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16 April 2021 - NW740

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether he has been informed that 5 452 officials working for Eskom have to date failed to submit their declaration forms relating to potential conflicts of interest at Eskom; if not, why not; if so, what steps are being taken to ensure compliance?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

On 14 October 2020, the SIU issued a report to SCOPA for the period 2015/16 to 2019/2020 identifying 5452 cases involving Eskom officials that had failed to submit declarations of interest for the indicated period. These cases have been handed over to Eskom by the SIU and the disciplinary process has commenced for the identified employees.

In order to ensure compliance, Eskom has implemented the following improvement actions to the declaration of interest management process:

  • The information system used to monitor employee declarations has been upgraded to enhance the ability to track and monitor non-compliances to the Eskom requirements.
  • Trained ethics coordinators and trainers have been appointed throughout the organisation to assist with ethics issues at the Eskom sites throughout the country.
  • Ethics training is provided to all employees through online learning, as the classroom training sessions have been placed on hold due to the Covid-19 restrictions.
  • Employees that fail to comply are taken through a consequence management process.

16 April 2021 - NW692

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) total number of incidents of fuel theft has Transnet had (i) in the 2019-20 financial year and (ii) since 1 April 2020, (b) was the total monetary value of the stolen fuel, (c) security measures have been put in place to prevent the incidents of fuel theft from reoccurring and (d) were the outcomes of law enforcement processes that unfolded to the incidents of fuel theft?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

A. (I) and (II): FUEL THEFT INCIDENTS 19/20 AND 20/21 FINANCIAL YEARS:

(b) TOTAL MONatETARY VALUE OF THE STOLEN FUEL:

The total monetary value of the stolen fuel is arrived at utilising the approximate volume lost at the Basic Fuel Price (BFP) plus taxes over the respective reporting date.

(i) 2019/20: R 147 m (11,9 million litres at R12,38 BFP & Tax)

(ii) 2020/21: R 102 m (8,5 million litres at R12,03 BFP & Tax)

(C) security measures put in place:

Transnet has implemented various security measures which include tactical and aerial surveillance deployments. There is close collaboration with the Directorate for Priority Crime Investigation (“Hawks”), National Crime Intelligence and the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) to deal with related fuel theft in the country.

Detail of Security Preventative Measures applied to reduce incidents:

(i) National Organised Crime Project registration (National Prosecuting Authority (NPA), Directorate Priority Crime Investigation (DPCI) and Crime Intelligence)

(II) Specialised Tactical Security deployments

(iii) Specialised Aerial Surveillance deployments

(iv) Specialised Aerial drone deployments

(v) Law Enforcement and TPL Security information/Intelligence led security operations

(vi) National Law Enforcement engagements for interventions and support (SAPS, NatJoints and SANDF)

(vii) Critical and Essential Infrastructure Protection Motivation – TPL Network (Pipeline) vs. only Pump Stations

(viii) Establishment of Transnet Group Security Fusion Centre

In addition there are specific anti-intrusion systems that are in the process of being implemented along the pipeline system.

(D) OUTCOMES OF LAW ENFORCEMENT PROCESSES:

16 April 2021 - NW608

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What: (a) Total amount did Eskom pay a certain law firm (name furnished) to investigate fraud and corruption at the Wilge Residential Development project and (b) Process was followed to appoint the specified law firm to conduct the specified

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The Wilge Residential Development investigation under Bowmans’ mandate letter dated 14 May 2018 and further Phase 2 mandate letter dated 08 August 2018 cost Eskom approximately R2,819,376.00 up to May 2019.  

Bowmans’ further investigation and attendance to the disciplinary proceedings under their mandate letter dated 20 June 2019 has cost Eskom R 2,811,915.37 up to 28 February 2021.

b) Bowmans was on Eskom’s panel of approved legal service providers when they were originally appointed in May 2018 to investigate procurement irregularities at Eskom. In June 2018, and pending the appointment of a new panel of attorneys, National Treasury provided approval for the continuation of existing legal services until completion of the work. This was for continuity purposes.

16 April 2021 - NW528

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What (a) are the details of the role his department plays in terms of the development of the new generation Rooivalk MK 11 and (b) budget has been provided for this purpose; (2) Whether Denel has been able to form partnerships (a) within the Republic and (b) internationally at this stage; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, with whom in each case?

Reply:

(1)(a) The Department is not playing a direct role in the development process of the new generation Rooivalk Combat Helicopter MK II. The discussions are still at a technical level between Denel and Armscor.

(1)(b) No budget provision has been made by the Department.

(2)(a) Domestic partnership is the Light Mobility (LMT) Holdings. Denel acquired the controlling stake in LMT in 2012. Denel owns 51% of LMT Holdings, PAMODZI 29% and the remainder is owned by the previous owners of LMT.

(b) Yes, Denel has in the past managed to enter into international partnerships. These are:

(i) With SAFRAN of France in 2002 to form Turbomeca Africa. SAFRAN owned 51% of Turbomeca Africa and Denel 49%. The company was based in South Africa. The joint venture was discontinued in 2017.

(ii) With SAAB of Sweden in 2007 to form Denel SAAB Aerostructures (DSA). Denel owned 80%  of DSA and SAAB 20%. The company was based in South Africa. SAAB sold back to Denel its 20% stake left the partnership in 2010. Denel Aerostructures was discontinued in 2019.

(iii) In Optronics with Carl Zeiss of Germany in 2007 to establish Carl Zeiss South Africa (now Hensoldt South Africa). Carl Zeiss owned (now Hensoldt) 70% of Carl Zeiss South Africa (Hensoldt South Africa) and Denel 30%. The company is based in South Africa

(iv) With Rheinmetall of Germany in 2008 to establish Rheinmetall Denel Munitions (RDM). Rheinmetall owns 51% and Denel 49%. The company is based in South Africa

(v) With Tawuzan of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2012 to establish Tawuzan Dynamic (now Barij Dynamics)s. Tawuzan owns 51% and Denel 49%. The entity is based in the UAE

(vi) With International Golden Group(IGG) PJSC of the United Arab Emirates (UAE) in 2014 to establish Pioneer Land Systems LLC. Denel (through its subsidiary) own 49% of Pioneer Land Systems LLC and IGG 51%. The company is based in the UAE.    

                                               

16 April 2021 - NW518

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether any staff member in his department (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of his department in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1)(a)

Yes. DPE has recorded staff members who, according to the Financial Disclosures System on the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) website, were noted to have performed remunerative work outside the Public Service dating back to April 2014.

(b)

These cases are reported on, on an annual basis through the DPSA’s financial disclosures system and is verified by the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission (CIPC) system conducted by the Public Service Commission (PSC), by determining whether an employee is a Director of a registered company(ies). The available records are as follows:

2014/2015: eleven (11) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have registered companies. During consultation with the officials, most companies were reported to be dormant, not trading, being a stokvel, staff members not actively involved, not generating an income, assisting on a voluntary basis, and staff member having resigned from the companies. Three (3) officials obtained formal approval to conduct Remunerative Work Outside the Public Service (RWOPS) and approval was confirmed.

2015/2016: twenty-one (21) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have registered companies. During consultations held with the officials, most companies were reported to be dormant, not trading, being a stokvel, staff members not actively involved, not generating an income, assisting on a voluntary basis, and staff member having resigned from the company.

2016/2017: four (4) staff members were detected through the financial disclosure and CIPC verification systems to have been engaging on RWOPS. Three cases had no RWOPS approval.

2017/2018: six (6) staff members were detected to have been engaging in RWOPS through the financial disclosure and CIPC systems. RWOPS approval only confirmed for Three staff members.

(i) The number of staff members confirmed to have been involved in RWOPS are as follows:

• 2014/2015: a total of 11 staff members with registered companies,

• 2015/2016: a total of 21 staff members with registered companies,

• 2016/2017: a total of 4 staff members engaged on RWOPS, and

• 2017/2018: 6 staff members engaged on RWOPS.

(ii) Job categories of these staff members are as follows:

• 2014/2015: Directors-5 & Chief Director- 4 & Deputy Director-General-2.

• 2015/2016: Directors-13, Chief Director -5, Deputy Director-General-2, Director-General-1.

• 2016/2017 – Director – 2, Chief Director-1, & Deputy Director-General-1.

• 2017/2018: Director -3, Chief Director – 2, Deputy Director-General-1.

(2) RWOPS approvals verified were: 2014/2015 -3 approvals, 2016/2017 – 3 approvals, and 2017/2018 – 1 approval.

(a)

The Department does not have its own separate policy as this is a regulatory function prescribed in terms of Regulation 19 of the Public Service Regulations (PSR), 2016, which provides a list and details of financial interests which designated employees (SMS and Non-SMS) are required to disclose. This explanatory manual is issued by the DPSA to guide designated employees on the required information relating to financial disclosures. Details of interests to be disclosed include different categories, namely (1) Shares, loan accounts or any other form of equity in a registered private or public company and other corporate entities recognised by law, (2) Equity, (3) Loan accounts (4) other forms of financial interests from which he/she receives an income (4) Income generating assets; (5) Trusts, (6) Directorships and Partnerships, (7) Other Remunerative Work outside the employees’ department (RWOPS), (8) Retainers, (9) Gifts, (10) Sponsorship, (11) Immovable property and (12) Vehicles

Other remunerative work refers to any work which an employee performs and receives remuneration for, outside his or her official employment. This category covers other remunerative work not disclosed under directorship/partnership, consultancy/retainership, and trustee. All employees must obtain written approval to perform other remunerative work outside of their official duties before engaging in such other remunerative work. The certificate of approval must be uploaded on the eDisclosure system.

