Question & Reply: Social Development

2010-07-01

THIS FILE CONTAINS 25 REPLIES.

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QUESTION 3559

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mrs H Lamoela (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

What is the (a) optimal and (b) actual number of social workers needed in each province to implement the Older Person's Act, Act 13 of 2006? NW4399E

REPLY:

(a) The optimal number of social workers needed in each province to implement the Older Person's Act, is based on the ratio of social workers per population. This is documented as follows:

POPULATION

RATIO OF SOCIAL WORKERS TO POPULATION

Urban, i.e. Gauteng

1: 5000

Combined urban and rural, i.e. Kwa-Zulu Natal and Western Cape

1: 4500

All other provinces

1:3000

The ratio indicated, is for social workers providing all social welfare services including older persons and it is based on the international standard for established norm for ratio of social worker per population. While South Africa is on par with international standards, we have a demand for more social workers due to the fact that being developing country, there are high levels of poverty, vulnerability and a high incidence of HIV and AIDS which compounds the prevailing social and health problems. Therefore, there is comparatively a need to recruit more social workers and other social service professionals.

(b) According to the report on the costing of the Older Persons Act, 2005, the actual number of social workers needed to implement the Act was calculated on a ratio: 1 social worker is to 5000 for urban areas, 4500 combined urban and rural areas and 3000 for rural areas for older persons. The determination of these figures was based on the costing model as well as the SOCPEN statistics. The figures illustrated below are based on the costing of the Older Persons' Bill conducted in 2005:

Distribution of Individuals(Older Persons) and Social Workers by Province

Province

Older Persons (2005)

Desired number of social workers exclusively for older persons

Current social workers in government (crosscutting functions)

Eastern Cape

644,338

129

1,629

Free State

214,947

43

543

Gauteng

628,127

126

1,588

KwaZulu Natal

744,065

149

1,881

Limpopo

461,342

92

1,166

Mpumalanga

227,167

45

574

North West

313,282

63

792

Northern Cape

72,146

14

182

Western Cape

400,720

80

1,013

South Africa

3,706,133

741

9,367

Ratio

1:5000

The figures provided above, reflects the total number of social workers providing cross cutting (generic) social work services in government and the desired number of social workers exclusively for older persons. It should be noted that older persons have a variety of specific needs and therefore require specialised services. Besides social workers there are other critical professionals such as social auxiliary workers, community development practioners, trained caregivers, professional nurses, physiotherapists, occupational therapists, and medical doctors that are required to provide specialised services to older persons.

NOTE:

Social Work has been declared a scarce skill and through funding made available by National Treasury, the Department of Social Development has embarked on a definitive social work scholarship programme to recruit potential students from poor families to train as social workers. The table below depicts the total number of Scholarship Holders per Province as at 30 March 2010.

PROVINCE

SCHOLARSHIP HOLDERS

Eastern Cape

1183

Free State

264

Gauteng

537

KwaZulu-Natal

1491

Limpopo

753

North West

525

Mpumalanga

394

Northern Cape

168

Western Cape

268

TOTAL

5574

QUESTION 3558

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mrs H Lamoela (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether all the aspects of the Older Persons Act, Act 13 of 2006, are fully implemented; if not, (a) why not, (b) which parts of the Act are not fully implemented and (c) by when will they be fully implemented;

(2) whether any research has been conducted to ascertain the optimal amount of funding needed to implement the Act properly; if not, (a) why not and (b) how does her department determine the level of funding that is needed; if so, what is the (i) optimal level of funding and (ii) actual level of funding? NW4398E

REPLY:

(1) Yes, all the aspects of the Older Persons Act, Act 13 of 2006 (the Act) are fully implemented.

(2) Yes, Research was conducted in a form of costing of services to older persons. The costing of the Act was done in 2005 before promulgation of the Act. The costing covered costs for all the programmes for different levels of care over Mid Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) period 2006/2007, 2007/2008 and 2008/2009.

(b) The level of funding needed was determined by the development of the norms and standards and costing models for older persons. The DSD is currently looking into reviewing and developing new models of funding services to older persons.

(i) The optimal level of funding was based on the costing of the Older Persons' Bill that was conducted in 2005 which included the following:

The total cost of services is as follows:

TOTAL COSTS FOR PROGRAMMES

2008/2009

Programmes

Target No.

Unit Cost

Total

Residential Care

41,453

R 2,384.33

R 1,186,050,433

Integrated Community Care + Outreach

734,060

R 352.89

R 3,108,508,926

Home-based Care

29,962

R 522.23

R 187,764,663

Poverty Relief + Economic Empowerment

4,961

R 1,966.67

R 117,085,698

Capital

R 21,300,000

Administrative: National + Provincial

R 39,577,215

TOTAL COSTS

R 4,660,286,936

The cost of social workers for the implement the Bill is as follows:

TOTAL COST FOR STAFF COMPLIMENT

Cost Drivers

Provincial - per province

Per Unit Cost

No. of Units

Total Cost

Director

R 448,872

0.35

R 157,105

Secretary

R 0

Deputy Director (DD)

R 193,555

1

R 193,555

Assistant Director (AD)

R 132,923

2

R 265,846

Chief Social Worker (CSW)

R 123,462

3

R 370,386

Social Worker (SW)

R 111,320

3

R 333,960

Social Worker (SW) - district office

R 111,320

6

R 667,920

Admin Clerk

R 71,960

2

R 143,920

Total

R 1,988,772

30% cost on total for admin

R 596,632

30% program costs

R 775,621

Grand Total per Province

R 3,361,025.02

Grand Total

R 30,249,225.16

The breakdown cost of implementation per province is as follows:

IMPLEMENTATION OF OLDER PERSONS BILL

Provinces

Total cost needed(programmes + staff compliment)

Eastern Cape

815,484,122

Free State

272,039,600

Gauteng

794,966,683

KwaZulu-Natal

941,698,951

Limpopo

583,881,027

Mpumalanga

287,505,381

Northern Cape

396,494,473

North West

91,308,426

Western Cape

507,157,498

Total

4,690,536,161

(ii) The current actual level of funding for services to older persons according to provincial and national allocated budgets is as follows:

OLDER PERSONS ALLOCATION PER PROVINCES

Summary

2010/11

Original Budget

R'000

National

7,592

Eastern Cape

94,960

Free State

78,387

Gauteng

249,279

KwaZulu-Natal

90,512

Limpopo

18,797

Mpumalanga

31,504

Northern Cape

14,684

North West

59,773

Western Cape

137,508

Total

782,996

QUESTION 3530

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether (a) her department and (b) any of its entities provided any financial support to the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) for the World Festival of Youth and Students to be held in Pretoria in December 2010; if not, why not; if so, (i) what amount was provided to the NYDA, (ii) from which budget were these funds drawn, (iii) who made the decision to provide these funds to the NYDA and (iv) how is this (aa) decision and (bb) amount justified;

(2) whether the NYDA made any other request to (a) her department and (b) any of its entities to provide support to the festival; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4369E

REPLY:

On behalf of the Department of Social Development

1. The Department of Social Development is not providing financial support to the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) for the World Youth Festival of Youth and Student to be held in Pretoria in December 2010.

2. Yes, the NYDA made a request to the Department of Social Development, for incorporation of DSD social cohesion programmes into the festival. In this regard, the Department will put exhibition stalls at the venue of the WYF in order to showcase the Department's work in the area of Youth Development, Social Crime Prevention Initiatives, Anti – Substance Abuse programmes and Counselling services, all of which contribute to social cohesion.

On behalf of the National Development Agency

1. The NDA did not provide any financial support to the NYDA for the World Festival of Youth and Students. This event does not from part of the approved Business Plan of NDA for the year.

2. The NDA was not approached by the NYDA to provide financial support for the event in question.

On behalf of the South African Social Security Agency

1. (b) No. The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) did not provide any financial support to the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) for the World Festival of Youth and Students to be held in Pretoria in December 2010.

(i)Not applicable

(ii) Not applicable

(iii) Not applicable

(iv) Not applicable

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

2. (b) No. No request was made to the SASSA to support the festival.

QUESTION 3501

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mr S Mokgalapa (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether any organisation working with children have made enquiries to her department with regard to vetting persons they intend employing against the Child protection register; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many have been received, (b) from which specific organisations and (c) how many persons were refused permission to work with children? NW4340E

REPLY:

No, there are no organisations at this stage working with children who have made enquiries to the National Department of Social Development (DSD) with regard to the vetting of persons they intend employing against the National Child Protection Register (CPR): Part B.

Although the DSD will undertake a proper evaluation of the uptake on the register for all applicants at the end of this financial year; the explanation for the absence of any requests by employers to screen their new employees against the Register, could be attributed to the fact that employers are either prioritising the vetting of their existing employees to comply with the deadline of March 2011; or they are in a process of aligning their policies with this new requirement or they are ignoring the requirement or they have not been properly informed as yet.

In order to address this challenge, key stakeholders that include Education, Justice and Constitutional Development, Labour, South African Police Service, Child Welfare SA, and Child Line SA, have been requested to comply with the Children's Act. The DSD has also developed and distributed promotional material on the requirements of the Register. In addition capacity building regarding the new provisions of the Children's Act, including CPR: Part B is being provided to all relevant stakeholders at national and provincial levels. An extensive communication drive is being planned to sensitise all the relevant employers about the Register during 2011and beyond.

The inquiries received by the Department for vetting employees against the Register in relation to persons who are already employed and working with children is as follows:

(a) 412 inquiries have been received from 1 April to 22 October 2010.

(b) The inquiries were received from the following organizations:

i. Abraham Kriel Kinderhuis

ii. Bethal Private Primary School

iii. Child Welfare Chatsworth

iv. Child Welfare SA Vanderbijlpark

v. Christelike-Maatskaplike Raad

vi. Ekukhanyeni Pre-School

vii. Embizeni Creche

viii. Entokozweni Place Of Care

ix. Hambanathi Creche and Pre-School

x. Egugu Elihle Creche and Pre-School

xi. Enkanyezi Creche

xii. Inkanyiso Creche and Pre-School

xiii. Isiduduzo Pre-School

xiv. Khulani Creche

xv. Korwe Multi-Purpose Centre

xvi. Phomolong Pre-School and Educare Centre

xvii. Resources aimed at the Prevention of Child Abuse and Neglect (RAPCAN)

xviii. South African Police Service

xix. Sibusiswe Creche

xx. Sigcawu Creche

xxi. Siyathuthuka Child Educare Centre

xxii. Siyathuthuka Creche and Pre-School

xxiii. Sobahle Creche and Pre-School

xxiv. Thabang Children's Project

xxv. Verulaam Child and Family Welfare

xxvi. Wadisa

xxvii. Wylie House: Child and Youth Care Centre

(c) No person in current employment was found unsuitable to work with children.

