Questions and Replies

07 August 2019 - NW401

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the implementation of the compulsory two-years of Early Childhood Development for all children before Grade 1, what (a) are the exact steps of implementation, (b) are the dates for finalisation of each step, (c) is the expected date of implementation and (d) is the estimated budget implication for this project?

Reply:

a) During the Basic Education Budget Vote 14 debate for the 2019/2020 financial year, it was indicated that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has committed to developing a comprehensive plan to ensure a phased-in and systematic relocation of the responsibility and leadership for ECD. It was further indicated that this comprehensive plan will include the provision of two years of compulsory ECD prior to Grade 1; as well as the provision of Early Childhood Development (ECD) for 0-4-year-olds. Finally, the Department committed to the costed plan being finalised by March 2020.

The development of these plans is based on two principles:

  1. The plans should ensure that both the access and quality of ECD should improve significantly over the next 10 years; and
  2. The plans should be sensitive to the current model of ECD provision and not destabilise nor cause confusion in either the ECD or schooling sector.

b) The detailed plan for institutionalising the abovementioned high-level objectives is still being developed.

c) The DBE is working towards finalising a detailed, costed plan by March 2020, while at the same time beginning preparations for implementation.

d) The cost will be clarified through the detailed, costed plan.

07 August 2019 - NW427

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of educators have been absent from teaching for a prolonged period of time in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) number of days has each of the specified educators been absent from teaching, (c) are the reasons for the extended absence in each case and (d) contingency measures were put in place during the extended periods of absence in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) and (d).

As part of monitoring, the National Department only collects aggregated information on teacher attendance. The Honourable Member is kindly advised to request the detailed information as requested directly from the Provincial Education Departments.

07 August 2019 - NW310

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of the Basic Education

With reference to the state of the nation address on 7 February 2019, (a) which schools will be transformed into technical schools in each province in order to expand participation in the new technological specialisations, (b) what is the time frame in each case, (c) what are the details of how the transformation will take place and (d) what costs will be incurred in each case?

Reply:

a) The Plan is to have a Technical High School in each Circuit. Provinces have not yet identified the schools to be transformed into technical schools.

b) The time frame for the transformation and expansion of schools will be over a period of 5 years starting in 2020 – 2025.

c) Details of how the transformation will take place:

  • Identification of schools by the 9 Provincial Education Departments;
  • Mapping of schools in circuits to be undertaken;
  • An onsite audit of schools will be conducted by the National and Provincial Departments;
  • Mathematics, Science and Technology (MST) Conditional Grant covers all schools offering Technical Occupational and Technical vocational subjects.

d) Costs that will be incurred in each case will include the following:

  • Infrastructure renovation and construction (workshops).
  • Provisioning of equipment tools and consumables for the Technical specialisation subjects.
  • Human Resource recruitment.

07 August 2019 - NW262

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will consider to establish a school violence task team to combat violence in the places of learning that will collaborate with the SA Police Service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All schools have established School Safety Committees in line with the National School Safety Framework. Each Committee is comprised of internal representatives from the School Governing Body (SGB) School Management Team (SMT), educators and learners. External role players are comprised of representatives from Government Department such as, South Africa Police Services (SAPS), Health, Social Development, Municipalities as well as Non-Governmental Organisations NGO) including Faith-based organisations.

The Department of Basic Education has also entered into partnership with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) to coordinate a wide spectrum of stakeholders through the National School Safety Steering Committee (NSSSC).

 

07 August 2019 - NW429

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) In each of the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, what number of (i) educators received training in information and communications technology (ICT) and (ii) the specified educators completed the training, (iii) educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) educators are currently using ICT in the classroom in each province?

Reply:

(a) Table 1, 2 and 3 below provides figures for the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, (i) 3 632 educators have been trained on various ICT programmes and (ii) all trained educators have completed the training, (iii) 3 632 educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) the DBE can provide data on how many educators and/ or schools have received ICT devices. However, the data on the usage of these devices lies in Provinces.

The data as captured by the Curriculum Branch on the training provided to educators on how to operate ICT devices, sourced from NSLA reports and the Moodle Platform is as follows:

Province

2016

2017

2018/19

 

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

GRAND TOTAL

Eastern Cape

2 999

782

632

4 413

8 826

14 653

2 852

26 331

4 056

2 667

291

7 014

37 758

Free State

408

8 092

632

9 132

8 172

3 593

6 378

18 143

181

185

39

405

27 680

Gauteng

1 171

502

632

2 305

4 028

6 885

1 326

12 239

1 987

1 700

600

4 287

18 831

KwaZulu-Natal

57

1 555

632

2 244

4 186

8 315

1 507

14 008

4 470

351

295

5 116

21 368

Limpopo

700

300

632

1 632

2 632

4 564

8 828

16 024

343

223

20

566

18 222

Mpumalanga

3 416

12 914

632

16 962

5 599

6 778

1 226

13 603

1 236

592

321

913

31 478

North West

2 638

1 307

632

4 577

8 615

14 592

2 787

25 994

296

4 675

266

5 237

35 808

Northern Cape

374

1 187

632

2 193

4 131

7 888

1 458

13 477

301

121

266

688

16 358

Western Cape

38 314

250

632

39 196

7 760

7 206

23 416

38 382

6 973

3 221

3 245

13 439

91 117

TOTAL

50 077

26 889

632

77 598

53 949

74 474

49 778

178 201

19 843

13 735

5 323

37 665

298 620

Table 1

The data as captured by the Teacher Development Branch sourced from the NSLA on the ICT integration into teaching training programmes:

PROVINCE

2017/18

2018/19

2019 (Quarter 1)

Eastern Cape

2 334

4 661

1 750

Free State

995

1 205

43

Gauteng

11 574

216

0

KwaZulu-Natal

359

234

368

Limpopo

950

1 480

200

Mpumalanga

1 928

1 605

0

North West

1 547

806

137

Northern Cape

250

727

0

Western Cape

3 832

1 879

634

Total

23 769

12 813

3 132

Table 2

Training provided on the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning since 2018.

PROVINCE

Target Group

Date

KwaZulu-Natal

405 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2019

Gauteng

200 subject advisors (3 hour workshops)

August to September 2018

North West

91 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2018

Western Cape

30 (30 e-learning specialists, Curriculum Support and Teacher Development)

April 2018

Total

371 provincial and district officials

Table 3

05 August 2019 - NW261

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will consider introducing a component within her department to help develop and empower the principals of schools in management on an ongoing basis just like there are subject advisors who are employed to assist school teachers in specific subjects; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has a component that helps develop and empower the principals of schools in management on an ongoing basis in the same way as Subject Advisors assist schools teachers with subject related matters. These are Circuit Managers who are supervisors of school principals. Each Circuit Manager is responsible for between 25 and 30 school principals according to the Policy on the Roles and Responsibilities of Education Districts with consideration to provincial differences.

05 August 2019 - NW177

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to schools in Johannesburg Wards 23, 54, 55, 56, 57, 124 and 125, what (a) assessments have been done to ascertain the number of additional schools needed in each ward, (b) were the outcomes of the assessments, (c) plans are there to build additional schools in the specified area and (d) are the time frames and deadlines in each case?

