Questions and Replies

Filter by year

23 June 2022 - NW2059

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Pertaining to the failure of the Eastern Cape Department of Education failure to spend a total of R205 million of the education budget while there exist infrastructure problems with specific reference to mud schools and pit toilets in the specified province, how does her department intend to supervise the province to avoid such mistakes from happening?

Reply:

The DBE has intensified its monitoring activities of  the Eastern Cape DoE Infrastructure Programme.  Meetings with the provincial team are held twice every month. Monitoring addresses planning, budgeting, expenditure, procurement and project management. These are interrogated and a sample of projects are visited. Based on the findings from these visits, remedial actions are devised with the province and monitored by the DBE. Monitoring deals with both programme and project issues. 

1.  Programme matters include - 

- The pattern of overall expenditure being achieved;

-Comparisons of expenditure to projected cash flows;

- Progress being made with key groups of projects [eg. Water, sanitation, libraries, laboratories, Grade R]; and

- Management of the portfolio of projects [ie evidence that the programme of projects is being managed effectively through the project cycle].

2.  At the Project level the focus is on ensuring -

-that PSP appointments are being made;

- that planning and design processes are progressing;

- that the tender process for the appointment of contractors is progressing, that construction is progressing satisfactorily, [i.e. on programme, on budget, at acceptable quality…]; and

- that projects are being handed over and closed out and that final accounts are being wrapped up.

23 June 2022 - NW2318

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1705 on 23 May 2022, what are the reasons that (a) KwaZulu-Natal, (b) Mpumalanga, (c) North West and (d) Northern Cape did not have placements in hotspots and all cases referred to district co-ordinators, something which might hinder the process of assisting learners who are in dire need of social intervention and psychological intervention?

Reply:

While the DBE responded to the initial question about the work we do with the Department of Social Development around provision of the psychosocial support to learners and educators with the intention of building resilience, minimizing mental health problems and ensuring continuity of teaching and learning in schools; the current question needs specifics about the three provinces which is the responsibility of the Members of the Executive Councils (MECs) of those provinces and not the Minister. 

23 June 2022 - NW2229

Profile picture: Komane, Ms RN

Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

On what date is it envisaged that pit toilets will be eradicated in all schools in the North West?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the North West Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

23 June 2022 - NW2327

Profile picture: Nolutshungu, Ms N

Nolutshungu, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her department’s assertion that, of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 can be accommodated due to budget constraints (details furnished), what mechanism will her department together with the Department of Transport use to ensure that 115 000 bicycles are delivered within a year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is not aware of assertions made that of the 125 000 pupils eligible for scholar transport in the Eastern Cape, only 10 000 will be accommodated due to budget constraints.

However, Information received from the Eastern Cape Department of Transport who implement the Learner Transport Programme in the province indicates that for the 2021/2022 Financial Year, there were 111 127 learners who were eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 125 423 learners were transported which was 112% more than the total need.

For the 2022/2023 Financial Year, there are 127 455 learners who are eligible for Learner Transport Programme and of these, 102 998 learners are targeted to be transported which is 81% of the total need. This leaves out 24 457 who are in need and qualify for learner transport due to Budget constraints

The Shova Kalula National Bicycle Project is an initiative of the National Department of Transport which was introduced as a pilot project in 2001. The project is an intervention to improve mobility and access to basic needs. The project aims to alleviate transport pressure on poor households and ensure access to public transport and schools.

The Department of Basic Education is not fully privy of the project schedule and thus request the Honorable Member to redirect the question to the Department of Transport as the custodians of the project. 

23 June 2022 - NW2189

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Reply:

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 03/06/2022

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/2022

2189. Mrs D van der Walt (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education: to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

. (1) What (a) is the total number of girls who gave birth in 2021 in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years and (b) monetary and/or otherwise support do the specified (i) learners and (ii) their children receive from her department; (2) what steps are being taken by her department to educate the learners with regard to the (a) long-term career implications, (b) monetary costs of raising a child and (c) implications of falling pregnant at a young age without finishing school?

Response

1. (a) According to data from the Department of Health, the total number of girls who gave birth in the 2021 financial year in each province in each age group from 12 to 19 years are provided below,  and

Province

Number of deliveries to girls aged 10-19 years (April 2021 - March 2022)

EC

12 582

FS

4 444

GT

13 814

KZN

24 230

LIM

11 287

MPU

8 840

NC

2 662

NW

5 635

WC

6 543

RSA

90 037

 

1. (b) Schools are required to provide an environment where all pregnant learners can access professional information advice, referrals, treatment, care, counselling and support. Therefore, other departments also have a role to play in ensuring that the pregnant learners are linked to services such as antenatal and postnatal care provided by the Health Department; and the Department of Social Development and SASSA for access to the Child Support Grant and other social support, amongst others. The department protects the rights of learners to education including continuation of schooling through accommodating reasonable absence due to pregnancy and provision of continuous educational support post-delivery while facilitating earliest return to school. Furthermore, through partners such as Global Fund, learners are given Early Childhood Development  (ECD) Vouchers so that they can leave their children in ECD Centres while the learner is continuing with schooling.

 2.  (a) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education that is offered through Life Skills and Life Orientation, educates all learners about goal setting and how they can reach their full potential. Furthermore, the department also holds Career Jamborees and Future Choice where learners get to see different career paths that they can choose.

 2. (b) and (c) The Career Jamborees and Future Choice campaigns are held with other government departments, including health. Sexual Reproductive Health and Rights information and services are provided, which includes content on the consequences of early and unintended pregnancy. 

23 June 2022 - NW1151

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers and (b) is the (i) total number of ECD workers in the Republic and (ii) is the breakdown of the total for each province?

Reply:

What are the educational requirements for early childhood development (ECD) workers?

  • The Department of Basic Education is training the ECD practitioners on the National Curriculum Framework (NCF) from birth to four years on NQF level 4, which is the minimum qualification for ECD practitioners.

What is the total number of ECD workers in the Republic and the provincial breakdown?

  • The Department released the ECD Census Summary Report on 01 April 2022, which tells us that there is a total of 198,361 staff employed in ECD Programmes. The information on the provincial breakdown will however be available when the full report of the ECD Census is finalised and released. 

13 June 2022 - NW2142

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Given that the current educator to student ratio in the Republic has been officially benchmarked at 33.5 in primary schools and 32.2 in secondary schools, although in reality classes on average carry between 40 and 50 learners in each class, (a) what are the reasons that her department allows the situation to spiral out of control and (b) by what date does she envisage the situation will be remedied to comply with the standards of the South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996?

Reply:

(a) There are currently no legislated norms and standards for learner to educator ratio in public schools. The post provisioning norms apply what is referred to "ideal maximum class size" for each subject which ranges from six (6) learners per class in the case of Music, to 37 for subjects that accommodate large class sizes. As referred, these are ideal measures that the sector strives to achieve through continuous improvement in providing resources. It must also be noted that actual class sizes experienced by learners at schools are an outcome of various factors in the provisioning of educators. These include, among other factors, availability of classroom space; distribution of learners within and across grades; an increase of learners in certain geographic areas; time-tabling; and school size.

(b) Improving the class size towards a subject-specific ideal class size is an ongoing process.

13 June 2022 - NW2243

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Considering where we are currently globally and nationally with the COVID-19 pandemic, what (a) has her department recorded as the amount of school time that has been missed as a direct and/or indirect result of the pandemic as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (b)(i) measures have thus far been put in place to make up for lost time and (ii) are the details regarding the effectiveness of such measures?

Reply:

a) School closures and lost contact time

After schools closed on the 18th of March in 2020, in response to the initial spread of COVID-19 in South Africa, a phased approach to reopening schools was adopted by the government. This meant that the amount of time that schools were closed varied across grades. Moreover, once schools were reopened they had to adhere to social distancing rules, which had the inevitable effect that most schools adopted some form of rotational timetabling. The overall effect of school closures and rotational timetabling meant that in some grades up to 60% of the 2020 school year was lost, as the figure below shows.

