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13 December 2022 - NW2937

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What is the current allocation of milk for each child for each day in the feeding schemes in each province; (2) whether the amount has changed in the past five years; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether the allocation is different based on age; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) The NSNP budget is allocated per meal/per child/per day, and NOT per food item spend; with price expectations in line with economies of scale. The allocation is further outlined per weekly menu plan (i.e 5 days cycle) per serving, that constitute a protein, starch, fruit and/or vegetable.  This allocation is not apportioned to milk only, but is shared between all protein source foods (i.e soya mince, canned pilchards, sugar beans and lentils/split peas or canned chicken livers). 

In general, protein has the highest cost. Therefore, at least 50% is allocated towards protein foods. Milk is served once per week and the low cost protein food supplements the more expensive proteins like milk.

(2) The meal cost is adjusted annually by the National Treasury in line with the general inflation.

(3) The different allocation is based on the portion sizes for primary and secondary schools.  Secondary schools with larger portion sizes have a higher allocation than primary schools.

13 December 2022 - NW4706

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her department’s irregular expenditure amounting to R1 471 583 000 and the lack of proactive and effective consequence management relating to the investigations of this, what is her department doing to ensure that its (a) financial management improves and (b) irregular expenditure is decreased; (2) whether her department will be making any changes to implementing agencies to ensure that their corrective measures are in accordance with her department’s corrective steps; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further, relevant details?

Reply:

1(a) The Department ensures 100% compliance to Supply Chain Management (SCM) processes and all financial management policies and procedures as well as instructions from National Treasury are adhered to. This has led to a material decrease in irregular expenditure in 2021/22 compared to 2020/21.

  1. DBE disclosed the irregular expenditure as part of a drive to clean up the accounting of infrastructure projects.
  2. ASIDI started in 2012 and SAFE started in 2018.
  3. DBE assessed all procurement processes on ASIDI and SAFE.  This revealed the following deficiencies in the procurement documents:
    1. Tenders not advertised for 21 days;
    2. Local content – no SBD6.2 included;
    3. Non-compliance to Preferential Procurement Regulations;
    4. Non-compliance to CIDB regulations;
    5. Non-compliance to mandatory subcontracting; and
    6. Non-compliance to Implementing Agent own SCM policies.
  4. The bulk of these projects have been completed and schools are already benefiting from the use of the facilities provided.
  5. Some implementing agents have applied for condonation from National Treasury.  This process has not been concluded

Response to question 1.(b)

  1. Allocation of projects to be implemented to Implementing Agents are done in Batches that can range from anything from 15 large schools to over 200 sanitation projects. A single process issue (such as not including a SBD6.2) in a bulk tender process, can thus have a large monetary impact as all the expenditure in a batch will have to be declared Irregular Expenditure.
  2. Expenditure may be multi-year or across financial years and process issues in previous years influences the Irregular Expenditure declared in the current financial year.

Response to question 2.

  1. The DBE implemented a standard operating procedure to check all procurement processes to avoid a repeat of this historical default. A checklist has been introduced in the SCM directorate to ensure that all procurement complies to SCM processes

13 December 2022 - NW4681

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What methods of assistance has her department provided to the Gauteng Department of Education in respect of the more than 35 000 Grade 1 to 8 learners who have not been placed in schools for the 2023 academic year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) holds regular meetings with the Gauteng Department of Education to plan, administer the admission programme and placement of learners. The DBE assists the provincial Department on:

a) conducting advocacy on how the Gauteng admission process works;

b) handling queries of unplaced learners received through the DBE's call centre, website and social media;

C) working with principals and SGB associations to accommodate additional learners where necessary; and following up on appeals lodged with the DBE.

13 December 2022 - NW4677

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What are the details of the (a) policy that is being used to guide the procurement of various foods for the school feeding schemes and (b) role of the school governing bodies as part of implementing the policy of the school feeding programme of her department; (2) (a) what are the details of the measures that her department has put in place to ensure that the procurement of foods by schools benefits local communities and (b) what portion and/or percentage of the budget allocated to various schools in the past two years benefited local black communities in the areas where the schools are located?

Reply:

1. (a) The NSNP Grant Framework as gazetted in the Division of Revenue Act, stipulates menu specifications, which include protein, carbohydrate, fruit and/or vegetable for procurement by Provinces, using the Food Specification Guide developed by the Department of Health.

(b) The NSNP Guidelines for Schools stipulate the role of SGBs, which includes among others, participation in the school based NSNP Committees, whose responsibility includes NSNP finances related to procurement of goods, especially in a decentralised procurement model.  The SGB is responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Programme. 

2.  (a) The Grant Framework makes provision for the promotion of local economic empowerment, including the procurement of fresh produce from smallholder farmers. The NSNP Financial Management Training Guidelines give special focus in promoting the empowerment of local communities.  Provinces are obliged to follow the supply chain management (SCM) processes in line with the Preferential Procurement Policy Act.

(b) No specific percentage of the budget is allocated for local black communities per se;  however, in principle Provinces follow the PPPA, whether its the open tender (centralised procurement), or transfers to schools (decentralised procurement).  The  PEDs' quarterly reports in the last two years show that a total of 3 599 SMEs and Local Cooperatives in black communities, benefit from the NSNP. 

13 December 2022 - NW4673

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Considering the approaching school holidays, what plans has her department put in place regarding feeding schemes for learners who rely on school feeding schemes to sustain them on a weekly basis?

Reply:

The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) aims to provide daily school meals for targeted learners during the school term (as per school calendar), and not during school holidays.  It's day-to-day operations is designed to serve meals at schools.  National Treasury allocates a specific budget for NSNP in line with the school calendar i.e., count per child per day.  In the 2022/23 financial year, all Provinces feed learners for 203 school days.  This excludes school holidays.

13 December 2022 - NW4664

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Mogale, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools in the Nkomazi region have scholar transport, (b) amount is her department spending on scholar transport in the Nkomazi region in Mpumalanga, in particular and (c) are the reasons that (i) Sophungane Combined School and (ii)(aa) Hoyi, (bb) Mshengu, (cc) Majembeni and (dd) Zenzele Primary Schools are without scholar transport?

Reply:

The question asked by the Honourable Member falls within the Executive Authority of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Mpumalanga and not the Minister of Basic Education.  We advise the Hon Member to refer the Question to Mpumalanga Department of Education.

13 December 2022 - NW4491

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools offer an indigenous African language as a (a) home language and (b) first additional language; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with (a) a list of schools and (b) the language of instruction in each specified school; if not, why not; if so, what (i) are the relevant details and (ii) percentage of schools have (aa) English and/or (bb) Afrikaans as a home language?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Table 1: Number of schools number offering indigenous African language as home language, by province, in 2022

Province

IsiNdebele HL

IsiXhosa HL

IsiZulu HL

Sepedi HL

Sesotho HL

Setswana HL

SiSwati HL 

Tshivenda HL 

Xitsonga HL 

EC

 

4 688

 

 

206

 

 

 

 

FS

 

73

73

5

725

100

1

 

2

GT

10

254

958

445

522

460

3

71

207

KZN

4

224

5 093

4

5

3

2

1

2

LP

61

5

66

2 469

5

57

 

723

598

MP

246

4

433

425

18

64

493

1

264

NC

 

43

 

1

4

241

1

 

1

NW

 

44

1

3

40

1 301

 

 

 

WC

13

1 516

17

 

98

2

1

 

2

SA

334

6 851

6 641

3 352

1 623

2 228

501

796

1 076

Table 1 above indicates that  6 851 schools are offering IsiXhosa as home language and 6 641 are offering IsiZulu home language.