Reply:

The response below is as received from the Gauteng Department of education.

a) The Gauteng Department of Education completed infrastructure assessments with regard to the number and type of facilities during the 2018/19 financial year. This data informs the number of additional facilities, including classrooms, required per school and by implication the number of new schools required in any given residential area.

b) There is a total of 38 public ordinary schools in the wards referred to above of which 28 are primary and 10 are secondary schools. There is a total shortage of 23 classrooms in 9 primary schools and 3 classrooms in 1 secondary school, whilst there is a surplus of 53 classrooms in 19 primary schools and 61 classrooms in 9 secondary schools, based on our learner: classroom ratio of 40:1.

c) There are no plans to build additional schools in the area as there isn’t a need for additional schools based on our learner: classroom ratio of 40:1. After the construction of Glenvista Primary School in 2015 the overcrowding in primary schools in these areas was significantly reduced.

d) See (c) above.

26 July 2019 - NW98

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has devised a specific plan for the sole purpose of combating the scourge of violence in our schools; if not, why not; if so, how effective has she found the plan projected to be?

Reply:

The National School Safety Framework (NNSF) provides the Basic Education Department with an organising framework to coordinate all efforts in response to school related violence. This Framework provides evidence-informed approaches based on accurate and comprehensive data of the effectiveness of existing programmes.

A key pillar of the NSSF is collaboration and partnerships. School violence cannot be separated from the high levels of violence that are experienced in some of our communities. The Framework encourages partnerships with sister departments like the SAPS, civil society organisations, academic institutions and education stakeholders. The Minister convened a School Safety Summit in October 2018 and one of the recommendations of this summit was the establishment of a School Safety Steering Committee comprised of a wide spectrum of education stakeholders including SGB federations, learner formations and teacher unions.

The Department has provided a manual on how to address violence at school level to all schools. The provincial education departments continue to provide training and support to schools, particularly those schools in high crime areas, to effectively respond to school violence and bullying. These hotspot schools have also been linked to local police stations through a national partnership with the SAPS. The manual encourages all schools to establish school safety committees and provides evidence informed strategies to address bullying, homophobia, xenophobia and gangsterism.

In addition, through the Council of Education Ministers, the Department has made available two key protocols on how to address corporal punishment and sexual abuse in schools. The Department has provided training to all provinces and districts on how to utilise these protocols in schools.

The Department, in partnership with UNICEF and Save the Children, will be undertaking the third School Violence Survey in 2019 to continue to monitor the effectiveness of the implementation of the NSSF.

17 July 2019 - NW109

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in view of the need for adjustment in education due to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution, she intends to revive the laptop initiative which was discussed for a long period in the labour relations council and was later abandoned just before implementation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Teacher Laptop Initiative was part of a strategy to take forward the objective of improving Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning.  After its announcement in 2009, the initiative was widely hailed as one of the critical steps towards the improvement of the quality of education. The initiative’s aim was to ensure that every teacher owns and uses a laptop, by providing them with a monthly allowance which will contribute to the purchase costs as well as the costs of connectivity.

2. Due to a number of challenges the Department did not launch this project.

3. STATE OF THE NATIONS ADDRESS (SONA) INJUNCTIONS

Based on the 2019 SONA injunctions, the DBE plans to provide each learner and teacher with an ICT device with access to digitised Learning and Teaching Support Material (LTSM).

3.1 A comprehensive ICT plan has been developed to provide a framework for an affordable and sustainable implementation of ICTs in education. The plan will be implemented in three phases, commencing with Phase 1 that will target multi-grade, multiphase, farm and selected rural schools (2020-2021). The Second Phase will target quintile 1 to 3 schools (2022-2023), and Phase 3 will target quintile 4 and 5 schools (2024). All Special schools will be accommodated in all phases according to the type of disability.

3.2 The DBE will work with other government departments, the private sector and social partners in the deployment of ICTs, and will drive a sector-wide campaign to maximise the benefit of e-Learning at all schools in the country.

4. FOCUS AREAS

Four areas have been identified from the e-Education White Paper (2004) as follows:

4.1 Digital content resource development (digitisation)

The DBE will invest in digital content development to ensure that high quality digital resources are available free of charge offline and online via the DBE Cloud, Thutong and other platforms. The basic education sector aims for a balance between ‘state-owned’ content resources, open education resources (OERs) and publisher-created (proprietary) content resources. The Department will continue with its initiative of digitising state-owned content resources.

4.2 ICT professional development for management, teaching and learning integration

The introduction of ICT in the education sector necessitates the professional development of all teachers, managers and educator support staff in the Provinces. This means the provision of appropriate training for teachers and managers before they attempt to introduce the use of ICT in the classrooms. The training of teachers will be guided by the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning.

4.3 ICT infrastructure

The DBE plans to provide each learner and teacher with an ICT device to enhance teaching and learning. It should be noted that ICT infrastructure is fundamental to the implementation of e-Education and offers opportunities to access learning, redress inequalities and improve the quality of teaching and learning.

4.4 School connectivity

The Departments of Basic Education and Communications have developed a connectivity plan for schools. The plan seeks to provide cost-effective, secure and efficient connectivity that will advance the quality of teaching and learning in schools, specifically ensuring access to quality education.

 

17 July 2019 - NW150

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether there are any specific measures in place to ensure that provinces roll out the school nutrition programme in a manner that will benefit the learners as the legitimate beneficiaries rather than money disappearing into the pockets of the service providers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will promulgate national guidelines to determine how the service providers are selected in an equitable and fair manner to avoid provincial departments being taken to court while learners suffer all the time as it sometimes happen; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The national Department of Basic Education has a responsibility to oversee, guide, monitor and support the provinces in the implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP), and to ensure compliance with National Treasury regulations and the Conditional Grant Framework in particular. The Provincial Education Departments on the other hand, have a key responsibility to implement the programme in line with the applicable prescripts and guidance. Procurement of services for the NSNP is a provincial responsibility. To ensure that learners benefit maximally, the Conditional Grant Framework of the NSNP specifies the following conditions: the percentage of funds that are to be used for procurement and cooking of meals (feeding); the quality of school meals; as well responsibilities for districts and provinces with respect to monitoring and support to ensure adherence.

2. The selection of service providers in the NSNP is managed like all procurement processes in the public service. The selection is done by provinces in line with the Supply Chain Management (SCM) System processes and applicable prescripts. Where the procurement model is centralised (Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Western Cape), an open tender process is followed. In the remaining provinces where the decentralised model is used and funds are transferred to schools, the 3 quotation system is mostly utilised, as determined by the ceiling price of the service in line with SCM prescripts. In all instances, procurement is required to be open, fair, transparent, equitable, effective and efficient, among others. The DBE has developed a guideline for schools on the management of NSNP funds which was disseminated to provinces and districts. School Management Teams were trained on the use of this guideline.

17 July 2019 - NW132

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1193 on 17 May 2018, it is still her department’s policy not to collect or collate information regarding the (a) number of cases of assault by (i) learners on educators and support staff, (ii) educators and support staff on learners, (iii) educators on educators, (iv) support staff on support staff, (v) support staff on educators and (vi) educators on support staff have been reported in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) type of assault took place in each case and (c) remedial action was taken in each case; if not, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether any perpetrator was convicted criminally; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1);(2) This information is not routinely collected by the national department. The member is advised to request the information directly from the provincial departments.

10 July 2019 - NW35

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of teachers who have been trained in coding in the past academic year, (b) of the specified total number of teachers, what is the number of teachers trained in each province and (c) what level of training was offered in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not conducted teacher training for coding, however some PEDs and individual schools have conducted training and this information may be obtained from PEDs. DBE has finalised Plans to deliver training of Teachers on coding. 

