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15 April 2021 - NW919

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that her department has just bought more than 20 water tankers worth R26 million for the Amathole District in the Eastern Cape, what are her long-term plans to resolve the water crisis in the specified district?

Reply:

The 20 water trucks (tankers) referred to by the Honourable Member were procured through Amatola Water as part of the Drought Intervention Programme for the entire Eastern Cape Province.

The Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) is currently implementing a number of long-term projects that seek to resolve the water crisis in Amathole District Municipality that are funded through government conditional grants, including the Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) as well as Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG).

Projects that are funded under RBIG are:

  • The Xhora Bulk Water Supply Scheme which includes a number of components, namely; the raw water supply system (river weir, pump stations and off-channel dam), the Xhora water treatment plant, and the treated water supply system. To date, 21 500 people have access to water. An additional 12 500 residents should have access to clean water in the next 3 months when the next phase is commissioned.
  • The Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme Phase 5A, referred to as the Butterworth Emergency Water Supply Scheme, will transfer raw water from the Tsomo River to the upper reaches of the Xilinxa River Dam catchment to augment the water supply to Butterworth. The existing water treatment works (WTW) downstream of the Xilinxa Dam will be used to supply treated water to Butterworth. This project will then be integrated into the Ngqamakhwe Regional Water Supply Scheme (RWSS) and will be used to distribute potable water once the Tsomo WTW has been commissioned. The contractor has established the site and construction has commenced. The anticipated completion date is 23rd of September 2023

District Wide Refurbishment projects that include a variety of refurbishment work of water treatment works, waste water treatment works, sewer pump stations, boreholes and bulk infrastructure in the towns of Adelaide, Bedford, Butterworth and Idutywa are as follows:

  • Bedford & Adelaide Town - Refurbishment of Adelaide & Bedford WTW currently under construction. The project is 50% complete and the anticipated completion date is 30th June 2021
  • Butterworth Town - Augmentation of Butterworth Water supply from Teko Kona Boreholes currently under construction. The project is 90% complete and the anticipated completion date on the 30th of June 2021.
  • Idutywa Town - The Amathole District Municipality will be equipping boreholes for the Augmentation of water supply around iDutywa area. The projects are to commence in 2022/23
  • Water Conservation and Demand Management (WCDM) teams have been established to deal with the implementation of various WCDM strategies aimed at reducing non-revenue water within Amathole District Municipality. The Water Loss Reduction Programmes are being implemented in the Amahlathi, Great Kei, Mbashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa and Raymond Mhlaba Local Municipalities. The projects include:
  • Monthly billing analysis,
  • Retrofitting of internal plumbing
  • Leak Detection and repairs
  • Reservoir repairs
  • Dam repairs
  • Meter Installations and replacements
  • Water Balance Reports, and
  • Pressure Management and Water Restrictions
  • District Wide Water Supply which entails the provision of bulk water supply and reticulation with standpipes and/or drilling and equipping of boreholes and refurbishment of existing infrastructure.
  • West Victoria East Water Supply phase 3 - The project is for the provision of water supply extension to all the local villages.
  • Rural Household Sanitation for Provision of basic sanitation services - 218 Ventilated Pit Latrines to be provided in order to address the sanitation backlog within the Municipal area of Mnquma ward 11 and 4. To date, 121 VIP structures have been constructed in the villages of Mnquma, Ward 11.
  • There are also Drought Intervention Projects which include projects for siting, drilling and testing of boreholes and ad-hoc emergency drought related works such as equipping of boreholes, refurbishing of pumps and generators throughout the District (Mnquma LM, Mbashe LM, Raymond Mhlaba, Adelaide, Bedford and Hogsback). Progress in this regard is as follows:
  • Equipping of Goshen Borehole = 100% complete
  • Construction of Butterworth Water Treatment Works Backwash recovery system = 70% complete
  • Equipping of Wartburg Borehole = 45% complete

The Projects that are funded under WSIG drought funding, rolled over from the 2018/19 financial year are:

  • Butterworth Water Supply - Water Treatment works backwash water recovery.
  • Butterworth Water Supply - Augmentation of bulk water to Ibika from Teko Kona boreholes.