 

Figure 1: School days in 2020 by grade

 

After schools were reopened, contact teaching time was still compromised throughout 2020 and 2021 due to rotational timetabling systems. A large survey of no-fee primary school schools in the North West Province in term 3 of 2021 revealed that in 60% of the 190 schools visited, the school was on a rotational schedule. These findings are roughly in line with patterns observed in no-fee schools in Limpopo Province (Ardington & Henry, Funda Wande Limpopo Evaluation, 2021). A Department of Basic Education analysis of 2021 Term 3 administrative data on attendance suggested that approximately 22% of contact time in Term 3 of 2021 was lost nationally, but that in schools where rotational timetabling was still being implemented the amount of lost contact time was as much as 50%.

 

 

Figure 2: School attendance in 2021 in the North West Province

(b) (i) Measures in place to make up for lost time: The Three year Recovery Annual Teaching Plans (ATPs), which is a trimmed curriculum, provides guidance on core content, concepts and skills per subject and grade that teachers should prioritise. Mediation sessions have been conducted by PEDs on the implementation of the Recovery Annual Teaching Plans. A directive has been issued to schools to focus on formative assessment to ensure that more time is allocated to teaching. The Assessment for Learning (AfL) approach has been promoted at all levels in the system. Mid-year examinations were replaced by controlled tests. The weightings of school based assessment versus examinations has been reviewed so that a greater weighting is allocated to school based assessment conducted by the teacher in the classroom. Remote and Digital Learning programmes such as Radio and television lessons are broadcast for catch-up. The Education Assistants and Reading Champions were employed and placed in schools to alleviate some of the teachers’ administrative responsibilities, to ensure that teachers focus on the teaching and learning. The DBE has officially declared that 2022 to 2024 will be focussing on learning recovery, based on the Recovery ATP (trimmed ATP), even though normal schooling has resumed across all schools. This will allow schools more time to recover the learning losses. Teachers have been advised to first assess the learning deficits, for each of the sections of the work to be taught, so that learners can be taken from where they are, to where they need to get to.   

(ii) Provinces do report on the implementation of measures put in place to counter-act learning losses and the DBE monitors the implementation of these measures on an ongoing basis. However, given the extent of the learning losses, it may be pre-mature to evaluate the effectiveness of the learning recovery at this early stage. Evaluation studies in this regard are part of the DBE plan and will be implemented in 2023 and 2024.  

For other details on how much contact time was list, please see attachment.

13 June 2022 - NW1158

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) is the number of teachers in her department who are able to teach in isiXhosa mother-tongue language and (b) is her department’s plan to develop isiXhosa as a medium of instruction; (2) what steps is her department taking to develop languages other than English or Afrikaans so that they can adequately be implemented as a medium of instruction in schools; (3) whether her department has any plans to work with the Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation to open teacher training colleges and produce teachers who are qualified to teach in mother-tongue languages; if not; why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) whether her department conducted any research on the impact of teaching and learning in mother-tongue languages for reading and writing for meaning; if not; why not; if so, what were the outcomes of such a study?

Reply:

1(a) The Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education initiative has 2 295 teachers who are able to teach through the medium of IsiXhosa and Sesotho.  

1(b) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is in the process of putting a plan in place to promote all the nine previously marginalised official African languages as languages of learning and teaching beyond Grade 3. 

2. The DBE is collaborating with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) to put a plan in place to promote the nine previously marginalised official African languages (IsiZulu, IsiXhosa, IsiNdebele, Siswati, Sesotho, Setswana, Sepedi, Tshivenda and Xitsonga) as languages of learning and teaching post Foundation Phase. The DBE is establishing a task team comprising different stakeholders. The Old Mutual is part of the Task Team. So is the Department of Sports, Arts and Culture. We are still in the very initial stage of the plan and trying to identify and bring in all the relevant stakeholders. 

The DBE, through the Eastern Cape Education's own initiative, piloted the Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education wherein IsiXhosa and Sesotho were utilised as languages of learning and teaching for Mathematics and Science and Technology beyond Grade 3. The learnings from the Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education pilot taught us to be very prudent on dealing with a programme of this nature.

3. The DBE has a working relationship with the Department of Higher Education, Science and Innovation (DHESI) on teacher production. The DHESI will be part of the African Languages Mother Tongue Education Task Team. The different options of accelerating teacher training in Mother-Tongue Based instruction will be explored by the Task Team and use of Teacher Training Colleges, could be one of the options. However, Teacher Training Colleges do not fall under the jurisdiction of the DBE.    

4. Research worldwide shows that learners learn best through their home languages. The DBE has continuously been conducting research on the impact of learning in one's home language. The Early Grade Reading Studies (EGRS) were designed as nested Randomised Control Trials led by the DBE in collaboration with other academics. The EGRS studies focus on the Foundation Phase, evaluating different interventions for supporting the teaching of reading. The studies aim to build evidence about what works to improve the learning and teaching of early grade reading in South African schools.

EGRS was a comparison of the cost-effectiveness of three promising intervention models to improve reading outcomes in Setswana as a Home Language. The interventions were (i) a structured learning programme with lesson plans and integrated materials as well as centralised training, (ii) the same structured programme with lesson plan integrated materials but with on-site coaching, and (iii) a parent involvement intervention.

Of the three interventions the coaching showed a substantial positive impact after two years of intervention. Learners who received two years of this coaching intervention were approximately 40% of a year of learning ahead of the students in the schools that received no intervention. The gains were sustained when the same learners were measured in Grade 4, one year after the intervention they were still about 40% of a year of learning ahead. A further follow-up on these learners was conducted in 2021 to measure long-term gains and the data thereof is currently being analysed. 

An improvement plan was developed based on the recommendations. This was adopted by Cabinet and the implementation of the improvement plan has been ongoing. Documents relating to EGRS are attached.

09 June 2022 - NW1997

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to the Annual Performance Plan 2022/23 of her department that was released recently, which states that the full-scale implementation of the subjects of robotics and coding for Grade R to Grade 3, and Grade 7 is planned for the academic year 2023, and the pilot is planned from 2022 to 2023 for grades 4 to 9 which will be followed by full-scale implementation in the grades between 2024 and 2025, her department has started to capacitate educators and upskilling them to teach the new subjects; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) whether educators in townships and rural areas will be prioritised as they will have a much tougher time given the limitation in resources; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the plan in this regard and (b) are the further relevant details?

Reply:

1) Over 10 000 teachers have been provided training across all provinces. The DBE has also, through a partnership with UNISA, provided training on coding and robotic to 986 Foundation Phase teachers, subject advisors and provincial coordinators to date. 

2) The selection of schools for the pilot included schools in townships, rural areas as well as those providing multi-grade teaching including school for learners with special education needs. 

02 June 2022 - NW2066

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In light of the closing down of Finetown Secondary School due to overcrowding, (a) what measures of intervention will her department put in place to address the specified issue and (b) by what date will her department address the matter?

Reply:

Finetown Secondary School was only closed for two days. The challenge of overcrowding is common in schools serving informal settlement due to non-stop immigration to such areas which cannot be planned for.  The department requires an amount over 5 billion Rands to build over 16 000 additional classes to overcome overcrowding in the sector, Finetown Secondary included. Such funding is currently unavailable to the sector due to budget constraints as the country focuses on rebuilding flood ravaged areas of KwaZulu-Natal, Eastern Cape and North West.

02 June 2022 - NW2061

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In light of confirmed statistics that more than 3 000 educators perished due to the scourge of COVID-19 in the past two years, (a) what total number of the specified teachers have been replaced already and (b) by what date does she envisage they will all be replaced?

Reply:

(a) The public schools' sector loses between 18 000-22 000 (4.5%-5.5% of the overall educator population) educators annually due to natural attrition, in the main, driven by resignations, retirements and deaths. Analysis of excess deaths shows that there was a notable increase in deaths during the height of COVID-19. However, on the whole, the numbers were still within the range in terms of the annual attrition rate experienced by the sector. Therefore, educators that the sector lost due to COVID-19 deaths were continuously being replaced as part of the overall replacement of educators due to natural attrition. 