(b)

All employees must obtain written approval to perform other remunerative work outside of their official duties by the Minister (Executive Authority) before engaging in such other remunerative work.

(c)

None. In terms of the Public Service Regulations, transgressions are required to be reported to the PSC and the DPSA, and not to National Treasury.

(d)

The Department engaged all implicated staff members and obtained written reasons for non-compliance with RWOPS prescripts. Warning letters were issued where it was found that financial disclosures were submitted late. Officials who were conducting RWOPS without approval were required to cease with the activity. A workshop was also offered to assist staff members to comprehend the DPSA policy and regulations and its implications.

16 April 2021 - NW241

Profile picture: Zungula, Mr V

Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)      Whether, given the state of affairs at SA Airways (SAA), he can account as to the reason that the voluntary severance package (VSP) payments of more than 3480 former SAA employees have not been paid, despite promises by his department to effect the payment by 31 January 2021; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What plan does his department have in place to ensure that the rest of the 1220 SAA employees who were not subjected to the section 189 retrenchment process do not encounter a similar payment issue; (3) Whether, in light of the recorded R10,5 billion bail-out for SAA that the Minister of Finance, Mr T T Mboweni, had set out, of which R2,2 billion had been set aside to fund retrenchment packages, the specified funds have been made available to the Ministry of Public Enterprises; if not, why not; if so, what are the reasons that the specified funds have not reached the intended recipients; and (4) By what date will his department process the VSPs of all affected employees as a matter of urgency?

Reply:

  1. The VSPs have since been paid with non-management and management employees paid on 12 and 19 February 2021 respectively. The payments could not be paid until the funds had been secured and this was achieved with the adjusted national budget on 28 October 2020. Immediately R3.5 billion of these funds were made available to start payment of employee related liabilities.
  2. The Department does not anticipate that payment related to further restructuring including section 189 retrenchments shall be delayed. Funds necessary for this purpose have been deposited with BRPs.
  3. All the funds for retrenchment packages for SAA employees have been transferred to SAA.
  4. See (1) and (2) above.
     
     
     
     
     

16 April 2021 - NW823

Profile picture: Clarke, Ms M

Clarke, Ms M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, in light of the five State-owned enterprises (SOEs), namely SA Airways, Alexkor, Safcol, Denel and SA Express that failed to submit their annual reports as required in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1996, his department will support the policy position which seeks to provide for additional measures in order to ensure SOE accountability in instances where the executive authority fails to table an annual report and financial statements of a department and/or public entity?

Reply:

10. The Department has adequate measures to ensure SOCs accountability in instances where the executive authority fails to table an annual report of the department and/or entity. Furthermore, extenuating circumstances would need to be considered on a case by case basis. The following are the extenuating circumstances that led to the following SOCs in not tabling annual reports and financial statements:

a) Denel: Denel’s AGM was held on the 29 January 2021. Several reasons resulted in the delay, including the liquidity challenges, which affected its ability to continue operating on a going concern basis. Consequently, Denel was unable to provide sufficient evidence to demonstrate that it is a going concern, resulting in the delayed external audit finalization by the Auditor General. The delayed finalisation of the AFS was also exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic which impacted day-to-day activities in general. The AFS and Integrated Report were tabled at Parliament on Tuesday, 9 February 2021.

b) Safcol: The audit was protracted due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The annual report was tabled on 10 March 2021, followed by the presentation to the Portfolio Committee, held on 17 March 2021.

c) Alexkor: The Alexkor AGM is expected to be held during the last week of March 2021. Alexkor’s operational and liquidity challenges not only resulted in delayed finalisation of the AFS and external audit by the Company’s auditors but has impacted its ability to continue operating on a going concern basis, resulting in a disclaimed audit opinion. It is expected that the AFS and IR will be tabled immediately after the AGM is held.

d) SAA: The airline could not table the annual report and financial statements due to financial and liquidity challenges. This had an impact on the going concern assessment which eventually led to the airline being placed under business rescue.​e) SA Express: The airline could not table the annual report and financial statements due to financial and liquidity challenges. This had an impact on the going concern assessment which eventually led to the airline being placed under business rescue and is now in provisional liquidation.

 

2. The last 2 years have been a difficult period for all SOCs, in terms of addressing all matters related to state capture, stabilising the SOC, and the impact of COVID-19 pandemic. The majority of the SOCs are facing serious financial challenges, which impact on going concern and the audit outcome. The accountability framework includes the oversight of Parliament as it relates to non-submission of annual reports. The SOCs, being corporate entities are also required to apply to the Companies Tribunal to grant an extension of the date within which to hold the Annual General Meeting and to present its annual report to the Shareholder. Late submission of the annual report, coupled with going concern and the viability of the company also impacts on loan covenants, which the Board and the Shareholder must address.

3. The Boards are also accountable for other non-negotiable targets such as the achievement of an unqualified audit outcome and the achievement of at least 80% of the total sum of key performance indicators of the Compact. In line with consequence management, but also informed by the financial constraints, Boards and management takes a 0% annual increase when these non-negotiable targets are not met. However, addressing the viability of the SOC remains one of government’s key objective.

16 April 2021 - NW860

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)In view of the delays in the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal that is often as a result of equipment breakdowns, (a) what was the average number of breakdowns experienced in each shift at the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal in 2020; (2 Whether Transnet keeps record of what is causing breakdowns at the Port of Cape Town’s container terminal; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

1. The average number of equipment breakdowns at the Cape Town Container Terminal per shift for the 2020/21 financial year, in respect of all equipment is as follows:

  • Shift One = 162 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021)
  • Shift Two = 134 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021)
  • Shift Three = 126 breakdowns per month (April 2020 – March 2021).

2. Transnet Port Terminals (TPT) keeps daily statistical records of the number of equipment breakdowns, the description of each breakdown and the associated outage times. The root cause of these breakdowns is largely attributed to the equipment reaching its mid-life.

There are 8 (eight) Ship-to-Shore Cranes due for mid-life refurbishments and with the high demand for crane density, a new strategic approach to replace all critical components within these cranes is now in place and will take Transnet Port Terminals to the desired reliability of 90% versus the current 85%. To improve the reliability of the Rubber-Tyred Gantry Crane (RTG) fleet, a ramp-up plan has been finalised to move from an average of 20 RTG Cranes to 28 RTG Cranes, within the next 24 months.

16 April 2021 - NW859

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether there is a maintenance plan in place with regard to the dry-dock at the Port of Cape Town; if not, why not; if so, how often does maintenance take place; (2) Whether there are any plans in place to upgrade the dry-dock; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

1. Every asset in the dry dock facility in the Port of Cape Town has a maintenance plan. Each maintenance plan is derived from the Original Equipment manufacturer (OEM) operating and maintenance manual. Each asset has its own maintenance interval (daily, weekly, monthly, yearly etc.). All maintenance plans are raised in the form of job cards through Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS), in this instance SAP.

The port adheres to annual maintenance repairs and ad hoc maintenance plans. This involves the reaction to the predicted asset failure which is not imminent. The repair cost is estimated, and funds are allocated accordingly. Job cards are created, and jobs are executed and documented and kept for a period of three years for auditing purposes.

2. The Port of Cape Town is in the process of refurbishing its outdated ship-repair facilities in line with Operation Phakisa initiatives. The port is providing an essential gravity point in the ship-repair sector. It has three main facilities namely, Robertson Dry Dock (RDD), Synchro-lift (SL) and Sturrock Dry Dock (SDD). The investment in the refurbishment of the facility to date is as follows:

  • All three-facilities combined capital spend to date is approximately R50 Million
  • Latest Estimate by end of the financial year is approximately R69 Million
  • The total estimated capital spends inclusive of all facilities above is “R1b”.
  •  

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

Kgathatso Tlhakudi P J Gordhan, MP

Director-General Minister of Public Enterprises

Date: Date:

16 April 2021 - NW842

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What steps is he taking to ensure that officials who resign from state-owned enterprises to avoid disciplinary action are not reemployed in other government department?

Reply:

The SOE’s are separate legal entities and employees in the SOE’s are not employed in terms of the Public Service Act. This makes the flagging of the employees who leaves the SOE’s pending disciplinary action or investigation difficult to track and trace in as far as other government departments. Heavy reliance will be on the strengths of our government departments recruitment processes to ensure that the vetting is done diligently to be able to detect such red flags. The prescripts developed under the auspices of Department of Public Service and Administration place a responsibility on the accounting officer of each government department to ensure that rigorous integrity assessments and background checks are conducted against candidates applying for employment.

The SOE’s have measures in place as part of their recruitment processes to prohibit the reappointment of employees who left through dismissal. The SOE’s are reviewing their measures to ensure that through the HR processes employees who leave the institution whilst under investigation or pending a disciplinary procedure are flagged. These should be done in line to what is permissible in terms of our Labour Relations Act.”

The department has also developed the SOC Risk and Integrity Management Framework that will be implemented with effect from 01 April 2021. Among others, the framework introduces reforms designed to regulate the affairs of the SOCs under the Ministry of Public Enterprises as follows:

  • Ensure that SOCs conduct rigorous background checks to prevent employment of candidates whose integrity indicates that they cannot be entrusted with the management of public resources;
  • Prohibit employees and board members of SOCs from doing business with their respective SOC.
  • Prohibit employees and board members of SOCs from soliciting or accepting gifts and/or donations from companies doing business with the SOC.

