Questions and Replies

15 April 2019 - NW741

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of schools which were connected to the internet in the 2018-19 financial year in each province?

Reply:

As education is a concurrent function, the requested information must be sought from the provinces.

 

15 April 2019 - NW294

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether any audits of infrastructure shortcomings and needs have been conducted at Pinedene Primary School in Parow in the Western Cape (details furnished); if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date(s) were such audits conducted and (b) what were the findings in each case; (2) whether any infrastructural parts of the school are considered to be unsafe; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, (3) whether any plans have been put in place to effect infrastructural (a) repairs and/or (b) improvements at the specified school; if not, (i) why not and (ii) by what date is it expected that the specified plans will be put in place; if so, what (aa) are the full relevant details of the infrastructural aspects that will be addressed, (bb) total amount will the planned work cost and (cc) are the relevant details of the time line covering the period from commencement to the completion of the planned infrastructural upgrades; (4) whether any budget allocations have been made to cover the envisaged costs of infrastructural repairs and/or improvements; if not, how will the specified repairs and/or improvements be funded; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Western Cape Education Department and will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 April 2019 - NW164

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) What number of schools in Gauteng comply with or do not comply with the legally prescribed infrastructure standards of her department or any other relevant department and (b) what requirements are complied with or not complied with, in each case; (2) whether infrastructure inspections are conducted at schools; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the nature of the inspections and what are the intervals between inspections, (b) at which schools were inspections conducted within the correct timeframe and at which schools were they not conducted, (c) at which schools were no inspections conducted despite requests by the school concerned, (d)(i) at which schools have inspections never been conducted and (ii) what is the reason in each case and (e) what action will be taken to conduct inspections at schools where it is overdue or has never been conducted?

Reply:

Infomation has been requested from the Gauteng Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 April 2019 - NW121

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 3797 on 21 December 2018, what was the total expenditure incurred by her department relating to the travel privileges contained in the 2007 Ministerial Handbook of former (a)(i) Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (b)(i) Deputy Ministers and (ii) their spouses, (c) Ministers’ widows or widowers and (d) Deputy Ministers’ widows or widowers (i) in each of the past five financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii) (b)(i)(ii) (c) (d) (i) (ii)

Chapter 10 of the Ministerial Handbook, Handbook for Members of the Executive and Presiding Officers indicates that the Minister and Deputy Minister are considered former “on the first day following the date on which they relinquished their office”

The political leadership of the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has been constant in the past five financial years and since 1 April 2018 and therefore there is neither a former Minister nor Deputy Minister.

15 April 2019 - NW446

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America, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Edleen Primary School, situated in the City of Ekurhuleni, (a) why is the school in such a state of disrepair, (b) when last was maintenance conducted at the school, (c) on what date will all repairs be completed at the school and (d) on what date will the five asbestos classrooms be replaced?

Reply:

Infomation has been requested from the Gauteng Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

09 April 2019 - NW743

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of teachers who retired from teaching (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past two financial years?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

PROVICE (a)

2016/2017(b)

 

2017/2018(b)

 

Post Level L1

Post Level L2

Post Level L3

Post Level L4

Grand Total

 

Post Level L1

Post Level L2

Post Level L3

Post Level L4

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

552

141

44

171

908

 

763

189

56

230

1 238

FREE STATE

211

38

14

21

284

 

355

75

23

44

497

GAUTENG

419

117

44

65

645

 

706

254

70

98

1 128

KWAZULU-NATAL

472

154

67

172

865

 

724

254

60

234

1 272

LIMPOPO

536

118

30

115

799

 

959

161

43

161

1 324

MPUMALANGA

190

52

21

30

293

 

366

103

33

86

588

NORTH WEST

191

48

9

41

289

 

379

81

25

52

537

NORTHERN CAPE

47

16

3

9

75

 

110

33

14

20

177

WESTERN CAPE

146

52

20

31

249

 

418

140

59

84

701

Grand Total

2 764

736

252

655

4 407

 

4 780

1 290

383

1 009

7 462

Source: PERSAL

09 April 2019 - NW165

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the tragedy at Driehoek High School on 1 February 2019, she can provide the date of all inspections her department or any other relevant department have conducted since 1 January 2000 regarding the relevant school's infrastructure; if so, what were the findings of the last inspection; (2) Whether the inspections have taken place within the inspection intervals as prescribed by her department or any other relevant department; if not, what are the complete relevant reasons why the prescribed inspection time and interval standards have not been met; (3) What are the full relevant details of (a) the standards regarding infrastructure inspections and (b) how does the relevant inspection(s) fail to comply; (4) whether she will ensure that the provincial department honours its undertaking to bear the medical costs of injured pupils; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. The National Education Infrastructure Management System (NEIMS) database indicates the assessment history of the schools as follows:

  • An assessment was conducted on 08 April 2006, 20 September 2006 and 08 April 2014;
  • The last assessment was conducted in July 2018, as part of the capacity audits determination for feeder zones.
  • It must be noted that visual assessments were also conducted by the school and during the school readiness visits that occur on a quarterly basis.

2. Yes, the inspections have taken place in line with the education sector prescripts.

3. There are various prescripts for inspections in the education sector. These inspections vary and they include but are not limited to the following:

  • School-Readiness Quarterly Assessments;
  • Emergency Maintenance queries and complaints (inspections are done by works inspectors to ascertain the level of damage and the cost implication thereof);
  • Assessments done by professional service providers, once schools have been identified to undergo major capital rehabilitation to define the scope and extent of the works;
  • As part of the school capacity audits, assessments were done to look at the high level of infrastructure;
  • Research Assessments done by education stakeholders (e.g.) Equal Education and Section 27;
  • Visual inspections are done by principals of schools;
  • Provincial Legislature oversight committees conducting monitoring assessments; and
  • Condition assessments done by Department of Basic Education and the custodian Department (GDID) to update the NEIMS database.

4. All claims against the Department will be processed in accordance with Section 60 of the South African Schools Act, 84 of 1996, in line with the liability.

09 April 2019 - NW693

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Van Dalen, Mr P to ask the Basic Education

What is the (a) make, (b) model, (c) price and (d) date on which each vehicle was purchased for use by (i) her and (ii) her deputy (aa) in the (aaa) 2016-17 and (bbb) 2017-18 financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018?

Reply:

MINISTER (GAUTENG PURPOSE)

(aaa) 2016-17 financial year

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE – MERCEDES -BENZ

b) MODEL – MERCEDES –BENZ GLE 500 (W166)

c) PRICE – R 849 900.00

d) DATE PURCHASED – 15/09/2016

(bbb) 2017-18 financial year =NONE

MINISTER -

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c_ PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

(bb) since 1 April 2018 =NONE

MINISTER –

VEHICLE PURCHASED

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c) PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

DEPUTY MINISTER –

(aaa) 2016-17 financial year

VEHICLE PURCHASED = NONE

a) MAKE –

b) MODEL –

c) PRICE –

d) DATE PURCHASED –

(bbb) 2017-18 financial year

DEPUTY MINSTER – (CAPE TOWN PURPOSE)

VEHICLE PURCHASED

e) MAKE – BMW

f) MODEL –BMW 5 SERIES SEDAN

g) PRICE – R 833 488.41

h) DATE PURCHASED – 28/03/2018

(bb) since 1 April 2018

DEPUTY MINISTER –

VEHICLE PURCHASED

i) MAKE AUDI

j) MODEL – AUDI Q7.3 OTDI QUATTRO

k) PRICE – R 1 015 702.05

l) DATE PURCHASED –15/10/2018

COMPILER

MRS N THEBE

D: LOGISTICAL SERVICES

DATE

MR J VISSER

D: SECURITY AND ASSETS MANAGEMENT

DATE:

OFFICIALS INVOLVED

MS N MOLALEKOA

CD: ADMINISTRATION FINANCE

DATE:

MR PRM KHUNOU

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: FINANCE & ADMINISTRATION

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

MR ME SURTY, MP

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

COMMENT:

QUESTION 693 APPROVED / NOT APPROVED / AMEND

MRS AM MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER

DATE:

 

09 April 2019 - NW815

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) primary and (b) high schools (i) are equipped with the necessary computer equipment and (ii) have teachers who are trained to teach computer skills and coding?

