Questions and Replies

14 December 2018 - NW3672

Profile picture: Alberts, Adv A

Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) What number of schools in Gauteng in each year since 1 January 2014, (a) (i) were built and (ii) should have been built and (b) what are the relevant details for the specified results; (2) whether, if the results are negative, existing single-medium schools will be forced to include learners speaking other languages so that such schools will eventually become dual medium schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

 

1. (a)(i) The table below indicates the number of planned schools and schools built since the 2014/15 financial year.

Financial Year

Target

Schools Built

School Name

2014/15

11

13

1. Munsieville Primary School

2. Iketleng Primary (Hammanskraal) School

3. Nellmapius Primary School

4. Phomolong Primary School

5. Oos Rand Secondary School

6. Buhle Park Primary School

7. Fochville Secondary School

8. Magaliesburg Secondary School

9. Freedom Park Secondary School

10. Naturena Primary No. 2 School

11. Slovoville Primary School

12. Imphendulo Primary School

13. Rosslyn Primary School

2015/16

13

16

1. Chief A Luthuli Primary School No.2 

2. Christiaanville (Montana Poort Primary School)

3. Doornkop (Obed Mosiane Primary School)

4. Etwatwa Primary School

5. Evans Park Primary School

6. Glen Vista Primary School

7. Kaalfontein Secondary School

8. Khutsong South Primary School

9. Mahareng Secondary School

10. Nellmapius Ext.6 Primary School

11. Palmridge Secondary School

12. Protea Glen Primary School

13. Ratanda Bertha Gxowa Primary School

14. Soshanguve East Secondary School 

15. Soshanguve Primary School

16. Tswelapele (Andrew Mapheto Primary School)

2016/17

13

08

1. Bophelong New Secondary School

2. Ga-Rankuwa Primary School

3. Mokone Marupeng Primary School

4. Moses Kotane Primary School

5. Nellmapius Secondary School

6. Nomzamo Madikizela Mandela Primary School

7. Sinenhlanhla Primary School

8. Wierdapark Primary School

2017/18

05

06

1. Olievenhoutbosch Sec No.2/Seshegong Sec School

2. Everest Primary School

3. Menzi Primary school

4. Julius Sebolai Primary School

5. Marotola Primary School

6. Nokuthula Special School (LSEN school)

(ii) Please see (i) above.

(b) The Department has a backlog in relation to the new and replacement schools, that is perpetuated by the constant influx of learners into the province. The Department has not achieved all its targets related to building schools, as indicated in (a) above, due to a number of reasons that have had an adverse impact on the delivery of schools. These include but not limited to:

• Budgetary Constraints;

• Under perfomance by contractors;

• Community disruptions; and

• Inclement weather.

2. The Department will not be forcing but engaging and encouraging the existing single-medium schools that have received a sufficiently large number of learner applications for admission, to offer additional languages and thereby become dual-medium schools. It must be noted that the process is guided by, amongst others, the number of applications to a school.

14 December 2018 - NW3902

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to the reply of the Minister of Public Service and Administration to question 141 for oral reply on 7 September 2018, her department and the entities reporting to her implemented the Public Service Coordinating Bargaining Council resolution that all persons employed in the Public Service as Assistant Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 9 to level 10, and that all Deputy Directors must have their salary level upgraded from level 11 to level 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education has implemented the Public Service Co-ordinating Bargaining Council resolution for the upgrading of Assistant Directors from salary level 9 to salary level 10 and the upgrading of Deputy Directors from salary level 11 to salary level 12. The implementation was effected in August 2014 and backdated to 1 August 2012.

14 December 2018 - NW3743

Profile picture: Wana, Ms T

Wana, Ms T to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that a sign was put up for Mahabaneng Primary School at the abandoned Lebaka B Primary School site in Mohlabaneng in Limpopo?

Reply:

Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019. The original name was supposed to be Mahabaneng Primary School instead of Lebaka B but the name was not registered at EMIS.

14 December 2018 - NW3745

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to Limpopo Department of Education Contract No. EDDP 182/142, Lebaka B Primary School in Mohlabaneng, was the school built within the contract period of 3 November 2010 to 3 October 2011; if not, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what was the total monetary cost of the building project, (b) who was the contractor and (c) was the contractor paid in full; (3) (a) what are the full details of the (i) total cost of the furniture and (ii) furnishings delivered and dates of delivery of all furnishings, (b) why has this school been abandoned, (c) on what date was a security company appointed, (d) what is the cost of the security contract and (e) what is the name of the security company; (4) has any litigation process been instituted; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The school was not completed within the envisioned construction period of 11 months. The contract period started on 3 November 2010 as scheduled, but unfortunately the contractor fell behind schedule. The delays led to the situation whereby the contractor subsequently abandoned site. The project was re-activated in 2016 and Practical Completion was achieved on 11 September 2017.

2. The initial contract amount was R 15 956 400.00. During the period when the contractor abandoned site the school was vandalised. Accordingly, when the project was re-activated, re-measurements were done to determine the cost to complete the project and a Variation Order was approved on 7 November 2016 increasing the contract amount to R 17 721 946.21. MPPJ Property Development was the Contractor. The contractor has not yet been paid in full as Final Completion has not yet been achieved.

3. (a) Total cost of Furniture is R930 491.000 and the furniture was delivered in 2012 and in 2018.

(b) Lebaka B was built as an offshoot of Lebaka A where the school buildings were dilapidated and no longer hospitable. Security was engaged and the repairs were effected. There are plans afoot to bring in Gr R –Gr 3 to the school in January 2019.

(c) The security company was appointed for Lebaka B School on 01 June 2018.

(d) The security service provider was initially appointed by the Limpopo Department of Education to do security services at Mamaila Circuit Office. A variation order was prepared and approved for the inclusion of Lebaka B School for an amount of R33 524.30 per month.

(e) Mathara Investment CC.

4. Yes, there is a litigation claim for the alleged exhumation of graves on the school site during the construction process. The matter is currently being handled by the state attorney.

14 December 2018 - NW3201

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of mega farm schools (a) have been built in each province in the past three financial years and (b) are envisaged to be completed in the 2018-19 financial year; (2) what number of non-viable schools (a) have been closed in the past three financial years in each province and (b) are envisaged to be closed in the 2018-19 financial year; (3) what number of teachers were trained on pedagogical content knowledge and facilitation skills in mathematics and science in each province in the (a) 2015-16 and (b) 2016-17 financial years; (4) what amount that was made available to improve mathematics, science and technology teaching in each province in the (a) 2015-16, and (b) 2016-17 financial years?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Sector has not built any Mega Farm Schools for the past three financial years but has a number of Non-Viable farm schools in lieu of two Boarding Schools in Mpumalanga Province which are Steve Tshwete Boarding School in Nkangala and Thaba Tshweu Boarding school in Ehlanzeni district.

(b) There are no Mega farm Schools envisaged to be completed in the 2018/2019 financial year.

(2) 2018-19 financial year:

Province

No. of schools closed to date

2018/19 projections

 

(a) @

(b)

EC

725

2 182*

FS

33

90

GP

521

14

KZN

248

1 405^

LP

1 783

61

MP

1 063

34

NC

142

8*

NW

948

0

WC

1 466

0

Source (a) National EMIS (b) PEDs

The above mentioned data indicate the number of schools closed to date except for the FS.

* Schools currently subjected to rationalisation but not necessarily to be effected in 2018/19

^ Schools rationalisation plan ranging from 2018 to 2023

(3) The number of teachers who were trained on Mathematics and Science content and pedagogy through DBE-led programmes are:

DBE TRAINING WORKSHOPS:

2015/16 YEAR

PROVINCE

TRAINED MST HODS 2015/16

Grade 8 & 9

 

MATHS

N.SC

TECHN

TOTAL

Free State

294

255

236

785

Gauteng

53

51

51

155

North West

415

439

642

1 496

Eastern Cape

1 520

1 636

1 536

4 674

Northern Cape

116

75

81

272

Limpopo

749

313

595

1 657

Mpumalanga

552

465

473

1 490

TOTAL

3 862

3 331

3 508

10 529

2016/17: NSC SUPPORT ON MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE

PROVINCE

MATHS

PHYSICAL SCIENCE

TOTAL

Eastern Cape

489

288

777

Free State

136

129

265

KwaZulu-Natal

520

417

937

Limpopo

535

606

1 141

Mpumalanga

234

199

433

Northern Cape

56

72

128

North West

232

196

428

TOTAL

2 202

1 907

4 109

(4)

  1. 2015-16 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2015/16 was R 347 185 million. R 104 156 million (30% of the total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

  1. 2016-17 Budget available to Improve MST Teaching in each Province:

Total allocated budget for MST Conditional Grant in 2016/17 was R 362 444 million. R 108 734 million (30% of total budget) was used for teaching in each province (15% - Training of Teachers and Subject Advisors in preparation for the Implementation of CAPS for Technical Schools and 15% - Targeted Teacher Training in Pedagogic Content Knowledge for MST Subjects).

