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24 March 2021 - NW808

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to her reply to question 168 on 25 February 2021, what (a) are the details of the gender-based violence (GBV) programme found within the Life Orientation subject, (b) number of days and/or weeks are there that focus on GBV within the specified subject and (c) are the contents of the programme; (2) whether she will furnish Mr B B Nodada with the details of the programme?

Reply:

1(a) GBV is addressed through the provision of comprehensive sexuality education, access to sexual and reproductive health services implemented in secondary schools including a focus on prevention of alcohol and drug use and learner pregnancy (now also COVID-19) as risk factors to GBV. In primary schools, activities mainly focus on raising awareness of social justice and vulnerabilities such as reporting of abuse and support for GBV-affected learners.

(b) The Comprehensive Sexuality Education lessons broadly are delivered through a total of 80 lessons (implying 80 hours) in the Lifeskills and Life Orientation subject, throughout the schooling life from Grade 4 to 12. Of the 80 lessons, 29 (36%) of these specifically address GBV.

(c) In Primary Schools with younger learners, it starts with addressing bullying, safety of the body, protecting personal space, prevention of rape, reporting of sexual abuse and sexual harm, with the view of empowering the potential victim. Gradually, as the learners progress to higher grades, the topics in the Intermediate Phase begin to introduce issues of bullying, sexual abuse, sexual grooming, skills for bullies to change, this is coupled with identification and linking to services for learners at risk. In the Senior Phase, the lessons begin to introduce the construction of gender, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. In the Further Education and Training (FET) phase, the lessons address in depth the issues of gender construction, consent, power and control in relationships as well as assertive communication. These messages communicate both to the potential victim and perpetrator with the view of challenging their attitudes in the communities.

2. Yes

24 March 2021 - NW809

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the plan of her department to reclaim money that was spent on fraudulent and/or overpriced irregular tenders of personal protective equipment and (b) amount has been (i) retrieved and (ii) lost?

Reply:

a) There has not been any money spent fraudulently on the procurement of personal protective equipment.  The Department of Basic Education procured PPEs through the Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement with the Private Party as per Regulation 16 of the PFMA.  As the Private Party cannot make use of the transversal contracts for PPEs and purchased PPEs from the open market, the Department has engaged with the Private Party with the assistance of National Treasury and has resolved any future pricing risk.   

b)

(i) Not applicable 

(ii) Not applicable

24 March 2021 - NW890

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has recorded the total number of teachers who have been absent from schools since the reopening for the 2021 academic year; if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the (a) total number of teachers who have been absent and (b)(i) name of the affected school and (ii) school’s location in each case?

Reply:

(a), (b) (i) (ii) No. The National Department does not collect information on teacher attendance as part of its monitoring framework and therefore has not set up systems to collect such information on a regular basis. The Honourable Member is requested to direct the question to the Provincial Education Departments.

24 March 2021 - NW780

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Mathulelwa, Ms B to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

By what date will she ensure that Harding Burgh Primary School in Matatiele is provided with proper classrooms and sanitation?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

24 March 2021 - NW867

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the prescribed maximum class size of 40 learners per class in the Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, (a) which schools do not comply with this prescript and (b) what are the reasons in each case for not complying; (2) (a) what actual steps have been taken to rectify the situation regarding classrooms and education, (b) by what date will the steps be implemented and (c) at what cost in each case?

Reply:

(1) and (2) The process to determine the learner-classroom ratio, as determined through the Regulations Relating to Minimum Uniform Norms and Standards for Public School Infrastructure, is conducted annually by provinces based on the learner enrolment received from Education Management Information Systems (EMIS) for that particular year.  Provinces are currently conducting the analysis for inclusion in the User Asset Management Plans for the 2021-22 Medium-Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF), including the costing thereof.  The main reason for schools not complying with the prescript, can include an increase in enrolment or an insufficient number of classrooms to cater for the number of learners.  In both instances, mobile classrooms are provided to schools to address the influx.  Further response to the question will be provided as soon as provinces conclude the analysis and submit the information.

24 March 2021 - NW866

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her; (2) whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date; (3) whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. With regard to the Volmink Report on the selling of posts, on what date was the investigation (a) commissioned, (b) finalised and (c) submitted to her;

ANSWER

a) The Ministerial Task Team (MTT) on the Selling of posts was commissioned in September 2014.

b) The MTT Report was finalised in April 2016 and

c) The report was handed over to the Minister on 20 May 2016. However, at the time of the handing over of this report, there were still some forensic investigations that were pending. They were later subjected to a second phase investigation of the MTT in order to complete the remaining Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report. Chapter 3 and Addendum V of the report was finalised in June 2018.

 

2. Whether the report will be (a) tabled to the Portfolio Committee on Basic Education and (b) made public; if not, in each case, why not; if so, in each case, on what date;

ANSWER:

a) Subsequent to the release of the MTT Report on 20 May 2016, the Report was tabled at the Cabinet meeting to brief them on the report and its findings; the Portfolio Committee was also briefed on May 2016 and June 2017 about the findings and the actions to be taken by the Department to remedy the challenges emanating from the report. Lastly, presentations were made to both the Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and Heads of Education Committee (HEDCOM).

b) Yes, the MTT Report was gazetted and also made public on the Department of Basic Education’s website for easy access.

3. Whether the illegal activity identified in the report has been stopped; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?  

ANSWER:                                 

The identified cases of the alleged illegal activities were sent to the affected Provincial Departments of Education (PEDs). Due to the fact that the PEDs are the Employers of educators in the respective provinces, they were requested to conduct investigations or follow-up investigations into these cases and provide reports on each of the cases to the DBE.

Since the provincial investigations were commissioned, the number of allegations subsequently dropped. Currently, the  DBE has not received any further complaints of such illegal activities or allegations of individuals who participated in one or other form of corruption or selling of posts.

24 March 2021 - NW868

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of schools for children with special educational needs (ELSEN) in each province, (b) are the norms and standards for funding the ELSEN sector and (c) is the current long-term plans of her department to improve the sector?

Reply:

a) Eastern Cape: 45; Free State: 21; Gauteng: 132; KwaZulu-Natal: 75; Limpopo: 35; Mpumalanga: 18; Northern Cape: 08; North West: 32; Western Cape: 67.

b) No, there are guidelines for the resourcing of inclusive education.

c) Yes.

24 March 2021 - NW956

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years, what (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, (iii) was the reason for each legal case, (iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose and (v) are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Reply:

                                

Response

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

 

2018-2019 financial year

Answer: The Department had 38 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case.In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 1 459 000 in litigation cost in the 2018/2019 financial year.

 

(iii) was the reason for each legal case, 

Answer: There were 8 cases relating to contractual disputes;9 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 10 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues;one case relating to pension payment of an educator; 2 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and five cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose 

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled three cases, won one and did not lose any case.