Reply:

(a) and (b) (i)

The Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) are responsible for providing schools with the necessary computer equipment. It is for this reason that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) does not keep updated information on the number of schools provided with the necessary computer equipment. Such updated information should be requested from the PEDs.

(ii) Besides training offered by the provinces, the DBE has trained 43774 teachers in computer skills. Furthermore, teachers will be trained on coding from June to September 2019.

 

09 April 2019 - NW231

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Ngwezi, Mr X to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the President’s announcement in his state of the nation address of major technological overhaul for the South African education system which included rolling out tablets to all schools, her department is ready for this move in terms of the (a) budget, (b) teacher training and (c) provision of security at schools?

Reply:

a) Readiness in terms of budget

The plan will be operationalised starting 2019 with a preparatory phase, followed by three roll out phases focusing on the provision of gadgets with pre-loaded content including, but not limited to, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) Workbooks. The three phases target firstly learners in multi-grade and rural farm schools secondly learners in quintile 1 to 3 schools, and lastly learners in quintile 4 and 5 schools. The source of funds for the rolling out of tablets to all schools will utilise money previously allocated to the following:

  1. Printing of Workbooks and textbooks since workbooks and textbooks are being digitised and will be pre-loaded into gadgets. Currently the workbooks are printed for a single use. Through converting the books to a downloadable, interactive electronic format, the longevity of the books would be increased as they could be used multiple times. In addition, loading workbooks onto electronic gadgets would have the added benefit of decreasing the dating and marking workload for teachers (as this could be done electronically) and minor edits could be made to the electronic versions without having to reprint and distribute, which would be much more cost effective than re-printing and distributing the books annually.
  2. Grant money (e.g Operation Phakisa, Maths Science and Technology (MST) School Funding and other grants) will also be used for this purpose.
  3. Money will also be drawn from the Provincial Education Equitable share funding to fund the plan.
  4. The Private Sector will also be approached to beef up any short fall.

b) Readiness in terms of teacher training.

The DBE is on a trajectory towards the Fourth Industrial Revolution (4IR) and recognises that it is crucial to onboard key stakeholders like teacher unions, and to provide effective change management, training and support, not only to teachers but also for subject advisors and curriculum developers. Since 2005 province wide programmes on Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) integration training for both teachers and subject advisors have been running. Training is classified into three levels: Basic Skills, Intermediate Skills and Advanced Skills. In some provinces such as Gauteng where there has been a rollout of SMART boards in the classroom, subject advisors and coordinators were trained on the use of interactive boards and tablets. In October 2016 the Directorate Curriculum Innovation and e-Learning had already developed three online platforms to train teachers on the use of technology to deliver the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) curriculum. The three platforms are:

1. The DBE MOODLE PLATFORM available at : https://dbemoodle.dedicated.co.za, the platform is a Learning Management System (LMS) (paperless) to deliver lessons with daily content and self marking learner classroom activities that are CAPS compliant. Hence saving time and hard work for teachers. The platform is for classroom utalisation with a teachers laptop and learner gadget to run an LMS.

2. DBE Cloud available at: http://www.dbecloud.org.za/lms/dbe/, the platform aggregate content and make it available online for parents, learners, teachers, subject advisors, subject coordinators and subject specialists.

3. Thutong Portal available at: http://www.thutong.doe.gov.za/, the platform is an online learning space managed by subject specialists at the DBE.

Training of teachers, subject advisers, subject coordinators and subject specialists at the DBE is ongoing, utilising the three platforms to integrate ICTs into teaching and learning. These trainings are coordinated and guided by the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning which was approved by Council of Education ministers (CEM) in September 2017.

c) Readiness in terms of provision of security at school.

There is readiness in terms of security at school, conceptualised based on the categories as indicated below:

Computer Labs

Schools have to comply to very stringent security measures before a computer lab can be installed in that school. This will include among others the visibility of the lab to the surrounding community so that the community can report on matters that may put the security of the lab at risk. This go hand in hand with allowing communities to co-own these labs with schools so that communities can also benefit in using these labs. The specifications also include that the labs must be in the first floor to avoid roof entry, they must have safe iron doors and there should be only small horizontal windows with strong burglar bars to prevent entry. Other security measures include a dedicated alarm system, strict management protocols by schools regarding access to the lab and keys control.

Classroom tablets / cellphones

Suppliers of Classroom tablets/cellphones are required to adhere to strict supply specifications in terms of security of these gadgets. These include that these gadgets must be a trolley that is secured and can be locked while in the classroom. The trolley should have wheels to ensure that after use the gadgets can be transported from the classroom for safe keeping in the school safe made of brick and with an iron door. There should be a strict protocol approved by district and provinces from the school regarding the issuing and collection of these gadgets after lessons.

Take home gadgets

In other provinces such as Gauteng learners and teachers are allowed to take these gadgets home to keep them secured. In the next gadget delivery to teachers and learners, the DBE plans to design gadgets that are community unfriendly and only friendly for educational use only, without compromising the quality of the gadget.

09 April 2019 - NW655

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Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with regard to the Gauteng Education Department's regulations that learners may apply for admission at any school in the province, irrespective of the feeder area in which the learner resides, she could indicate whether the specified regulations are compatible with the (a) South African Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (b) court rulings that a single-medium school that is full may not be forced to take in learners; if not, what steps will she take to stop the implementation of the regulations; if so, what are the full relevant details; (2) given the change regarding the language demographics of single-medium schools to English when learners who speak different languages are taken in, what will she do to protect single-medium schools in Gauteng and also nationwide, especially, given the fact that not all learners are fluent in English or have full command of the language at all?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Gauteng Education Department and will be provided as soon as it is received.

09 April 2019 - NW742

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools were (i) built and (ii) closed down in the (aa) 2017-18 financial year and (bb) since 1 April 2018 and (b) is the (i) name, (ii) location and (iii) size of each school?

Reply:

a) (i)& (ii)

Table below indicates the number of schools opened and closed since 2017 -18 financial year.

PROVINCE

Closed schools

New Schools

 

Officially
Closed

Provisionally
Closed

Total

 

EC

456

 

456

7

FS

51

 

51

13

GT

1

 

1

 

KZN

22

 

22

7

LP

2

20

22

7

MP

 

 

 

 

NC

0

 

0

0

NW

 

 

 

 

WC

5

 

5

11

NATIONAL

537

20

557

45

Source: EMIS Master list

(b) (i) ,(ii) & ( iii)

Refer to link: https://www.education.gov.za/QuestionNo742Schoolsbuiltandcloseddown.aspx

 

09 April 2019 - NW814

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of teachers are due to reach retirement age in the next 10 years?

Reply:

The number of teachers due to reach retirement age or age 60 in the next 10 years starting in 2019 per year by province.

YEAR

PROVINCE

TOTAL

 

EC

FS

GP

KZN

LP

MP

NW

NC

WC

 

2019

1 281

466

1 495

1 694

1 548

806

656

206

794

8 946

2020

1 362

559

1 530

1 984

1 788

888

727

236

881

9 955

2021

1 346

598

1 617

2 073

1 880

931

713

265

802

10 225

2022

1 643

721

1 882

2 537

2 215

1 179

882

249

874

12 182

2023

1 887

803

2 082

2 699

2 563

1 333

961

255

1 006

13 589

2024

2 193

825

2 337

3 070

2 753

1 554

999

307

1 157

15 195

2025

2 430

857

2 554

3 190

2 844

1 563

1 101

300

1342

16 181

2026

2 696

870

2 659

3 270

2 946

1 705

1 237

392

1 371

17 146

2027

2 828

907

2 806

3 302

3 093

1 767

1 242

385

1 326

17 656

2028

3 272

902

2 821

3 747

3 266

1 821

1 365

397

1 292

18 883

TOTAL

20 938

7 508

21 783

27 566

24 896

13 547

9 883

2 992

10 845

139 958

Source: PERSAL, February 2019

09 April 2019 - NW576

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What are the relevant details of the general criteria that (a) an educator needs to fulfil in order to become a marker for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examinations and (b) educators marking Business Studies had to fulfil for the 2018 NSC examinations; (2) whether she will furnish Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi with a list of each person marking the 2018 NSC Business Studies examinations, in each case indicating the person’s (a) qualifications and (b) experience relating to Business Studies?