05 July 2019 - NW70

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools in the country are without remedial teachers and (b) is the (i) name and (ii) location of each specified school?

Reply:

Currently, the system appoints Learning Support Educators (LSEs). LSEs are appointed at district level, not at school level. This is because the resourcing model in this respect locates support at district level to ensure support provisioning for all schools rather than a few schools.

05 July 2019 - NW74

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the (a) names and (b) location of each school that has not received their textbook allocation for the 2019 school year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the development of the National Catalogues of Textbooks. Provincial Departments of Education (PEDs) are responsible for the budget allocation for the procurement of textbooks for schools. The information on the schools must be sourced from the respective Provincial Departments of Education.

05 July 2019 - NW99

Senye, Ms L to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has her department considered implementing a multi-department plan in order to introduce social workers into the school system in light of the alarming reports of violence and mental health issues suffered by both pupils and teachers in school as well as the high unemployment rate of social workers?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) works together with education stakeholders, social partners and the Departments of Social Development, Health and the South African Police Service to address the causes as well as the effects of violence prevalent in schools, as in society. In the implementation of the Integrated School Health Policy by the Departments of Basic Education, Health and Social Development, mental health screening is included in the school health service package. In addition, the Department has developed the draft DBE National Guidelines for Resourcing an Inclusive Education System, wherein social workers are included in the multi-disciplinary team at various levels of the education system.

In implementation, Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) establish partnerships with the Provincial Departments of Social Development (DSD) as well as universities and partners to provide social work services to schools. In addition, PEDs engage and place unemployed social workers as Learner Support Agents.

04 July 2019 - NW73

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of learners have failed (i) in each province and (ii) in each of the past five years and (b) grade was failed in each case?

Reply:

Table 1: Number of learners that Failed Grade 12 (2014 – 2018)

Province

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

EASTERN CAPE

23 158

37 615

33 734

23 667

19 340

FREE STATE

4 541

5 745

3 157

3 499

3 108

GAUTENG

15 231

17 115

15 448

14 458

11 464

KWAZULU-

NATAL

42 223

63 897

49 616

33 728

27 667

LIMPOPO

19 811

34 629

38 212

28 603

23 476

MPUMALANGA

9 466

11 751

12 450

12 210

9 387

NORTH WEST

4 005

6 168

5 597

6 330

5 483

NORTHERN

CAPE

2 079

3 559

2 139

2 127

2 645

WESTERN CAPE

8 472

8 232

7 153

8 427

9 404

Source: National Integrated Examinations computer system (IECS)

Table 2 below indicates the number of learners who repeated a grade per province between 2014 and 2018. Please note that number of repeaters are used as proxy for failure as the department does not collect data in this format.

P

rovince

Province

Grade R

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

other

Grand Total

 

Eastern Cape

14 066

28 564

24 952

19 778

18 726

14 234

11 614

11 766

10 629

17 803

34 687

31 193

10

238 022

 

Free State

365

4741

3757

2770

5289

4452

4529

4447

8706

13986

12423

6176

0

71 641

 

Gauteng

1 472

19 693

14 348

10 098

11 098

8 623

6 947

3 195

9 595

20 801

41 596

18 437

285

166 188

 

KwaZulu-Natal

8 422

38 940

23 967

18 159

17 427

13 326

11 218

8 392

22 820

27 467

57 075

43 211

295

290 719

 

Limpopo

2 354

18 755

16 563

13 722

15 740

12 962

11 214

6 580

10 980

58 612

71 992

34 999

0

274 473

 

Mpumalanga

1 722

17 965

14 406

11 651

11 764

10 137

8 308

7 856

13 416

13 697

22 348

18 128

297

151 695

 

Northern Cape

438

4 533

2 788

2 273

3 412

2 351

1 963

1 788

3 282

5 068

6 890

4 175

0

38 961

 

North West

1 711

14 746

12 177

9 675

10 567

7 827

5 949

4 142

6 374

17 068

21 587

10 012

0

121 835

 

Western Cape

3 766

15 273

8 778

4 624

9 265

5 375

3 403

1 541

4 060

12 321

10 992

4 805

188

84 391

2014

Total

34 316

163 210

121 736

92 750

103 288

79 287

65 145

49 707

89 862

186 823

279 590

171 136

1 075

1 437 925

 

Eastern Cape

14 260

38 391

26 949

21 375

19 841

14 843

11 863

12 206

15 013

18 114

37 482

27 212

22

257 571

 

Free State

475

3934

3110

2680

5156

3898

3060

5140

8883

9541

10937

5444

0

62 258

 

Gauteng

1 543

21 194

15 259

11 269

12 526

7 395

5 856

5 231

18 413

22 370

39 127

21 729

207

182 119

 

KwaZulu-Natal

7 344

34 623

24 754

19 882

19 510

13 468

12 023

11 078

24 136

28 735

51 157

45 248

30

291 988

 

Limpopo

2 533

17 969

16 355

13 289

15 501

10 108

8 728

7 667

15 862

35 155

54 002

28 337

0

225 506

 

Mpumalanga

2 755

18 461

13 178

10 590

10 648

7 828

6 237

7 623

13 973

13 212

22 585

17 014

51

144 155

 

Northern Cape

700

4 343

2 901

2 743

3 185

2 526

2 118

2 351

3 595

3 688

3 967

2 843

0

34 960

 

North West

890

7 222

10 162

12 368

5 791

3 057

2 344

2 206

8 174

7 732

11 881

4 983

21

76 831

 

Western Cape

3 757

12 341

7 727

4 295

9 830

4 052

2 395

3 108

7 313

13 131

10 343

5 439

159

83 890

2015

Total

34 257

158 478

120 395

98 491

101 988

67 175

54 624

56 610

115 362

151 678

241 481

158 249

490

1 359 278

 

Eastern Cape

13 931

44 332

24 546

19 087

18 992

12 861

9 817

9 027

13 421

12 199

37 755

28 245

0

244 213

 

Free State

1076

2171

2509

1756

3973

3076

2851

4914

15010

11176

14342

6255

0

69 109

 

Gauteng

1 816

27 142

15 723

11 530

12 407

6 915

4 783

4 921

19 804

18 835

47 658

27 343

1 005

199 882

 

KwaZulu-Natal

6 659

38 073

26 099

21 186

21 992

15 545

12 057

11 177

26 373

29 941

59 895

54 856

317

324 170

 

Limpopo

1 836

16 884

14 742

12 059

15 262

9 769

7 254

7 102

19 560

29 489

71 703

40 541

608

246 809

 

Mpumalanga

3 942

11 161

12 897

12 118

17 716

13 460

13 234

18 278

26 708

22 284

19 105

13 274

3

184 180

 

Northern Cape

630

4 661

3 445

2 435

3 592

2 831

2 304

2 451

2 894

3 078

5 390

3 955

12

37 678

 

North West

1 251

11 075

9 699

7 062

10 056

6 055

4 245

4 273

15 465

12 645

22 834

9 929

0

114 589

 

Western Cape

3 851

11 433

8 346

4 692

9 222

3 685

2 036

2 836

8 741

8 941

10 907

6 663

100

81 453

2016

Total

34 992

166 932

118 006

91 925

113 212

74 197

58 581

64 979

147 976

148 588

289 589

191 061

2 045

1 502 083

 

Eastern Cape

5589

17038

11844

11210

17041

12147

9169

9859

12393

10783

25108

18903

0

161 084

 

Free State

584

6131

4463

3349

7445

4562

3329

5975

7521

5795

11868

5769

0

66 791

 