(SEE TABLE BELOW)

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2015/16

Province

Budget Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total

100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

45 059

9 012

6 759

6 759

4 506

6 759

6 759

4 506

45 059

FS

32 145

6 429

4 822

4 822

3 215

4 822

4 822

3 215

32 145

GP

47 842

9 568

7 176

7 176

4 784

7 176

7 176

4 784

47 842

KZN

59 998

12 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

9 000

9 000

6 000

59 998

LP

40 979

8 196

6 147

6 147

4 098

6 147

6 147

4 098

40 979

MP

39 136

7 827

5 870

5 870

3 914

5 870

5 870

3 914

39 136

NC

22 113

4 423

3 317

3 317

2 211

3 317

3 317

2 211

22 113

NW

33 378

6 676

5 007

5 007

3 338

5 007

5 007

3 338

33 378

WC

26 535

5 307

3 980

3 980

2 654

3 980

3 980

2 654

26 535

Total

347 185

69 437

52 078

52 078

34 719

52 078

52 078

34 719

347 185

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2015-16 FINANCIAL YEAR AS AT 31 MARCH 2016

Province

2015-16

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 16

Actual Expenditure against Allocation

Budget Available as at 31 March 2016

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

45 059

45 059

26 350

10 236

72,02%

FS

32 145

33 466

21 524

10 165

67,92%

GP

47 842

47 842

47 842

- 678

101,44%

KZN

59 998

59 998

59 259

739

98,77%

LP

40 979

40 979

35 673

- 6 649

122,91%

MP

39 136

39 136

42 408

- 10 923

134,69%

NC

22 113

22 113

23 466

- 1 783

108,22%

NW

33 378

33 378

32 225

553

98,31%

WC

26 535

26 535

27 668

- 1 133

104,27%

TOTAL

347 185

347 185

316 415

527

99, 83%

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

MST CONDITIONAL ALLOCATION 2016/17

Province

Budget

Allocation

ICT Resource to improve Teaching and Learning 20%

Technical School Workshop ,Equipment and Tools 15%

School Laboratories and Workshop Apparatus and Consumables 15%

Direct Learner Support 10%

Technical Schools Teachers and Subject Advisors Training and CAPS Orientation 15%

Targeted Teacher Training in Teaching Methodologies and Subject content 15%

Training and Support in ICT Integration for end-users 10%

Total 100%

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

EC

46 898

9 380

7 035

7 035

4 690

7 035

7 035

4 690

46 898

FS

33 466

6 693

5 020

5 020

3 347

5 020

5 020

3 347

33 466

GP

49 810

9 962

7 472

7 472

4 981

7 472

7 472

4 981

49 810

KZN

62 453

12 491

9 368

9 368

6 245

9 368

9 368

6 245

62 453

LP

42 553

8 511

6 383

6 383

4 255

6 383

6 383

4 255

42 553

MP

41 639

8 328

6 246

6 246

4 164

6 246

6 246

4 164

41 639

NC

23 030

4 606

3 455

3 455

2 303

3 455

3 455

2 303

23 030

NW

34 754

6 951

5 213

5 213

3 475

5 213

5 213

3 475

34 754

WC

27 841

5 568

4 176

4 176

2 784

4 176

4 176

2 784

27 841

Total

362 444

72 489

54 367

54 367

36 244

54 367

54 367

36 244

362 444

FINANCIAL EXPENDITURE AS AT 31 MARCH 2017

EXPENDITURE DURING THE 2016/17 FINANCIAL YEAR

Province

2016-17

Budget Allocation

Actual Funds Transferred at

31 March 17

Actual Expenditure

Against Allocation

Budget Available as at

31 March 2017

%

Spent Against Budget Allocation

 

R'000

R'000

R'000

R'000

%

EC

46 898

46 898

58 241

-11 343

124%

FS

33 466

33 466

39 167

-5 701

117%

GP

49 810

49 810

49 810

0

100%

KZN

62 453

62 453

63 402

-949

102%

LP

42 553

42 553

34544

8 009

81%

MP

41 639

41 639

41 376

263

99%

NC

23 030

23 030

23 214

-184

101%

NW

34 754

34 754

36 176

-1 422

104%

WC

27 841

27 841

27 841

0

100%

TOTAL

362 444

362 444

373 771

-11 327

103%

14 December 2018 - NW3831

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her contracted the services of a certain company (name and details furnished), in each of the past 10 financial years; if so, what (i) number of contracts were signed, (ii) was the date on which each contract was signed, (iii) was the duration of each contract, (iv) services did the company render and (v) was the monetary value of each contract in each case; (2) whether any irregular expenditure relating to the contracts was recorded and/or condoned in each case; if so, what are the relevant details? NW4408E

Reply:

1. (a)The Department was never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) UMALUSI

1. Umalusi has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

(b) SACE

1. SACE has never engaged in any business with the service provider in question.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(iii) N/A

(v) N/A

2. N/A

12 December 2018 - NW3226

Profile picture: Shackleton, Mr M S

Shackleton, Mr M S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) amount did (i) her department and (ii) each entity reporting to her borrow from any entity in the People’s Republic of China (aa) in each of the past three financial years and (bb) since 1 April 2018, (b) is the name of the lender of each loan, (c) conditions are attached to each loan and (d) are the repayment periods for each loan in each case?

Reply:

(a) (i) The DBE does not and has not borrowed money from China.

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(i) ENTITIES:

(a) Umalusi has not borrowed from the People’s Republic of China in the past three financial years, including the year starting on 1 April 2018.

(aa) Not applicable

(bb) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

(d) Not applicable

(a) SACE has never borrowed any amount from any entity in the People’s Republic of China.

(aa) N/A

(bb) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) N/A

12 December 2018 - NW3369

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1393 on 21 June 2018, what is the number of pupils in each (a) primary school and (b) high school in each province?

Reply:

For number of pupils in each (a) primary school and (b) high school in each province refer to the link https://www.education.gov.za/NA3369.aspx

12 December 2018 - NW2858

Profile picture: Boshoff, Ms H

Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of the 9 894 schools have been trained on the National School Safety Framework since her reply to question 890 on 3 May 2018?

Reply:

Since the reply to question 890 on 3 May, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has supported provinces to train 139 additional schools on the National School Safety Framework.

03 December 2018 - NW3198

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of public comments did her department receive relating to the draft Basic Education Laws Amendment Bill, (b) is the breakdown of (i) objections and (ii) support in respect of the specified draft Bill and (c) is the current progress of reviewing the public comments thereon?

Reply:

a) The Department received more than 6 000 reactions to the call for comments. The vast majority were emails, but there were also a number of faxed and couriered documents. Many of the reactions do not contain substantive comments, but are merely requests for extension of the deadline or for information of some kind, and indications of opposition to the Bill. There were unfortunately also quite a number of repetitions – emails sent twice (and even up to five times), whether by accident or on purpose, and whether identical or with changes. The Department also received many petitions signed by interested parties. To date, 122 petitions containing 188 648 names and/or signatures have been registered. Owing to the practical difficulties alluded to above, the Department will be able to give details of how many comments were received only after all the comments have been evaluated.

b) The Minister appointed a task team consisting of officials from the Department and from three of the provincial education departments to evaluate the comments. The task team still needs to consider approximately 1 800 comments and can therefore not at this stage give an accurate breakdown of how many commentators are against or in support of the Bill. However, the majority of the commentators are opposed to the provisions in the Bill that, as they put it, restrict the powers of school governing bodies (SGBs). It should be mentioned that there were a few comments in favour of the restriction of the powers of SGBs. These commentators feel that SGBs do not have the necessary knowledge, or are corrupt, or use their powers to keep certain groups of children out of their schools. There has also been strong opposition to the provisions relating to home education. Centralised procurement, the declaration of educators' personal finances and those of their spouses, the provisions relating to alcoholic liquor, and the provisions relating to leases and loans are a few of the other matters that have drawn criticism.

c) To date, the task team has had 11 meetings, stretching over 23 days, at which approximately 3 000 reactions have been considered. These include the comments of 32* of the main organisations directly involved in education. This does not represent a complete list of education stakeholder organisations because, as the sorting of the reactions continues, the comments of more organisations are coming to light. Task team members have also spent countless hours outside of meetings, working on the Bill. During the course of the work described above, changes have been made to the Bill in line with decisions that the task team took at its meetings. Currently, the fourth draft of the Bill is the version on which the task team is working.

*

  1. Centre for Child Law
  2. Equal Education & EE Law Centre
  3. Section27
  4. Legal Resources Centre
  5. AfriForum
  6. FEDSAS
  7. Governors’ Alliance
  8. NAISA
  9. Solidarity
  10. Solidarity Helping Hand’s Schools Support Centre
  11. KZNED
  12. SADTU
  13. SAOU
  14. WCED
  15. Centre for Constitutional Rights
  16. FOR SA
  17. The Governing Body Foundation
  18. ISASA
  19. FEDUSA
  20. Progressive Principals’ Association
  21. Grahamstown Residents Association
  22. Concerned Teachers’ Group
  23. ADvTECH Group
  24. OGOD
  25. WCED
  26. GED
  27. Corruption Watch
  28. IEB
  29. DeafSA
  30. PACSEN
  31. NASGB
  32. (The Pestalozzi Trust submitted two comments, which the task team decided not to discuss at that time, because one of the task team members was given the responsibility of reevaluating the whole matter of home education for an in-depth discussion at a later stage.)