Reply:

1. (a) In terms of Personnel Administrative Measures, Government Gazette No. 39684, dated 12 February 2016, an educator that is appointed as a marker must have at least a recognised three year post matric qualification which must include the subject concerned at second or third year level. In addition the marker must have appropriate teaching experience, including teaching experience at the appropriate level, in the subject concerned, language competency, and preference must be given to serving educators who are presently teaching the subject concerned.

(b) In terms of the appointment of markers for 2018, including Business Studies, the marker must have taught the subject or a related subject at the Grade 12 level for a minimum of two years in the last five years.

2. In terms of the Regulations Pertaining to the conduct, administration and management of National Senior Certificate Examination, the Head of an Assessment Body (i.e. the Provincial Education Department) is responsible for the appointment of markers. These records are therefore kept at the nine provincial education departments and not at the Department of Basic Education. Therefore access to the list of markers appointed to mark the 2018 NSC Business Studies examination should be obtained directly from the Heads of Department in each of the nine provinces.

09 April 2019 - NW758

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What screening processes do teachers go through in order to determine whether they are sexual offenders or not before they are appointed?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education is currently embarking on a process to strengthen measures related to the appointment of educators in general and in particular school-based educators. This includes, among other measures, a protocol clarifying the roles and responsibilities of various stakeholders with regards to vetting of educators and all other staff employed in positions where they will have contact with learners. The key stakeholders include the Departments of Social Development, Justice and Constitutional Development; the South African Council of Educators and the School Governing Body Associations.

09 April 2019 - NW744

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of principals who retired (a) in each province and (b) in each of the past two financial years?

Reply:

(a) and (b)

PROVINCE (a)

2016/17 (b)

2017/18 (b)

EASTERN CAPE

171

230

FREE STATE

21

44

GAUTENG

65

98

KWAZULU-NATAL

172

234

LIMPOPO

115

161

MPUMALANGA

30

86

NORTH WEST

41

52

NORTHERN CAPE

9

20

WESTERN CAPE

31

84

Grand Total

655

1 009

Source: PERSAL

01 April 2019 - NW509

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of (i) buildings, (ii) properties and (iii) facilities does her department currently (aa) own and (bb) rent, (b) what is the value and purpose of each (i) owned and (ii) rented property and (c)(i) for how long has each property been rented, (ii) from whom is each property rented and (iii) what is the monthly rental fee for each property?

Reply:

(a) (i) One building

(ii) None

(iii) None

(aa) None

(bb) Public Private Partnership Agreement

(b) (i) Not applicable

(ii) The value of the building is unknown and the purpose is for office accommodation for the Department of Basic Education

(c) (i) The Public Partnership Agreement is for a contract period of 25 years

(ii) The Public Private Partnership is for the Department of Basic Education

(iii) Monthly Unitary fee is R13 731 406.74 excluding VAT

01 April 2019 - NW340

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha she has been informed of the (a) general state of disrepair at the school, (b) alleged gross maladministration by the principal, (c) theft of wheelchairs and other material needed by the disabled learners, (d) alleged abuse of staff and (e) the inhumane conditions in which disabled learners are kept; if not, what steps will she take to investigate and take action; if so, what has her department done in this regard?

Reply:

A)  The National Department of Basic Education has not been informed of the general state of disrepair at the Ikhwezi Lokusa Special School in Mthatha. The matter has since been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education for investigation and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the province.

01 April 2019 - NW293

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What are the (i) regulations upon which officials at South African embassies rely to set the approval of curriculums and educational plans as a visa requirement for home-schooled children and (ii) contact details of the section within her department or provincial education departments that is dedicated to deal with the approval of curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors and (b) how long does the section take to evaluate curriculums and educational plans for children of foreign visitors; (2) whether the specified section has a list of approved curriculums and educational plans; if not, what criteria do they use to evaluate curriculums and educational plans; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether, in instances where her department does not approve the curriculums and educational plans of the children of foreign visitors who have been home-schooled and who intend to visit South Africa, there are any mechanisms available to appeal against such a decision; (4) are foreigners who apply for a visa informed up front that their visa applications might be unsuccessful if their children are home-schooled and their curriculums and educational plans are not approved by her department?

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) Parents who home educate and are willing to register their children with the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) in the Republic of South Africa are responsible and accountable for the education of their children. These parents, who are not citizens of this country, have already complied with the curriculum requirements of their country of origin.

(ii)The departments of education in South Africa does not deal with approval of curricula for citizens from other countries (who are not seeking citizenship in South Africa). However, they are at liberty to contact officials responsible for the implementation of the Policy on Home Education in South Africa, should they wish to do so. The contact details of the officials in South Africa are obtainable from www.education.gov.za, and are as follows:

Province

Coordinator

Tel

Email

Address

National

Ms EM Chaane

Ms LZ Brown

012 357 4105

0122 357 4106

Chaane.m@dbe.gov.za

brown.l@dbe.gov.za

222 Struben Street

PRETORIA

0001

Eastern Cape

Ms N Ndzunga

040 608 4186/ 4342

Nomfundo.ndzunga@ecdoe.gov.za

 

Steve Thswete Complex, Zone 6, Zwelitsha

Private Bag X0032 Bisho 5605

Free State

Mr MJ Ntsala

051 447 0038/ 0037

MJ.Ntsala@fseducation.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X 20565

BLOEMFONTEIN

9300

Gauteng

Ms C Motshwane

011 355 0631

carol.motshwane@gauteng.gov.za

 

Hollard Building (7th Floor)

P. O. Box 7710

Johannesburg

2000

KwaZulu-Natal

Ms D Motloli

033 348 6111/115

dineo.motloli@kzndoe.gov.za

188 Pieter Maritz Street

PIETERMARITZBURG

3200

Limpopo

Ms M Baloyi

015 290 9382

baloyiME@limpopo.edu.gov.za

 

P/ Bag X9489

POLOKWANE

0700

Mpumalanga

Dr M Pieterse

013 766 5875

m.pieterse@education.mpu.gov.za

P/Bag X 111341

NELSPRUIT

1200

Northern Cape

Mr K Mhlom

053 839 6386

Uzondwa@gmail.com

 

P/ Bag X 5029

KIMBERLEY

8300

North West

Ms P Pule

018 389 8204

Ppule@nwpg.gov.za

P/Bag X 2044

MMABATHO

2735

Western Cape

Mr D Louw

021 467 2653

Deon.louw@westerncape.gov.za

P/ Bag X 9114

CAPE TOWN

8000

(b) In terms of the Policy on Home Education, the Head of a Provincial Education Department must take all reasonable steps to respond within 30 days after receipt of the application on the prescribed form.

(2) There is no approved list of curricula and educational plans except for the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 in the department. Parents are free to choose any curriculum that will be of a standard not inferior to that of basic education provided in public schools in South Africa.

(3)A parent may appeal to the MEC within 14 days of receiving a notice. The MEC should take all reasonable steps to respond to the appeal within 30 days of receiving the appeal.

(4) The Department of Basic Education does not have a mechanism for considering curricula and educational plans of foreigners who apply for a visa in South Africa.

