Questions and Replies

Filter by year

15 June 2021 - NW1235

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department is taking any initiatives to address structural digital inequalities in e-learning in primary schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether, in view of the much-feared third wave of COVID-19 which might dawn on the Republic soon, with anticipated learning losses for all learners, and given that due to the digital divide between fee-paying and non-fee paying schools more losses are anticipated for learners in non-fee paying schools, her department has a long-term sustainable solution to fight the digital divide for primary school learners who are disadvantaged; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1) The Department of Basic Education has developed a comprehensive plan to provide learners and teachers with digitised content as well as Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSMs). Different types of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) gadgets will be provided to learners in the Primary as well as Secondary schools, based on the type of teaching and learning resources that will be installed on these devices.  The department has also developed the Remote Learning Strategy that ensures education continuity during the period imposed by the pandemic.  This includes the Tswelopelo platform for primary school learners, and the zero-rating of education sites.

(2) The Department of Basic Education is working with State Information Technology Agency  (SITA) and National Treasury to put all the necessary procurement processes in place to provide learners and teachers with ICT devices.  The DBE has partnered with the Department of Communications and Digital Technologies to zero-rate over 300 education sites, that provide digital and video content to all learners.  Furthermore, the DBE has developed a comprehensive recovery plan for teaching and learning that includes broadcast through TV OVHD Channel; use of both public and community radio broadcast; and printed materials have been made available and are collected at schools by parents and caregivers to complement all the other efforts by the department.  

10 June 2021 - NW1688

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the effects of budget cuts on feeding schemes in each province and (b) is the total number of meals that have had to be reduced as a result of budget cuts?

Reply:

a) The budget cut on the Grant in 2020/21 totaled 1.5% over the 2021 MTEF.  This cut has affected all provinces; especially on priorities, such as the meal costs, which were not substantially increased against the rising food prices.  Also the honoraria for Volunteer Food Handlers could not be increased in line with the Ministerial Determination of the Department of Employment and Labour.

b, The number of learners/meals was affected by the rotation timetable. However, no meals were reduced, as all learners attending school or collecting meals/food parcels were catered for at the school. 

10 June 2021 - NW1590

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What was the total number of unplaced learners (a) of each grade and (b) in each province (i) when schools re-opened on 15 February 2021 and (ii) on the latest date for which information is available; (2) whether each province removes a learner from the list of unplaced learners once the learner has been offered a place and/or once a place has been accepted by the learner’s parent; (3) what is the total number of learners who have been removed from the list of unplaced learners in each province without parents having accepted any of the places that were offered?

Reply:

(1)       What was the total number of unplaced learners (a) of each grade and (b) in each province (i) when schools re-opened on 15 February 2021 and (ii) on the latest date for which information is available; 

Response:

Kindly refer to the attached consolidated table as provided by provinces.

(2)       whether each province removes a learner from the list of unplaced learners once the learner has been offered a place and/or once a place has been accepted by the learner’s parent;

Response:

Learners are removed from the list of unplaced learners as and when placement is confirmed.

(3)       what is the total number of learners who have been removed from the list of unplaced learners in each province without parents having accepted any of the places that were offered? 

Response:

There are no learners removed from the list of unplaced learners without the consent  of the parents. They are only removed when placement is made and confirmed by parents.                                                                  

10 June 2021 - NW1520

Profile picture: Hendricks, Mr MGE

Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to a certain instruction (details furnished) issued by a principal of a certain school (name and details furnished) to parents and staff not to allow learners to discuss and/or debate the latest Israeli-Palestinian fighting at school and in which the specified principal threatens to take further action in line with the school’s Code of Conduct should anyone overstep the specified instruction, her department will take any steps against the principal; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps; (2) whether her department will issue a directive to all educational institutions to refrain from issuing threats to learners, parents and teachers who wish to address any crisis involving humanitarian matters; if not, what is the position in this regard if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) It is not yet necessary for the Department of Basic Education (DBE) to take any steps against the Principal until the Gauteng Department of Education, through its relevant Education District authority, has had an opportunity to interact with the School Principal to provide proper hearing on how the standpoint of the Code of Conduct at the school on such matters has been interpreted.

The Provincial Department and District Office will be advised ahead of time of their interaction with the School Principal, to clarify with the School Principal the fundamentals of the DBE Human Rights Education programme offering, in raising awareness among learners, regarding constitutional imperatives; as well as violence and crimes against humanity.  Thereafter, the necessary adjustments and modifications will follow, which could include further clarification in the provisions in the Code of Conduct, or retraction of the instruction by the Principal where violation is detected.

(2) The DBE will not be issuing any such directive at this stage.  Instead, an invitation is being extended to all Provincial Departments and schools to participate in the Oral History, Moot Court, and Youth Citizen Action programmes, where such matters are safely discussed and debated, to support the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) existing provisions in Social Sciences, Lifeskills and Life Orientation.

10 June 2021 - NW1764

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that the R431 million paid to service providers in Gauteng for decontaminating schools was awarded without following due procedure; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) who was responsible for issuing the specified contracts and (b) what steps will be taken in this regard?

Reply:

(a) and (b) As the Minister of Basic Education, I do not know who was responsible for issuing the specified contracts, and what steps will be taken by the Gauteng Administration in that regard.  Matters of procurement in all the 9 Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), are processed and finalised by the respective PEDs; and the national Department of Education (DBE) has no jurisdiction over any of the PEDs on such matters.  PEDs, similar to the DBE, have an obligation in terms of the Public Finance Management Act (PFMA), Treasury Regulations, Treasury Instruction Notes, Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (PPPFA) and PPPFA Regulations, to follow due process when procuring goods and services. 

10 June 2021 - NW1762

Profile picture: Motsepe, Ms CCS

Motsepe, Ms CCS to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of unqualified teachers are employed by her department across the Republic and (b) subjects do the specified unqualified teachers mainly teach?

Reply:

There is a total of 1 139 unqualified educators employed by Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) across the country.  This number is made up of 1 038 temporary and 101 permanent educators.  The 101 permanent educators are the protected group, who were made permanent in 2001.  The number of unqualified educators has declined, and is down to zero in some PEDs.  Some of these educators, are either in scarce skills subjects; or are teaching in farm and rural schools.  Some are in technical schools, where they teach technical-vocational subjects.

08 June 2021 - NW1591

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) was the total number of learners in each (i) quintile and (ii) province in the (aa) 2018, (bb) 2019 and (cc) 2020 and (b) are the details of the data source from which the figures were sourced in each case; (2) what was the total number of learners in each province according to the SNAP Survey for Ordinary Schools undertaken (a) in the past nine academic years and (b) since the beginning of the 2021 academic year?

Reply:

(1)

 (i)(ii)(aa)(bb)(cc) Table 1 (ATTACHED ANNEXURE) indicates the number of learners by quintile and province between 2018 and 2020. (see attached).