(b) The replacement of educators lost due to attrition is an ongoing process.

30 May 2022 - NW2018

Profile picture: Mokgotho, Ms SM

Mokgotho, Ms SM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Noting the long distance which learners have to travel daily from their villages to get to school, what are the reasons that payment intended for scholar transport for learners from Moubana, Manamela and Rakoko high schools in Moses Kotane, North West, was stopped?

Reply:

Information received from the North West Provincial Department of Transport and Roads (NWDoTR) through the North West Department of Education (NWDoE), indicates that the province experienced the budget depletion for the financial year 2021/2022 during the said period of interrupted service.  Therefore, the NWDoTR was unable to pay learner transport operators for the months of January, February and March 2022. 

When the budget for the new financial year 2022/2023 was loaded, all outstanding payments were processed. Therefore, at this moment there is no stopped or intention to stop payment intended for learners of Rakoko High School.

30 May 2022 - NW922

Profile picture: Sukers, Ms ME

Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In terms of what statutory power(s) does she issue the Standard Operating Procedure for the Containment and Management of COVID-19 in Schools and School Communities (SOP); (2) what is the rationale for the SOP, given the context of the (a) low mortality rate caused by newer variants of the virus, such as Omicron, (b) high levels of immunity created by a combination of natural immunity and the national vaccination programme and (c) indication by the President of the Republic, Mr M C Ramaphosa, that the Republic is to exit the national state of disaster very soon; (3) how does clause 12.3 of the SOP regarding the prohibition of religious services serve to achieve the stated purpose of minimising the contamination of school facilities and observing the social gathering restrictions, given that (a) up to 1 000 indoor and 2 000 outdoor spectators are allowed at schools for various activities and (b) religious services are allowed, subject to strict sanitisation and social distancing protocols as per the Regulations and ministerial directive; (4) (a) by what date is it envisaged that the SOPs will allow for religious services and (b) if no such point is anticipated, what is the reason for this?

Reply:

The question  has been addressed by the Revised Directions published in the gazette on 4 April 2022.

30 May 2022 - NW1511

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr SL

Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools in each province did not receive their Learning and Teaching Support Material allocation for the 2020-21 financial year and (b) are the reasons for this in each case?

Reply:

(a) The provisioning of Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSMs) is a provincial responsibility. However, DBE guides provinces on the procurement processes which detail the activities and timeframes in line with the LTSMs sector plan.

Thereafter DBE monitors if provinces observe the timeframe set. According to the reports received from provinces, all schools received their LTSMs as per their orders for 2020/21 financial year. The Hounourable Member is requested to direct the question through the provincial legislatures, where there are province-specific questions or concerns.

(b) Provincial reports to DBE show that all schools received their ordered LTSMs. Provinces have assured the DBE that where there are shortages, the provinces are currently receiving requisitions from schools to address these shortages.

30 May 2022 - NW2012

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is (a) the current total number of schools that are without proper sanitation services in the Republic, (b) the breakdown of that figure in terms of each province and (c) her department doing to ensure that no school is without sanitation infrastructure?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (c). In 2011, the Department of Basic Education (in collaboration with the nine Provincial Departments of Education), determined the number of schools with no toilets.  A total of 1 053 such schools were included in the scope of the Accelerated School Infrastructure Development Initiative (ASIDI).

At present, 1 039 of these schools have received a full set of appropriate toilets in accordance with the minimum uniform norms and standards for public school infrastructure.  The balance of 14 schools are scheduled for completion in 2022/23.

In 2018, the Department of Basic Education, again in collaboration with the nine Provincial Departments of Education, determined the number of schools that are dependent on basic pit toilets. A total of 3 482 such schools were included in the scope of the Sanitation Appropriate For Education (SAFE) programme.

At present, 1 962 of these schools have received a full set of appropriate toilets in accordance with the minimum uniform norms and standards for public school infrastructure.  The balance of 1 520 schools are part of the DBE plans for this current financial year.

30 May 2022 - NW2067

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps have been taken by her department to deal with the challenge of substance abuse in schools?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education collaborates with the Central Drug Authority (CDA), a statutory body established in terms of the Prevention and Treatment of Substance Abuse Act, 2008 (Act No. 70 of 2008). The DBE supports the implementation of the CDA Drug Master Plan, as reflected in the annual report.

The DBE has developed the National Strategy for the Prevention and Management of Alcohol and Drug Use Amongst Learners in Schools, accompanied by Drug Testing Guidelines, which are currently under review to ensure these remain abreast of evidence-based developments in the field.

In addition, the resource High-on-Life Toolkit, was co-developed with the African Youth Development Agency and is used to capacitate District Co-ordinators to prevent the abuse of substances in schools.

In the course of 2021 through 2022 financial years, the Minister and Deputy Minister of Education are leading a multi-sectoral programme in all nine provinces towards the Prevention of Violence, Bullying, Corporal Punishment, Gender-based Violence, Discrimination and the Abuse of Alcohol and Substances in Schools

30 May 2022 - NW1990

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of ghost teachers have been on the systems of each provincial education department from 1 January 2020 to 31 March 2022 and (b) is the (i) rate of educator absenteeism in each province and (ii) associated cost in Rand value of such absenteeism amongst educators in each province?

Reply:

(a), (b) (i)(ii). The National Department does not collect the requested information as part of its routine monitoring and support framework. The Department will, however, request each Provincial Education Department to provide the information as requested. The information will be provided to the Honorable Member of Parliament once it is obtained. 

23 May 2022 - NW1705

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has approached the Department of Social Services to provide social workers to schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education partnered with the Department of Social Development (DSD) as efforts to ensure the provision of psychosocial support to learners and educators with the intention of building resilience, minimizing mental health problems and ensuring continuity of teaching and learning in schools. All Provincial Departments of Education refer learners to DSD, particularly for statutory services in relation to child abuse cases.

Working with the Gauteng Department of Education, the DSD has employed one hundred and thirteen (113) social workers, eighteen (18) Social Work Supervisors and ten (10) Social Auxilliary Workers, and attached them to the Education Districts. The contact details for the DSD supervisors have been provided to schools and School Based Support Team members should they need to escalate cases.

To strengthen psychosocial support during COVID-19, the Free State Department of Education partnered with the Department of Social Development (DSD) around placement of Social Work Interns at District level. Fifty four (54) social work interns were placed in the respective Districts and hotspot areas within circuits. Orientation of these Social workers on the psychosocial needs in the context of COVID-19 was conducted by the DBE and the Province. The placement has since been terminated.

The North West Department of Education has partnered with the DSD by referring learners with psychosocial support needs to social workers within the DSD and networking with DSD to provide trauma debriefing and counselling of learners. They have established an Inter sectoral collaboration with Health and DSD in terms of identification and support of learners.

In KwaZulu-Natal Education Department, each school in the Province has been linked to the Health facilities and DSD service office for the provision of health and psychosocial support services respectively.

Mpumalanga Department of Education has been in discussion with DSD on how they can assist with the Social Workers employed by DSD. Currently, they have a working partnership where districts have contact details of DSD district coordinators, for case referral purposes.

The Northern Cape Department of Education refer cases that need further support to Provincial and District Structures of the DSD and Health. The Province conducts monthly meetings with DoH and DSD.

23 May 2022 - NW1813

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will her department provide adequate water to the Chief Ampie Mayisa Secondary School in the Govan Mbeki Local Municipality in Mpumalanga, where approximately 2 000 learners are enrolled?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Mpumalanga Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

23 May 2022 - NW1572

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) entities reporting to her concluded any commercial contracts with (i) the government of the Russian Federation and/or (ii) any other entity based in the Russian Federation since 1 April 2017; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, for each commercial contract, what are the (aa) relevant details, (bb) values, (cc) time frames, (dd) goods contracted and (ee) reasons that the goods could not be contracted in the Republic?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not have any commercial contracts with the Russian Federation.