29 November 2018 - NW3306

Profile picture: Tshwaku, Mr M

Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) On what date was the information technology (IT) infrastructure of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her last upgraded or updated, (b) what is the name of the company contracted to do the upgrades, (c) what was the monetary value of the contract and (d) what is the name of each IT system that was upgraded; (2) (a) what is the name of the company that is currently responsible for the maintenance of the IT systems of (i) her department and (ii) entities reporting to her and (b) what is the value of the contract

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) The information technology (IT) infrastructure of the Department of Basic Education is regularly updated as and when updates are provided by the Original Equipment Manufacturers (OEM). The Datacentre hosting the critical systems of the Department has been refreshed as a cloud capable, full managed service with effect from 1 February 2018.

(1)(a)(ii) The information regarding Umalusi and SACE is not readily available and can be provided separately when obtained.

(1)(b) State Information Technology Agency (SITA)

(1)(c) Infrastructure updates is part of the Service Level Agreements with SITA for maintenance and support for network and hosting services. The monetary value of the Service Level Agreement with SITA for the refreshment of the Datacentre as a cloud capable, full managed service is R 9 682 692.00 for the 2018/2019 Financial Year.

(1)(d) The IT systems of the Department regularly enhanced and updated are:

  • National Senior Certificate (NSC)
  • Senior Certificate Amended (SCA)
  • Learner Unit Record Information Tracking System (LURITS)
  • National Education Infrastructure System (NEIMS)
  • Funza Lushaka Information Management System (FLIMS)
  • Learner and Teacher Support Material Catalogue (LTSM)
  • Business Intelligence (BI)
  • South African School Administration and Management stand-alone Application (SA-SAMS)

(2)(a)(i)The State Information Technology Agency (SITA). The Department is incorporated with for all IT services.

(2)(a)(ii) The information regarding Umalusi and SACE is not readily available and can be provided separately when obtained.

(2)(b) The annual value of the Service Level Agreement with SITA for the maintenance of systems is R 13 790 160.04 for the 2018/2019 Financial Year.

27 November 2018 - NW3419

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 28 August 2018, in which the combined results of the 2017 National Senior Certificate examinations and their associated supplementary exams were presented, what is (a) the reason for the 0,1% decline in the Eastern Cape’s pass rate after the addition of the supplementary results and (b) being done to address the decline?

Reply:

 

a) With the combination of the November 2017 and Supplementary 2018, it is expected that the combined results will be higher in numbers and percentage. However, it needs to be noted that the combined results includes all outstanding marks that would have been added between the official release of results on 5 January 2018 and the final combined results released on 7 May 2018. In the case of the Eastern Cape, 2 544 more candidates were added to the number who wrote, compared to the other PEDs, where the additions were less than 1 000. This higher number of additional candidates added to the number of candidates that wrote in the Eastern Cape, who in the main failed the examination, and this caused the final combined percentage in the Eastern Cape to be lower, despite the increase in the numbers that achieved.

b) The province has intensified the provision of additional support over and above the normal teaching and learning, as part of their efforts to improve learning outcomes. Below follows a summary of the interventions undertaken, both for teachers and learners to support the Class of 2018:

  • Mediation of 2017 Chief Markers and diagnostic reports per subject
  • Tracking learner performance ;
  • SBA Support;
  • Common tasks;
  • Holiday extra classes/camps;
  • Weekend classes;
  • Professional development forums or teacher support;
  • Provision of additional LTSM;
  • Provision of Radio lessons and Telematics Broadcast.

 

27 November 2018 - NW3417

Profile picture: Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI

Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current pass rate of learners in each (a) province and (b) grade?

Reply:

The pass rate that is reflected below is for the Class of 2017 (Grade 12), based on the combined results of the November 2017 and Supplementary Examination (2018)

Province

Combined Pass Rate 2017 (Gr 12)

EASTERN CAPE

64.9

FREE STATE

87.5

GAUTENG

86.2

KWAZULU-NATAL

73.7

LIMPOPO

67.9

MPUMALANGA

76.2

NORTH WEST

81.8

NORTHERN CAPE

78.2

WESTERN CAPE

84.1

NATIONAL

76.3

Source: 2017 Data Exam Mainframe Computer system

27 November 2018 - NW2741

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools in the country that are without a facility manager or caretaker?

Reply:

 

a) (b) The Department of Basic Education requested the information from all the nine Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) and only the Gauteng and Western Cape Education Departments responded.

Gauteng Department of Education (GDE) response: In GDE all schools have General Assistants which are posts allocated to schools to do garden and cleaning.

Western Cape Education Department (WCED) response: All Primary and Secondary Schools in the Western Cape that have 201 learners and more receive a post of General Foreman/Caretaker, according to approved provincial Norms and Standards.

The Honourable Member is requested to kindly submit the request directly to the provinces because this kind of information is not available at the national Department of Basic Education.

27 November 2018 - NW3361

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 1393 on 21 June 2018, what is the total number of (a) primary and (b) high schools in each province?

Reply:

 

A) Primary and (b) High schools in each province

The table below shows the number of primary and high schools in the ordinary school sector by province in 2018

Province

  1. Primary School
  1. Secondary School

EC

3 320

2 089

FS

730

457

GT

1 671

1 165

KZN

3 928

2 097

LP

2 381

1 530

MP

1 028

716

NC

355

216

NW

1 021

502

WC

1 058

621

Grand Total

15 492

9 393

Source: Master list of Ordinary School

Note 1: Combined schools were counted as part of Secondary schools.

27 November 2018 - NW3152

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of students have been unable to write matric exams as a result of the lack of necessary identity documentation in the (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017 and (d) 2018 academic years?

Reply:

RESPONSE:

In terms of the directive issued by the Department of Basic Education, to all Provincial Education Departments, no candidate without an identity document should be disallowed from writing the matric examinations. Therefore, we have no record of candidates that were disallowed from writing the matric examination due to a lack of identity documentation over the years mentioned.

27 November 2018 - NW3196

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Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With regard to the tenders awarded for learner-teacher support material in each province for the current academic year, (a) what is the name of each supplier, (b) what conditions are attached to each contract, (c) what is the duration of each contract and (d)(i) where and (ii) on what date was each tender published; (2) whether the contracts to deliver learner-teacher support material include delivery to section (a) 20 and (b) 21 schools as defined in the SA Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996;\ (3) (a) who is responsible for monitoring, controlling and auditing the delivery of learner-teacher support material at (i) district and (ii) provincial level, (b) what salary grade(s) are the specified persons on and (c) how often do the specified persons conduct audits using learner-teacher support material retrieval sheets at schools?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education does not collect or collate this information. The honourable Member is requested to direct the questions to the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

27 November 2018 - NW3197

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Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 983 on 18 May 2017, how did each province perform in the 2017 academic year according to each of the seven criteria contained in the Inclusive Basket of Criteria?

Reply:

The inclusive basket of performance indicators is a more integrated approach to reporting that reflects the key indicators of learner performance. The key indicators together with their weighting are as follows:

(a) Overall pass percentage (35%)

b) Mathematics pass percentage (10%)

c) Physical Sciences pass percentage (10%)

d) Bachelor attainment percentage (15%)

e) Distinction percentage (10%)

f) Mathematics Participation Rate (10%)

g) Secondary Throughput rate (10%)

The above indicators are captured in a consolidated format which includes a weighting based on the importance attached to each of these indicators. A computation of the percentage obtained for each of these indicators at school, district, provincial and national level, is also available. This new approach to reporting on performance in the National Senior Certificate Examination is being piloted and is therefore not the official mechanism of reporting on provincial performance. This information will however be used to monitor performance of the System at the different levels.

The Table below shows the performance of each of the Provincial Education Departments (PED’s) in terms of the Inclusive Basket Criteria:

 

Weighted Basket Score

Province Name

Basket Score

Overall Pass Perc(W-35%)

Perc Maths Passed(W-10%)

Perc Physics Passed(W-10%)

Perc Bachelor Passed(W-15%)

Perc Distinctions(W-10%)

Perc Maths Participation(W-10%)

Secondary Throughput Rate(W-10%)

EASTERN CAPE

46.2%

22.8%

4.2%

5.7%

3.4%

0.3%

5.3%

4.5%

FREE STATE

58.8%

30.1%

7.1%

7.7%

5.3%

0.4%

4.0%

4.2%

GAUTENG

58.6%

29.8%

6.8%

7.0%

5.4%

0.5%

3.8%

5.4%

KWAZULU-NATAL

51.5%

25.5%

4.2%

6.5%

4.3%

0.4%

5.5%

5.0%

LIMPOPO

47.1%

23.0%

5.0%

6.3%

3.2%

0.2%

4.9%

4.5%

MPUMALANGA

51.0%

26.2%

4.8%

6.2%

3.5%

0.2%

5.0%

5.1%

NORTHERN CAPE

49.6%

26.5%

5.7%

5.7%

3.8%

0.2%

3.2%

4.5%

NORTH WEST

52.7%

27.8%

6.1%

6.4%

4.0%

0.3%

3.3%

4.7%

WESTERN CAPE

60.0%

29.0%

7.4%

7.3%

5.9%

0.7%

3.2%

6.5%

NATIONAL

50.0%

26.3%

5.2%

6.5%

4.3%

0.4%

2.4%

5.0%

The above computation has also been determined for the provincial, district and school levels.