(1)(b) 

 

Table 2: Number of schools offering an indigenous African language as first additional language, by province, in 2022

 

Province

IsiNdebele FAL

IsiXhosa FAL

IsiZulu FAL

Sepedi FAL

Sesotho FAL

Setswana FAL

SiSwati FAL

Tshivenda FAL

Xitsonga FAL

EC

 

269

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

FS

 

3

8

1

75

11

 

1

 

GT

 

 

589

121

142

117

 

19

33

KZN

8

15

727

10

9

3

2

 

10

LP

2

2

5

55

5

3

2

26

25

MP

4

 

33

15

1

2

51

2

8

NC

1

4

1

1

1

6

 

 

 

NW

 

1

2

 

2

52

1

 

 

WC

12

299

14

 

5

5

 

4

 

SA

27

593

1 379

203

242

199

56

52

76


Table 2 indicates that majority of schools,   (1 379 ) schools offers IsiZulu first additional language followed by IsiXhosa with 593 schools.

(2) List of schools by Language of learning and teaching is attached.

Note: All data represented above is self-reported by schools

13 December 2022 - NW3738

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of schools in the West Rand district in Gauteng cater for learners with special needs such as autism, (b) where are such schools located and (c) how does her department assist parents in the application process?

Reply:

(a) There were 56 schools in the West Rand district in Gauteng that cater for learners with special needs.

(b) The response to question b is attached.

(c) Admissions for learners with disabilities who must be enrolled in a special school are managed and processed at the district office. In the district office, there is a dedicated section that assists parents with admissions.

13 December 2022 - NW3419

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What methods of intervention have been taken in ensuring that provincial departments of education co-operate with the national office on issues of accountability?

Reply:

Financial Performance - The Department of Basic Education (DBE) conducts meetings with all nine (9) Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) in January/ February to assess the credibility of the PEDs’ budget allocations for the following financial year. The Annual Performance Plans (APPs), Estimated Provincial Revenue and Expenditure (EPRE) documents, In-Year Monitoring (IYM) and Annual Reports received from PEDs are key documents guiding the discussions.

During the financial year, the PEDs submit the monthly reports (Financial Reports) within 15 days after the end of the month.  These reports are analysed to check the utilisation of funds against the available budget. The DBE conducts bilateral meetings with all PEDs in July/August to discuss the financial performance and the impact on the service delivery.  The PEDs account on how the allocated funds were utilised in that specific financial year.

Compliance with National Norms and Standards for School Funding (NSSF) - The DBE conducts HEDCOM Sub-Committee on Finance Meetings on quarterly basis, where the PEDs are expected to provide information with regard to the compliance with NSSF.  The DBE also engages in telephonic survey with samples of schools in each Province to verify the information provided by the PED, and check the implementation of the policy at school level. If the gaps are identified in the implementation, the relevant PED will be approached to discuss and to resolve those matters.

12 December 2022 - NW4688

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 4307 on 28 November 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a list of the stakeholders working on the Gender Responsive Pedagogy for Early Childhood Education (GRP4ECE) that have been consulted for the specified policy and/or programme; (2) on what date will the specified programme be rolled out?

Reply:

(1) Before commencement of the phased implementation of the Gender Responsive Pedagogy for Early Childhood Education (GRP4ECE) Toolkit, the following stakeholders were consulted:

  • National Consultative Forum (NCF) of School Governing Body (SGB) Associations;
  • Heads of Education Department Committee (HEDCOM);
  • Broad Management Meeting (BMM) of various units of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) implicated;
  • Human Sciences Research Council (HSRC);
  • South African Council for Educators (SACE);
  • Academic Institutions that provide training of ECD Practitioners;
  • Department of Social Development, the Government Lead on Children; 
  • ECD Training Institutes; and
  • Civil Society Organisations representing the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group (SIiEWG) - as per the detailed list previously provided to the Honourable Member.

(2) Following the pilot in KwaZulu-Natal, the current phased implementation is concluding in Free State, Northern Cape, Eastern Cape and North West in December 2022. As per the reply to Question 4307 on 28 November 2022, there is no indication of further rollout, pending identification and allocation of new resources to support rollout. 

12 December 2022 - NW4704

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in view of the projected retirement wave of teachers peaking in the next few years and the low retention of teachers currently, her department engaged with the Department of Employment and Labour on collaborative initiatives to counter this through the implementation of sustainable employment programmes outside of the Presidential Employment Stimulus to ensure a smooth transition between older and new teachers in schools and/or the education labour market; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The average overall attrition rate of teachers in public schools ranges between 3%-5% which is relatively low by international standards; and thus, suggests a high retention rate overall. The Department, through its internal analysis and collaborative research with the Department of Higher Education and Training (DHET) and partners, such as ReSEP-Stellenbosch University, has taken note of the high retirement wave in the next 10 or more years; and working closely with the latter! to address this concern.

The research into the retirement of South African teachers was also done by ReSEP-Stellenbosch University, which acknowledged that South Africa's universities appear prepared to deal with the retirement of teachers, and that university output is on a sound trajectory, and should be able to deal with a demand for a larger workforce.

In addition, and in anticipation of the injection of a high number of new entrants into the system, the Department will intensify the rollout of a comprehensive induction programme. In short, the programme provides holistic support to new teachers, covering not only personal development, but professional and social support. This induction programme will ensure a smooth assimilation of young teachers into the system.

12 December 2022 - NW4351

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) schools and (b) learners are signed up for the Learner Unit Tracking System (i) nationally and (ii) in each province?

Reply:

(a)(b)(i)(ii)

Table 1: Number of schools and learners uploaded on the Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System (LURITS) by province, in 2022

 

Province

Schools

Number of  Learners

Eastern Cape

5 343

1 717 684

Free State

1 052

762 885

Gauteng

3 174

2 425 339

KwaZulu Natal

6 119

2 366 550

Limpopo

3 890

1 744 803

Mpumalanga

1 801

1 091 246

North West

1 572

848 070

Northern Cape

596

302 589

Western Cape

1 887

1 261 054

National

25 434

12 520 220

 

Note: 

Due to the rigorous quality control measures embedded in the LURITS, the system can reject records e.g duplicated learners or learners without grade or subject allocations, to ensure better quality of learner data.

This however is mediated by a stringent process to identify, verify and quality assure the rejected learners and to ensure all learners are accurately accounted for in the Sector before finalising the annual statistics.

07 December 2022 - NW4040

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with information relating to the Teacher Connect Application (App); if not, why not; if so, (2) whether the App is currently operational; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what total (a) amount in funds have been allocated towards the App and (b) number of (i) schools, (ii) teachers and (iii) learners are currently using the App?