16 April 2021 - NW800

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether the areas that are both supplied in bulk and billed by Eskom for energy provision are entitled to and receive a subsidy for the installation of prepaid meters as per relevant government programmes; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

All residential customers who fall within the allocated area to be funded by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy qualify for free prepaid meters (20A) installed by Eskom or by municipalities. The electrification programme is rolled out in line with the municipalities’ Integrated Development Plans (IDP).

Only customers who require more than 20A supply are required to pay an upgrade fee from 20A to 60A.

16 April 2021 - NW708

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)    What are details of any passengers carried on the aircraft during the outbound and return flights of the SA Airways (SAA) aircraft that departed on 24 February 2021 to the Kingdom of Belgium to collect another batch of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines, including but not limited to (a) the names of ach passenger and (b) the amounts charged to each passenger; (2) Whether SAA and/or Mango airline will be awarded any further government tenders for the transportation of COVID-19 vaccines (a) within the Republic and (b) within Africa; if not, why not in each case; if so, what (i) aircraft will be used and (ii) are the details of all procurement regulations and legislation that will be followed for the procurement of such air services?

Reply:

(1) No passengers were carried on the outbound and inbound flights

(2)(a) The awarding of such tenders is the responsibility of the National Department of Health. SAA has the capacity an infrastructure to transport cargo including the vaccines. SAA will put forward its value proposition for this role in South Africa and in the continent.

(2)(b)(i) The aircraft used will depend on the size of the consignment and distance to and from where the vaccine is transported.

(2)(b)(ii) The vaccine procurement regulations are the responsibility of the Department of Health.

Obtaining and transporting vaccines to SA is of national interest and importance. The state’s limited capacity must be utilized to avail vaccines to South Africans who are waiting to be vaccinated in order to prevent the worst effects of the COVID pandemic.

It is regrettable that some pilots and their collaborators, are doing everything possible to selfishly extract more Benefits for themselves, even if it means misleading the public.

Government is fairly advanced in securing an equity partner, and every effort must be made to ensure that this is successful- such that there is no future imposition on the fiscus.

06 January 2021 - NW2530

Profile picture: Buthelezi, Ms P

Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the relevant details of the (a) Demographic make-up, (b) Date of appointment, (c) Highest qualification obtained, (d) Age, (e) Gender and (f) Race of each executive leadership in each state-owned entity?

Reply:

Responses from the State-Owned Companies are attached as Annexure A

According to the information received from Alexkor

Name

Designation

Date of appointment

Highest qualification obtained

Age

Gender

Race

Mr Lemogang Pitso

Alexkor Chief Executive Officer

01/12/2017

Master in Business Leadership

49

Male

Black

Mr Deon Bowers

PSJV Act General Mine Manager

01/11/20

BSc Honors (Geological Science)

47

Male

Coloured

             

Demographics

Alexkor

PSJV

Male African

104

557

Male European

5

121

Male Asian

 

2

Female African

47

51

Female European

3

11

Female Asian

 

0

According to the information received from DENEL SOC LTD

Name of Executive

Designation

Date of appointment

Highest qualification obtained

Age

Gender

Race

Mr. Talib Sadik

Acting Group CEO

17 August 2020

B.Com/DIP Accounting/CA(SA)/

AMP (Insead)

55

Male

Indian

Ms. Carmen Le Grange

Group CFO

01 September 2019

B.Com/DIP Accounting/CA(SA)

47

Female

Coloured

Mr. William Hlakoane

Group COO

01 July 2019

MBA, ND: Mech Engineering/B:Tech Mech Engineering

48

Male

Black

Ms. Mercia Ngema

Group HR & Transformation

01 July 2019

MBA, Honours Degree in HR Management

46

Female

Black

Mr. Sello Ntshihlele

CEO: Denel Dynamics

01 August 2019

MBA, M. Eng (Electrical and Electronic)

56

Male

Black

Mr. Phaladi Petje

CEO: PMP

01 May 2013

BA(Hons) Economics

PDM Business Admin

Executive Development Programs

55

Male

Black

Mr. Mxolisi Makhathini

CEO: DLS/DVS

01 August 2019

Bsc (Electronic Eng)

47

Male

Black

Mr. Mike Kgobe

CEO: Denel Aeronautics

01 March 2010

Master Degree: Aeronautical Production & Maintenance

52

Male

Black

According to the information received from ESKOM SOC LTD

NAME

DESIGNATION

DATE OF APPOINTMENT

HIGHEST QUALIFICATIONS

AGE

GENDER

RACE

Mr Bala Monde ludovick

Group executive (distribution)

19970101

Master of Engineering Graduate Diploma in Engineering Industrial Engineering

47

Male

African

Ms Burn Faith

Chief information officer

20200515

Bsc maths; BSC Hons Maths

Master of Science Maths

Masters of Business Leadership

52

Female

Coloured

Mr Cassim Calib

Chief financial officer

20020211

Master of Business Leadership

Bachelor of Commerce
Honours Bachelor of Accounting Science
chartered accountant

49

Male

Coloured

Mr De ruyter Andre marinus

Group chief executive

20200106

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Civil Law
Bachelor of Arts

52

Male

White

Mr Dukashe Phillip

General manager- eskom rotek industries

19940101

Bsc Degree: Engineering

Post Grad Diploma: Engineering

50

Male

African

Mr Etzinger Andrew

General manager-risk and sustainability

19891211

Bsc Maths; BSC Hons Mathematical Statistics; BSC Hons Operations Research; Executive programme London Business School

52

Male

White

Mr Hewu Nqaba bartlett

Group executive legal and compliance (contractor)

20180326

Bachelor of Law
Baccalaureus Legum
Tax Law
Extracurricular Higher Diploma Law

45

Male

African

Mr Manjingolo Mlawuli

Company secretary

20200701

Ba law; LLB; Higher Diploma Company and Labour Law

52

Male

African

Mr Mathebula Rhulani

Group executive- generation (acting)

20031001

National Diploma Analytical Chemistry

Btech: Business Administration

40

Male

African

Mr Mflathelwa Mziwoxolo

General manager-strategy and planning

20100301

Bachelor of Engineering (mechanical)

35

Male

African

Mr Minyuku Nthato

Group executive (government and regulatory affairs)

20201015

Master of City Planning and Urban Design
Bachelor of Architectural Studies

42

Female

African

Ms Nxumalo Bhekizitha johannes

Group executive (group capital)

20170501

Master of Business Administration

National higher diploma (chemical engineering)
National Diploma (chemical engineering)

52

Male

African

Mr Oberholzer Jan albert

Chief operating officer

20180706

Master of Business Leadership

Bachelor of Engineering (electrical)
Electrical Engineers Certificate of Competency

62

Male

White

Ms Pule Elsie mamolatelo

Group executive (human resources)

20121201

Master of Science in Engineering Business Management

Bachelor of Arts and Social Work
BA Hons Psychology

53

Female

African

Mr Scheppers Segomoco Martin

Group executive (transmission)

19930809

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Engineering
Graduate Diploma in Engineering

57

Male

African

Mr Sookrajh Bob

General manager- audit and forensics (acting)

19940401

B.Com Hons; Chartered Internal Auditor

Post Graduate Advanced Diploma Taxation

54

Male

Asian

Mr Tshitangano Solly

Chief procurement officer

20190101

B.Com Hons

58

Male

African

Mr Tuku Vuyolwethu

Group executive (transformation management office)

20200701

Master of Business Administration

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

45

Male

African

According to the information received from TRANSNET SOC LTD

SURNAME AND NAME

DESIGNATION

DATE OF APPOINTMENT

ACADEMIC QUALIFICATION

GENDER

AGE

RACE

Derby Portia

Group Chief Executive

2020/02/01

Master’s Degree

Female

50

African

Kgomo Lucas Makoma (Brian)

Chief Audit Executive

2020/06/01

Certified Internal Auditor (CIA), Masters of Philosophy in Internal Audit, B.Com Accounting

Male

53

African

Shaw Andrew

Group Chief Strategy Officer

2020/07/01

PhD (Transport Economics), MBA, BSc and MSc (Engineering)

Male

53

White

Kani Yolisa

Group Chief Business Development Officer

2020/05/01

BSc Applied Science Honours in Transportation Engineering

Female

45

African

Dlamini Nonkululeko

Group Chief Financial Officer

2020/05/01

CA (SA), Higher Diploma in Accounting (CTA) and a B-Comm degree

Female

46

African

Coetzee Sandra Adv

Group Chief Legal Counsel

2020/05/01

Admitted Advocate, BLC, LLB and Senior Leadership Programme

Female

58

White

Munyai Pandelani

Chief Information Officer

2020/04/01

Master of Business Leadership, Master of Electronic Engineering, a BSc Electrical Engineering, BSc Physics and Mathematics

Male

51

African

Nemukula Vuledzani

Group Chief Procurement Officer

2020/04/01

BSc; MBA; Advanced Business Management Programme (AMP), Advanced Management Programme from INSEAD and Oxford Executive Leadership Programme (OELP)

Male

52

African

Mzimela Sizakele

Chief Executive: Transnet Freight Rail

2020/04/01

BA Economics and Statistics, a Certificate in Management from Henley College and a Certificate of the Transnet Executive Development Programme from GIBS

Female

55

African

Mills Ralph

Chief Executive: Transnet Engineering

2020/05/01

Bachelor’s degree in Military Science and an MBL.

Male

56

White

Velile Dube

Chief Executive: Transnet Port Terminals

2009/11/01

BA in Communications and a BA (Hons) in English Literature, Program Leadership Certificate, certificate in Leadership from the Gordon Institute of Business (GIBS).

