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03 October 2019 - NW928

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Bergman, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the more than 3000 schools to be merged or closed in each province, (a) what number of primary schools have fewer than 135 pupils, (b) which of the specified schools will (i) close and (ii) be merged, (c) what are the (i) names of the schools affected and (ii) time frames in each case and (d) what will happen to the school buildings where schools will be closed; (2) with reference to the schools to be merged or closed in each province, (a) what number of high schools have fewer than 225 pupils, (b) which of the specified schools will (i) close and (ii) be merged, (c) what are the (i) names of the schools affected and (ii) what are the time frames in each case and (d) what will happen to the school buildings where schools will be closed?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (i) ( ii)

Province

(a)

  1. (i) Closure
  1. (ii) Merger

Eastern Cape

1 813

761

1 052

Free State

No info

Gauteng

9

3

6

Kwazulu-Natal

731

0

731

Limpopo

416

133

283

Mpumalanga

10

0

10

Northern Cape

No info

North West

Rationalisation put on hold

Western Cape

25

8

17

Source: PED Provided

1 (c) (i) (ii) and (d) for responses see attached Annexure A1 and A2

2. (a) (b) (i) (ii)

Province

(a)

(b)(i) Closure

  1. (ii) Merger

Eastern Cape

133

54

79

Free State

No info

Gauteng

1

1

 

Kwazulu-Natal

348

 

348

Limpopo

124

21

103

Mpumalanga

0

   

Northern Cape

No info

North West

Rationalisation put on hold

Western Cape

0

   

Source: PED Provided

2. (c) (i) (ii) (d) for responses to see attached Annexure B1 and B2

03 October 2019 - NW1034

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of parents in Quintile 1, 2 and 3 have attended scheduled parents’ meetings of school governing bodies in each province in the period 1 January 2015 up to the latest specified date for which information is available?

Reply:

The South African Schools Act (SASA) demands that school governing bodies should hold meetings. These meetings are held according to the needs and requirements of each school and therefore the date is randomly selected in each school.

The question posed by the honourable member requires detailed information that Provincial Education Departments are best placed to provide. The Honourable member is advised to direct the question to the Provincial Education Department.

03 October 2019 - NW927

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total number of public schools in each province that are (a) Afrikaans single-medium schools, (b) English single-medium schools and (c) Afrikaans and English dual-medium schools?

Reply:

(a)(b)(c)

Table 1 below shows that about 1 126 and 5 790 public schools use only Afrikaans and English, respectively, as their language of learning and teaching, while 1 112 school use both Afrikaans and English.

Please note that single medium school is defined as “a school that offers only one medium of instruction in every grade of the school.

The term "dual medium of instruction" refers to the employment of two languages as media of instruction, wherein a teacher switches from one medium of instruction to another during a lesson on a 50:50 percent basis. In this instance, the teacher repeats the instruction in another language.

For a school to be classified as dual medium school, all learners of that school should be receiving the tuition through dual medium of instruction. Such information is not collected from schools as it is very difficult to collect.

The Department does however collect information on parallel medium schools. It defines a parallel medium school as one that offers more than one medium of instruction in all grades of the school.

Table 1: Number of public schools by, language of learning and teaching and province

Province

Afrikaans Single-Medium Schools

English Single-Medium Schools

English\Afrikaans parallel medium Schools

Ec

149

890

141

FS

56

217

90

GT

113

563

188

KZ

7

1 367

45

LP

15

1 406

39

MP

18

541

60

NC

158

61

121

NW

44

371

43

WC

566

374

385

Total

1 126

5 790

1 112

Source: LURITS

The underlying principle of the Language in Education Policy is to maintain the use of Home language as the LOLT, hence, there are schools using English and other African languages as LOLT. Majority of primary schools use English and home language as their LOLT especially in the foundation phase. The question requires schools that offers only English and Afrikaans.

02 October 2019 - NW1035

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether school safety committees have been established in each school in each province; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) what (a) number of school safety committees are functional and (b) steps have been taken to ensure that school safety committees are (i) established and (ii) functional?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) continuously conducts monitoring on the implementation of the National School Safety Framework (NSSF) in order to gauge whether schools are complying with the minimum requirements for school safety. Support is also afforded to all provinces in the form of NSSF training as a means to assist schools to establish functional School Safety Committees, conduct school safety audits and develop school safety plans.

2. Please see below statistics on the number of school safety committees established in response to (a) (b) (i) and (ii):

Province

Functional School Safety Committees Established

Eastern Cape

3 120

Free State

1 346

Gauteng

1 860

KwaZulu-Natal

5 607

Limpopo

3 592

Mpumalanga

1 488

Northern Cape

564

North West

1 284

Western Cape

1 163

TOTAL

20 024

02 October 2019 - NW925

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)With reference to the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative programme, (a) what number of schools were completed in the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18 and (v) 2018-19 financial years, (b) what are the names of the schools in each province, (c) what was the total cost for each specified school and (d) who were the implementing agents in each case; (2) whether the schools were completed in accordance with the respective contract dates; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(1) With reference to the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative programme,

(a) (i) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2014-15 is 59

(ii) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2015-16 is 52

(iii) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2016-17 is 16

(iv) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2017-18 is 14; and

(v) Number of inappropriate school completed in 2018-19 is 21.

(b) The attached table is a list of completed schools including their the names per province,

(c) the attached table also includes the construction cost for each specified school. The cumulative total is R5,7 Billion

(d) The implementing agents (IA) are also indicted in the attached table. The IA’s are Development Bank of Southern Africa (DBSA), the Independent Development Trust (IDT), the Coega Development Corporation (CDC), the National Department of Public Works (NDPW), the Eastern Cape Provincial Public Works (DPW);

(2) Each school was constructed under the JBCC building contract. Each school was managed according to the said contract. Adjudicated extensions of time were approved where they applied and requisite penalties were levied where applicable.

 

02 October 2019 - NW812

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What progress did her department make with regard to the vocational and technical education during the (i) 2014-15, (ii) 2015-16, (iii) 2016-17, (iv) 2017-18 and (v) 2018-19 financial years and (b) will she furnish Ms B M van Minnen with a list of schools that will be affected by the programme in each province?

Reply:

a) (i) (ii) The implementation of the Technical Vocational Stream commenced in January 2015. 1 660 teachers and Subject Advisors were trained on Technical Subjects Specialisations, 203 in Technical Sciences, and 228 in Technical Mathematics in preparation for the implementation at Grade 10 in 2016.

(iii) In 2016,1 647 Grade 11 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical specialisation subjects.345 trained in Technical Mathematics and Technical Sciences in preparation for implementation at Grade 11 in 2017.

(iv) (v) In 2017,1229 Grade 12 Teachers and subject advisors for Technical subjects specialisations,195 in Technical Mathematics and 206 in Technical Sciences were trained in preparation for implementation at Grade 12 in 2018.

(b) See attached document

02 October 2019 - NW983

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)In view of her undertaking on 12 March 2019 to eradicate the remaining 3 898 pit latrines in the Republic’s schools within the next three years, (a) what are the (i) names and (ii) GPS locations of all schools in the City of Tshwane that still have pit latrines and (b) in which financial year is the eradication work planned to take place; (2) whether the concrete dates for the eradication of the pit latrines are available; if not, what is the plan to eradicate the pit latrines in the City of Tshwane within the next three financial years; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) and (2)

The Gauteng Province has no schools with inappropriate sanitation (pit latrines).

02 October 2019 - NW853

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) How does the new social workers programme which is tailor-made for social workers who are to work in schools and who have been assigned by her department to universities, differ from the current social workers curriculum provided at universities and (b) what is preventing her department from appointing the current 3 000 unemployed social worker graduates to various schools?

Reply:

a) The Department of Basic Education (DBE) participates in the National Committee for School Social Work Education and Practice (NACOSSWEP) which brings together universities, Government Departments and the Council for Social Services Professions (SACSSP) to declare school social work as a specialisation recognised by the SACSSP. In 2019, the Board of Social Work at the SACSSP approved the regulations for specialisation in school social work which is yet to be gazetted by the Minister of Social Development. It is anticipated that social workers will begin to specialise in school social work from 2020 or 2021.

b) The Department continues to optimise services through referrals and close collaboration with the Department of Social Development as the employer of social workers. The DBE currently has no budget to employ social workers.

 

QUESTION 853

Compiler:

DR F KUMALO

CHIEF DIRECTOR: CARE AND SUPPORT IN SCHOOLS

DATE:

DR G WHITTLE

DEPUTY DIRECTOR-GENERAL: SOCIAL MOBILISATION AND SUPPORT SERVICES

DATE:

MR HM MWELI

DIRECTOR-GENERAL

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

DR MR MHAULE

DEPUTY MINISTER

DATE:

QUESTION 853 APPROVED/ NOT APPROVED/ AMENDED

MS MA MOTSHEKGA, MP

MINISTER OF BASIC EDUCATION

DATE:

02 October 2019 - NW947

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Walters, Mr TC to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has any plans to replace the asbestos school buildings at (a) Toekomsrus Primary School and (b) Randfontein Secondary School in Toekomsrus, Randwest Municipal Area; if so, (i) by what date will the specified school buildings be replaced and (ii) what are the relevant details of the allocated budgets for the buildings; (2) whether the Department of Labour supplied her department with a report of the dangers that the two school buildings may hold for learners and teachers; if so, what are the relevant details of the specified report?