Gauteng

814

12363

11968

12626

18310

14561

14314

20756

17609

16629

28011

17589

0

185 550

 

KwaZulu Natal

1485

21451

20792

29450

33490

25818

23104

22293

27952

29641

43054

46692

0

325 222

 

Limpopo

509

10659

10383

10693

17374

11259

8707

7118

18070

23056

44264

32711

0

194 803

 

Mpumalanga

227

5052

5272

5503

7045

4537

3490

3386

5224

6530

12622

11861

0

70 749

 

Northern Cape

51

2419

1574

1153

3045

1559

1247

1510

2151

1700

3890

2022

0

22 321

 

North West

77

1707

3606

4433

8711

4085

3840

3205

4224

4013

12926

6397

0

57 224

 

Western Cape

140

257

626

1644

8128

11191

7528

6406

7188

8012

8753

5727

0

65 600

2017

Total

9 476

77 077

70 528

80 061

120 589

89 719

74 728

80 508

102 332

106 159

190 496

147 671

0

1 149 344

 

Eastern Cape

10 141

25 955

16 721

13 009

16 401

9 445

6 478

7 008

12 329

9 895

29 151

22 348

0

178 881

 

Free State

2 114

8 518

5 309

3 432

7 627

4 183

2 499

4 809

9 026

5 537

11 192

5 248

0

69 494

 

Gauteng

2 675

23 080

18 130

12 390

14 444

8 714

5 529

5 138

21 946

19 583

44 043

24 831

0

200 503

 

KwaZulu Natal

3 749

29 636

16 902

15 717

17 489

11 400

7 565

6 551

24 134

21 642

44 804

43 067

0

242 656

 

Limpopo

2 150

17 888

16 457

6 493

24 300

14 663

10 300

9 423

36 520

36 104

70 872

52 203

0

297 373

 

Mpumalanga

1 219

11 781

8 483

13 766

7 023

3 967

2 773

3 440

9 042

8 404

19 785

16 805

0

106 488

 

Northern Cape

299

3 961

2 820

2 013

3 904

2 396

1 868

2 193

3 334

2 624

5 040

2 602

0

33 054

 

North West

747

6 964

6 128

5 174

9 490

4 114

3 733

2 845

11 008

6 455

14 319

6 701

0

77 678

 

Western Cape

4 327

9 405

7 660

5 486

8 562

3 514

1 781

2 352

6 625

4 547

11 167

5 993

0

71 419

2018

Total

27 421

137 188

98 610

77 480

109 240

62 396

42 526

43 759

133 964

114 791

250 373

179 798

0

1 277 546

Source 1: 2014-16 Annual School Survey

Source 2: 2017-18 LURITS

15 April 2019 - NW741

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of schools which were connected to the internet in the 2018-19 financial year in each province?

Reply:

As education is a concurrent function, the requested information must be sought from the provinces.

 

15 April 2019 - NW446

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Edleen Primary School, situated in the City of Ekurhuleni, (a) why is the school in such a state of disrepair, (b) when last was maintenance conducted at the school, (c) on what date will all repairs be completed at the school and (d) on what date will the five asbestos classrooms be replaced?

Reply:

Infomation has been requested from the Gauteng Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 April 2019 - NW294

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether any audits of infrastructure shortcomings and needs have been conducted at Pinedene Primary School in Parow in the Western Cape (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) were such audits conducted and (b) what were the findings in each case; (2) whether any infrastructural parts of the school are considered to be unsafe; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, (3) whether any plans have been put in place to effect infrastructural (a) repairs and/or (b) improvements at the specified school; if not, (i) why not and (ii) by what date is it expected that the specified plans will be put in place; if so, what (aa) are the full relevant details of the infrastructural aspects that will be addressed, (bb) total amount will the planned work cost and (cc) are the relevant details of the time line covering the period from commencement to the completion of the planned infrastructural upgrades; (4) whether any budget allocations have been made to cover the envisaged costs of infrastructural repairs and/or improvements; if not, how will the specified repairs and/or improvements be funded; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Western Cape Education Department and will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 April 2019 - NW164

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) What number of schools in Gauteng comply with or do not comply with the legally prescribed infrastructure standards of her department or any other relevant department and (b) what requirements are complied with or not complied with, in each case; (2) whether infrastructure inspections are conducted at schools; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the nature of the inspections and what are the intervals between inspections, (b) at which schools were inspections conducted within the correct timeframe and at which schools were they not conducted, (c) at which schools were no inspections conducted despite requests by the school concerned, (d)(i) at which schools have inspections never been conducted and (ii) what is the reason in each case and (e) what action will be taken to conduct inspections at schools where it is overdue or has never been conducted?

Reply:

Infomation has been requested from the Gauteng Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 April 2019 - NW121

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) (b)(i)(ii) (c) (d) (i) (ii)

Chapter 10 of the Ministerial Handbook, Handbook for Members of the Executive and Presiding Officers indicates that the Minister and Deputy Minister are considered former “on the first day following the date on which they relinquished their office”

The political leadership of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has been constant in the past five financial years and since 1 April 2018 and therefore there is neither a former Minister nor Deputy Minister.

09 April 2019 - NW743

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of teachers who retired from teaching (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past two financial years?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

PROVICE (a)

2016/2017(b)

 

2017/2018(b)

 

Post Level L1

Post Level L2

Post Level L3

Post Level L4

Grand Total

 

Post Level L1

Post Level L2

Post Level L3

Post Level L4

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

552

141

44

171

908

 

763

189

56

230

1 238

FREE STATE

211

38

14

21

284

 

355

75

23

44

497

GAUTENG

419

117

44

65

645

 

706

254

70

98

1 128

KWAZULU-NATAL

472

154

67

172

865

 

724

254

60

234

1 272

LIMPOPO

536

118

30

115

799

 

959

161

43

161

1 324

MPUMALANGA

190

52

21

30

293

 

366

103

33

86

588

NORTH WEST

191

48

9

41

289

 

379

81

25

52

537

NORTHERN CAPE

47

16

3

9

75

 

110

33

14

20

177

WESTERN CAPE

146

52

20

31

249

 

418

140

59

84

701

Grand Total

2 764

736

252

655

4 407

 

4 780

1 290

383

1 009

7 462

Source: PERSAL

09 April 2019 - NW815

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) primary and (b) high schools (i) are equipped with the necessary computer equipment and (ii) have teachers who are trained to teach computer skills and coding?

Reply:

(a) and (b) (i)

The Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) are responsible for providing schools with the necessary computer equipment. It is for this reason that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) does not keep updated information on the number of schools provided with the necessary computer equipment. Such updated information should be requested from the PEDs.

(ii) Besides training offered by the provinces, the DBE has trained 43774 teachers in computer skills. Furthermore, teachers will be trained on coding from June to September 2019.

 

09 April 2019 - NW655

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with regard to the Gauteng Education Department's regulations that learners may apply for admission at any school in the province, irrespective of the feeder area in which the learner resides, she could indicate whether the specified regulations are compatible with the (a) South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (b) court rulings that a single-medium school that is full may not be forced to take in learners; if not, what steps will she take to stop the implementation of the regulations; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) given the change regarding the language demographics of single-medium schools to English when learners who speak different languages are taken in, what will she do to protect single-medium schools in Gauteng and also nationwide, especially, given the fact that not all learners are fluent in English or have full command of the language at all?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Gauteng Education Department and will be provided as soon as it is received.