 

Province

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020

Eastern Cape

1 951 523

1 938 078

1,946,885

1,953,397

1,961,547

1,795,563

1,840,780

1,843,814

1,843,297

Free State

 661 974

 664 508

672,290

682,704

688,349

701,487

707,166

716,080

719,847

Gauteng

2 075 387

2 129 526

2,191,475

2,262,319

2,326,584

2,413,225

2,402,576

2,447,377

2,508,387

KwaZulu-Natal

2 877 969

2 866 570

2,901,697

2,881,518

2,877,544

2,863,316

2,821,221

2,844,764

2,867,271

Limpopo

1 715 778

1 714 832

1,720,585

1,753,734

1,765,555

1,776,467

1,724,791

1,753,819

1,759,322

Mpumalanga

1 054 783

1 052 807

1,057,788

1,079,280

1,074,352

1,096,428

1,045,972

1,094,941

1,107,890

Northern Cape

 277 494

 282 631

289,004

290,139

292,595

292,377

295,339

298,888

304,237

North West

 775 142

 788 261

800,316

813,873

829,467

825,776

840,640

852,589

863,071

Western Cape

1 038 019

1 052 435

1,075,396

1,097,509

1,116,572

1,127,634

1,141,057

1,188,926

1,243,150

South Africa

12 428 069

12 489 648

12,655,436

12,814,473

12,932,565

12,892,273

12,819,542

13,041,198

13,216,472

(b) The data provided in question i and  ii, were extracted from the 2018, 2019 and 2020 School Master list data which is also published on the Department's Website.

 

(2) Table 2  shows the number of learners, by province, between 2012 and 2020. Please note that the 2021 data is not yet available.

Table 2: Number of learners in ordinary schools, by province, between 2012 and 2020

Sources: 2012-2016 SNAP Survey. 2017-2020 LURITS

07 June 2021 - NW1066

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the current status of the Incremental Introduction of African Languages initiative in public schools and (b) how does her department intend to ensure that everyone’s right to receive education in the official languages and/or languages of their choice in public schools are realised?

Reply:

(a) The Incremental Introduction of African Languages (IIAL) continues to target schools that did not offer a previously marginalised official African language (2 584) and is currently being implemented in 2 144 (83%) schools. There is thus a shortfall of 440 schools. The IIAL strategy has been implemented in Grades 1-3, and it was supposed to move to Grade 4 in 2021.  However, its implementation has been impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic; and the Department of Basic Education's (DBE) primary focus has been and continues to be on fundamentals, which is the Home Language and the First Additional Language levels (reading and writing).  It is worth noting that there are schools that are already implementing the IIAL strategy up to Grade 7, as evidenced through the 2021 Annual Performance Plan monitoring report. 

(b) All the language related legislation, policies, programmes and strategies that are developed, adopted and used by the DBE advocate for learners to primarily learn through their home languages.  Section 29(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa provides that "everyone has the right to receive education in the official language or languages of their choice in public educational institutions where that education is reasonably practicable."  This Bill of Rights is further echoed by the National Education Policy Act (1996), the South African Schools Act (1996), and the Language in Education Policy (1997). The National Development Plan is also very explicit and recommends that learners' Home Language be used as a language of learning and teaching for longer.

The National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 supports mother tongue education, particularly in the Foundation Phase where learners learn the critical foundational skills of reading, writing and counting.  Consequently, African languages are mainly used as languages of learning and teaching in the Foundation Phase.

The DBE developed the Language Framework document, which aims to support the utilisation of African languages as languages of learning and teaching in the early grades and beyond. 

Provinces continue to support and extend the use of mother tongue education. The Eastern Cape, forexample, initiated the Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education, wherein 2 024 schools are using IsiXhosa and Sesotho for learning and teaching beyond the Foundation Phase.  Learners in these schools are taught Mathematics, Natural Science and Technology in their Home Languages of  IsiXhosa and Sesotho.  The 2020 Grade 12 learners, for the first time in the history of the NCS, had access to preliminary examination question papers in their Home Languages (IsiXhosa and Sesotho).

07 June 2021 - NW1366

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) engagements has she had with the parents and staff of the Theresa park Primary School in Pretoria, to find out what the relevant details were about the issues that led the parents to eject the principal from the specified school and (b) kind of assistance has her department given to the principal to deal with the trauma of her violent eviction from the school?

Reply:

This matter falls within the competence of Gauteng Department of Education (GDE); and as such I had to consult with MEC Lesufi. 

(a) I am informed that MEC  Lesufi visited the Principal, Ms Mabaso, at her home on 14 May 2021; and on the same evening, held a meeting with the  School Governing Body (SGB) members and the SMT of Laerskool Theresapark.  In this meeting, the SGB members (old and new) made submissions on the issue of the Principal. An independent investigation has since been instituted into the allegations of financial mismanagement, and the reported resignation of staff at the school.

(b) On 17 May 2021, the GDE Employee Assistance Programme (EAP) unit visited the Principal, Ms Mabaso at her home to provide support. She was advised to do self-referral and was provided with contact details.

07 June 2021 - NW1446

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the fact that the annual School Realities report is normally published not more than three months into the next year, (a) what is the reason that the School Realities report for 2020 has not been published on her department’s website, (b) on what date will it be available and (c) what is the reason for the delay?

Reply:

(a) The design of the School Realities report has not yet been completed.  However, the School Realities data has been approved by the Accounting Officer in October 2020 and is available from the Department.

(b) The School Realities report will be published by the end of June 2021 on the Department's website.  

(c) School closures in 2020, due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the subsequent suspension of normal programming in the Basic Education Sector, led to the delay.

07 June 2021 - NW1588

Profile picture: Opperman, Ms G

Opperman, Ms G to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department has been informed of the Nico Bekker Intermediary School Hostel that is standing abandoned and vandalised in Williston in the Northern Cape; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what is the reason that her department has not intervened earlier; (2) what (a) is the total worth in Rand of repairs that the specified building needs and (b) steps will her department take against persons holding official positions in other departments who are found guilty of stealing state-owned property at the specified hostel; (3) what are the reasons that the building was transferred to the Department of Sport, Arts and Culture when it and was intended to be used as accommodation and/or a hostel for primary school learners?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Northern Cape Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

07 June 2021 - NW1365

Profile picture: Thembekwayo, Dr S

Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) processes were followed in the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished) in the Gauteng Department of Education and (b) are the reasons that the candidate recommended by the panel was not appointed for the specified position?

Reply:

(a) and (b) The question asked falls within the Executive Authority of the Member of Executive Council (MEC) for Education in Gauteng Province, not the Minister of Basic Education.  

07 June 2021 - NW1444

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the criteria of the allocation schools to quintiles across the Republic and in each province and (b) percentage of schools (i) should be in each quintile in each province and (ii) are in fact allocated to each quintile in each province?

Reply:

What (a) are the criteria of the allocation schools to quintiles across the Republic and in each province and (b) percentage of schools (i) should be in each quintile in each province and (ii) are in fact allocated in each quintile in each province.

(a) The National Norms and Standards for School Funding (NNSSF) prescribes that the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), when determining the relative poverty of a school and consequently in which quintile a school is placed, should base their decisions on the relative poverty of the community around the school, using national census data; and taking into account indicators, such as income; dependency ratio (or unemployment rate); and level of education of the community (or literacy rate). Schools may dispute the correctness of the poverty score assigned through representation to the provincial Head of Department.

The cut-off line between quintiles within a province is guided by the national poverty distribution table as provided in the school funding policy (Paragraph 111 of the NNSSF). This poverty distribution table basically determines the percentage of learners within a province which should be in the different quintiles.

(b)(i) Each year, the Minister of Basic Education publishes a national poverty distribution table, which also indicates the breakdown of the 60% of learners that would not pay school fees. Guided by that table, provinces are required to submit their list of schools that would be no-fee paying schools for the following year. The Minister also annually publishes the no-fee paying schools lists. The following Gazetted ‘national poverty distribution table’ or ‘poverty table’ should be used by provinces in determining how the target table (Paragraph 109 of the NNSSF) finds expression in each province. For example, Eastern Cape must consider the national quintile 1 target to be applicable to as many schools on the resource targeting list as it takes to cover 27.3% of learners, starting from the poorest school.