The table below shows the breakdown of the allocations per programme for 2018/19, 2019/20 and 2020/21 financial year allocation to ADM:

Programme

2018/19 Allocation

2019/20

Allocation

2020/21

Allocation

RBIG

R 66 500 000

R 99 694 000

R106 366 000

WSIG

R100 000 000

R102 000 000

R 80 000 000

WSIG Drought

R 64 000 000

R 64 000 000

-

Total

R230 500 000

R201 6294 000

R186 366 000

15 April 2021 - NW285

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Whether she will furnish Ms E L Powell with the (a) specifications of the Travel With Flair tender, (b) date on which the tender was awarded, (c) total value of the tender, (d) total costs spent against the tender from commencement of the contract to date, (e) notice of any deviations processed in order to procure personal protective equipment from Travel with Flair, (f) legislative prescripts upon which the deviation relied, (g) notice of approval of the deviation and (h) contract value of the deviation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) The tender specification of Travel With Flair (TWF) is attached as Annexure A.

(b) The tender was awarded to Travel with Flair on 16 October 2017.

(c) & (d) From the commencement date of the tender until to date the department paid R401 113 751.00. This is a total amount spent inclusive of local accommodation provided, international accommodation provided, local air transport, international air transport, local land transport, community events management, conferences, seminars, departmental functions, information sessions, training sessions, departmental management meetings (away from department’s offices and usually with other spheres of government), travel agency service fees, travel agency back office processing fees and travel agency conference and events management fees.

(e) to (h) There were no deviations processed. The personal protective equipment paid for were part of the costs of community events the company coordinated or managed on behalf of the department. This was to ensure that the events comply with requirements of the guidelines issued by the Department of Health and SAPS as well as the disaster management regulations on Covid-19 issued by the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs,

 

15 April 2021 - NW184

Profile picture: Mackenzie, Mr C

Mackenzie, Mr C to ask the Minister of Communications

(1)   (a) Why and (b) for how long has the electricity been turned off at the Reygersdal Post Office in Atlantis; (2) What steps are being taken to ensure power is restored? (3) What steps are being taken to ensure a backup power system is put in place?

Reply:

I have been advised by the SAPO as follows:

1. (a) The Reygersdal branch’s electricity was disconnected due to cable theft in the area.

(b) The electricity was disconnected in mid-January 2021.

2. The electricity has since been restored.

3. The disconnection of electricity due to cable theft can not be predicted and planned for due to its nature. However, in instances where cable theft unexpectedly occurs, the Municipality is contacted to ensure urgent restorative maintanance to avoid prolonged disruption of services.

 

MS. STELLA NDABENI-ABRAHAMS, MP

MINISTER OF COMMUNICATIONS AND DIGITAL TECHNOLOGIES

15 April 2021 - NW917

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

How does her department intend to resolve the issues of raw sewerage and pollution at the eMfuleni Local Municipality?

Reply:

The pollution of the Vaal River System is a consequence of poor maintenance of sanitation infrastructure by a number of municipalities located along the Vaal River including the Provinces of Mpumalanga, Gauteng, Free State and North West. The Emfuleni Local Municipality (LM) contributes a significant amount to this pollution. The water and sanitation infrastructure challenges in the Emfuleni LM which the provincial and national government interventions are focusing upon are as follows:

a) Operations and Maintenance

b) Refurbishment

c) Upgrade

The Honourable Member will be aware that the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC) published its report titled “Final Report of the Gauteng Provincial Inquiry Into the Sewage Problem of the Vaal River” on 17 February 2021. Immediately thereafter we started consultations with the relevant stakeholders in accordance with the Water Services Act.

I have had meetings with my colleague, the Minister of Cooperative Government and Traditional Affairs, the Premier of Gauteng and the Gauteng MEC of COGTA as well as the Emfuleni Local Municipality to solicit inputs that will be incorporated into the intervention plan. 

A task team comprising senior officials of the Department of Water and Sanitation, Water and Sanitation Advisory Panels, NRRTT and other technical experts have been established to manage the implementation of the intervention plan.

I shall be approaching Cabinet to brief it on the SAHRC Report and to present the intervention plan for support and approval as soon as the necessary consultations are completed.

15 April 2021 - NW849

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Whether he will furnish Ms H Ismail with a comprehensive plan for the actual rollout of vaccines broken down into (i) time frames and the (ii) number of vaccines to be administered on each day and (b) what is being done to address the challenges with Emergency Medical Services in each province?