23 May 2022 - NW1696

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Noting how more than 600 learners did not report to school after the devastating floods in KwaZulu-Natal, what (a) engagements has her department made with the management of affected schools and (b) are the agreed-upon contingency plans?

Reply:

The question asked by the Honourable Member falls within the purview of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) of KwaZulu-Natal (KZN), not the Minister of Basic Education. Attached please see response from KZN. 

23 May 2022 - NW1823

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of no-fee schools are without a school feeding scheme and (b) are the reasons behind this?

Reply:

a) Zero. 

b) The National School Nutrition Programme's mandate is to provide school meals to Q1-3 primary and secondary schools, and identified special schools. The Department has no knowledge of any schools falling into these categories that are not included in the programme.

23 May 2022 - NW264

Profile picture: Ceza, Mr K

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether invigilators have been paid their salaries for the December 2021 examinations period; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All Provincial Education Departments have paid their invigilators, except for two PEDs, where there are outstanding payments. In the case of the Western Cape, 22 of the 2007 invigilators that were appointed have not been paid. The 22 outstanding payments emanate from administrative issues relating to incorrect banking details, awaiting deceased estate details, and individuals blocked on Persal due to different reasons. In the Eastern Cape, 594 of the 1192 invigilators have not been paid, due to incomplete or late submission of documents by the invigilators. However, this has now been finalised and the outstanding payments were made.   

23 May 2022 - NW1808

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will review the closing of Seekoegat Primary School in the Western Cape, since there was no sufficient consultation between her department and the community before the decision to close the school was taken; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The closing of a school is a provincial matter and should be referred to the Member of the Executive Council of the relevant province.

18 May 2022 - NW1662

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) components of her department make up the Inclusive Basket of Results score for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations, (b) are the reasons that the particular components of the score were chosen, (c) are the reasons that the score is not announced at the same time as the pass rate at the beginning of the year and (d) are the Inclusive Basket scores for each (i) province and (ii) education district in the 2021 NSC results?

Reply:

(a) The nine criteria that constitute the reporting in terms of the Inclusive Basket framework, are as follows:

        (i)     Overall Achievement (%).

        (ii)    Mathematics Participation (%).

        (iii)    Mathematics Achievement (%).

        (iv)    Physical Science Achievement (%).

        (v)    Technical Mathematics Achievement (%)

        (vi)    Accounting Achievement (%)

        (vii)   Admission to Bachelor Studies (%)

        (viii)  Distinction Achievement (%)

        (ix)   Throughput rate (%) 

       

(b)    The rationale for the Inclusive Basket of Criteria, is to move away from a single determinant of the performance of the schooling system (i.e. Overall Pass Percentage) to a more comprehensive set of quality indicators that more accurately reflect the performance of the schooling system at the end of Grade 12. The specific subjects which include Mathematics, Physical Science, Technical Mathematics and Accounting, represents the priority subject fields that need to be promoted in the schooling system. Accounting has been added as a proxy subject for the Business, Commerce and Management subjects, and Technical Mathematics added as a proxy subject for the Technology stream. Admission to Bachelor Studies and the Distinction Achievement are strong indicators of the quality of the achievement and throughput rate reflects the efficiency of the system.

(c)  The Council of Education Ministers (CEM) made a decision that the Inclusive Basket of Criteria will be piloted for a few years so as to obtain feedback on the uptake of this new system of reporting and to ensure that the criteria are appropriately selected. Therefore, over the last three years the criteria have been amended based on feedback on what should be the priority drivers in the system and there has been a shift from aggregating the individual scores of the selected indicators to reporting on each of the criteria individually. The Inclusive Basket of Criteria has been used as the secondary mode of reporting, while overall pass percentage remained the primary reporting tool. This will be reviewed once again this year and a decision will be made as to how the Inclusive Basket of Criteria will be used in 2022 and beyond.

(d)  (i) Table representing the Performance of the Nine PEDs, in the 2021 NSC Examination, in terms of the Inclusive Basket of Criteria.

Province Name

% Achieved  

% Accounting Achieved

% Mathematics Achieved

% Physical Sciences Achieved 

% Technical Mathematics

% Maths Participation  

% Bachelors  

% Distinctions Achieved

% Throughput

EASTERN CAPE

73.0%

76.4%

46.6%

62.3%

50.7%

48.0%

34.3%

3.7%

66.2%

FREE STATE

85.7%

81.9%

66.6%

75.1%

73.5%

36.4%

39.9%

3.5%

58.7%

GAUTENG

82.8%

81.9%

68.2%

73.5%

63.4%

31.2%

43.8%

5.2%

70.4%

KWAZULU-NATAL

76.8%

70.1%

54.2%

71.2%

63.0%

36.9%

37.1%

5.0%

73.5%

LIMPOPO

66.7%

65.2%

54.5%

67.8%

53.6%

42.7%

26.7%

2.4%

70.1%

MPUMALANGA

73.6%

71.4%

54.0%

61.5%

78.0%

42.8%

31.5%

2.4%

77.3%

NORTH WEST

78.2%

79.6%

71.5%

77.5%

48.4%

23.9%

33.8%

2.8%

61.5%

NORTHERN CAPE

71.4%

80.8%

59.2%

65.2%

59.8%

21.1%

30.3%

2.1%

58.1%

WESTERN CAPE

81.2%

80.1%

73.4%

78.3%

63.2%

26.3%

45.3%

7.2%

73.4%

NATIONAL

76.4%

74.7%

57.6%

69.0%

60.1%

36.8%

36.4%

4.2%

69.8

(d) (ii)  Annexure A, Representing the Performance of the Seventy Five Education Districts in the 2021 NSC Examinations, in terms of the Inclusive Basket of Criteria.  

18 May 2022 - NW1402

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Noting the snail-pace progress in eradicating pit latrines in schools, by what date is it envisaged that the pit latrines in rural schools will be completely eradicated?

Reply:

DBE plans to eradicate pit toilets on the original list of schools which were identified at inception of the SAFE initiative during the 2022/2023 financial year.

18 May 2022 - NW1764

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the criteria for (i) the admissions for the Funza Lushaka bursary scheme, (b) what are the criteria for (ii) a student wanting to change subjects when receiving the scholarship, (b) number of learners have (i) been accepted for mathematics and science, (ii) passed with mathematics and science in the past three academic years and (iii) dropped out of their studies before completion?

Reply:

a) What are the criteria for the admissions for the Funza Lushaka bursary scheme?

     (i) There are criteria for first time applicants who include the District and Community-based recruits and the returning or existing students who are already enrolled at an HEI. The              criteria are stipulated as follows:

A. For 1st time entrants to a Higher Education Institution

  • An exemption, endorsement, or ‘admission to bachelor degree studies’ pass at Grade 12 level.
  • At least a level 4 pass at Grade 12 level in the subject which leads on to the priority area/subject in which the applicant will specialize to teach.
  • For students who wish to specialize in the Foundation Phase, a pass in Mathematics or at least level 4 pass in Mathematical Literacy at Grade 12 level is required. In addition, a level 4 pass in the Home Language is required.
  • Students who wish to specialize in the teaching of Technology subjects, including CAT, and who do not have these subjects at matric level, must have at least a level 4 pass in Mathematics.
  • If the institution’s admission requirements are higher than the bursary requirement and vice versa then the higher requirement will apply.

 

  1. For existing bursars
  • The student must have passed at least two-thirds (66.6%) of all the subject modules studied in the last year of study at the university.
  • The student must have passed at least two-thirds (66.6%) of the priority subject area modules studied in the last year of study at the Higher Education Institution. This should include specific province-specific subjects of students selected through the District and Community Based teacher recruitment programme.
  • For the Foundation Phase, Language, Mathematics and Life Skills will form the priority subjects for purposes of the re-awarding of the bursary.
  • If a student is doing one priority subject, he/she must pass it to qualify for re-award.
  • The student must be progressing to the next level/year of study.
  • The students must achieve at least a 55% average across all subject modules.
  • Students who register and fail a module twice in a year, that module will be counted twice for purposes of determining the course load and the number of modules failed.
  • Students who fail to meet the above will have their bursaries temporarily withdrawn until they redeem themselves by meeting these requirements, where they will again be considered for funding.