National Poverty Distribution Table

Quintiles

%

1 poorest

2

3

4

5

Total

EC

27.3

24.7

19.6

17

11.4

100%

FS

20.5

20.9

22.4

20.8

15.4

100%

GP

14.1

14.7

17.9

21.9

31.4

100%

KZN

22.1

23.2

20.2

18.7

15.8

100%

LP

28.2

24.6

24.2

14.9

8

100%

MP

23.1

24.1

21.5

17.7

13.5

100%

NC

21.5

19.3

20.7

21.4

17.1

100%

NW

25.6

22.3

20.8

17.6

13.7

100%

WC

8.6

13.3

18.4

28

31.7

100%

SA

20

20

20

20

20

100%

 

(b)(ii)    Percentage of learners that are in fact allocated in each quintile in each province:

Actual percentage of learners accommodated in each quintile in 2021

Quintiles

%

1 poorest

2

3

4

5

Total

EC

33,11%

20,00%

44,90%

1,00%

1,00%

100%

FS

28,61%

22,75%

28,88%

9,58%

10,17%

100%

GP

14,83%

15,32%

18,21%

21,09%

30,55%

100%

KZN

22,47%

26,40%

32,72%

10,11%

8,31%

100%

LP

34,82%

39,44%

21,35%

1,43%

2,96%

100%

MP

45,22%

37,61%

9,67%

3,90%

3,60%

100%

NC

23,33%

23,58%

25,18%

16,30%

11,62%

100%

NW

28,77%

19,92%

40,04%

10,53%

0,75%

100%

WC

9,85%

13,69%

17,80%

27,21%

31,45%

100%

SA

25,96%

24,47%

27,13%

11,24%

11,16%

100%

All PEDs accomodate more learners in no-fee schools than have been provided for by the policy. In 2021, approximately 87% of all schools have been declared as no-fee paying schools, accommodating approximately 83% of all learners nationally.

31 May 2021 - NW1236

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether her department is conducting a thorough investigation into the death of 15-year-old Avethandwa Nokhangela from Xolani High School in the Eastern Cape who passed away in a drowning accident while participating in an activity organised by the nongovernmental organisation (NGO) Equal Education; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the specified NGO (a) disclosed a detailed report of the possible risks involved in their activity and (b) engaged the student body, teachers and parents; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether all the water hazards were researched and communicated to everyone involved prior to the organised activity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Basic Education, together with the Eastern Cape Department of Education, are working together with the South African Police Service to investigate the incident.  A report is expected by the 31 May 2021. The Department will determine the next steps once the report has been studied in detail.

2. It is anticipated that the preliminary investigation which is currently underway will provide clarity in this regard.

3. It is also anticipated that the report from the preliminary investigation which is currently underway will provide clarity in this regard.

31 May 2021 - NW1289

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether she has found that the current criteria used to determine the quintile of a school reflect the true circumstances; if so, what are the relevant details; if not, (2) whether the specified NGO (a) disclosed a detailed report of the possible risks involved in their activity and (b) engaged the student body, teachers and parents; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case; (3) whether all the water hazards were researched and communicated to everyone involved prior to the organised activity; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Whether she has found that the current criteria used to determine the quintile of a school reflect the true circumstances, if so, what are the relevant details?

The Department has, since 2011, been in the process of reviewing the use of the quintile system, as it relates to the funding of public schools, inclusive of no-fee schools.  A study in 2009 has revealed that there are a noteworthy number of quintile 4 and 5 school principals, who are interested in their school becoming no-fee schools.  This study also revealed that, if public funding, through the school allocation and fee revenue are added, then a large number of quintile 4 and quintile 5 experiences a level of funding that is below the no-fee threshold.  This confirms the reality of a group of schools that is not regarded to be poor enough to attract the higher level of public funding; but on the other hand, is not rich enough to fill the gap with sufficient fee revenue.  Inappropriate quintile classification may be a contributing factor to this situation.  These schools are under constant fiscal pressure, since it has all the financial and administrative obligations of other schools (no-fee as well as fee paying) but are not able to attract the necessary level of funding.

2. Whether her department will revise the criteria for each quintile; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The following activities were achieved to give effect to the proposed review of the use of the quintile system, and the ultimate phasing out the use of quintiles in relation to the school allocation are the following:

  1. Collapsing of Quintiles 1, 2 and 3; i.e., all no fee schools to be funded at the same (Q1) level.
  2. A choice to fee charging schools (Quintiles 4 and 5) to be voluntarily reclassified as no-fee schools.  This would effectively result in there being only two categories of schools for allocation purposes; i.e., no-fee schools and fee charging schools.

In terms of voluntary reclassification of quintiles 4 and 5 schools, as no-fee schools (2. above); up to now no additional funding could be secured.  Some provinces (GP and WC) have however, to a limited degree, and from their existing funding, offered a choice to selected schools in quintiles 4 and 5 to be voluntarily declared no-fee schools.  Given the current fiscal environment, the proposed voluntary reclassification of Quintile 4 and 5 schools as no fee will, in the absence of securing additional funding, be difficult to implement nationally.

In order to address the challenge, some of the measures implemented by Provincial Education Departments are:

(a)    All Provincial Education Departments are accommodating more learners in no-fee schools than have been provided for by the policy. In 2021, approximately 87% of all schools have been declared as no fee schools, accommodating approximately 82% of all learners nationally; and

(b)  Some Provincial Education Departments are currently providing a funding allocation, which is above that, which is prescribed by the funding policy, to some of their quintiles 4 and 5 schools.

In the absence of additional funding, schools should use the normal communication channels to apply for re-classification to another quintile or to become no fee in line with paragraph 106 of the National Norms and Standards for School Funding.  The Head of Department considers each case on its merits, and provides a formal response.  Schools in Quintiles 4 and 5 can apply in writing to the Head of Department to challenge the quintile allocation.  The continued application of these measures however, depends on the available budget within the Provincial Education Department.

The school will be required to submit an appeal in writing on a school letterhead, signed by the principal and SGB chairperson to their relevant district office.  The appeal should clearly indicate the purpose of their appeal; i.e., no-fee status and/or quintile status.  The appeal should be well-motivated including the factors that are placing the school in financial difficulties.  Furthermore, detail must also be provided on the action that has been taken by the school to address these factors.  The application should be sent to the relevant Circuit Manager at the District office.

31 May 2021 - NW1288

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the results of the National Senior Certificate (NSC) in the (a) 2018, (b) 2019 and (c) 2020 academic years, (i) which schools in each province received a zero percent pass rate, (ii) what number of learners (aa) were in each school at the time (bb) repeated the exam or year and (cc) left school in each specified year without completing Grade 12 and (iii) what steps were taken to improve the results of the NSC at each of the affected schools since then?

Reply:

2018

(a) (i) See table (a) – Column A

(a) (ii) (aa) See table (a) – Column B

(a) (ii) (bb) See table (a) – Column C

(a) (ii) (cc) See table (a) - Column D. 

(a) (iii) Response provided below.

2019

(b) (i) See table (b) – Column A

(b) (ii) (aa) See table (b) – Column B

(b) (ii) (bb) See table (b) – Column C

(b) (ii) (cc) See table (b) - Column D

(b) (iii) Response provided below.