Reply:

a) The vaccination programme is aims reduce the morbidity and mortality of Covid-19. Fundamentally, it is to ensure community survival and manage economic survival. It will do through two main objectives. In the short term it is to manage severity of disease and reduce mortality by vaccinating the most vulnerable (health care workers, elderly and those with co-morbilidies); and in the medium term to build herd immunity by vaccinating everyone else.

(i) Phase 1 of the programme is targeting health care workers. This phase will be completed by end April 2021. Phase 2 of the Programme will be completed by the end of quarter 2 of the 2021/22 financial year. Phase 3 of the Programme will be completed by the end of the 2021/22 financial year.

(ii) We are estimating that on average we would vaccinate 50,000 persons per day in quarter 1; progressively increasing to on average vaccinating 135,000 persons per day in quarter 4.

b) The National Department of Health promulgated the Emergency Medical Services (EMS) Regulations in December 2017. These regulations make provision for a licensing and inspectorate processes and also stipulate the minimum requirements to become an EMS provider for both the public and private sectors. The process of accreditation of EMS providers in compliance with the EMS Regulations is ongoing at provincial level. Only those EMS providers and ambulance units that meet the requirements are issued license token and allowed to operate within the respective health districts.

In addition, the National Department of Health (NDOH) together with the Office of Health Standards and Compliance (OHSC), in consultation with the National Committee for EMS (Provincial EMS Managers) developed the draft Regulations relating to Standards for Emergency Medical Services (EMS) to facilitate standardization and equitable services in the provision of public and private EMS countrywide by all accredited EMS providers – now published for public comment. The proposed regulation will not only maintain a standard of service delivery but will also improve the quality of service as well as maintaining a minimum standard of service delivery. It will enhance the EMS Regulation, by detailing the standards required in the provision of a high quality EMS. It will also assist in refining the licensing and inspection process of the EMS Regulations by the respective provincial Licensing and Inspectorate Authorities.

A 5 year quality improvement plan is embedded in the assessment tool – the Ideal EMS Framework – with systems in place for district, provincial and national monitoring which includes the Office of Health Standards Compliance when these regulations are promulgated.

EMS will also form an integral part of the Quality Learning Centres (QLCs) envisaged in the Presidential National Quality Improvement Plan to create centres of excellence in each province. These QLCs are the spearhead for improving service delivery in preparation for NHI.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW878

Profile picture: Mhlongo, Mr TW

Mhlongo, Mr TW to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

With regard to COVID-19 relief funding, what total (a)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the first phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the first phase, (b)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the second phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the second phase and (c)(i) amount was allocated to beneficiaries in the third phase of the relief funding and (ii) number of beneficiaries received their funding during the third phase?

Reply:

PHASE ONE

a) (i) R80 044 284,14 was paid to beneficiaries

(ii) 4166 (including 319 from Sport sector) received funding

PHASE TWO

(i) R 5 543 800 was paid to beneficiaries including the partnership between

DSAC/DSBD.

(ii) 4110 (including 88 from Sport sector) beneficiaries received funding.

PHASE THREE

c) (i) No beneficiaries have been paid yet in the third phase.

(ii). Still to be determined

15 April 2021 - NW911

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total (i) number of cases of medical negligence have been submitted to his department over the past five years and (ii) amount has it cost his department to settle the specified claims and (b) has he found are the root causes of the proliferation of the cases of medical negligence?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW926

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(1)(a)(i). How does mentorship at the National Arts Council work and (ii) on what bases are they linked to funded projects and/or applications for funding, (b)(i) what procurement process was followed to appoint mentors and (ii) in cases where mentors were nominated, what does the process entail and how does it correlate with the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, (c)(i) what amount of the allocated funding that is applied for, do mentors receive and (ii) where does this reflect on the record and (d) what (i) total number of applicants completed their projects without assistance from their mentors and (ii) what happens to the money deducted and allocated towards mentors where they are not assisting the applicants; (2). whether the money goes to the applicant and/or to the Surplus Fund and then distributed via the Surplus Policy; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to NAC:

(1)(a)(i). In 2019, the National Arts Council initiated a mentorship programme for specific approved beneficiaries. However, the programme did not proceed as there was no policy developed for it.

(ii) The mentorship was proposed for projects in marginalised and rural areas that needed support in implementing projects. The amount was meant to be 25% of identified projects’ allocation.

(b)(i) There was no procurement process followed as the programme did not continue.