Reply:

1 (a) (b) The Gauteng Department of Education has plans to eradicate all schools built out of inappropriate materials as mandated by the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, Government Gazette Number 37081 of 2013. Both these schools have been identified as schools built entirely out of asbestos and are part of the replacement programme. Both these schools are in the Estimates of Capital Expenditure (ECE) for the 2020/21 MTEF period.

The table below indicates the relevant details of the projects.

No

Project

Number

Project name

Scope of Works

Project Status

Indicative / Estimated Budget

Anticipated Start Date

1

GDE/700270025/N&R/2018/1

Randfontein Secondary School

Construction of a Brick and Mortar Replacement Secondary School

Design

R80 000 000

2020/21 MTEF Period

2

GDE/700270033/N&R/2018/1

Toekomsrus Primary School

Construction of a Brick and Mortar Replacement Primary School

Design

R70 000 000

2020/21 MTEF Period

(2) The Department of Labour provides reports and prohibition notices on educational facilities as and when they conduct inspections and they find the facilities to be not compliant. The Department is not aware of any specific reports issued by the Department of Labour on the two schools.

26 September 2019 - NW532

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether she will furnish Ms D van der Walt with a list of schools in each province which have been provided with safe and adequate sanitation by the national Sanitation Appropriate for Education Initiative as at 30 June 2019; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (2) for each specified school in each province, what is (a) the name of the school, (b) the number of toilets that were (i) demolished and/or (ii) provided, (c) the type of toilet provided (details furnished), (d) the cost of the project at the school and (e) the portion of the total cost was paid for from government (non-donor) funds?

Reply:

1.  To date 188 Schools have been provided with adequate sanitation.

Province

No. of Projects

Donor

EIG & ASIDI

EC

11

4

7

FS

29

 

29

KZN

93

2

91

LP

35

3

32

MP

20

9

11

TOTAL

188

18

170

2.

(a) Refer to Annexure A, column B

b) (i) All the inappropriate sanitation was demolished.

(ii) The number of toilets seats provided is to be confirmed by the Provincial Education Department (PEDs).

c) The type of toilets provided is to be confirmed by the PEDs.

d) & (e) The financial implications are to be confirmed by the PEDS.

26 September 2019 - NW533

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Diale, Mrs B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Regarding the Sanitation Appropriate for Education (SAFE) Initiative projects to provide safe and adequate sanitation to schools, (a) what number of projects are in the (i) planning and design and (ii) construction phase in each province as at 30 June 2019, (b) for each project, what (i) is the name of the school where the project is taking place and (ii) the number of toilets to be (aa) demolished and (bb) provided, (iii) type of toilet will be provided, (iv) are the projected costs of each project and (v) what portion of the total cost will be paid from Government funds?

Reply:

a)

(i) 880 Projects are currently under planning and design phase

(ii) 127 Projects are currently under construction.

Province

No. of Projects

Planning

Construction

EC

262

262

0

FS

148

80

68

KZN

402

372

30

LP

162

162

0

MP

33

4

29

Total

1007

880

127

b) 

(i) Refer to Annexure A, column B

(ii) 

(aa) All the inappropriate sanitation will be demolished.

(bb) The number of toilets seats to be provided is determined by the learner enrolment as the ratio is prescribed in the Norms and Standards.

(iii) Where there is reliable source of water supply, flushing ablutions will be constructed and if the water supply is not reliable dry sanitation systems will be constructed.

(iv) Refer to Annexure A, column K

(v) All the 1007 projects will be funded through government funding, either the SAFE Allocation which is managed at the National Department of Basic Education (DBE) or the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) that is managed by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs). Refer to Annexure A, column L

26 September 2019 - NW850

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the information and communications technology material and gadgets provided to schools, her department has costed the price of the (a) laptops, (b) iPad/tablets and (c) smart boards that all public schools will require; if not, why not; if so, what total amount will it cost her department, (2) is (a) there any evidence of improvement in the performance of learners who have received the above gadgets as compared to schools who do not have these gadgets and (b) her department finding value for money in providing the above gadgets; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, what are the relevant details? NW1970E

Reply:

1. (a), (b) and (c)

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) and Provincial Education Departments (PDEs) are using State Information and Communication Technology (SITA) and National Treasury transversal contracts to procure and rollout ICT devices to schools.

The DBE in collaboration with Department of Trade and Industry, National Treasury, State Information & Technology Agency are working together to develop an education specific contract. The department will use this education specific contract to leverage on the economies of scale. Furthermore, the DTI is conducting a study to determine the local capacity in the country to manufacture and assembly ICT devices. Based on the study the government will be able to determine the cost of providing ICT equipment to schools.

2. (a) The department has not conducted a comparative research study to determine whether there has been an improvement in the performance of learners who have received the above gadgets as compared to schools who do not have these gadgets.

(b) The primary value of providing ICTs in education is to transform teaching and learning to:

  • Enhance learning experiences of learners;
  • Improve efficiency in delivering educational services; and
  • Leverage on ICTs to mitigate educational challenges.

However, drawing lessons from local experiences, the Khanya Project in the Western Cape was implemented to promote learning and maximize educator capacity by integrating the use of appropriate, available and affordable technology (computer technology) into the curriculum delivery process. In addition, the GDE ICT and e-Education Strategy is aimed at ensuring that schools in Gauteng are well resourced with ICT facilities to:

  • Promote e-learning with the aim of introducing devices and smart software into the classroom using technology;
  • Enhance teaching quality;
  • Accessing materials to engage learners; and
  • Train teachers and school administrators.

In conclusion, it should be noted that in order to bring 21st century skills to learners, the department is implementing the use of ICTs and eLearning programs to enhance the education environments that are best suitable for teaching and learning.

 

26 September 2019 - NW809

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Diale, Mrs B to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has used any training programmes of the National School of Government during the period 1 January 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, why not; if so what are the relevant details, including the costs incurred in each case?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education sent officials to the National School of Government (NSG) on a regular basis, to attend skills development and training courses. The five tables below indicate the number of officials who attended skills development and training programmes offered by National School of Government (NSG) from 2014/15; 2015/16; 2016/17; 2017/18 and 2018/19 financial years.

The information presented includes the name of courses, number of officials according to race, gender, disability and the total cost per financial year.

Financial year 2014/15

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per Official

Total cost per course

Advanced Management Development Programme

10

9

         

1

20

R 6 498.000

R129 960.00

Foundation Management Development Programme

5

15

           

20

R4 250.00

R85 000.00

Emerging Management Development Programme

6

11

     

2

1

 

20

R6 890.00

R137 800.00

Breaking Barriers into public service

 

2

           

2

No cost

No cost

Assessor Training

1

3

           

4

R 4 215.00

R16 860.00

CIP Train the Trainer

 

2

           

2

No cost

No cost

Compulsory Induction

11

15

     

1

   

27

R4 025.00

R108 675.00

TOTALS

33

57

     

3

1

1

95

 

R 478 295.00

Financial year 2015/16

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per Official

Total cost per course

Public Service Trainers Forum

 

3

           

3

R3 275.000

R9 825.00

Financial year 2016/17

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

Advanced Management Development Programme

8

9

1

       

2

20

R8 400.00

R168 000.00

Compulsory Induction Programme

16

20

           

36

R1 892.00

R68 112.00

E-Learning on BID Committee (PFMA)

10

5

2

1

   

2

 

20

R2060.00

R41 200.00

Job Evaluation Follow up

 

2

           

2

R3 680.00

R7 360.00

Supply Chain Management

2

5

 

1

       

8

R4 925.00

R39 400.00

TOTALS

36

41

3

2

   

2

2

86

 

R 324 072.00

Financial year 2017/18

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

Compulsory Induction Programme

3

13

       

1

1

18

R2 159.00

R38 862.00

Mentoring for Public Service

1

4

       

0

1

6

No cost

No cost

Mentoring for Public Service

2

15

(1-disable official)

   

1

1

 

1

20

R4 100.00

R82 000.00

Emerging Management Programme Development

4

15

   

1

     

20

R8 400.00

R168 000.00

TOTAL

10

47

   

2

1

1

3

64

 

R 288 862.00

Financial year 2018/19

Course name

African Male

African Female

Indian Male

Indian Female

Coloured Male

Coloured Female

White Male

White Female

Total number of officials attended

Cost per official

Total cost per course

BID Committee (PFMA)

11

7

2

1

1

   

1

23

R4 782.60

R110 000.00

Compulsory Induction Programme (On-line)

7

3

           

10

R946.00

R9 460.00

Job Evaluation

5

1

       

1

1

8

R4 650.00

R37 200.00

Supply Chain Management

4

6

           

10

R6 750.00

R67 500.00

TOTAL

27

17

2

1

1

 

1

2

51

 

R224 160.00

Conclusion

The total amount spent by the Department of Basic Education for Skills Development and Training programmes attended by officials facilitated by the National School of Government from 1 March 2014 to 31 March 2019 (i.e the past five years) is R1 328 214.00.

20 September 2019 - NW810

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the 13 700 Funza Lushaka bursaries approved for initial teacher education by 31 March 2019, (a) why were only 13 070 students awarded bursaries by the National Student Financial Aid Scheme and (b) what is the total (i) number of students in each province who were awarded bursaries and (ii) monetary value of the bursaries awarded in each province?