Reply:

1. Yes

2. Yes.

The DBE's TeacherConnect Application service is operational since April 2020. It provides information and resources to teachers and the public via the WhatsApp number 060 060 3333

Services offered include single-sign access to a zero-rated learning environment with SACE-accredited teacher training and other DBE-related resources.

Resources and services are currently teacher and school-management focused, though learners, parents and other members of the public may register and access appropriate resources and services. 

The TeacherConnectchat is also being used to provide orientation and support resources to youth who are appointed as school assistants and the schools that they are placed into through the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative (PYEI).

TeacherConnectChat users may also opt-in for relevant communication based on their needs and interests. Cohort-targeted surveys (by subject or role etc.) have a high response rate and have provided valuable supplemental information for the DBE on teacher experiences and needs. 

All data are treated according to POPIA-compliant best practices, with the user having complete control of what communication they opt in for. Clear and straightforward instructions to opt out are given in every communication. 

3. a) The application does not receive any voted funding. Currently it is funded through Donor funding. The total set-up and running costs for the WhatsApp bot, from April 2020 to date is R4,263,244.46.

        3. b) The number of:

           (i) schools- 11,254 (on TeacherConnectlearn)

          (ii) teachers- 17,300 (registered users)

          (iii) learners- 13,333 (registered users)

07 December 2022 - NW4530

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has any improved eye health programmes in place to address eyesight problems of learners in schools; if not, why not; if so, what (a) number of learners has her department (i) screened and (ii) provided with prescriptions in each province in the past two years, (b) marketing strategies has her department implemented to ensure a wider outreach in schools and for learners with no access to optometric services and (c) are the further relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)The Department of Basic Education in collaboration with the Departments of Health as well as Social Development are implementing the Integrated School Health Programme (ISHP). The Health Services Package for the ISHP includes health screening (such as screening for vision, hearing, oral health and general health), onsite services (such as deworming and immunization), and health education for each of the four school phases.  According to the data received from the Department of Health that is extracted from the District Health Information System, the learners reached through health screening in 2021 were 74 529, and those learners referred for eye care were 296 nationally. in 2022, the number of learners reached through health screening was  257 407, those referred for eye care were 22 462. Referrals are done to different health care facilities for further examination and care. 

b) Annually, learners are provided with consent forms for parents to sign, in order for learners to be able to receive health services. The consent form is often accompanied with the information that is giving parents details on the health services that learners will receive in that particular year.  

07 December 2022 - NW4493

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 3609 on 25 October 2022, wherein she indicated that during the 2013 to 2021 period, a total number of 33 113 bursary recipients who were eligible for placement graduated, whom were placed after graduation and a total number of 135 309 received bursaries during the specified time, of which only 33 113 graduated were placed, what (a) total number of the original 135 509 (i) changed streams and/or (ii) dropped out and (b) is the reason for the discrepancy of students that registered versus the 33 113 who graduated and/or were placed?

Reply:

(a) 135 509 refers to the number of bursaries awarded between 2013 and 2021, not the number of recipients, as the number of recipients was 43 014.  Bachelors of Education degree (B Ed) is a four-year degree; and therefore, one person will receive a minimum of four bursaries in the four years of study at universities - meaning that 43 014 recipients received +/- 135 509 bursaries in their four years of study.   The indicator on Funza Lushaka is a cumulative target / indicator, and it is expected that the Department of Basic Education reports on the number of bursaries awarded each year, i.e., the "Number of Funza Lushaka bursaries awarded to students enrolled for Initial Teacher Education per year

(i) changed streams and/or (ii) dropped out and (b) is the reason for the discrepancy of students that registered versus the 33 113 who graduated and/or were placed?

Reply:   

(i) (ii)

The DBE does not have the details of the students who changed streams; as well as those who dropped-out.  such information may be requested from universities via Department of Higher Education and Training.

(b)

There are no discrepancies, the difference is between 43 014 and 33 113.  33 113 reflects returning bursars (students), i.e., bursars that are currently studying at Higher Education Institutions (HEIs).

07 December 2022 - NW4490

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What is the total number of (a) single-medium schools, (b) double-medium schools and (c) parallel-medium schools (i) nationally and (ii) provincially; (2) what is the total number of single language of instruction schools for each of the official languages (a) nationally and (b) provincially?

Reply:

(1)(2)(a)

Table 1 below shows that majority of schools (5 875) are English single medium schools followed by Afrikaans (1 004) single medium schools. With regards to schools that uses African Languages as single medium, majority of schools are IsiXhosa Single Medium. 

(b) Dual Medium schools are schools that uses two languages of instruction by a teacher in a lesson, switching from one language of instruction to another during a lesson. The Department does not collect information on Dual Medium Schools.

(c)

Table 2 below shows that the majority of parallel-medium schools are found in KwaZulu-Natal  (3 807) teaching in IsiZulu and English follwed by the Eastern Cape (3 614) teaching in IsiXhosa and English.

07 December 2022 - NW4489

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools (a) nationally and (b) provincially have (i) generators, (ii) uninterrupted power supply systems and/or (iii) both; (2) what is the breakdown of each school in each province that has (a) a generator, (b) an uninterrupted power supply system and/or (c) both?

Reply:

1. (a); (b) (i) (ii); (ii)

Province

Number of Schools with Generators

 

Eastern Cape

255

 

Free State

18

 

Gauteng

39

 

KwaZulu-Natal

192

 

Limpopo

33

 

Mpumalanga

38

 

Northern Cape

10

 

North West

42

 

Western Cape

6

 

National

633

 

These  schools can have other forms of Electricity supply

Information on interrupted power supply not available

2. (a) (b) (c) 

See table attached

07 December 2022 - NW4459

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to a credit card and/or similar expense account issued to the (a) Minister and (b) Deputy Minister (i) in the past three financial years and (ii) from 1 January 2022 to date, (aa) what total amount was spent in each month in each case, (bb) what were the reasons for each expenditure in each case and (cc) who were the creditors in each case?

Reply:

No credit cards have been issued to either the Minister or Deputy Minister.

05 December 2022 - NW4392

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Faber, Mr WF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the (a) total number of staff employed and/or provided as departmental support in (i) her and (ii) the Deputy Minister’s private offices and (b)(i) job title and (ii) annual remuneration package of each specified person?

Reply:

(a)(i)

Total Nr = 11

(b)(i)

Job Titles:

(b)(ii)

Annual Remuneration Package:

1

Household Aid

R130,092.00

2

Household Aid

R130,092.00

3

Food Services Aid II

R128,166.00

4

Chief Registry Clerk

R285,735.00

5

Assistant Appointment and Administrative Secretary

R578,841.00

6

Parliamentary and Cabinet Officer

R922,137.00

7

Administrative Support and Coordinator

R978,726.00

8

Private and Appointment Secretary

R1,054,356.00

9

Portfolio Coordinator

R1,070,169.00

10

Media Liaison Officer

R1,173,231.00

11

Chief of Staff

R1,308,051.00

 

(a)(ii)

Total Nr = 9

 

 

1

Household Aid

R128,166.00

2

Household Aid

R130,092.00

3

Receptionist

R181,599.00

4

Driver/Messenger

R184,308.00

5

Chief Registry Clerk

R277,362.00

6

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

R336,171.00

7

Community Outreach Officer

R766,584.00

8

Private and Appointment Secretary

R908,502.00

9

Head of Office

R1,105,383.00

28 November 2022 - NW4326

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in light of the reported guidelines set out by her department regarding the implementation of unisex/genderless toilets and changing rooms, she and/or her department have applied their minds to the possible challenges to this new undertaking, given the total number of crimes that have reportedly taken place at schools throughout the Republic; if not, why not; if so, how will her department ensure that the specified challenges are addressed?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has applied its mind in these considerations. That is why the Department has not established any stance about unisex school facilities. Through the consultations underway, we hope to gather responsible, credible and suitable recommendations for inclusion in the guidelines.