22 November 2018 - NW3362

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 2687 on 21 September 2018, what is the total number of (a) teachers and (b) principals at each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province?

Reply:

a) Teachers at each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province. For consistency with the response to Question 2687, all five (5) school categories are reflected.

PROVINCE

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

COMBINED

INTERMEDIATE

SPECIAL

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

17 652

14 146

13 773

 

886

46 457

FREE STATE

10 248

6 916

1 332

2 658

667

21 821

GAUTENG

38 244

23 587

12

33

3 488

65 364

KWAZULU-NATAL

51 296

33 435

8

1 214

1 420

87 373

LIMPOPO

25 111

20 694

 

19

615

46 439

MPUMALANGA

17 858

11 421

1 847

 

376

31 502

NORTH WEST

14 106

6 767

1 093

2 016

664

24 646

NORTHERN CAPE

4 671

2 541

427

1 703

208

9 550

WESTERN CAPE

16 095

9 164

   

1 965

27 224

Grand Total

195 281

128 671

18 492

7 643

10 289

360376

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figures reflect the number of teachers (Post Level 1-3) including Grade R teachers/Practitioners that were in the system as at July 2018. It is not the reflection of the number of posts.

(b) principals at each (i) primary and (ii) high school in each province. For consistency with the response to Question 2687, all five (5) school categories are reflected.

PROVINCE

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

COMBINED

INTERMEDIATE

SPECIAL

Grand Total

EASTERN CAPE

2 695

780

1 397

 

43

4 915

FREE STATE

446

227

53

176

16

918

GAUTENG

1 356

584

1

1

113

2 055

KWAZULU/NATAL

3 753

1 542

1

69

58

5 423

LIMPOPO

2 243

1 282

 

4

35

3 564

MPUMALANGA

1 084

428

67

 

17

1 596

NORTH WEST

867

258

61

135

29

1 350

NORTHERN CAPE

282

100

20

96

11

509

WESTERN CAPE

929

326

   

74

1 329

Grand Total

13 655

5 527

1 600

481

396

21 659

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figures reflect Principals that were in the system as at the end of July 2018. It is not the reflection of the number of posts.

22 November 2018 - NW3329

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Kwankwa, Mr NL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will she commit to finalise the payment to Mr Dyafta (details furnished) of the outstanding (a) salary from April 2010 to October 2017, (b) the promised pension arrangements and (c) promised leave gratuity as undertaken by her department on 26 October 2017?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c) Mr Dyafta was employed by Eastern Cape Department of Education (ECDoE) until his termination, due to ill-health. As this is a matter between the employer (ECDoE) and employee (Mr Dyafta) affecting his conditions of service, the appropriate procedure is to address the matter directly with the ECDoE.

14 November 2018 - NW3002

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Makeleni, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education

1) With reference to her reply to question 2801 on 2 October 2018, in which schools in each province have the learners with (a) hearing impairments, (b) visual impairments and (c) learners with profound to severe intellectual disabilities who are on waiting lists been accommodated; (2) What steps are taken in each province to ensure that the specified learners are receiving the education they are entitled to according to their respective disabilities? (3) are the schools in each province who accommodate these learners provided with the relevant resources like (a) SA Sign Language (i) teachers and (ii) assistant teachers, (b) braille teachers, (c) braillers and (d) large print books?

Reply:

(1) (a),(b),(c) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

(2) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

(3) (a)(i), (ii),(b),(c) and (d) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

14 November 2018 - NW2999

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her department’s presentation on the progress of the implementation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for SA Sign Language (SASL), Grades R-12, presented to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 12 September 2018, (a) why was the development of the SASL CAPS only done following a court case in 2009 between Springate and Others v the Minister of Basic Education and Others and (b) why did her department wait for legal proceedings to introduce CAPS for SASL, which is a deaf person’s constitutional right; (2) in view of 2018 being the first year that deaf learners will be examined in SASL as a Home Language subject, has she found that (a) the deaf learners are well prepared to be examined and (b) her department and the education system are sufficiently prepared to examine deaf learners in SASL; (3) what is (a) the number of suppliers of SASL learning and teaching support materials on her department’s database and (b) the experience of the specified suppliers in the field of SASL?

Reply:

Response

(1)(a) The development of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for South African Sign Language (SASL) prior to the 2009 court case of Springate and others versus the Minister of Basic Education and others was impeded and limited by challenges faced by government which had not yet been finalised. This is in reference to the fact that SASL is not yet the Official Language of government which essentially means it may not be provided at Home Language level in Basic Education, which is what it is for Deaf learners. However, it must be noted that the South African Schools Act 84 of 1996 already recognised Sign Language for use as language of learning and teaching (LoLT) for Deaf learners. Following the court case, the Minister instituted a process of developing SASL CAPS which is already being implemented even though the Department of Arts and Culture and the Pan South African Language Board have not yet concluded the process of making SASL one of the official languages of government.

(b) In addition to the response in (1)(a) above, it must be noted that there is nothing in legislation that prevents right holders from claiming their right from those who have a hold on it. This claim was inadvertently directed to government largely than it was directed to Basic Education given the response in (1)(a) above.

(2)(a) In preparation for the first Grade 12 NSC examinations and in an effort to prepare candidates for the exit examination, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has set and released SASL HL exemplar question papers for Grade 10 and Grade 11 in 2017. In 2018, the DBE has set the preparatory examination question papers for SASL HL in Grade 12, so that learners have full exposure to an examination that is equivalent to the final examination.

(b)The DBE appointed a panel of experts to set and internally moderate question papers for the Grade 12 NSC examinations. These question papers were externally moderated and approved by Umalusi. In preparation for the implementation and administration of examinations in SASL HL, the DBE established a task team to ensure that all schools, teachers and learners are fully prepared for the November examination. This task team developed Guidelines for the Implementation and Conduct of Examinations in South African Sign Language Home Language and this document was issued to schools prior to the preparatory examination. The DBE and PEDs also conducted an audit of all centres where SASL HL examinations are to be conducted. In cases where there were deficiencies, these were addressed. In addition, the DBE took a decision to mark the preparatory examination papers nationally in Pretoria. Teachers from schools that offer SASL HL in Grade 12 were appointed as markers. The DBE appointed a national team for the moderation of School-Based Assessment in SASL HL. All portfolios of candidates that offer SASL HL were moderated and feedback was given to schools.

On the basis of the above initiatives, the DBE is confident that we are adequately prepared to examine Deaf learners in SASL.

(3) (a) There are six (6) suppliers of South African Sign Language (SASL) learning and teaching support material in the DBE database.

(b) The DBE puts a call for submission of SASL materials to all suppliers. The following are the only suppliers that have responded: Sign Language Education and Development (SLED), National Institute for the Deaf (NID) and University of Stellenbosch. These are the only institutions that have developed and submitted SASL materials over the years.

14 November 2018 - NW2860

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

1. (a) Which countries were visited by a team of her department’s officials and educator union representatives in 2018 as part of the seven-country tour, (b) on what date was each country visited and (c) why was that particular country chosen as having experience relevant to the South African context; 2. (a) what are the names of the officials and educator union representatives who visited the specified countries, (b) why was each specified official and unionist chosen to undertake the visit and (c)(i) what was the cost of each official and unionist’s flights and accommodation and (ii) from which departmental budget was the cost of the visit to the country paid; 3. was each official and unionist required to provide a report on their findings; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings for each country visited?

Reply:

  1. RESPONSE

 

1 (a). The bench mark study tour was initiated and funded by the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) to assist the research work currently underway in the ELRC. Four(4) countries were visited, namely Finland, Singapore, Canada and Brazil.

(b). The engagements with the countries various departments took place from 26 February 2018 to 9 March 2018. The dates were as follows:

  • Finland : 26 February 2018 – 27 February 2018.
  • Singapore : 28 February 2018 – 2 March 2018.
  • Canada : 5 March 2018 – 6 March 2018.
  • Brazil : 8 March 2018 – 9 March 2018.

(c). At an Education Indaba in 2017 that was organised by the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC), three streams of work were identified to be undertaken to address challenges relating to education provisioning and related matters. One of these pertinent matters is post provisioning, which has become one of the difficult issues in the different provincial education departments in South Africa.