QUESTION 3499

WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mr T W Coetzee (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether all aspects of the Children's Act are now fully implemented; if not, (a) why not, (b) which aspects are not fully implemented and (c) when will they become fully implemented; if so, what are the (i) optimal and (ii) actual funding requirements needed to implement the Children's Act? NW4338E

REPLY:

a. Yes, all aspects of the Children's Act are now fully implemented.

b. There are no aspects of the Children's Act that are not fully implemented.

c. All aspects of the Children's Act became fully implemented on 01 April 2010.

i. The optimal funding needed to implement the Children's Act is as follows:

PROVINCE

OPTIMAL FUNDING REQUIRED 2010/2011

Eastern Cape

R2 159 700 000

Free State

R935 700 000

Gauteng

R3 212 400 000

KwaZulu-Natal

R1 849 900 000

Limpopo

R1 511 800 000

Mpumalanga

R779 800 000

Northern Cape

R335 400 000

North West

R550 600 000

Western Cape

R1 195 800 000

South Africa

R12 531 100 000

(Source: Cornerstone Economic Research (2006). the Cost of the Children's Bill.)

ii. The actual funding available to implement the Children's Act is as follows:

PROVINCE

ACTUAL FUNDING 2010/11

Eastern Cape

R215 078 000

Free State

R294 511 000

Gauteng

R765 749 000

KwaZulu-Natal

R487 159 000

Limpopo

R147 635 000

Mpumalanga

R166 213 000

Northern Cape

R70 077 000

North West

R117 478 000

Western Cape

R345 931 000

South Africa

R 2 609 831 000

(Source: Budget II Statement of provinces)

QUESTION 3498

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mr T W Coetzee (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether any amounts have been budgeted for the (a) national and (b) provincial child protection register as stipulated in the Children's Act, Act 35 of 2005, (i) in the (aa) 2007-08, (bb) 2008-09 and (cc) 2009-10 and (ii) 2010-11 financial years; if not, why not; if so, how much in each case;

(2) whether any of the provincial child protection registers are linked electronically; if not, (a) which ones are not linked, (b) why are they not linked and (c) when will they be linked; if so, (i) which provinces are linked electronically, (ii) what system is being used to link them, (iii) how much did it cost, (iv) when was it installed in each province and (v) when did each province come on line;

(3) how many (a) persons, (b) offices, (c) telephone lines and (d) fax machines does each provincial office have? NW4337E

REPLY:

(1) (a) Yes, the national Child Protection Register (CPR) has been budgeted for in the stipulated financial years through the Integrated Justice System, these funds are ring fenced and allocated under the Department of Justice budget vote. The funds are centrally managed at National for the development of the register. The budget was allocated as follows:

(a) (i) (aa); (bb); (cc) and (ii)

Names of provinces

Year : 2007/2008

Year : 2008/2009

Year : 2009/2010

Year : 2010/2011

National Office

R1, 00,000

R1, 536,000

R1, 628,000

R1, 725, 849

Gauteng

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the child care and protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the child care and protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the child care and protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the child care and protection budget

Kwa-Zulu Natal

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

Northern Cape

R 43 236

R 56 238

R 57 549

R 70 077

Western Cape

R34 706

R72 299

0

0

North West

0

R 47 500

R 99 400

R 122 400

Limpopo

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of the overall budget for children.

Mpumalanga

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of Child Protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of Child Protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of Child Protection budget

No dedicated CPR Budget

Part of Child Protection budget

Free State

0

R 95 099

R 111 361

R 1 012 705

Eastern Cape

R145 234

R227, 731

R211,708

R215 078

(b) No, the Provincial Departments of Social Development do not have a separate specific budget for the provincial Child Protection Register, most have included the allocation for this activity in the provincial Children's or Child Protection budget. The above-mentioned costs reflect child protection register activities. Most of the costs are related to 3 G Cards, telephone lines, training and salaries of staff who have dedicated child protection register personnel such as Mpumalanga (Provincial and district Offices), Free State (Provincial Office), Gauteng (data capturer) and Northern Cape (Provincial Office).

(2) (a) Yes, eight provinces are linked to the national Child Protection Register as it is a centralised web based application accessible from anywhere in the country by social workers that have been trained and granted access to the system. The Eastern Cape Province has a Social Development Information Management System (SDIMS) (including CPR data), which is currently not linked to the centralised web base CPR for consolidated reporting.

(b) The Province (EC) opted to make use of the CPR which is part of the (SDIMS). The SDIMS links different modules such as foster care and facilities to enable social workers to trace service delivery to a child throughout the child protection system.

(c) The Department is in the process of integrating CPR with other Social Worker Modules within the integrated Social Development Information Management System to optimise the social workers' ability to manage each case of a child from one central point. The success of this integration will enable the Eastern Cape Province to be part of the centralised web CPR reporting abuse directly to the national department. The plan is to finalise the integration process during 2011.

(2) (i) The following provinces are linked electronically namely: Western Cape, Northern Cape, Mpumalanga, Free State, Gauteng, KZN; North West and Limpopo province.

(ii) No additional system was used to link the provinces other than the departmental Data Warehouse.

(iii) The Data Warehouse solution is an Open Source Software and no additional costs were involved.

(iv) The centralised web CPR was rolled out in 2008 and consolidated at National with Data Warehouse between 2009 and 2010.

(v) The mentioned eight provinces have been online since 2005 with the first rollout of the decentralised CPR implementation.

(3) The information requested is provided in Table 2 below. It needs to be noted that not all provinces have dedicated Child Protection Register personnel at provincial and regional/district or local level. Although the Children's Act made provision for specialisation, due to budgetary constraints most provincial departments of DSD have not as yet allocated the required specific capacity resources towards child protection service delivery.

Resources:

Names of provinces

Person(s)

Office(s)*

Telephone line(s)

Fax machine(s)

(Not CPR specific)

National Office

02

01

02

01

Gauteng

02

02

(Provincial office)

02

01

Kwa-Zulu Natal

5

5

5

5

Northern Cape

08

01 Provincial

5 Persons at district

2 persons at sub-district

08

01 Provincial

5 Districts

2 sub-districts

08

08

Western Cape

07

1 Provincial – part time

6 districts

07

1 Provincial

6 Districts

07

07

North West

22

01 Provincial

21 Service points

22

01 Provincial

21 service points

22

22

Limpopo

01

01

01

0

Mpumalanga

4

01 Provincial

3 Districts

4

01 Provincial

03 Districts

4

4

Free State

01Provincial

01 Provincial

01

01

Eastern Cape

119

119

119

119

01 Provincial

7 Districts

24 Area social workers

87 service social workers capturing CPR

01 Provincial

7 Districts

24 Area offices

87 service points

Offices in this context refer to the provincial and districts office level, with the exception of Eastern Cape. Each provincial office has one child protection co-ordinator of which the CPR is one function.

QUESTION 3482

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 39

Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(a) How many employees of (i) her department and (ii) any of its entities who are on level 11 salary scale and above have been suspended with full pay (aa) in the 2009-10 financial year and (bb) during the period 1 April 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what is the total amount of money that was paid by her department in respect of these salaries? NW4317E

REPLY:

On behalf of the Department of Social Development

(a) None

(a)(i) None

(a)(ii) None

(aa) None

(bb) Same as above

(b) Same as above

On behalf of the National Development Agency

(aa) A total of five employees in grade level 11 and above at the National Development Agency were suspended for the period 2009/10 and 2010 for durations not more than six months are as follows:

(aa) Two employees in 2009/10

(bb) Three employees in 2010

(b) The total amount spent for salaries is 629 000.00

On behalf of the South African Social Security

(a) The number of SASSA employees who have been suspended with full pay over the specified periods is as reflected in the tables below:

2009/ 2010 Financial Year

(aa) Number of Officials

Levels of Officials

(b) Total amount paid

5

12

R2 215 848. 00

5

13

R2 783 688. 25

TOTAL – 10

R4 999 536. 25

2010/ 2011 Financial Year (1 April 2010 to date)

(bb) Number of Officials

Levels of Officials

(b)Total amount paid

6

12

R2 149 163. 00

3

13

R1 250 763. 00

TOTAL - 9

R3 399 926. 00

QUESTION 3334

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 12 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 37

Ms N P Gcume (Cope) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether, her department will consider the review of the social grant procedure for the benefit of its holders who are frail, elderly and people with disabilities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4166E

REPLY:

The current procedures go a long way in ensuring that the frail, elderly and people with disabilities receive special, humane and dignified treatment in the processing of their applications and points of payment. In addition, Section 15 of the Social Assistance Act No.6 of 2004, provides that a person applying for or receiving social assistance may appoint a procurator, by a power of attorney, to apply or receive social assistance on his or her behalf, in accordance with the prescribed requirements. Beneficiaries who become ill/frail and do not have procurators, are identified by queue marshalls and given first preference at paypoints.

In addition, the SASSA is exploring the development of a policy on home visits to beneficiaries who are unable to visit local offices to both apply for social grants as well as complete the review of grants.

QUESTIONS 3277 FOR WRITTEN REPLY

FRIDAY, 12 NOVEMBER 2010

3277. Dr H C van Schalkwyk (DA) to ask the Minister for the Public Service and Administration:

Whether knowledge of the information technology (IT) industry and specific qualifications regarding information and communication technology (ICT) are requirements for a person to serve on the State Information Technology Agency (SITA) board; if not, why not; if so, (a) what (i) qualifications and (ii) experience does each member on the current board have with regard to the ICT sector and (b) what are the further relevant details? NW4094E

______________________________________________________________________

REPLY:

No, the knowledge of Information Technology and specific qualifications regarding information and communication technology are not the requirements for a person to serve on the SITA board. Due to the following reasons:

(a) The requirements for appointment to the SITA Board are regulated by the State Information Technology Agency Act, 1998 (Act 88 of 1998 – the SITA Act).