28 November 2022 - NW4433

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

a) On what date is it envisaged that extra classrooms will be built for the learners of the Lwapongo High School in Limpopo and (b) what are the further, relevant details in this regard?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Limpopo Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

28 November 2022 - NW4307

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, the guidelines for Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression and Sex Characteristics that her department is consulting on, would include (a) early childhood development centres and/or (b) kindergartens; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a draft of the specified guidelines; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No, because the ECD centres participate on a more tailor-made intervention programme called Gender Responsive Pedagogy for Early Childhood Education (GRP4ECE), which is meant to promote gender equality through play-based learning, thereby addressing discrimination, School-related Gender-based Violence (SRGBV) and bullying on the basis of gender.

(2) Yes, once the internal consultation with stakeholders is complete and the Draft Guidelines are put out as the latest version for public comment. 

23 November 2022 - NW4220

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, what (a) will be the process for the roll-out of the guidelines, (b) steps (i) will be taken and (ii) have been taken to prepare for the roll-out of the guidelines and (c) public participation process would be implemented for the guidelines with specific reference to the (i) timelines, (ii) publication and (iii) person to whom comments will be sent?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) will be collaborating with the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC), South African Council for Educators (SACE), South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC), School Governing Body (SGB) Associations, South African Principals' Association (SAPA), Education Faculties of Universities and Civil Society Organisations on a dissemination and sensitisation programme for schools.

(b)(i) As the document was endorsed by Council of Education Ministers (CEM), it will need to be re-tabled at CEM for final approval and publication, followed by a dissemination and sensitisation programme for schools.

(ii) The DBE has commenced consultations and engagements with relevant education stakeholders nationally.

(c) The DBE is currently in the process of consultations and engagements with relevant education stakeholders, working through Provincial Educations Departments (PEDs) and Education District Offices.

(i) The DBE is ambitiously aiming to conclude the consideration and incorporation of submitted comments by March 2023.

(ii) Due to delays already experienced in carrying out the consultations that are underway, the process may take a further three (3) months to June 2023 before publication.

(iii) Comments may be sent to SOGIESC@dbe.gov.za by 31 December 2022

23 November 2022 - NW3675

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Which mechanisms have been put in place to ensure that the online application system for school placements places learners in schools that are preferred by parents and not simply based on distance of the school from the place of residence of the family and/or learner?

Reply:

The online system prioritises place of residence, primary feeder school and place of work and not parental choice for placement of learners. Parental choice is considered after all qualifying learners have been placed. 

23 November 2022 - NW4096

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What provisions have been made to curb the rising levels of violence at schools without overly securitising schools?

Reply:

1. National School Safety Framework

The Department has trained schools on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF) which is a guiding framework in addressing all forms of violent incidences in schools including gangsterism. The NSSF empowers schools to identify and manage all safety threats in schools, establish school safety committees comprising of stakeholders such as teachers, police officers, school governing body members and learner representative council members. Furthermore, The NSSF also empowers schools to develop incident reporting mechanisms, establish collaborations with external stakeholders such as the South African Police Service (SAPS), the Department of Social Development and civil society organisations, as well as develop school safety plans and policies to respond to safety challenges.

2. Protocol to Deal with Incidences of Corporal Punishment in schools

The Department developed and published a Protocol to Deal with Incidences of Corporal Punishment in schools to highlight the abolishment of corporal punishment in schools and to provide Provinces, Districts and schools guidance on how to deal with issues of corporal punishment. The protocol foregrounds the following areas:

  • The steps to be taken by provincial, district, circuit and school Senior Management Team (SMT) in reporting the incidents of corporal punishment in schools;
  • The complaints procedures are outlined and the measures to be taken at every level of the system are explicit and include the labour relations processes in response to perpetrators of corporal punishment as well as sexual abuse and harassment;
  • In line with the NSSF the Protocol further supports schools in ensuring safe and supportive learning environments that use protective behaviour, positive discipline, restorative justice and positive behaviour intervention support systems.

3. Protocol on the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools

The Department developed and published a Protocol on the Management and Reporting of Sexual Harassment and Abuse in Schools, which highlights the illegality of sexual harassment and abuse committed against children in schools, and to provide Provinces, Districts and schools guidance on how to deal with issues of sexual harassment and abuse in schools. The Protocol foregrounds the following:

  • The various key legislation that protect children against sexual harassment and abuse which include the Employment of Educators act, 76 of 1998, the South African Council for Educators Act 31 of 2000, the Children’s Act of 2005 and Criminal law (sexual offences and related matters) amendment act, 2007 act 32 of 2007;
  • The steps to be taken by provincial, district, circuit and school SMT  in reporting the incidents of sexual abuse and harassment in schools;
  • The key stakeholders that schools are required to work with in dealing with cases of sexual harassment and abuse in schools.

4. Partnership Protocol between the Department of Basic Education and the South African Police Service (SAPS)

The Department also has an established Protocol with SAPS to address crime and violence in schools The Protocol has enabled all schools to be linked to their local police stations, SAPS conduct searches and seizures in schools and conduct crime awareness campaigns in schools. Regularly, schools work with SAPS and local community police forums and social workers to address gangsterism issues. Constantly, searches and seizures of illegal drugs and weapons are done in schools and anti-gangsterism campaigns in collaboration with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development are conducted in schools.   

5. Inter-Departmental Campaign on the prevention of Violence, Bullying, Corporal Punishment, GBBV, Learner Pregnancy, Drugs and Substance Abuse

The Department and its partner Departments: Social Development, Justice and Constitutional Development, Correctional Services, the South African Police Service and the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies have also embarked on an Inter-Departmental Campaign on Violence Prevention. This Campaign raises awareness on issues such as the prevention of bullying, corporal punishment, gender-based violence, teenage pregnancy and drugs and substance abuse in schools. The Campaign has been championed by the Deputy Minister of Basic Education and is supported by other Deputy Ministers from the partner Departments. The Campaign has been targeting districts with high levels of crime and violence known as hot spots. The Campaign includes build up events that take groups of learners through priority content areas related to violence prevention.

Thus far, the Campaign has been rolled out in four provinces: Gauteng (Gauteng West District), Limpopo (Sekhukhune East District), Mpumalanga (Nkangala District) and the North West (Dr Kenneth Kaunda District).  The Campaign also involves Senior Management Teams, School Governing Bodies, learners, parents and ward councillors of the participating schools, in this way the Campaign is a whole school community engagement. The Department intends to continue rolling out the Campaign in other outstanding provinces during this financial year and into subsequent years.