 

01 April 2019 - NW331

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teachers have joined the Public Service since 1 January 1996 and (b) is the highest qualification of each specified teacher?

Reply:

PROVINCE

UNQUALIFIED

(Matric)

UNDER-QUALIFIED (Matric plus 1-2)

QUALIFIED (Matric plus 3 and more years)

Grand Total

 

REQV10

REQV11

REQV12

REQV13

REQV14

REQV15

REQV16

REQV17

 

EC

36

10

147

5 071

24 451

2 736

311

24

32 786

FS

33

17

21

1 962

10 061

1 376

228

27

13 725

GP

11

1

64

4 618

35 848

8 031

1 465

126

50 164

KZN

728

7

23

6 231

41 493

11 398

2 714

141

62 735

LP

1

 

7

3 169

20 955

1 199

275

11

25 617

MP

4

 

6

2 472

14 905

2 742

593

27

20 749

NW

   

118

2 779

11 489

1 492

306

14

16 198

NC

96

4

6

1 074

4 451

627

96

8

6 362

WC

86

11

120

1 890

14 458

2 633

487

59

19 744

Grand Total

995

50

512

29 266

178 111

32 234

6 475

437

248 080

Source: PERSAL, January 2019

01 April 2019 - NW115

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deaf and/or (ii) hearing-impaired learners in each province and (b) what number of the specified learners have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources; (2) how are the deaf learners in Mpumalanga accommodated in view of the fact that no schools for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners have been built; (3) by what date does her department envisage building a school for deaf and/or hearing-impaired learners, as this issue has been a discussion point for the past two years?

Reply:

Response: (1)(a) (i) (ii)

Table 1: Number of (i) deaf and hard of hearing learners, by province, in 2018

Province

Deaf (i)

Hard of Hearing (ii)

Grand Total

Eastern Cape

722

1 819

2 541

Free State

364

285

649

Gauteng

1 305

510

1 815

KwaZulu Natal

1 359

1 090

2 449

Limpopo

494

189

683

Mpumalanga

191

138

329

North West

290

88

378

Northern Cape

98

46

144

Western Cape

935

219

1 154

Grand Total

5 758

4 384

10 142

Source: 2018 LURITS II

(1)(b) The data on the number of deaf and/or hard-of-hearing learners who may have been denied access to education due to the lack of resources is not available at the Department of Basic Education and should be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

(2) Deaf learners in Mpumalanga are accommodated in the following five (5) schools:

  • Marietjie Special School;
  • Wolvenkop Special School;
  • KaMagugu Special School;
  • Silondokuhle Special School; and
  • Bukhosibetfu Full Service School.

(3) The information about the date for the envisaged building of a school for Deaf and/or hard-of –hearing learners should be obtained from a province as schools are established by the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) for education in the province.

27 March 2019 - NW578

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has found that educators who are not members of teachers’ unions are disqualified from consideration to become markers of National Senior Certificate examinations; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All educators that have the appropriate qualification and the relevant grade 12 teaching experience are eligible to apply to mark. Markers are then selected in terms of the criteria listed in the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM).

Membership to a Teacher Union is not a criterion for appointment as a marker and no educator has ever been disqualified from the selection process due non-membership to a Teacher Union.

27 March 2019 - NW579

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners between the ages of 9 and 14 years old fell pregnant in the past five academic years and (b) the specified learners returned to continue schooling after giving birth?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Please note that the question has been referred to Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). The information will be provided as soon as received from PEDs.

27 March 2019 - NW292

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of tender briefings were held in 2018 by (i) her department and (ii) each of the entities reporting to her and (b) what number of the specified briefings were compulsory?

Reply:

DEPARTMENT OF BASIC EDUCATION

a) (i) One tender briefing was held in 2018 by (i) the Department of Basic Education and it was compulsory.

b) One compulsory briefing session.

UMALUSI

a) (ii) Umalusi conducted four (4) tender briefings in the period 1 April 2018 to date.

b) All four (4) tender briefings were compulsory.

SACE

a) (ii) The South African Council for Educators never held any tender briefing during 2018.

b) No briefing was held and non were compulsory.

27 March 2019 - NW577

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether the 2018 National Senior Certificate Business Studies examination paper was remarked nationally or only in specific provinces; (2) whether (a) her department and/or (b) provincial departments of education requested the remarking of the Business Studies examination; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (3) whether individual requests for remarking were made; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The 2018 NSC Business Studies, as with all other subjects, are remarked by all nine (9) Provincial Education Departments and not remarked nationally or in specific provinces. Only in the case of the selected subjects that were marked centrally by the DBE, was the remark also done centrally by the DBE.

2. The remark process is an appeal process that can be utilised by any candidate who wants to confirm his/her marks in the written examination. As such, it is the candidates and not the DBE or the Provincial Education Departments that request the remarking. Candidates are also allowed to request a re-check of their scripts and they could further request to view their scripts after the remark request has been processed.

3. Individual requests for remarking of Business Studies were made. There were a total of 6685 individual requests for the remark of Business Studies that were made.

 

12 March 2019 - NW252

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Xalisa, Mr Z R to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that closed in each province in the 2018 academic year?

Reply:

Please note that the question has been referred to Provincial Education Departments Heads. The information will be provided as soon as received from Provincial Education Departments.

12 March 2019 - NW257

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Rawula, Mr T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of learners currently have access to a work book or tablet at each school in each province?

Reply:

a) Response on workbooks

For the 2019 academic year, Grade R, Grade 1-3 Life Skills, Grades 1-6 Home Language, Grades 1-6 English First Additional Language and Grades 1-9 Mathematics Volume 1 and Volume 2 workbooks were distributed as follows:

Province

Grade R

Grades 1 to 9

 

No of Schools

No of Learners

Books delivered

No of Schools

No of Learners

Books delivered

Eastern Cape

4338

141982

567930

5156

1499320

80993140

Free State

661

47440

189760

1098

652155

3409150

Gauteng

1431

160432

641730

2154

1963455

9846540

KwaZulu-Natal

4107

194360

777440

5945

2239945

11610450

Limpopo

2272

143403

573620

3836

1344525

7418550

Mpumalanga

1133

92115

368460

1667

945860

5072320

Northern Cape

389

23250

93000

548

260540

1391150

North west

980

56280

225120

1457

648655

3569860

Western Cape

1005

79800

319200

1493

975830

4920130

Totals

16312

939064

3756260

23346

10530285

55331290

b) The question on the number of tablets in each school should be directed to provincial legislatures.

12 March 2019 - NW250

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Ntlangwini, Ms EN to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of schools in each province (a) are and (b) are not English-medium schools?

Reply:

(a) (b)

Table 1 below indicates the number of schools that (a) are using and (b) are not using English as medium of instruction. It shows that about 23 474 schools are English medium schools and 1 391 are using other languages as medium of instruction. Please note that these schools are not only single medium schools, they can be parallel medium, meaning they use two or more languages as medium of instruction.

Table 1: Number of English and none English medium schools, by province, in 2018

Province

  1. English
  1. Not English

Total

Eastern Cape

4 922

291

5 213

Free State

1 121

69

1 190

Gauteng

2 769

138

2 907

KwaZulu-Natal

5 938

42

5 980

Limpopo

3 927

50

3 977

Mpumalanga

1 694

49

1 743

Northern Cape

389

183

572

North West

1 447

63

1 510

Western Cape

1 267

506

1 773

Total

23 474

1 391

24 865

Source: 2018 LURITS

12 March 2019 - NW249

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of new teachers have been appointed in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified new teacher (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of new teachers have been appointed in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified new teacher (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The data has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

12 March 2019 - NW253

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Sonti, Ms NP to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that opened in each province in the 2018 academic year; (2) what is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools that will be opened in each province in the 2019 academic year? NW264E

Reply:

Please note that the questions have been referred to Provincial Education Departments Heads. The information will be provided as soon as received from Provincial Education Departments.