09 April 2019 - NW742

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools were (i) built and (ii) closed down in the (aa) 2017-18 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b) is the (i) name, (ii) location and (iii) size of each school?

Reply:

a) (i)& (ii)

Table below indicates the number of schools opened and closed since 2017 -18 financial year.

PROVINCE

Closed schools

New Schools

 

Officially
Closed

Provisionally
Closed

Total

 

EC

456

 

456

7

FS

51

 

51

13

GT

1

 

1

 

KZN

22

 

22

7

LP

2

20

22

7

MP

 

 

 

 

NC

0

 

0

0

NW

 

 

 

 

WC

5

 

5

11

NATIONAL

537

20

557

45

Source: EMIS Master list

(b) (i) ,(ii) & ( iii)

Refer to link: https://www.education.gov.za/QuestionNo742Schoolsbuiltandcloseddown.aspx

 

09 April 2019 - NW165

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the tragedy at Driehoek High School on 1 February 2019, she can provide the date of all inspections her department or any other relevant department have conducted since 1 January 2000 regarding the relevant school's infrastructure; if so, what were the findings of the last inspection; (2) Whether the inspections have taken place within the inspection intervals as prescribed by her department or any other relevant department; if not, what are the complete relevant reasons why the prescribed inspection time and interval standards have not been met; (3) What are the full relevant details of (a) the standards regarding infrastructure inspections and (b) how does the relevant inspection(s) fail to comply; (4) whether she will ensure that the provincial department honours its undertaking to bear the medical costs of injured pupils; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. The National Education Infrastructure Management System (NEIMS) database indicates the assessment history of the schools as follows:

  • An assessment was conducted on 08 April 2006, 20 September 2006 and 08 April 2014;
  • The last assessment was conducted in July 2018, as part of the capacity audits determination for feeder zones.
  • It must be noted that visual assessments were also conducted by the school and during the school readiness visits that occur on a quarterly basis.

2. Yes, the inspections have taken place in line with the education sector prescripts.

3. There are various prescripts for inspections in the education sector. These inspections vary and they include but are not limited to the following:

  • School-Readiness Quarterly Assessments;
  • Emergency Maintenance queries and complaints (inspections are done by works inspectors to ascertain the level of damage and the cost implication thereof);
  • Assessments done by professional service providers, once schools have been identified to undergo major capital rehabilitation to define the scope and extent of the works;
  • As part of the school capacity audits, assessments were done to look at the high level of infrastructure;
  • Research Assessments done by education stakeholders (e.g.) Equal Education and Section 27;
  • Visual inspections are done by principals of schools;
  • Provincial Legislature oversight committees conducting monitoring assessments; and
  • Condition assessments done by Department of Basic Education and the custodian Department (GDID) to update the NEIMS database.

4. All claims against the Department will be processed in accordance with Section 60 of the South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996, in line with the liability.

09 April 2019 - NW814

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of teachers are due to reach retirement age in the next 10 years?

Reply:

The number of teachers due to reach retirement age or age 60 in the next 10 years starting in 2019 per year by province.

YEAR

PROVINCE

TOTAL

 

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NW

NC

WC

 

2019

1 281

466

1 495

1 694

1 548

806

656

206

794

8 946

2020

1 362

559

1 530

1 984

1 788

888

727

236

881

9 955

2021

1 346

598

1 617

2 073

1 880

931

713

265

802

10 225

2022

1 643

721

1 882

2 537

2 215

1 179

882

249

874

12 182

2023

1 887

803

2 082

2 699

2 563

1 333

961

255

1 006

13 589

2024

2 193

825

2 337

3 070

2 753

1 554

999

307

1 157

15 195

2025

2 430

857

2 554

3 190

2 844

1 563

1 101

300

1342

16 181

2026

2 696

870

2 659

3 270

2 946

1 705

1 237

392

1 371

17 146

2027

2 828

907

2 806

3 302

3 093

1 767

1 242

385

1 326

17 656

2028

3 272

902

2 821

3 747

3 266

1 821

1 365

397

1 292

18 883

TOTAL

20 938

7 508

21 783

27 566

24 896

13 547

9 883

2 992

10 845

139 958

Source: PERSAL, February 2019

09 April 2019 - NW576

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What are the relevant details of the general criteria that (a) an educator needs to fulfil in order to become a marker for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations and (b) educators marking Business Studies had to fulfil for the 2018 NSC examinations; (2) whether she will furnish Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi with a list of each person marking the 2018 NSC Business Studies examinations, in each case indicating the person’s (a) qualifications and (b) experience relating to Business Studies?

Reply:

1. (a) In terms of Personnel Administrative Measures, Government Gazette No. 39684, dated 12 February 2016, an educator that is appointed as a marker must have at least a recognised three year post matric qualification which must include the subject concerned at second or third year level. In addition the marker must have appropriate teaching experience, including teaching experience at the appropriate level, in the subject concerned, language competency, and preference must be given to serving educators who are presently teaching the subject concerned.

(b) In terms of the appointment of markers for 2018, including Business Studies, the marker must have taught the subject or a related subject at the Grade 12 level for a minimum of two years in the last five years.

2. In terms of the Regulations Pertaining to the conduct, administration and management of National Senior Certificate Examination, the Head of an Assessment Body (i.e. the Provincial Education Department) is responsible for the appointment of markers. These records are therefore kept at the nine provincial education departments and not at the Department of Basic Education. Therefore access to the list of markers appointed to mark the 2018 NSC Business Studies examination should be obtained directly from the Heads of Department in each of the nine provinces.

09 April 2019 - NW758

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What screening processes do teachers go through in order to determine whether they are sexual offenders or not before they are appointed?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is currently embarking on a process to strengthen measures related to the appointment of educators in general and in particular school-based educators. This includes, among other measures, a protocol clarifying the roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders with regards to vetting of educators and all other staff employed in positions where they will have contact with learners. The key stakeholders include the Departments of Social Development, Justice and Constitutional Development; the South African Council of Educators and the School Governing Body Associations.

09 April 2019 - NW693

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Basic Education

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

MINISTER (GAUTENG PURPOSE)

(aaa) 2016-17 financial year

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE – MERCEDES -BENZ

b) MODEL – MERCEDES –BENZ GLE 500 (W166)

c) PRICE – R 849 900.00

d) DATE PURCHASED – 15/09/2016

(bbb) 2017-18 financial year =NONE

MINISTER -

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c_ PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

(bb) since 1 April 2018 =NONE

MINISTER –

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c) PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

DEPUTY MINISTER –

(aaa) 2016-17 financial year

VEHICLE PURCHASED = NONE

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c) PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

(bbb) 2017-18 financial year

DEPUTY MINSTER – (CAPE TOWN PURPOSE)

VEHICLE PURCHASED

e) MAKE – BMW

f) MODEL –BMW 5 SERIES SEDAN

g) PRICE – R 833 488.41

h) DATE PURCHASED – 28/03/2018

(bb) since 1 April 2018

DEPUTY MINISTER –

VEHICLE PURCHASED

i) MAKE AUDI

j) MODEL – AUDI Q7.3 OTDI QUATTRO

k) PRICE – R 1 015 702.05

l) DATE PURCHASED –15/10/2018

COMPILER

MRS N THEBE

D: LOGISTICAL SERVICES

DATE

MR J VISSER

D: SECURITY AND ASSETS MANAGEMENT

DATE:

OFFICIALS INVOLVED

MS N MOLALEKOA

CD: ADMINISTRATION FINANCE

DATE:

MR PRM KHUNOU

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

MR ME SURTY, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

COMMENT:

QUESTION 693 APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMEND

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER

DATE:

 

09 April 2019 - NW744

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of principals who retired (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past two financial years?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

PROVINCE (a)

2016/17 (b)

2017/18 (b)

EASTERN CAPE

171

230

FREE STATE

21

44

GAUTENG

65

98

KWAZULU-NATAL

172

234

LIMPOPO

115

161

MPUMALANGA

30

86

NORTH WEST

41

52

NORTHERN CAPE

9

20

WESTERN CAPE

31

84

Grand Total

655

1 009

Source: PERSAL

09 April 2019 - NW231

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the President’s announcement in his state of the nation address of major technological overhaul for the South African education system which included rolling out tablets to all schools, her department is ready for this move in terms of the (a) budget, (b) teacher training and (c) provision of security at schools?