B. What are the criteria for a student wanting to change subjects when receiving the scholarship?

            Students are not allowed to change subjects, once awarded they have to adhere to the subject until the qualification is completed.

        b. (i) The number of learners have that been accepted for mathematics and science,

  • For 2022, selections at HEIs are still being conducted and the data will be made available after the outcome of the selections have been concluded. However, the table below illustrates the number of Mathematics and Sciences students for the previous academic year (2021).

   

SUBJECTS/MODULES

Number of students

Mathematics

5958

Physical Science

1970

Source: FLIMS SUBMITTED Q4 LIST

 

       b. (ii)  The number of student passed with mathematics and science in the past three academic years is indicated in the table below:

       

Mathematics and Physical Science Pass Rate in the past three academic years

Subject

2019

2020

2021

Total

Mathematics

1500

2355

2408

6263

Physical Science

430

687

807

1924

 

      b. (iii) The number of drop out of their studies before completion?    

  • No drop-outs from the Funza Lushaka bursars, however, one (1) student was reported as deceased.                         

12 May 2022 - NW1313

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of technical schools are in each province and (b) how are they funded?

Reply:

A. NUMBER OF TECHNICAL SCHOOLS PER PROVINCE

 

PROVINCE

NO. OF TECHNICAL SCHOOLS

 

   

 

EASTERN CAPE (EC)

69

 

FREE STATE (FS)

30

 

GAUTENG (GP)

82

 

KWAZULU NATAL (KZN)

73

 

LIMPOPO (LP)

43

 

MPUMALANGA (MP)

40

 

NORTHEN CAPE (NC)

11

 

NORTH WEST (NW)

31

 

WESTERN CAPE (WC)

24

 

NATIONAL

403

 

 

B. FUNDING OF TECHNICAL SCHOOLS

  • All Technical Schools are funded by provinces from the allocated provincial budgets.
  • Some Technical Schools are supported by Departmental Partners like Sasol Foundation
  • Selected Technical Schools are chosen to be MST Grant Schools and they are supported in different ways including resourcing.
  • Every three years, new schools are included by provinces in the list of MST Grant Schools.

12 May 2022 - NW1403

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will her department ensure that the critical vacant posts in (a) schools and (b) circuit offices in Limpopo are filled?

Reply:

Posts whether teaching or otherwise on the establishment of the Provincial Department of Education in Limpopo are the responsibility of the Head Of the Department of Education in Limpopo to fill since he/she is the employer and not the Department of Basic Education.

For this reason, the honourable Ms Tafeni is requested to direct this question to the MEC or Head of Department of the Limpopo Provincial Department of Education for a response.

12 May 2022 - NW1390

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has the power to hold principals of underperforming schools accountable; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) are the details of the underperforming schools and (b) action has she taken against the principals in the past three years up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

1. The Minister does not have the power to hold principals of underperforming schools accountable, but Heads of Department (HODs) do. This is guided by section 58B of the South African Schools Act (SASA), 1996 (Act No. 84 of 1996) as amended.  According to subsection 1-5 of the SASA, the HoD takes the necessary steps to assist the school.  However, Members of the Executive Council (MECs) report to the Minister on the identification, management and support of underperforming schools by 31 March of each calendar year.  In the reports, the MECs indicate the challenges that led to underperformance, and the support programmes that will be implemented to deal with underperformance.

2. At the end of each financial year Provincial Education Departments report to the Minister the progress that has been made in supporting schools that have been identified as underperforming.

3 A table showing the number of underperforming schools per province is attached.

12 May 2022 - NW23

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, in light of alarming reports that 46 learners from the Umbozane Primary School in KwaMaphumulo became seriously ill after apparently eating lollipops at school, her department has investigated the specific incident; if not, why not; if so, what are the findings; (2) whether her department has any plans in place to prevent this from happening in the future?

Reply:

(a) An investigation was conducted by iLembe District and a report will made available to the Department of Basic Education by the KZN provincial education department. 

(b) The school has been issued with the Guidelines for Tuckshop Operators. 

12 May 2022 - NW1448

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of (i) physical and (ii) sexual cases against educators in each province (aa) in the past three financial years and (bb) since April 2022 and (b) total number of the specified cases led to (i) disciplinary actions and (ii) dismissal?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii); (aa); (bb); (b)(i) and (ii) Sexual misconduct cases are reported to the employer. Therefore, the question is more relevant to the provincial administration since it is the responsibility of the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, is the Head of the Provincial Education Department, to enforce disciplinary code and procedures against all educators employed at the provincial level.

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant employer for details and response.

12 May 2022 - NW1663

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the National Education Excellence Awards ceremony held on 7 April 2022, what are the (a) criteria for each category of the awards, (b) reasons that her department has chosen to highlight the specific criteria and (c) reasons that the awards were not awarded during the National Senior Certificate examinations results announcement?

Reply:

a) 

2022 National Education Excellence Awards Categories and Criteria

Category

Criteria

1. Special Recognition Awards

  • Districts showing consistent National Senior Certificate (NSC) performance of above 85% (2019 – 2021)
  • Quintile 1 - 3 Secondary schools showing consistent NSC performance at 100%
    (2017 – 2021)

2. Top Performing District: 2021 NSC Highest Percentage Pass

  • Districts serving up to 400 schools
  • Districts serving more than 400 schools

3. Top Performing District:  selected Quality Indicators – 2021 NSC

Highest score:

Overall Passes; Bachelors; Mathematics; and Physical Science

  • Districts serving up to 400 schools
  • Districts serving more than 400 schools

4. Most Improved District 

2020- 2021 NSC

Highest percentage improvement

 

5. Top Performing District: NSC Bachelor Passes

Highest Percentage NSC Bachelor passes: 2019- 2021

6. Top Performing District: NSC Mathematics and Physical Science Passes

Highest Number of  NSC Mathematics and Physical Science passes: 2019 – 2021
 

7. Excellence in District Leadership and Management



 

District with excellence in:

  • Management of the district 
  • Innovations in the district
  • Management of partnerships

8. Excellence in Primary Schools Learning Outcomes Support


 

District with excellence in:

  • Clear strategies to support improved quality of Grade R practices
  • Clear strategies to improve quality in Mathematics teaching: Grade R-6
  • Strategies to improve language teaching in all languages: Grade R-6
  • Innovations to improve reading in all schools: Grade R-6

9. Top Performing Public Schools: 2021 NSC Highest percentage pass

  • Quintile 5
  • Quintile 4
  • Quintile 3
  • Quintile 2
  • Quintile 1

10. Best Full Service School 2021




 

Full Service School that has shown the most commitment to inclusion including: School policy on inclusion;  Increased and successful accommodation of learners with diverse needs and learners with physical disabilities/ impairments; Functional School Based Support Team; and Evidence of steps taken to ensure physical access for all learners, including transport

11. Special Ministerial Award

Districts with the highest annual average percentage improvement between 2018 and 2021 in the number of Black African and Coloured candidates achieving 60% or more in Mathematics and Physical Science

 

b) 

Reasons per Category Criteria

Criteria category

Reasons

1

To acknowledge and recognise districts for consistent NSC performance of above 85% over the last three years; and Club 100 Quintile 1 - 3 schools for consistent NSC performance at 100% over the last five years.

2

To reward small and large districts (separately by size comparison) that obtained the highest overall percentage passes. 

3

To reward small and large districts (separately by size comparison) that obtained the highest sum score of selected quality indicators viz. Overall passes; Bachelors; Mathematics; and Physical Science. 

4

To reward districts that obtained the highest percentage improvement in the two years of the Covid-19 pandemic

5

To reward districts that produced the highest percentage Bachelor passes over the last three years.

6

To reward districts that produced the highest number of  learners that pass NSC Mathematics and Physical Science over the last three years

7

To reward districts that exhibited excellent leadership and management practices in 2021.