Reply:

a) The Department of Basic Education is responsible for the awarding of Funza Lushaka Bursaries to eligible students. The National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) is appointed as the financial administrator of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Programme. The 13 070 students awarded bursaries refer to the number of students who received all their bursary funding from the NSFAS. The balance of 630 Funza Lushaka bursary holders is approved by the Department of Basic Education but have not received all their bursary funding by 31 March 2019. The Department is working with the NSFAS to ensure all bursary funding is disbursed to approved Funza Lushaka Bursary holders.

b) (i) The Funza Lushaka Bursary Programme awards bursaries by university and not provinces. Students recruited from provinces must be registered in one of the 24 public universities to be considered for the Funza Lushaka Bursary.

(ii) The total budget for the Funza Lushaka Bursary Programme in 2019 was R 1.22 billion. The allocation to a bursary holder is capped at R 103 899.00. The bursary amounts vary per university. The average value of the bursary across 24 universities in 2019 was R 93 923.00. An allocation letter is issued annually to the NSFAS indicating the number and monetary value of bursaries allocated by university.

20 September 2019 - NW811

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the highlights from the Lekgotla of her department held from 21-23 January 2019, what are the detailed outcomes of (a) a competence-based curriculum to enhance entrepreneurship, (b) the assessment implications for the Fourth Industrial Revolution and (c) the provision of learning and teaching support material?

Reply:

a) The outcomes of a competence-based curriculum to enhance entrepreneurship include problem-solving, creative thinking, critical thinking and collaboration all of which are inculcated through the Project Based Learning approach.

b) Assessment in subjects focusing on the 4IR, such as Digital Skills (including coding and robotics) to be project-based (include Practical Assessment Tasks) where learners demonstrate their skills and competencies and which will also foster ‘soft’ skills required for functioning in a changing world.

c) The Learning and Teaching Support Materials (LTSM) will be developed following the finalisation of the Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for these subjects.

20 September 2019 - NW854

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Joseph, Mr D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to the incorporation of Early Childhood Development (ECD) into her department, any costing was done in terms of the (a) number of teachers who will be required and (b) qualification(s) they will need; if not, why not; if so, has the qualification programme already been developed and provided at various universities; (2) whether the title of practitioner will change to educator; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) whether the salaries of the ECD teachers and/or practitioners will be raised to the level of educators instead of receiving stipends; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The funding available currently is for Grade R only. This will be revised in the new financial year to accommodate for the new functions that have been transferred to the DBE.

(b) REQV 13 is the minimum qualification as determined in the Employment of Educators ‘Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). The Minister of Higher Education and Training gazetted the Policy on Minimum Requirements for Programmes Leading to Qualifications in Higher Education for Early Childhood Development Educators in 2017. This Policy puts in place a set of qualifications for ECD practitioners who are delivering or assisting in delivering ECD programmes.

2. To be employed as an educator, one has to have an REQV 13 as a minimum qualification as determined in the Employment of Educators ‘Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). This translates to Matric plus three years of formal training for a teaching degree. In relation to compulsory Grade R, qualified Grade R practitioners will be appointed as educators in terms of the Employment of Educators Act and will be subject to the conditions of service as they apply to all other school-based educators. In relation to ages 0-4 years, the Department is still gathering information about these practitioners, including identifying a need for a full audit on the qualifications and skills set of the practitioners. The audit will inform the decisions that need to be taken in relation to career options for practitioners. This will also clarify what job titles should exist in ECD centres, the qualification framework required and the salary scales as well as the conditions of service that will exist for Early Childhood Practitioners.

3. Salary scales of educators are determined in terms of the requirements of the Employment of Educators’ Act and the Personnel Administrative Measures (PAM). It will therefore not be automatic that the salaries of ECD practitioners will be equal to educators, if they do not meet the minimum requirements for appointment as educators. However, any qualified Grade R practitioners will be subject to the conditions of service applicable to other school-based educators.

20 September 2019 - NW800

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that her department failed to reinstate Mr Obilana Aderemi (details furnished) despite the ruling of the Education Labour Relations Council and the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration, which ordered the reinstatement of the specified person after finding that he was dismissed unfairly?

Reply:

This is an employer-employee relations issue of which the processes are regulated by the Labour Relations Act, 66 of 1995. In terms of section 3(1)(b) of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998, the Head of the Provincial Education Department is the Employer of educators employed at the provincial level. Therefore, the responsibility to implement rulings wherein cases were ruled against the Employer lies with the Head of the Provincial Education Department.

The response received from the Mpumalanga Education Department states that the Department/Employer has demonstrated its willingness to comply with the award, but Mr Obilana refused to comply and cooperate. An alternative post was identified for him to occupy effectively from 1 October 2018 and was within the same circuit a few kilometres from the school where he used to teach prior to his dismissal, but he failed to report for duty to date.

The details are as follows:

The Department did not immediately comply with the award because at the time the award was received, the position which Mr Obilana occupied prior to his dismissal was already filled. Mr Obilana was, however, informed through his union on 28 September 2018 that the Department had established a vacant substantive post where he would be placed effectively from 1 October 2018. He was directed to report at the Emalahleni Circuit where the Circuit Manager would take him to the institution he would be serving at. A response was received from his union indicating that he was sick, and insisted that the Department place him in accordance with the award. Mr Obilana never reported for duty, but instead proceeded to take steps to enforce the award by filing an application for the certification of the award with the Commission for Conciliation, Mediation and Arbitration (CCMA).

The award was certified in terms of section 143 of the Labour Relations Act. The CCMA issued a document entitled “Enforcement of the Award” [the CCMA writ] instructing the sheriff to attach and execute the movable goods of the Employer to the value of R 171 952.40 with interest. The sheriff served the document and attached a vehicle belonging to the Employer on several occasions and this culminated in the Employer filing an urgent application with the Labour Court, which was heard on 27 August 2019, wherein the enforcement award was declared invalid and set aside.

20 September 2019 - NW808

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Did her department incur any legal costs in the (a) 2014-15, (b) 2015-16, (c) 2016-17, (d) 2017-18 and (e) 2018-19 financial years; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details of the costs incurred in each case?

Reply:

a) The Department incurred legal cost for the 2014-2015 financial year to the amount of R2 847 339.48. The details of each case is as follows:

NO

NAME OF CASE

AMOUNT

1.

Fedsas v Minister of Basic Education

R276 581.00

2.

MEC Education v Beavallon Secondary school

R184 642.65

3.

PTY Trade 73T/A Edusolutions v MEC Education Limpopo

R519 640.00

4.

Section 27 & Others v Minister of Basic Education

R135 410.58

5.

Disciplinary hearing: Soobrayan

R164 331.00

6.

Isaac Shabangu v Minister of Basic Education

R289 971.84

7.

Pease v Minister of Basic Education and Others

R204 776.79

8.

Magna FS v Minister of Basic Education

R60 534.00

9.

Steadman and Others v Minister of Basic Education

R81 210.50

10

Minister of Basic Education v Public Protector

R302 215.05

11.

SADTU v Minister of Basic Education

R41 969.00

12

Minister of Basic Education v Basic Education for All

R395 308.54

13.

Trade Mark application

R1 435.00

14.

Pitsi Et Al v Minister of Basic Education

R8 208.00

15.

Aurecon v MEC Education and Others

R26 220.00

16.

Konani v Minister of Basic Education

R45 600.00

17.

Opinion (ASIDI)

R25 992.00

18.

State Attorney

R406.41

19.

Centre for Child Law v MEC Education Eastern Cape

R8 216.55

20.

State Attorney (Sherriff)

R57.57

21.

BB Mubake and7 Others v Department of Education and Others

R36 423.00

22.

Michelle Saffer v MEC Education and Others

R38 190.00

     
 

TOTAL

R 2 847 339.48

b) The Department incurred legal cost for the 2015-2016 financial year to the amount of R1 948 671.43. The details of each case is as follows:

NO

NAME OF CASE

AMOUNT

1.

Centre for Child Law vs Department of Basic Education

R9 120.00

2.

BEFA vs Minister of Basic Education

R40 000.00

3.

Clareville Primary School vs Department of Basic Education

R5 130.00

4.

Mtongana vs Department of Basic Education

R82 080.00

5

BVCVO & others vs Minister of Education & others

R231.28

6

Beavollon Secondary School and 36 others vs Minister of Education for Western Cape and 3 others

R 406 629.60

7.

Kgoro Sipho & others vs Minister of Education

R2 852.28

8.

PTY Trade 73T/A Edusolutions v MEC Education Limpopo

R648 642.58

9.

Securing the intellectual property of the DBESA-SAMS

R23 707.18

10.

Request for a Legal opinion on areas of intervention in the Eastern Cape Department of Education in terms of section 100(1)(b)

R32 902.50

11.

Kgoro Sipho & others vs Minister of Education

R17 831.60

12.

Steadman & others vs Minister of Education

R99 792.75

13.

Mabotja Patience Pitsi & others vs Department of Basic and others

R8 208.00

14.

CTU-SADTU & CTU-ATU vs Department of Basic Education

R273 166.57

15

Legal Opinion

R27 787.50

16.

Aurecon Pty LTD vs Limpopo Department of Education

R73 255.26

17.

PSC Investigation into Mr Soobrayan-DG of DBE

R152 071.83

18.

Arbitration: T Khoza

R 45 262.50

 

TOTAL

R1 948 671.43

c) The Department incurred legal cost for the 2016-2017 financial year to the amount of R2 054 327.26. The details of each case is as follows:

NO

NAME OF CASE

AMOUNT

1.

Michelle Saffer v MEC Education Western Cape and Others

R345 884.17

2.