Reply:

a) Readiness in terms of budget

The plan will be operationalised starting 2019 with a preparatory phase, followed by three roll out phases focusing on the provision of gadgets with pre-loaded content including, but not limited to, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) Workbooks. The three phases target firstly learners in multi-grade and rural farm schools secondly learners in quintile 1 to 3 schools, and lastly learners in quintile 4 and 5 schools. The source of funds for the rolling out of tablets to all schools will utilise money previously allocated to the following:

  1. Printing of Workbooks and textbooks since workbooks and textbooks are being digitised and will be pre-loaded into gadgets. Currently the workbooks are printed for a single use. Through converting the books to a downloadable, interactive electronic format, the longevity of the books would be increased as they could be used multiple times. In addition, loading workbooks onto electronic gadgets would have the added benefit of decreasing the dating and marking workload for teachers (as this could be done electronically) and minor edits could be made to the electronic versions without having to reprint and distribute, which would be much more cost effective than re-printing and distributing the books annually.
  2. Grant money (e.g Operation Phakisa, Maths Science and Technology (MST) School Funding and other grants) will also be used for this purpose.
  3. Money will also be drawn from the Provincial Education Equitable share funding to fund the plan.
  4. The Private Sector will also be approached to beef up any short fall.

b) Readiness in terms of teacher training.

The DBE is on a trajectory towards the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) and recognises that it is crucial to onboard key stakeholders like teacher unions, and to provide effective change management, training and support, not only to teachers but also for subject advisors and curriculum developers. Since 2005 province wide programmes on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) integration training for both teachers and subject advisors have been running. Training is classified into three levels: Basic Skills, Intermediate Skills and Advanced Skills. In some provinces such as Gauteng where there has been a rollout of SMART boards in the classroom, subject advisors and coordinators were trained on the use of interactive boards and tablets. In October 2016 the Directorate Curriculum Innovation and e-Learning had already developed three online platforms to train teachers on the use of technology to deliver the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) curriculum. The three platforms are:

1. The DBE MOODLE PLATFORM available at : https://dbemoodle.dedicated.co.za, the platform is a Learning Management System (LMS) (paperless) to deliver lessons with daily content and self marking learner classroom activities that are CAPS compliant. Hence saving time and hard work for teachers. The platform is for classroom utalisation with a teachers laptop and learner gadget to run an LMS.

2. DBE Cloud available at: http://www.dbecloud.org.za/lms/dbe/, the platform aggregate content and make it available online for parents, learners, teachers, subject advisors, subject coordinators and subject specialists.

3. Thutong Portal available at: http://www.thutong.doe.gov.za/, the platform is an online learning space managed by subject specialists at the DBE.

Training of teachers, subject advisers, subject coordinators and subject specialists at the DBE is ongoing, utilising the three platforms to integrate ICTs into teaching and learning. These trainings are coordinated and guided by the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning which was approved by Council of Education ministers (CEM) in September 2017.

c) Readiness in terms of provision of security at school.

There is readiness in terms of security at school, conceptualised based on the categories as indicated below:

Computer Labs

Schools have to comply to very stringent security measures before a computer lab can be installed in that school. This will include among others the visibility of the lab to the surrounding community so that the community can report on matters that may put the security of the lab at risk. This go hand in hand with allowing communities to co-own these labs with schools so that communities can also benefit in using these labs. The specifications also include that the labs must be in the first floor to avoid roof entry, they must have safe iron doors and there should be only small horizontal windows with strong burglar bars to prevent entry. Other security measures include a dedicated alarm system, strict management protocols by schools regarding access to the lab and keys control.

Classroom tablets / cellphones

Suppliers of Classroom tablets/cellphones are required to adhere to strict supply specifications in terms of security of these gadgets. These include that these gadgets must be a trolley that is secured and can be locked while in the classroom. The trolley should have wheels to ensure that after use the gadgets can be transported from the classroom for safe keeping in the school safe made of brick and with an iron door. There should be a strict protocol approved by district and provinces from the school regarding the issuing and collection of these gadgets after lessons.

Take home gadgets

In other provinces such as Gauteng learners and teachers are allowed to take these gadgets home to keep them secured. In the next gadget delivery to teachers and learners, the DBE plans to design gadgets that are community unfriendly and only friendly for educational use only, without compromising the quality of the gadget.

01 April 2019 - NW293

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What are the (i) regulations upon which officials at South African embassies rely to set the approval of curriculums and educational plans as a visa requirement for home-schooled children and (ii) contact details of the section within her department or provincial education departments that is dedicated to deal with the approval of curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors and (b) how long does the section take to evaluate curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors; (2) whether the specified section has a list of approved curriculums and educational plans; if not, what criteria do they use to evaluate curriculums and educational plans; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in instances where her department does not approve the curriculums and educational plans of the children of foreign visitors who have been home-schooled and who intend to visit South Africa, there are any mechanisms available to appeal against such a decision; (4) are foreigners who apply for a visa informed up front that their visa applications might be unsuccessful if their children are home-schooled and their curriculums and educational plans are not approved by her department?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) Parents who home educate and are willing to register their children with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) in the Republic of South Africa are responsible and accountable for the education of their children. These parents, who are not citizens of this country, have already complied with the curriculum requirements of their country of origin.

(ii)The departments of education in South Africa does not deal with approval of curricula for citizens from other countries (who are not seeking citizenship in South Africa). However, they are at liberty to contact officials responsible for the implementation of the Policy on Home Education in South Africa, should they wish to do so. The contact details of the officials in South Africa are obtainable from www.education.gov.za, and are as follows:

Province

Coordinator

Tel

Email

Address

National

Ms EM Chaane

Ms LZ Brown

012 357 4105

0122 357 4106

Chaane.m@dbe.gov.za

brown.l@dbe.gov.za

222 Struben Street

PRETORIA

0001

Eastern Cape

Ms N Ndzunga

040 608 4186/ 4342

Nomfundo.ndzunga@ecdoe.gov.za

 

Steve Thswete Complex, Zone 6, Zwelitsha

Private Bag X0032 Bisho 5605

Free State

Mr MJ Ntsala

051 447 0038/ 0037

MJ.Ntsala@fseducation.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X 20565

BLOEMFONTEIN

9300

Gauteng

Ms C Motshwane

011 355 0631

carol.motshwane@gauteng.gov.za

 

Hollard Building (7th Floor)

P. O. Box 7710

Johannesburg

2000

KwaZulu-Natal

Ms D Motloli

033 348 6111/115

dineo.motloli@kzndoe.gov.za

188 Pieter Maritz Street

PIETERMARITZBURG

3200

Limpopo

Ms M Baloyi

015 290 9382

baloyiME@limpopo.edu.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X9489

POLOKWANE

0700

Mpumalanga

Dr M Pieterse

013 766 5875

m.pieterse@education.mpu.gov.za

P/Bag X 111341

NELSPRUIT

1200

Northern Cape

Mr K Mhlom

053 839 6386

Uzondwa@gmail.com

 

P/ Bag X 5029

KIMBERLEY

8300

North West

Ms P Pule

018 389 8204

Ppule@nwpg.gov.za

P/Bag X 2044

MMABATHO

2735

Western Cape

Mr D Louw

021 467 2653

Deon.louw@westerncape.gov.za

P/ Bag X 9114

CAPE TOWN

8000

(b) In terms of the Policy on Home Education, the Head of a Provincial Education Department must take all reasonable steps to respond within 30 days after receipt of the application on the prescribed form.