Moreover, districts in collaboration with provincial education departments and civil society organisations also conduct regular awareness raising interventions that advocate for the prevention of violence in schools.  These provincial led programmes include school assembly talks, public debates and dialogues amongst learners.  The DBE monitors these awareness programmes through the District Monitoring of School Safety Programmes annually.

6. Codes of Conduct and Policies

The Department compels all schools to develop and adopt a code of conduct to address ill-discipline of learners. School codes of conduct are aligned with the Constitution of South Africa and child-protection legislation; and are communicated and adopted/ agreed to by all school stakeholders such as SMTs, School Governing Bodies and Learner Representative Councils. School codes of conduct are further supplemented by anti-bullying policies, alcohol and drug abuse policies which contribute towards creating safe and enabling environments in schools.  

23 November 2022 - NW4221

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to the reply to question 3782 on 2 November 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with the names of all the like-minded civil society organisations and interest groups that are part and have formed the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group since its establishment; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details (2) (a) how were the groups brought together and (b) were they brought together by her department; (3) whether there is a possibility that civil society organisations representing family values can form a working group with her department; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, will she and her department support such organisations and consider their counsel?

Reply:

(1) The list of the like-minded civil society and interest groups that are part of the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group is enclosed.

(2) (a) Although the intention of the working group is to address all social inclusion matters, when it was established, it sought to address in the meantime the burning issue of socio-educational inclusion of diverse sexual orientation, gender identitiy, expression and sex characteristics.  Due to limited capacity internally at the Department of Basic Education (DBE), it was important to reach out to civil society organisations that work daily at the coalface of similar issues at school and community level, to ensure an efficient, effective, relevant and appropriate education sector response. Establishing a working group is recommended to maintain stakeholder relations.

(b) Yes

(3) The DBE has previously attempted to incorporate civil society organisations representing family values in the working group. However, this approach to group composition proved to be a challenge due to extreme differences in opinion. As such, the DBE has opted to openly engage with civil society organisations representing family values separately, as their voice is valuable and essential in addressing discrimination and oppression of children from a family values perspective.  These engagements have already begun.

23 November 2022 - NW4306

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, the guidelines for Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression and Sex Characteristics that her department is consulting on, would enable an inclusive and safe learning environment for all learners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what are the practical considerations for implementation to ensure that the culture and rights of all learners are protected and respected; (3) whether she has any concerns about the specified guidelines and/or their implementation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Yes

(2) Due consideration has been given to the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa as the supreme law of the State, which prohibits violation of rights of all citizens.

(3) Human rights compliant education practice is an ongoing discourse; and the concern is that educators may not all be technically ready to implement the guidelines once published.  Therefore, the Department of Basic Education is working with the South African Human Rights Commission (SAHRC), South African Council for Education (SACE), Equal Education Law Centre (EELC), and the Commission on Gender Equality to ensure proper sensitisation of educators and school communities to circumvent this concern.

23 November 2022 - NW4352

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What number of (a) learners make use of learner transport, (b) established transport routes are used by learner transports and (c) learner transport programmes are subsidised by her department (i) nationally and (ii) in each province in each case; (2) whether there are public-private partnerships to fund learner transport programmes and/or routes (a) nationally and (b) in each province; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what do the specified partnerships entail?

Reply:

1. Learner Transport Programme is a shared responsibility between the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Transport. The provisioning of learner transport programme is a provincial competency and the National Departments of Basic Education and Transport monitor the provisioning of learner transport programme in provinces.

Province

 (a) Number of Learners

(b) Learner Transport Routes

 (c ) subsidized by her department

 

       

 

EC

125071

1608

Learner Transport programme is funded through the equitable share allocations to provinces and not subsidized by DBE

 

FS

9524

397

 

 

GP

190857

677

 

 

KZN

73933

672

 

 

LP

57636

399

 

 

MP

69725

524

 

 

NC

25878

408

 

 

NW

64450

671

 

 

WC

64843

566

 

 

TOTAL

681917

5922

 

 

2. There are no Public Private Partnerships as the Learner Transport programme is funded through the equitable share allocations to provinces.

21 November 2022 - NW4222

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With reference to the reply to question 3781 on 2 November 2022, what are the (a) requirements and/or (b) directives that came with the funding of the Socio-Educational Inclusion of Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Expression and Sex Characteristics programme; (2) whether her department applied for the specified programme; if not, was it simply offered to them; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether her department was given a mandate to be involved in such a programme; if not, what (a) is the position in this regard and (b) are the reasons that her department felt it was important to be involved in the programme; if so, by whom?

Reply:

(1) (a) the requirements for the UNESCO funding Socio-Educational Inclusion of Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Expression and Sex Characteristics programme were seeking services of a consultant to help the Department of Basic Education (DBE) draft guidelines for schools.

(b) there were no particular directives that came with the funding.

(2) The programme supports the realisation of Pillar 10 (a Rights-based Socially Cohesive and Inclusive School Environment) in the operational framework of the DBE on Care and Support for Teaching and Learning (CSTL). The intention is to ensure social justice and inclusion of previously marginalised minorities.

(3) The DBE is mandated by the Constitution to carry out this work. It is important for the education sector to be deliberate and intentional in addressing discrimination, prejudice and related intolerances that seem to prevent children from realising their inalienable right to education and undermine the constitutional gains of a democratic South Africa.

16 November 2022 - NW3821

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of mother tongue education facilities and schools exist (a) nationally and (b) provincially; (2) what is the (a)(i) name, (ii) town and/or city and (iii) province of each specified education facility and/or school and (b) language of teaching of each; (3) what is the matric pass rate of each facility and/or school since each school and/or education facility was established?

Reply:

1. (a) and (b)

The Department of Basic Education advocates for learners to learn through their home languages.  This is particularly so in the Foundation Phase, where learners learn the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and numeracy.  Post the Foundation Phase, the majority of our learners from African languages background switch to English First Additional Language as the medium of instruction.

Learners in schools that adopted English Home Language and Afrikaans Home Language, as their languages of learning and teaching continue to use these two languages up to Grade 12.  The table below attempts to provide a response for 1(a) nationally and (b) provincially.

Row Labels / Province

COMBINED SCHOOL

INTERMEDIATE SCHOOL

PRIMARY SCHOOL

SECONDARY SCHOOL

Grand Total / National

 

EC

1 324

8

3 255

905

5 492

 

FS

146

 

754

333

1 233

 

GP

214

33

1598

819

2 664

 

KZN

375

3

3858

1718

5 954

 

LP

165

45

2 435

1 318

3 963

 

MP

73

146

1 042

513

1 774

 

NC

113

3

316

121

553

 

NW

89

6

994

400

1 489

 

WC

116

1

1114

460

1 691

 

Grand Total

2 615

245

15 366

6 587

24 813

 

2.(a)(i)(ii)(iii) and (b) 

The Eastern Cape Bilingual Based Mother Tongue Education programme has 1 953 schools, where English, together with IsiXhosa and Sesotho, are used as languages of learning and teaching up to Grade 8.  The list of schools is herein attached as Annexure A. 