Kgoro Sipho and Others v Minister of Basic Education

R190 286.50

3.

Van Den Heever v Minister of Basic Education

R910.50

4.

Magna FS v Minister of Basic Education

R115 398.50

5.

Muvamba Dzivhani v Minister of Basic Education

R14 700.00

6.

Minister of Basic Education v Basic Education for All

R587 871.28

7.

Konani v Minister of Basic Education

R20 292.00

8.

Minister of Basic Education v Public Protector

R9 094.00

9.

Centre for Child Law v Minister of Basic Education and Others

R197 933.31

10.

Mbulawa Zingisa v Minister of Basic Education

R27 588.00

11.

Department of Basic Education//Pinehurst Meridian

R93 907.50

12.

Gebuza v Minister of Basic Education

R31 500.00

13.

Ncedo Hoyi v Minister of Basic Education

R9 600.00

14

Pease v Minister of Basic Education and Others

R15 366.70

15.

Aaron Mkhize v Minister of Basic Education

R11 371.50

16

True Harvest Trading v Minister of Basic Education

R197 942.73

17.

OGOD v Randhart high School and Others

R42 663.50

18.

Equal Education v Minister of Basic Education

R5 980.00

19.

Maqhelana and Other v Minister of Basic Education

R17 100.00

20.

Samson Primary School v MEC Education and Others

R37 217.07

21.

Solidariteit Helpende Hand v Minister of Basic Education

R81 720.00

(Department won with cost)

 

TOTAL

R 2 054 327.26

d) The Department incurred legal cost for the 2017-2018 financial year to the amount of R3 895 822.26. The details of each case is as follows:

NO

NAME OF CASE

AMOUNT

1.

CTP and Others v Director-General and Others

R1 751 120.99

2.

Konani v Minister of Basic Education

R128 234.00

3.

Centre for Child Law v Minister of Basic Education

R200 640. 00

4.

Michelle Saffer v MEC Education and Others

R94 260.03

5.

OGOD v Minister of Basic Education and Others

R117 819.00

6.

Prestige Academy v Minister of Basic Education

R23 400.00

7.

Kgoro Sipho and Others v Minister of Basic Education

R85 742.24

8.

Equal Education v Minister of Basic Education

R564 016.50

9.

Ncedo Hoyi v Department of Basic Education

R143 241.00

10

Van Der Westhuizen N.O and Others v Minister of Basic Education

R16 800.00

11.

Legal Opinion

R46 500.00

12.

Minister of Basic Education v Public Protector

R295 695.47

13.

Nhlapo v Minister of Basic Education

R28 500.00

14.

MMPA Quantity Surveyors v Minister of Basic Education

R245 913.65

15.

Centre for Child Law v Minister of Basic Education

R143 489.38

16

Gebuza v Minister of Basic Education

R10 450.00

 

Total

R 3 895 822. 26

e) The Department incurred legal cost for the 2018-2019 financial year to the amount of R1 458 797.07. The details of each case is as follows:

NO

NAME OF CASE

AMOUNT

1.

CTP Limited and Others v Director-General of Basic Education

R1 126 078.12

2.

Centre for Child Law v Minister of Basic Education

R248 668.95

3.

Madoda Gebuza v Minister of Basic Education

R56 000.00

4.

Munano and Others v Minister of Basic Education

R28 050.00

 

   
 

TOTAL

R1 458 797.07

13 September 2019 - NW734

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De Villiers, Mr MJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department hosted any event and/or function related to its 2019 Budget Vote debate; if so, (a) where was each event held, (b) what was the total cost of each event and (c) what is the name of each person who was invited to attend each event as a guest; (2) whether any gifts were distributed to guests attending any of the events; if so, (a) what are the relevant details of the gifts distributed and (b) who sponsored the gifts?

Reply:

1. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

(c) N/A

2. The Department of Basic Education did not host any event or function and thus the above does not apply.

(a) N/A

(b) N/A

13 September 2019 - NW644

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the statement of the former President, Mr Jacob Zuma in his 2011 state of the nation address that all indigent school girls will receive free sanitary pads, (a)(i) what number of sanitary pads has been delivered to indigent school girls so far and (ii) in which provinces, (b) what number of indigent school girls have been identified by the Government as being in need of sanitary pads and (c) what is the time frame to ensure that all indigent school girls have access to sanitary pads?

Reply:

Since the 2011 State of the Nation Address, the Presidency has established an interdepartmental coordinating mechanism to explore innovative means for implementing a sanitary dignity campaign, given the prevailing lack of resources in each department. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) continues to mobilise partners in business and civil society to support the cause of providing sanitary pads to leaners.

13 September 2019 - NW703

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in each province (i) have and (ii) do not have (aa) holiday and (bb) after-school programmes and (b) why do the specified schools not have the specified programmes?

Reply:

a)  (i) (aa) (bb) Given that holiday and after-school programmes are provincially determined and driven programmes, the number of schools that participate in these programmes per province is not in the possession of the Department of Basic Education and may therefore be solicited from Provincial Education Departments (PEDs).

b) (ii)(aa)(bb) Similarly, the number of schools that do not participate in these programmes may be requested from the PEDs.

06 September 2019 - NW444

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the total (a) number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools and (b) monetary cost that has been incurred by her department in this regard?

Reply:

(a) The total number of schools that have been converted into inclusive schools is 832.

(b) The information is not readily available in the Department of Basic Education and it should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments.

06 September 2019 - NW521

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)What (a) is the current status of the upgrades to the Lingcom Primary School in Graaff-Reinet and (b) are the details of the timeframes for the completion of the upgrades; (2) (a) what are the details of all outstanding amounts owed to the (i) main contractor and (ii) each other contractor or professional team and (b) by which date(s) will the outstanding amounts be settled; (3) what additional expenses has her department incurred for each month since the upgrade works were stopped?

Reply:

The information has been requested from the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received from the Province.

06 September 2019 - NW441

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of learners have received (i) tablets and/or (ii) laptops from the Government since 1 January 2019 and (b) from which budget(s) was or were the devices bought?

Reply:

a) (i) and (ii)

The Departments of Basic Education and Telecommunications and Postal Services in collaboration with ICASA provided 105 (North West=55, Mpumalanga=21 and Gauteng =29) schools with ICT equipment as part of the Universal Service and Access Obligations (USAO). Each school received the following ICT equipment:

  • 24 x Tablets for learners;
  • 1 x Server loaded with DBE electronic content;
  • 2 x Teacher laptops;
  • 2 x Wi-Fi Access Points;
  • 1 x data projector; and
  • 1 x Mobile charging trolley.

b) The budget for the rollout of USAO solution is part of the Network Operators Licence Obligations imposed by ICASA.

Further information about the procurement of tablets and laptops should be requested from the Provincial Education Departments. The PDEs are responsible for the rollout of tablets and laptops to teachers.

 

06 September 2019 - NW454

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Which schools in the Republic have been declared hotspots for crime and violence; (2) whether there are any interventions to curb crime and violence at the specified schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. See the attached list of schools declared as hotspots for the 2018/19 financial year.

Province

No of Schools

KwaZulu-Natal

202

Western Cape

147

Free State

90

Limpopo

22

Gauteng

251

Northern Cape

40

Eastern Cape

99

North West

80

Mpumalanga

414

TOTAL

2 345

2. The National School Safety Framework (NSSF) remains the Department of Basic Education (DBE) strategic response to school violence;

  1. It is a comprehensive approach that coordinates and consolidates all school safety interventions in the sector;
  2. It is based on a social ecological systems model which locates the school within its broader community;
  3. It relies on collaboration and partnership; and
  4. The INSPIRE framework provides further granularity to the NSSF focusing on seven (7) areas: Implementation and law enforcement; Norms and values; Safe environments; Parent and care-giver support; Income and economic strengthening; Response and support services; and Education and Life Skills.

The DBE also supports provinces to implement a number of interventions in response to crime and violence in schools; including for example:

  1. Strengthening the School Safety Committees through training to adequately respond to the challenges school face;
  2. Bullying prevention programmes roll-out in Eastern Cape
  3. Anti-gangsterism joint intervention programme with South African Police Service (SAPS) in the Northern Education Region – Port Elizabeth;
  4. In partnership with SAPS, searches and seizures are randomly held to seize dangerous weapons in school campuses;
  5. Moral rejuvenation seminars held in all North West Education districts in partnership with the QLTC in the Office of the Premier;
  6. District Safety Coordinators trained on Protocols on prevention of Corporal Punishment and Sexual Abuse and Harassment of leaners in schools;
  7. After the National Summit on School violence hosted by Minister in 2018, five provinces (Gauteng, North West, Free State, Western Cape and Eastern Cape) have convened provincial summits to roll-out the Declaration and implementation of the recommendations to enhance safe learning environments and instil a culture of respect and discipline among leaners and educators.

06 September 2019 - NW133

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What total number of educators that teach Grade 3 are currently employed by (i) her department and (ii) each provincial department of education and (b) what number of the specified educators (i) were tested for English language proficiency and (ii) passed the English language proficiency test in each province?

Reply:

(a) (i) The National Department of Basic Education does not employ teachers.

(ii) The Department does not routinely collect information on the actual number of educators by Grade as part of regular monitoring and reporting. The figures below are an estimation based on the number of Grade 3 classes.