In addressing the issues raised by the Post Provisioning Commission at the Education Indaba, the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) commissioned desktop research to assess how international countries have approached post provisioning challenges, managed compensation of teachers and adopted effective distribution models within their education system. Based on the research, the four (4) countries that were identified that could best assist South Africa with its challenges and provide possible solutions.

During the visits three (3) focus areas were concentrated on primarily because of the South African context. The areas were:

  • Annual and long-term human resource (HR) planning (teachers and other personnel) at state, provincial, and school levels;
  • Budget allocation and funding structures from Grade R/ Kindergarten to Matriculation levels taking into account factors such as poverty, special education needs, and specialist subjects; and
  • Norms and standards for HR provisioning in small and/or rural schools.

2. (a). The names of the departmental officials were the following:

  • Mr T Kojana: Eastern Cape Department of Education;
  • Adv T Malakoane: Free State Department of Education;
  • Ms N Mutheiwana: Limpopo Department of Education;
  • Ms L Moyane: Mpumalanga Department of Education;
  • Mr E Mosuwe: Gauteng Department of Education;
  • Ms S Semaswe: North West Department of Education;
  • Mr T van Staden: Northern Cape Department of Education;
  • Mr M Cronje: Western Cape Department of Education;
  • Mr S Faker: Department of Basic Education; and
  • Mr M Mfela: Department of Basic Education.

The names of the union officials were the following:

  • Mr B Manuel: Teacher Union Executive Director: CTU ATU;
  • Mr M Maluleke: Teacher Union SADTU; and
  • Mr M Galorale: Teacher Union: SADTU.

The teacher unions identified the officials that were to attend on their behalf and they were invited separately from the DBE officials. The information on how the union officials were identified therefore needed to be obtained from the unions.

(b). The departmental officials were chosen because of their expertise and responsibility in either post provisioning, human resource management, early childhood development and finance. Unions were required to identify their own representatives.

(c) (i). The entire benchmark study tour was orgainised by the ELRC based on the resolutions taken at the Education Indaba 2017. The ELRC funded the entire study tour. There were no financial implications for the Department.

The Department is not in a position to provide the cost for each delegate on the benchmark tour.

(c) (ii). See (c) (i) above.

3. A detailed report with findings and recommendations were drafted by the ELRC with inputs provided by the delegates. A copy of the report may be requested from the ELRC.

14 November 2018 - NW2859

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What are the relevant details of the Early Grade Reading Norms and Standards that are meant to be implemented by provincial education departments and (b) what progress has each province made in meeting the specified norms and standards?

Reply:

 

Response:

(a) The relevant details of the Early Grade Reading Norms and Standards which are meant to be implemented by provincial education departments are explained in the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) from Grades R – 3. These include the text types that learners should engage with in a 2 weekly cycle and the time allocation per grade for each term of the year. They also contain the components of reading such as decoding, sounding letters of the alphabet, letter recognition to reading words and reading fluency which is clearly described in the Annual Teaching Plan (Section 3) of the CAPS. Additional guidelines were developed in February 2018 and mediated through the Foundation Phase Subject Committees and workshops at national, provincial, district and teacher training, as well as through Professional Learning Communities.

(b) Progress by province in meeting the specified norms and standards as per the CAPS are reported on quarterly through the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA). In addition, the Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA) Programme is being implemented to assist teachers to evaluate learners reading progress. Base-line, mid-line and end-line assessments are conducted to evaluate learners. Currently, 1670 schools are using EGRA to support the implementation of the CAPS.

The Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP) was launched in October 2016. As a result, 11 712 Foundation Phase teachers and 263 subject advisors have trained on reading content and pedagogy in preparation for delivering the reading component of the CAPS. The table below details the progress as at 30 September 2018 on the above programmes in provinces.

Province

Progress

Eastern Cape

  • 334 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1677 Foundation Phase teachers and 58 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.
  • Jolly Phonics programme is currently being piloted in 48 schools in Grade 1 to support the implementation of the norms and standards.

Free State

  • 100 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1108 Foundation Phase teachers and 25 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Gauteng

  • 112 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1098 Foundation Phase teachers and 38 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

KwaZulu-Natal

  • 324 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 2350 Foundation Phase teachers and 24 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.
  • The Jika Imfundo programme is used to teach teachers on how to use reading strategies effectively in the classroom.

Limpopo

  • 333 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1597 Foundation Phase teachers and 28 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Mpumalanga

  • 125 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1247 Foundation Phase teachers and 22 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

North West

  • 117 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 668 Foundation Phase teachers and 19 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Northern Cape

  • 115 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 933 Foundation Phase teachers and 22 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

Western Cape

  • 110 schools are using Early Grade Reading Assessment (EGRA).
  • 1034 Foundation Phase teachers and 27 subject advisors have been trained on the PSRIP Phase 1.

05 November 2018 - NW2964

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of learners will be writing the National Senior Certificate Examination in each province in 2018?

Reply:

Table 1: Full-Time Candidates – NSC 2018

Province

Enrolled

EASTERN CAPE

85 371

FREE STATE

29 253

GAUTENG

107 168

KWAZULU NATAL

151 932

LIMPOPO

96 834

MPUMALANGA

57 907

NORTH WEST

34 716

NORTHERN CAPE

12 195

WESTERN CAPE

53 765

TOTAL

629 141

Source:

Table 2: Part-Time Candidates - NSC 2018

Province

Enrolled

EASTERN CAPE

21 466

FREE STATE

5 675

GAUTENG

43 753

KWAZULU NATAL

35 405

LIMPOPO

29 120

MPUMALANGA

11 833

NORTH WEST

5 606

NORTHERN CAPE

2 067

WESTERN CAPE

12 476

TOTAL

167 401

Source:

05 November 2018 - NW3001

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her department’s presentation on the progress of the implementation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for SA Sign Language (SASL), Grades R-12, presented to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 12 September 2018, and with reference to slide 10 of the presentation, (a) is there a full-time dedicated Chief Education Specialist with experience of the education of deaf learners in the employment of her department and (b) what are the qualification of the specified specialist; (2) how many provincial education departments (a) have dedicated Chief Education Specialists with previous experience of the education of deaf learners and (b) where are they based; (3) with reference to slide 10 of the presentation, has she found that the duration of the training of teachers is sufficient to prepare them for the implementation of CAPS for SASL; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) There is currently no full-time Chief Education Specialist at the Department of Basic Education (DBE) responsible for schools for the Deaf. The Project Manager for the implementation of SA Sign Language (SASL) is fulfilling this role and supporting schools for the Deaf. She has 11 years experience of the education of Deaf learners as well as 8 years experience in managing curriculum adaptations in schools for the Deaf.

(b) The project manager has the following qualifications:

  • B.Ed. Hon: Support teaching; and
  • MEd: Psychology of Education – Alternative and adaptive methods of assessment for learners with barriers.

(2) (a) and (b) None

(3) The duration of the training of teachers is sufficient to prepare them for the implementation of CAPS for SASL.

The training conducted by DBE focused on the SASL CAPS as well as the basic skills that teachers and Deaf Teacher Assistants need to teach in the implementing Grades. The training conducted to the first group of Foundation Phase teachers was more elementary to align with the curriculum in that phase, while the training offered to the higher grades, increased in terms of depth and scope. The teaching and assessment of the four key skills were emphasised, namely, Observing and Signing, Visual Reading and Viewing (literature), Recording and Language Structure and Use.

05 November 2018 - NW3000

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her department’s presentation on the progress of the implementation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for SA Sign Language (SASL), Grades R-12, presented to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 12 September 2018, (a) what is the total number of SA Sign Language (SASL) subject advisors in the country (i) with previous experience on the education of deaf learners and (ii) with knowledge of SASL, (b) where are they based and (c) what qualification do they have in SASL?

Reply:

 

a) SASL subject advisors have not yet been appointed by Provincial Departments of Education;

i) N/A

ii) N/A

(b) SASL subject advisors have not yet been appointed by Provincial Departments of Education.

(c) SASL subject advisors have not yet been appointed by Provincial Departments of Education.

05 November 2018 - NW2965

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) In what number of languages are the 2018 (i) Mathematics and (ii) Science matric exams offered and (b) what are those languages?

Reply:

 

Response

(a) (i) Two Languages

(a) (ii) Two languages

(b) English and Afrikaans

17 October 2018 - NW2803

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether learners with severe to profound intellectual disabilities in each province have been included in the LURITS or EMIS as required by its agreement with the National Treasury and the Auditor-General of South Africa, as indicated on page 71 of the 2018-19 Annual Performance Plan of her department; (2) by what date will her department gazette and promulgate the final Draft Learning Programme; (3) whether (a) provinces record learners at special care centres on a central database and (b) the centres are provided with an EMIS number? NW3096E

Reply:

1.  The Department of Basic Education is in the process of updating SA-SAMS to include information on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities which will be provided to Care Centres as their administrative tool. This will enable them to upload data into Provincial Warehouses and thereafter to LURITS. However, this requires all centres to have computers.