 

 (v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There are no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases. 

 

2019-2020 financial year

With regard to legal cases that her department was involved in during the (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019-20 financial years 

Answer: The Department had  42 cases on its litigation register at the end of the 2019/2020 financial year

 

What (i) was the cost in each case, (ii) was the total cost to her department, 

Answer: The Department did not spend on each case. In many of the cases the Minister is cited with the MECs and in such cases the cost is covered by the province.The Department spent R 12 853 000  in litigation cost in the 2019/2020 financial year.

 

(iii)What was the reason for each legal case,

Answer: There were 11 cases relating to contractual disputes; 10 cases relating to claims for injury or death of a learner; 6 cases relating to constitutional or administrative law issues; 1 case relating to pension payment of an educator; 7 cases relating to examination issues; 1 case each for defamation, copyright infringement and motor vehicle collision and  4 cases relating to labour disputes of educators

 

iv) total number of cases did her department (aa) win and (bb) lose

Answer: Many of the cases were ongoing or dormant, however the Department settled  two cases and lost one.

 

(v) what are the relevant details of any official of her department who was involved?

Answer: There were no officials who were directly involved in any of the cases.

15 March 2021 - NW552

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the breakdown of the total number of learners in each (a) Grade and (b) province who have been unaccounted for in the period 15 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

Learner drop-out statistics are not available at this point. Based on the information provided by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) during the DG's weekly one-on-one virtual meetings with PEDs, provinces are still collating the drop-out statistics. As they work out drop-out-statistics, PEDs are identifying learners who do not physically come to school, but have not dropped out, because they are learning from home.  These are learners who have comorbidities or other illnesses, as well as those who are in the home education programme.

15 March 2021 - NW664

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

a) For the office accommodation the Department of Basic Education has signed a Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement for its head office. The agreement provides security as part of the services provided.

  1. Sethekgo Private Party,
  2. The Private Party security services are provided for the securing of the perimeter, CCTV monitoring and access control to the building,
  3. The Department pays a single unitary fee to the Private Party,
  4. The PPP agreement is for a 25 year period. 

           

   For the Administrator at the North West Provincial Education Department the response is as follows:

                   i)  Wise Training Centre.

                   ii) To provide protection for the Administrator as an intervention due to the

North West Province which was placed under Administration, Section100 (1) (b).

                   iii) R206 906.00

                   iv) 1 November 2020 to 30 April 2021.

(b) Umalusi:

    (i) Rise Security Services (PTY) LTD

    (ii) The security company provides perimeter security services, access control to the building as well as emergency reaction unit.

    (iii) Contract value is R3,276,136.00

    (iv) Contract period 01 October 2018 -30 September 2021

(b) SACE 

The South African Council for Educators makes use of a private security company for its Head Office in centurion and for its Limpopo Provincial office makes use of the school security (Tom Naude).

(i) For the SACE Head Office in Centurion WANGIS security services provides the service; (ii) The security contract entered into with the provider is to offer security services by securing of the perimeter and access control for the SACE building. (iii) R 437 400 (iv) The contact is for a 12-month period 

(i) For the SACE Limpopo provincial office – School security (Tom Naude). (ii) The security agreement entered into with the school security is to offer security services by assisting with access control. (iii) R10 000 MONTHLY (iv) The contract is for the duration of our lease agreement 2 years.

15 March 2021 - NW754

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)(a) What is the total number of school infrastructure projects which were (i) stopped and (ii) delayed during the 2020-21 financial year in each province, (b) which schools were affected in each case, (c) which were (i) new projects, (ii) upgrades, (iii) maintenance and (iv) repairs and (d) what is the total cost of each project’s (i) initial costs and (ii) savings by halting the projects; (2) whether any of the projects will continue during 2021-22 financial year; if not, why not; if so, on what date is it envisaged the projects will resume?

Reply:

1. (a) (b) (c) Breakdown of projects cancelled or postponed during 2020/21 financial year (d) No savings were realised as these projects were stopped or delayed as a result of budget cuts as a result of COVID 19. The budget for these projects was reallocated to address COVID 19 requirements.

2. All those projects that could not be addressed in the 2020/21 financial year will be carried over to 2021/22 MTEF for implementation. The infrastructure budget will be revised to make sure that all other projects that were planned for 2021/22 MTEF are not negatively affected.

 

Province

Projects stopped or delayed

EC

R114m for 17 new and replacement projects, R105m for 15 Upgrades and additions and R9m for 1 refurbishment project.

FS

R120m for 17 upgrades and additions as well as 44 maintenance projects.

GP

R9m for 55 new and replacements, R35m for 47 upgrades and additions, R162 for 168 rehabilitation and refurbishments and R17m for 32 maintenance projects.

KZN

R78m for 22 new and replacement schools and R222m for 400 repairs and renovations projects

LP

R50m for 7 new and replacement projects and R135m for 101 refurbishment and rehabilitation projects.

MP

R56m for 24 new and replacement projects, R48m for 435 maintenance projects and R56m for 249 upgrades and additions

NW

R143m for 24 new and replacement projects and R16m for 4 upgrades and additions

NC

R41m for 51 upgrades and additions and R40m for 22 new and replacements projects

WC

R159m for 200 maintenance projects

SUMMARY                                          1 938 Projects

New and Replacements

168 Projects

Upgrades and additions

388 Projects

Rehabilitation and refurbishment

269 Projects

Repairs and renovations

400 Projects

Maintenance

 

711 Projects

 

15 March 2021 - NW756

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with regard to Masinakane Special School for learners with intellectual disabilities in Mpumalanga, she has been informed that (a) there is no hostel as undertaken, (b) learners have to sleep in (i) classrooms and (ii) boardroom and (c) there is an urgent need for mobile showers; if not, why not; if so, (2) will the hostel be built on the school property to avoid crossing of main road; if not, why not; if so, on what date will the hostel be built to accommodate the learners?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Mpumalanga Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

15 March 2021 - NW789

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Moteka, Mr PG to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to some secondary schools that are constantly failing to produce results every year in Limpopo (names furnished) and another nine schools that achieved a zero matric pass rate in Limpopo for the 2020 academic year, what special attention will she be giving to the specified schools this year, that was not given over the past few years?

Reply:

Annually, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) identifies and classifies schools according to the support required. Differentiated support plans are developed based on the identified needs of the school which include training of teachers, extra lessons and resources for learners such as study guides, regular oversight and monitoring visits by Districts, the Province and the DBE. 

Provinces are also required to submit such support and intervention plans as well as quarterly reports to the DBE for monitoring purposes to ensure turn-around strategies are implemented and are yielding results.  

15 March 2021 - NW715

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of learners who are eligible for learner transport do not benefit from the service and (b) what is the reason for this situation?