3. The attached document (Annexure B) provides matric pass rate from a sample of seven schools.

16 November 2022 - NW3897

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In view of reports that gang-related activities in secondary schools, theft and violence is on the rise, (a) what total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools since the beginning of 2022 have been reported to her department and (b) how has her department responded to such incidents; (2) what are the relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks?

Reply:

1 a Total number of incidents related to gang violence at schools

The Department has received a total of 411 gang-related incidents. 

1 b The Department’s response to such incidents

The Department has trained schools on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF), which is a guiding framework in addressing all forms of violent incidents in schools, including gangsterism.  The NSSF empowers schools to identify and manage all safety threats in schools; establish school safety committees, comprising of stakeholders, such as teachers, police officers, school governing body members, and learner representative council members.  Furthermore, the NSSF also empowers schools to develop incident reporting mechanisms; establish collaborations with external stakeholders, such as the South African Police Service (SAPS), the Department of Social Development, and civil society organisations; as well as develop school safety plans and policies to respond to safety challenges.

The Department has also empowered schools to develop and implement Codes of Conduct for learners.  These Codes of Conduct enable schools to address ill-discipline related to gangsterism, such as bullying, physical and verbal assaults, as well as the selling and distribution of drugs, truancy and theft in schools.

The Department also has an established Protocol with the South African Police Service (SAPS) to address crime and violence in schools, including gang violence.  The Protocol has enabled all schools to be linked to their local police stations.  SAPS conducts searches and seizures in schools, and conduct crime awareness campaigns in schools.  Regularly, schools work with SAPS, local community police forums and social workers to address gangsterism-related issues.  Regular searches and seizures of illegal drugs and weapons are done in schools and anti-gangsterism campaigns, in collaboration with the Department of Social Development and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development, are conducted in schools.   

The Department also encourages learner participation in sport and school enrichment programmes in order to promote healthy lifestyles.

 

2 a The relevant details of the trends related to this type of gangsterism, including but not limited to (a) bullying and/or (b) physical attacks

Bullying and physical fights committed by gangsters in schools are influenced by social issues, originating in the communities and spilling over to the schools.  In addition, gangsterism in some schools is also influenced by faction fighting between learners from different villages.  This form of gangsterism is common in the Eastern Cape and KwaZulu-Natal.  Furthermore, gangsterism is closely linked to drug peddling in schools.

09 November 2022 - NW2942

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to vulnerable learners receiving the child support and foster care grant who (a) are frequently absent from school and/or (b) have stopped attending school all together, what (i) support and interventions does her department provide for the learners in order to actively get them to attend and/or re-enrol in school and (ii) has been the success rate of the interventions over the past five years?

Reply:

Ensuring that children attend school during the compulsory schooling age, and striving to increase the percentage of young people, who successfully complete twelve years of schooling - in other words reach and complete Grade 12, are central to the mission of the Department.  A large range of activities and initiatives are aimed at advancing this mission, especially to ensure that vulnerable children, such as those receiving Child Support Grants (CSG) or under foster care, have an opportunity to succeed in school.

These initiatives have been successful insofar as addressing dropping out of school before learners successfully complete the National Senior Certificate; and schooling among children of  compulsory school-going age, has for many years been kept at almost 100%, especially up to Grade 9; though there were some setbacks during the COVID-19 pandemic.  The successful completion of twelve years of schooling in South Africa, is approximately on a par with that seen in other middle income countries.  This fact is provided in several of the Department’s Annual Reports on the results of the National Senior Certificate examinations (available on the DBE website).

Not only has there been steady improvement in the overall rates of school participation amongst children in the compulsory schooling age, and in the overall Grade 12 completion rate, but there have also been improvements for children who are orphans, Child Support Grant recipients and those with disabilities.  According to the STATS-SA's General Household Surveys, in the years 2002-2006, only 68% of 19-21 year-olds with both biological parents deceased, had completed at least Grade 9.  For the years 2018-2021, this percentage had increased to 77%.  Turning to Grade 12 completion rates amongst young people with disabilities, for example, we see that in the years 2002-2006 that only 19% of 21-29 year-olds with a disability, had completed at least completed Grade 12, compared to an estimated 34% in the years 2018-2021.  School attendance rates amongst 7-15 year-olds receiving the Child Support Grants has hovered around 99% ever since 2010.

The problem of learners not successfully completing Grade 12 (or anything equivalent outside the schooling system), should be seen in the context of relatively weak results among many of those learners who do obtain the NSC.  The problem is reflected in the comparably low Grade 9 TIMSS results, even in 2019, and after a couple of decades of improvements, improvements attributable in large part to government’s focus on quality schooling.  Clearly, these improvements should continue.  It is this need that lies behind certain high-level targets in government’s Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF).  For instance, more Grade 12 candidates should achieve above the mark thresholds in mathematics and physical science, enable them to enter university programmes generating critical skills in areas such as engineering, chemistry and financial accounting.

Moreover, it is critical to understand our efforts to promote successful completion of schooling compared to young people dropping out of school.  The current research, conducted by [WHOM]confirms that it is those learners who do not cope with their studies who are the most likely to drop out; and poverty in the home plays a large role here.  According the 2019 General Household Survey, 34% of young people aged 16 to 18 years, are not at school, essentially because they are not coping academically.  Another large factor, according to the same source, shows that 25% of young people blame their parents' inability to pay school fees as their reason to drop out.. Even here, coping academically plays a role; parents and guardians may decide that a child who is not performing well as school, is not worth investing in (See the Department’s series of publications General Household Survey (GHS): Focus on Schooling).

In line with the international and local evidence, and in line with the policy advice provided by organisations, such as the UNESCO, government’s strategies aimed at increasing ‘survival’ to Grade 12, are multi-pronged; with a special emphasis on dealing with the effects of poverty and on improving learning and teaching in the classroom.  The following can be considered key initiatives behind past reductions in dropping out, and likely drivers of future improvements in this regard:

  • The National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP). This intervention encourages children to attend school, and promotes learning by reducing levels of hunger and malnutrition, which inhibit successful learning.
  • No fee schools. This longstanding intervention ensures that children and youths in poorer communities are not prevented from attending school due to the inability of the household to pay for school fees.
  • Policies on teenage pregnancies. Government Notice 704 of 2021 formalised policy on the protection of the schooling of pregnant learners. Among females aged 16 to 18, around 10% did not attend school due to pregnancy, according to the 2019 GHS.
  • Ongoing strengthening of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS). A more focussed curriculum is one reason that has been put forward as a reason for past improvements in South Africa’s performance in international testing programmes – see the Department’s Action Plan to 2024.
  • Efforts aimed at improving learning in the early grades. A key government priority is improving reading, and learning and teaching in general, in the early grades. Several interventions contribute towards this, including the shift in the responsibility for pre-schooling from the social development sector to basic education, the Early Grade Reading Study and associated teacher development innovations, and the introduction of the Systemic Evaluation.
  • Special examination preparation support for Grade 12 learners. Activities here, aimed largely at ensuring that learners leave school with the NSC, include the so-called winter schools.
  • The expansion of the learner-level enrolment and attendance monitoring systems. The Learner Unit Record Information and Tracking System (LURITS), the SA-SAMS school management system and the partnership-driven Data Driven Districts (DDD) initiative have all contributed to a more robust approach to monitoring exactly where in the country dropping out is occurring. These systems proved invaluable for providing information on, for instance, where children were not returning to school during the pandemic.