(ii) There were no mentors nominated

(c)(i) None as the programme did not proceed, mentorship fees were not allocated.

(ii) Nothing is reflected as there were no payments done to mentors

(d) Ten (10)

(ii) The money is still in the NAC’s account

(2). The money remaining will be allocated to funding of bursaries and projects through an open call for funding.

15 April 2021 - NW535

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Service and Administration

Whether, in light of the dismissal of a certain person (name and details furnished), for illegally appointing his mistress to the position of Chief Director: Professional Ethics, he intends to institute a review of the fitness to hold office of all people appointed by the specified person; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As it stands all appointments made by this person were performed in line with the law and delegations and therefore they are all valid until declared invalid by a court of law. In addition, each appointment made creates a contract of employment and rights for employees in terms of the Labour Relations Act of 1995 and other labour legislation. The individual employees’ rights cannot be diminished by just one incident that has no bearing on their employment.

The dismissal of the person is regarded as a deterrent to all employees to act within the prescribed legislative framework and the organisation cannot conduct a witch-hunt where no allegation or evidence of wrong-doing exist. Such an approach will have a destabilising effect on the organisation. In this regard, it should be kept in mind that the recruitment and selection process is not undertaken by a single person, but by a Selection Committee comprising of at least three members and is guided by the Public Service Regulations, 2016, as amended, and the Departmental Policy on Recruitment and Selection. When the allegations came to the attention of the Executive Authority, the former employee was removed from all recruitment and selection processes within the organisation.

Since the dismissal of the former employee, the organisation has been at pains to institute additional controls in the human resources management environment to overcome the challenges identified in the recruitment and selection process, this includes but is not limited to a comprehensive legislative and policy framework checklist that accompanies each recruitment and selection process, as well as the review of human resources management policies.

Whistle-blowing Guidelines are in place to encourage and enable employees to raise serious concerns about fraud and corruption within the organisation or with the independent Audit Committee. All complaints are handled professionally and in line with the prevailing prescripts.

15 April 2021 - NW625

Profile picture: Madlingozi, Mr BS

Madlingozi, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Health

Whether the Johnson & Johnson vaccine that is being used to vaccinate persons is still part of a study; if not, is it a roll-out of an approved vaccine; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Johnson & Johnson vaccine that is currently being used to vaccinate healthcare workers is still part of a study.

The vaccine was used in a large international Phase 3 study which enrolled nearly 40,000 participants. The study showed that, in South Africa where we have the 501Y.V2 variant, the vaccine reduced severe disease by 81.7% and moderate disease by 64%. The Phase 3a study provided evidence of efficacy and safety of the vaccine. Because there is often a time lapse between a Phase 3 study being successfully completed, and the registration of a product for use outside of a clinical trial, an open label study is often used to bridge this gap. Phase 3b studies, the context in which this vaccine is being used, allows for early access to the vaccine and also enables the collection of additional data on safety, efficacy and how to introduce a new product. In a phase 3b study, although evidence of safety and efficacy is confirmed, informed consent must be obtained. In a phase 3b study, placebo is not used in the study and does not involve experimentation with any unproven vaccines.

A medicine is registered based on the evidence of safety and efficacy obtained from Phase 3 studies. The use of a registered medicine does not require informed consent, although as with any medicine, patients must understand what the vaccine is for, whether there are any specific side effects, and they must be willing to take it.

A phase 3b study and a vaccine roll-out both involve wide-scale implementation of Covid-19 vaccines, they differ only insofar as the type of regulatory approval required as well as the informed consent and information collected from those being vaccinated

END.

15 April 2021 - NW396

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

In light of the fact that early in January 2021 a total number of 202 communities in KwaZulu-Natal served by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality had no water for nearly a week, and in view of the fact that although water has been restored, there are reports of civil action to be taken against the specified municipality, what immediate action will be taken to rehabilitate ageing water infrastructure considering the seriousness of the COVID-19 pandemic and the urgent need for water security?

Reply:

I have been informed by the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality that the main cause of the water outages in eThekwini in early January 2021 was the lack of capacity within the eThekwini Metropolitan Municipality to deal with mechanical and electrical failures. There was a delay in the awarding of the maintenance contracts which are now in the final stages of procurement and should be awarded within the next month.