PROVINCE

ESTIMATED NUMBER OF EDUCATORS

Eastern Cape

5 125

Free State

1 680

Gauteng Province

4 770

KwaZulu-Natal

6 528

Limpopo

3 510

Mpumalanga

2 306

Northern Cape

805

North West

1 911

Western Cape

3 071

Grand Total

29706

Source: Education Management Information System Data, 2018

(b) (i) 2018 Foundation Phase (FP) English First Additional Language (EFAL) teachers were tested nationwide on English with emphasis on reading.

(ii) 65% of these teachers did very well, while the remaining 35% is getting attention through the Primary School Reading Improvement Programme (PSRIP).

06 September 2019 - NW110

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, in line with the Government policy of taking services to the people, she will commit to the development of nonviable schools within the communities where they are located, rather than closing them down and incurring huge costs for transporting learners to the well-developed schools; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she would consider developing a policy on the special post provisioning norm for this category of schools, which usually have a very low student enrolment due to their historic deeply rural background; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. Rationalisation of schools cannot be implemented in a blanket approach, but on a case by case approach. In general, non-viable schools are a disadvantage to learners as they cannot be provided with resources and sufficient number of educators, to ensure quality education at par with other schools. However, where circumstances dictate that such schools be retained in communities where they are located, such a determination will be dictated by its peculiar circumstance. As such, it will not be prudent to commit that all non-viable schools will be retained where they are located.

2. The Department continuously monitors the effectiveness of the post provisioning norms including the provisioning to small schools. Once it is decided that it is viable to maintain or establish a small school after considering both educational effectiveness and cost efficiency, the post provisioning norms assists in determining the number of posts to be provided to such a school. The current Post Provisioning Norms are under review to ensure that small schools are adequately addressed. This is being done together with stakeholders in the Education Labour Relations Council.

 

06 September 2019 - NW152

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether her department has an instrument to measure the capacity and effectiveness of subject advisors whose job is to ensure that quality teaching and learning take place in schools; if not, what other mechanisms would help her department monitor effectiveness of what subject advisors do; if so, (a) are those instruments available across provinces and (b) are there consequences for non-compliance;

Reply:

The sector uses the instruments contained in the Education Management Service (EMS): Performance Management and Development System (PMDS) for office-based educators as contained in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) Collective Agreement No. 3 of 2017; as well as the job description of subject advisors as contained in Collective Agreement No. 4 of 2017 to measure the performance and effectiveness of subject advisors.

(a) Yes. As a national ELRC collective agreement, it is available across all provinces and implementation is mandatory. Subject advisors enter into, and sign annual performance agreements with their immediate supervisor. The agreements contain among others, the following:

  1. Key Result Areas (KRAs), which describe what is expected from the subject advisor in terms of the job description; and
  2. Core Management Criteria (CMCs); which are elements and standards used to describe and assess performance, taking into consideration knowledge, skills and attributes.

The performance agreement serves as the cornerstone of performance management of subject advisors at the individual level, while a workplan describes what will be achieved within particular timeframes through clearly defined activities and performance indicators.

(b) There are consequences for non-compliance as determined by the Labour Relations Act and the Employment of Educators Act, which prescribe the processes to be followed during such misconduct.

(2) whether her department has ways to prevent provinces from appointing persons who are not capable and/or suitably qualified and were not achieving good results during their teaching careers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1110E

Response

The process for the recruitment and selection of educators prescribed in relevant regulations, as stipulated in the Personnel Administrative Measures, Chapter B. The regulations prescribe educational requirements, statutory requirements, and experience required for appointment in education. The stipulated process includes the selection process, which involves formation of representative panels or Interview Committees that are responsible for the shortlisting a pool of suitable candidates and conducting interviews. It is the view of the department that the existing regulations and processes, are adequate to ensure that suitably qualified educators are appointed in every post.

05 September 2019 - NW602

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the number of teaching and principal vacancies in each province?

Reply:

Province

Number of Principal Vacancies as at the end of June 2019

Number of Teaching Vacancies (Includes Deputy Principal, HOD and Post Level 1)

Eastern Cape

562

3 618

Free State

134

943

Gauteng

77

2 783

KwaZulu-Natal

322

758

Limpopo

697

6 124

Mpumalanga

113

237

North West

226

736

Northern Cape

37

195

Western Cape

234

1 211

Total

2 402

16 605

Source: Provincial Education Department Reporting, end of June 2019

21 August 2019 - NW268

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount is budgeted for her private office for the 2019-20 financial year and (b) was the (i) total remuneration, (ii) salary level, (iii) job title, (iv) qualification and (v) Job Description of each employee appointed in her private office since 1 May 2019?

Reply:

(a) The total amount Budgeted for her private office is R 9 342 585.00

Incumbents from 31 May 2019 to date

(b)(i) Total Remuneration

(b)(ii) Salary Level

(b)(iii) Job Title

(b)(iv) Qualification

(b)(v) Job Description

PRIVATE OFFICE

       

P Sehlabelo

1,308,345.00

14

1 X Chief of Staff

Baccalaureus Artium (BA), University Education Diploma,

Chief of Staff

S Mabua

978,924.00

12

1 X Private Secretary

Diploma Office Administration, Diploma Secretarial Skills & Computer Software

Private Secretary

W Mncube

1,089,294.00

13

1 X Media Liaison Officer

Bachelors Degree In Technology Journalism, National Diploma Journalism

Media Liaison Officer

MJ Letsoha-Mathae

1,023,645.00

12

1 X Community Outreach Officer

Diploma: Project Management

Community Outreach Officer

EN Mbatha

553,677.00

10

1 X Assistant Appointment Secretary

National Diploma: Hospitality Studies

Assistant Appointment Secretary

JN Skwatsha

303,339.00

7

1X Principal Ministerial Typist

Grade 12 & Certificate In Introduction

Principal Ministerial Typist

PM Mphigalale

234,960.00

6

1X Secretary/ Receptionist

Bachelor of Social Science

Secretary/ Receptionist

DR Kunene

122,595.00

3

2 X Domestic Worker

Grade 12 Matric

Domestic Worker

PT Mashaba

122,595.00

3

 

Grade 12 Matric

Domestic Worker

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

       

MB Masuku

1,245,495.00

13

1 X Administrative Secretary

Bachelors Degree in Paedagogia, Masters of Law

Administrative Secretary

NM Ramahuma

908,694.00

12

1 X Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

Primary Teachers Diploma, Further Diploma In Education, Baccalaureus Educationis Honoribus, Master Artium (MA)

Parliamentary and Cabinet Support

T Mohlala

869,007.00

12

1 X Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

N4 Certificate: Business Studies, UNISA - Executive Leadership Municipal Development Programme

Cabinet and Parliamentary Officer

A Segakweng

261,372.00

7

1 X Registry Clerk

Grade 12 Matric

Registry Clerk

MA Mashaba

218,109.00

6

1 X Driver/Messenger

Grade 12 Matric

Driver/Messenger

SM Hlatshwayo

102,534.00

2

1 X Food Aide Services

Grade 11

Food Aide Services

21 August 2019 - NW402

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What period is covered by the National Education Infrastructure Management System report dated January 2018 and (b) on what date will the report for the next period be tabled; (2) whether any measures are in place to confirm the accuracy of the reports; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The National Education Infrastructure Management System Report dated January 2018, is information of NEIMS condition Assessment done in the years 2013 to 2014, also information of completed projects which the Provincial Education Department submit every quarter.

2. Yes, DBE have engaged with Provincial Education Department requesting them to make budget allocations for the financial year 2019/20 to ensure that NEIMS condition assessments are done for the updating of the system.

21 August 2019 - NW353

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Weber, Ms AMM to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of official international trips is (i) she and (ii) her deputy planning to undertake in the 2019-22 medium term expenditure framework, (b) will the (i) destination, (ii) date, (iii) purpose and (iv) number of persons who will travel with the delegation be and (c) is the detailed breakdown of the expected cost of (i) flights, (ii) accommodation and (iii) any other expenses in each case?

Reply:

(a)(i)(ii)The official international trips that the Minister and her deputy might undertake in 2019-22 depends on, as and when the Department of Basic Education receive an invite, the invitation is then assessed and accepted subject to the president’s approval, or declined if it’s of little value to the department for consideration.

(b)(i)(ii)(iii) Dependant on (a) above, therefore currently not available.

(c)(i)(ii)(iii) Dependant on (a) above, therefore currently not available.

21 August 2019 - NW265

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will clarify the (a) policy of her department regarding the promotion of learners in the Foundation Phase and (b) educational basis for the specified policy; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1. a) The Foundation Phase policy on promotion requirements is stipulated in the National Policy Pertaining to the Programme and Promotion Requirements of the National Curriculum Statement (NCS) and the National Protocol on Assessment (NPA), which state that a learner may only be retained once in the Foundation Phase in order to prevent the learner being retained in this phase for longer than four years.

  • In the Basic Education Budget Vote Speech for the 2018/19 Financial Year, it was announced that the progression and promotion policies, especially in the lower Grades needed to be reviewed, a policy proposal that is currently under consideration.

 

b) The international literature on this topic demonstrates very little evidence for repetition policies actually benefitting children. At best, these policies appear to have no effect on learner achievement and dropout, despite the immense financial stress they place on the schooling system. However, in many cases they have a negative effect on child outcomes.

Two early meta-analyses (Holmes, 1989; Jimerson 2001) showed strong negative effects of retention policies on academic achievement and socio-emotional adjustment. A recent and more rigorous meta-analysis (Allen 2009), indicated that on average repetition either had a negative effect or a null effect on academic achievement.