Reply:

a) There are 751 318 Learners who are in need of Learner Transport nationally; and 616 126 of these learners are being transported, which leaves out 135 192 Learners who are eligible for learner transport and are not benefiting from the service.

b) The reason for not transporting these learners is purely attributed to insufficient funding, as the demand for learner transport exceeds the budget allocated; which result in the exclusion of a number of qualifying learners.

10 March 2021 - NW359

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What measures have been put in place since the investigation into the exam leaks in 2020 to prevent such leaks from happening again?

Reply:

In response to the leaked question papers in Mathematics and Physical Science, the Director General appointed a National Investigation Task Team (NITT) and one of the objectives of the NITT was to make recommendations relating to improvement of the examination system so as to avoid a recurrence of these leakages.   

Two recommendations emanating from the investigations of the National Investigation Task Team (NITT), relate to what needs to be done to improve the examination system so that a recurrence of a leakage is avoided. 

Firstly, it is recommended that an audit of origination and printing processes a the Government Printing Works (GPW) be conducted given that these processes are susceptible to security breaches. An audit of the protocols and processes for securing the origination and printing be undertaken and that if this proves necessary a new protocol be established. 

Secondly, in terms of the NITT report, the examination cycle has provided evidence of substantial compliance in most aspects of the process, from setting and moderation to the marking and resulting process, and in the handling of such other irregularities as did occur. The NITT is therefore, of the view that the system is otherwise secure. However, the DBE and the PEDs need to know how the leaks occurred and take such remedial action as may be necessary. The DBE will conduct a full audit of the printing, packing, distribution and storage of question papers across all the provinces and using the findings from previous audits will establish the extent to which the previous audit findings have been addressed and what are the new gaps that must be addressed. 

The DBE will also await the outcome of the criminal investigation by the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), which will point the DBE to the actual source of the leakage and how it occurred. This will be fully interrogated and remedial measures will be put in place, ahead of the next examination.

The Department will also undertake to invest in the latest technology relating to the security of question papers. An implementation plan will be put in place as to how these new technologies can be phased in.

10 March 2021 - NW553

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What is the breakdown of the total number of learners in each (a) Grade and (b) province who have dropped out of school in the period 15 March 2020 to 15 February 2021?

Reply:

Learner drop-out statistics are not available at this point. Based on the information provided by the Provincial Education Departments (PEDs) during the DG's weekly one-on-one virtual meetings with PEDs, provinces are still collating the drop-out statistics. As they work out drop-out-statistics, PEDs are identifying learners who do not physically come to school but have not dropped out because they are learning from home. These are learners who have comorbidities or other illnesses, as well as those who are in the home education programme.




 

10 March 2021 - NW604

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What plans will her department implement to accommodate learners who (a) did not write the National Senior Certificate examinations and (b) dropped out of Grade 12 in 2020 as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic?

Reply:

There were 28 758 learners that registered for the examination but did not write all six subjects in the final October/November 2020 examination, which represents 4.7% of the learners that enrolled. This absenteeism rate is extremely low compared to previous years. However, all learners who registered for the October / November 2020 NSC examinations will be allowed to write the May / June 2021 examinations.  These learners will be supported through the Second Chance Matric Programme, so that they are adequately prepared to write the examinations in May / June 2021.

10 March 2021 - NW229

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Hendricks, Mr MGE to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in order to continue with the curriculum during the COVID-19 pandemic, she will consider (a) that the Republic switches over to home schooling so that teachers remain at schools and have an appointment system for learners during the current COVID-19 pandemic, (b) investigating alternative teaching methods such as (i) developing a public broadcaster model utilising the SA Broadcasting Corporation television and radio stations and (ii) developing applications for smartphones to supplement home schooling; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) Switching Schooling Model during the current COVID-19 pandemic.

The current schooling model under  the recently amended Directions issued in terms of Regulation 4(3) of the Regulations made under the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002) regarding the dates for the re-opening of schools, to provide for the 2021 academic year, and for measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 in the national Department of Basic Education, all Provincial Departments of Education, all education district offices and all schools in the Republic of South Africa, as published under Government Notice No. 343, in Government Gazette No. 43465 of 23 June 2020, as amended, is adequate to ensure sufficient curriculum coverage under the prevailing level of COVID-19 infections.  Therefore, there is no need for the Republic to switch over to home schooling alone.

(b) Alternative Teaching Methods

(i) Educational Broadcasting (TV & Radio):

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) in collaboration with the National Education Collaboration Trust (NECT) and various partners have since April 2020 adopted the use of online and broadcast platforms under the theme "Woza Matric Catchup Programme 2020".  Planning is currently underway to expand the online and broadcast learning support intervention to cover all grades (Grade R - 12) under the "Remote Learning Programme 2021".  This includes the following:

(aa) TV Educational Broadcasting:

  • OVHD Channel 122 (DBE TV Channel): eMedia Investments in partnership with the DBE are broadcasting educational support material for learners and teachers on the Openview HD (OVHD) platform – channel 122. The channel is currently available for free to homes with OVHD decoders.
  • Telematics: The Western Cape Education Department (WCED) in partnership with the University of Stellenbosch are broadcasting via the Telematics platform that uses satellite technology to broadcast lessons in 9 subjects from the University of Stellenbosch. The subjects include Mathematics, Physical Science, Life Sciences, Accounting, Business Studies, History, Geography, English FAL and Afrikaans HL. These lessons are planned by WCED subject specialists and presented by expert teachers.
  • Mindset Network: Mindset is a digital satellite television free-to air channel. The Network broadcasts educational support material for learners and teachers on both Openview HD (OVHD) platform – channel 134 and DSTV - channel 319.
  • SABC TV in partnership with the DBE broadcasted educational support material for learners and teachers on the SABC TV Channel 2 in 2020. Plans are underway to request the broadcaster to provide similar support in 2021 under the DBE/NECT Remote Learning Programme.

(bb) Radio Educational Broadcasting:

The SABC and private community radio stations in collaboration with Provincial Education Departments broadcasted Covid-19 Curriculum Support Programmes to parents and Grade R – 12 learners in 2020. Plans are underway to request the broadcasters to offer similar services in 2021 under the DBE/NECT Remote Learning Programme. This will include the following:

  • Limpopo Province: Munghana Lo Nene FM;  Thobela FM and Phalapala FM Radio Stations.
  • Mpumalanga Province: Ikwekwezi FM; Pulpit FM; Ligwalagwala FM, Radio Laeveld; Radio Kragbron; Community Radio Stations; and Rise FM Radio Stations.
  • Eastern Cape Province: Umhlobo Wenene FM Radio Station.
  • North West community radio stations.

ii) Applications for smartphones

There is already a proliferation of free educational smartphone applications available to users, ranging from content access, communicator, learning management systems and assessment Apps. Many of which are already being used by schools, teachers and learners to support remote learning. 