Male

59

African

Michelle Phillips

Chief Executive: Transnet Pipelines

1999/11/16

Admitted Advocate of the High Court with a B Juris LLB, Executive Development leadership programmes, certificates for several International Terminal Operations Management Programmes from Antwerp, Rotterdam, Paris and Le Havre.

Female

49

Coloured

Khayalethu Ngema

Chief of People

2017/07/01

BA in Law and Industrial Sociology, A Public and Development Management Diploma and a postgraduate diploma in Public Policy and Development , Certificate for a Senior Executive Program

Male

50

African

Kapei Phahlamohlaka

Chief Executive: Transnet Property

2020/09/01

Bachelor of Arts (Hons) and Bachelor of Laws (LLB), Master of Business Administration (MBA)

Male

44

African

Mninawe Silinga

Chief Executive: Transnet National Ports Authority

2020/09/01

BSc in Civil Engineering, Master of Engineering, MBA, AMP, Chartered Director [IoD-UK]. Fellow of the South African Academy of Engineering

Male

55

African

According to the information received from SAFCOL

Name and Surname

DESIGNATION

(b) Date of Appointment

(c) Highest Qualification

(d) Age

(e) Gender

(f) Race

Mr Tsepo Monaheng

Chief Executive Officer (CEO)

01/12/2017

  • MBA
  • BSc in Electrical Engineering
  • BSc in Physics and Mathematics

57

Male

African

Mr John Maruma

Acting Chief Financial Officer (ACFO)

01/03/2020

  • MBA (In progress)
  • CA (SA)
  • Post Graduate Diploma in Accounting (CTA)
  • B. Com (Hons) in Banking
  • Leadership Development Programme

37

Male

African

Mr Sibalo Dlamini

Chief Operating Officer (COO)

05/10/2020

  • Masters in Engineering Management
  • BSc in Chemical Engineering
  • BSc in Chemistry and Biology
  • Registered Professional Engineer (PrEng)
  • Leadership Development Programme

54

Male

African

Mr Vishal Harichund Executive:

Strategy and Commercial

01/06/2020

  • LLB
  • LLM
  • Admitted Attorney

42

Male

African

Mr Siyabonga Mpontshana

Executive: Legal

01/06/2018

  • B Accounting Sciences
  • Certified Internal Auditor (CIA)
  • IIASA

44

Male

African

Ms Dimakatso Motseko

Executive Human Capital

02/01/2018

  • MBL
  • BSc (hon) in Industrial Psychology
  • BSc in Industrial Psychology
  • Advanced Programme in Organisational Development
  • Registered Psychometrics

47

Female

African

Ms Christelle Marias

Chief Risk Officer

01/06/2020

  • MBA
  • B.Iuris
  • Certified Director (IoDSA Cert. Dir.)
  • Certified Risk Management Professional (IRMSA CRM Prof.)

49

Female

White

According to the information received from SAA

Position

Date of Appointment

Highest qualification

Age

Gender

Race

Chief Executive Officer (vacant)

-

-

-

-

-

Interim Chief Financial Officer

15 October 2018

CA (SA)

60

M

C

Chief Commercial Officer

19 August 2019

MA TV Journalism

53

M

W

Acting General Manager Operations

01 July 2019

Post Graduate Diploma in Business Management

52

M

B

Head of Loyalty/Voyager

01 April 2014

US BSc. Business Administration, Private Pilot License, Commercial Pilot License

50

F

W

Acting General Manager Cargo

01 June 2018

B. Com Hons (Transport Economics), Masters in Business Administration, IATA Diploma in Air Cargo Transportation

55

M

B

Acting General Manager Human Resources

03 October 2019

B. Com

52

M

W

Acting Chief Information Officer

01 October 2019

Masters in Business Administration

49

M

W

Acting Head Customer Services

01 October 2019

Management Advanced Programme (MAP), Diploma in Public Relations

47

F

B

Acting Chief Legal Officer

01 May 2020

Bachelor of Laws

40

M

B

Acting Chief Internal Auditor

01 October 2019

B. Com Hons (Accounting)

37

F

B

Company Secretary

01 February 2009

BA. Hons. (Economics and Social Administration), CIS Diploma, Bachelor of Laws

58

F

B

CEO

Vacant

 

 

 

 

Acting Chief Financial Officer

01 October 2020

B. Com Hons. Accounting

43

M

B

Acting HOD - Base Maintenance

01 September 2019

NTC 4 Aircraft Technology

48

M

B

Acting HOD- Marketing and Sales

01 May 2018

Aircraft Avionics Technician (Olifantsfontein)

44

M

B

Acting HOD- Workshops

01 September 2019

National Technical Certificate Part 3 (N3)

57

M

W

General Manager Engineering and Support Sevices

01 December 2019

Masters Airworthiness & Aviation Safety

49

M

B

General Manager Human Resources

01 November 2019

Executive MBA

49

M

B

General Manager Quality and Risk

01 December 2019

M.Sc Business and Strategic Leadership

45

M

B

HOD- Line Maintenance

01 February 2012

Senior Management Development Programme NQF 8

44

M

B

HOD- Security

01 December 2019

M. Tech Degree Policing

57

M

B

HOD-Business Excellence

04 November 2019

Masters Project Management

37

M

B

Chief Executive Officer

01 November 2013

B. Com

52

M

W

Chief Financial Officer

03 June 2019

B. Com Honours, CA (SA)

37

M

B

Acting General Manager Commercial

01 May 2018

Diploma in Hospitality Management

34

F

B

General Manager Operations

01 September 2019

Management Advanced Programme (MAP), National Diploma in Tourism Management

43

M

B

General Manager Human Resources

19 January 2015

Post Graduate Diploma in Human Resources

43

F

B

Head of Quality, Safety and Environment

01 July 2015

BSc. Human Ecology

41

F

B

Head of Coastal

01 September 2017

BSc. Hons. Dietetics, Management Development Programme

47

F

B

06 January 2021 - NW2636

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) On what date will the annual reports, including the detailed financial statements, of (i) SA Airways, (ii) Denel, (iii) Transnet, (iv) Eskom and (v) Alexkor for the 2019-20 financial year be tabled in the National Assembly and (b) what are the reasons for the delay in publication of the annual reports; (2) whether any measures are being considered to speed up the auditing processes, the annual reports and financial statements of public enterprises in order to meet the statutory deadlines; if not, what is the reason for this lack of consideration; if so, on what date can full implementation of considered measures be expected?

Reply:

1(a)(i) SA Airways: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 23 November 2020, informing Parliament that SA Airways is under business rescue. The Auditor-General suspended the audit when the airline was placed in business rescue. The audit will be finalised once the airline recommences operations and the annual report and annual financial statements will thereafter be tabled.

(ii) Denel: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 30 November 2020. The Department wrote to Parliament as soon as Denel had confirmed to the Department that it was unable to finalize its audit challenges with its external auditors, the Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA), prior to 30 November 2020. Denel Board and Management are engaging with the AGSA to resolve certain audit ISSUES. It is anticipated that the annual financial statements and integrated report will be tabled in January 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter, once the above- mentioned issues are resolved.

(iii) Transnet’s 2020 Integrated Report and audited Annual Financial Statements were tabled by the Minister in Parliament on 09 November 2020. The Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises received a briefing from Transnet on 18 November 2020.

(iv) Eskom’s Integrated Report and audited Annual Financial Statements were tabled by the Minister on 12 November 2020. The Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises received a briefing from Eskom on 25 November 2020.

(v) Alexkor: The Minister wrote to the Speaker of Parliament and the Chairperson of National Council of Provinces on 30 November 2020, to inform Parliament that Alexkor would not be in a position to table its Annual Financial Statements, Integrated Report and Audit Report due to serious going concern and other audit concerns. The Department wrote to Parliament once it was able to confirm with Alexkor that it was unable to finalize its audit challenges with its external auditors and prepare its AGM documentation prior to 30 November 2020. It is anticipated that the annual financial statements and integrated report will be tabled in January 2020 or as soon as possible thereafter, once the above- mentioned concerns are resolved.

2 As indicated above Denel, Alexkor, and SAA would not be able to submit the 2020 Integrated Reports and audited annual financial statements to the Minister prior to 30 November 2020 for the reasons set out above. The reports will be tabled in Parliament as soon as the companies are able to submit these reports.

27 November 2020 - NW2259

Profile picture: Steenhuisen, Mr JH

Steenhuisen, Mr JH to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) Are the relevant details of the submissions made by his department to the Competition Commission regarding South32’s acquisition of 91,8% shares in SA Energy Coal by Seriti Resource Holdings and; (b) Is his department’s position on the deal that will result in nearly 72% of Eskom’s coal supply coming from only two companies?

Reply:

a) The Department provided its views in terms of the potential impact that the merger between Seriti Resources Holdings and SA Energy Coal may likely have on the energy coal sector. Amongst others, these views included: (i) the potential impact the merger might have on security of coal supply, particularly on Eskom electricity generation requirements;(ii) the electricity pricing effects the merger might have on the economy given the current socio economic challenges the country is confronted with.

b) Security of coal supply is of primary importance to ensure Eskom meets the demand for electricity. Eskom for the past three years embarked on coal procurement exercise to ensure that long term coal supply agreements are secured for the majority of the coal fired power stations.

Ownership and access to the state’s mineral assets is effective through the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, 2002 (MRPDA) and Mining

Charter. The DMRE is the authority in terms of determining effective ownership of these assets. The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) intervenes through the Competition Commission if there are likely effects of substantially lessening or prevention of competition in the sector.