I am further informed that electricity outages result in a shortage of supply when there is load shedding. Therefore, the unit that deals with electricity issues in the municipality has been approached to find a way of excluding Wiggins and Durban Heights Waterworks from load shedding. I have been advised that it has now been agreed that the two works will be excluded from load shedding when ESKOM imposes levels below Level 3 load shedding.  

15 April 2021 - NW848

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) is the percentage of posts currently vacant in State hospitals and (b) is the current recovery rate of COVID-19 patients with comorbidities in each province?

Reply:

(a)​  The overall percentage (%) rate for vacant posts in State Hospitals is 13%. The table below indicates the (%) rate of vacant posts in State Hospitals per Province as at end February 2021.

Province

% Vacant posts in Hospitals

Eastern Cape

13%

Free State

21%

Gauteng

11%

KwaZulu Natal

14%

Limpopo Province

7%

Mpumalanga

12%

North West

14%

Northern Cape

17%

Western Cape

15%

Overall Total

13%

(b) The recovery rate of COVID-19 patients without comorbidities reported as at 14 April 2021 is as below, please note that the comorbidities indicator is not covered as the current reporting classification does not include it:

 

PROVINCE

TOTAL RECOVERIES

 

14 April 2021

Eastern Cape

184,064

Free State

79,579

Gauteng

405,110

KwaZulu-Natal

319,830

Limpopo

60,970

Mpumalanga

74,225

North West

61,631

Northern Cape

33,215

Western Cape

268,249

Total

1,486,873

END

15 April 2021 - NW893

Profile picture: Hlengwa, Ms MD

Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether, with reference to the administration of the first batch of vaccines (details furnished), he has been engaging with the medical aid companies, particularly those whose apparent current stance is that they do not carry liability in law for side effects and adverse effects of medicine administration and this would apply to the vaccine on the same basis; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether members of medical aid schemes qualify for medical care for conditions that are a result of vaccine side-effects; if not, why not; if so, (3) what is his department’s position with regard to the no-fault compensation fund mentioned by the Finance Minister in his recent Budget Speech?

Reply:

1. The engagements with the medical schemes industry have been coordinated and managed by the Council for Medical Schemes (CMS), which is the body mandated with oversight of the industry as per the provisions of the Medical Schemes Act (No. 131 of 1998). One of the core provisions of the Act is the need for all medical schemes to cover Prescribed Minimum Benefits (PMBs), except for those that have applied and qualified for specific exemptions. By definition, PMBs are a set of predefined conditions which, anyone who is part of a medical scheme, no matter what benefit option they are on, can receive treatment for 270 hospital-based and 25 chronic conditions, and the price of these will be covered in full. The aim of PMB cover is to ensure that the wellbeing and health of South African medical scheme members is safeguarded, and that private healthcare is more affordable. PMBs also cover any kind of emergency treatment and include certain out-of-hospital treatments.

To ensure that the population is adequately covered for COVID-19, the CMS included it as part of the PMB conditions in May 2020. Additionally, COVID-19 vaccines were also included as a benefit in December 2020. These two inclusions were done in concurrence between the Minister of Health and the Council for Medical Schemes in line with the provisions of the Act. This essentially implies that each medical scheme is compelled to cover the full costs of testing, diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of COVID-19 related conditions. This also includes covering all clinical adverse events as well as any complications that may arise because of being inoculated with a COVID-19 vaccine.

2. All medical schemes are legally obliged through the amendments that have been made to the PMB regulations to cover the full costs of any side effects that their members may experience due to having being inoculated with a COVID-19 vaccine.

3. There are several requirements when governments and or international entities engage with manufacturers and suppliers of vaccines globally. In the engagements that we have been having regarding access to and supply of COVID-19 vaccines, some of the core requirements include the need for countries to make (a) upfront payments for vaccines prior to receiving delivery of their orders; (b) compliance with all contractual confidentiality clauses for a period of up to 10 years; (c) the establishment of No-Fault Compensation systems to indemnify manufacturers from any adverse events that may occur as a result of administering the vaccines; (d) the demand for Ministers to sign contracts and not DGs; and (e) the change in delivery terms without negotiating with the purchasing country and no penalties to be imposed in instances where that occurs.