12 March 2019 - NW247

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teachers were employed in the public education system in each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province as at 1 February 2019 and (b) is the breakdown in terms of (i) gender and (ii) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of teachers were employed in the public education system in each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province as at 1 February 2019 and (b) is the breakdown in terms of (i) gender and (ii) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The information has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

 

12 March 2019 - NW248

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of teaching vacancies have opened up in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified vacancy (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

Reply:

What (a) number of teaching vacancies have opened up in the public education sector since 1 January 2019 and (b) are the relevant details of each specified vacancy (i) in each (aa) province, (bb) primary school and (cc) high school and (ii) with regard to (aa) gender and (bb) pay scale?

The data required to respond to the question is currently not available. The information has been requested from Treasury: PERSAL. It will be submitted as soon as Treasury makes these data available.

22 February 2019 - NW111

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 3619 on 4 December 2018, she will furnish Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi with a copy of the report of her department’s investigation into an alleged compromise of the Economics question papers for the 2018 National Senior Certificate examinations; (2) whether any further investigations into the matter have been launched since her reply to question 3619 on 4 December 2018; if so, (a) on what date was the further investigation (i) launched and (ii) completed, (b) what are the (i) names and (ii) professional designations of each investigating officer and (c) what are the details of the outcome of the further investigation? NW116E

Reply:

1.  The investigation has been concluded and a detailed report on the findings of the investigation is attached as (Annexure A)

2. The reply to the Parliamentary question 3619, submitted on 4 December 2018 was a preliminary report which focussed on the support programme broadcast on Ukhozi FM.

(a) The further investigation (i) commenced on 11 December 2018 and was (ii) completed on 27 December 2018.

(b) The investigation was headed by the Director responsible for Public Examinations at the Department of Basic Education, and she was supported by a team of subject specialists, the DBE Data Manager, the DBE Irregularities Manager and the DBE Question Paper Manager. The details of the team are included as (Annexure B).

3. The outcome of the further investigation is as follows:

  • The credibility of the Economics Paper 1 and Paper 2, was not compromised given that learners were not given direct questions that appeared in the examination and were not asked to focus on particular questions. Hence, there was no unfair advantage to any group of candidates
  • Given the focus of the teaching and testing of Economics, which in the main provides learners with a pool of questions, it is possible for experienced teachers to predict some of the questions that may appear in the question paper, particularly the essays.
  • An analysis of learner performances does not show any anomalous trends. There is no significant improvement compared to 2017 and in some cases performance is actually lower.
  • It would appear that Economics has taken on an approach of providing learners with a pool of questions and this starts with the Examination Guideline that is based on a series of questions. In the same vein, all support programmes are dominated by questions. It would also appear that based on a historical analysis of the previous question papers, teachers and subject advisors are able to predict to some degree which questions will appear in the paper. Examination predictability is a phenomenon of most examinations and the DBE is actively working towards minimising examination predictability.

22 February 2019 - NW114

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)By what date will her department make use of deaf poets and storytellers to record their stories for learners with hearing impairments to study; (2) what (a) number of educators in each province are qualified to teach SA Sign Language (SASL) and (b) steps will her department take to ensure that the specified educators are adequately trained to teach SASL; (3) what number of persons were used by her department in the development of the SASL curriculum and policies; (4) by what date does her department envisage having its own curriculum for SASL rather than copying the English curriculum?

Reply:

1. There is currently no fixed date for this exercise. However, this matter is on the agenda of the department.

2. (a) The database of teachers and their qualifications is kept and maintained by provinces. Such data could be sourced from Provincial Legislatures.

3. The Curriculum Management Team (CMT) that oversaw the development of SASL curriculum and policies consisted of 9 members. A writing team comprising five members was established and the team formed the core of the development process. SASL experts and phase specialists (e.g. SASL linguists from Universities and NGOs as well as SASL teachers) were co-opted during the development of specific areas of the curriculum.

4. The SASL Home Language curriculum was not copied from the English curriculum. The English Home Language curriculum is the Framework to which SASL and all other Home Languages are aligned, to ensure parity of esteem of all languages.

22 February 2019 - NW113

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of (a)(i) deaf and (ii) hearing impaired learners from each province enrolled for the 2018 National Senior Certificate (NSC), (b) the specified learners wrote the SA Sign Language (SASL) examination and (c) the specified learners obtained (i) an NSC pass and (ii) a Bachelor pass in SASL; (2) what number of learners from schools for the deaf and hearing impaired in each province were exposed to bridging courses in Grades 9, 10 and 11 to prepare for the unique grammar and structure of the SASL examination; (3) (a) what number of appointed markers had the pre-requisite qualifications to mark the final SASL examination papers in each province, (b) what are the details of the pre-requisite qualifications and (c) what number of years’ experience is required; (4) on what date will all schools in each province providing SASL as a home language be provided with sufficient textbooks; (5) what number of students who completed their NSC in SASL were approached by her department to assist educators with SASL?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) and (ii) The current examination system only has a record of Hearing Impaired Learners and does not distinguish between Deaf learners and Hearing Impaired Learners The total number of hearing impaired learners that enrolled for the National Senior Certificate (NSC) examination is 456.

(b) Of the 54 candidates that enrolled to write the 2018 NSC South African Sign Language Home Language (SASL HL) examination, 52 candidates wrote the examination.

(c) (i) 26 candidates achieved an NSC pass

(ii) 7 candidates achieved admission to Bachelor studies

Note that of the 52 candidates that wrote the SASL HL examination, only 28 candidates could be resulted in terms of the full qualification, given that the remaining 24 candidates did not write the full NSC subject package in 2018.

2. All the full time candidates who wrote SASL HL in the NSC 2018 examinations were exposed to the bridging Grade 9 and 10 programme. No bridging programme was developed for Grade 11.

The table below provides the school, province and number of learners who wrote the SASL examinations in 2018:

School

Province

Number of learners – Gr 12

Efata

EC

3

St Thomas

EC

10 (full time) + 6 (part time)

Bartimea

FS

4

Thiboloha

FS

2

Sizwile

GP

11

Fulton

KZN

3

Kwathintwa

KZN

8

St Martin

KZN

7

De-la-Bat

WC

1

Dominican (Wittebome)

WC

3

     

Total

10 schools

58

3. (a) (b) (c)

In terms of the policy relating to the appointment of markers, the marker must have at least a recognised three year post matric qualification which must include the subject concerned at second or third year level. In addition the marker must have extensive experience as an educator in the particular subject or a related area and at least two years teaching or other curriculum-related experience within the last 5 years at the appropriate level, and must be competent in the language of teaching and learning.

In terms of marker appointments for SASL HL, it was not expected that the DBE will be able to appoint markers that satisfy all of the above criteria given that this is the first year of implementation of this examination. All 15 markers have extensive experience as teachers of deaf learners and have a Teaching Qualification. Four (4) of the markers have a qualification in SASL – ranging from a short course qualification to an Honours Degree in SASL. Two Deaf Teaching Assistants were also appointed to assist the hearing markers with the translation of SASL. The Teaching Assistants were not involved directly in marking. The teaching assistants have a Matric qualification.

Given the limitations relating to the appointed markers, the marking of the 2018 NSC SASL HL examinations was centralised at the DBE to ensure stringent standardisation and quality assurance of the marking process.

(4) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the development of the South African Sign Language National Catalogue which is forwarded to provinces, districts and schools. The provinces and schools are responsible for procurement and delivery of these textbooks as required. The Catalogues referred to were developed in 2015 and 2017.

(5). The Department of Basic Education has not been approached by students as the function of teacher development resides with provinces.