2020

(c) (i) See table (c) – Column A

(c) (ii) (aa) See table (c) – Column B

(c) (ii) (bb) See table (c) – Column C

(c) (ii) (cc) See table (c) - Column D

(c) (iii) Response provided below.

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

AMAJUBA

5213141

GROENVLEI COMBINED

26

8

0

0

18

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112421

KWAMPUNZI COMBINED

9

7

0

0

2

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212110

MAWENI H

12

7

0

0

5

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212223

MPIKAYIZEKANYE SS

27

18

0

0

9

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212419

MZONIWE JS

14

8

0

0

6

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112136

NCWECWE SS

2

2

0

0

0

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ZULULAND

5112233

NENDE SS

10

10

0

0

0

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

ILEMBE

5413332

SIBONGINHLANHLA SS

10

1

0

0

9

201811

KWAZULU-NATAL

KING CETSHWAYO

5113347

VULEKA SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF

9

4

0

0

5

201811

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN 2

7042303

LETSHEGA-MALOKWANE SECONDARY

14

12

0

3

2

201811

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE 2

7103306

RAMOROKE SECONDARY

5

2

0

0

3

201811

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7021210

SENWANE SECONDARY

15

12

0

0

3


Response to Question (a)(iii); (b)(iii); (c)(iii) 

In each case, the school was visited by a team comprising of the provincial head office and the district, and an audit was conducted and the reasons for the exceptionally poor performance was established and a turn-around plan would have been established for each school.  The turn-around plan would address each aspect of teaching and learning that would have resulted in the dismal performance.  This plan would have been monitored by both the district and the province in regular accountability sessions and on-site visits, to ensure that the elements of the plan are implemented.  Where there is slow or no improvements, more drastic measures would have been implemented; e.g., replacement of the school principal, or members of the Senior Management Team; and/or the replacement of educators.    

Note:

In terms of question (a)(ii)(cc); (b)(ii)(cc); (c)(ii)(cc), i.e. "the number of learners that left school in each year without completing Grade 12", the data provided refer to candidates who registered to write the examination at the beginning of the year, but did not pitch to write the examination.  It is assumed that these candidates dropped out of school, but it could also imply that these learners were absent from the examination for a valid reason; and would have therefore, registered to write the June examination of the following academic year.  Therefore, the numbers provided in Column D, are estimate figures, and the correct figures can only be determined if an audit is done of each candidate that registered and did not write the final examination.  

Table (a): NSC 2018

 

Table (b): NSC 2019

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

201911

EASTERN CAPE

CHRIS HANI EAST

4261011

DOLOPHINI SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

57

14

0

0

43

201911

EASTERN CAPE

BUFFALO CITY

4321038

HOHO SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

46

22

0

0

24

201911

EASTERN CAPE

AMATHOLE EAST

4301060

NGUBESIZWE SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

8

8

0

0

0

201911

EASTERN CAPE

CHRIS HANI EAST

4261057

ZWELIVUMILE SENIOR SECONDARY SCHOOL

107

7

0

0

100

201911

GAUTENG

EKURHULENI SOUTH

8800008

DESIGNATED CENTRE GALLWAY PRIM SCH

6

4

0

0

2

201911

GAUTENG

TSHWANE SOUTH

8400444

ROSTEC TECHNICAL COLLEGE - PRETORIA

26

6

0

0

20

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

UGU

5312107

FINGQINDLELA S

3

2

0

0

1

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212217

MAHLOKOHLOKO S

8

2

0

0

6

201911

KWAZULU-NATAL

KING CETSHWAYO

5113339

PHINDIZWE H

10

9

0

0

1

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091408

KANAMA SECONDARY

5

5

0

1

0

201911

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023311

KGABEDI SECONDARY

13

13

0

0

0

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7102307

MAHLABA SECONDARY

15

13

0

4

2

201911

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN NORTH

7043307

MAKAMA SECONDARY SCHOOL

10

3

0

3

7

201911

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN NORTH

7042206

MAKOBATENG SECONDARY

8

8

0

0

0

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7092301

MANAWE SENIOR SECONDARY

14

6

0

0

8

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7101207

MATSEBE SECONDARY

7

6

0

0

1

201911

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7093202

MOKHULWANE SECONDARY

1

1

0

1

0

201911

LIMPOPO

WATERBERG 2

7011104

ROEDTAN COMBINED

12

10

0

1

2

 

Table (c):  NSC 2020

 

 

 

 

A

B

 

 

C

D

Exam Date

Province

District

Centre No

Centre Name

Total Entered

Total Wrote

Total Achieved

Repeaters

Total did not write

202011

EASTERN CAPE

OR TAMBO INLAND

4292104

KHANYA PRIVATE SCHOOL

10

4

0

1

6

202011

EASTERN CAPE

NELSON MANDELA METRO

4343099

REUBEN BIRIN SPECIAL SCHOOL

3

3

0

0

0

202011

EASTERN CAPE

NELSON MANDELA METRO

4345514

ST JUDES ACADEMY

17

15

0

0

2

202011

FREE STATE

Lejweleputswa

3182008

ED-U-COLLEGE WELKOM CI/S

6

5

0

0

1

202011

KWAZULU-NATAL

HARRY GWALA

5313322

RAMAROBI S

9

6

0

0

3

202011

KWAZULU-NATAL

UMZINYATHI

5212255

SINOTHANDO SECONDARY SCHOOL

7

7

0

0

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091408

KANAMA SECONDARY

9

9

0

2

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOPANI WEST

7081131

KHESETHWANE REPEAT PART-TIME

22

22

0

1

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023306

KUBUSHE SECONDARY

15

15

0

5

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE EAST

7091411

MAKIDI SECONDARY

5

5

0

2

0

202011

LIMPOPO

MOGALAKWENA

7023203

MASHUBASHUBA SECONDARY

7

7

0

3

0

202011

LIMPOPO

CAPRICORN SOUTH

7031211

MMADITHAKADU SECONDARY

9

9

0

0

0

202011

LIMPOPO

SEKHUKHUNE SOUTH

7103412

NGOATOANAPE SECONDARY

6

6

0

0

0

 

31 May 2021 - NW1067

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What rewards did her department issue since the adoption of the National Development Plan, including Action 55, to introduce incentive schemes linked to the Annual National Assessments to reward schools for consistent improvements?

Reply:

There were no rewards issued to schools as incentives. 

31 May 2021 - NW1031

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether there are any schools in the Eastern Cape that still have mud structures; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) where are they located; (2) whether there are any schools in the Eastern Cape that still do not have proper sanitation; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) where are they located?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education, and a response will be forwarded as soon as it is received.

31 May 2021 - NW1068

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, since the adoption of the National Development Plan, her department increased state funding and support to ensure universal access to two years of early childhood development exposure before Grade 1; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

As the majority of 4-year olds attend pre-Grade R in Early Childhood Development (ECD) Centres, the responsibility of funding is still with the Department of Social Development.  The Department of Basic Education will only be responsible for this age group, once the ECD programme has been relocated from the Department of Social Development to the Department of Basic Education.

31 May 2021 - NW1025

Profile picture: Mkhonto, Ms C N

Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the extent of bullying in South African schools and (b) steps has her department taken to protect both learners and teachers against bullying?