The SITA Act therefore does not have a specific requirement that any member must have knowledge of the information technology (IT) industry and specific qualifications regarding information and communication technology.

(b) In terms of section 10(1)(c)(iv) of the SITA Act a range of skills and expertise needs to considered for purposes of good corporate governance. This would include the expertise needed for the different Board committees, which are the Chairpersons' Audit and Risk, Human Resources and Remuneration, Finance and Capex, Procurement, Stakeholder Management and Communications, and Ethics and Governance Committees.

QUESTION 3237

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 12 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 37

Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

What is the (a) total cost and (b) number of copies of each (i) annual report and (ii) report on strategic plans that was produced by (aa) her department and (bb) any of its entities in the 2009-10 financial year? NW4052E

REPLY:

Honourable member,

On behalf of Department of Social Development (DSD)

(aa) (i)

Annual Report

Financial Year

Total Cost

Number of Copies

2009/10

R318,038.34

1000 hard copies and 600 disks

(ii)

Strategic Plan

Financial Year

Total Cost

Number of Copies

2009/10

R152,860.32

1000 hard copies and 600 disks

Grand total of Annual Report and Strategic Plans for DSD

R470,898.66 (318,038.34 +152,860.32)

On behalf of National Development Agency (NDA)

(bb) (i)

Annual Report

Financial Year

Total Cost

Number of copies

2009/10

R200,021.00

3000 hard copies

(ii)

Strategic Plan

Financial Year

Total Cost

Number of copies

2009/10

R34,930.00

500 hard copies

Grand total of Annual Report and Strategic Plan for NDA

R234,951.00 (200,021.00 + R34,930.00)

On behalf of the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA)

(bb) (i)

Annual Report

The annual report for the financial year 2009/10 is yet to be produced*.

(ii)

Strategic Plan

Financial Year

Total Cost

Number of Copies

Strategic Plan for 2009/10 - 2011/12

R95 323.30

300 books (A4) and 700 compact discs

Grand total of Strategic Plan for SASSA

R95 323.30

Note: *Refer to Announcements, Tabling and Committee Reports dated 21 September 2010 for explanation submitted to the Speaker of the National Assembly by the Minister of Social Development explaining the late submission of the Annual Report of the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA's) for 2009-2010.

QUESTION 3113

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 5 November 2010

Internal question paper no: 36

Mr L W Greyling (ID) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(a) How many social workers are currently working in South Africa, (b) what is the ratio of social workers employed by the government to those employed by nongovernmental organisations and (c) what plans does her department have in place to ensure that more social workers are trained? NW3913E

REPLY:

(a) According to the South African Council for Social Service Professions, there were 14,037 social workers registered with it as at March 2010. These are social workers in the public, private and nongovernmental organisation (NGOs) sectors.

(b) The number of social workers employed by government is 8,944 and those that are in the employ of NGOs are 5,093; therefore the ratio is approximately 1:2. This means that for every two government social workers there is one nongovernmental social worker.

(c) The Department of Social Development provides scholarship to students who pursue social work as a profession. The tables below provide the detailed information regarding the scholarship programme.

(i) Since the inception of this programme, the National Treasury has committed the following budget:

Financial Year

Budget allocation

2007/2008

R50m

2008/2009

R105m

2009/2010

R210m

2010/2011

R226m

Total

R591m

(ii) The number of students awarded bursaries is as follows:

Financial Year

Student bursaries

2007/2008

1428

2008/2009

2900

2009/2010

4200

2010/2011

5574

(iii) The number of students that graduated through funding is as follows:

Financial Year

Graduated Students

2007

286

2008

816

2009

1600

Total

2702

Furthermore, the Department conducts careers fair annually to high school learners to intensify the marketing of the social work profession and the recruitment of scholars to pursue Bachelor's Degree in of Social Work.

QUESTION 2859

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 18 October 2010

Internal question paper no: 31

Adv A de W Alberts (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether her department has made use of any consultants since the 2004-2005 financial year; if so, (a) how many (i) consultants and (ii) consultancies were used in each financial year, (b) what were their names in each case, (c) what amounts were paid in each financial year to each (i) consultant and (ii) consultancy and (d) who are the directors of the various consultancies that his department has made use of since the 2004-05 financial year;

(2) Whether any of these consultants and consultancies were formerly in the employ of her department; if so, (a) who are these persons, (b) why did they leave the employ of her department and (c) what was the salary scale of each specified person at the time that he or she left the employ of the department? NW3542E

REPLY

(1) Yes

(a)(i)(ii) The table below provide the number of consultants and consultancies used by DSD during the 2004/2005 to 2010/2011 financial years.

Financial Year

Consultants

Consultancies

Amount

2004/2005

0

11

R34 544 923.08

2005/2006

0

9

R35 481 909.96

2006/2007

24

33

R15 808 275.42

2007/2008

0

41

R60 417 034.14

2008/2009

0

36

R87 261 855.09

2009/2010

0

22

R21 016 162.20

*2010/2011

0

9

R5 421 321.50

*Statistics up until the end of October 2010

1(b); (c)(i),(ii) The names and amounts paid to each consultant and consultancy used by the DSD are contained in the attached Annexure A.


1(d) The names and personal detail of the Directors of the consultancies are maintained by the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO).

2(a)(b)(c) The Department cannot confirm at this point in time if any of the consultants were previously employed in the Department. The Department does not have access to the personal information in respect of the Directors of each consultancy. The detailed personal information is only available to CIPRO.

QUESTION 2816

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 18 October 2010

Internal question paper no: 31

Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether all the (a) non-governmental organisations and (b) community-based organisations are registered with her department; if not, (i) why not, (ii) what are the full particulars of these organisations and (iii) in which provinces are they situated; if so, how many of these organisations are registered (aa) permanently and (bb) temporarily? NW3497E

REPLY:

Any non-governmental organisation and/or community based organisation can apply to the Department for registration as a nonprofit organisation in terms of section 12 of the Nonprofit Organisations Act, 1997 (Act 71 of 1997). In terms of this law such an application is voluntary.

According to our records, as at 15th October 2010, the number of organisations granted nonprofit status is 71 204.

(ii) This CD contain the full particulars of the total number of registered NPOs (71 204). The details thereof are:

a. NPO Number, Name, Physical and Postal Address, Telephone and Fax numbers.

b. The focus activities of the organisations in terms of the sector in which in it operates.

(iii) Registered NPOs are situated in all the nine provinces of the Republic of South Africa. The specific numbers of registered NPO per province is as follows:

Table 1. Total number of Registered NPO per Province

Province

Number of Registered NPO

Eastern Cape

6203

Free State

3754

Gauteng

22746

KwaZulu Natal

14912

Limpopo

7294

Mpumalanga

4150

North West

3695

Northern Cape

1610

Western Cape

6840

Total

71204

(aa) Organisations are registered permanently until they fail to comply with the provisions of the NPO Act, in which event their registration is terminated.

(bb) In terms of the NPO Act, there is no provision for temporary registration.

QUESTION 2815

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 18 October 2010

Internal question paper no: 31

2815. Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether her department has developed a monitoring compliance tool to monitor nongovernmental organisations funded by her department; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3496E

REPLY:

Yes, the Department of Social Development has developed monitoring and compliance tools to monitor non-governmental organizations (NGOs) funded by the department.

The Department utilizes the administration tools that have been developed to give effect to the implementation of the Policy on Financial Awards to Service Providers. These administration tools are also in line with the Public Finance Management Act of 1999. The Directorate: Monitoring of Public Entities in the Department also conducts financial analysis on the six monthly reports and Audited Financial Statements submitted by the national bodies before funds can be allocated for the new financial year.

In order to strengthen the current tools, a comprehensive and uniform tool to monitor all non-governmental organisations funded by the Department at provincial and national levels is currently been developed by the Monitoring and Evaluation Unit in the Department. It is expected that the tool will be completed and implemented to complement the existing tools by April 2011.

QUESTION 2811

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 18 October 2010

Internal question paper no:

Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

Whether her department currently utilises a standardised costing model for frail care facilities run by each of the provincial administrations; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3494E

REPLY:

No. The Department does not utilize a standardized costing model for frail care facilities run by each of the provincial administrations as yet. Currently, provincial Departments are implementing their own costing models for frail care.

The Older Persons Act (Act 13 of 2006) Section 3.1, clearly stipulates that services to older persons must be rendered in a uniform and coordinated manner by all spheres of government. In order to comply with the Act, and to address disparities amongst provinces regarding frail care, the Department is currently undertaking a study to investigate frail care services nationally. One of the objectives of the study is to determine the cost drivers of frail care services in facilities and communities. This is intended to inform the costing model for frail care services which will be completed before the end of this financial year.

QUESTION 2756

FOR WRITTEN REPLY

Date of publication on internal question paper: 23 September 2010

Internal question paper no: 30

2756. Ms N P Gcume (Cope) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

(1) Whether, with reference to her reply to oral question 52 on 10 March 2010, she had developed any new measures to ensure a more successful roll-out of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness programme in all provinces; if not, why not; if so, in which provinces (a) has this programme been successfully rolled out and (b) is her department still facing hurdles;

(2) how does her department plan to overcome these hurdles? NW3429E

REPLY:

(1) Yes, the Department of Social Development has developed new measures to ensure the successful roll out of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme. The measures are as follows:

Capacity building on Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme

The overall aim of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme is to equip facilitators with knowledge and skills to facilitate sessions around substance abuse. The programme also explores the psychological aspects of substance abuse and provides life skills necessary to deal with related pressures.

The National Department of Social Development will conduct training on the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme during 2010/2011 in two provinces, that is; Eastern Cape and Kwa Zulu Natal. The Free State Province has revised the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme and conducted capacity building to service providers and master trainers. 182 service providers have been trained on Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme in Gauteng Province. The programme was implemented at 106 schools throughout the province reaching 16239 learners.