8

To reward districts that showed excellent approaches and implemented best strategies towards improving the teaching and learning of literacy and numeracy.

9

To reward public ordinary schools by quintile for excellent performance in the 2021 NSC taking into account their context including the socio-economic factors.

10

To reward Full Service schools that implemented excellent practices towards the achievement of imperatives on the policy on inclusion. 

11

To to reward districts for improvement in their achievement levels especially among black learners in the gateway subjects of Mathematics and Physical Science in the NSC pre- and during- the Covid-19 pandemic. 

 

c) The National Education Excellence Awards focus on rewarding excellence in performance, management and leadership, policy implementation, improvement strategies and innovation across the General Education and Training (GET) and Further Education and Training (FET) bands, thus going beyond the scope of the NSC results.

12 May 2022 - NW1042

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her reply to question 573 on 7 March 2022, what guarantee does her department give that other learners will not be exposed to corporal punishment administered by the same educator and putting another learner in danger; (2) whether other learners in the previous class also received counselling after the incident; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The question is more relevant to the provincial administration since it is the responsibility of the employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act is the Head of the Provincial Education Department (PED) to implement policies with regards to the Code of Conduct and safety measures at schools, as well to enforce disciplinary code and procedures against all employees employed at the provincial level.

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant employer (PED) for a response.

12 May 2022 - NW1660

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current learner to teacher ratio (a) nationally and (b) in each province?

Reply:

The official learner to educator ratio is as follows: 

Province

Learner Educator Ratio considering both State-paid and
SGB-Paid Educators

Learner Educator Ratio State-Paid
Educators only

Eastern Cape

30.1

34.7

Free State

31.1

33.9

Gauteng

30.9

33.6

KwaZulu-Natal

30.7

31.9

Limpopo

34.5

35.5

Mpumalanga

31.6

33.9

Northern Cape

29.9

33.3

North West

31.6

33.5

Western Cape

31.9

39.8

South Africa

31.4

34.1

Source: 2021 School Realities Publication, EMIS

06 May 2022 - NW1312

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

How did each province perform according to each of the seven criteria of the Inclusive Basket of Criteria reporting in the (a) 2019, (b) 2020 and (c) 2021 academic years?

Reply:

The Inclusive Basket of Criteria as a reporting mechanisms was adopted by HEDCOM & CEM, as a secondary reporting modality for the National Senior Certificate Results

The criteria have remained fairly constant over the last three years with a weighting attached to each criterion in 2019 and 2020 and a final Basket Score based on the summation of the scores. However, in 2021, it was agreed by HEDCOM and CEM to do away with the summation of the individual scores and to report on the individual criteria separately, so as to avoid the focus on one final score which defeats the purpose of presenting a group of indicators that more comprehensively reflect the performance of the system.    

(a) In 2019 the Inclusive Basket of Criteria and the associated weightings were as follows:

2019 Criteria and Weightings

Indicator

Weighting

Factor

Max Score

1. Overall Pass Percentage

30%

0.30

30

2. Percentage Passed Maths

10%

0.1

10

3. Percentage Passed Physical Sciences

10%

0.1

10

4. Percentage Attained Bachelor Passes

10%

0.10

10

5. Percentage attained Distinctions

10%

0.1

10

6. Mathematics Participation rate

10%

0.1

10

7. Physical Science Participation Rate

10%

0.1

10

8. Secondary Throughput rate

10%

0.1

10

Total

100%

1

100

 

The Performance of the Class of 2019 in terms of the Inclusive Basket of Criteria

Province

% Achieved Weighted 30%

% Maths Achieved Weighted 10%

% Maths Participation Weighted 10%

% Physical Science Achieved Weighted 10%

% Physics Participation Weighted 10%

% Bachelors Weighted 10%

% Distinctions Weighted 10%

% Throughput Weighted 10%

Basket Score 

P: Basket Score Rank along Table (Down)

Eastern Cape

22,94%

4,18%

5,58%

7,03%

3,75%

3,23%

0,31%

4,47%

51,49%

7

Free State

26,52%

6,85%

3,87%

8,27%

3,09%

3,91%

0,31%

4,29%

57,10%

2

Gauteng

26,17%

6,78%

3,62%

8,40%

2,63%

4,45%

0,50%

5,15%

57,71%

1

Kwazulu-Natal

24,38%

4,85%

4,95%

7,48%

3,38%

3,78%

0,43%

4,88%

54,12%

6

Limpopo

21,96%

5,31%

4,82%

7,20%

4,08%

2,68%

0,22%

4,16%

50,44%

8

Mpumalanga

24,10%

5,16%

5,19%

7,09%

4,52%

3,27%

0,23%

4,68%

54,23%

5

Northern Cape

22,95%

5,66%

2,86%

6,92%

2,31%

3,03%

0,22%

4,82%

48,77%

9

North-West

26,03%

6,22%

3,27%

7,90%

2,59%

3,72%

0,34%

4,34%

54,41%

4

Western Cape

24,70%

7,02%

3,06%

8,18%

1,98%

4,36%

0,68%

6,53%

56,51%

3

NATIONAL

24,38%

5,46%

4,40%

7,55%

3,26%

3,69%

0,39%

4,79%

53,93%

 

 

(b) In 2020 the Inclusive Basket of Criteria and the associated weightings were as follows:

2020 Criteria and Weightings.

Indicator

Weighting

Factor

Max Score

1. Overall Pass Percentage

35%

0.30

30

2. Percentage Passed Maths

10%

0.1

10

3. Percentage Passed Physical Sciences

10%

0.1

10

4. Percentage Attained Bachelor Passes

15%

0.10

10

5. Percentage attained Distinctions

10%

0.1

10

6. Mathematics Participation rate

10%

0.1

10

7. Secondary Throughput rate

10%

0.1

10

Total

100%

1

100

 

The Performance of the Class of 2020 in terms of the Inclusive Basket of Criteria is as follows:

Province

% Achieved Weighted 30%

% Maths Participation Weighted 10%

% Maths Achieved Weighted 10%

% Physical Science Achieved Weighted 10%

% Physics Participation Weighted 10%

% Bachelors Weighted 10%

% Distinctions Weighted 10%

% Throughput Weighted 10%

Basket Score 

Basket Score Rank along Table (Down)

Eastern Cape

20,4%

5,3%

4,0%

5,6%

3,5%

4,5%

0,3%

5,3%

49,0%

8

Free State

25,5%

4,0%

6,6%

7,1%

3,1%

6,1%

0,4%

4,9%

57,7%

2

Gauteng

25,1%

3,4%

6,5%

7,3%

2,5%

6,8%

0,5%

5,9%

58,0%

1

Kwazulu-Natal

23,3%

4,2%

5,1%

7,0%

3,0%

5,7%

0,5%

5,9%

54,6%

4

Limpopo

20,4%

4,9%

5,0%

6,3%

4,0%

4,4%

0,3%

5,2%

50,5%

7

Mpumalanga

22,1%

4,6%

5,1%

6,0%

4,1%

4,6%

0,2%

6,3%

53,0%

5

Northern Cape

19,8%

2,3%

5,5%

5,3%

1,9%

4,3%

0,2%

5,1%

44,4%

9

North-West

22,9%

2,5%

6,3%

6,8%

2,0%

4,8%

0,3%

5,5%

51,2%

6

Western Cape

24,0%

2,8%

7,2%

7,6%

1,8%

6,6%

0,7%

6,7%

57,4%

3

NATIONAL

22,9%

4,0%

5,4%

6,6%

3,0%

5,5%

0,4%

5,7%

53,5%

 

 

(c) In 2021, the summation of the individual scores and the weightings were removed and Accounting & Technical Maths was added. 