The National Department of Health is in full support of the no-fault compensation fund mentioned by the Finance Minister in his recent Budget Speech. To this effect, the Department has initiated a few actions to support the expedited establishment of the no-fault compensation fund. We are proposing the establishment of a National Immunisation Safety Committee (NISEC) to be chaired by a Retired Judge. The NISEC would be charged with determining causality in terms of the adverse events. It would be supported by an Adjudication Committee which will look into the severity of the injury suffered by the claiming party and also determine the appropriate level of compensation. An Appeals Committee will also be created to handle all appeals and an Administrator would be in place to manage all matters pertaining to records keeping, communication with claimants, processing and payment of claims and all other relevant administration matters. The administration could be under an entity similar to SASRIA. Standard operating procedures would be in place to follow clear steps that ensure appropriate adjudication of claims, and also providing opportunity for claimants to accept or reject the recommended compensation.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW818

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

1. with reference to the Arts Organisation Support Funding, he will furnish Mrs V van Dyk with a list of all applications for projects funding in terms of the (a) names of applicants, (b) amounts approved and (c) date on which funding of each project (i) started and (ii) expired from 1 January 2019 to 31 December 2020; 2. What (a) number of applications are still active and (b) is the name of each applicant; 3. Whether any of the applicants had successfully reapplied in 2020, but still have active projects, if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, (a) what is the (i) name of each applicant and (ii) amount of funding allocated and (b) has any payment been made? NW977E

Reply:

1. The following are the projects financially supported in the year under review.

LIST OF CULTURAL DEVELOPMENT PROJECT PROJECTS FUNDED DURING 2020/21

   

#

Name & surname

Date of Approval

Budget

Duration of the Project

Active/Non Active

1

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300.000

Not yet started

Non-Active

2

Mr Molaodi Sekake

18/05/2020

R100.000

18/03/2021 – 30/09/2021

Active

3

Ms Rosemary Gray

18/05/2020

R100 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

4

Mr Barney Mokgatle

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

5

Mr Mandlakayise Dube

18/05/2020

R350 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

6

Ms Fikile Hlatshwayo

18/05/2020

R300 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

7

Mr Mothobi Mutloatse

18/05/2020

R380 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

8

Mr Reedwaan Vally / New Africa Books

18/05/2020

R1,100 000

20/09/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

9

Congress Mahlangu and Andre Marais / Reading Incubator SOECA

18/05/2020

R1 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

10

South African Book Development Council (SABDC)

18/05/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R 2 500 000

20/12/2020 – 25/02/2021

Active

11

Nonhlanhla Matshazi / Londilox

18/05/2020

R2 000 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

12

South African Literary Awards (Raks Seakhoa)

13/03/2020

Has received annual funding for the period under review

R1 500 000

20/12/2020 – 31/03/2021

Active

13

Roshnie Moonsammy (Afro Arts SA) / African Women Writers Network project

13/03/2020

Has received funding in the period under review

R750 000

Not yet started

Non-Active

14

UKZN Time of the Writer Festival

13/03/2020

R800 000

01/07/2020 – 31/12/2020

Active

15

KZN Music Imbizo

24/08/2020

R1060,000

31/03/2021

Completed

16

Crown Gospel Awards

22/08/2020

R2000,000

31/03/2021

Active

17

Africa Rising International Film Festival (Streamed)

25/06/2019

R1,200,000

03/2019 – 05/2021 (2 yrs)

Active

18

Fashion Industry Awards (online launch)

01/09/2020

R500,000

15/02/2021

Active

19

Groovafest

17/12/2020

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

20

Fashion Heritage Social Entrepreneur capacity building (online program)

01/09/2020

R1000 000

31/03/2021

Active

21

Content Creation/Innovative Hubs (Animation)

 

R 3 000 000

Not Started

Non Active

23

Emerging Creatives capacity building program (virtual & steamed)

22/09/2020

R1190 000

31/03/2021

Active

24

Dr Wally Serote Reading Incubator

 

R 1 000 000

 

Active

25

BOM Music Development Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 00

 

Completed

26

Playhouse company Incubator

 

R1 000 000

 

Active

27

Arts in Motion Incubator Programme

 

R1 000 000

 

Completed

28

Arts Cape Incubator

 

R1 000 000

Not started

Non Active

29

Reading Incubator & Athlone Hub

 

R 700 000

 

Active

30

Training program (Amambazo Mobile Academy)

16/07/2018

R12 million

30/06/2021

Non Active

31

INDONI SA

 