There is also a multitude of local online educational content portals and learning support platforms, some of which as zero-rated and accessible free of charge to support remote learning. Many of these platforms are augmented by smartphone applications.

The DBE website at https://www.education.gov.za/covid19supportpackage.aspx 

provides links for accessing online content resources for parents, caregivers and learners to support learning on its landing page.

 Some of the main online platforms and portals include:

10 March 2021 - NW143

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2812 on 27 November 2020, the data include students who have permission to be home-schooled and/or stay at home; if not; what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the figure includes only learners who have been registered with and whose applications have been received by provincial education departments. 

10 March 2021 - NW592

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the degrading state of toilets, taps running dry, lack of scholar transport, dilapidated classrooms and lack of food for learners in rural areas which was reported by teacher unions in KwaZulu-Natal who conducted oversight visits as thousands of learners returned to schools, how is her department addressing the persisting deplorable state of affairs in schools; (2) whether any schools have been refurbished during the period that learners and teachers were at home due to the COVID-19 pandemic; if not, why not; if so, (a) what total number of schools and (b) in which areas?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Kwa Zulu Natal Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

10 March 2021 - NW393

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, with reference to her announcement that an investigation into the 2020 Matric exam paper leaks found that the National Senior Certificate examinations were not compromised, and given that the leaking of examination papers is not a new problem and has happened almost every single year for a long time now, she has found (a) how the papers were leaked and (b) who was responsible; if not, in each case, why not; if so, what are the relevant details in each case?

Reply:

(a) and (b) In response to the leaked question papers in Mathematics and Physical Science, the Director General appointed a National Investigation Task Team (NITT) and the objectives of the NITT, inter alia, included: an identification of the source of the leakage and to make recommendations relating to improvement of the examination system so as to avoid a recurrence of these leakages. 

The DBE also reported the leakage to the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI), and the investigation is ongoing and one arrest has been made and the suspect appeared in court already and the case has been remanded to a date in March 2021. 

In the case of the NITT investigation, an audit was conducted of the Government Printing Works (GPW), where the Limpopo and North West provinces print their question papers and it has now emerged that one of the question papers that leaked could have come from the Government Printing Works (GPW). The security at the point of origination and the printing at GPW is susceptible to breaches and the investigation is now with the DPCI. Computers from GPW have been confiscated for further forensic investigation by DPCI. 

The conclusion of the criminal investigation will reveal the source of the leakage and the Department will put in place remedial measures to address these leakages. 

It needs to be noted that in both these alleged sources of the leakage, it is the human element that has contributed to the breach. The human factor is often difficult to control and hence the Department is exploring various technologies that will minimise the human element in the process of printing, packing and distribution. 

On a point of correction, it needs to be stated that the previous leakage of a question paper occurred in 2016 and this was limited to one district in the Limpopo province. This implies that there were no leaked question papers in the last three years.  

08 March 2021 - NW530

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Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total amount was spent on sanitising schools by (i) by her department nationally and (ii) each provincial department of education and (b) are the details of each company and/or business entity that got the contract in each case?

Reply:

(a) The provincial education departments provided the budget and the expenditure for COVID-19, file attached. School specific amounts and the (b) companies that provided the services, can be requested directly from the provinces.

08 March 2021 - NW441

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps will she take to ensure that decent classrooms are built for the educators and learners at the Empumelelweni Primary and High School in Eerste River, Cape Town?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Western Cape Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

08 March 2021 - NW444

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a)(i) total number of learners entered Grade 1 in 2009 and (ii) number of the specified learners wrote final examinations for Grade 12 in 2020 and (b) happened to the rest of the learners who could not reach Grade 12?

Reply:

(a)(i) According to our national records, there were 1 106 827 learners enrolled in Grade 1 in 2009.  It needs to be noted that this figure includes learners that repeated Grade 1; and therefore, the number of learners that entered Grade 1 in 2009, will be slightly lower.

(ii) The number of full-time candidates who wrote the final examination in Grade 12  in 2020, was 578 468.

(b) The rest of the learners who did not write the final Grade 12  examination, but entered Grade 1 in 2009, are included in:

  • the almost 30 000 learners who registered for the 2020 NSC examinations, but were absent for the examinations;
  • a large number of learners would have failed in one of the earlier Grades; and thus, would be retained in the system as repeaters;
  • a large number of learners would have left the schooling system in Grade 10, 11; and registered at the TVET Colleges;
  • a significant number of learners would have entered the world of work; and
  • a large number of learners would have exited the system in Grade 10 and Grade 11, or earlier; and registered to write the final NSC examinations, either in the May / June examinations, or in October / November examinations as part-time candidates.

08 March 2021 - NW250

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Langa, Mr TM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has she taken to ensure that all the schools that fall within the KwaMbonambi municipal area adhere to all COVID-19 protocols, and that includes ensuring that there are sanitisers, temperature scanners and masks for all the teachers and learners?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education (DBE) has developed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) for the containment and management of COVID-19 in schools; and further gazetted Directions issued in terms of regulation 4(3) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), regarding the reopening of schools and measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 in the Department of Basic Education, all Provincial Education Departments, all Education district offices and all schools in the Republic of South Africa.  The SOPs and Directions are not municipal specific, but are applicable to the entire education system. 

08 March 2021 - NW360

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the announcement that teachers will be considered as frontline workers to receive the vaccines, what (a) is the detailed plan for the vaccination rollout for teachers, (b) measures have been put in place for (i) teachers and (ii) learners who suffer from co-morbidities so that they are not be left behind as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic and (c)(i) are the details of the regulations for the safe re-opening of schools and (ii) how does her department intend to ensure its strict implementation?

Reply:

a) The plan for the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccination is led by the National Department of Health (NDOH). 

b) The national strategy has three phases; with phase one focusing on health workers - phase one started during the week of 15 February 2021; and phase two will focus on frontline workers, including teachers.

c) The Department of Basic Education has developed Standard Operating Procedures for the containment and management of COVID-19 in schools and further gazetted Directions issued in terms of regulation 4(3) of the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), regarding the reopening of schools and measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 in the basic education sector.

05 March 2021 - NW423

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Boshoff, Dr WJ to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether she will furnish Dr W J Boshoff with a list of all schools in Kimberley in the Northern Cape; if not, why not; if so, by what date will she provide the specified list, indicating under each school (a) if the specified school charges (i) school fees or (ii) no school fees and (b) the number of vacancies for additional learners; (2) whether she will make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

1.(a) (i) (ii) Refer Annexure A attached

05 March 2021 - NW336

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Sarupen, Mr AN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether any staff member in her department (a) performed work in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work, outside normal working hours, in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what are the relevant details; if so, (a) what is the policy of her department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)

 (a) Yes   

 (b) Yes there are staff members who were performing remunerative work outside the Department from 1 April 2014, and approval for such remunerative work is granted over a period of twelve (12) months, and subject to re-application, if it continues beyond the initial 12 months period.