(2) There is no approved list of curricula and educational plans except for the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 in the department. Parents are free to choose any curriculum that will be of a standard not inferior to that of basic education provided in public schools in South Africa.

(3)A parent may appeal to the MEC within 14 days of receiving a notice. The MEC should take all reasonable steps to respond to the appeal within 30 days of receiving the appeal.

(4) The Department of Basic Education does not have a mechanism for considering curricula and educational plans of foreigners who apply for a visa in South Africa.

 

01 April 2019 - NW115

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deaf and/or (ii) hearing-impaired learners in each province and (b) what number of the specified learners have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources; (2) how are the deaf learners in Mpumalanga accommodated in view of the fact that no schools for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners have been built; (3) by what date does her department envisage building a school for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners, as this issue has been a discussion point for the past two years?

Reply:

Response: (1)(a) (i) (ii)

Table 1: Number of (i) deaf and hard of hearing learners, by province, in 2018

Province

Deaf (i)

Hard of Hearing (ii)

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

722

1 819

2 541

Free State

364

285

649

Gauteng

1 305

510

1 815

KwaZulu Natal

1 359

1 090

2 449

Limpopo

494

189

683

Mpumalanga

191

138

329

North West

290

88

378

Northern Cape

98

46

144

Western Cape

935

219

1 154

Grand Total

5 758

4 384

10 142

Source: 2018 LURITS II

(1)(b) The data on the number of deaf and/or hard-of-hearing learners who may have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources is not available at the Department of Basic Education and should be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

(2) Deaf learners in Mpumalanga are accommodated in the following five (5) schools:

  • Marietjie Special School;
  • Wolvenkop Special School;
  • KaMagugu Special School;
  • Silondokuhle Special School; and
  • Bukhosibetfu Full Service School.

(3) The information about the date for the envisaged building of a school for Deaf and/or hard-of –hearing learners should be obtained from a province as schools are established by the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) for education in the province.

01 April 2019 - NW340

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha she has been informed of the (a) general state of disrepair at the school, (b) alleged gross maladministration by the principal, (c) theft of wheelchairs and other material needed by the disabled learners, (d) alleged abuse of staff and (e) the inhumane conditions in which disabled learners are kept; if not, what steps will she take to investigate and take action; if so, what has her department done in this regard?

Reply:

A)  The National Department of Basic Education has not been informed of the general state of disrepair at the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha. The matter has since been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education for investigation and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the province.

01 April 2019 - NW331

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teachers have joined the Public Service since 1 January 1996 and (b) is the highest qualification of each specified teacher?

Reply:

PROVINCE

UNQUALIFIED

(Matric)

UNDER-QUALIFIED (Matric plus 1-2)

QUALIFIED (Matric plus 3 and more years)

Grand Total

 

REQV10

REQV11

REQV12

REQV13

REQV14

REQV15

REQV16

REQV17

 

EC

36

10

147

5 071

24 451

2 736

311

24

32 786

FS

33

17

21

1 962

10 061

1 376

228

27

13 725

GP

11

1

64

4 618

35 848

8 031

1 465

126

50 164

KZN

728

7

23

6 231

41 493

11 398

2 714

141

62 735

LP

1

 

7

3 169

20 955

1 199

275

11

25 617

MP

4

 

6

2 472

14 905

2 742

593

27

20 749

NW

   

118

2 779

11 489

1 492

306

14

16 198

NC

96

4

6

1 074

4 451

627

96

8

6 362

WC

86

11

120

1 890

14 458

2 633

487

59

19 744

Grand Total

995

50

512

29 266

178 111

32 234

6 475

437

248 080

Source: PERSAL, January 2019

01 April 2019 - NW509

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a) (i) One building

(ii) None

(iii) None

(aa) None

(bb) Public Private Partnership Agreement

(b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) The value of the building is unknown and the purpose is for office accommodation for the Department of Basic Education

(c) (i) The Public Partnership Agreement is for a contract period of 25 years

(ii) The Public Private Partnership is for the Department of Basic Education

(iii) Monthly Unitary fee is R13 731 406.74 excluding VAT

27 March 2019 - NW577

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether the 2018 National Senior Certificate Business Studies examination paper was remarked nationally or only in specific provinces; (2) whether (a) her department and/or (b) provincial departments of education requested the remarking of the Business Studies examination; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (3) whether individual requests for remarking were made; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The 2018 NSC Business Studies, as with all other subjects, are remarked by all nine (9) Provincial Education Departments and not remarked nationally or in specific provinces. Only in the case of the selected subjects that were marked centrally by the DBE, was the remark also done centrally by the DBE.

2. The remark process is an appeal process that can be utilised by any candidate who wants to confirm his/her marks in the written examination. As such, it is the candidates and not the DBE or the Provincial Education Departments that request the remarking. Candidates are also allowed to request a re-check of their scripts and they could further request to view their scripts after the remark request has been processed.

3. Individual requests for remarking of Business Studies were made. There were a total of 6685 individual requests for the remark of Business Studies that were made.

 

27 March 2019 - NW579

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners between the ages of 9 and 14 years old fell pregnant in the past five academic years and (b) the specified learners returned to continue schooling after giving birth?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Please note that the question has been referred to Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). The information will be provided as soon as received from PEDs.

27 March 2019 - NW578

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has found that educators who are not members of teachers’ unions are disqualified from consideration to become markers of National Senior Certificate examinations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All educators that have the appropriate qualification and the relevant grade 12 teaching experience are eligible to apply to mark. Markers are then selected in terms of the criteria listed in the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM).

Membership to a Teacher Union is not a criterion for appointment as a marker and no educator has ever been disqualified from the selection process due non-membership to a Teacher Union.

27 March 2019 - NW292

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) what number of the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

a) (i) One tender briefing was held in 2018 by (i) the Department of Basic Education and it was compulsory.

b) One compulsory briefing session.

UMALUSI

a) (ii) Umalusi conducted four (4) tender briefings in the period 1 April 2018 to date.

b) All four (4) tender briefings were compulsory.

SACE

a) (ii) The South African Council for Educators never held any tender briefing during 2018.

b) No briefing was held and non were compulsory.

12 March 2019 - NW250

Profile picture: Ntlangwini, Ms EN

Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of schools in each province (a) are and (b) are not English-medium schools?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Table 1 below indicates the number of schools that (a) are using and (b) are not using English as medium of instruction. It shows that about 23 474 schools are English medium schools and 1 391 are using other languages as medium of instruction. Please note that these schools are not only single medium schools, they can be parallel medium, meaning they use two or more languages as medium of instruction.