In the Northern Cape Province, the department reached 5044 youth during the period April- June 2010 under the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme. The KwaZulu-Natal Province has trained 5 Ke Moja Master Trainers. Training was rolled out to Department of Social Development district officials. Training has also been integrated to include representatives from Community Based Organisations, Faith Based Organisations, Non Government Organisations and other State Departments (Health and Education).

The Western Cape Province conducted training of the Non Profit Organisations involved in Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme to ensure that they are adequately capacitated to implement the programme throughout the province. Training of Master trainers was conducted to ensure the successful roll-out of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness programme. The training was also offered to other departments to strengthen prevention services and awareness.

The North West province has trained 25 053 youth on Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme. Educators, parents and members of school governing bodies were reached through the implementation of Ke Moja strategy during the two quarters of the current financial year (April to September 2010). 55 schools were reached as part of the implementation of the programme. This included training of youth as master trainers.

Media Campaign

The National Department of Social Development has identified the need to embark on the Substance Abuse Media Campaign to provide information in order to educate communities about substance abuse and its effects, and encourage them to refrain from experimenting with and abusing drugs and alcohol. The media campaign will be conducted in November 2010.

Radio talks were conducted in the North West through the following radio stations to create awareness about substance abuse: Mafikeng FM, Radio Mafisa in Rustenburg, Radio Letlhabile in Brits, Radio Moretele and Vaaltar FM in Taung.

Youth Dialogue:

The National Department of Social Development, in partnership with the Free State Department of Social Development, conducted substance abuse Youth Dialogue on 22 October 2010, in Jacobsdal. The aim of the dialogue was to encourage participation and interaction amongst the youth and stakeholders in the field of substance abuse and government on issues affecting the youth. It was also intended to help youth to realize their role in the fight against substance abuse. The Youth Dialogue approach will be rolled out to other provinces in the next financial year (2011/2012).

Door to Door campaigns:

The Department of Social Development is currently conducting door to door campaigns in all the nine provinces where different households will be interviewed, utilizing a rapid assessment questionnaire, on their understanding, needs and concerns regarding substance abuse. The findings will be used to inform government strategies to combat substance abuse.

The Free State Province conducted door to door campaigns in five districts, targeting 300 households. Door to door campaigns were also held in the North West Province reaching 400 households, in various districts.

School Based Programmes

In order to intensify substance abuse interventions in schools, the Gauteng Province will fund an NPO that will deploy Social Auxiliary Workers (SAW) to schools where Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme is being implemented. This will ensure that intervention measures are put in place for high risk learners who require further assistance. The Social Auxiliary Workers will also liaise with families of referred learners and will, if necessary, refer such learners for specialist interventions.

School based programme was implemented in 58 schools in the Northern Cape Province. This programme targeted learners in grades 4 – 12. About 1000 children between the ages of 4 – 13 yrs also benefited from holiday programmes and puppet programmes.

There is partnership between District offices of the Department of Education in the Western Cape Province and the Provincial Department of Social Development to identify schools that would be suitable for the implementation of the programme.

The North West Province has developed 15 000 pamphlets on substance abuse prevention and delivered them to various schools. During FIFA Soccer World Cup and school vacations, a holiday programme focusing awareness raising and alternative lifestyle to substance abuse was conducted.

(a) The Limpopo Province has achieved all the set targets on the implementation of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme as outlined in the province Annual Performance Plan. The province trained 25 social workers and 20 volunteers in December 2009 to assist in rolling out the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme to improve the coverage and sustainability.

(b) The Department of Social Development is still facing hurdles. Some master trainers trained on the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme left the department for greener pastures. Volunteers in some provinces also left the programme as they found full time employment.

The Eastern Cape Department of Social Development faces shortage of human resources (Social Workers) dedicated to the Substance Abuse Programme, more especially at implementation level. The scarcity of social workers in Gauteng Province prohibits effective implementation of the programme.

The departure of volunteers in the Northern Cape Province makes it difficult to present the programme to children in schools.

A challenge faced by the Kwa Zulu Natal the Province in rolling out the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme efficiently and effectively, is caused by lack of dedicated funding for the roll out of the programme. The Western Cape Province experiences challenges with the Department of Education which does not allow non-syllabus activities during the day. In Mpumalanga Province, the challenge is that trained and experienced officials leave the department for greener pastures.

The North West and Free State Provinces do not have major challenges in relation to the implementation of Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme.

(2) The Department of Social Development is conducting training of master trainers in provinces which have lost their master trainers. Training has already been conducted in the North West and Limpopo Provinces and it will be continued in the Kwa Zulu Natal and Eastern Cape Provinces during 2010/11 financial year.

In the Eastern Cape Province, plans have been made to increase human resources in the province, through recruitment of new staff, and reorientation of the existing personnel. Meaningful relations with all organisations involved in Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme have been improved. The Gauteng Province has expanded the Ke Moja Drug Awareness training to include more service providers to roll out the programme.

The Limpopo Province is engaged in the recruitment and retention strategy for social workers through bursaries. Educational programmes will be increased to children outside school hours in the Northern Cape Province. The following projects were developed by the Kwa Zulu Natal Province in an attempt to overcome the current challenges that the Department faces in rolling out of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme effectively:

· Accreditation of Master trainers;

· Accreditation of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme;

· Use of media to market Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme.

· Use of technology such as face book, twitter and other social networks in order to reach young people;

· The establishment of help desks.

· Selection and training of Ke Moja ambassadors

The Western Cape Province is planning to overcome hurdles by:

  • Signing Memorandum of Understanding to clearly define the roles and responsibilities of the Department of Social Development and the Department of Education at Provincial, District and individual school level.
  • Setting up a task – group together with the Departments of Education, Culture, Arts and Sport to examine the integration of the Ke Moja Drug Awareness Programme into Life Orientation syllabus/classes or alternately making the programme part of the after-school programmes that will be in future facilitated by the Department of Culture, Arts and Sport.
  • The Mpumalanga Province addresses challenges through various strategies including:

    · The implementation of the National Recruitment and Retention Strategies for social workers by providing opportunities for further professional development and improving their working conditions on an ongoing basis.

    · The allocation of resources based on the prioritized areas as well as the needs to ensure that services are channelled to deserving communities.

    QUESTION 2755

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 23 September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 30

    2755. Ms N P Gcume (Cope) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    What are her department's strategies (a) to escalate access for young people in predominantly black areas to treatment facilities for people addicted to Tik and other drugs and (b) to mitigate the impact of drug addiction at (i) family, (ii) community and (iii) institutional level? NW3428E

    REPLY:

    (a) The Department of Social Development is committed to ensuring that persons who require treatment are able to access treatment facilities. Prevention of and Treatment for Substance Abuse Act, Act 70 of 2008, and the Policy on the Management of Substance Abuse make provision for the establishment of at least one state treatment centre and one halfway house per province. The provincial Departments of Social Development are funding private treatment facilities in order to ensure accessibility of services to service users.

    There are currently seven public treatment centres and forty three registered private treatment centres nationally. Limpopo is the only province that does not have any public or private treatment centre.

    A list of state and private treatment centres is attached as Annexure A. A Resource Directory has been distributed to service providers with contact details of services and facilities.

    Tik addiction is more prevalent in the Western Cape Province and parts of Gauteng Province. As indicated in the Annexure A, both these provinces have numerous treatment centres to deal with Tik addiction.

    The following provinces are in the process of establishing state treatment centres:

    · Northern Cape

    · Eastern Cape

    · North West

    · Limpopo

    · Free State

    (b) The Department of Social Development has developed a community-based model and Minimum Norms and Standards for Out-Patient Treatment Services in order to reduce the impact of drug addiction at (i) family, (ii) community and (iii) institutional level. The Community-based Model and the Minimum Norms and Standards for Out-patient Treatment Services are to ensure the availability and accessibility of services to service users whilst they remain with their families and in communities.

    Prevention services, such as the "Ke Moja Anti-Drug Campaign", are ongoing and have been rolled out in all provinces. The Ke Moja campaign in particular aims to make the public aware of the dangers of substance abuse, to educate the public and to develop skills and mobilise families, communities and schools to become involved in the fight against substance abuse.

    The Department of Social Development and the Central Drug Authority (CDA) have launched a Substance Abuse Community Mobilisation Campaign on the 14th ofOctober 2010 which will continue up to the beginning of December 2010. The purpose of the campaign is to assess the needs of the communities, mobilise them to play an active role in combating the scourge of substance abuse and encourage their participation in both the Provincial and National Summits. The Provincial and National Summits are intended to intensify government strategies to combat substance abuse. The summits will further call for a collective action through the programme of action on the eradication of illicit drug production, use and trafficking in South Africa.

    In addition, prevention, early intervention, treatment, aftercare and reintegration services are available to reduce the impact of substance abuse on the family, community and institutions.

    Early intervention services are provided by the Department of Social Development and other specialised agencies to persons at risk of addiction. These services include assessment, referral and treatment to prevent persons from becoming addicted to substances. At this level; families, communities and institutions, such as schools are encouraged to become involved in supporting persons affected by substance abuse.

    Treatment services at community based level in most public hospitals, out-patient basis or residential treatment programmes are available and accessible in all provinces

    Aftercare and reintegration services are available in communities to persons who have completed a residential treatment programme and need to return to their family and community of origin. Social workers, health centres and support groups such as Alcoholic Anonymous play a critical role to assist service users in their recovery. The involvement of the community, family members and institutions such as schools and churches in supporting the recovery and reintegration efforts of the service user is of critical importance.

    End.