(i) There are twenty (20) staff members who obtained approval to do remunerative work outside the Department for the period under review i.e., 1 April 2014 to date.

(ii) the specified staff members are in categories of:

  • Chief Directors
  • Directors
  • Chief Education Specialist
  • Deputy Directors

(2) Yes approval was obtained in each case.

(a) The Policy of the Department requires prior application for approval to do remunerative work outside the Department.

(b) Applications to perform remunerative work outside the Department are considered by the respective Branch Heads (DDGs) and Ethics Officers; and approved by the Director-General.

(c) There have been no transgressions of this policy for the past five years to date in the Department.

(d) Not applicable.

01 March 2021 - NW269

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that many public schools are still excluding learners on the basis of non - payment of school fees; if not, why not; if so, what steps has she taken to stop the practice and allow learners to receive education without any hindrances?

Reply:

I have been informed about the illegal practices by schools to collect school fees, and charge registration fees as a condition for learners to return to school. 

I have instructed the Department to work with Provincial Education Departments to ensure that school principals and School Governing Bodies stop the practice.  Officials of the Department have been conducting interviews on various radio stations in the country, to inform parents about their rights on the demand by schools to charge registration fee.  Media statements, including statements on social media, have been issued on the matter, advising all affected parents to report such cases to the nearest provincial or district office for intervention.

01 March 2021 - NW448

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Madokwe, Ms P to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that the Xhariep region does not have its own District Office and what is the logic behind subjecting principals and educators to travel all the way to Bloemfontein to get services for their schools, sometimes losing up to six hours that could have been spent teaching and/or doing school-related administration?

Reply:

The information required to respond to the question is not available at the Department of Basic Education but rather the Free State Department of Education. According to the Public Service Act, 1994 (Proclamation 103 of 1994 (PSA) s, 1, 3, 7(a)), the power to demarcate, name and organise education districts in a province vests with the Member of Executive Council (MEC) for Education, who is the executive authority responsible for the organisation of the provincial education department (PED).

01 March 2021 - NW272

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Mkhonto, Ms C N to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       In view of the severe damage to infrastructure (details furnished) caused by the tropical storm Eloise in some parts of the Republic over the past three weeks, what contingency plan does her department have in place to ensure that all schools have water available at all times; (2) whether her department has a database of schools where learners might not be able to get to schools on time due to the damaged infrastructure; if not, why not; if so, how will the learners be accommodated in order to ensure that they are not left behind with lessons?

Reply:

1. Provinces have provided schools with rainwater harvesting tanks and schools replenish the water in the tanks through their school allocations. In cases where schools are unable, agreements have been entered into with municipalities for the replenishment of water at affetcted schools.

2. The Department has received reports from provinces which indicate the number of schools affected by storm damages.  Only in 6 schools, where learners are not able to utilize the classrooms, due to the extent of the damages.  In four of the schools, learners and educators are accommodated in adjacent schools, while repairs are in progress; and in two of the schools, mobile classrooms have been provided.

01 March 2021 - NW361

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether her department has commenced with the recruitment process to fill vacancies of the 1 600 educators who succumbed to COVID-19; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The filling of vacant posts is an ongoing process to ensure that there is a teacher in front of every class.  Schools received their new post establishments for 2021 in September and October 2020.  All vacant posts that occurred as a result of the declaration of the new post establishments, and/or natural attrition, are filled continuously.  This would include all vacancies that resulted from the loss of 1600 educators, who succumbed to COVID-19.  The posts are filled in the order of priority, which involves the placement of educators declared in addition; placement on provincial and national bursary recipients; placement of young graduates; and lastly other unemployed educators seeking employment in public schools.

25 February 2021 - NW236

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether, in light of the fact that in many parts of the world school sport has restarted, albeit tentatively, she has plans in place to ensure that school sports go on this year, especially at schools in areas that are more impoverished in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what plans?

Reply:

On 21 October 2020 the Department of Basic Education issued the Amended Directions, in terms of Regulation 4(3) of the Regulations made under the Disaster Management Act, 2002 (Act No. 57 of 2002), regarding the re-opening of schools; and measures to address, prevent and combat the spread of Covid-19 at Alert Level 1. At that point, non-contact sport was allowed and inter-school matches were allowed to resume activity. However, this was short-lived as the country experienced a surge in the number of people who contracted the corona virus; and the country was then moved to Alert Level 3. As a result, the Department has finalised the amended draft Directions in line with Alert Level 3.

These Directions have been consulted on widely with basic education stakeholders and the Human Rights Commission. The draft Directions allow for non-contact sport to resume within all schools, provided that compliance with social distancing, hygiene and safety measures to prevent and combat the spread of COVID-19 is adhered to.

The following safety measures must be adhered to with this resumption:

  1. The number of persons in the sporting venues, change rooms or training area at any given time, must be limited as far as is reasonably practicable;
  2. Sport personnel and all participants must be subjected to temperature screening before they enter the sport venue or sport fields;
  3. Face masks, or appropriate items that cover the nose and mouth as required by the health protocols, must be worn by all personnel and participants entering the sporting venues, change rooms or training area except participants when training or participating in matches;
  4. All windows and doors must remain open, where feasible, to reduce contact and ensure adequate ventilation;
  5. Social distancing must be maintained at all times; and
  6. A register of all personnel and participants must be kept.

Contact sport training is also allowed under Lockdown Alert Level 3, provided there is no contact during training, and physical distancing is maintained. Arts and Culture and other enrichment programmes are also allowed to resume in schools with safety and hygiene measures maintained.

For now, inter-school matches, choir rehearsals, choir competitions and sport championships at district, provincial and national level will be suspended. This is temporary as the country deals with the surge in the numbers of infections.

These measures are temporary and will be reviewed as the Covid-19 infections decline.

25 February 2021 - NW168

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) plans has her department put in place to create and implement the promotion of gender empowerment in school communities and (b) is the total number of schools in each province which have been identified for the implementation of programmes specifically designed to address gender equity?

Reply:

a) What plans does DBE put in place to create and implement the promotion of gender empowerment in school communities?

DBE has a responsibility of implementing gender empowerment in schools. This is a constitutional obligation, but also serves as a catalyst in addressing gender discrimination, dismantling patriarchy, boosting confidence and promoting mutual respect between and amongst people, in particular learners.

Gender Empowerment is addressed in the Lifeskills and Life Orientation Curriculum Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) delivered in all schools. To enhance the Lifeskills and Life Orientation offering, a phased implementation of Scripted Lesson Plans for Comprehensive Sexuality Education (CSE) is currently undertaken in five (5) provinces.