Reply:

a) The recently released Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMMS) Report (2019) indicates that 29% of Grade 5 learners and 18% of Grade 9 learners reported being bullied on a weekly basis. The most cited form of bullying is verbal, followed by physical, and then cyber bullying.

b) The National School Safety Framework remains the basic education sector's primary strategic response to violence and bullying prevention in schools.  The Department of Basic Education is also rolling out crime awareness campaigns, working with Community Policing Forums and the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign.  Newly elected School Governing Bodies are trained, in order to strengthen School Safety Committees, as well as Codes of Conduct for learners.  The Department of Basic Education is currently implementing a bullying prevention programme, together with a range of government and civil society actors to address the scourge of bullying, including cyber-bullying, in our schools.

31 May 2021 - NW1445

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) criteria are used in respect of the funding for the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP) paid to provinces and (b) amount was paid to each province in the (i) 2018-19, (ii) 2019-20 and (iii) 2020-21 financial years?

Reply:

a) The allocation of NSNP funds to provinces are based on the poverty index / distribution, and the number of learners in no-fee schools.  Provinces, such as KwaZulu Natal, Limpopo and Eastern Cape, with high levels of poverty, and which are predominantly rural, receive the largest share of the NSNP Grant allocation. 

b) The table below shows provincial allocation over the past three financial years (2018/19 -2020/21)

Provinces(Allocation)

2018/19  (R'000)

2019/20 (R'000)

2020/21 (R'000)

Eastern Cape 

1 216 559

 1 278 365

1 376 343

Free State

   379 369

    400 727

   431 851

Gauteng

   807  454

     849 075

   905 006

KwaZulu-Natal

1 534  878

1 621 292

1 717 512

Limpopo

1 229 299

1 292 010

1 369 485

Mpumalanga 

   651 036

    687 691

   734 414

Northern Cape 

   170 211

   189 224

   202 614

North West 

   456 176

   481 859

   516 114

Western Cape 

    357 097

    385 202

    412 548

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27 May 2021 - NW1232

Profile picture: Mashabela, Ms N

Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What total number of schools are considered (a) rural and (b) township schools; (2) what (a)(i) total number of learners between Grade 9 and 12 are enrolled in each specified school and (ii) is the location of each school and (b) are the relevant details of enrolment by each grade

Reply:

1 (a)(b)

Province

NOT CLASSIFIED

RURAL

URBAN

EC

 

 2 846

 2 680

FS

 

  163

  986

GT

 

  180

 2 936

KZN

 

 4 315

 1 789

LP

 

 3 436

  484

MP

 1 804

 

 

NC

 

  308

  288

NW

 

  40

 1 525

WC

 

  561

 1 298

Grand Total

 1 804

 11 849

 11 986

Note: Schools were classified into Rural and Urban. Due to not having a formal definition of Rural, Mpumalanga schools were not classified. The detailed list of above is included as Annexure A, with physical addresses of each school for further identification of township schools.

 

2 (a)(i) (ii) and (b)

Refer Annexure B

19 May 2021 - NW1032

Profile picture: Arries, Ms LH

Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What measures has her department put in place to ensure that all learners who are entitled to school feeding schemes are getting their meals every day?

Reply:

The National Department, in cooperation with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), submitted approved business plans to the National Treasury for the new financial year with the subsequent release of funds to provinces in April 2021. Amidst COVID-19 restrictions and to ensure learners receive meals, the Programme is implemented using three feeding modalities (i) feeding learners attending school (ii) collection of meals by learners not attending school due to rotation, and (iii) collection of food item/parcels by learners and/or parents. Provinces monitor and support schools. 

19 May 2021 - NW1226

Profile picture: Tito, Ms LF

Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What preparations has she made to protect both (a) teachers and (b) learners in schools against the third wave of the coronavirus?

Reply:

(a) and (b). The Minister and Department of Health have advised the country that the implementation of the Non-Pharmaceutical Interventions (NPIs) is the most effective way of preventing the spread of COVID-19. To that end, the Department of Basic Education has developed the Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for the Management and Containment of COVID-19, which are used in the basic education sector.  Learners, teachers and non-teaching staff are provided orientation on the SOP.  Schools ensure that the SOP is adhered to, and that the COVID-19 cleaning and sanitising resources are available.  The wearing of face masks is mandatory in schools.  Screening is conducted for learners, staff and visitors.  All these measures continue to be emphasised so that schools remain a much safer environment for all.   

17 May 2021 - NW1205

Profile picture: van der Merwe, Ms LL

van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of children of undocumented foreign nationals and/or illegal migrants are currently enrolled at government schools?

Reply:

According to the data collected through Learner Unit Record Information System (LURITS), there were approximately 301 217 undocumented immigrant learners in South African schools, in 2020. However, it is not known whether their parents were documented or not as it is not compulsory for parents to submit documentation before their children are admitted to a school. There is court case judgment regarding this matter. 

17 May 2021 - NW1085

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to his reply to question 715 on 15 March 2021, what is the breakdown of the number of learners in each province?

Reply:

Learners transported per quarter 

PROVINCE

NEEDS

 

 

No. of Learners in Need

No. of Learners being Transported

No of Learners not being Transported

Eastern Cape

111 127

124 727

0

Free State

12 045

8 948

3 097

Gauteng

161 375

160 439

936

KwaZulu Natal

179 318

62 070

117 248

Limpopo

49 892

47 276

2 616

Mpumalanga

63 000

62 160

840

North West

72 210

63 636

8 574

Northern Cape

27 256

25 372

1 884

Western Cape

60 215

61 498

0

TOTAL

                   736 438

            616 126

135 195

12 May 2021 - NW1195

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to her media briefing on 30 April 2021 regarding the end of her department’s youth employment initiative, (a) how will the second phase of the initiative be rolled out and (b) what support structures are there to support teachers and learners in the immediate period since the second term commences in May 2021?

Reply:

 

a) The Department is using successes achieved and lessons learnt from Phase 1 of the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative (PYEI) - Basic Education Employment Initiative (BEEI), to plan for Phase 2 of the Initiative.  In order to address COVID-19 related challenges on teaching and learning, there will still be a bias towards supporting educators through Education Assistants.  General School Assistants will also be provided to assist schools to implement the necessary health, safety and hygiene measures.  The details regarding implementation, will be announced once funding has been confirmed and planning finalised.

(b) The PYEI - BEEI is part of a temporary relief programme to alleviate the impact of COVID-19, for which limited funding was provided.  The established management and governance structures in the Provincial Education Departments will continue to support teachers, learners and schools.  Through the Quality Learning and Teaching Campaign (QLTC), the sector mobilises communities to support education as a societal matter.

30 April 2021 - NW955

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the current staff shortage for (i) Grade R and (ii) learners with special educational needs in each province and (b) immediate steps has her department taken to deal with the specified staff shortage in each case?

Reply:

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/03/2021

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2021

     

           

Response

(a) (i) Grade R is currently not part of compulsory education. And as such, allocation of educator posts in schools that offer Grade R classes is not done in terms of the post provisioning norms. The majority of educators appointed in Grade R posts are paid a monthly stipend as opposed to a salary. In schools where Grade R classes are offered, all posts are always filled. The is, therefore, no shortage of Grade R educators at schools, quantitatively. However, when considering the level of qualifications of Grade R teachers/practitioners appointed at schools there is an indication of qualitative shortage. The qualification of Grade R teachers/ practitioners currently employed at schools ranges from below Matric to a fully appropriate educator qualification. The latter category makes only about 34% of the 21 700 Grade R educators appointed at schools. It should, however, be noted that the sector will always find it difficult to attract fully qualified educators into Grade R teaching posts given the current conditions of service of Grade R educators.