As such, support for automatic progression within the South African context is being considered as a possible policy position, given that repetition is regarded as being associated with learner dropout and poor academic performance (Branson, Hofmeyr and Lam, 2013; Hartley, 2006).

Indeed, many scholars (Jimerson et al., 1997) hold the view that the negative effects of repetition far outweigh automatic promotion.

Within this debate, we must also consider issues of efficiency and human rights aspects of over-sized classes, as well as the unaffordability of bringing the learner/educator ratio down substantially via hiring of additional teachers.

Many school systems in both developed and developing countries have adopted automatic promotion policies which stipulate that all learners who complete a given school year be promoted to the next grade, regardless of their levels of achievement.

2. The Minister will not make a statement. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is putting plans in place to make the necessary policy amendments which could give effect to automatic progression in the Foundation Phase:

  • Every learner will be supported to achieve the expected levels of performance for the grade. There will be adequate support for learners at risk throughout the phase.
  • For the breadth of foundational skills across the phase, there will be an identified set of skills per grade to focus on, thus making it possible to give more opportunities to demonstrate competence in the next grade on the same skills if there is a need.
  • Learners who experience barriers to learning will be given the opportunities to demonstrate their competence in ways that suit their needs. This has the following implications:
  • Some learners may need concrete apparatus for a longer time than their peers.
  • Assessment activities, especially written activities, may have to be broken up into smaller sections for learners who cannot concentrate or work for a long time, or they may be given short breaks during the tasks.
  • A variety of assessment instruments should be used, as a learner may find that a particular assessment instrument does not allow her to demonstrate her true competence.
  • In the Foundation Phase the inability to read should not prevent learners from demonstrating their mathematical competence, because this produces misleading results that are of no use to the learner, the teacher who has to plan the learner’s learning sequence, and the education authorities who have to identify problems in the education system.
  • The usage of Mathematical terms should not be confined to the Language of Learning and Teaching (LoLT), the knowledge of Mathematical concepts in other languages should be accepted as correct.
  • Reporting will be comprehensive, giving the teacher in the next grade and the parents a clear indication of strengths and skills that need further development.

21 August 2019 - NW428

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the name of each provider of learner transport that has not received payment for services rendered within the prescribed 30 days in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) is the reason for not abiding by the policy of payment within 30 days for services rendered in each case and (c) number of days were exceeded in each case?

Reply:

Procurement of learner transport service providers and payment of these service providers take place at a provincial level, as such, the information on these payments, or lack thereof is located in provinces. Information has been requested from all the Provincial Departments responsible for the provision of Learner Transport Programme and will be provided as soon as it is received. The Honourable member must also note that the Learner Transport Programme is provided by both the Department of Basic Education and the Department of Transport and that in some provinces the function resides with the education sector whilst in others resides with the transport sector.

07 August 2019 - NW429

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) In each of the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, what number of (i) educators received training in information and communications technology (ICT) and (ii) the specified educators completed the training, (iii) educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) educators are currently using ICT in the classroom in each province?

Reply:

(a) Table 1, 2 and 3 below provides figures for the past three years and (b) since 1 January 2019, (i) 3 632 educators have been trained on various ICT programmes and (ii) all trained educators have completed the training, (iii) 3 632 educators benefitted from ICT training and (iv) the DBE can provide data on how many educators and/ or schools have received ICT devices. However, the data on the usage of these devices lies in Provinces.

The data as captured by the Curriculum Branch on the training provided to educators on how to operate ICT devices, sourced from NSLA reports and the Moodle Platform is as follows:

Province

2016

2017

2018/19

 

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

BASIC

INTERMEDIATE

ADVANCE

TOTAL

GRAND TOTAL

Eastern Cape

2 999

782

632

4 413

8 826

14 653

2 852

26 331

4 056

2 667

291

7 014

37 758

Free State

408

8 092

632

9 132

8 172

3 593

6 378

18 143

181

185

39

405

27 680

Gauteng

1 171

502

632

2 305

4 028

6 885

1 326

12 239

1 987

1 700

600

4 287

18 831

KwaZulu-Natal

57

1 555

632

2 244

4 186

8 315

1 507

14 008

4 470

351

295

5 116

21 368

Limpopo

700

300

632

1 632

2 632

4 564

8 828

16 024

343

223

20

566

18 222

Mpumalanga

3 416

12 914

632

16 962

5 599

6 778

1 226

13 603

1 236

592

321

913

31 478

North West

2 638

1 307

632

4 577

8 615

14 592

2 787

25 994

296

4 675

266

5 237

35 808

Northern Cape

374

1 187

632

2 193

4 131

7 888

1 458

13 477

301

121

266

688

16 358

Western Cape

38 314

250

632

39 196

7 760

7 206

23 416

38 382

6 973

3 221

3 245

13 439

91 117

TOTAL

50 077

26 889

632

77 598

53 949

74 474

49 778

178 201

19 843

13 735

5 323

37 665

298 620

Table 1

The data as captured by the Teacher Development Branch sourced from the NSLA on the ICT integration into teaching training programmes:

PROVINCE

2017/18

2018/19

2019 (Quarter 1)

Eastern Cape

2 334

4 661

1 750

Free State

995

1 205

43

Gauteng

11 574

216

0

KwaZulu-Natal

359

234

368

Limpopo

950

1 480

200

Mpumalanga

1 928

1 605

0

North West

1 547

806

137

Northern Cape

250

727

0

Western Cape

3 832

1 879

634

Total

23 769

12 813

3 132

Table 2

Training provided on the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning since 2018.

PROVINCE

Target Group

Date

KwaZulu-Natal

405 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2019

Gauteng

200 subject advisors (3 hour workshops)

August to September 2018

North West

91 (Provincial Core Training Team)

July 2018

Western Cape

30 (30 e-learning specialists, Curriculum Support and Teacher Development)

April 2018

Total

371 provincial and district officials

Table 3

07 August 2019 - NW427

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of educators have been absent from teaching for a prolonged period of time in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) number of days has each of the specified educators been absent from teaching, (c) are the reasons for the extended absence in each case and (d) contingency measures were put in place during the extended periods of absence in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b), (c) and (d).

As part of monitoring, the National Department only collects aggregated information on teacher attendance. The Honourable Member is kindly advised to request the detailed information as requested directly from the Provincial Education Departments.

07 August 2019 - NW310

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of the Basic Education

With reference to the state of the nation address on 7 February 2019, (a) which schools will be transformed into technical schools in each province in order to expand participation in the new technological specialisations, (b) what is the time frame in each case, (c) what are the details of how the transformation will take place and (d) what costs will be incurred in each case?

Reply:

a) The Plan is to have a Technical High School in each Circuit. Provinces have not yet identified the schools to be transformed into technical schools.

b) The time frame for the transformation and expansion of schools will be over a period of 5 years starting in 2020 – 2025.

c) Details of how the transformation will take place:

  • Identification of schools by the 9 Provincial Education Departments;
  • Mapping of schools in circuits to be undertaken;
  • An onsite audit of schools will be conducted by the National and Provincial Departments;
  • Mathematics, Science and Technology (MST) Conditional Grant covers all schools offering Technical Occupational and Technical vocational subjects.

d) Costs that will be incurred in each case will include the following:

  • Infrastructure renovation and construction (workshops).
  • Provisioning of equipment tools and consumables for the Technical specialisation subjects.
  • Human Resource recruitment.

07 August 2019 - NW262

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will consider to establish a school violence task team to combat violence in the places of learning that will collaborate with the SA Police Service; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

All schools have established School Safety Committees in line with the National School Safety Framework. Each Committee is comprised of internal representatives from the School Governing Body (SGB) School Management Team (SMT), educators and learners. External role players are comprised of representatives from Government Department such as, South Africa Police Services (SAPS), Health, Social Development, Municipalities as well as Non-Governmental Organisations NGO) including Faith-based organisations.

The Department of Basic Education has also entered into partnership with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) to coordinate a wide spectrum of stakeholders through the National School Safety Steering Committee (NSSSC).

 

07 August 2019 - NW401

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to the implementation of the compulsory two-years of Early Childhood Development for all children before Grade 1, what (a) are the exact steps of implementation, (b) are the dates for finalisation of each step, (c) is the expected date of implementation and (d) is the estimated budget implication for this project?

Reply:

a) During the Basic Education Budget Vote 14 debate for the 2019/2020 financial year, it was indicated that the Department of Basic Education (DBE) has committed to developing a comprehensive plan to ensure a phased-in and systematic relocation of the responsibility and leadership for ECD. It was further indicated that this comprehensive plan will include the provision of two years of compulsory ECD prior to Grade 1; as well as the provision of Early Childhood Development (ECD) for 0-4-year-olds. Finally, the Department committed to the costed plan being finalised by March 2020.

The development of these plans is based on two principles:

  1. The plans should ensure that both the access and quality of ECD should improve significantly over the next 10 years; and
  2. The plans should be sensitive to the current model of ECD provision and not destabilise nor cause confusion in either the ECD or schooling sector.

b) The detailed plan for institutionalising the abovementioned high-level objectives is still being developed.

c) The DBE is working towards finalising a detailed, costed plan by March 2020, while at the same time beginning preparations for implementation.

d) The cost will be clarified through the detailed, costed plan.