Eskom on Managing Risk

1. Eskom estimates that the Seriti supply share after the transaction would increase to approximately 28% from 17% based on FY2020 delivery volumes. It is estimated that the two largest suppliers will account for approximately 55% of Eskom’s coal supply based on FY2020 delivery volumes. However, this may vary slightly subject to changes in Eskom’s coal demand and the mines’ production profiles.

2. Approximately 28% of Eskom’s supply is supplied from the cost plus mines. Post the Seriti/South32 merger, this percentage will remain the same and is approximately half of the 55% of the post-merger supply. Under the cost plus arrangement, Eskom is responsible for the majority of the operating, capital and rehabilitation costs of these mines. The supply risk also resides with Eskom.

3. The remaining 27% of supply from the two largest suppliers (post-merger) would be from fixed price long term and medium term contracts. These are arm’s length contracts where, the mine is responsible for the capital and operational expenditure as well as all the associated mining risks. Should the supplier not deliver as per the contractual terms and conditions, there are contractual recourses including but not limited to the rectification of undersupply and penalties. Approximately 80% of the 27% mentioned above mainly relates to the coal supply to Medupi and Matimba Power Stations, which are supplied by Exxaro. There is an excess 16 Mton coal stockpile at Medupi which could cater for any short term coal supply risk at Medupi or Matimba.

20 November 2020 - NW2529

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Buthelezi, Ms P to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the plans of schools and educational programmes under the Transnet Academy in (a) funding the activities in order to invest in the academy and give it the necessary technology, facilities and faculties required to function at an optimal level and (b) forming and improving strategic partnerships with technical and vocational, education and training colleges, universities and research institutions?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

a) The Transnet Academy has identified the requisite technology requirements, developed the strategy and agreed business requirements with the Transnet Information, Communication and Technology Management (ICTM). Budget provisions have been made by ICTM as part of the Transnet Capex funding requirements.

b) Transnet has concluded a Memorandum of Understanding with the TVET Directorate. This approach has an advantage of building capacity across the country on an integrated basis.

University partnerships form the bedrock of the Academy strategy and this includes previously disadvantaged Universities to be included in the partnering review.

The Transnet Head of Academy serves as a Board member on the South African International Maritime Institute (SAIMI) and Transnet plays a pivotal role in the SETA’s. To date, three Transnet Employees serve in the Rail, Freight Handling, and Maritime Chamber. As members’ their role is to advise as industry experts in skills development.

20 November 2020 - NW2177

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Regarding the maintenance of prepaid electricity meters under Eskom, what is the current status of reported faults of electricity meters in terms of reported issues and maintenance outstanding; (2) Under what circumstances will Eskom carry out calibration tests and/or maintenance on electricity meters to ensure that the equipment reflects the correct consumption and usage?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. As at 9 October 2020, 7 038 prepaid electricity meters faults were reported in October 2020. Of these, 3 698 prepaid electricity meters have been maintained and faults were resolved/closed.

The 3 340 prepaid electricity meter work orders that are still open are reported by zero-buying customers, that is the meters indicated that the customers are not consuming electricity. In these cases, Eskom first scheduled the fault for investigation, after which the following actions will follow:

Where a customer is found to have tampered with the supply or meter, a tamper fine will be issued, the meter will be maintained and then the customer’s supply restored.

Where a meter is found to be bypassed, a tamper fine will be issued. The meter will be maintained however then the customer’s supply will be restored once the tamper fine is paid or a deferred payment form is signed.

Where the customer is zero buying but no tamper is found, the prepaid electricity meter will be maintained and the work order closed.

(2) Prepayment meters are full electronic devices with no moving parts on the measurement circuit that require calibration during the lifespan of the meter. They are electronically calibrated during the manufacturing process using high-tech calibration equipment embedded in the production line.

The accuracy is regularly certified by the South African Bureau of Standards (SABS). All the calibration results of individual meters are loaded into the Eskom Customer Care and Billing System for future reference. The calibration is not expected to drift in anyway during the lifespan of meter.

In instances where a customer complains that a meter is inaccurate, Eskom uses SABS certified equipment to verify the accuracy of the meter. In the unlikely event that the meter is found to be inaccurate, the meter is replaced with a new one. The faulty meter is then sent to the supplier for full analysis and the supplier is expected to submit a comprehensive report to Eskom.

20 November 2020 - NW2517

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Thembekwayo, Dr S to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a)What are the reasons that Eskom has cut off the electricity for the community of Braamfisherville in Phase 3, Soweto, in Gauteng for the past six months and (b) By what date does he envisage the electricity will be restored in the specified community?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. Eskom has not cut off electricity supply for the Phase 3 customers in Braamfisherville. The transformers have failed as a result of overloading networks caused by meter bypasses and ghost vending, as well as the illegal operations by third parties. In order to avoid this phenomenon from repeatedly reoccurring, Eskom has decided to audit the meters, fine those who have illegally bypassed their meters or are purchasing ghost vouchers, and replace the damaged meters before replacing the transformers. This process has been resisted by customers and hence delayed the process of transformer replacement across Braamfisherville.

We have currently agreed with ward councilors and the Gauteng Province to defer the payment of fines where customers who cannot afford them will have to agree to a payment arrangement by signing the relevant forms.

It was only after the payment arrangement was agreed upon that customers agreed that we implement the process. This process has created a backlog of about 70 transformers that need to be replaced. We have drafted a schedule to replace these transformers and are progressing very well.

2. A number of transformers are offline in Phase 3 as a result of the reasons provided above. The replacement of transformers in Phase 3 is expected to be completed by 21 December 2020 subject to the customers signing the deferred payment agreements and material availability. Eskom will have to be provided with the meter or reference number in order to provide a more specific date.

20 November 2020 - NW2510

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether, with reference to the reply by the Deputy President to oral question 15 in the National Assembly on 22 October 2020, wherein he indicated that there will be no load shedding in the Republic over the next 18 months, although not guaranteed, he is in a position to confirm that indeed there will be no load shedding in the Republic; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

Eskom recognizes the negative impact that load shedding has on the lives of the people and the economy of South Africa. Eskom endeavours not to load shed and does so only as a last resort to ensure the security of the electricity network. However, Eskom’s generating fleet is ageing, at around 39 years on average, and it is both unreliable and unpredictable. As Eskom has often stated, until all the required reliability maintenance has been executed, all the new build units come on line and the DMRE emergency generation comes on line, the system remains constrained and the risk of load shedding remains high in the foreseeable future.

20 November 2020 - NW2285

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)On what date did a certain senior Eskom official (name furnished) complete his Master of Business Administration degree; (2) Whether the degree was verified with the SA Qualification Authority; if not, why not; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. Mr André de Ruyter obtained his Master of Business Administration qualification on 17 September 1998.

2. The qualification was verified on behalf of Eskom, prior to Mr de Ruyter’s appointment, by Lexis Refcheck. Eskom did not request SAQA to evaluate or verify the qualification.

As part of all executive appointments in Eskom, a full verification by a reputable company has to be done to verify ID number, driver’s license and criminalrecords and ensure the candidate has obtained all the qualifications listed on their résumés.

SAQA evaluation/verification of overseas qualifications is not a specific requirement for the appointments of executives at Eskom. A SAQA verification by the qualification holder will be requested only when the foreign qualification is a minimum requirement.

It is also important to note that as of 16 September 2019, only qualification holders (QHs) may apply for the evaluation of their foreign qualifications.

The above requirement according to SAQA, is to ensure that QHs are the prima facie owners of their applications and the outcomes thereof, including the protection of their private details. For this reason, SAQA will only interact directly with QHs, and involve third parties only when they are the parents or legal guardians of the affected QHs.

Please note that the change in the SAQA approach took place before Mr de Ruyter’s appointment and verification of his qualification. 

Government has total confidence in Mr de Ruyter who has already made a substantial difference in Eskom. We call on all stakeholders to support the efforts of the Board and management team in their efforts to restore good governance, operational effectiveness, financial stability and efficiently implement the Eskom Roadmap.

20 November 2020 - NW2284

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What informed the use of Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint Rand Merchant Bank as transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner transaction of Air Chef by SAA?NW2858

Reply:

SAA did not use Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint Rand Merchant Bank (RMB) as a transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner transaction of Airchefs. SAA used normal open competitive procurement processes to appoint RMB as transaction advisor for Airchefs.

The Department however, used Treasury Regulation 16A6.6 to appoint RMB as a transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner (SEP) transaction for SAA. This was carried out in order to speed up the process of assessing the best SEP for SAA as part of the work of concluding the business rescue process given the fact that RMB was already underseeing this SEP transaction with Airchefs.

20 November 2020 - NW2509

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(a) What progress has been made with the Port St Johns Local Municipality (Turnkey) Electrification Project; (b) What total amount has been spent on the specified project to date and (c) By what date does he envisage the project will be completed?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

The Port St Johns Local Municipality (Turnkey) Electrification Project is a schedule 5B project that is managed by the municipality. The question should therefore be directed to the municipality.

20 November 2020 - NW1933

Profile picture: Macpherson, Mr DW

Macpherson, Mr DW to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) By what date is the R3,5 billion loan and/or equity bridge from the Development Bank of South Africa to South African Airways repayable; (2) whether the loan will be repaid under the business rescue process; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, who will be responsible for the repayment of the loan? NW2449E

Reply:

1. The loan from the Development Bank of Southern Africa to South African Airways (SAA) was paidON THE DIRECTION OF THE NATIONAL TREASURY,on 27 August 2020.