In the interim, the Education Management Information System (EMIS) together with Inclusive Education Directorate have developed a survey tool to collect data on Learners with Severe to Profound Intellectual Disabilities, which was uploaded into DBE (MOODLE) platform. This platform serves as a central database for Care Centre Information, though the information is aggregated.

2. The Draft Learning Programme is envisaged to be gazetted and promulgated by 31 October 2018.

3. (a) No, learners at the special care centres are not recorded.

(b) The Department is in the process of registering Care Centres through Provincial Education Departments which will assist in obtaining EMS numbers.

17 October 2018 - NW2688

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in the country (i) have swimming pools and (ii) do not have swimming pools and (b) where is each of the schools with a swimming pool located?

Reply:

a) (i) A total of 562 schools have swimming pools.

(ii) 22707 schools do not have swimming pools.

b) See attached annexure

17 October 2018 - NW2799

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) lessons has her department learned during past implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign and (b) criteria are used to determine the (i) officials and (ii) participants who form part of the campaign?

Reply:

a) Some of the lessons learnt in the implementation of the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC) – For the QLTC and/or social mobilisation to find traction on the ground it must be underpinned by the following approaches:

  1. Engage and secure diverse and strong community participation in the identified programme;
  2. Clearly identify the roles and responsibilities the broader community could play in the execution of the targeted programme;
  3. The community members and/or stakeholders must buy into the programme;
  4. Develop a shared vision with the concerned community;
  5. Jointly conduct the needs analysis of the community at large; and
  6. Constantly monitor, support and report on the progress on the implementation of the programme.

b) Criteria used to determine (i) officials

All teacher unions in the education sector were requested to nominate their senior representatives to serve in the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign Coordinating Team (QCT) to implement the QLTC non-negotiables. There were five Union Officials who have been seconded to the Department of Basic Education (DBE) as follows: 2 from South African Democratic Teachers Union (SADTU), 1 from National Professional Teachers Organisation of South Africa (NAPTOSA), 1 from Professional Educators Union (PEU) and 1 from National Teachers Union (NATU). However, the Suid-Afrikaanse Onderwysers Unie (SAOU) resolved to waiver its participation in the secondment arrangement in favour of PEU.

b) Criteria used to determine the (ii) participants who form part of the campaign:

During the launching of QLTC, stakeholders (within and outside the education sector) committed to the QLTC Principles and further pledged their respective roles and responsibilities they could play in strengthening the delivery of quality learning and teaching. The following are the stakeholders in question:

  1. Teacher Unions;
  2. School Governing Body (SGB) Association;
  3. Inter-faith based organisations;
  4. Traditional leaders;
  5. Learner formations including Representative Council of Learners’ (RCL);
  6. Non-Governmental Organisations (NGO’s);
  7. Community Based Organisations (including Councillors); and
  8. Others.

05 October 2018 - NW2800

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current average ratio of learners to teachers in Quintile (a) 1, (b) 2 and (c) 3 schools?

Reply:


(a)(b)(c)
Table 1 below indicates that, the average learner to educator ratio (LER) in quintile 1, 2 and 3 is 33, 4:1.

Table 1: Learners to educator ratio in ordinary public schools in 2017

LER

Quintile 1

Quintile 2

Quintile 3

32,7

33,4

34,2

Source: 2017 LURITS

02 October 2018 - NW2278

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Hugo, Mr RT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) amount in funding did her department allocate to eradicate pit latrine toilets at schools in each province (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) since 1 April 2018 and (b) number of schools in each province still make use of pit latrine toilets as at the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii). The DBE does not allocate funding for specific sub programmes on the provincial infrastructure programme funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant and the equitable share. Provinces are allocated funding based on approved User Asset Management Plans and PED’s allocate funding to sub programmes. On the ASIDI programme, the table below indicates the budget allocated to sanitation projects per province.

Table 1: ASIDI Expenditure on sanitation projects.

Province

2015/2016

2016/2017

2017/2018

2018/2019

EC

R62,330,603

R59,606,644

R65,180,090

R58,576,264

FS

 

 

R9,767,708

 

KZN

R35,381,425

R49,221,256

R23,747,468

R1,302,244

LIM

R10,361,152

R84,688,051

R251,509,822

R62,851,525

MPU

R26,972,511

R79,970,983

R1,779,464

 

(blank)

 

 

 

 

Grand Total

R135,045,691

R273,486,934

R351,984,552

R122,730,033

Table 2: ASIDI Allocation to sanitation in the current financial year

Row Labels

Planned Expenditure 2018/2019

EC

R803,270,651

KZN

R50,339,526

LIM

R297,844,277

Grand Total

R1,151,454,454

   

(b)The table below indicates the number of schools with pit latrines that are not in the current year’s project plans. This is as per the sanitation audit conducted in May/June 2018.

Table 3: Schools with pit latrines.

 

Schools with pit latrines ONLY and Unacceptable sanitation

School with proper sanitation but pits not demolished

Eastern Cape

1598

323

Free State

156

42

Gauteng

0

5

KwaZulu Natal

1365

1477

Limpopo

507

853

Mpumalanga

127

278

North West

145

47

Northern Cape

0

15

Western Cape

0

0

TOTALS

3898

3040

02 October 2018 - NW2729

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to her reply to question 1410 on 28 June 2018, what progress has her department made to put in place measures that will ensure that all school educators and other personnel who may come into contact with children have been vetted in accordance with the National Register for Sex Offenders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. Discussion is at an advanced level with the South African Council for Educators (SACE), the Department of Social Development (DSD) and the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) with regards to putting in place measures that will ensure that all school educators and other personnel who come into contact with children are vetted in accordance with the National Register for Sex Offenders.

These discussions have culminated in a draft Protocol between the SACE, the employers of educators, the DSD and the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ) on the management of educators’ conduct, accessing the registers and the reporting of offences against children to the DSD. It is envisaged that the protocol will be concluded before the end of this year.

Since conditions of employment of other personnel appointed in terms of the Public Service Act are determined by the Minister of Public Service and Administration, a request to the Minister to amend the Public Service Regulations to accommodate the requirements of the Children’s Act, 2005 and the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act 32 of 2007 may be necessary, alternatively to work together with the Department of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (DPME) to develop a similar protocol.

2. The events leading to the finalisation of the protocol will guide the Minister on whether to issue a statement or not.

02 October 2018 - NW2727

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Alberts, Adv A to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What number of employees in her department at each post level are currently suspended on full salary; (2) what number of the specified employees at each post level has currently been suspended for (a) less than 60 days, (b) 60 to 90 days, (c) 90 to 120 days and (d) longer than 120 days; (3) what is the total cost attached to the days of service lost in each specified case?

Reply:

1. Currently, there are no officials suspended in the DBE

2. (a) There are no officials suspended for less than 60 days.

(b) There are no officials suspended for 60 to 90 days.

(c) There are no officials suspended for 90 to 110 days.

(d) There are no officials suspended for longer than 120 days.

3. Not applicable

02 October 2018 - NW2733

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What are the names of the (a) individuals and (b) organisations that undertook the research and wrote the White Paper 6: Special Needs Education, Building an Inclusive Education and Training System; (2) whether the persons who undertook the research and wrote the paper were external contractors; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amount were they paid in each case? NW3025E

Reply:

1. There were two structures, namely, National Committee for Education Support Services (NCESS) and National Commission on Special Needs in Education and Training (NCSNET). Below are the members of each of the structures:

  • National Committee for Education Support Services (NCESS)

Ms Hawa Bawa

Ms Cornelia Elizabeth Aucamp

Mr Arthur John Jervis Brownell

Dr Keith Cloete

Prof Priscilla Fihla

Rev Ertol Randall Gradwell

Prof Patrick Sibaya

Mrs Nozicelo Abigail Tukulu

Ms Deborah Anne van Stade

Mr Edcent Williams

  • National Commission on Special Needs in Education and Training (NCSNET)

Dr Johan Hamilton

Mrs Sumboornam Moodley

Mrs Shirley Makutoane

Dr Anbanithi Muthukrishna

Mr Sigamoney Manicka Naicker

Ms Gretta Mazwi

Ms Colleen Rulten

Ms Marie Schoeman

Mr Thinyane Frank Molelle

Ms Lidia Pretorius

Prof Petrus Van Niekerk

Ms Belinda Ngoqo

  • Secretariat

Ms Colleen Howell

Ms Berenice Daniels

Ms Donell Trimmel

Ms Sheila Manko

2. The registry does not retain information for longer than five years.

02 October 2018 - NW2801

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What is the total number of schools for the (a) hearing impaired, (b) visually impaired and (c) learners with profound and severe intellectual disabilities that have been built in each province in the past five financial years; (2) (a) what is the total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years and (b) of these learners, what number was accommodated in schools in the specified years?

Reply:

(1) (a) (b) (c) No schools have been built in the past five financial years.