2021 Inclusive Basket of Criteria

Province Name

% Achieved 

% Accounting Achieved

% Mathematics Achieved

% Physical Sciences Achieved

% Technical Mathematics

% Maths Participation 

% Bachelors 

% Distinctions Achieved

% Throughput

EASTERN CAPE

73.0%

76.4%

46.6%

62.3%

50.7%

48.0%

34.3%

3.7%

66.2%

FREE STATE

85.7%

81.9%

66.6%

75.1%

73.5%

36.4%

39.9%

3.5%

58.7%

GAUTENG

82.8%

81.9%

68.2%

73.5%

63.4%

31.2%

43.8%

5.2%

70.4%

KWAZULU-NATAL

76.8%

70.1%

54.2%

71.2%

63.0%

36.9%

37.1%

5.0%

73.5%

LIMPOPO

66.7%

65.2%

54.5%

67.8%

53.6%

42.7%

26.7%

2.4%

70.1%

MPUMALANGA

73.6%

71.4%

54.0%

61.5%

78.0%

42.8%

31.5%

2.4%

77.3%

NORTH WEST

78.2%

79.6%

71.5%

77.5%

48.4%

23.9%

33.8%

2.8%

61.5%

NORTHERN CAPE

71.4%

80.8%

59.2%

65.2%

59.8%

21.1%

30.3%

2.1%

58.1%

WESTERN CAPE

81.2%

80.1%

73.4%

78.3%

63.2%

26.3%

45.3%

7.2%

73.4%

NATIONAL

76.4%

74.7%

57.6%

69.0%

60.1%

36.8%

36.4%

4.2%

69.8%

 

06 May 2022 - NW1152

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) tracking and tracing processes, procedures and/or plans are in place to track learners who have not returned to school, (b) retention plans have been put in place to ensure learners stay in school and (c) other government departments does her department work with in order to implement such strategies?

Reply:

(a)  South African Schools Administration and Management System (SA-SAMS) provides an electronic and automated platform to enable the following functionalities to record and manage attendance, identify learners with poor attendance and track learners who have dropped out.  

  1. Learner attendance is marked daily, and the school must capture reasons for learners that are absent. 
  2. Learners absent for 10 days consecutively with “no reason” are flagged for attention by the school, as per the 10-day Attendance Policy.   
  3. The number of days absent is also indicated on the quarterly schedule as well as promotion schedules, that are submitted to the district for approval. 
  4. Class lists with attendance summaries are available for monitoring, showing the number of days absent, per reason. 
  5. Monthly and Quarterly Attendance reports are generated from SA-SAMS for reporting and monitoring by the district. 

This allows for effective record keeping and enables efficient practices by converting manual processes to automated functions to track learners who do not return to schools. 

(b) retention plans have been put in place to ensure learners stay in school

- Schools are guided by the Policy on Screening, Identification, Assessment and Support Policy which prescribes that learners be screened and supported for barriers to learning.

- Educators have been trained to identify academic, behavioral and social barriers and they continue to identify and support at school level by the teacher, or School Based Support Team. Should a referral be required it usually involves the Department of Social Development.

- In addition, the Department of Basic Education has trained Learner Support Agents (LSAs) that are placed in some schools to identify learners with psychosocial needs.

The LSAs undertake a home visit to Identify issues at home that prevent children from attending school. When it is identified that the concern is at home, the LSAs undertake a home visit.

(c) other government departments does her department work with in order to implement such strategies?  

- In the case of child abuse, neglect, and children living on the streets, the Department of Social Development takes over to involve the children’s court. 

- If at school level impacting schooling.  

_- In the case where parents are struggling financially, they are assisted through the various provisions at the DSD.

06 May 2022 - NW1541

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In light of reported incidents of racism at the Afrikaanse Hoër Meisieskool in Clydesdale, Tshwane, what (a) steps has her department taken in this regard and (b) policies have been put in place to deal with racism in schools throughout the Republic?

Reply:

(a) The Minister of Basic Education enquired with the Provincial Education Department in question and recommended an investigation of the case and requested a report of the outcome.

(b) The Constitution of the Republic of South Africa is used as the most supreme law of the State to deal with Racism in Schools. As such, a circular is released annually to all schools to encourage the Recital of the Preamble of the Constitution in schools, as a way to inculcate constitutional values and principles. This is coupled with the distribution of Slimline Constitutions, in partnership with the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD). Furthermore, the National Action Plan to combat Racism, Discrimination, Xenophobia and Related Intolerances led by the DoJ&CD has education-specific activities to guide the sector in addressing racism in schools. 

Within the basic education sector and the schooling community, the South African Schools Act is used as the basis of legislation to deal, among others, with issues of racism in schools. This is coupled with the South African Council of Educators Act and the Employment of Educators Act, which provide guidance on the ethical, non-prejudiced and non-racial conduct of teachers in the classroom and within the school environment. The School Code of Conduct provides for the discipline and ethical conduct of learners in schools.

06 May 2022 - NW1401

Profile picture: Mohlala, Ms MR

Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In light of the fact that Limpopo recorded the lowest matric pass rate among the nine provinces in the 2021 academic year, what plans has her department put in place to ensure that the Limpopo matric class of 2022 receives the necessary support in order to improve the performance of learners?

Reply:

The province, through the office of the Premier, hosted a provincial education summit that saw all relevant stakeholders meeting to address the challenges facing education in the province. A detailed plan of action was developed and is currently embedded in the 2022/23 Operational plan of the province. All in the sector are driven and guided by the blue print from the summit.

The detailed action plan include the following:

a) Strengthening accountability

  • Capacity building mechanism to all underperforming  District Directors, Circuit managers and principals of schools;
  • Fostering all underperforming within the system to develop performance improvement plans/strategies; and
  • Ensuring implementation of the plans or strategies and continuous monitoring and evaluation.

b)  Enrichment classes

The province has allocated  R154 million to strengthen teaching and learning for the class of 2022 through the following enrichment and support classes to be offered in identified schools. These include amongst others:

  • Weekend classes
  • Autumn classes
  • Winter classes
  • Spring classes
  • Camps for gifted and progressed learners
  • Radio lessons
  • Accessing electronic learner support materials through  Content Access Points (CAPs)

c) Teacher Development

An amount of R20 million has been set aside to strengthen teacher content capacity in the following subjects to improve performance:

  • Mathematics
  • Physical Sciences
  • Technical Mathematics
  • Technical Sciences
  • Life Sciences
  • Accounting
  • Economics
  • Business Studies

An induction program as well has been put in place to empower newly appointed teachers, subjects’ heads and newly appointed principals.

The DBE will be conducting  regular oversight visits to support and monitor the implementation of the plan.

04 May 2022 - NW1364

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Linmeyer Montessori Primary School, which is also referred to as Magick Mushroom and/or Linmeyer Montessori Centre in Rosettenville, which is allegedly located on the same premises as a bar and club house, (a) what (i) is the reason for this and (ii) steps will be taken by her department to resolve the specified issue and (b) given the allegations that the specified school does not have qualified teachers, what steps will her department take to resolve the matter?

Reply:

Montessori schools are classified as private schools and do not form part of the public sector. The Minister of Basic Education can therefore not account for the school in question.

04 May 2022 - NW222

Profile picture: Madokwe, Ms P

Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to the fact that a number of schools in the Eastern Cape are yet to receive their stationery and groceries for the feeding programme, while scholar transportation is discontinued in some areas, an investigation has been conducted into the total number of schools that are affected; if not, why not; if so, (a) what interventions were put in place and (b) who has been held accountable?

Reply:

Funds for the school meals were disbursed to all schools participating in the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) by the second week of the school term.  The Eastern Cape (ECDOE) implements the decentralised model where funds are transferred to the schools in 4 tranches, and the schools procure the food required for preparing meals for the learners.  54 district based officials monitor approximately 350 schools per week to ensure that nutritious meals are provided every day on time.

25 April 2022 - NW1184

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What are the reasons that her department is planning to close the Mhlangazane Primary School in Ward 9 in the Chief Albert Luthuli Local Municipality; (2) whether her department has consulted the community on the decision; if not, why not; if so, what are the views of the community on the closure of the school?