2. The loan was repaid from the 2020 Medium Term Expenditure Framework (MTEF) allocation for the period 2020/21 to 2022/23 financial year, for the purchase of equity in SAA.

20 November 2020 - NW909

Profile picture: Marawu, Ms TL

Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to the challenges that the SA Airways (SAA) is going through in relaunching itself, (details furnished), what steps will he take to ensure that: (a) the new SAA pilot structures reflect the economically active population; and (b) all the Black pilots are retained.

Reply:

According to the information received from SAA:

(a) The failure to transform the pilot corps at SAA is a symptom of the general failure of leadership at the airline to make pertinent decisions and ensure their implementation. The Regulating Agreement (RA) entered into in 1988’s primary objective was to preserve undeserved privileges accrued through unjust laws that preserved aviation careers to a small minority in this country.

These privileges came with unaffordable perks and salary framework which should have long been remedied. The airline (i.e. the Business Rescue Practitioners) on insistence of the Department is addressing the matter of RA as it cannot become part of the new SAA.

The following is the background to the RA:

1.1  The Regulating Agreement, (“The RA”) is an evergreen collective agreement entered into between South African Airways Pilots Association (SAAPA) and South African Airways (SOC) LTD (SAA) in 1988. The RA regulates the terms and conditions of employment of pilots and contains volumes of onerous provisions on SAA.

1.2. It is our view that the RA is unconstitutional and unlawful, and it is imperative that it be terminated.

1.3. The unconstitutionality and unlawfulness of the RA relates to the following:

1.3.1 First, the evergreen nature of the regulating agreement is in breach of section 23(4) of the Labour Relations Act 66 of 1995 (“the LRA”). Section 23(4) of the LRA does not contemplate or permit collective agreements which have no fixed term, no specific notice period and which may not be terminated on reasonable notice – in other words it does not contemplate or permit evergreen collective agreements.

1.3.2 The regulating agreement precludes and impedes SAA achieving meaningful and expeditious transformation which is in breach of the Constitution and the Employment Equity Act 55 of 1998. In particular, in terms of the RA, the principle of seniority rigidly and directly affects and controls all elements of the manner in which pilots are employed and dealt with by SAA, including promotions, demotions, salaries and so on. Given the make-up of SAA’s pilot list, which comprises overwhelmingly of white males, this operates to the detriment of and discriminates unfairly against white women, black men, and especially black women.

1.3.3 The regulating agreement effectively removes core elements of decision-making from the board and management of SAA and precludes SAA from giving effect to its procurement obligations. This is in breach of the Constitution, the Public Finance Management Act 1 of 1999 and the Companies Act 71 of 2008. The effect of the Regulating Agreement is that SAA is precluded from reaching any agreement to wet-lease SAA aircraft without the consent of SAAPA. The RA has a “succession of ownership” provision which means that notwithstanding any changes in ownership of SAA, the RA will remain in full operation. Considering the fact that Government has taken a decision to find a strategic equity partner (SEP) for SAA, the RA in its current form, combined with succession clauses, will no doubt make SAA less attractive to potential partners.

The RA also subjects key SAA procurement decisions such as which hotels to contract with to the control of SAAPA in that SAAPA is entitled to select the short-list of three hotels from which SAA can choose and even within this short-list, SAA is required to take SAAPA’s preferences into account. It requires SAA to act in breach of Treasury instructions – such as requiring SAA to accommodate pilots and crew in four- or five-star hotels when the Treasury instruction requires that three-star hotels be used.

1.3.4 The negotiations at the LCF with the DPE. After more than two and a half months of engagements, no agreement on the restructure of SAA was concluded and no agreement was reached on the VSP offered by DPE. In fact, SAAPA are on record at different forums and in writing to SAA that they never agreed to the VSP and reserve their rights in that regard.

(B) In engagement with potential Strategic Equity Partners (SEPs), the Department has placed the transformation of pilot corps as an imperative to the partnership. This is to ensure that National developmental objectives in Aviation should still receive priority in the new SAA. An appropriate balance must be attained to correct historical discrimination, retention of key skills, and achieving the correct demographic and gender objectives. This is a non-negotiable set of objectives. It is important that all pilots cooperate in achieving these objectives.

04 November 2020 - NW2102

Profile picture: Lees, Mr RA

Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of the (a) sources of the funds and (b) progress made to obtain the funding required for the implementation of the business rescue plan of the SA Airways (SAA) that was approved by the SAA creditors on 14 July 2020?

Reply:

a) Various sources of funding are being considered including the strategic equity partner, application for funding from Government through the Medium-Term Expenditure Framework process, approaching Development Financial Institutions and Commercial Banks.

b|) The process has reached an advanced stage, which we will be able to announce in due course. Due to the sensitive nature of these negotiations we are unable to pronounce at this stage.

04 November 2020 - NW1985

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) total amount did Eskom pay for coal that was above the annual average price for coal purchases in each year since 2007, (b) is the name of each company that the coal was purchased from and (c) were the coal volumes purchased from each specified company?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(b) and (c)

The request to disclose the prices and names of associated suppliers is commercially sensitive. The utility is currently progressing coal supply negotiations with existing and potentially new coal suppliers. By disclosing the requested information to parliament and to the public, suppliers could potentially use this information to erode Eskom’s bargaining power.

04 November 2020 - NW982

Profile picture: Cachalia, Mr G K

Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)      With reference to the ongoing business rescue process at the SA Airways and following the statement he made to the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises on 6 May 2020 (details furnished), (a) how is the Government planning to keep the airline running without any further financial support from the fiscus; (2) Whether he will furnish Mr G K Y Cachalia with a copy of the business rescue plan with proposals on the alternative transition process that he presented to the business rescue practitioners; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) (a) The Department and National Treasury have been tasked by Cabinet to consider alternative sources of funding for SAA to ensure that a restructured airline emerges from the Business Rescue process. Government will have to consider various sources of Funding including Strategic Equity Partnerships.

(2) Yes, a copy of the business rescue plan with proposals on the alternative transition process that he presented to the business rescue practitioners will be provided accordingly. (Kindly note the attached copy of the BR Plan for consideration).

04 November 2020 - NW1890

Profile picture: Mkhaliphi, Ms HO

Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that (a) he has not taken any action against a certain company (name furnished) amidst the allegations of corruption and money laundering and (b) the contract of the specified company was extended by Transnet; (2) Whether he has found that a certain person (name and details furnished) received a donation of R300 000 from the specified company through a foundation?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet:

(1)(a) According to MNS the allegations of bribery and kickbacks as published in the City Press were malicious and defamatory. As a result, MNS lodged a complaint against City Press with the Press Council.

The Press Council rejected the City Press allegations of bribery and kickbacks and directed City Press to publish an apology to MNS and to Mr Ndlovu for:

1.1.1 Unjustifiably reflecting in its reportage, both in the headlines and in the text of the article, that MNS had been implicated in kickbacks, alleged acts of corruption and bribery; and

1.1.2Unnecessarily tarnishing their reputation.

(1)(b) MNS was appointed onto Transnet’s legal panel through a fair, just and equitable procurement process during 2017. The panel was appointed for a period of 3 years.

(2) The allegations of Dr Molefe receiving R300 000 from MNS have been peddled since June 2019 and despite the facts being put on the table on numerous occasions, the allegations are repeated by the EFF.

MNS received a request from the Popo Molefe Foundation Charitable Trust to make a sponsorship/donation to the Charitable Trust to provide bursaries to previously disadvantaged students who cannot afford the costs of tertiary education. MNS was not the only recipient of this request. A number of companies and individuals were approached with a similar request. A copy of the request letter is attached hereto as Annexure “A”.

The Charitable Trust organized a Golf Day and Gala Dinner on 31 May 2019 as part of its fund raising programme. All potential donors/sponsors could contribute to advance the educational aspirations of previously disadvantaged students. In this regard MNS contributed an amount of R350 000 to the Charitable Trust, which entitled MNS and other sponsors/donors to inter alia be recognized and listed on the various branding platforms that the Charitable Trust employed. This included amongst others, being publicly mentioned at the Gala Dinner and listed on Charitable Trust’s website for the contribution made to the Charitable Trust in the 2019 fund raising programme.

There was no direct or indirect benefit to either Dr Molefe or any of his family members arising from the funds donated to the Charitable Trust. The sole beneficiaries of the Charitable Trust are disadvantaged students benefitting from the Charitable Trust through bursaries to pay for their tertiary fees. Save for the donation referred to above, MNS has not, either directly or indirectly advanced any donation/loan/payment to Dr Molefe or any of his associated entities.

04 November 2020 - NW2134

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a)What financial payments that were requested have been paid to Eskom since 1 January 2020, (b) On what exact dates were the payments made and (c) What amounts were paid; (2) What is the; (a) Total cost in each month of transporting diesel from Cape Town to the gas turbine power plants in the Republic over the past 12 months and (b) Cost per litre of diesel in each month for the past 12 months for the gas turbine power plants; (3) Whether the report of the Medupi Conveyor Belt accident has been completed; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (4) Whether he will furnish Mrs B M van Minnen with a copy of the report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(1)(a)(b)(c) Since the question regarding financial payments is not specific, Eskom assumes it refers to payments received in line with the Government Appropriations.

Since January 2020, Eskom received the amounts set out in Table 1 below, as part of the Appropriations and Special Appropriations Act of 2019.