22 February 2019 - NW112

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of newly (a) qualified teachers have (i) applied for, (ii) been granted and (iii) produced the SA Police Service (SAPS) Clearance Certificate to the SA Council of Educators (SACE) as part of the registration requirement and (b) appointed teachers in each province for the 2019 academic year are currently employed without the specified clearance certificate; (2) what (a) criteria has been set by SACE for SAPS officers to use when issuing the clearance certificate, (b) qualification is required by SAPS officers to conduct the interview and issue the certificate to an educator and (c) costs are involved for an educator applying for the certificate; (3) will it be required of teachers who are appointed to update this clearance certificate on a regular basis or is the certificate only required at the registration process; (4) on what date will the certificate be a requirement for incumbent teachers appointed by (a) the department and (b) school governing bodies? NW117E

Reply:

SACE RESPONSE

1(a)

(i) All in all, 2983 educators applied and updated their registration status from the 1st January 2019 when the requirement for the police clearance came into effect.

(ii) 2981 have been granted registration and 2 were not due to some criminal record.

(iii) 1854 produced the SAPS Clearance Certificate. 1127 were registered provisionally until the 30th June 2019, with proof of application for the SAPS Police Clearance. This move was necessitated by the slow turnaround time from the SAPS in issuing the clearance certificates and impacting negatively on the recruitment of newly qualified teachers into the schools.

1(b) SACE does not have information on the employment of newly qualified teachers.

(2) what (a) criteria has been set by SACE for SAPS officers to use when issuing the clearance certificate, (b) qualification is required by SAPS officers to conduct the interview and issue the certificate to an educator and (c) costs are involved for an educator applying for the certificate;

SACE RESPONSE

(a) As a third party, the SAPS’s Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management Centre (CR and CSMC) uses its own criteria to process and issue the clearance certificate.

(b) The police clearance certificate is issued purely on the basis of one’s criminal record from the SAPS’s Criminal Record and Crime Scene Management Centre (CR and CSMC).

(c) R114.00

(3) will it be required of teachers who are appointed to update this clearance certificate on a regular basis or is the certificate only required at the registration process;

SACE RESPONSE

In line with Council resolution, the SAPS clearance certificate is currently required for all the new registration applicants since the 01st January 2019.

(4) on what date will the certificate be a requirement for incumbent teachers appointed by (a) the department and (b) school governing bodies? NW117E

SACE RESPONSE

(4) There is no date set by Council for (a) and (b)

14 December 2018 - NW3743

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Wana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that a sign was put up for Mahabaneng Primary School at the abandoned Lebaka B Primary School site in Mohlabaneng in Limpopo?

Reply:

Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019. The original name was supposed to be Mahabaneng Primary School instead of Lebaka B but the name was not registered at EMIS.

14 December 2018 - NW3831

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4408E

Reply:

1. (a)The Department was never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) UMALUSI

1. Umalusi has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) SACE

1. SACE has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

14 December 2018 - NW3201

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Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of mega farm schools (a) have been built in each province in the past three financial years and (b) are envisaged to be completed in the 2018-19 financial year; (2) what number of non-viable schools (a) have been closed in the past three financial years in each province and (b) are envisaged to be closed in the 2018-19 financial year; (3) what number of teachers were trained on pedagogical content knowledge and facilitation skills in mathematics and science in each province in the (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17 financial years; (4) what amount that was made available to improve mathematics, science and technology teaching in each province in the (a) 2015-16, and (b) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Sector has not built any Mega Farm Schools for the past three financial years but has a number of Non-Viable farm schools in lieu of two Boarding Schools in Mpumalanga Province which are Steve Tshwete Boarding School in Nkangala and Thaba Tshweu Boarding school in Ehlanzeni district.

(b) There are no Mega farm Schools envisaged to be completed in the 2018/2019 financial year.

(2) 2018-19 financial year:

Province

No. of schools closed to date

2018/19 projections

 

(a) @

(b)

EC

725

2 182*

FS

33

90

GP

521

14

KZN

248

1 405^

LP

1 783

61

MP

1 063

34

NC

142

8*

NW

948

0

WC

1 466

0

Source (a) National EMIS (b) PEDs

The above mentioned data indicate the number of schools closed to date except for the FS.

* Schools currently subjected to rationalisation but not necessarily to be effected in 2018/19

^ Schools rationalisation plan ranging from 2018 to 2023

(3) The number of teachers who were trained on Mathematics and Science content and pedagogy through DBE-led programmes are:

DBE TRAINING WORKSHOPS:

2015/16 YEAR

PROVINCE

TRAINED MST HODS 2015/16

Grade 8 & 9

 

MATHS

N.SC

TECHN

TOTAL

Free State

294

255

236

785

Gauteng

53

51

51

155

North West

415

439

642

1 496

Eastern Cape

1 520

1 636

1 536

4 674

Northern Cape

116

75

81

272

Limpopo

749

313

595

1 657

Mpumalanga

552

465

473

1 490

TOTAL

3 862

3 331

3 508

10 529

2016/17: NSC SUPPORT ON MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

PROVINCE

MATHS

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

489

288

777

Free State

136

129

265

KwaZulu-Natal

520

417

937

Limpopo

535

606

1 141

Mpumalanga

234

199

433

Northern Cape

56

72

128

North West

232

196

428

TOTAL

2 202

1 907

4 109

(4)

  1. 2015-16 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2015/16 was R 347 185 million. R 104 156 million (30% of the total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

  1. 2016-17 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2016/17 was R 362 444 million. R 108 734 million (30% of total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the Implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2015/16

Province

Budget Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total

100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

45 059

9 012

6 759

6 759

4 506

6 759

6 759

4 506

45 059

FS

32 145

6 429

4 822

4 822

3 215

4 822

4 822

3 215

32 145

GP

47 842

9 568

7 176

7 176

4 784

7 176

7 176

4 784

47 842

KZN

59 998

12 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

59 998

LP

40 979

8 196

6 147

6 147

4 098

6 147

6 147

4 098

40 979

MP

39 136

7 827

5 870

5 870

3 914

5 870

5 870

3 914

39 136

NC

22 113

4 423

3 317

3 317

2 211

3 317

3 317

2 211

22 113

NW

33 378

6 676

5 007

5 007

3 338

5 007

5 007

3 338

33 378

WC

26 535

5 307

3 980

3 980

2 654

3 980

3 980

2 654

26 535

Total

347 185

69 437

52 078

52 078

34 719

52 078

52 078

34 719

347 185

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2015-16 FINANCIAL YEAR AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

Province

2015-16

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 16

Actual Expenditure against Allocation

Budget Available as at 31 March 2016

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

45 059

45 059

26 350

10 236

72,02%

FS

32 145

33 466

21 524

10 165

67,92%

GP

47 842

47 842

47 842

- 678

101,44%

KZN

59 998

59 998

59 259

739

98,77%

LP

40 979

40 979

35 673

- 6 649

122,91%

MP

39 136

39 136

42 408

- 10 923

134,69%

NC

22 113

22 113

23 466

- 1 783

108,22%

NW

33 378

33 378

32 225

553

98,31%

WC

26 535

26 535

27 668

- 1 133

104,27%

TOTAL

347 185

347 185

316 415

527

99, 83%

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

Province

Budget

Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total 100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

46 898

9 380

7 035

7 035

4 690

7 035

7 035

4 690

46 898

FS

33 466

6 693

5 020

5 020

3 347

5 020

5 020

3 347

33 466

GP

49 810

9 962

7 472

7 472

4 981

7 472

7 472

4 981

49 810

KZN

62 453

12 491

9 368

9 368

6 245

9 368

9 368

6 245

62 453

LP

42 553

8 511

6 383

6 383

4 255

6 383

6 383

4 255

42 553

MP

41 639

8 328

6 246

6 246

4 164

6 246

6 246

4 164

41 639

NC

23 030

4 606

3 455

3 455

2 303

3 455

3 455

2 303

23 030

NW

34 754

6 951

5 213

5 213

3 475

5 213

5 213

3 475

34 754

WC

27 841

5 568

4 176

4 176

2 784

4 176

4 176

2 784

27 841

Total

362 444

72 489

54 367

54 367

36 244

54 367

54 367

36 244

362 444

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2017

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2016/17 FINANCIAL YEAR

Province

2016-17

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 17

Actual Expenditure

Against Allocation

Budget Available as at

31 March 2017

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

46 898

46 898

58 241

-11 343

124%

FS

33 466

33 466

39 167

-5 701

117%

GP

49 810

49 810

49 810

0

100%

KZN

62 453

62 453

63 402

-949

102%

LP

42 553

42 553

34544

8 009

81%

MP

41 639

41 639

41 376

263

99%

NC

23 030

23 030

23 214

-184

101%

NW

34 754

34 754

36 176

-1 422

104%

WC

27 841

27 841

27 841

0

100%

TOTAL

362 444

362 444

373 771

-11 327

103%

14 December 2018 - NW3902

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, her department and the entities reporting to her implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council resolution that all persons employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to level 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 11 to level 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education has implemented the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council resolution for the upgrading of Assistant Directors from salary level 9 to salary level 10 and the upgrading of Deputy Directors from salary level 11 to salary level 12. The implementation was effected in August 2014 and backdated to 1 August 2012.