R10 milliom

Not Strated

Non Active

32

Covid Book and Women Network

-

R840 000

Not sarted

Non Active

33

South African Roadies Association (SARA) International Relations

21/12/2020

R1,265,000

31/03/2023

Active

34

CCIFSA

08/05/2020

R2.5millin

31/03/2021

Active

36

Northern Cape Provincial CADP

 

0.00

 

Active

37

Eastern Cape Provincial CADP

26/02/2020

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

38

Western Cape CADP

09/03/2021

450,000

31.04/2021

Active

39

Limpopo Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

41

North West CADP

08/03/2020

300,000

30/04/2021

Active

42

Gauteng Provincial CADP

10/03/2020

300,000

31/03/2021

Active

43

Mpumalanga Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Active

44

Free State Provincial CADP

01/11/2019

0.00

30/05/2021

Acrive

45

KZN Provincial CADP

26/02/2021

450,000

31/03/2021

Active

47

National Arts Festival

 

R3,5 million

 

Completed

48

Mai Mai

17/11/2020

R2. million

31/03/2021

Active

49

South African National Book Development Policy Consultative Session (s)

-

R1 300 000

Not started

Non Active

50

Downtown Studios

15/06/2020

R6 million

31/03/2020

Active

51

District Six

-

R3 million

Not started

Non Active

52

African Book Design Fair

-

R300 000

Not Started

Non Active

53

Spoken Word Youth Performance Poetry ( Hear my Voice)

 

R500 000

 

Active

54

Public Art project in Tembisa, Gauteng

30/06/2020

R250,000

31/03/2020

Active

55

Public Art project at Emakhazeni, Mpumalanga

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2020

Active

56

SAMIC Conference

-

R604 000

Not Started

Non Active

57

Public Art project at Salt River, Western Cape

30/06/2020

R400,000

31/03/2021

Active

58

Public Art project at Eluthuthu, Eastern Cape

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

59

Gateways Public Art at Several Municipalities

30/06/2020

R500,000

31/03/2021

Active

60

KZN_ Wushini

 

R400 000

Not started

Non Active

61

LP_TLZ Development Projects

 

R400 000

Not stared

Non Active

62

MPUMALANGA_ Emthojeni

   

Not started

Non Active

65

Writers Guild of South Africa

October 19

R700 000

2019 -2021

Active

66

Siters Working in Film and TV

0ctober 2019

R246 000

2019 -2021

Active

67

South African Guild of Actors

19/07/2019

R300 000

31/03/2021

Active

68

South African Screen Federation (SASFED

19/07/2-19

R1 000 000

31/03/2021

Active

69

Independent Black Filmmakers Collective (IBFC)

1+9/07/2019

R964 750

31/03/2021

Active

70

South African Arts & Culture Youth Forum (SAACYF)

03=09=2019

R1,7 million

31/03/2020

Completed

71

Open Design Afrika

02/09/2020

R300 000

31/03/2021

Completed

72

The Village Knockout Foundation

22/11/2021

R516 850

31/03/2021

Active

73.

Marang Youth Development

22/11/2021

R600 000

31/03/2021

Active

74.

Somelezi Development & Project

22/11/2021

R638 000

31/03/2021

Active

75.

The Filed Band Foundation

22/11/2021

R700 000

31/03/2021

Active

76

Sizovelela Community Development

22/11/2021

R572 000

31/03/2021

Active

77.

Make It Happen (NPO)

22/11/2021

R500 000

31/03/2021

Active

78.

Unity and Cultural Diversity Council (NPO)

22/11/2021

R554 000

31/03/2021

Active

79.

Steelpan and Marimba Youth Development

03/02/2021

R590 000

31/03/2021

completed

80.

Ndwanenhle Rural Development

15/12/2020

R583 150

31/03/2021

Completed

2 . (a) 44 applications / projects are still active and the (b) names are reflected in the table above

15 April 2021 - NW705

Profile picture: Ismail, Ms H

Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)When last did his department conduct oversight of the (a) academic programmes offered to and (b) living conditions of students studying in the Republic of Cuba as part of the Nelson Mandela-Fidel Castro Medical Collaboration Programme; (2) whether his department made any changes to the programme over the past five academic years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) what number of (a) students enrolled in the programme in every academic year since its inception and (b) the specified students graduated with a medical degree after completion of the programme?

Reply:

In order to respond to this Question, information must be sourced from the provinces. The Department is still in the process of sourcing this information and as soon as all the information is received, the Minister will provide the response to the Question.