Table 1: Payments received by Eskom in line with Government Appropriations

Financial Year

(b) Date

(c) Amount paid, R'm

2020

03-Feb-20

4 000

2020

11-Feb-20

4 000

2020

28-Feb-20

5 000

2020

31-Mar-20

9 500

2021

29 May 20

1 000

2021

11 Aug 20

5 000

Total for the 2020 Calendar year

28 500

(2)(a) The cost of transport is included in the diesel price. Transport of diesel to Ankerlig and Port Rex is via truck, while transport is via pipeline for Gourikwa and Acacia.

(2)(b) The cost of diesel per litre in each month over the past 12 months for the gas turbine power plants is as set out in Table 2 below. Eskom received an average discount of 35c/l over this period.

Table 2 Cost of diesel per litre in each month for the gas turbine power plants

Month

Wholesale Price (R/l)

Average Discount

Nett Price

(R/l)

04-09-19

14.05

0.35

13.70

02-10-19

14.30

0.35

13.95

06-11-19

14.14

0.35

13.79

04-12-19

13.99

0.35

13.64

01-01-20

14.08

0.35

13.73

05-02-20

14.03

0.35

13.68

03-03-20

13.49

0.35

13.14

01-04-20

12.09

0.35

11.74

06-05-20

10.48

0.35

10.13

03-06-20

10.70

0.35

10.35

01-07-20

12.43

0.35

12.08

05-08-20

12.88

0.35

12.53

(3) The report of the Medupi conveyor belt accident has been completed.

(4) The report is a product of an internal investigation that was commissioned in accordance with Eskom’s established integrated risk management processes. The report is therefore an internal report for consumption by the relevant Eskom senior executives and cannot be made public. However, Eskom endeavours to provide a summary of key findings from the report once internal governance processes are finalised.

04 November 2020 - NW2133

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What; (a) Is the current municipal debt outstanding to Eskom by each municipality and (b) Attempts have been made to collect the outstanding specified municipal debt to Eskom? NW2696E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The total debt owed by municipalities as at 31 July 2020 is R46.1 billion, of which R31 billion is overdue debt. The details of the age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom, as at 31 July 2020 are set out in Annexure A.

b) Eskom has implemented several interventions to collect the outstanding debt owed as set out in Table 1 below:

Table 1: Interventions by Eskom to collect outstanding debt

Interventions by Eskom

Implemented concessions as agreed with SALGA

  • Eskom increased the payment days from 15 to 30 days for all non-metropolitan municipalities, reduced the interest rate on arrears, and applies payments to capital first before interest.
  • Eskom offers payment plans as a means to make the payment of the arrear debt more affordable over a period of time.

Interventions by Eskom

Focus on enhancing and enforcing current revenue management processes

  • This includes direct engagement with defaulting municipalities, issuing contract breach notices with the intention of encouraging a remedy of the breach, interruption of supply, and also litigating by issuing summons for payment.
  • Legal pursuance of debt owed also extends to the attachment of assets and bank accounts of certain municipalities.

Partnering with government

  • Eskom fully participates in intergovernmental structures such as the Eskom Political Task Team and the Multi-disciplinary Revenue Committee that is convened by the Office of the Deputy President.
  • Eskom offers its services and expertise in the form of active partnering with stakeholders to improve revenue collection within municipalities.
  • Eskom works closely with National Treasury, which provides municipal financial oversight, thereby ensuring municipal budgets are funded and payment obligations to Eskom are met.

ANNEXURE A - PQ2133

REPORTING MONTH :

2020/07/31

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

31 - 60 days

61 - 90 days

90 days+

Total

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

 

EASTERN CAPE

1 045 309 406

2 530 451

82 838 040

54 125 462

1 094 964 881

2 279 768 239

1 795 121 602

268 812 797

215 833 839

1

ALFRED NZO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-206 089

247 583

38 373

9 043

92 140

181 051

153 815

19 010

8 225

2

AMAHLATHI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 173 481

10 224

4 674 349

1 760 031

16 357 033

27 975 119

22 424 224

3 363 616

2 187 279

3

AMATHOLE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 274 342

1 087 143

1 210 463

981 709

1 092 622

5 646 278

4 836 768

727 414

82 097

4

BLUE CRANE ROUTE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 094 374

0

0

0

0

14 094 374

12 255 977

1 838 397

0

5

BUFFALO CITY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

237 804 629

0

36 963

1

0

237 841 592

206 746 921

31 094 356

315

6

CHRIS HANI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-723 145

101 341

4 198 860

221 205

432 114

4 230 375

3 786 403

389 371

54 601

7

DR BEYERS NAUDE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 712 692

69 099

8 824 386

7 206 803

85 385 606

114 198 585

87 592 369

13 119 997

13 486 219

8

ELUNDINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

152 619

0

0

0

0

152 619

134 562

18 057

0

9

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 019 976

0

5 877

0

0

2 025 852

1 756 485

263 473

5 895

10

ENGCOBO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0,05

0,01

0

11

ENOCH MGIJIMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 663 040

15 051

31 083 743

20 638 507

298 112 955

392 513 295

305 419 072

45 776 831

41 317 392

12

GREAT KEI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 562 521

0

484 587

10 368

3 802 232

5 859 708

4 665 931

699 858

493 919

13

INGQUZA HILL LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

250 676

34 647

257 909

0

0

543 232

469 595

70 439

3 198

14

INTSIKA YETHU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

527 757

0

0

0

0

527 757

458 919

68 838

0

15

INXUBA YETHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 308 862

0

8 968 063

5 983 581

140 121 530

167 382 037

119 397 835

17 741 834

30 242 368

16

JOE GQABI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

11 361

134 482

109 492

1 496 472

0

1 751 808

1 500 303

225 045

26 459

17

KING SABATA DALINDYEBO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

101 419 957

31 501

424 314

1 441 991

112 009 461

215 327 225

180 089 083

27 617 009

7 621 133

18

KOUGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

31 699 079

0

798

0

0

31 699 876

27 563 600

4 134 540

1 737

19

KOU-KAMMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

704 582

0

308 878

0

0

1 013 460

877 925

131 689

3 847

20

MAKANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

17 097 721

0

0

0

36 749 083

53 846 804

45 909 235

6 829 881

1 107 688

21

MATATIELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

6 988 990

0

0

0

0

6 988 990

6 077 383

911 607

0

22

MBASHE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 827

0

219

333

0

2 378

1 992

299

87

23

MBIZANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

93 301

0

0

0

1

93 302

80 413

12 067

822

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

24

MHLONTLO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

199 361

45 970

34 821

0

0

280 152

242 800

36 420

932

25

MNQUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

26

NDLAMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 573 353

0

0

0

0

7 573 353

6 518 988

1 054 365

0

27

NELSON MANDELA BAY METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

513 455 879

527 935

0

0

0

513 983 814

446 942 072

67 041 372

370

28

NGQUSHWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

29

NTHABANKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

30 151

0

276

0

0

30 427

26 458

3 969

0

30

NYANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY FBE

107 342

0

0

0

0

107 342

93 341

14 001

0

31

O R TAMBO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-468 490

225 060

222 275

174 269

193 240

346 355

263 672

64 209

18 474

32

PORT ST JOHNS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

303 262

0

0

0

0

303 262

263 706

39 556

0

33

RAYMOND MHLABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 715 887

0

7 687 542

4 832 117

166 402 968

188 638 514

122 480 855

17 928 459

48 229 201

34

SAKHISIZWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 995 628

12

0

0

0

1 995 640

1 720 822

258 121

16 698

35

SENQU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 340 493

0

0

0

0

5 340 493

4 643 910

696 582

0

36

SUNDAYS RIVER VALLEY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 538 619

0

2 510 673

1 583 566

0

7 632 858

6 176 658

926 499

529 701

37

UMZIMVUBU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

44 043

403

0

0

0

44 446

38 649

5 797

0

38

WALTER SISULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

15 841 324

0

11 755 177

7 785 466

234 213 897

269 595 865

173 510 863

25 689 820

70 395 182

 

FREE STATE

558 515 003

247 880 311

275 222 401

206 877 352

11 474 620 510

12 763 115 577

8 663 638 405

1 258 736 678

2 840 740 494

39

CENTLEC MUNICIPALITY

3 430 414

0

0

0

0

3 430 414

2 971 169

445 675

13 570

40

DIHLABENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

26 792 920

0

18 576 125

13 342 424

347 465 405

406 176 873

296 860 680

43 919 008

65 397 185

41

KOPANONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 331 508

0

10 065

15 155

1 226 544

6 583 272

5 556 785

825 596

200 892

42

LETSEMENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 981 926

0

4 272 604

2 347 114

46 973 170

58 574 813

45 544 488

6 840 068

6 190 257

43

MAFUBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 032 629

0

12 416 681

15 357 066

98 532 534

139 338 910

101 708 119

14 920 993

22 709 798

44

MALUTI A PHOFUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

103 018 183

662 361

89 820 631

72 908 612

5 140 907 401

5 407 317 188

3 416 686 863

493 591 612

1 497 038 713

45

MANGAUNG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

4 952 986

247 171 599

12 040 567

0

13 886 892

278 052 045

241 698 211

36 254 997

98 836

46

MANTSOPA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 029 084

0

14 084 839

7 374 869

192 387 328

221 876 119

144 565 922

21 065 830

56 244 367

47

MASILONYANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

6 792 694

0

5 811 351

2 434 505

60 087 494

75 126 044

60 368 482

8 906 425

5 851 137

48

MATJHABENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

178 222 967

7 893

49 033 516

44 390 457

3 129 712 117

3 401 366 950

2 277 416 556

329 785 275

794 165 118

49

METSIMAHOLO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

44 243 387

0

0

0

13 500 000

57 743 387

49 953 693

7 493 054

296 640

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

50

MOHOKARE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

67 803

0

66 300

65 412

192 350

391 865

334 842

50 226

6 796

51

MOQHAKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 234 333

0

15 742 628

0

298 357 452

354 334 414

274 732 913

40 968 278

38 633 222

52

NALA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

25 440 184

0

2 973 884

17 704 568

346 273 371

392 392 006

298 390 489

43 565 352

50 436 165

53

NGWATHE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

37 416 763

0

31 989 813

18 228 528

1 221 468 050

1 309 103 154

986 444 975

142 542 453

180 115 726

54

NKETOANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

20 562 888

0

5 750 543

5 557 075

321 984 368

353 854 874

239 246 224

34 691 455

79 917 195

55

PHUMELELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 037 971

26 578

2 314 024

2 213 297

124 528 836

137 120 705

99 794 356

14 859 853

22 466 496

56

SETSOTO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 717 024

11 879

210 852

0

0

11 939 755

10 275 707

1 541 356

122 692

57

TOKOLOGO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 006 543

0

4 049 180

2 839 483

93 121 829

105 017 035

78 046 722

11 542 190

15 428 123

58

TSWELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 202 797

0

6 058 799

2 098 788

24 015 370

43 375 754

33 041 210

4 926 979

5 407 565

 