(ii) The post provisioning norms are used to allocate posts of educators teaching learners with special educational needs. The allocated posts are filled with appropriately qualified educators.

(b) The Department runs ongoing targeted programmes that ensure the supply of educators in areas of need. Grade R and special needs education are part of the priority areas. With regards to improving Grade R qualifications, provinces are financially supporting Grade R educators currently employed in schools to upgrade their qualifications, either to the level of Grade R Diploma or the Bachelor of Education in Foundation Phase. About 2 700 such educators are currently being supported. As part of the Funza Lushaka Bursary scheme, the Department prioritises, in addition to African Languages, bursaries for studying towards a Bachelor of Education in Foundation Phase with specialisation neurodevelopmental needs, Braille, and South African Sign Language.                               

30 April 2021 - NW807

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of public schools in each province (i) are currently in operation, (ii) meet the minimum norms and standards found within the SA Schools Act, Act 84 of 1996, and (iii) do not meet the minimum norms and standards and (b) of those schools that do not meet the minimum norms and standards, what are the reasons in each case?

Reply:

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/03/2021

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2021

                  

Response

The information as per reports received from provinces as a sphere of government responsible for school infrastructure.

      1. Table below shows that there are 23 259 public ordinary schools currently operational,
      2. The minimum standards relate to Basic Services (Water, Electricity, Sanitation and schools built entirely of inappropriate material), as well as fencing and classroom provision. See table below:

PED

Total number public ordinary school                

Total number(%) of Schools provided with Water Supply        

Total number(%) of schools provided with Electricity supply        

Total number(%) of schools with sanitation        

Total number of Schools built of inappropriate structures

Schools using pit latrines ONLY

Total number of school without adequate Fencing

EC

5290

100%

100%

100%

*96

944

5 227

FS

1084

100%

100%

100%

*2

47

339

GP

2073

100%

100%

100%

0

0

146

KZN

5803

100%

100%

100%

0

901

198

LP

3833

100%

100%

100%

0

219

138

MP

1713

100%

100%

100%

0

1

1101

NW

1469

100%

100%

100%

0

18

0

NC

545

100%

100%

100%

0

0

88

WC

1449

100%

100%

100%

0

0

0

Total

23 259

100%

100%

100%

*98

2 111

7 237

*These schools are subjected to the process of rationalisation and realignment.

  

(b)

  • Unavailability of adequate budget;
  • Learner migration - learners move from one province to another, and also move in the same province from one district to another, which makes the classroom and sanitation backlog a moving target;
  • Rationalisation, were learner enrolment is low, or the school must be closed because it is not a viable school anymore;
  • Movement of learners from one school to another, were the schools that had sufficient infrastructure end up falling with backlog of insufficient facilities;
  • Drought were boreholes run dry, and waterborne toilets are not used anymore because of lack of water;
  • Deterioration of infrastructure, when the facilities are dilapidated that the facility can’t be used anymore; and
  • Vandalism and theft of infrastructure assets.

19 April 2021 - NW799

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the full, relevant details and breakdown of the (a) total amount that her department has spent on mobile classrooms countrywide and (b) location of the specified classrooms?

Reply:

(a)       R774 430 461

(b) 

The Classrooms are located as follows:

           

FREE STATE

2704

 

KWA-ZULU NATAL

1925

 

LIMPOPO

605

 

NORTHERN CAPE

65

 

NORTH WEST

73

 

WESTERN CAPE

206

 

GAUTENG

240

19 April 2021 - NW554

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of (a) schools in each province that do not have access to water in 2021 and (b) water tankers that have been installed in schools in each province since 1 November 2020?

Reply:

1. As reported by provincial education departments, there were no schools that did not have any access to water.

2. No water tanks were installed in the provinces since November 2020.

13 April 2021 - NW875

Profile picture: Masango, Ms B

Masango, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of learners who (a) are registered with her department do not have birth certificates and (b) do not have birth certificates have parents who are (i) South African citizens and (ii) foreign nationals in each province?

Reply:

(a)(b) (i)(ii) Refer Annexure A

01 April 2021 - NW891

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools have been affected by (i) vandalism and (ii) the weather since the start of the current academic year and (b) is the extent of the damage in monetary terms?

Reply:

(a)  (i) 148 schools have been vandalised since the start of the current academic year; 

        (ii) 288 schools have be affected by the weather since the start of the current academic year.

(b)  The cost estimates to repair the schools affected by the weather is R196 695 374.01

01 April 2021 - NW954

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the proposed Grade RR as part of the schooling system (a) what are the current details of the plan, (b) on what date will the plan be implemented, (c) what funding will be made available and (d) what total number of educators will be added to the system; (2) whether sufficient infrastructure will be provided; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Question 1

a) The Departments of Basic Education and Social Development are working together to develop a plan that will see the ECD function migrated from DSD to the DBE. Joint teams have been allocated to workstreams to deliberate on the technical detail and specifics. 

b) The ECD function shift to DBE is planned for 1 April 2022.

c) The details of the funding will be determined through the finalisation of the function shift process.

d) The Department of Basic Education will develop a Human Resource Development Strategy in the 2021/22 financial year, to detail with the professionalisation of the ECD workforce and its implications for ECD practitioners. 

Question 2

a) The availability of appropriate facilities is important in the provision of ECD services. In this regard, the Department of Basic Education will develop an Infrastructure Strategy to be implemented using the ECD conditional grant. 

01 April 2021 - NW755

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) total number of schools were vandalised (i) in (aa) 2019 and (bb) 2020 and (ii) from 1 January 2021 to date in each province, (b) number of the specified schools were vandalised during the (i) school holidays and (ii) lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 and (c) is the total cost of the damages in each case in each province; (2) whether all the schools will be (a) repaired and (b) re-open; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, (3) where are the affected learners accommodated where schools close due to vandalism?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) (aa) 957 schools were vandalised in 2019

            (bb) 1633 schools were vandalised in 2020

        (ii) 148 schools have been vandalised since 01 January 2021 to date.

    (b) (i) 23 schools were vandalised during school holidays;

            (ii) 1716 schools were vandalised during lockdown

    (c) The total cost of repairs amount to R74.6million.

2. (a) Yes

    (b)  YES, All schools are open and operational irrespective of the vandalism.

3. Not applicable   

01 April 2021 - NW941

Profile picture: King, Ms C

King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the national vacancy rate of teachers in the Republic, (b) is the total breakdown of the number of posts that have remained vacant in each province and (c) are the details of the vacancy rate in the (i) 2016, (ii) 2017, (iii) 2018, (iv) 2019 and (v) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

(a) 5.8% as at the end of February 2021

(b)The vacancy rate reported is in terms of the actual vacancies at schools in relation to posts that each school was allocated for 2021. Provincial Education Departments are currently redeploying educators that are additional to the allocated post establishments at some schools to schools that have vacancies. Once this process has been finalised and the residual vacant posts have been filled through appointment of educators from outside the system the actual number of vacancies will be lower than the current rate.