END.

15 April 2021 - NW927

Profile picture: Van Dyk, Ms V

Van Dyk, Ms V to ask the Minister of Sport, Arts and Culture

(Given that his department donated funds for COVID-19 relief where applicants were promised to receive three payments of R2 200 over three months, totalling an amount of R6 600, what (a) total amount was made available for the COVID-19 Relief Fund by his department, (b)(i) were the dates for applications and (ii) number of applicants applied and (c) are the (i) names of the beneficiaries, (ii) dates of application for the funding and (iii) relevant details of the payments made in each case?

Reply:

The R6 600 was applicable in the 2ND Wave of Covid-19 Relief funding cycle and was never broken down over three months.

a) Total amount made available was R20 million split equally between BASA and NAC.

b) (i) The applications opened on 17 August 2020 and closed on 11th September 2020.

(ii) 2809 applications were received.

c) (i) See attached list

(ii) All applicants applied within the window period of 17 August 2020 to 11th September 2020.

(iii) So far, 582 approved applicants were each paid R6 600.

 

15 April 2021 - NW660

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

(a) What is the annual amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) and (b) will she furnish Ms E L Powell with the details of all (i) contractors involved in the production of the television, (ii) the terms of agreement and (iii) any contractual documents between the SABC and the specified department with regard to the screening of the BNG television show?

Reply:

a) The amount spent by the Department of Human Settlements on the Breaking New Ground (BNG) television show hosted by the SA Broadcast Corporation (SABC) was R11 417 699.00 for the 2020/21 financial year.

No

Description

Amount (Rands)

 

SABC 2 Airtime through GCIS

7,335 199.00

 

BNG TV Production through GCIS

4,082 500.00

 

TOTAL

11, 417 699.00

(b) Tsalena Media was appointed through the Government Communication Information System (GCIS). The terms of the agreement can be obtained from GCIS.

15 April 2021 - NW856

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the imported KN95 masks that have been supplied to many of the healthcare professionals in the Republic to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic of which the majority were found to be below par in efficiency, what (a) number of the specified KN95 masks were imported for use and/or supply to SA healthcare workers and (b) was the total amount paid to the suppliers of these masks during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic;

Reply:

The following information has been received from the Provincial Departments of Health:

  1. The following table reflects the details in this regard:

PROVINCES

(a) number of the specified KN95 masks were imported for use and/or supply to SA healthcare workers

(b) total amount paid to the suppliers of these masks during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic

Eastern Cape

900,000

R38,270,000.00

Free State

450,000

R20,501,000.00

Gauteng

12,165,760

R114,863,550.03

KwaZulu-Natal

The only KN95 masks received were all donated stock.

R0.00

Limpopo

600,002

R16,500,025.00

Mpumalanga

450,000

R20,501,000.00

Northern Cape

280,000

R11,028,800.00

North West

165,000

R2,863,500.00

Western Cape

600,000

R28,715,000.00

(2) During the outset of the Covid-19 pandemic the only supplier contracted as part of the transversal contract was for Respirators that complied with the N95 (United States NIOSH-42CFR84) standard. The USA government during this period placed an embargo on the exportation of N95 respirators due to the demand for these in the USA. This situation impacted on the availability of N95 respirators in South Africa.

To manage the procurement of PPE, in this case respirators within the context of a global shortage, Treasury Notes 3 and 5 of 2020/21 made special provisions for the procurement of PPE in an emergency. National Treasury issued Treasury Note 3 of 2020/21 to allow for a central procurement mechanism which would have assisted provinces. However due to objections raised by stakeholders this note was repealed and replaced by Treasury Note 5 of 2020/21. Treasury Note 5 of 2020/218 then enabled local procurement of PPE within the framework of emergency procurement under the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), as amended, and up to a value of R30 million on a decentralised basis by provinces.

(3) The Infection Prevention and Control guidelines developed in response to the Covid-19 pandemic recommends the use of respirators in environments where aerosol generating procedures are performed.

These respirators or filtering facepiece respirators (FFR), are subject to various regulatory standards around the world. These standards specify certain required physical properties and performance characteristics for respirators to claim compliance with the particular standard.

  • N95 (United States NIOSH-42CFR84)
  • FFP2 (Europe EN 149-2001)
  • KN95 (China GB2626-2006)

Noting that all of the above standards are comparable as per the below table.