    See annexure A for details on state and private treatment centres

    ANNEXURE A: LIST OF TREATMENT CENTRES

    A.PUBLIC TREATMENT CENTRES

    Province

    Name of treatment centre

    Gauteng

    Dr F.F Riberro

    Mpumalanga

    Swartfontein

    Western Cape

    De Novo

    Kensington

    Western Cape Substance Abuse Rehabilitation Centre – Eerste River

    KZN

    Madadeni

    Newlands Park

    B. PRIVATE TREATMENT CENTRES

    Province

    Name of treatment Centre

    Funded / Not funded

    Free State

    Aurora

    Funded

    Mpumalanga

    Mkhondo Alathia (adult)

    Funded

    Mkhondo Alathia (youth)

    Funded

    Eastern Cape

    Thembelitsha

    Funded

    Welbedacht

    Funded

    SANCA- East London

    Funded

    SANCA- Port Elizabeth

    Funded

    Family Outreach Ministries

    Not funded

    Life St Mark's Clinic

    Not funded

    Bethesda

    Not funded

    Shepherd's Field

    Not funded

    North West

    Sanpark

    Funded

    Gauteng

    Wedge Gardens

    Funded

    SANCA -Horizon clinic

    Funded

    SANCA Pretoria/ Soshanguve

    Funded

    House of Mercy

    Funded

    SANCA: Phoenix House

    Funded

    The General Addictions Programme

    Not funded

    Nishtara

    Not funded

    SHARP

    Not funded

    Stabilis

    Funded

    Elim Clinic

    Not funded

    KwaZulu Natal

    Khanyani

    Funded

    Shekinah

    Funded

    South Coast Recovery Centre

    Not funded

    The Cedars Inside Recovery Centre

    Not funded

    Siyakhula

    Funded

    Sitholimpilo

    Funded

    SANCA (Lulama /Warman House)

    Funded

    Prydon Clinic

    Not funded

    Serenity

    Addiction Treatment Unit

    Not funded

    Northern Cape

    Noupoort Christian Care Centre

    Not funded

    Western Cape

    Hesketh King (Adult)

    Funded

    Hesketh King (youth)

    Funded

    Ramot Treatment Centre

    Funded

    Toevlug Treatment Centre (adult)

    Funded

    Toevlug Treatment Centre (youth)

    Funded

    Cresent Clinic

    Not funded

    Minesota House

    Not funded

    Oasis Treatment Centre

    Not funded

    Serendipity House

    Not funded

    Tharagay House

    Not funded

    Kenilworth place

    Not funded

    Loyola Addiction Treatment Centre

    Not funded

    Orient Treatment centre

    Not funded

    Serenity Care Treatment Centre

    Not funded

    Steppingstones Treatment Centre

    Not funded

    Tabankulu Addiction Centre

    Not funded

    False Bay Therapeutic Community Centre

    Not funded

    QUESTION 2754

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 21 September 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    Ms N P Gcume (Cope) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether her department has conducted any study to ascertain the effectiveness of the treatment model for young people who are addicted to drugs with a view to guiding service providers in the treatment of young people; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3427E

    REPLY:

    Yes. The Department of Social Development through the Human Science Research Council (HSRC) conducted research on "Substance Abuse trends in South Africa" in 2007. This broad based research identified trends on types of drugs being used, reasons for drug use, settings in which drug use occurs within various socio- demographic categories and types of substance abuse treatment centres available. The Department has however, identified the need to evaluate substance abuse services including treatment for young people because of the change in the profile of people who abuse substances. An assessment tool has already been developed covering all levels of interventions such prevention, early intervention, treatment, aftercare and reintegration. The tool is currently being implemented as a pilot with full implementation in 2011/12 financial year.

    Furthermore, the Department through the Central Drug Authority (CDA) begun conducting drug related research on the prevalence, nature, extent and impact of drug abuse in South Africa. The report will be available in October 2011. The outcomes of the research will provide a broad overview on issues of substance abuse including the treatment model.

    QUESTION 2729

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 23 September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 30

    Mrs H Lamoela (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether all 40 mobile units bought by the SA Social Security Agency (SASSA) are now operational in all provinces; if not, (i) (a) why not and (b) when is it anticipated that these mobile units will be operational in all provinces; if so, (ii) (a) what are the relevant details in respect of a breakdown of costs in each province and (b) what are the further relevant details;

    (2) whether any maintenance was done in the past three financial years on these mobile units; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3401E

    REPLY:

    (1) No. Only 35 of the 40 mobile units deployed in all the regions are currently operational.

    (i) (a) The other five unoperational mobile units are currently undergoing mechanical repairs. Of the five, two are in KwaZulu-Natal, two in Northern Cape and one in Mpumalanga region.

    (b) It is anticipated that the five unoperational mobile units will resume operation by November 2010.

    (ii)(a) A consolidated breakdown of the operational costs for the mobile units over the past 3 financial years in all 9 regions is reflected in the table below.


    TABLE: 2007/2010 FINANCIAL YEAR - MOBILE UNITS TRANSPORT OPERATIONAL BREAKDOWN

    BREAKDOWN OF MOBILE UNITS OPERATIONAL COSTS

    FINANCIAL YEAR

    REGION

    2007/2008

    2008/2009

    2009/2010

    Current 2010/2011

    Gauteng

    R 0.00

    R 6,792.42

    R 2,902.25

    R 6,292.89

    Mpumalanga

    R 71,438.47

    R 300,086.39

    R 142,019.86

    R 39,959.53

    North West

    R 42,882.48

    R 211,092.83

    R 19,448.10

    R 18,883.05

    Northern Cape

    R 27,474.25

    R 249,671.26

    R 30,453.29

    R 26,638.59

    Western Cape

    R 0.00

    R 34,839.82

    R 34,533.91

    R 1,735.99

    Limpopo

    R 43,144.42

    R 283,713.97

    R 65,773.96

    R 11,396.14

    Eastern Cape

    R 124,478.15

    R 42,728.14

    R 225,881.34

    R 138,101.66

    Free State

    R 14,478.27

    R 30,691.27

    R 54,222.26

    R 46,231.70

    Kwa Zulu Natal

    R 45,468.07

    R 392,163.99

    R 241,812.67

    R 143,506.99

    TOTAL

    R 369,364.11

    R 1960,275.57

    R 816,284.39

    R 438,248.66

    TOTAL FOR ALL THE FINANCIAL YEAR

    3,584,172.39

    FOOT NOTE:

    Information supplied above is inclusive of all maintenance, repairs, accident, tyres, fuel,oil,and toll gate fees

    (b) The costs for the ICT related operations were covered under the Service Level Agreement (SLA) with Double Ring. In 2007 SASSA entered into a 24-months national SLA with Double Ring for the following services – bandwidth connectivity, onsite satellite maintenance, onsite generator maintenance and onsite television maintenance. In 2008, SASSA further entered into a 3-year SLA with TSS for the maintenance and support of computer equipments on the trucks.

    (2) Yes. Maintenance was done in the past three financial years. The relevant maintenance costs details are reflected in the tables below.

    TABLE 1: TRANSPORT MAINTENANCE COSTS - 2007/2010 FINANCIAL YEARS

    BREAKDOWN OF MOBILE UNITS MAINTENANCE COSTS PER REGION

    FINANCIAL YEAR

    REGION

    2007/2008

    2008/2009

    2009/2010

    Gauteng

    R 0.00

    R 6,792.42

    R 2,902.25

    Mpumalanga

    R 71,438.47

    R 300,086.39

    R 142,019.86

    North West

    R 42,882.48

    R 211,092.83

    R 19,448.10

    Northern Cape

    R 27,474.25

    R 249,671.26

    R 30,453.29

    Western Cape

    R 0.00

    R 34,839.82

    R 34,533.91

    Limpopo

    R 43,144.42

    R 283,713.97

    R 65,773.96

    Eastern Cape

    R 124,478.15

    R 42,728.14

    R 225,881.34

    Free State

    R 14,478.27

    R 30,691.27

    R 54,222.26

    Kwa Zulu Natal

    R 45,468.07

    R 392,163.99

    R 241,812.67

    TOTAL

    R 369, 364.11

    R 1, 960, 275.57

    R 813, 848.77

    TOTAL FOR ALL THE FINANCIAL YEAR

    R 3, 143 488.45

    TABLE 2: ICT MAINTENANCE COSTS - 2007/2010 FINANCIAL YEARS

    SERVICE

    2007/2008

    2008/2009

    2009/2010

    Onsite Satellite Maintenance

    R 286,516.20

    R 1,862,355.30

    R 1,925,249.00

    Onsite Generator and Television Maintenance

    R 120,655.22

    R 2,423,776.80

    R 921,753.84

    Break Fix

    Repairs to satellite, generator, antenna, dish protector, replace DVD, computers, monitors, printer

    R 2,255,842.59

    5. Onsite Support and Maintenance of computer equipment

    R 1,500,000.00

    TOTAL PER FINANCIAL YEAR

    R 407,171.42

    R 4,286,132.10

    R 5,102,845.43

    GRAND TOTAL FOR ALL THE FINANCIAL YEARS

    R 9,796,148.95

    QUESTION 2632

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 17 September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 29

    2632. Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether she has been informed that a certain company (name furnished*) allegedly granted loans to recipients of state grants at an interest rate of 50%; if so,

    (2) whether any investigation has been launched into these allegations; if not, why not; if so, what are (a) the findings, (b) the recommendations and (c) the further relevant details;

    (3) whether she has taken any action against the company; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW3287E

    *CPS, Northern Cape

    REPLY:

    (1) No, the Minister has not been informed of allegations of the CPS (Northern Cape) granting loans to recipients of State Grants at an interest rate of 50%.

    (2) Yes.

    (a) During our investigation into the practice by CPS, it transpired that (according to CPS) its holding company is registered with the National Credit Regulator (NCR) to operate a loan scheme. However, the certificate provided by CPS was questioned by the region as CPS was not listed on the NCR credit provider database and SASSA Northern Cape regional office is in possession of a copy of the alleged proof of registration that belongs to another business entity going under the name of Friedland 035 Investments (Pty) Limited. This is contrary to the provision of the schedule that gave the entitlement to Cash Paymaster Services (Pty) Limited/Aplitec.

    (b) In terms of the current Service Level Agreement the CPS is contracted to render only the cash payment service to the Agency. Schedule 2 – RDP Program of Action of the previous SLA provides that the Service Provider will make a loan facility available for the beneficiaries on a market related basis to counteract local 'loan sharks'. However, the current SLA has no similar provision. It is our conviction that the schedule 2 was ultra vires in that Section 20 of the Social Assistance Act, Act 13 of 2004, provides that a beneficiary must without limitation or restriction receive the full amount of a grant to which he or she is entitled before any other person may exercise any right or enforce any claim in respect of the grant amount. Only the Minister may sanction deductions from a beneficiary's social grant, which deductions must be necessary and in the best interest of the beneficiary.