Reply:

1. Mhlanagazane Primary School had only 83 learners by the end of 2021.

  • It is classified as a small and non-viable school in terms of the Government Notice No. 37081 on minimum uniform norms and standards for public school infrastructure.
  • It is planned to be merged with Phumelele Primary School for quality teaching and learning and maximum use of resources to the benefit of all learners. The merger and closure will be as per sections 12A and 33 of the South African Schools Act 84 of 1996, as amended.

(2)       whether her department has consulted the community on the decision; if not, why not; if so, what are the views of the community on the closure of the school?           

Response:

         Mhlanagazane consultations:

There were a number of consultations that were done for the closure of Mhlangazane Primary and its merger with Phumelele Primary. There were consultations on the following dates:

11 June 2019; 19 June 2019; 9 September 2019; and 7th June 2021 (Parents meetings).

  • Views of the community

The Chief of Esandleni and some members of the community mentioned that the school is the only Government structure available in the area and on those grounds, they wanted the school not to be closed or merged with Phumelele Primary.

Other members of the community who are in support of the closure and merger of Mhlangazane with Phumelele Primary schools have since removed their children and registered them at Phumelele.

As it stands, there is no likelihood that learner enrolment at Mhlangazane Primary will increase. Under such circumstances, the school will forever have the challenge of not receiving effective teaching and learning.

25 April 2022 - NW773

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of girls between the ages of 9 and 18 years have been sexually assaulted at schools in the past five years and (b) in which area and/or province has this been most prevalent?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not keep statistical information on sexual assault nationally. This information resides with Provincial Education Departments. However, as the Department is building the South African Schools Administration and Management System, this element is accommodated in the plans. It is advised that the Honourable Member obtains the information directly from provinces.

25 April 2022 - NW1236

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps will be taken by her department to speed up the filling of vacancies in the Council for Quality Assurance in General and Further Education and Training?

Reply:

UMALUSI’S RESPONSE TO PARLIAMENTARY QUESTION 1236

 

What steps will be taken by her department to speed up the filling of vacancies in the Council for Quality Assurance and Further Education and Training?

a) Umalusi has a total staff establishment of one hundred and thirty-eight (138) approved positions on the structure.

b) Of the one hundred, and thirty-eight (138) approved positions, one hundred and thirty (130) positions are filled.

c) The organisation currently has eight (8) vacancies, and seven (7) vacancies are in the process of being filled. One (1) vacancy will be filled after completing the infrastructure renovations later during the current financial year.

d) Due to the ever-increasing pressures in delivering a national mandate, there is a need to expand the Umalusi staff establishment. The organisation intends to submit a request to the Council during the current financial year to create additional posts, but the approval and filling of these posts will be considered within the limited budget allocation.

25 April 2022 - NW783

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners and (b) teachers (i) were injured and (ii) have died of unnatural causes on school premises in the (aa) 2017, (bb) 2018, (cc) 2019, (dd) 2020 and (ee) 2021 academic years?

Reply:

The information has been sourced from provincial education departments (PEDs) and will be provided once received from the PEDs.

25 April 2022 - NW1133

Profile picture: Mabika, Mr M

Mabika, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed of the application to build a high school between Hlokohloko and Hlazane Primary Schools in the Umkhanyakude District Municipality in KwaZulu-Natal that was made by the community over a decade ago, because learners from the two primary schools still have to walk for over 10km to the nearby Vukani Bantwana and Esiphondweni High schools without any form of scholar transport; if not, will she intervene to solve the problem; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The question falls within the purview of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) for KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) province. Attached please find response from KZN. 

05 April 2022 - NW833

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the details of the Government’s position regarding the value of mothertongue education in the Republic and (b) percentage of schools are able to teach in mother-tongue education?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) values mother tongue education and thus encourages learners to learn through their Home Languages wherever it is feasible and practicable. This position is in alignment with the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. Section 6 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa lists the official languages as IsiZulu, IsiXhosa, IsiNdebele, Siswati, Sesotho, Setswana, Sepedi, Tshivenda, Xitsonga, English and Afrikaans. All these languages can be used as languages of learning and teaching or as subjects. Section 29(2) of the Bill of Rights provides that “everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is REASONABLY PRACTICABLE.” 

The above are reiterated in the National Education Policy Act, the South African Schools Act and the Language in Education Policy. The South African Schools Act goes further and provides that “A recognised Sign Language has the status of an official language for purposes of learning at a public school.” Whilst waiting for the enactment of the South African Sign Language as the twelfth official language, in the education sector, it has been long that the system has been operating with 12 official languages. 

In its attempts to elevate the status of the previously marginalised languages, the Department of Basic Education developed the National Curriculum Statement (NCS) Grades 1-12, which makes provision for equal use of all 11 official languages and the South African Sign Language in the schooling system. The National Curriculum Statement Grades 1-12 encourages learners to learn through their home language(s), particularly, though not limited, in the Foundation Phase. The policy does not restrict the use of home language instruction up to Grade 3, but emphasises the use of the home language in Grades 1-3 to reinforce the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and counting. The NCS recognises the importance for learners to learn in their home language. The Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT) can be selected from any official language. The NCS and the LiEP advocate for an additive bi/multilingualism approach that encourages learners to learn through their home language as long as it is feasible, as well as to learn other languages. Additive bi/multilingualism allows maintenance of learners’ home language as they acquire additional languages as subjects or as languages of instruction.

The National Development Plan (NDP) recommends that learners’ home language be used as LoLT for longer periods and English be introduced much earlier in the foundation phase. Chapter 15 of the NDP emphasises the need to develop African languages or mother tongue as integral to education, science and technology, in order to develop and preserve these languages.

Despite all these noble efforts, the reality on the ground reflects otherwise. The hegemony of English as a preferred medium of instruction and communication seems to prevail, which together with Afrikaans are still the dominant languages of learning and teaching in majority of South African schools.

The Eastern Cape initiated the Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education pilot, wherein 2 015 schools are using IsiXhosa and Sesotho as LoLT beyond Foundation Phase (up to Grade 9). Learners in these schools are taught Mathematics, Natural Science and Technology in their home languages IsiXhosa and Sesotho. This initiative was started in 72 Confimvaba schools in Grade 4 in 2012 and incrementally in subsequent grades and it is now being implemented up to Grade 9 in 2022. The province is planning to roll it out to all the schools where it is feasible.

The DBE is currently putting prudent plan in place to roll out African Languages Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education to the other eight provinces.  

(b) As detailed under (a) English and Afrikaans are used as LoLT throughout the schooling system. African languages are used as LoLT mainly in the Foundation Phase. Only IsiXhosa and Sesotho, through the Eastern Cape Mother Tongue Based Bilingual Education are used as LoLT post the Foundation Phase.

05 April 2022 - NW921

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the internationally benchmarked systemic tests that were conducted by the Western Cape Education Department in January 2021, which provide for an independent analysis of learning losses suffered by learners during the COVID19 pandemic and rotational attendance by learners, her department has any plans to increase funding to support catching up of the curriculum, as the specified systemic tests have clearly showed that gains achieved in mathematics and language have reversed; if not, why not; if so, what amount in funding is being considered?

Reply:

The question asked has direct implication to the work of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of the Western Cape Provincial Government who has direct jurisdiction to the work referred to, not the Minister of Basic Education. The question has therefore been referred to the MEC of the Western Cape Department of Education for response. 

05 April 2022 - NW1150

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What is the current (a) total number of (i) registered and (ii) unregistered early childhood development centres (ECDs) in the Republic and (b) breakdown of the number of ECDs in each province; (2) what (a) has she found to be the demand for such facilities and (b) number of the specified facilities meet compliance standards; (3) what number of children (a) need access to the facilities and (b) can the facilities accommodate; (4) what (a) is the current state of ECD infrastructure in the Republic, (b) number of ECDs do not have access to water, sanitation and electricity and (c) is the budget that was allocated to ECD infrastructure?

Reply:

The DBE has just completed the fieldwork on the National ECD Census and is busy with data analysis. The honourable member is therefore humbly requested to allow the DBE to finalise the analysis process and release the Census data as this will enable the DBE to respond.