In the co-curricular offering, the DBE has two programmes that assist with the promotion of gender empowerment in schools. These programmes are the Girls and Boys Education Movement (GBEM) and Techno-Girl. Briefly:

  • GBEM aims to encourage girls and boys to work together as equals and to foster respect for the human dignity and rights of both sexes. Through engaging with the movement and its activities, learners are equipped with adequate knowledge to engage on various issues such as governance, lifeskills, sport and development, gender based violence an related topics in a constructive manner, thereby encouraging active citizenry.

 

  • Techno-Girl programme on the other hand, is a girl economic empowerment initiative, which is achieved through a Public-Private Partnership (PPP) model. Girls from disadvantaged communities benefit from a three-year structured job shadowing, mentorship and skills development programme with companies that have core skill requirements for Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) careers. The programme provides girls with a unique opportunity to explore various STEM career choices, analyse and make informed decisions in a given career choice. The programme has developed a mentorship component through Techno-Girl Alumni where learners, especially those who are in Grade 12, are offered assistance for applying to tertiary institutions.

 

b) Is there a total number of schools in each province which have been identified for implementation of programmes specifically designed to address gender equity?

 

Province

District

Number of Schools

Eastern Cape

Chris Hani

06

 

Buffalo City Metropolitant

06

 

Amathole East

07

 

Nelson Mandela Bay

09

Gauteng

 

Gauteng West

15

 

Johannesburg West

09

 

Tshwane South

09

Limpopo

 

Capricorn

09

 

Waterburg

05

Mpumalanga

 

Gert Sibande

06

 

Ehlanzeni

11

 

Nkangala

07

 

Bohlabela

06

KwaZulu Natal

 

Umgungundlovu

06

 

Uthukela

06

 

Umlazi

11

The Lifeskills and Life Orientation curriculum, as it addresses gender empowerement and equity, is offered in all 25 154 schools across the country.

The phased implementation of Scripted Lesson Plans for CSE is in 2176, broken down as follows:

Province

Number of Schools

Western Cape

101

Free State

131

Gauteng

436

KwaZulu-Natal

930

Mpumalanga

578

 

The GBEM programme is implemented in a selected 128 schools from the following provinces:

The latest statistical information on the Techno-Girl programme is still being consolidated by the Techno-Girl Trust with whom the DBE holds a partnership.

25 February 2021 - NW167

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Nodada, Mr BB to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the total number of schools that have been identified by Sanitation Appropriate for Education to have inappropriate sanitation and (b) number of schools have had their sanitation facilities upgraded as a result?

Reply:

a) An initial list of 3 898 schools were identified for intervention under the SAFE programme.

b) Since the start of the programme, some of the non-viable schools have been closed or rationalised and do not need intervention under the SAFE programme.  A verification of the actual need at schools, futher revealed that some schools have appropriate toilets; and do not need intervention under the SAFE programme.  There are however, 2 865 schools that do require intervention under the SAFE programme.  Of these, the construction of new toilets has progressed to practical completion at 683 schools.  A further 340 schools have toilets under construction.  New toilets at the remaining 1 842 schools, are scheduled for construction during 2021/22.

19 February 2021 - NW47

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the reasons that teacher assistants have not been paid in KwaZulu-Natal for the past three months and (b) steps has she taken to resolve the specified matter?

Reply:

a)What  are the reasons that teacher assistants have not been paid in KwaZulu-Natal for the past three months

The teacher assistance were employed in December 2020. The province reported that the delay in payment of stipend is that the PED experienced a challenge with monthly cashflows received from their Provincial Treasury . The Provincial Treasury is allocating cashflow to the Provincial department amounting to 8.33% of the annual budget.

b)What steps has she taken to resolve the specified matter?   

The Department is conducting weekly meetings with PEDs to provide assistance and guidance. The PED reported that they  engaged  with the Provincial Treasury, and  the funds will be released to Districts on 11 and 18 February 2021. It is envisaged that the outstanding stipends will be finalised by 20 February 2021. The matter pertaining to February and March stipends is being attended to by the PED with the Provincial Treasury.

19 February 2021 - NW43

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Komane, Ms RN to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What steps has he taken to address the infrastructure and human resource capacity challenges at the Kgosi Shope Primary School in the North West?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the North West Department of Education and a response will be provided as soon as it is received.

19 February 2021 - NW52

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) are the reasons that her department allowed the Lower Ntlaza Junior Primary School in Libode, Eastern Cape, to be run down the way it has been and (b) plans does her department have in place to repair damaged classrooms in the specified school?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Eastern Cape Department of Education and the response will be provided as soon as it is received.

15 February 2021 - NW72

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Ngcobo, Mr SL to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the Presidential Youth Employment Initiative (details furnished) where recipients will be given a stipend of R3 500 per month and are expected to assist in teaching and learning, administration duties, general maintenance and cleaning, data capturing as well as facilitating sports, safety and health-related activities, what (a) measures has her department put in place to ensure that recipients  will be (i) youth with no criminal record and (ii) effectively inducted into the codes of conduct of the school and her department, (b) selection criteria will be utilised to determine who will be chosen and (c) form of skills transfer can the recipients expect to gain from participating in this programme?

Reply:

(i) will be youth with no criminal record  

The Department, working together with Provincial Education Departments (PEDs), acknowledges the need for the youth employed in schools, as part of the Presidential Employment Stimulus Package, to be members of society, without criminal records.  As such, the Implementation Framework for the Basic Education Employment Initiative (BEEI) makes it mandatory for all youth employed in schools to submit a copy of their most recent Police Clearance Certificate (PCC), issued by the South African Police Service (SAPS).  The Department has taken into account that the processing of PCCs takes time to be finalised.  As such, PEDs have been advised to inform School Principals to request youth appointed in their schools to submit confirmation that they have made an application for a PCC.  All participants are required to have submitted their PCCs by January 2021.

In addition to this measure, PEDs are required to work with their counterparts, the provincial Departments of Social Development (DSD), to run the IDs of incumbents against the Sexual Offenders’ Register.  This is meant to protect our learners, as well as to ensure that schools remain as protective environments for our children to the extent necessary.

A further measure put in place is for the youth to have submitted testimonials, affirming their standing in their communities, as part of the documentation required to finalise appointments.

 

(ii) will be effectively inducted into the codes of conduct of the schools? 

All schools are required to use the period following immediately after finalising appointments to rollout an induction and orientation programme.  To facilitate this, the Department has finalised an orientation manual for Education Assistants and General School Assistants.  This manual has been mediated through the training of District Directors, Circuit Managers and School Principals.

Once the youth have taken up their positions, Principals are required to ensure that induction and orientation are provided to all.  The DBE orientation manual should be augmented with programmes designed by schools, supported by their Circuits.