05 August 2019 - NW261

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she will consider introducing a component within her department to help develop and empower the principals of schools in management on an ongoing basis just like there are subject advisors who are employed to assist school teachers in specific subjects; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department has a component that helps develop and empower the principals of schools in management on an ongoing basis in the same way as Subject Advisors assist schools teachers with subject related matters. These are Circuit Managers who are supervisors of school principals. Each Circuit Manager is responsible for between 25 and 30 school principals according to the Policy on the Roles and Responsibilities of Education Districts with consideration to provincial differences.

05 August 2019 - NW177

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to schools in Johannesburg Wards 23, 54, 55, 56, 57, 124 and 125, what (a) assessments have been done to ascertain the number of additional schools needed in each ward, (b) were the outcomes of the assessments, (c) plans are there to build additional schools in the specified area and (d) are the time frames and deadlines in each case?

Reply:

The response below is as received from the Gauteng Department of education.

a) The Gauteng Department of Education completed infrastructure assessments with regard to the number and type of facilities during the 2018/19 financial year. This data informs the number of additional facilities, including classrooms, required per school and by implication the number of new schools required in any given residential area.

b) There is a total of 38 public ordinary schools in the wards referred to above of which 28 are primary and 10 are secondary schools. There is a total shortage of 23 classrooms in 9 primary schools and 3 classrooms in 1 secondary school, whilst there is a surplus of 53 classrooms in 19 primary schools and 61 classrooms in 9 secondary schools, based on our learner: classroom ratio of 40:1.

c) There are no plans to build additional schools in the area as there isn’t a need for additional schools based on our learner: classroom ratio of 40:1. After the construction of Glenvista Primary School in 2015 the overcrowding in primary schools in these areas was significantly reduced.

d) See (c) above.

26 July 2019 - NW98

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has devised a specific plan for the sole purpose of combating the scourge of violence in our schools; if not, why not; if so, how effective has she found the plan projected to be?

Reply:

The National School Safety Framework (NNSF) provides the Basic Education Department with an organising framework to coordinate all efforts in response to school related violence. This Framework provides evidence-informed approaches based on accurate and comprehensive data of the effectiveness of existing programmes.

A key pillar of the NSSF is collaboration and partnerships. School violence cannot be separated from the high levels of violence that are experienced in some of our communities. The Framework encourages partnerships with sister departments like the SAPS, civil society organisations, academic institutions and education stakeholders. The Minister convened a School Safety Summit in October 2018 and one of the recommendations of this summit was the establishment of a School Safety Steering Committee comprised of a wide spectrum of education stakeholders including SGB federations, learner formations and teacher unions.

The Department has provided a manual on how to address violence at school level to all schools. The provincial education departments continue to provide training and support to schools, particularly those schools in high crime areas, to effectively respond to school violence and bullying. These hotspot schools have also been linked to local police stations through a national partnership with the SAPS. The manual encourages all schools to establish school safety committees and provides evidence informed strategies to address bullying, homophobia, xenophobia and gangsterism.

In addition, through the Council of Education Ministers, the Department has made available two key protocols on how to address corporal punishment and sexual abuse in schools. The Department has provided training to all provinces and districts on how to utilise these protocols in schools.

The Department, in partnership with UNICEF and Save the Children, will be undertaking the third School Violence Survey in 2019 to continue to monitor the effectiveness of the implementation of the NSSF.

17 July 2019 - NW109

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in view of the need for adjustment in education due to the demands of the fourth industrial revolution, she intends to revive the laptop initiative which was discussed for a long period in the labour relations council and was later abandoned just before implementation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Teacher Laptop Initiative was part of a strategy to take forward the objective of improving Information and Communications Technology (ICT) in teaching and learning.  After its announcement in 2009, the initiative was widely hailed as one of the critical steps towards the improvement of the quality of education. The initiative’s aim was to ensure that every teacher owns and uses a laptop, by providing them with a monthly allowance which will contribute to the purchase costs as well as the costs of connectivity.

2. Due to a number of challenges the Department did not launch this project.

3. STATE OF THE NATIONS ADDRESS (SONA) INJUNCTIONS

Based on the 2019 SONA injunctions, the DBE plans to provide each learner and teacher with an ICT device with access to digitised Learning and Teaching Support Material (LTSM).

3.1 A comprehensive ICT plan has been developed to provide a framework for an affordable and sustainable implementation of ICTs in education. The plan will be implemented in three phases, commencing with Phase 1 that will target multi-grade, multiphase, farm and selected rural schools (2020-2021). The Second Phase will target quintile 1 to 3 schools (2022-2023), and Phase 3 will target quintile 4 and 5 schools (2024). All Special schools will be accommodated in all phases according to the type of disability.

3.2 The DBE will work with other government departments, the private sector and social partners in the deployment of ICTs, and will drive a sector-wide campaign to maximise the benefit of e-Learning at all schools in the country.

4. FOCUS AREAS

Four areas have been identified from the e-Education White Paper (2004) as follows:

4.1 Digital content resource development (digitisation)

The DBE will invest in digital content development to ensure that high quality digital resources are available free of charge offline and online via the DBE Cloud, Thutong and other platforms. The basic education sector aims for a balance between ‘state-owned’ content resources, open education resources (OERs) and publisher-created (proprietary) content resources. The Department will continue with its initiative of digitising state-owned content resources.

4.2 ICT professional development for management, teaching and learning integration

The introduction of ICT in the education sector necessitates the professional development of all teachers, managers and educator support staff in the Provinces. This means the provision of appropriate training for teachers and managers before they attempt to introduce the use of ICT in the classrooms. The training of teachers will be guided by the Professional Development Framework for Digital Learning.

4.3 ICT infrastructure

The DBE plans to provide each learner and teacher with an ICT device to enhance teaching and learning. It should be noted that ICT infrastructure is fundamental to the implementation of e-Education and offers opportunities to access learning, redress inequalities and improve the quality of teaching and learning.

4.4 School connectivity

The Departments of Basic Education and Communications have developed a connectivity plan for schools. The plan seeks to provide cost-effective, secure and efficient connectivity that will advance the quality of teaching and learning in schools, specifically ensuring access to quality education.

 

17 July 2019 - NW132

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether, with reference to her reply to question 1193 on 17 May 2018, it is still her department’s policy not to collect or collate information regarding the (a) number of cases of assault by (i) learners on educators and support staff, (ii) educators and support staff on learners, (iii) educators on educators, (iv) support staff on support staff, (v) support staff on educators and (vi) educators on support staff have been reported in each province since 1 January 2019, (b) type of assault took place in each case and (c) remedial action was taken in each case; if not, what are the relevant details in each case; (2) whether any perpetrator was convicted criminally; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1);(2) This information is not routinely collected by the national department. The member is advised to request the information directly from the provincial departments.

17 July 2019 - NW150

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)Whether there are any specific measures in place to ensure that provinces roll out the school nutrition programme in a manner that will benefit the learners as the legitimate beneficiaries rather than money disappearing into the pockets of the service providers; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether she will promulgate national guidelines to determine how the service providers are selected in an equitable and fair manner to avoid provincial departments being taken to court while learners suffer all the time as it sometimes happen; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The national Department of Basic Education has a responsibility to oversee, guide, monitor and support the provinces in the implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP), and to ensure compliance with National Treasury regulations and the Conditional Grant Framework in particular. The Provincial Education Departments on the other hand, have a key responsibility to implement the programme in line with the applicable prescripts and guidance. Procurement of services for the NSNP is a provincial responsibility. To ensure that learners benefit maximally, the Conditional Grant Framework of the NSNP specifies the following conditions: the percentage of funds that are to be used for procurement and cooking of meals (feeding); the quality of school meals; as well responsibilities for districts and provinces with respect to monitoring and support to ensure adherence.

2. The selection of service providers in the NSNP is managed like all procurement processes in the public service. The selection is done by provinces in line with the Supply Chain Management (SCM) System processes and applicable prescripts. Where the procurement model is centralised (Gauteng, KwaZulu-Natal, Limpopo, Mpumalanga and Western Cape), an open tender process is followed. In the remaining provinces where the decentralised model is used and funds are transferred to schools, the 3 quotation system is mostly utilised, as determined by the ceiling price of the service in line with SCM prescripts. In all instances, procurement is required to be open, fair, transparent, equitable, effective and efficient, among others. The DBE has developed a guideline for schools on the management of NSNP funds which was disseminated to provinces and districts. School Management Teams were trained on the use of this guideline.

10 July 2019 - NW35

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Mashabela, Ms N to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What is the total number of teachers who have been trained in coding in the past academic year, (b) of the specified total number of teachers, what is the number of teachers trained in each province and (c) what level of training was offered in each case?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has not conducted teacher training for coding, however some PEDs and individual schools have conducted training and this information may be obtained from PEDs. DBE has finalised Plans to deliver training of Teachers on coding. 

05 July 2019 - NW74

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Montwedi, Mr Mk to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the (a) names and (b) location of each school that has not received their textbook allocation for the 2019 school year?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is responsible for the development of the National Catalogues of Textbooks. Provincial Departments of Education (PEDs) are responsible for the budget allocation for the procurement of textbooks for schools. The information on the schools must be sourced from the respective Provincial Departments of Education.

05 July 2019 - NW70

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of schools in the country are without remedial teachers and (b) is the (i) name and (ii) location of each specified school?

Reply:

Currently, the system appoints Learning Support Educators (LSEs). LSEs are appointed at district level, not at school level. This is because the resourcing model in this respect locates support at district level to ensure support provisioning for all schools rather than a few schools.