14 December 2018 - NW3745

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to Limpopo Department of Education Contract No. EDDP 182/142, Lebaka B Primary School in Mohlabaneng, was the school built within the contract period of 3 November 2010 to 3 October 2011; if not, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what was the total monetary cost of the building project, (b) who was the contractor and (c) was the contractor paid in full; (3) (a) what are the full details of the (i) total cost of the furniture and (ii) furnishings delivered and dates of delivery of all furnishings, (b) why has this school been abandoned, (c) on what date was a security company appointed, (d) what is the cost of the security contract and (e) what is the name of the security company; (4) has any litigation process been instituted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The school was not completed within the envisioned construction period of 11 months. The contract period started on 3 November 2010 as scheduled, but unfortunately the contractor fell behind schedule. The delays led to the situation whereby the contractor subsequently abandoned site. The project was re-activated in 2016 and Practical Completion was achieved on 11 September 2017.

2. The initial contract amount was R 15 956 400.00. During the period when the contractor abandoned site the school was vandalised. Accordingly, when the project was re-activated, re-measurements were done to determine the cost to complete the project and a Variation Order was approved on 7 November 2016 increasing the contract amount to R 17 721 946.21. MPPJ Property Development was the Contractor. The contractor has not yet been paid in full as Final Completion has not yet been achieved.

3. (a) Total cost of Furniture is R930 491.000 and the furniture was delivered in 2012 and in 2018.

(b) Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019.

(c) The security company was appointed for Lebaka B School on 01 June 2018.

(d) The security service provider was initially appointed by the Limpopo Department of Education to do security services at Mamaila Circuit Office. A variation order was prepared and approved for the inclusion of Lebaka B School for an amount of R33 524.30 per month.

(e) Mathara Investment CC.

4. Yes, there is a litigation claim for the alleged exhumation of graves on the school site during the construction process. The matter is currently being handled by the state attorney.

14 December 2018 - NW3672

Profile picture: Alberts, Mr ADW

Alberts, Mr ADW to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) What number of schools in Gauteng in each year since 1 January 2014, (a) (i) were built and (ii) should have been built and (b) what are the relevant details for the specified results; (2) whether, if the results are negative, existing single-medium schools will be forced to include learners speaking other languages so that such schools will eventually become dual medium schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. (a)(i) The table below indicates the number of planned schools and schools built since the 2014/15 financial year.

Financial Year

Target

Schools Built

School Name

2014/15

11

13

1. Munsieville Primary School

2. Iketleng Primary (Hammanskraal) School

3. Nellmapius Primary School

4. Phomolong Primary School

5. Oos Rand Secondary School

6. Buhle Park Primary School

7. Fochville Secondary School

8. Magaliesburg Secondary School

9. Freedom Park Secondary School

10. Naturena Primary No. 2 School

11. Slovoville Primary School

12. Imphendulo Primary School

13. Rosslyn Primary School

2015/16

13

16

1. Chief A Luthuli Primary School No.2 

2. Christiaanville (Montana Poort Primary School)

3. Doornkop (Obed Mosiane Primary School)

4. Etwatwa Primary School

5. Evans Park Primary School

6. Glen Vista Primary School

7. Kaalfontein Secondary School

8. Khutsong South Primary School

9. Mahareng Secondary School

10. Nellmapius Ext.6 Primary School

11. Palmridge Secondary School

12. Protea Glen Primary School

13. Ratanda Bertha Gxowa Primary School

14. Soshanguve East Secondary School 

15. Soshanguve Primary School

16. Tswelapele (Andrew Mapheto Primary School)

2016/17

13

08

1. Bophelong New Secondary School

2. Ga-Rankuwa Primary School

3. Mokone Marupeng Primary School

4. Moses Kotane Primary School

5. Nellmapius Secondary School

6. Nomzamo Madikizela Mandela Primary School

7. Sinenhlanhla Primary School

8. Wierdapark Primary School

2017/18

05

06

1. Olievenhoutbosch Sec No.2/Seshegong Sec School

2. Everest Primary School

3. Menzi Primary school

4. Julius Sebolai Primary School

5. Marotola Primary School

6. Nokuthula Special School (LSEN school)

(ii) Please see (i) above.

(b) The Department has a backlog in relation to the new and replacement schools, that is perpetuated by the constant influx of learners into the province. The Department has not achieved all its targets related to building schools, as indicated in (a) above, due to a number of reasons that have had an adverse impact on the delivery of schools. These include but not limited to:

• Budgetary Constraints;

• Under perfomance by contractors;

• Community disruptions; and

• Inclement weather.

2. The Department will not be forcing but engaging and encouraging the existing single-medium schools that have received a sufficiently large number of learner applications for admission, to offer additional languages and thereby become dual-medium schools. It must be noted that the process is guided by, amongst others, the number of applications to a school.

12 December 2018 - NW3226

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr MS

Shackleton, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The DBE does not and has not borrowed money from China.

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(i) ENTITIES:

(a) Umalusi has not borrowed from the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years, including the year starting on 1 April 2018.

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(a) SACE has never borrowed any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China.

(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) N/A

12 December 2018 - NW3369

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1393 on 21 June 2018, what is the number of pupils in each (a) primary school and (b) high school in each province?

Reply:

For number of pupils in each (a) primary school and (b) high school in each province refer to the link https://www.education.gov.za/NA3369.aspx

12 December 2018 - NW2858

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms SH

Boshoff, Ms SH to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of the 9 894 schools have been trained on the National School Safety Framework since her reply to question 890 on 3 May 2018?

Reply:

Since the reply to question 890 on 3 May, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has supported provinces to train 139 additional schools on the National School Safety Framework.

03 December 2018 - NW3198

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of public comments did her department receive relating to the draft Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, (b) is the breakdown of (i) objections and (ii) support in respect of the specified draft Bill and (c) is the current progress of reviewing the public comments thereon?