(2) (a) The total number of learners with disabilities that were on waiting lists in the (i) 2016-17 and (ii) 2017-18 financial years is depicted in the table below:

Province

(i) 2016-2017

(ii) 2017-2018

EC

2 106

0

FS

257

548

GT

14 081

852

KZN

1 363

770

LP

53

0

MP

445

393

NC

300

687

NW

16

72

WC

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Use a centralised waiting system (CEMIS) 0

Total

18 621

3 322

Source: Provincial Quarterly Stats

(b) Learners on the waiting list are awaiting alternative placement in other schools, and are supported in their current schools until they are placed.

02 October 2018 - NW2106

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Khanyile, Ms AT to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her reply to question 134 on 28 February 2018, has she received the outstanding information from the Eastern Cape?

Reply:

The response is in response to National Assembly Question 880. The question is attached for ANNEXURE A ease of reference. The response to NA 880 was without a response from Eastern Cape and as a result a number of follow ups were made with NA 2106 being the last. The response to NA 880 and subsequent follow-up questions is attached as ANNEXURE B

a) (i) 995 (ii) 1187

b) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

c) Small and non-viable

d) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

e) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

f) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

g) See attached list (ANNEXURE B)

ANNEXURE A

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

WRITTEN REPLY

QUESTION 880

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 31/03/2017

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2017

880. Ms N I Tarabella Marchesi (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her department’s presentation to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education on 7 March 2017, (a) how many schools are due to be (i) closed and (ii) merged with other schools in each province, (b) what is the name of each of the specified schools, (c) what is the reason in each case, (d) to which school(s) will the affected pupils be transferred, (e) what is the timeline in each case, (f) what arrangements will be made to transport the affected learners to the specified school(s) and (g) what additional resources will be allocated to such schools, including educators, infrastructure and learning and teaching support materials;

(2) did any consultation with stakeholders take place in each case; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW946E

RESPONSE:

1. (a) – (e) The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Departments and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

(f) As part of the process of rationalisation, merging and closing of schools, learners who will need to be transported from their current schools to the host school are identified, the routes finalised and approved. These are then factored into the transport plan that is submitted to the Department of Transport for the transportation of these learners.

(g) The LTSM resources of the closed school are transferred to the host school that has been identified to accommodate the learners from both schools that are merged. Where there are shortages, additional orders are placed to ensure the requisite LTSM resources are supplied to the school.

However, it must be noted that provisioning of educators at receiving schools is in terms of the post provisioning norms, which takes into account the number of learners as one of the factors.

2. The Department has forwarded the question to the Provincial Education Departments and is awaiting the response. The response will be forwarded as soon as the Department receives it.

21 September 2018 - NW2265

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with regard to her media statement on 22 March 2018 (details furnished), her department has received the updated figures from the provincial education Members of the Executive Committee; if not, why not; if so, what are the updated figures?

Reply:

Yes, the Department has received the updated figures from the provincial education Members of the Executive Committee. Below is a table on the updated figures.

Table 1: Schools with pit latrines.

 

Schools with pit latrines ONLY and Unacceptable sanitation

Schools with proper sanitation but pits not demolished

Eastern Cape

1598

323

Free State

156

42

Gauteng

0

5

KwaZulu Natal

1365

1477

Limpopo

507

853

Mpumalanga

127

278

North West

145

47

Northern Cape

0

15

Western Cape

0

0

TOTALS

3898

3040

21 September 2018 - NW2687

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) teachers and (b) principals in each province are (i) male and (ii) female?

Reply:

a) Number of (i) male and (ii) female teachers in each province.

PROVINCE

(b)(i)MALE TEACHERS

(b)(ii)FEMALE TEACHERS

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

11 450

35 007

46 457

FREE STATE

6 195

15 626

21 821

GAUTENG

15 959

49 405

65 364

KWAZULU-NATAL

21 560

65 813

87 373

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

17 020

29 419

46 439

MPUMALANGA

9 828

21 674

31 502

NORTH WEST

6 672

17 974

24 646

NORTHERN CAPE

2 650

6 900

9 550

WESTERN CAPE

7 675

19 549

27 224

Grand Total

99 009

261 367

360 376

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figures reflect the number of teachers (Post Level 1-3) including Grade R teachers/Practitioners. They are not a reflection of the number of posts.

b) Number of (i) male and (ii) female principals in each province.

PROVINCE

(b)(i)MALE PRINCIPALS

(b)(ii)FEMALE PRINCIPALS

TOTAL

EASTERN CAPE

2 991

1 924

4 915

FREE STATE

619

299

918

GAUTENG

1 298

757

2 055

KWAZULU-NATAL

3 239

2 184

5 423

LIMPOPO PROVINCE

2 278

1 286

3 564

MPUMALANGA

1 031

565

1 596

NORTH WEST

823

527

1 350

NORTHERN CAPE

334

175

509

WESTERN CAPE

949

380

1 329

Grand Total

13 562

8 097

21 659

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

Note: The figure reflects Principals. They are not a reflection of the number of posts.

21 September 2018 - NW2267

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) are the names of the three companies that were allegedly paid more than R260 million in advance by her department to provide mobile classrooms, but did not deliver any (details furnished), (b) amount was paid to each company and (c) are the names of the schools where the mobile classrooms were meant to be delivered to; (2) were tenders issued for the classrooms before paying funds to the companies; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether (a) her department and/or (b) the provincial department of education took action to recover the money; if not, why not; if so, what was the nature of the action; (4) were any departmental officials investigated for the irregularity; if not, why not; if so, (a) what is the name of each official who was investigated and (b) what was the outcome of the investigations; (5) were any measures put in place to assist the schools that were supposed to receive classrooms but did not; if not, why not; if so, what measures were taken?

Reply:

(1)(2)(3)(4)(5):

Information received from the Eastern Cape Department of Education is that a preliminary investigation is currently being conducted by the Eastern Cape Office of the Premier and the Provincial Department of Public Works and the Eastern Cape Department of Education. The companies involved are Kwikspace, E-kwibuild and Parkhomes. The details of the amounts paid, schools affected, whether tenders were issued will be available as soon as the investigation is concluded and it is on the basis of the findings and recommendations that a determination will be made on the course of action.

21 September 2018 - NW2572

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of (i) deputy directors-general and (ii) chief directors that are employed in (aa) an acting and (bb) a permanent capacity in her department and (b) what is the total number of women in each case; (2) (a) what is the total number of (i) chief executive officers and (ii) directors of each entity reporting to her and (b) what is the total number of women in each case?

Reply:

DBE RESPONSE

(1) (a) Total number of:

(i) Deputy Directors-General: 8

(ii) Chief Directors employed in:

(aa) an acting capacity: 2

(bb) a permanent capacity: 14

(b) Total number of women in each case:

(i) Deputy Directors-General: 3

(ii) Chief Directors: 5

(2) (a) To be answered by the Office of the DG.

NW2862E

SACE RESPONSE

(1) (a) SACE does not have deputy director- general’s (ii) or chief directors on its approved organogram.

(bb) not applicable

(b) not applicable

(2) (a) (i) SACE has 1 Chief Executive Officer

(ii) Not applicable

(b) 01 – Chief Executive Officer

UMALUSI RESPONSE

(1) N/A to Umalusi.

(2) Umalusi management employees statistics are as follows for the period ending 31 August 2018:

Designation

(a) Total number

(b) Number of women

(i) Chief Executive Officers

1

0

Chief Directors / Executive Managers

3

2

(ii) Directors / Senior Managers

10

7

Total

14

9

18 September 2018 - NW2417

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Does her department provide costing guidelines for the construction of school toilets; if not, why not; if so, what is the guideline cost for the construction or installation of (a) enviro loos, (b) ventilated improved pit toilets, (c) flush toilets with septic tanks, (d) flush toilets connected to municipal lines, (e) mobile toilets, (f) chemical toilets and (g) the demolition of plain pit toilets; (2) have any provincial education departments been found to have exceeded the specified cost guidelines; if so, what action was taken by her department to investigate this overspending?

Reply:

1. (a), (b),(c), (d), (e), (f) & (g)

The Department of Basic Education has not developed costing guidelines for the construction of school toilets, however, National Treasury has developed the cost norms for the development of new schools and the upgrading of existing schools and this includes toilets. The cost model is a guide and it is subject to the designs that it is derived from. The cost model remains a guide and the cost of constructing an ablution facility based on the technology selected is largely determined by the market. The Department is in no position to dictate to the market as the cost can be influenced by different factors such as location, topography, scope of work, specifications, technology and mode of implementation, among others. Therefore the market rate remains the determining factor of construction cost for toilets and any other school buildings.

2. Not applicable.

13 September 2018 - NW2526

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Matsepe, Mr CD to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the vacancy rate of principals at secondary schools in each province, (b) are the reasons for the vacancies and (c) period have the positions been vacant; (2) what (a) number of disputes in respect of appointments of principals have been declared in each province, (b) are the main reasons for the disputes and (c) is the envisaged time frame for the resolution of the disputes?