 

(b) What selection criteria will be utilised to determine who will be chosen

        The following standard criteria have been discussed and agreed with PEDs: 

  • that the recruits are 18 – 35 years old;  
  • that they reside in the community where the school is located;
  • a special dispensation is provided for Schools for Learners with Special Education Needs (LSEN).  PEDs have been advised to inform such schools that when they undertake recruitment processes, they should target their former learners who are suited to work in the schools;
  • a minimum of NQF Level 4 qualification for Education Assistants and General School Assistants; and
  • Since Education Assistants will be required to work with teachers and learners in classrooms, having an NQF level 7 qualification will be an added advantage.

 

(c) What form of skills transfer can the recipients expect to gain from participating in this programme             

        The Department has developed an inventory of training programmes, with the following five focus areas:

  • Child and Youth Care Workers (CYCW) to provide Psychosocial Support to learners;
  • Curriculum to claw-back on the losses imposed by the outbreak of COVID-19;
  • Reading Champions to respond to one of the key Sector priorities;
  • Infrastructure to support critical school infrastructure maintenance, and

to conduct an infrastructure condition assessments that will inform future maintenance work; and

  • e-Cadre programme to support schools and teachers with the following

ICT related activities - Basic ICT equipment troubleshooting, use of ICT in lesson planning, ICT school management Tools (SASAMS),

Integration of ICT in Teaching and Learning, Audit of schools for ICT readiness, and Loading Open Educational Resources on teacher and

learner devices to be used in the classrooms.

 The training programme will be provided in collaboration with various partners.

18 December 2020 - NW2975

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Sukers, Ms ME to ask the Minister of Basic Education

In view of the reports that public schools will have to choose their source materials that achieve the learning outcomes of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement curriculum before the end of 2020, (a) what is the status of the pilot studies on the Scripted Lesson Plans (SLPs), (b) have the final SLPs been approved and (c) by what date does her department intend to roll out the SLPs nationally?

Reply:

(a) what is the status of the pilot studies on the Scripted Lesson Plans (SLPs), and (b) have the final SLPs been approved:

The Grades 4 - 12 Scripted Lesson Plans have been  piloted and approved by the DBE. These are available on the DBE website.

(c) by what date does her department intend to roll out the SLPs nationally?

The SLPs are a teacher tool used to guide the provision of CSE content in the classroom. The roll-out in high HIV burden districts was planned to start in 2020. However, this has been deferred to 2021. 

11 December 2020 - NW3078

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Mthenjane, Mr DF to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has investigated the circumstances leading to the leaks of the 2020 matric questions papers; if not, why not; if so, what (a) measures has she put in place to ensure that it does not happen in future and (b) actions will she take to ensure that the integrity of the 2020 matric year examinations is not undermined because of the leaks?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education has established a National Investigation Team comprising of the South African Qualification Authority (SAQA); Universities South Africa (USAf), Umalusi as observer, the Department of Basic Education, one member of the National Examinations Irregularities Committee (NEIC) and an independent Examinations Consultant. The National Investigation Task Team (NITT) has been mandated to determine the extent of the spread of the leakage, the origin of the leak and measures that will be taken to ensure the credibility of the 2020 National Senior Certificate (NSC) examination and prevent a future occurrence of this nature. The investigation is ongoing and the Directorate of Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) has also been engaged and they are at an advanced stage of the investigation.   

(a) in terms of ensuring that this does not happen in the future, the Department has commenced with an audit of the entire value chain from origination of question papers to the delivery of question papers to examination centres. The purpose of this audit is to establish the weak points in the system with a view to strengthening these weak points and the  security will be doubled at all points in the system. The DBE will also appoint an independent Investigator to conduct a comprehensive audit of the entire examination system, inclusive of the Information Technology systems that are used to evaluate what new technologies can be utilised in future years to improve and modernise the examination system.

(b) In terms of the integrity of the 2020 NSC examinations, the Department has made a decision to rewrite nationally the question papers in Mathematics Paper 2 and Physical Science Paper 2. Umalusi has indicated based on a preliminary investigation report  that these two question papers have been compromised and therefore to restore the integrity of the examination in these two question papers, the decision to rewrite both these question papers on 15 December 2020 and 17 December 2020, has been taken.        

11 December 2020 - NW3042

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of (a) learners were enrolled for the multiple examination opportunity in the past three financial years and (b) the specified learners have completed their National Senior Certificate?

Reply:

The Table below represents the number of Multiple Examination Opportunity (MEO) candidates that did not write all six subjects in November 2017 and November 2018. These candidates would have written the remaining subjects in the  subsequent examination in June 2018 and June 2019. The candidates that opted for the Multiple Examination opportunity in November 2019, would have written the remaining subjects in the June 2020 examination. However this examination due to COVID-19, has been combined with the November 2020 examination and the examination is currently in progress.

Hence the table below represents the number of MEO learners that enrolled in November 2017 and November 2018 and the number that achieved the NSC after completing their examination in June 2018 and June 2019, respectively.

 

 

November 2017

November 2018

Province

MEO Enrolled

MEO Achieved

MEO Enrolled

MEO Achieved

EC

6 485

185

12 848

414

FS

2 241

128

3 130

395

GP

8 036

806

10 064

1 052

KZ

21 125

1 443

30 705

2 126

LP

13 365

815

16 899

1 105

MP

10 372

1 773

6 470

677

NC

1 512

116

2 085

113

NW

4 377

552

5 164

438

WC

1 215

18

1 463

33

NAT

68 728

5 836

88 828

6 353

11 December 2020 - NW2787

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Abrahams, Ms ALA to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What total number of the (a) 12 452 072 children who received child support grants in the 2018-19 financial year, (b) 12 269 084 children in the 2017-18 financial year and (c) 12 081 375 children in the 2016-17 financial year (i) are enrolled in (aa) primary and (bb) high school and (ii) attend school regularly?

Reply:

a) b)  c) (i) (aa) (bb) & (ii)

 

 

Table 1: Total number of learners who received child support grants and attend school, by phase, from 2018 to 2020

 

 

 

 

 

 

DATA YEAR

PRIMARY

SECONDARY

COMBINED

SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION
 CENTRES (SNE)

TOTAL
LEARNERS

2018

 5 198 811

 2 490 900

  969 471

  217 945

 8 877 127

2019

 5 468 742

 2 881 247

 1 005 639

  82 448

 9 438 076

2020

 16703 878

 8 246 050

  994 439

  518 338

 9 672 788

Source: EMIS & Social Pension System (SOCPEN) dataset 2018 -2020

 

Note1: Data for 2016-17 financial year is substituted by recent data for 2020

Note2: Data reported is based on academic year instead of financial year.