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2021

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

50 705

3 718

5.4%

Free State

20 490

842

3.9%

Gauteng

64 950

2 282

3.4%

KwaZulu-Natal

87 351

7 274

5.7%

Limpopo

51 637

5 375

9.2%

Mpumalanga

32 543

2 161

6.1%

North West 

26 556

1 433

5.3%

Northern Cape

9 181

354

4.5%

Western Cape 

29 099

1 117

4.3%

Grand Total

372 512

24 556

5.8%

Source: PERSAL, February 2021

(c) 

(i) 2016

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2016

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

53 998

1 739

3.2%

Free State

20 432

662

3.2%

Gauteng

59 848

684

1.1%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 356

2 712

3.1%

Limpopo

64 155

6 654

10.4%

Mpumalanga

32 783

792

2.4%

North West 

25 329

1 200

4.7%

Northern Cape

8 678

2 252

26.0%

Western Cape 

29 803

1 024

3.4%

Grand Total

381 382

17 719

4.6%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2016

(ii) 2017

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2017

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54 747

4 593

8.4%

Free State

20 974

845

4.0%

Gauteng

61 761

580

0.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

90 698

1 710

1.9%

Limpopo

52 097

4 920

9.4%

Mpumalanga

32 700

644

2.0%

North West 

25 908

666

2.6%

Northern Cape

8 231

512

6.2%

Western Cape 

30 225

1 218

4.0%

Grand Total

377 341

15 688

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2017

 

(iii) 2018

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2018

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54 026

4 497

8.3%

Free State

20 619

142

0.7%

Gauteng

60 302

1 243

2.1%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 420

412

0.5%

Limpopo

54 214

4 511

8.3%

Mpumalanga

32 799

552

1.7%

North West 

25 906

560

2.2%

Northern Cape

8 039

326

4.1%

Western Cape 

29 826

1 309

4.4%

Grand Total

377 341

15 688

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2018

(iv) 2019

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2019

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54029

3 281

6.1%

Free State

20608

843

4.1%

Gauteng

60027

1 140

1.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

86737

2 729

3.1%

Limpopo

51724

5 101

9.9%

Mpumalanga

32651

538

1.6%

North West

26260

319

1.2%

Northern Cape

9046

296

3.3%

Western Cape

31246

1 445

4.6%

Grand Total

372328

15 692

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2019

 

(v) 2020

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2021

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

52 632

2 848

5.4%

Free State

20 240

343

1.7%

Gauteng

59 138

452

0.8%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 737

6 216

7.2%

Limpopo

56 468

4 538

8.0%

Mpumalanga

34 854

1 772

5.1%

North West

25 863

509

2.0%

Northern Cape

9 149

40

0.4%

Western Cape

28 944

101

0.3%

Grand Total

374 025

16 819

4.5%

Source: PERSAL, December 2020

01 April 2021 - NW796

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that the Sefogole Sepeke Secondary High School in the Sekhukhune District Municipality in Limpopo is still using pit toilets and (b) by what date will she ensure that (i) the school buildings are refurbished and (ii) proper sanitation is provided to the learners and teachers?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Limpopo Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

24 March 2021 - NW956

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years, what (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, (iii) was the reason for each legal case, (iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose and (v) are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Reply:

                                

Response

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

 

2018-2019 financial year

Answer: The Department had 38 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case.In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 1 459 000 in litigation cost in the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

(iii) was the reason for each legal case, 

Answer: There were 8 cases relating to contractual disputes;9 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 10 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues;one case relating to pension payment of an educator; 2 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and five cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose 

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled three cases, won one and did not lose any case.

 

 (v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There are no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases. 

 

2019-2020 financial year

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

Answer: The Department had  42 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2019/2020 financial year

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case. In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 12 853 000  in litigation cost in the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

(iii)What was the reason for each legal case,

Answer: There were 11 cases relating to contractual disputes; 10 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 6 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues; 1 case relating to pension payment of an educator; 7 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and  4 cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled  two cases and lost one.

 

(v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There were no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases.

24 March 2021 - NW890

Profile picture: Ngcobo, Mr S

Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has recorded the total number of teachers who have been absent from schools since the reopening for the 2021 academic year; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the (a) total number of teachers who have been absent and (b)(i) name of the affected school and (ii) school’s location in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b) (i) (ii) No. The National Department does not collect information on teacher attendance as part of its monitoring framework and therefore has not set up systems to collect such information on a regular basis. The Honourable Member is requested to direct the question to the Provincial Education Departments.

24 March 2021 - NW780

Profile picture: Mathulelwa, Ms B

Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will she ensure that Harding Burgh Primary School in Matatiele is provided with proper classrooms and sanitation?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

24 March 2021 - NW867

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the prescribed maximum class size of 40 learners per class in the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, (a) which schools do not comply with this prescript and (b) what are the reasons in each case for not complying; (2) (a) what actual steps have been taken to rectify the situation regarding classrooms and education, (b) by what date will the steps be implemented and (c) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

(1) and (2) The process to determine the learner-classroom ratio, as determined through the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, is conducted annually by provinces based on the learner enrolment received from Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) for that particular year.  Provinces are currently conducting the analysis for inclusion in the User Asset Management Plans for the 2021-22 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), including the costing thereof.  The main reason for schools not complying with the prescript, can include an increase in enrolment or an insufficient number of classrooms to cater for the number of learners.  In both instances, mobile classrooms are provided to schools to address the influx.  Further response to the question will be provided as soon as provinces conclude the analysis and submit the information.

24 March 2021 - NW866

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her; (2) whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (3) whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her;

ANSWER

a) The Ministerial Task Team (MTT) on the Selling of posts was commissioned in September 2014.

b) The MTT Report was finalised in April 2016 and

c) The report was handed over to the Minister on 20 May 2016. However, at the time of the handing over of this report, there were still some forensic investigations that were pending. They were later subjected to a second phase investigation of the MTT in order to complete the remaining Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report. Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report was finalised in June 2018.

 

2. Whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date;

ANSWER:

a) Subsequent to the release of the MTT Report on 20 May 2016, the Report was tabled at the Cabinet meeting to brief them on the report and its findings; the Portfolio Committee was also briefed on May 2016 and June 2017 about the findings and the actions to be taken by the Department to remedy the challenges emanating from the report. Lastly, presentations were made to both the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and Heads of Education Committee (HEDCOM).

b) Yes, the MTT Report was gazetted and also made public on the Department of Basic Education’s website for easy access.

3. Whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?  

ANSWER:                                 

The identified cases of the alleged illegal activities were sent to the affected Provincial Departments of Education (PEDs). Due to the fact that the PEDs are the Employers of educators in the respective provinces, they were requested to conduct investigations or follow-up investigations into these cases and provide reports on each of the cases to the DBE.

Since the provincial investigations were commissioned, the number of allegations subsequently dropped. Currently, the  DBE has not received any further complaints of such illegal activities or allegations of individuals who participated in one or other form of corruption or selling of posts.

24 March 2021 - NW809

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the plan of her department to reclaim money that was spent on fraudulent and/or overpriced irregular tenders of personal protective equipment and (b) amount has been (i) retrieved and (ii) lost?

Reply:

a) There has not been any money spent fraudulently on the procurement of personal protective equipment.  The Department of Basic Education procured PPEs through the Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement with the Private Party as per Regulation 16 of the PFMA.  As the Private Party cannot make use of the transversal contracts for PPEs and purchased PPEs from the open market, the Department has engaged with the Private Party with the assistance of National Treasury and has resolved any future pricing risk.   

b)

(i) Not applicable 

(ii) Not applicable

24 March 2021 - NW868

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of schools for children with special educational needs (ELSEN) in each province, (b) are the norms and standards for funding the ELSEN sector and (c) is the current long-term plans of her department to improve the sector?