Reply:

  1. (a) The table below shows the vacancy rate for principals at secondary schools in each province

PROVINCE

NUMBER OF VACANCIES AS AT THE END OF JULY 2018

NUMBER OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS

VACANCY RATE

EASTERN CAPE

81

847

10%

FREE STATE

14

244

6%

GAUTENG

49

621

8%

KWAZULU-NATAL

172

1 604

11%

LIMPOPO

127

1 352

9%

MPUMALANGA

41

430

10%

NORTH CAPE

9

111

8%

NORTH WEST

24

341

7%

WESTERN CAPE

55

339

16%

NATIONAL

572

5 889

10%

Source: PERSAL, July 2018

(b) Vacancies occur at schools throughout the year mainly as a result of natural attrition with key drivers being resignations, retirements and to a lesser extent deaths. Also to note is that Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) advertise and fill promotional posts, at most, twice a year. Acting appointments are made in promotional posts as soon as the post becomes vacant. In order to address workload challenges, PEDs make temporary appointment against vacant promotional posts where necessary.

(c) About 44% of the posts as at the end of July 2018 were six (6) months or less vacant; 24% vacant of 7-12 months, 9 % up to 24 months and 23% longer than 24 months. Of the posts that were vacant for more than 12 months, about 45% were those in small schools of between one (1) and three (3) teachers some of them on the verge of being closed due to decreasing or consistently low enrolment.

2. The question is more relevant to the provincial administration because it is the responsibility of the Employer, who in terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act is the Head of the Provincial Education Department, to ensure that vacancies are filled and to attend to any dispute that arises at the provincial level.

The question should therefore be forwarded to the relevant Employers for details and response.

13 September 2018 - NW2393

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Dudley, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Will she consider delaying the promulgation of the Policy on Home Education until the misunderstanding between her department and home education stakeholders has been clarified; (2) what is the projected cost of publishing the specified policy in the Government Gazette?

Reply:

 

1. Unfortunately at this stage the Policy on Home Education may not be delayed in this regard as it was presented at the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) on 19 July 2018, and it was approved for promulgation.

2. The projected cost of publishing the Policy on Home Education is R1 008.80.

13 September 2018 - NW2465

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has her department revised the deadlines of the National Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for School Infrastructure; if so, what are the new revised deadlines?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not revised the deadlines for the National Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure.

13 September 2018 - NW2601

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of matric results at Mashiyamahle High School that have not been released by (i) the school and (ii) her department in the (aa) 2014, (bb) 2015, (cc) 2016 and (dd) 2017 academic years, (b) what are the reasons that the results have not been released and (c) on what date will her department release the results?

Reply:

a) Mashiyamahle High School was implicated in group copying in 2014 and the examination protocol in terms of results that are compromised due to an irregularity is to withhold the results in subjects that are irregular and conduct a full investigation and a hearing so that a decision can be made on culpability. Hence, in the case of:

(aa) 2014: 106 candidates did not receive their complete results

(bb) 2015: All candidates received their results

(cc) 2016: All candidates received their results

(dd) 2017: 12 candidates were found to be guilty of an irregularity in Mathematical Literacy and their results in Mathematical Literacy were nullified, but the results in the other subjects were released.

b) In the case of 2014 candidates, on 9 June 2015, an investigative team comprising officials from the Provincial Education Department (PED), Department of Basic Education (DBE) and Umalusi arrived at the school to conduct the investigations, after having notified the school. The officials were taken hostage by the parents and learners and this later became violent and resulted in officials’ cars being stoned and their valuables stolen. Departmental officials had to escape from the school, through a hole in the fence and were escorted out of the area by the Police. Subsequently, repeated attempts were made to serve notices on the implicated candidates, inviting them to a hearing and there has been no response. The school engaged the services of a lawyer and this has also contributed to the delay. The Department, approached two local Radio Stations and a local newspaper to publicise a request for the learners implicated in the 2014 examination irregularity at the Mashiyamahle school, to report to the school principal, to facilitate the hearings. The principal subsequently responded that there were no responses.

c) The DBE and Umalusi met with a group of parents and learners from the school on Friday, 24 August 2018, and it was agreed that the learners continued refusal to participate in the hearings has delayed the finalisation of this matter, and given that the learners have in a sense self-imposed a sanction on themselves for the four year period, the results of those candidates that wrote the supplementary examination in 2015, in the subjects that they were implicated, will have these results combined with the uncompromised results of 2014 and released to the candidates on 31 August 2018. Unfortunately, this arrangement to provide the combined, uncompromised results to the candidates was disrupted by a group of candidates that insisted on being provided with their full results of the 2014 NSC examination. The Department has subsequently agreed to have the results made available at the Illembe district office and those candidates who wish to collect the results can do so. The availability of the results at the Illembe district will be published in the local newspapers and the local radio stations.

13 September 2018 - NW2280

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Boshoff, Ms H to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the vetting process followed by the SA Council for Educators when an individual applies for a teaching certificate and (b) are any certificates issued on the spot without (i) vetting or (ii) verification of qualifications?

Reply:

(a) What is the Vetting Process Followed by the SA Council for Educators when an Individual applies for a Teaching Certificate?

SACE RESPONSE

Firstly, all registration applicants are required to declare their fitness-to-practice status when they apply as follows:

I declare that all information provided (including copies) is complete and correct. I also hereby give SACE permission to check if there are no previous convictions against me by any tribunal. I understand that any false information supplied could lead to my application being disqualified or my de-registration from the roll, and I subscribe to the Code of Conduct of Professional Ethics”.

Where an applicant has disclosed any misconduct case or criminal record, the Fit-to-Teach Hearings are held prior to any processing of the application form.

Secondly, currently the fitness-to-teach process is assessed against the submission of the Police Clearance Certificate by the foreign educators. The authenticity of the police clearance is verified against the SAPS online portal available on its website.

Finally, as indicated previously, the process for the submission of the Police Clearance by all South African applicants, will commence on 1 January 2019 onwards as prioritised by Council.

(b) are any certificates issued on the spot without (i) vetting or (ii) verification of qualifications?

Certificates of registration are issued in line with the current Council’s Fitness-to-Practice measures as outlined above.

All these measures in (a) and (b) will be enhanced further, once the Department of Justice and Constitutional Development’s register of sexual offenders is available and the necessary systems and logistical arrangements are in place to facilitate the registration turn-around time process.

13 September 2018 - NW2316

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1) (a) What number of labour disputes are currently being faced by (i) her department and (ii) the entities reporting to her, (b) what is the cause of each dispute, (c) what is the nature of each dispute and (d) on what date was each dispute (i) reported and (ii) resolved; (2) (a)(i) what number of employees have been dismissed by her department in the past five years and (ii) for what reason was each employee dismissed and (b)(i) what number of the specified employees were paid severance packages and (ii) what was the monetary value of each severance package? NW2493E

Reply:

1 (a) (i) Number of labour disputes faced by the Department

(b)Cause of the dispute

(c) Nature of dispute

(d)

     

Date Reported

Date Resolved

Four

Non-renewal of fixed term contract (NEEDU)

Unfair Dismissal -S186 (i)(b)

17/12/2014

31/07/2018

 

Non- renewal of fixed term contracts (NEEDU)

Unfair Dismissal -S186 (i)(b)

22/07/2017

12/02/2018

 

Non- renewal of fixed term contracts (IQMS)

Unfair Dismissal -S186 (i)(b)

26/07/2018

Still awaiting award. Set down on 12/07/2018

 

Non-renewal of Internship contract

Unfair Dismissal -S186 (i)(b)

28/02/2018

Set down on 20/08/2018. Award pending

REPLY BY UMALUSI

(1) (a) (ii) Umalusi is currently facing no labour disputes.

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

(d) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

 

(2) Umalusi is a public entity reporting to the Minister of Basic Education, and not part of the Department of Basic Education.

(a) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) (i) N/A

(ii) N/A

REPLY BY SACE

(1) (a) (ii) One

(b) A new union demanding recognition by SACE.

(c) Refusal to bargain with the non-recognized labour union.

(d) (ii) Not yet resolved (CCMA hearing date not yet communicated to SACE)

(2)(a)(i) One

(ii) Misconduct

(b)(i) None

(ii)N/A

13 September 2018 - NW2283

Profile picture: Bara, Mr M R

Bara, Mr M R to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the qualifications of the (a) Chief Executive Officer, (b) Chief Financial Officer and (c) Head of the Ethics Department of the SA Council for Educators?

Reply:

SACE RESPONSE:

a) The Chief Executive Officer of SACE has the following qualifications:

  • Matric
  • BPrim Ed
  • BEd Honours
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Education(PGDE)
  • Human Resource Management and Development Diploma
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Management (PGDM)
  • Certificate in Financial Accounting principles for public entities
  • Masters of Management in Public Policy (Currrent)

b) The Chief Financial Officer of SACE has the following qualifications:

  • Matric
  • National Diploma in State accounts and Finance
  • Certificate in Fraud Risk Management
  • Certificate in Financial Accounting principles for public entities
  • Certificate in Service Delivery ; Performance & Reporting
  • Certificate in Asset Management in Public Sector

c) Currently the position of Head Registration & Ethics has been vacant since June 2017.