07 November 2022 - NW3899

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, considering that her department promised a number of schools in Limpopo including the Ndzalama Primary School, Dingamanzi Primary School, Chameti Secondary School and Bvuma Primary School infrastructure projects years before the COVID-19 lockdown, and in some cases allocated funds for delivery of the specified projects, thereafter infrastructure projects were suspended indefinitely and school communities continued to suffer the consequences, her department will provide an audit of all schools in Limpopo and other provinces at which it promised infrastructure projects and/or started and subsequently suspended such projects indefinitely; if not, why not; if so, what are the (a) relevant details of funds allocated to unfinished projects and (b) reasons for the indefinite suspension of the projects?

Reply:

The question asked by the Hon Member is asking for information that is in the purview of the MEC for Education in Limpopo Department  of Education, not the Hon Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to refer the question to the respective province.  

07 November 2022 - NW3870

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has put any mechanisms in place to ensure that provinces transfer the full amount allocated to schools in the various quintiles in terms of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding as gazetted annually; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) confirms the allocations to schools through telephonic surveys and physical monitoring in schools. To support and corroborate information provided by schools, the schools surveyed are also required to provide copies of the allocation letters they received, as well as copies of bank statements reflecting transfers received. The findings, and areas of non-compliance, are communicated to Members of the Executive Council (MECs) wherein, they also requested to ensure that, where applicable, the necessary corrective measures are implemented to aspects of non-compliance raised in the report.

07 November 2022 - NW3860

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Yabo, Mr BS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the (a) progress of the Vangasali campaign to register early childhood development centres and (b) target number for her department for the current financial year?

Reply:

(a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has continued to train provincial officials on Vangasali, to particularly capacitate all officials post the ECD function shift. To date, seven (7) provinces have been trained on the programme. For the two (2) outstanding provinces, training in the North West is scheduled to take place on 26 and 27 October 2022; while for Western Cape, it will take place early November 2022. These capacity-building sessions are meant to support provinces which continue to register ECD programmes as part of the Vangasali drive. 

(b) In total, provinces have targeted 6 361 ECD programmes to be registered for 2022/23 financial year.

07 November 2022 - NW3541

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Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In light of the pilot phase of the use of scripted lesson plans for Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) which is drawing to an end and the previous research which has shown that the CSE programme was ineffective in addressing the sexual behaviour of students, what research (a) protocols have been built into the programme and (b) is being done to determine the effectiveness of the pilot programme; (2) whether her department will proceed to implement the CSE programme roll-out without research into the efficacy and/or impact of the pilot phase; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has been implementing CSE through Life Skills and Life Orientation learning arears since 2000. However, the assessment and classroom observation that were conducted by the late Dr Doug Kirby (one of the writers of the 2009 International Technical Guidance on Comprehensive Sexuality Education) revealed content gaps and low confidence to teach certain topics and content. In this regard, the DBE developed Scripted Lesson Plans (SLPs) as a teacher resource to address content gaps and assist educators to deliver age appropriate Sexuality Education whilst addressing the capacity issues. The content and topics presented in the  Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement are informed by research.

07 November 2022 - NW3849

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her replies to questions (a)(i) 734, (ii) 1429 and (iii) 1608 on 13 October 2020, (b) 1608 on 3 August 2020 and (c) 1427 on 13 July 2020, any response was received from the Gauteng Department of Education; if not, what has she found are the reasons that the replies have not been received yet?

Reply:

Gauteng Department of Education has only responded to question NA734 (See Attached). The information that the Hon Member is requesting on the questions reside with the MEC for Gauteng Department of Education. To obtain the remaining information, the Hon Member is requested to refer the questions to the MEC for Gauteng.  

07 November 2022 - NW3953

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Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2968 on 26 September 2022, she was guided by a legal opinion; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what statutory provisions lead to her department’s position that is developing legislation and/or policy dealing with this phenomenon that will be institutionalising unfair labour practice; (2) whether she will furnish Ms A M van Zyl with details of (a) the specified statutory provision and (b) who and/or what informed her department to take the stance?

Reply:

 1. No, The Minister of Basic Education did not require legal opinion on whether the Department has any policy or legislation in place to deal with the displaced educators. The Department cannot make legislation or policy in this regard. A legal opinion cannot be sought based on the phenomenon that is fundamentally flawed. Educators who are forced out of the workplaces by communities on allegations that are not proven are treated unfairly because their labour rights are infringed.

Suggested (1) No. The Department has not identified any need to develop a specific policy or legislation on the matter. Displaced educators remain the employees of a Provincial Education Department that employed them and this follows an assessment and confirmation that the allegations against them are unproven and that they cannot be charged for misconduct of any kind. 

2. (a) There is no statutory provision with which the Minister could furnish the honourable Ms AM van Zyl as we have status that there is no policy or legislation in place that specifically deal with displaced educators.  

(b)  As indicated above, the phenomenon of pushing educators out of schools infringes on the teachers' rights and thus perpetuates unfair labour practice. Departments must find a way of investigating issues raised by the complainant in a fair and legal manner.

Suggested. (b) The Department is satisfied that the existing processes, practices and procedures are adequate to deal with instances of displacement that occur from time to time.

07 November 2022 - NW3941

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of early childhood development (ECD) centres are registered in (i) Graaff-Reinet, (ii) Aberdeen, (iii) Nieu-Bethesda, (iv) Steytlerville, (v) Jansenville, (vi) Klipplaat and (vii) Willowmore and Rietbron in the Sarah Baartman District Municipality, (b) number of the specified ECD centres cater for people with disabilities and (c) number of learners are each of the ECDs registered for?

Reply:

The questions the Honourable Member has asked require information on a function which falls within the remit of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) of the Eastern Cape Provincial Education Department, and not the Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to submit the questions to the MEC for Education in the Eastern Cape. 

07 November 2022 - NW3939

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether any assessments have been done on the state of the infrastructure of the Luxolo Intermediate School in Aberdeen, Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details of the findings; (2) whether any budgetary allocations have been made for (a) day-to-day maintenance, (b) upgrading of facilities and (c) cleaning; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether any staffing provision has been made at the school for (a) maintenance and (b) cleaning; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

The question asked by the Hon Member is asking for information that is in the purview of the MEC for Education in the Eastern Cape Department  of Education, not the Hon Minister of Basic Education. The Hon Member is therefore advised to refer the question to the respective province.  

07 November 2022 - NW3907

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the relevant details of the steps that her department has taken to ensure the safety and security of teachers and learners within the confines of the schools?