Reply:

a) The Department received more than 6 000 reactions to the call for comments. The vast majority were emails, but there were also a number of faxed and couriered documents. Many of the reactions do not contain substantive comments, but are merely requests for extension of the deadline or for information of some kind, and indications of opposition to the Bill. There were unfortunately also quite a number of repetitions – emails sent twice (and even up to five times), whether by accident or on purpose, and whether identical or with changes. The Department also received many petitions signed by interested parties. To date, 122 petitions containing 188 648 names and/or signatures have been registered. Owing to the practical difficulties alluded to above, the Department will be able to give details of how many comments were received only after all the comments have been evaluated.

b) The Minister appointed a task team consisting of officials from the Department and from three of the provincial education departments to evaluate the comments. The task team still needs to consider approximately 1 800 comments and can therefore not at this stage give an accurate breakdown of how many commentators are against or in support of the Bill. However, the majority of the commentators are opposed to the provisions in the Bill that, as they put it, restrict the powers of school governing bodies (SGBs). It should be mentioned that there were a few comments in favour of the restriction of the powers of SGBs. These commentators feel that SGBs do not have the necessary knowledge, or are corrupt, or use their powers to keep certain groups of children out of their schools. There has also been strong opposition to the provisions relating to home education. Centralised procurement, the declaration of educators' personal finances and those of their spouses, the provisions relating to alcoholic liquor, and the provisions relating to leases and loans are a few of the other matters that have drawn criticism.

c) To date, the task team has had 11 meetings, stretching over 23 days, at which approximately 3 000 reactions have been considered. These include the comments of 32* of the main organisations directly involved in education. This does not represent a complete list of education stakeholder organisations because, as the sorting of the reactions continues, the comments of more organisations are coming to light. Task team members have also spent countless hours outside of meetings, working on the Bill. During the course of the work described above, changes have been made to the Bill in line with decisions that the task team took at its meetings. Currently, the fourth draft of the Bill is the version on which the task team is working.

*

  1. Centre for Child Law
  2. Equal Education & EE Law Centre
  3. Section27
  4. Legal Resources Centre
  5. AfriForum
  6. FEDSAS
  7. Governors’ Alliance
  8. NAISA
  9. Solidarity
  10. Solidarity Helping Hand’s Schools Support Centre
  11. KZNED
  12. SADTU
  13. SAOU
  14. WCED
  15. Centre for Constitutional Rights
  16. FOR SA
  17. The Governing Body Foundation
  18. ISASA
  19. FEDUSA
  20. Progressive Principals’ Association
  21. Grahamstown Residents Association
  22. Concerned Teachers’ Group
  23. ADvTECH Group
  24. OGOD
  25. WCED
  26. GED
  27. Corruption Watch
  28. IEB
  29. DeafSA
  30. PACSEN
  31. NASGB
  32. (The Pestalozzi Trust submitted two comments, which the task team decided not to discuss at that time, because one of the task team members was given the responsibility of reevaluating the whole matter of home education for an in-depth discussion at a later stage.)

29 November 2018 - NW3306

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) On what date was the information technology (IT) infrastructure of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her last upgraded or updated, (b) what is the name of the company contracted to do the upgrades, (c) what was the monetary value of the contract and (d) what is the name of each IT system that was upgraded; (2) (a) what is the name of the company that is currently responsible for the maintenance of the IT systems of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her and (b) what is the value of the contract

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The information technology (IT) infrastructure of the Department of Basic Education is regularly updated as and when updates are provided by the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM). The Datacentre hosting the critical systems of the Department has been refreshed as a cloud capable, full managed service with effect from 1 February 2018.

(1)(a)(ii) The information regarding Umalusi and SACE is not readily available and can be provided separately when obtained.

(1)(b) State Information Technology Agency (SITA)

(1)(c) Infrastructure updates is part of the Service Level Agreements with SITA for maintenance and support for network and hosting services. The monetary value of the Service Level Agreement with SITA for the refreshment of the Datacentre as a cloud capable, full managed service is R 9 682 692.00 for the 2018/2019 Financial Year.

(1)(d) The IT systems of the Department regularly enhanced and updated are:

  • National Senior Certificate (NSC)
  • Senior Certificate Amended (SCA)
  • Learner Unit Record Information Tracking System (LURITS)
  • National Education Infrastructure System (NEIMS)
  • Funza Lushaka Information Management System (FLIMS)
  • Learner and Teacher Support Material Catalogue (LTSM)
  • Business Intelligence (BI)
  • South African School Administration and Management stand-alone Application (SA-SAMS)

(2)(a)(i)The State Information Technology Agency (SITA). The Department is incorporated with for all IT services.

(2)(a)(ii) The information regarding Umalusi and SACE is not readily available and can be provided separately when obtained.

(2)(b) The annual value of the Service Level Agreement with SITA for the maintenance of systems is R 13 790 160.04 for the 2018/2019 Financial Year.

27 November 2018 - NW3152

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of students have been unable to write matric exams as a result of the lack of necessary identity documentation in the (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017 and (d) 2018 academic years?

Reply:

RESPONSE:

In terms of the directive issued by the Department of Basic Education, to all Provincial Education Departments, no candidate without an identity document should be disallowed from writing the matric examinations. Therefore, we have no record of candidates that were disallowed from writing the matric examination due to a lack of identity documentation over the years mentioned.

27 November 2018 - NW3197

Profile picture: Makeleni, Ms P

Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 983 on 18 May 2017, how did each province perform in the 2017 academic year according to each of the seven criteria contained in the Inclusive Basket of Criteria?

Reply:

The inclusive basket of performance indicators is a more integrated approach to reporting that reflects the key indicators of learner performance. The key indicators together with their weighting are as follows:

(a) Overall pass percentage (35%)

b) Mathematics pass percentage (10%)

c) Physical Sciences pass percentage (10%)

d) Bachelor attainment percentage (15%)

e) Distinction percentage (10%)

f) Mathematics Participation Rate (10%)

g) Secondary Throughput rate (10%)

The above indicators are captured in a consolidated format which includes a weighting based on the importance attached to each of these indicators. A computation of the percentage obtained for each of these indicators at school, district, provincial and national level, is also available. This new approach to reporting on performance in the National Senior Certificate Examination is being piloted and is therefore not the official mechanism of reporting on provincial performance. This information will however be used to monitor performance of the System at the different levels.

The Table below shows the performance of each of the Provincial Education Departments (PED’s) in terms of the Inclusive Basket Criteria:

 

Weighted Basket Score

Province Name

Basket Score

Overall Pass Perc(W-35%)

Perc Maths Passed(W-10%)

Perc Physics Passed(W-10%)

Perc Bachelor Passed(W-15%)

Perc Distinctions(W-10%)

Perc Maths Participation(W-10%)

Secondary Throughput Rate(W-10%)

EASTERN CAPE

46.2%

22.8%

4.2%

5.7%

3.4%

0.3%

5.3%

4.5%

FREE STATE

58.8%

30.1%

7.1%

7.7%

5.3%

0.4%

4.0%

4.2%

GAUTENG

58.6%

29.8%

6.8%

7.0%

5.4%

0.5%

3.8%

5.4%

KWAZULU-NATAL

51.5%

25.5%

4.2%

6.5%

4.3%

0.4%

5.5%

5.0%

LIMPOPO

47.1%

23.0%

5.0%

6.3%

3.2%

0.2%

4.9%

4.5%

MPUMALANGA

51.0%

26.2%

4.8%

6.2%

3.5%

0.2%

5.0%

5.1%

NORTHERN CAPE

49.6%

26.5%

5.7%

5.7%

3.8%

0.2%

3.2%

4.5%

NORTH WEST

52.7%

27.8%

6.1%

6.4%

4.0%

0.3%

3.3%

4.7%

WESTERN CAPE

60.0%

29.0%

7.4%

7.3%

5.9%

0.7%

3.2%

6.5%

NATIONAL

50.0%

26.3%

5.2%

6.5%

4.3%

0.4%

2.4%

5.0%

The above computation has also been determined for the provincial, district and school levels.

27 November 2018 - NW3196

Profile picture: Makeleni, Ms P

Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to the tenders awarded for learner-teacher support material in each province for the current academic year, (a) what is the name of each supplier, (b) what conditions are attached to each contract, (c) what is the duration of each contract and (d)(i) where and (ii) on what date was each tender published; (2) whether the contracts to deliver learner-teacher support material include delivery to section (a) 20 and (b) 21 schools as defined in the SA Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996;\ (3) (a) who is responsible for monitoring, controlling and auditing the delivery of learner-teacher support material at (i) district and (ii) provincial level, (b) what salary grade(s) are the specified persons on and (c) how often do the specified persons conduct audits using learner-teacher support material retrieval sheets at schools?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not collect or collate this information. The honourable Member is requested to direct the questions to the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).