    (3) Yes, action has been taken as outlined below;

    · A formal investigation into the matter has been instituted;

    · The matter has been reported to the National Credit Regulator; and

    · SASSA has ordered CPS's or Friedland 035 Investments (Pty) Limited not to pursue the practice and to comply with the 100m radius applicable to all unauthorised vendors.

    QUESTION 2624

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 17September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 29

    Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    What has been her department's progress in (a) developing a strategy to curb fraud related to social grants and (b) dealing with the (i) conditions of the facilities for poor, elderly and sick persons at paypoints and (ii) challenges faced in the grant payout system? NW3270E

    REPLY:

    (a) The South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) has developed a strategy to curb social grant fraud. The strategy emphasis on prevention rather than detection and investigations. The key element of the strategy is the verification of the existence of beneficiaries, confirmation of the validity of the grants, as well as confirming the eligibility of a beneficiary for a specific grant. The strategy is being piloted in the Mthatha area of the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal. The other elements of the strategy relate to measure to be implemented to improve the integrity of the systems, processes and staff members.

    (b) (i) In dealing with the conditions of the facilities for the poor, the elderly and sick persons at pay points, the Agency has concluded Service Level Agreements (SLA's) with the Grants Payment Contractors, which require the latter to ensure that pay point facilities are in clean conditions prior to and after payment where infrastructure is available. The Agency is also engaging with the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) and Faith Based Organisations (FBO's) to avail their facilities for use as pay points in instances where there is no infrastructure. A monitoring tool in line with the agreed service levels in terms of the SLAs is also utilised to monitor compliance during the payment of social grants.

    (ii) SASSA is developing a cost effective and convenient Social Security Payment Model. Through this model, SASSA seeks to create an environment where beneficiaries will have access to their payments through various payment distribution mechanisms including, point of sale merchants, ACB and cash payment providers. The model SASSA envisages seeks to provide social assistance in an integrated manner, and does not place unreasonable burdens on beneficiaries and households, and will be flexible in being able to respond to the changing socio-economic environment.

    QUESTION 2526

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 13 September 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    2526. Mrs H Lamoela (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) What is the current bed capacity of (a) government-run and (b) nongovernmental organisation-run child and youth care centres ineach province;

    (2) whether she has found that there is a sufficient number of beds in child and youth care centres in each province; if not, how many beds are needed in each province; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (3) what is the (a) breakdown of the fund allocation scale for bed capacity for (i) Government-run and (ii) NGO-run child and youth care centres and (b) monthly amount allocated per child to (i) government-run and (ii) NGO-run child and youth care centres? NW3104E

    REPLY:

    (1) For the purpose of this reply it is important to note that a Child and Youth Care Centre has been defined in the Children's Act No 38 of 2005 as a facility for the provision of residential care to more than six children outside the child's environment in accordance with an accredited residential care programme and this includes Children's Homes, Temporary Places of Safe Care, Shelters, Secure Care Facilities Schools of Industry and Reform School.

    The tables below illustrate the current bed capacity of both Government-run and non-governmental Child and Youth Care Centres per province.

    (a) Bed capacity for government Children's homes.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    None

    None

    Free State

    2

    215

    Gauteng

    1

    200

    KwaZulu-Natal

    None

    None

    Limpopo

    3

    200

    Mpumalanga

    0

    None

    Northern Cape

    None

    None

    North West

    1

    36

    Western Cape

    None

    None

    TOTAL

    7

    651

    (a) Bed capacity for government run places of temporary safe care.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    3

    250

    Free State

    None

    none

    Gauteng

    7

    620

    KwaZulu-Natal

    5

    395

    Limpopo

    2

    198

    Mpumalanga

    none

    none

    Northern Cape

    1

    65

    North West

    none

    none

    Western Cape

    5

    190

    TOTAL

    23

    1718

    (a) Bed capacity government run shelters.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    None

    None

    Free State

    None

    None

    Gauteng

    None

    None

    KwaZulu-Natal

    None

    None

    Limpopo

    None

    None

    Mpumalanga

    None

    None

    Northern Cape

    None

    None

    North West

    None

    None

    Western Cape

    None

    none

    TOTAL

    (a) The bed capacity of government-run secure care facilities.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    1

    60

    Free State

    2

    90

    Gauteng

    1

    120

    Mpumalanga

    1

    60

    North West

    2

    86

    Northern cape

    3

    175

    KwaZulu-Natal

    5

    186

    Western Cape

    4

    342

    TOTAL

    20

    1239

    For the purpose of this reply it is important to note that the facilities; Schools of Industry and Reform Schools are still under the management of the Department of Basic Education and according to the Act, these are regarded as child and youth care centres. Allocated budget is from the Department of Basic Education. It is important to note that there are no non-government run schools of industry and reforms schools.

    (a) Bed capacity for Schools of Industry.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    1

    150

    Free State

    2

    160

    Gauteng

    2

    180

    KwaZulu-Natal

    3

    110

    Mpumalanga

    3

    160

    North West

    1

    108

    Western Cape

    1

    120

    TOTAL

    13

    988

    (a) Bed capacity for Reform Schools.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    None

    None

    Free State

    None

    None

    Gauteng

    None

    None

    KwaZulu-Natal

    1

    30

    Limpopo

    None

    None

    Mpumalanga

    1

    160

    Northern Cape

    None

    None

    North West

    none

    None

    Western Cape

    1

    120

    TOTAL

    3

    310

    (b) Bed capacity for Non government-run Children's homes.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    24

    1811

    Free State

    31

    718

    Gauteng

    67

    3392

    KwaZulu-Natal

    46

    3221

    Limpopo

    10

    587

    Mpumalanga

    11

    764

    Northern Cape

    8

    582

    North West

    3

    480

    Western Cape

    36

    1978

    TOTAL

    236

    13533

    (b) Bed capacity for non government-run places of safe care.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    none

    none

    Free State

    14

    422

    Gauteng

    none

    none

    KwaZulu-Natal

    none

    none

    Limpopo

    1

    20

    Mpumalanga

    6

    147

    Northern Cape

    none

    none

    North West

    none

    none

    Western Cape

    none

    none

    TOTAL

    21

    589

    (b)Bed capacity for non-government-run Shelters.

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern Cape

    11

    370

    Free State

    3

    82

    Gauteng

    15

    700

    KwaZulu-Natal

    7

    290

    Limpopo

    4

    126

    Mpumalanga

    4

    91

    Northern Cape

    1

    99

    North West

    4

    160

    Western Cape

    5

    206

    TOTAL

    54

    2124

    (b) The bed capacity for non-government-run Secure Care Facilities

    Province

    Quantity

    Capacity

    Eastern cape

    1

    50

    Gauteng

    1

    450

    North Cape

    2

    102

    North West

    2

    96

    Western Cape

    2

    255

    Limpopo

    2

    190

    TOTAL

    10

    1143


    (2) In terms of sufficient number of beds in the child and youth care centres there is no recent information available we are still updating our database with the provinces.

    (3) In terms of budget breakdown and monthly allocations, this is a Provincial competency since budgets are appropriated by their respective Provincial Legislatures. It is therefore suggested that such information be sourced through the Provincial Legislatures.

    QUESTION 2490

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 3 September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 26

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether any employees of her department are currently on suspension with full pay for more than 60 days pending investigations into alleged misconduct in contravention of the Public Service Act, Act 103 of 1994; if so, (a) how many and (b) what (i) is the average number of days that each of these employees have been with full pay, (ii) steps have been taken to expedite the disciplinary hearings of these employees and (iii) is the total cost to her department of the salaries paid to these employees beyond the 60-day period? NW3062E

    REPLY:

    Honourable Member,

    (a) No employees are currently on suspension with full pay for more than 60 days pending investigations into alleged misconduct in contravention of the Public service Act, 103 of 1994, as amended.

    (b)(i) Same as above.

    (b)(ii) Same as above.

    (b)(iii) No financial implications.

    QUESTION 2489

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 3 September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 26

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether her department has handed any disciplinary cases over to the labour court in the past two years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, how many;

    (2) Whether any of these cases were lost by her department; if so, (a) how many, (b) what were the costs involved in these cases and (c) who will be held responsible for this mismanagement? NW3061E

    REPLY:

    Honourable Member,

    (1) No disciplinary cases were handed over to the Labour Court.

    (2)(a) No disciplinary cases were handed over to the Labour Court.

    (2)(b) Same as above.

    (2)(c) Same as above.

    QUESTION 2474

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: September 2010

    Internal question paper no: 26

    Mrs S V Kalyan (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether her department has been informed of the phenomenon of Aids-orphans tourism; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so,

    (2) whether her department has statistics for this phenomenon; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details for the period 1 January 2006 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

    (3) Whether such tourists are counselled on the possible adverse emotional and psychological effects on Aids orphans; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (4) Whether her department has researched how Aids orphans may potentially be exploited by such voluntourism; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (5) Whether she will make a statement on the matter? NW3044E

    REPLY:

    (1) No, the Department of Social Development was not aware of the phenomenon of "Aids orphan tourism". The Department became aware of it after reading an article written by Prof. Linda Richter in the HSRC Review Volume 8, No. 2 August 2010, while doing investigations to response to this question.

    However, the Department has observed that there are volunteers who come to South Africa, and are placed within child and youth care centres. The volunteers placed in these centres, are normally utilized as care givers, providing life skills, recreational and after care services. In addition, they assist with therapeutic programmes (play therapy and individual counseling), weekend and holiday programmes. Further, other volunteers are used to assist with the building and renovations of these facilities.

    Cognisance must be taken of the fact that the Department has always promoted volunteerism in this sector; therefore if there are any challenges within this practice, this matter must be thoroughly investigated before any action is undertaken.

    The Department of Social Development is however, concerned about the labeling of the phenomenon as" Aids orphans tourism" as children resident in these child and youth care facilities are not only orphans affected by HIV and AIDS but ,include all children in need of care and protection. Labeling children as "Aids orphans", is detrimental to their well being as it promotes discrimination.

    (2) The Department of Social Development does not have specific statistics on the broader volunteerism and on this phenomenon in particular, in child and youth care centres. The utilization of volunteers in the non- governmental sector has always been regarded by the Department as an arrangement between volunteers themselves and the particular organisation.