11 December 2020 - NW2635

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

With reference to the general decline in the enrolment of students in various subjects, most notably mathematics and science since January 2016, what (a) plans is her department implementing to address the general decline in enrolment for mathematics and science subjects and (b) was the total number of teachers who majored in mathematics and science subjects in the Republic in the 2019 and 2020 academic years?

Reply:

The Department of Basic Education makes R400 000 000 (four hundred million Rands) available to the nine (9) Provincial Education Departments (PEDS) by means of ring-fenced funding as the Mathematics, Science and Technology Conditional Grant. Programmes funded by the MST Grant are implemented by the PEDs; and are intended to increase learner participation rate as well as to improve the quality of learner performance.  In addition, provision is made for interventions specifically aimed at supporting girl learners.  In the event a PED has difficulty recruiting teachers of Mathematics and Physical Sciences, the DBE has, for almost a decade, also partnered with TEACH SA to provide good quality university graduates who can be deployed where needed.  The placement of these young graduates reduces the likelihood of learners dropping Mathematics and Physical Sciences. This programme ensures provision of an academically qualified person to schools that may otherwise would not have  been able to employ a teacher of these subjects.

11 December 2020 - NW2815

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(a) What number of schools in each province still have asbestos classrooms, (b) what is the name of each school, (c) what number of asbestos classrooms does each specified school have and (d) by what date will all asbestos classrooms be replaced?

Reply:

(a) (b) (c) (d) The attached report indicates the number of schools which still have asbestos classrooms, the names of the schools, number of asbestos classrooms in each school and the estimated dated for the replacement of  these classrooms.

11 December 2020 - NW2471

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What number of children (a) have returned to school and (b) who have returned to school are currently receiving their food from the National School Nutrition Programme?

Reply:

a) The number of learners that have returned and benefitting from the school nutrition programme were 9 057 395 as at 23 October 2020.  

b) Provincial statistics show that the number of learners that received meals (October) was 9 057 395.

11 December 2020 - NW2866

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       Whether, with reference to a process which her department began in 2019 to develop a new subject for Grades R-9 to address a wide range of coding and robotics competencies in order to develop skills and expertise needed to usher in the fourth industrial revolution in the Republic, her department has considered implementing coding and robotics principles into existing subjects rather than introducing a new subject; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department will furnish a progress report on the drafting, consultation and implementation of the new subject; if not, why not; if so, (a) by what date does she envisage the new subject to be introduced into schools and (b) what is the total budget allocation towards the new subject?

Reply:

1. The Curriculum for Coding and Robotics Curriculum for Grades R-9 has been developed as a stand-alone subject for the following reasons:

  • There is not enough space in NS & T as well as in Technology to include enough of the new content without removing too much content in NS&T and Technology which is necessary for learners to acquire.
  • Infusing Coding and Robotics in the existing subject might require reducing the content of the other subjects that might affect the articulation, flow and progression of the subject
  • The notional hours are linked to Annual Teaching Plan (ATP), the content and assessment, new content will interrupt the flow of the content
  • Teachers may fall back to what they are comfortable with, meaning that the new content in the curriculum may never reach the learners effectively if we infuse it
  • Infusing into Life Skills, NS & T and Technology would involve updating three different curriculums as opposed to creating one new one
  • The Coding and Robotics curriculum is more skills focused than theory focused, meaning there is still a large need for the theory knowledge contained in NS & T and Technology
  • The 4IR needs more skills taught to learners and not just a change in focus of subjects that are already offered - more time is needed to prepare learners.

2. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) initiated a process of developing the draft curriculum and Policy Statement for Coding and Robotics for Grade R-9. The development process was highly inclusive of DBE and PED specialists, and stakeholders with expertise and knowledge in the field of Coding and Robotics from business and sistergovernment departments, NAPTOSA, NATU, PEU, SADTU, SAOU, Academia (5 Universities) and NGO Sector.

The Draft Coding and Robotics Curriculum for Grades R -9 was presented and approved at Heads of Education Committee (HEDCOM) and Council of Education Ministers (CEM) and has been submitted to UMALUSI for Evaluation and Quality Assurance. The Draft Curriculum and Assessment Policy statements (CAPS) documents for Coding and Robotics for Grades R-3, Grades 4-6, and Grades 7-9 are developed. A process of gazetting the draft CAPS documents for public comments is underway.

The draft CAPS for Grades R-3 and Grade 7 for Coding and Robotics curriculum will be piloted in 2021-2024 for Grades R-3 in two hundred (200) schools and for Grade7-9 in one thousand (1000) schools. Full implementation in will commence in 2025.

(b)The Department of Basic Education has secured funding for the Grades R-3 from ETDP-SETA and the amount secured is seven million (R7 000 000). A business plan was submitted to the National Treasury requesting funding for the strengthening of Technology subject in Grades4-9 through integration of Coding and Robotics. The amount approved by National Treasury for the request was sixty million R60 000 000.

11 December 2020 - NW2882

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Mohlala, Ms MR to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed that more than 4 000 schools in the Republic are still using pit latrines; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what plans does she have in place to eliminate pit latrines in all the specified schools and (b) by what date will the pit latrines be eliminated?

Reply:

a) The SAFE programme (Sanitation Appropriate For Education) was launched to address the sanitation at 3 898 schools that reportedly were still dependent on basic pit toilets.  Of these 3898 schools, 427 have subsequently been closed (mostly due to rationalisation).  A further 725 of these schools have been assessed and the sanitation has been confirmed to be of an appropriate standard, though some of these sanitation facilities require some form of maintenance.  The remaining 2 747 schools require intervention to eradicate the dependency on basic pit toilets.  These schools are located in EC (997), FS (123), KZN (1 168), LP (298), MP (106), and NW (55).   Of these 2 747 schools, the work has progressed to practical completion at 612 schools.  There are current construction projects at a further 420 of the 2747 schools.

b) The plan is to eradicate the dependency on basic pit toilets at the identified schools by March 2022.    

11 December 2020 - NW2656

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Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether she has been informed of the allegation of nepotism and misappropriation of funds levelled against a certain person (details furnished); if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what actions has she taken to ensure that the (a) specified matter is investigated and (b) specified person is held accountable?

Reply:

The matter raised in the question falls in the jurisdiction of the Member of the Executive Council (MEC) of Mpumalanga not the Minister of Basic Education. Investigation on the matter and holding the Principal accountable can only be done by the MEC of Mpumalanga. 

11 December 2020 - NW2737

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Tarabella - Marchesi, Ms NI to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

Whether there is a progress report on the Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education Pilot Programme in the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what is the current status of the pilot programme?

Reply:

The Eastern Cape is phasing-in Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education per district.  All districts are implementing the programme in a phased-in manner across all districts in 2004 schools.  A report on Mother Tongue-Based Bilingual Education was disseminated in 2019/2020.