Reply:

a) Eastern Cape: 45; Free State: 21; Gauteng: 132; KwaZulu-Natal: 75; Limpopo: 35; Mpumalanga: 18; Northern Cape: 08; North West: 32; Western Cape: 67.

b) No, there are guidelines for the resourcing of inclusive education.

c) Yes.

24 March 2021 - NW808

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her reply to question 168 on 25 February 2021, what (a) are the details of the gender-based violence (GBV) programme found within the Life Orientation subject, (b) number of days and/or weeks are there that focus on GBV within the specified subject and (c) are the contents of the programme; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with the details of the programme?

Reply:

1(a) GBV is addressed through the provision of comprehensive sexuality education, access to sexual and reproductive health services implemented in secondary schools including a focus on prevention of alcohol and drug use and learner pregnancy (now also COVID-19) as risk factors to GBV. In primary schools, activities mainly focus on raising awareness of social justice and vulnerabilities such as reporting of abuse and support for GBV-affected learners.

(b) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education lessons broadly are delivered through a total of 80 lessons (implying 80 hours) in the Lifeskills and Life Orientation subject, throughout the schooling life from Grade 4 to 12. Of the 80 lessons, 29 (36%) of these specifically address GBV.

(c) In Primary Schools with younger learners, it starts with addressing bullying, safety of the body, protecting personal space, prevention of rape, reporting of sexual abuse and sexual harm, with the view of empowering the potential victim. Gradually, as the learners progress to higher grades, the topics in the Intermediate Phase begin to introduce issues of bullying, sexual abuse, sexual grooming, skills for bullies to change, this is coupled with identification and linking to services for learners at risk. In the Senior Phase, the lessons begin to introduce the construction of gender, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. In the Further Education and Training (FET) phase, the lessons address in depth the issues of gender construction, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. These messages communicate both to the potential victim and perpetrator with the view of challenging their attitudes in the communities.

2. Yes

15 March 2021 - NW664

Profile picture: Sarupen, Mr AN

Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

a) For the office accommodation the Department of Basic Education has signed a Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement for its head office. The agreement provides security as part of the services provided.

  1. Sethekgo Private Party,
  2. The Private Party security services are provided for the securing of the perimeter, CCTV monitoring and access control to the building,
  3. The Department pays a single unitary fee to the Private Party,
  4. The PPP agreement is for a 25 year period. 

           

   For the Administrator at the North West Provincial Education Department the response is as follows:

                   i)  Wise Training Centre.

                   ii) To provide protection for the Administrator as an intervention due to the

North West Province which was placed under Administration, Section100 (1) (b).

                   iii) R206 906.00

                   iv) 1 November 2020 to 30 April 2021.

(b) Umalusi:

    (i) Rise Security Services (PTY) LTD

    (ii) The security company provides perimeter security services, access control to the building as well as emergency reaction unit.

    (iii) Contract value is R3,276,136.00

    (iv) Contract period 01 October 2018 -30 September 2021

(b) SACE 

The South African Council for Educators makes use of a private security company for its Head Office in centurion and for its Limpopo Provincial office makes use of the school security (Tom Naude).

(i) For the SACE Head Office in Centurion WANGIS security services provides the service; (ii) The security contract entered into with the provider is to offer security services by securing of the perimeter and access control for the SACE building. (iii) R 437 400 (iv) The contact is for a 12-month period 

(i) For the SACE Limpopo provincial office – School security (Tom Naude). (ii) The security agreement entered into with the school security is to offer security services by assisting with access control. (iii) R10 000 MONTHLY (iv) The contract is for the duration of our lease agreement 2 years.

15 March 2021 - NW715

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of learners who are eligible for learner transport do not benefit from the service and (b) what is the reason for this situation?

Reply:

a) There are 751 318 Learners who are in need of Learner Transport nationally; and 616 126 of these learners are being transported, which leaves out 135 192 Learners who are eligible for learner transport and are not benefiting from the service.

b) The reason for not transporting these learners is purely attributed to insufficient funding, as the demand for learner transport exceeds the budget allocated; which result in the exclusion of a number of qualifying learners.

15 March 2021 - NW754

Profile picture: Van Der Walt, Ms D

Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of school infrastructure projects which were (i) stopped and (ii) delayed during the 2020-21 financial year in each province, (b) which schools were affected in each case, (c) which were (i) new projects, (ii) upgrades, (iii) maintenance and (iv) repairs and (d) what is the total cost of each project’s (i) initial costs and (ii) savings by halting the projects; (2) whether any of the projects will continue during 2021-22 financial year; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it envisaged the projects will resume?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (c) Breakdown of projects cancelled or postponed during 2020/21 financial year (d) No savings were realised as these projects were stopped or delayed as a result of budget cuts as a result of COVID 19. The budget for these projects was reallocated to address COVID 19 requirements.

2. All those projects that could not be addressed in the 2020/21 financial year will be carried over to 2021/22 MTEF for implementation. The infrastructure budget will be revised to make sure that all other projects that were planned for 2021/22 MTEF are not negatively affected.

 

Province

Projects stopped or delayed

EC

R114m for 17 new and replacement projects, R105m for 15 Upgrades and additions and R9m for 1 refurbishment project.

FS

R120m for 17 upgrades and additions as well as 44 maintenance projects.

GP

R9m for 55 new and replacements, R35m for 47 upgrades and additions, R162 for 168 rehabilitation and refurbishments and R17m for 32 maintenance projects.

KZN

R78m for 22 new and replacement schools and R222m for 400 repairs and renovations projects

LP

R50m for 7 new and replacement projects and R135m for 101 refurbishment and rehabilitation projects.

MP

R56m for 24 new and replacement projects, R48m for 435 maintenance projects and R56m for 249 upgrades and additions

NW

R143m for 24 new and replacement projects and R16m for 4 upgrades and additions

NC

R41m for 51 upgrades and additions and R40m for 22 new and replacements projects

WC

R159m for 200 maintenance projects

SUMMARY                                          1 938 Projects

New and Replacements

168 Projects

Upgrades and additions

388 Projects

Rehabilitation and refurbishment

269 Projects

Repairs and renovations

400 Projects

Maintenance

 

711 Projects

 

15 March 2021 - NW789

Profile picture: Moteka, Mr PG

Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to some secondary schools that are constantly failing to produce results every year in Limpopo (names furnished) and another nine schools that achieved a zero matric pass rate in Limpopo for the 2020 academic year, what special attention will she be giving to the specified schools this year, that was not given over the past few years?

Reply:

Annually, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) identifies and classifies schools according to the support required. Differentiated support plans are developed based on the identified needs of the school which include training of teachers, extra lessons and resources for learners such as study guides, regular oversight and monitoring visits by Districts, the Province and the DBE. 

Provinces are also required to submit such support and intervention plans as well as quarterly reports to the DBE for monitoring purposes to ensure turn-around strategies are implemented and are yielding results.  

15 March 2021 - NW552

Profile picture: Nodada, Mr BB

Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the breakdown of the total number of learners in each (a) Grade and (b) province who have been unaccounted for in the period 15 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

Learner drop-out statistics are not available at this point. Based on the information provided by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) during the DG's weekly one-on-one virtual meetings with PEDs, provinces are still collating the drop-out statistics. As they work out drop-out-statistics, PEDs are identifying learners who do not physically come to school, but have not dropped out, because they are learning from home.  These are learners who have comorbidities or other illnesses, as well as those who are in the home education programme.