    (3) The Department of Social Development is not directly involved in the selection and placement of volunteers as they are directly contracted by the non- governmental organisations concerned. In some instances, the Department is aware that volunteers are screened and trained on the potential emotional and psychological effects of their contact with children, but the department is unaware whether a similar approach is used for the placement of "tourist volunteers."

    (4) The Department of Social Development has not undertaken any research on this matter. Nonetheless, research will be commenced in collaboration with non -governmental organisations. This will be done within the framework of the transformation of the child and youth care centres, as required by the Children's Act of 2005 as amended.

    (5) No.

    QUESTION 2463

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 3 September 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether any audit has been conducted into the backlog of the (a) disability, (b) older person, (c) child support and (d) care dependency grants; if not, why not; if so,

    (2) whether any recommendations were made; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are these recommendations, (b) by when will each of these recommendations be implemented and (c) what will be the cost of implementing each of these recommendations;

    (3) how many cases are currently in the backlog, (b) what are the reasons for the backlog and (c) how many applications have taken (i) longer than (aa) six months, (bb) one year and (cc) three years and (ii) more than three years;

    (4) whether any of the applications are to be fast-tracked; if not, why not; if so, (a) how many, (b) which applications, (c) what are the details of the process to be followed to fast-track these applications and (d) when is it anticipated that these applications will be completed? NW3033E

    REPLY:

    For purposes of this reply, backlogs can relate to general Social Grants and appeals.

    On behalf of the South African Social Security (SASSA) in respect of social grants:

    (1) Yes, monthly audits are conducted into the backlog of the (a) disability, (b) older person, (c) child support and (d) care dependency grants. A backlog is defined as an application that has not been concluded within 90 days.

    (2) Yes.

    (a) SASSA has recommended the following:

    · Prioritization of backlog cases according to their application dates.

    · Resolving of identified backlogs within 21 days.

    (b) Recommendations are implemented as and when the backlog is identified.

    (c) No additional costs are to be incurred in resolving backlogs as they are addressed as part of the operational budget.

    (3) 7 362 application backlog cases (SASSA to provide as specific date for this figure)

    (b) Reasons for the backlogs:

    · Lack of connectivity at some satellite points contribute to the delay in the finalization of applications.

    · Outstanding documentation to be submitted by the applicant as required by the legislation.

    · Policy directives resulting in increased demand for social grant.

    · Shortage of staff at local offices.

    (c) (i) (aa) No applications have taken longer than six months.

    (bb) No applications have taken one year.

    (cc) No applications have taken three years.

    (ii) No applications have taken more than three years.

    (4) Yes, all applications identified as backlogs are to be fast-tracked.

    (a) 7 362 applications.

    (b) All grant types.

    (c) A two-pronged strategy has been established by SASSA to deal with backlogs, namely;

    · Regional specific teams have been established to detect and address backlogs on a monthly basis; and

    · The planned implementation of the Improved Grants Application Process (IGAP) aimed at achieving a one-day application turnaround time will in future assist regions to proactively prevent backlogs from occurring.

    (d) Backlogs are addressed on a monthly basis as they occur.

    Input by the Independent Tribunal for Social Assistance Appeal, operating within the Department of Social Development, focusing on appeals only

    (1) No audit has been done.

    (a) Approximately 80% of backlog appeals relate to disability i.e. Disability Grant (DG), Care-Dependency Grant (CDG) and Grant-in-Aid (GIA).

    (b) And (c) and (d) constitute the remainder of the 20%, i.e. Old Age (OA), Child Support Grant (CSG) and Foster Care Grant (FCG).

    (2) No formal audit has been done but has recorded numbers from our own internal processes and developed a strategic plan to deal with the backlog.

    (3) To date the backlog has increased to 56 569. The reason for the backlog is that the Independent Tribunal was established only in May 2008 and most of the appeals pre-date the establishment. The Act was promulgated during 2006 and during 2008 systems as well as processes were being established. We are still receiving backlog appeals from the regional offices and civil society organizations as well as legal representatives.

    (4) A backlog project plan has been put in place to deal with the backlog appeals by the end of the 2011/12 financial year.

    QUESTION 2423

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 20 August 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether (a) her department or (b) any of its entities has signed any contractual agreements with a certain company (name furnished) or any of its affiliates (i) in the (aa) 2006-07, (bb) 2007-08, (cc) 2008-09 and (dd) 2009-10 financial years and (ii) during the period 1 April 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (aaa) what is the nature of each contract, (bbb) what is the monetary value of each contract, (ccc) what is the (aaaa) start and (bbbb) end date of each contract, (ddd) what are the details of the process that was followed for the signing of each contract, (eee) who else tendered for each contract that was awarded and (fff) what amount did each tenderer quote in each case? NW2992E

    REPLY:

    Department of Social Development (DSD)

    (a) No, DSD has not entered into any contractual agreement with the said company. The names of the affiliates of the above mentioned company could not be obtained to determine if the Department has entered into contracts with anyone of them.

    Only the Companies and Intellectual Property Registration Office (CIPRO), can determine affiliates to the above mentioned company, where after, the Department will be able to establish if contracts were entered into with any such affiliated company.

    (i) (aa),(bb),(cc) and (dd) Not applicable

    (ii) (aaa),(aaaa); (bbb),(bbbb); (ccc); (ddd); (eee); and (fff) Not applicable

    (b) Not applicable

    South African Social Security Agency (SASSA)

    (a) Not applicable.

    (b) No. SASSA has not signed any contractual agreements with the said company or any of its affiliates.

    (i) (aa); (bb); (cc) and (dd) Not applicable

    (ii) (aaa),(aaaa); (bbb),(bbbb); (ccc); (ddd); (eee) and (fff) Not applicable.

    National Development Agency (NDA)

    (a) Not applicable.

    (b) No. The National Development Agency has not entered into any contractual agreement with the mentioned company or any of their affiliates during the period 1 April 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available.

    (i) (aa), (bb), (cc) and (dd) Not applicable

    (ii) (aaa),(aaaa); (bbb),(bbbb); (ccc); (ddd); (eee); and (fff) Not applicable.

    QUESTION 2281

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 20 August 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    Mrs H Lamoela (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether her department or any of its entities has (a) purchased or (b) leased any buildings for administration (i) in the (aa) 2008-09 and (bb) 2009-10 and (ii) for the 2010-11 financial years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (aaa) what is the cost of the building, (bbb) what is the size of the building, (ccc) why was it bought or leased, (ddd) what will be its use, (eee) who will occupy it and (fff) approximately how many persons will occupy the total space of each building;

    (2) whether her department and any of its entities intends purchasing or leasing any buildings for administration for the (a) 2011-12, (b) 2012-13 and (c) 2013-14 financial years; if not, why not; if so, in each case, (i) what is the cost of each building, (ii) what is the size of each building, (iii) why will it be bought or leased, (iv) for what will it be used, (v) who will occupy it and (vi) approximately how many persons will occupy the total space of each building? NW2790E

    REPLY:

    Department of Social Development:

    (1)

    (a) The National Department of Social Development has not purchased any building over the reporting period.

    (i) and (ii) (aa),(aaa); (bb),(bbb);(ccc);(ddd);(eee) and (fff) refer to table details

    (b) The National Department of Social Development (DSD) leases its Office accommodation through the Department of Public Works, as per table attached. (i)(aa); (bb) and (ii)

    National Development Agency (NDA):

    (1)

    (a) The National Development Agency has not purchased any buildings.

    (b) All NDA ten (10) offices are leased for administration from landlords.

    (aa) 2008-09 see attached table

    (2) The National Development Agency intends leasing the buildings for administration for the identified period:

    (a) 2011-2012 see attached

    QUESTION 2280

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 17 August 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether her department and/or any of its entities have purchased any 2010 Fifa World Cup Soccer tournament (a) clothing or (b) other specified paraphernalia; if not, what has been the position in each case; if so, in each case, (i) what are (aa) the details and (bb) the total cost of the items purchased, (ii) (aa) how many items have been purchased and (bb) why, (iii) (aa) to whom has each of these items been allocated and (bb) why have these items been allocated to these persons, (iv) (aa) on what basis was the decision taken to purchase each of these items and (bb) on whose authority was the decision taken to make these purchases? NW2789E

    REPLY

    Department of Social Development:

    (a) Yes

    (i) (aa) Bafana Bafana Bench jackets were purchased

    (bb) R 11 000

    (ii) (aa) 20

    (bb) The jackets were purchased as a token of appreciation for the guidance received to facilitate improvements in social development service delivery.

    (iii) (aa) Each member of the Social Development Portfolio Committee

    (bb) Each member received a Bafana Bafana Bench Jacket as a token of appreciation for the guidance by each member of the Social Development Port Folio Committee in facilitating improved social development service delivery.

    (iv) (aa) The decision taken to purchase Bafana Bafana Bench Jackets for the Social Development Portfolio Committee members was done in terms of section 64 (1) of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 ( Act 1 of 1999) as amended. The items were purchased in line with the Supply Chain Policy requirements.

    (bb) Executing authority for the Department of Social Development.

    (b) No.

    South African Social Security Agency:

    (a) Yes.

    (ii) (aa) 550 South African scarves were purchased for all employees of the SASSA Free State Region at the value of R51 per item, per official to a total amount of R27 950.00.

    (bb) A SASSA behavioural risk management audit carried out in the Free State Region revealed that the work stress of staff is substantially higher amongst the Free State staff than for all Regions. This stress appears to be exacerbated by amongst other things a heavy workload leading to low staff motivation and job satisfaction. The Regional Management of SASSA subsequently developed a comprehensive plan of action to address the identified problems. Among the activities, are sports and cultural events. The World Cup in South Africa was identified as an ideal opportunity not only to celebrate the event but also to improve staff morale and motivation. A number of activities linked to the World Cup were organised in which all staff participated and received scarves.

    (iii) (aa) Each SASSA Free State staff member received a scarf.