05 July 2019 - NW99

Senye, Ms L to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Has her department considered implementing a multi-department plan in order to introduce social workers into the school system in light of the alarming reports of violence and mental health issues suffered by both pupils and teachers in school as well as the high unemployment rate of social workers?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) works together with education stakeholders, social partners and the Departments of Social Development, Health and the South African Police Service to address the causes as well as the effects of violence prevalent in schools, as in society. In the implementation of the Integrated School Health Policy by the Departments of Basic Education, Health and Social Development, mental health screening is included in the school health service package. In addition, the Department has developed the draft DBE National Guidelines for Resourcing an Inclusive Education System, wherein social workers are included in the multi-disciplinary team at various levels of the education system.

In implementation, Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) establish partnerships with the Provincial Departments of Social Development (DSD) as well as universities and partners to provide social work services to schools. In addition, PEDs engage and place unemployed social workers as Learner Support Agents.

04 July 2019 - NW73

Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) number of learners have failed (i) in each province and (ii) in each of the past five years and (b) grade was failed in each case?

Reply:

Table 1: Number of learners that Failed Grade 12 (2014 – 2018)

Province

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

EASTERN CAPE

23 158

37 615

33 734

23 667

19 340

FREE STATE

4 541

5 745

3 157

3 499

3 108

GAUTENG

15 231

17 115

15 448

14 458

11 464

KWAZULU-

NATAL

42 223

63 897

49 616

33 728

27 667

LIMPOPO

19 811

34 629

38 212

28 603

23 476

MPUMALANGA

9 466

11 751

12 450

12 210

9 387

NORTH WEST

4 005

6 168

5 597

6 330

5 483

NORTHERN

CAPE

2 079

3 559

2 139

2 127

2 645

WESTERN CAPE

8 472

8 232

7 153

8 427

9 404

Source: National Integrated Examinations computer system (IECS)

Table 2 below indicates the number of learners who repeated a grade per province between 2014 and 2018. Please note that number of repeaters are used as proxy for failure as the department does not collect data in this format.

P

rovince

Province

Grade R

Grade 1

Grade 2

Grade 3

Grade 4

Grade 5

Grade 6

Grade 7

Grade 8

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

other

Grand Total

 

Eastern Cape

14 066

28 564

24 952

19 778

18 726

14 234

11 614

11 766

10 629

17 803

34 687

31 193

10

238 022

 

Free State

365

4741

3757

2770

5289

4452

4529

4447

8706

13986

12423

6176

0

71 641

 

Gauteng

1 472

19 693

14 348

10 098

11 098

8 623

6 947

3 195

9 595

20 801

41 596

18 437

285

166 188

 

KwaZulu-Natal

8 422

38 940

23 967

18 159

17 427

13 326

11 218

8 392

22 820

27 467

57 075

43 211

295

290 719

 

Limpopo

2 354

18 755

16 563

13 722

15 740

12 962

11 214

6 580

10 980

58 612

71 992

34 999

0

274 473

 

Mpumalanga

1 722

17 965

14 406

11 651

11 764

10 137

8 308

7 856

13 416

13 697

22 348

18 128

297

151 695

 

Northern Cape

438

4 533

2 788

2 273

3 412

2 351

1 963

1 788

3 282

5 068

6 890

4 175

0

38 961

 

North West

1 711

14 746

12 177

9 675

10 567

7 827

5 949

4 142

6 374

17 068

21 587

10 012

0

121 835

 

Western Cape

3 766

15 273

8 778

4 624

9 265

5 375

3 403

1 541

4 060

12 321

10 992

4 805

188

84 391

2014

Total

34 316

163 210

121 736

92 750

103 288

79 287

65 145

49 707

89 862

186 823

279 590

171 136

1 075

1 437 925

 

Eastern Cape

14 260

38 391

26 949

21 375

19 841

14 843

11 863

12 206

15 013

18 114

37 482

27 212

22

257 571

 

Free State

475

3934

3110

2680

5156

3898

3060

5140

8883

9541

10937

5444

0

62 258

 

Gauteng

1 543

21 194

15 259

11 269

12 526

7 395

5 856

5 231

18 413

22 370

39 127

21 729

207

182 119

 

KwaZulu-Natal

7 344

34 623

24 754

19 882

19 510

13 468

12 023

11 078

24 136

28 735

51 157

45 248

30

291 988

 

Limpopo

2 533

17 969

16 355

13 289

15 501

10 108

8 728

7 667

15 862

35 155

54 002

28 337

0

225 506

 

Mpumalanga

2 755

18 461

13 178

10 590

10 648

7 828

6 237

7 623

13 973

13 212

22 585

17 014

51

144 155

 

Northern Cape

700

4 343

2 901

2 743

3 185

2 526

2 118

2 351

3 595

3 688

3 967

2 843

0

34 960

 

North West

890

7 222

10 162

12 368

5 791

3 057

2 344

2 206

8 174

7 732

11 881

4 983

21

76 831

 

Western Cape

3 757

12 341

7 727

4 295

9 830

4 052

2 395

3 108

7 313

13 131

10 343

5 439

159

83 890

2015

Total

34 257

158 478

120 395

98 491

101 988

67 175

54 624

56 610

115 362

151 678

241 481

158 249

490

1 359 278

 

Eastern Cape

13 931

44 332

24 546

19 087

18 992

12 861

9 817

9 027

13 421

12 199

37 755

28 245

0

244 213

 

Free State

1076

2171

2509

1756

3973

3076

2851

4914

15010

11176

14342

6255

0

69 109

 

Gauteng

1 816

27 142

15 723

11 530

12 407

6 915

4 783

4 921

19 804

18 835

47 658

27 343

1 005

199 882

 

KwaZulu-Natal

6 659

38 073

26 099

21 186

21 992

15 545

12 057

11 177

26 373

29 941

59 895

54 856

317

324 170

 

Limpopo

1 836

16 884

14 742

12 059

15 262

9 769

7 254

7 102

19 560

29 489

71 703

40 541

608

246 809

 

Mpumalanga

3 942

11 161

12 897

12 118

17 716

13 460

13 234

18 278

26 708

22 284

19 105

13 274

3

184 180

 

Northern Cape

630

4 661

3 445

2 435

3 592

2 831

2 304

2 451

2 894

3 078

5 390

3 955

12

37 678

 

North West

1 251

11 075

9 699

7 062

10 056

6 055

4 245

4 273

15 465

12 645

22 834

9 929

0

114 589

 

Western Cape

3 851

11 433

8 346

4 692

9 222

3 685

2 036

2 836

8 741

8 941

10 907

6 663

100

81 453

2016

Total

34 992

166 932

118 006

91 925

113 212

74 197

58 581

64 979

147 976

148 588

289 589

191 061

2 045

1 502 083

 

Eastern Cape

5589

17038

11844

11210

17041

12147

9169

9859

12393

10783

25108

18903

0

161 084

 

Free State

584

6131

4463

3349

7445

4562

3329

5975

7521

5795

11868

5769

0

66 791

 

Gauteng

814

12363

11968

12626

18310

14561

14314

20756

17609

16629

28011

17589

0

185 550

 

KwaZulu Natal

1485

21451

20792

29450

33490

25818

23104

22293

27952

29641

43054

46692

0

325 222

 

Limpopo

509

10659

10383

10693

17374

11259

8707

7118

18070

23056

44264

32711

0

194 803

 

Mpumalanga

227

5052

5272

5503

7045

4537

3490

3386

5224

6530

12622

11861

0

70 749

 

Northern Cape

51

2419

1574

1153

3045

1559

1247

1510

2151

1700

3890

2022

0

22 321

 

North West

77

1707

3606

4433

8711

4085

3840

3205

4224

4013

12926

6397

0

57 224

 

Western Cape

140

257

626

1644

8128

11191

7528

6406

7188

8012

8753

5727

0

65 600

2017

Total

9 476

77 077

70 528

80 061

120 589

89 719

74 728

80 508

102 332

106 159

190 496

147 671

0

1 149 344

 

Eastern Cape

10 141

25 955

16 721

13 009

16 401

9 445

6 478

7 008

12 329

9 895

29 151

22 348

0

178 881

 

Free State

2 114

8 518

5 309

3 432

7 627

4 183

2 499

4 809

9 026

5 537

11 192

5 248

0

69 494

 

Gauteng

2 675

23 080

18 130

12 390

14 444

8 714

5 529

5 138

21 946

19 583

44 043

24 831

0

200 503

 

KwaZulu Natal

3 749

29 636

16 902

15 717

17 489

11 400

7 565

6 551

24 134

21 642

44 804

43 067

0

242 656

 

Limpopo

2 150

17 888

16 457

6 493

24 300

14 663

10 300

9 423

36 520

36 104

70 872

52 203

0

297 373

 

Mpumalanga

1 219

11 781

8 483

13 766

7 023

3 967

2 773

3 440

9 042

8 404

19 785

16 805

0

106 488

 

Northern Cape

299

3 961

2 820

2 013

3 904

2 396

1 868

2 193

3 334

2 624

5 040

2 602

0

33 054

 

North West

747

6 964

6 128

5 174

9 490

4 114

3 733

2 845

11 008

6 455

14 319

6 701

0

77 678

 

Western Cape

4 327

9 405

7 660

5 486

8 562

3 514

1 781

2 352

6 625

4 547

11 167

5 993

0

71 419

2018

Total

27 421

137 188

98 610

77 480

109 240

62 396

42 526

43 759

133 964

114 791

250 373

179 798

0

1 277 546

Source 1: 2014-16 Annual School Survey

Source 2: 2017-18 LURITS