Table 1: Number of English and none English medium schools, by province, in 2018

Province

  1. English
  1. Not English

Total

Eastern Cape

4 922

291

5 213

Free State

1 121

69

1 190

Gauteng

2 769

138

2 907

KwaZulu-Natal

5 938

42

5 980

Limpopo

3 927

50

3 977

Mpumalanga

1 694

49

1 743

Northern Cape

389

183

572

North West

1 447

63

1 510

Western Cape

1 267

506

1 773

Total

23 474

1 391

24 865

Source: 2018 LURITS

12 March 2019 - NW248

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teaching vacancies have opened up in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified vacancy (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of teaching vacancies have opened up in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified vacancy (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The information has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

12 March 2019 - NW249

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of new teachers have been appointed in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified new teacher (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of new teachers have been appointed in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified new teacher (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The data has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

12 March 2019 - NW253

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that opened in each province in the 2018 academic year; (2) what is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that will be opened in each province in the 2019 academic year? NW264E

Reply:

Please note that the questions have been referred to Provincial Education Departments Heads. The information will be provided as soon as received from Provincial Education Departments.

12 March 2019 - NW247

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teachers were employed in the public education system in each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province as at 1 February 2019 and (b) is the breakdown in terms of (i) gender and (ii) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of teachers were employed in the public education system in each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province as at 1 February 2019 and (b) is the breakdown in terms of (i) gender and (ii) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The information has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

 

12 March 2019 - NW257

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of learners currently have access to a work book or tablet at each school in each province?

Reply:

a) Response on workbooks

For the 2019 academic year, Grade R, Grade 1-3 Life Skills, Grades 1-6 Home Language, Grades 1-6 English First Additional Language and Grades 1-9 Mathematics Volume 1 and Volume 2 workbooks were distributed as follows:

Province

Grade R

Grades 1 to 9

 

No of Schools

No of Learners

Books delivered

No of Schools

No of Learners

Books delivered

Eastern Cape

4338

141982

567930

5156

1499320

80993140

Free State

661

47440

189760

1098

652155

3409150

Gauteng

1431

160432

641730

2154

1963455

9846540

KwaZulu-Natal

4107

194360

777440

5945

2239945

11610450

Limpopo

2272

143403

573620

3836

1344525

7418550

Mpumalanga

1133

92115

368460

1667

945860

5072320

Northern Cape

389

23250

93000

548

260540

1391150

North west

980

56280

225120

1457

648655

3569860

Western Cape

1005

79800

319200

1493

975830

4920130

Totals

16312

939064

3756260

23346

10530285

55331290

b) The question on the number of tablets in each school should be directed to provincial legislatures.

12 March 2019 - NW252

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that closed in each province in the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

Please note that the question has been referred to Provincial Education Departments Heads. The information will be provided as soon as received from Provincial Education Departments.

22 February 2019 - NW113

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of (a)(i) deaf and (ii) hearing impaired learners from each province enrolled for the 2018 National Senior Certificate (NSC), (b) the specified learners wrote the SA Sign Language (SASL) examination and (c) the specified learners obtained (i) an NSC pass and (ii) a Bachelor pass in SASL; (2) what number of learners from schools for the deaf and hearing impaired in each province were exposed to bridging courses in Grades 9, 10 and 11 to prepare for the unique grammar and structure of the SASL examination; (3) (a) what number of appointed markers had the pre-requisite qualifications to mark the final SASL examination papers in each province, (b) what are the details of the pre-requisite qualifications and (c) what number of years’ experience is required; (4) on what date will all schools in each province providing SASL as a home language be provided with sufficient textbooks; (5) what number of students who completed their NSC in SASL were approached by her department to assist educators with SASL?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) and (ii) The current examination system only has a record of Hearing Impaired Learners and does not distinguish between Deaf learners and Hearing Impaired Learners The total number of hearing impaired learners that enrolled for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examination is 456.

(b) Of the 54 candidates that enrolled to write the 2018 NSC South African Sign Language Home Language (SASL HL) examination, 52 candidates wrote the examination.

(c) (i) 26 candidates achieved an NSC pass

(ii) 7 candidates achieved admission to Bachelor studies

Note that of the 52 candidates that wrote the SASL HL examination, only 28 candidates could be resulted in terms of the full qualification, given that the remaining 24 candidates did not write the full NSC subject package in 2018.

2. All the full time candidates who wrote SASL HL in the NSC 2018 examinations were exposed to the bridging Grade 9 and 10 programme. No bridging programme was developed for Grade 11.

The table below provides the school, province and number of learners who wrote the SASL examinations in 2018:

School

Province

Number of learners – Gr 12

Efata

EC

3

St Thomas

EC

10 (full time) + 6 (part time)

Bartimea

FS

4

Thiboloha

FS

2

Sizwile

GP

11

Fulton

KZN

3

Kwathintwa

KZN

8

St Martin

KZN

7

De-la-Bat

WC

1

Dominican (Wittebome)

WC

3

     

Total

10 schools

58

3. (a) (b) (c)

In terms of the policy relating to the appointment of markers, the marker must have at least a recognised three year post matric qualification which must include the subject concerned at second or third year level. In addition the marker must have extensive experience as an educator in the particular subject or a related area and at least two years teaching or other curriculum-related experience within the last 5 years at the appropriate level, and must be competent in the language of teaching and learning.

In terms of marker appointments for SASL HL, it was not expected that the DBE will be able to appoint markers that satisfy all of the above criteria given that this is the first year of implementation of this examination. All 15 markers have extensive experience as teachers of deaf learners and have a Teaching Qualification. Four (4) of the markers have a qualification in SASL – ranging from a short course qualification to an Honours Degree in SASL. Two Deaf Teaching Assistants were also appointed to assist the hearing markers with the translation of SASL. The Teaching Assistants were not involved directly in marking. The teaching assistants have a Matric qualification.

Given the limitations relating to the appointed markers, the marking of the 2018 NSC SASL HL examinations was centralised at the DBE to ensure stringent standardisation and quality assurance of the marking process.

(4) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the development of the South African Sign Language National Catalogue which is forwarded to provinces, districts and schools. The provinces and schools are responsible for procurement and delivery of these textbooks as required. The Catalogues referred to were developed in 2015 and 2017.

(5). The Department of Basic Education has not been approached by students as the function of teacher development resides with provinces.

22 February 2019 - NW114

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)By what date will her department make use of deaf poets and storytellers to record their stories for learners with hearing impairments to study; (2) what (a) number of educators in each province are qualified to teach SA Sign Language (SASL) and (b) steps will her department take to ensure that the specified educators are adequately trained to teach SASL; (3) what number of persons were used by her department in the development of the SASL curriculum and policies; (4) by what date does her department envisage having its own curriculum for SASL rather than copying the English curriculum?

Reply:

1. There is currently no fixed date for this exercise. However, this matter is on the agenda of the department.

2. (a) The database of teachers and their qualifications is kept and maintained by provinces. Such data could be sourced from Provincial Legislatures.

3. The Curriculum Management Team (CMT) that oversaw the development of SASL curriculum and policies consisted of 9 members. A writing team comprising five members was established and the team formed the core of the development process. SASL experts and phase specialists (e.g. SASL linguists from Universities and NGOs as well as SASL teachers) were co-opted during the development of specific areas of the curriculum.

4. The SASL Home Language curriculum was not copied from the English curriculum. The English Home Language curriculum is the Framework to which SASL and all other Home Languages are aligned, to ensure parity of esteem of all languages.