    (bb) Scarves were handed out by SASSA Free State management as a token of appreciation to thank staff in the SASSA Free State Region for their work for the past quarter which included 16 integrated community outreach programmes as part of the provincial Operation Hlasela and other outreach programmes as well as the piloting of the Improved Grants Administration Project, which culminated in a total of 37,728 applications being registered. Due to austerity measures no additional staff could be appointed and overtime work performed could not be remunerated.

    (iv) (aa) It was part of the Integrated Behaviour Risk Action Plan to improve the morale and motivation of staff in the SASSA Free State region. The Behaviour Risk Survey results and the Action Plan are available for scrutiny.

    (bb) As a joint coordinator of the Behaviour Risk Action Plan together with the Manager: Employer Wellness Programme, the Senior Manager: Communications and Marketing in line with the delegations approved the purchase of the items. The correct procurement procedures were followed to procure these items.

    (b) No.

    National Development Agency:

    (a) No

    (i)(aa) and (bb); (ii)(aa) and (bb); (iii)(aa) and (bb) and (iv)(aa) and (bb) not applicable

    (b) No.

    QUESTION 2059

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: August 2010

    Internal question paper no: 19

    Mr S J F Marais (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether any steps have been taken to ensure that electronic funds transfers (EFT) to pensioners and various recipients of government grants are transferred before the third day of every month in order to avoid delays in transfers; if not, why not; if so, what steps have been taken;

    (2) whether she will put measures in place to eliminate problems that may cause delays in EFT payments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (3) what has been the accrued-interest benefit to her department from delayed payments owing to payment dates falling on weekends and public holidays (a) in the 2009-10 financial year and (b) during the period 1 April 2010 up to the latest specified date for which information is available? NW2458E

    REPLY:

    (1) There are no delays in ACB transfers because all ACB payments are effected on the third day of each month and not before or later than that.

    (2) Adequate controls are in place to make sure that funds reach the ACB account in time to avoid delays. The following are some of the controls:

    · Socpen cut-off schedule, which dictates when the money should be in the ACB account and when to be distributed to the beneficiaries; and

    · Annual and monthly cash requirements are prepared and sent from SASSA to the Department of Social Development and National Treasury in advance for approval to avoid cash flow shortfalls.

    (3) There is no accrued interest earned from payments for the period 2009-10 financial year and from April 2010 to date, due to the following reasons:

    · ACB payments are transferred via the Paymaster General Account (PMG) which is the South African Reserve Bank account to the account of ACB, who then in turn, transfer the funds to the different banks, and then the banks transfer the grant money into the account of the individual beneficiaries every the third day of every month; and

    · The transfer to the beneficiary's bank account is effected on the same day ACB receives the transfer from SASSA's PMG account and all ACB unpaid grants are refunded back to the same PMG account.

    QUESTION 1961/2010

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 July 2010

    Internal question paper no: 17

    1961. Mrs P de Lille (ID) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    With reference to her reply to question 791 on 18 May 2010, what types of service are provided by the different (a) cash payment contractors and (b) free banking services to justify the difference in rates? NW2349E

    REPLY:

    (a) Services provided by cash payment contractors may differ slightly given the fact that they work in different geographical locations with some offering services in more rural locations not easily accessible, compared to urban locations.

    An overview of amalgamated services provided by the cash payment contractors includes the following:

    · Payments of grants;

    · Issuing of Cards and enrolment of new recipients;

    · Implement use and maintenance of Biometric Technology and beneficiary information;

    · Reconciliation of paid and unpaid Grants, including ensuring electronically accessible information to the Agency;

    · Disseminate information to the Recipients and provide Helpdesk services;

    · Provide services within and outside of normal working hours as may be required;

    · Maintain Pay Points;

    · Provide Security at the Pay Points as well as for the cash in transit.

    And

    (b) Free banking services are charges paid by the Agency to a relevant bank which subsidises beneficiaries allowing them to receive grant monies into their bank account without being responsible for associated bank charges. Banks do not provide the following services :-

    · Use and maintenance of Biometric Technology and beneficiary information;

    · Disseminate information to the Recipients and provide Helpdesk services;

    · Provide services within and outside of normal working hours as may be required; except access to ATM's;

    · Maintain Pay Points ;

    · Provide Security at the Pay Points for the safety of beneficiaries.

    Whilst we recognise that the cash payment is more expensive than banking services, we are also aware that the current fee that we pay is excessive. This makes the current payment system inefficient and unsustainable. The Agency is busy developing a new payment model which will replace the current inefficient one. Our vision is to have a payment system that caters for both urban and rural based beneficiaries, where beneficiaries can get their payment anytime and anywhere under a secure and dignified environment. With this new system we project to cut the current costs by between 20% to 30%. The new system will also ensure that the transaction cost (i.e. bank charges) is not carried by the beneficiary meaning that the grant recipient will receive his/her money in full.

    QUESTION 1945

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 26 July 2010

    Internal question paper no: 17

    Dr W G James (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether her department has a bursary scheme aimed at funding university students; if so, (a) how is the funding allocated and (b) since inception, how many (i) eligible students have applied for it but have not received funding and (ii) students has it funded each year? NW2333E

    REPLY:

    Yes, the Department has a bursary scheme aimed at funding university students studying Social Work.

    (a) The allocation of the scholarship funds to successful applicants is informed by the Department's Social Work Scholarship Policy which makes provision for the following process:

    The applicants who wish to apply for the scholarship are advised to send their applications to the provincial Departments of Social Development. On receipt of such applications the provincial departments have to profile and select the qualifying applicants. Thereafter the list of qualifying applicants is forwarded to the national Department of Social Development to be considered at a meeting, attended by both national and provincial officials to determine the final list of applicants who will be awarded the scholarship. The awarding of the scholarship to students takes into consideration the available budget for that financial year.

    The students who have been awarded the scholarship are provided with promissory notes which they have to submit to the universities where they have been admitted to study social work.

    The following criteria are used to consider applicants for the scholarship:

    · Applicants should have met the Higher Institutions of Learning entry requirements. And should come from disadvantaged communities/backgrounds.

    · They should have also gone through a selection process as prescribed by a University, preferably in their own province to study social work, and a proof of admission should be submitted.

    · Social Work students who are currently studying at a particular University but are unable to continue with their studies due to lack of funds are also considered.

    · The academic record of the applicant is also used as a criterion and the continuation of funding students already on the scholarship is informed by their annual performance.

    The Department of Social Development manages the funds for the Scholarship programme through National Student Financial Aid Scheme which administers the transfers to respective universities.

    (b)(i) The National Department of Social Development does not have information on the number of unsuccessful students who had applied for the scholarship funding. Such information is kept by provincial Departments of Social Development, because, as mentioned above, applications are received, profiled and shortlisted at that level.

    (b)(ii) The table indicates the number of students who received funding for the first time since 2007.

    Period

    2007

    2008

    2009

    2010

    Total

    Number of students funded

    1428

    1462

    1310

    1410

    5610

    QUESTION 1873

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 3 June 2010

    Internal question paper no 16

    Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether her department intends releasing the forensic report on alleged corruption by a certain person* (name furnished); if not, why not; if so, when will the report be released;

    (2) whether any action has been taken against any person implicated in corruption by the forensic report; if not, why not; if so, (a) against whom, (b) what action has been taken and (c) what was the cost implication? NW2166E

    REPLY:

    (1) No. The purpose of the investigation is to enquire whether there was any wrongdoing by the said person and, where appropriate, to recommend appropriate action. The internal investigation process has been concluded. The incumbent has been charged and found guilty. However, the external process which is intended to lead to the recouping of lost funds is still ongoing. This may lead to criminal charges being laid and the claims being laid to recoup the funds. This unfolding process may require us to use evidence in the said forensic report. The report will not be released to the public for reasons alluded to above.

    (2) Refer to (1) above.

    QUESTION 1872

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 4 June 2010

    Internal question paper no:

    1872. Mrs S P Kopane (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    Whether the current chief executive officer (CEO) of the National Development Agency (NDA) is serving in an acting capacity; if not, (a) why not, (b) when was the acting CEO removed from office, (c) why was the acting CEO removed from office, (d) who is in that position currently, (e) when was this individual appointed, (f) on what basis was the person appointed and (g) what process was followed with the (i) removal of the acting CEO and (ii) appointment of the current individual on the position; if so, (aa) why, (bb) on what basis was this individual appointed in an acting capacity and (cc) when will this position be filled permanently? NW2165E

    REPLY:

    The Board Authority is the current Chief Executive Officer of the NDA serving in an acting capacity pending the appointment of the CEO.

    (a) The appointment of the CEO was awaiting the Minister's approval and endorsement by Cabinet.

    (b) The Acting CEO was relieved of her duties effective from 31st March 2010.

    (c) The Acting CEO was relieved of her duties as she would have been in an acting capacity for a period of 12 months at the end of March 2010. The Board had envisaged a shorter acting period for the acting CEO.

    (d) Anticipating that a new CEO will be named soon, the NDA Board established a Board Authority to oversee the executive management of the NDA and maintain institutional stability before the permanent CEO is in place. The Board Authority comprises three persons: Ms Marcia Manong, Deputy Chairperson of the Board and Chair of the Board Human Resources & Remuneration Committee; Prof. Thokozile Mayekiso, Chairperson of the Projects and Programme Screening Committee and Mr. Muthuhadini Madzivhandila, Chairperson of the Research and Development Committee.

    (e) The Board Authority was appointed with effect from 1st April 2010.

    (f) The three members of the Board Authority were appointed on the basis that they are chairing three Board Sub-Committees, namely, Human Resources and Remuneration Committee; Projects and Programmes Screening Committee and Research and Development Committee, and are therefore familiar with the core business of the organisation.

    (g) (i) And (ii) The process followed in terminating the services of the Acting CEO and the appointment of the Board Authority was a MANCO resolution of 26th March and was supported by a Board resolution on 29th March 2010. A letter of post implementation of this decision was sent to the Minister by the Chairperson of the Board on 31st March 2010.

    (aa) and (bb) See point c and d above.

    (cc) On the 19th of April 2010, Cabinet concurred with the recommendation by the Minister of Social Development to appoint Ms Vuyelwa Nhlapo as the CEO of the NDA. It is expected that she will assume duty as the Chief Executive Officer of the NDA with effect from 1st July 2010.