Reply:

The steps that the Department has taken to ensure the safety and security of teachers and learners within the confines of the schools are:

  1. The  Department developed the National School Safety Framework  to assist schools in dealing and managing incidents of crime and violence, furthermore, it contains tools that assess physical security (safety audits) and learner safety surveys.
  2. The Department  further developed  the protocol that deals with incidents of corporal punishment and the Protocol for the Management and Reporting of Sexual Abuse and Harassment in Schools. 
  3. The Department signed a collaborative protocol with the South African Police Service to manage school-based crime prevention programmes. 
  4. The Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) assist in bringing parents and social partners to address the challenges faced by schools.
  5. All schools must have a learner code of conduct that each learner and their parent should sign.
  6. All schools must develop safety plans based on the audits conducted.

02 November 2022 - NW3781

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a complete list of all (a) supplementary funding, (b) donations and/or (c) other types of contribution towards the guidelines for Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Expression and Sex Characteristics since 2019, with specific reference to the (i) donor and (ii) country of origin; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The development of the Draft Guidelines for the Socio-educational Inclusion of Diverse Sexual Orientations, Gender Identities, Expression, and Sex Characteristics was funded by the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation (UNESCO) in 2021/22 and the total cost was up to $15000 (approximate R270 000).

02 November 2022 - NW3822

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In each year since 2005, what total number of learners in Grade 1 to Grade 11 were progressed (a) nationally and (b) provincially; (2) in each year since 2005, what total number of learners in Grade 1 to Grade 11 were progressed after the second registration for relevant grade (a) nationally and (b) provincially; (3) since 2005, (a) what impact has she found the progression policy has had on the learner dropout rate and (b) how has this been monitored and/or measured?

Reply:

(1) and (2) Please refer to the attached spreadsheet. 

(3) We have observed that drop-out rates have been declining over the years in the schooling system. While there has been no specific research on the link between the progression policy and changes in drop-out rates, the implementation of the progression policy is likely to be a contributing factor to the decline. Measurement and monitoring of attendance, absence and dropping out at school level of the school are done using SA-SAMs tools. School personnel then use this information to follow up and monitor individual learner to comply with policy and legislation on basic education participation.  

02 November 2022 - NW3793

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there are any schools that were affected by the floods in (a) KwaZulu-Natal and (b) the Eastern Cape that will not be repaired on time for the final National Senior Certificate examinations in 2022; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the (a) relevant details and (b) reasons in each case?

Reply:

The question can best responded to by the KwaZulu-Natal and Eastern Cape Departments of Education. The Hon member is therefore advised to refer the question to the respective provinces.  

02 November 2022 - NW3782

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a complete list of all (a) supplementary funding, (b) donations and/or (c) other types of contribution towards the Social Inclusion in Education Working Group since 2019, with specific reference to the (i) donor and (ii) country of origin; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The Social Inclusion in Education Working Group is a South African based group of like-minded civil society organisations and interest groups working in the space of social inclusion and diversity management. It is convened by the DBE on a voluntary association basis. It is an unfunded working group. Each of the members contributes resources for their own participation in the group towards the common purpose of the working group.

02 November 2022 - NW3780

Profile picture: Boshoff, Dr WJ

Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply to question 2522 on 10 October 2022, she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a complete list of all (a) supplementary funding, (b) donations and/or (c) other types of contribution towards the Social Cohesion and Equity in Education unit since 2019, with specific reference to the (i) donor and (ii) country of origin; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

The requested information is outlined in the attachment. It should be noted that none of these were direct payments and transfers to the Department of Basic Education (DBE). Each of the contributing partners managed their own financial contributions towards the corresponding projects.  

02 November 2022 - NW3752

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What consequence management measures have been undertaken to deal with repeated fines by the Auditor-General for non-improvement pertaining to the implementation of consequence management and improved control on measures of irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure?

Reply:

Measure to deal with consequence management on cases of Irregular Expenditure

  1. The Department has implemented consequence management through the Labour Relations. On some of the cases investigation was completed for officials in the Department, progressive disciplinary process was taken where final written warning and cautionary letters were issued. Other cases of disciplinary processes are still in progress
  2. For the irregular expenditure that affected the Implementing Agents the letters were issued to the CEOs of each Implementing Agent to provide response on consequence management taken and corrective action to improve the control environment especially within the Supply Chain Management. The progress reported so far is that the DBSA has received approval for condonation of R800 million on irregular expenditure incurred because of non- compliance with local content requirement.

Measure taken to deal with consequence management for fruitless and wasteful expenditure

  1. On consequence management of other cases; the disciplinary process within the Department is still in progress.
  2. The Adopt – a -school project , the process of recovery was followed as handled by the Legal Services and subsequently the arbitration process was taken, and final recommendation was obtained from senior counsel to write off the debt.
  3. The case on Kha Ri Gude, there was internal investigation in 2017/18 financial year, and the case was referred to the HAWKS, as it is still under investigation. There were some recoveries of some monies on stipend as payments were stopped.
  4. A case, for Department of Roads and Public Works (DRPW) – EC; it was investigated and referred to the HAWKS for further criminal prosecution.
  5. Other cases are still under investigation.

02 November 2022 - NW3749

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that although the Hlanganani Primary School in Merafong City Local Municipality has a sink hole within its school premises, the specified school is still active, putting the learners in danger; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons that the school is still active and with no plans in place to relocate learners?

Reply:

The question asked falls within the purview of Gauteng Department of Education, the Hon Member is advised to refer the question to the respective province.

25 October 2022 - NW3433

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Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has she taken to protect the integrity of this year’s matric examination in light of persistent load shedding by Eskom this year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in establishing the state of readiness for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations has considered the impact of load shedding on the different phases of the examination cycle. Contingency plans have been put in place to address the negative impact of load shedding on critical processes. There has been communication between Eskom and  DBE to prevent load shedding on certain critical days during the conduct of the examinations, that are dependent on electricity. These subjects include Computer Applications Technology (CAT), Information Technology and South African Sign Language (SASL). In addition, the heads of provincial examination units will be liaising with the provincial coordinators of Eskom to manage the load shedding. In addition, during the important processes of marking, mark capture and resulting, the sites at which these will take place, will have generators installed as a back-up option. 

In the unlikely event that load shedding affects the writing of CAT and IT, the Department of Basic Education has a rewrite paper which is scheduled for 07 December 2022. Rewrite for CAT and IT is planned for every examination, given the computer glitches that could cause candidates not to complete their examinations

The security of question papers is not threatened by load shedding in any way. Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) factored this into their plans and all question papers are secure, and printing, packing and distribution will be completed on time.       

25 October 2022 - NW3503

Profile picture: Van Zyl, Ms A M

Van Zyl, Ms A M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) total amount does her department owe to the (i) Walter Sisulu Local Municipality and (ii) Senqu Local Municipality and (b) is the age analysis of the monies owed in each case; (2) what (a) are the specific details of the buildings in respect of which her department owes the specified municipalities and (b) is the use of each specified building; (3) whether her department has any plans to address the debts; if not, why not; if so, what (a) are the details of her department’s plan and (b) is the time frame in which the debts will be settled?

Reply:

The question was referred to the Eastern Cape Education Department with a response date of Wednesday, 05 October 2022. To date, there has been no response from the province. 

The response will be shared as and when it is received.