if medical treatment is not obtained. Other specific symptoms may be seen, depending on the organ system involved. The reproductive organs of both men and women can potentially be affected by brucellosis, which can lead to epididymo-orchitis (swollen testes) and infertility in men and in miscarriages or abortions in pregnant women.

Men and women in rural communities are vulnerable to brucellosis if their cattle or livestock are infected, especially if they consume raw milk and milk products from these animals. Unfortunately, the symptoms of brucellosis are not very specific and can be confused with many other diseases. Clinics and doctors are not always particularly knowledgeable on brucellosis and may not consider it as a potential diagnosis. It is very important that the patient informs the clinic or doctor if they work closely with livestock or if they consume raw dairy products (unpasteurised/ not boiled).

The Department fully supports improved and continuous awareness of brucellosis in humans, through the national and provincial Departments of Health. Having decided to recognise November as a national brucellosis awareness month, the South African Veterinary Council, in partnership with the South African Veterinary Association, the National Animal Health Forum, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development and all their associated partners, have embarked on an extensive awareness and education campaign regarding bovine brucellosis which will continue into December. The National Institute for Communicable Diseases and the National Department of Health will be invited to participate in the awareness campaign

21 December 2020 - NW3011

Profile picture: Roos, Mr AC

Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, with reference to his reply to question 562 on 18 November 2020 (details furnished), he has found that his department has taken no action to investigate and/or hold corrupt officials to account for their part in the specified scandal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the reasons that his department has not yet appointed a new service provider despite the current extortionate contract ending in November; (3) whether the interim arrangement is to extend the current contract with a certain service provider (name furnished) until such time that a new service provider is appointed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. May the Honourable member please advise which scandal is he referring to.

2. The department completed its bid evaluation process and after finalising outstanding matters with selected bidders, such as confirmation of price and costs as well as any sub-contracting arrangements the preferred supplier may have, realised that the costing methodology in the bid did not allow for an equitable evaluation process of the pricing by the bidders, and as a result no appointment could be made by 30 November 2020. The department therefore extended the current contract by one month from 1 to 31 December 2020.

2. On 9 December 2020, the Bid Adjudication Committee (BAC) approved the cancellation of Bid DHA10-2020. It is therefore necessary to extend the existing service provider’s contract from 1 to 31 January 2021. This is a provisional arrangement during January 2021 to allow engagement with National Treasury so as to provide for an implementable timeframe allowing the department to re-advertise the Bid using a different costing method.

END

 

21 December 2020 - NW3001

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

With reference to the briefing by her department to the Portfolio Committee on Environmental Affairs, Forestry and Fisheries on 13 October 2020, wherein it was stated that her department is still drafting various pieces of legislation to further clarify animal welfare requirements, (a) what are the details of the specific legislation currently under review, (b) what is the status of the review process, (c) on what date will the necessary public participation process commence, (d) on what date will the draft legislation be made public and (e) what is the latest draft amendment thereto?

Reply:

a) An Animal Welfare Bill is being drafted which will repeal the Animals Protection Act, 1962 and the Performing Animals Protection Act, 1935.

b) The drafting and consultation towards the Animal Welfare Bill is currently limited to structures within the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development. A phase 1 Socio-Economic Impact Assessment approval for the development of the Animal Welfare Bill was granted in 2019.

c) There are no specific dates that have been set yet for the gazetting and/or release of the documents for public consultation. However, consultation with stakeholders on the Bill will be undertaken during the 2021/2022 financial year.

d) Please refer to (c) above.

e) The Department is not working on any draft amendment in relation to the subject matter. The response in (a) above clarifies that new legislation is being drafted.

21 December 2020 - NW2966

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Social Development

(1)With regard to the subsidy from her department to the Springs Child Welfare, what (a) were the reasons that the subsidy was not paid for the month of October 2020 and (b) was the total amount that was paid to the Springs Child Welfare in November 2020; (2) whether her department was informed that the late payment caused the Springs Child Welfare to close its doors in October due to its dire financial circumstances; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps will be taken to ensure that payment will be made on time in future?

Reply:

(1)(a) Gauteng Social Development scheduled the third quarter subsidy payment of Springs Child Welfare which was due end of October 2020 earlier in the same month but could not release it due to system glitches.

(b) However, once the system glitches were resolved, an amount of R 488,353 was paid on 10 November 2020 which was an advance subsidy payment for the months of October to December 2020.

(2) Yes, Gauteng Social Development was informed about the possibility of Springs Child Welfare closing its doors due to late subsidy payment and the Department urged Springs Child Welfare not to do so, as their funding delays were receiving urgent attention. The subsidy was eventually paid on 10 November 2020 which was 10 days later than the cut-off date of 30 October 2020.

With regards to the consequences of payment delays, Gauteng Social Development endeavours to minimise the adverse impact of subsidy delays by providing alternative measures to NPOs such as giving assurance letters to be utilised to access short finance/funds from the banks.

Gauteng Social Development is currently upgrading its payment system which will come into effect mid-financial year of 2021/22. The system upgrade is geared to resolve the various glitches that causes payment delays and we expect to see improvement post implementation.