GAUTENG

6 262 789 360

707 633 991

259 734 441

182 966 557

2 405 224 960

9 818 349 309

7 967 389 189

1 194 170 609

656 789 511

59

CITY OF EKURHULENI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 841 503 839

703 358 185

14 068 423

331 637

0

2 559 262 084

2 226 904 328

334 200 566

-1 842 810

60

CITY OF JOHANNESBURG METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 670 743 142

85 603

3 778 616

0

2 275

1 674 609 637

1 456 122 030

218 418 546

69 062

61

CITY OF TSHWANE METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 508 561 807

724 170

384 906

0

0

1 509 670 884

1 312 835 323

196 828 012

7 548

62

EMFULENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

626 500 695

3 386 573

158 757 750

110 805 767

1 833 220 909

2 732 671 694

1 968 807 647

294 487 852

469 376 196

63

LESEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

39 965 438

0

0

0

0

39 965 438

34 753 416

5 212 022

0

64

MERAFONG CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

106 995 000

79 460

30 161 686

26 536 973

363 916 132

527 689 250

382 220 081

57 162 147

88 307 021

65

MIDVAAL LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

43 316 862

0

0

0

0

43 316 862

37 666 837

5 650 026

0

66

MOGALE CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

226 714 381

0

168 198

0

0

226 882 579

170 075 997

25 511 623

31 294 960

67

RAND WEST CITY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

198 488 196

0

52 414 862

45 292 180

208 006 073

504 201 310

377 934 338

56 689 438

69 577 534

68

SEDIBENG DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

79 570

79 570

69 192

10 379

0

 

KWAZULU NATAL

2 640 303 110

5 626 740

38 055 628

32 493 098

482 404 486

3 198 883 061

2 686 612 419

403 032 475

109 238 166

69

ABAQULUSI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

52 536 257

12 584

0

0

17 281 243

69 830 084

56 131 678

8 421 628

5 276 778

70

ALFRED DUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 465 418

0

0

0

0

42 465 418

36 926 450

5 538 968

0

71

AMAJUBA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

365 343

0

243 797

16 239

41 156

666 535

577 233

86 800

2 502

72

BIG 5 HLABISA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-2

0

0

0

0

-2

-2

0

0

73

CITY OF UMHLATHUZE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

135 633 196

1 230 235

153 317

148 200

0

137 164 948

119 267 789

17 893 124

4 036

74

DANNHAUSER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

Current

16 - 30 days

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

75

DR NKOSAZANA DLAMINI ZUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 415

0

2 545

0

0

20 960

18 208

2 731

21

76

EDUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 118 208

0

0

0

0

5 118 208

4 450 616

667 592

0

77

EMADLANGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 020 573

0

0

0

0

2 020 573

1 757 020

263 553

0

78

ENDUMENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 996 139

0

0

0

0

18 996 139

16 519 983

2 476 156

0

79

ETHEKWINI METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 512 335 557

0

5 185

0

0

1 512 340 742

1 315 078 890

197 261 841

11

80

GREATER KOKSTAD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-1 633

0

0

0

0

-1 633

-1 633

0

0

81

HARRY GWALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-584 999

161 024

0

0

0

-423 975

-427 098

1 947

1 175

82

ILEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

819 821

780 852

1 013

0

0

1 601 686

1 392 771

208 916

0

83

IMPENDLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

84

INKOSI LANGALIBALELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

51 163 261

0

0

0

25 207 105

76 370 366

59 246 542

8 886 539

8 237 286

85

JOZINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

32 710

0

0

0

0

32 710

28 443

4 266

0

86

KING CETSHWAYO DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

156 948

166 379

0

0

0

323 328

279 853

43 474

0

87

KWADUKUZA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

104 639 975

0

0

0

0

104 639 975

90 991 283

13 648 692

0

88

MANDENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

89

MAPHUMULO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 839

0

0

0

0

1 839

1 599

240

0

90

MKHAMBATHINI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

91

MPOFANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 921 418

0

5 957 353

3 952 182

168 480 033

186 310 986

137 797 506

20 384 739

28 128 740

92

MSINGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-3 304

0

0

0

0

-3 304

-2 782

-522

0

93

MSUNDUZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

480 468 091

0

45 104

24 039

1 592 529

482 129 763

415 304 937

62 535 103

4 289 724

94

MTHONJANENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 547 629

0

0

0

3 571 696

6 119 325

5 203 446

781 578

134 301

95

MTUBATUBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 550

9 548

0

0

0

21 098

17 917

2 688

493

96

NDWEDWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

97

NEWCASTLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

125 363 929

0

30 242 547

21 597 294

166 566 605

343 770 375

262 288 394

39 461 437

42 020 544

98

NKANDLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 021 175

0

0

0

0

4 021 175

3 484 208

522 631

14 336

99

NONGOMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

25 992

0

26 194

0

0

52 186

45 379

6 807

0

100

NQUTHU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 574 987

0

0

0

0

3 574 987

3 108 684

466 303

0

101

OKHAHLAMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 455

0

0

0

0

1 455

1 265

190

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

102

RAY NKONYENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 348 518

0

0

0

0

14 348 518

12 476 972

1 871 546

0

103

RICHMOND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

104

UBUHLEBEZWE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

35 627

42 770

33 220

0

0

111 617

96 508

14 569

540

105

UGU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

305 961

1 673 529

0

0

0

1 979 491

1 721 959

257 037

494

106

ULUNDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

22 836 934

0

8 111

6 586 606

99 612 854

129 044 505

93 943 656

13 991 774

21 109 076

107

UMDONI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-57 247

70 103

0

0

0

12 856

10 655

2 201

0

108

UMFOLOZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

99 443

19 360

0

0

0

118 803

103 307

15 496

0

109

UMGUNGUNDLOVU DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

8 567

0

0

0

0

8 567

7 449

1 117

0

110

UMHLABUYALINGANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-1 000

0

0

0

0

-1 000

-870

-130

0

111

UMKHANYAKUDE DISTRICT MUNIC

3 832 673

0

79 841

0

0

3 912 513

3 409 374

502 361

779

112

UMLALAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

7 920 573

0

0

0

0

7 920 573

6 887 455

1 033 118

0

113

UMNGENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

20 381 396

0

0

0

0

20 381 396

17 722 952

2 658 443

0

114

UMSHWATHI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-2

0

0

0

0

-2

-2

0

0

115

UMUZIWABANTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

116

UMVOTI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 353 066

0

0

0

0

10 353 066

9 002 666

1 350 400

0

117

UMZIMKULU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

118

UMZINYATHI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

897 411

221 356

710 537

148 451

51 264

2 029 019

1 758 677

267 133

3 209

119

UMZUMBE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

171 762

0

0

0

0

171 762

148 285

22 243

1 234

120

UPHONGOLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 736 084

0

0

0

0

3 736 084

3 248 768

487 315

0

121

UTHUKELA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

4 311 747

199 515

181 736

16 056

0

4 709 054

4 094 838

614 217

0

122

ZULULAND DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 471 651

1 039 484

365 126

4 032

0

2 880 292

2 491 189

376 216

12 887

 

LIMPOPO

365 644 212

83 934

36 521 267

19 461 882

799 096 597

1 220 807 892

917 389 531

136 409 206

167 009 155

123

BA-PHALABORWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 296 929

0

0

0

0

10 296 929

8 953 852

1 343 078

0

124

BELA-BELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 529 223

0

16 264 129

6 505 124

534 614

35 833 091

22 204 295

3 349 128

10 279 668

125

BLOUBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 796 357

0

68 663

0

0

5 865 021

5 100 018

765 003

0

126

CAPRICORN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

231 179

0

108 572

0

0

339 751

293 593

44 456

1 701

127

COLLINS CHABANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

442 394

0

0

0

0

442 394

344 466

97 928

0

128

ELIAS MOTSOALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 791 749

0

0

0

0

10 791 749

9 366 960

1 405 044

19 744

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

129

EPHRAIM MOGALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 984 035

0

0

0

0

5 984 035

5 203 508

780 526

0

130

FETAKGOMO - GREATER TUBATSE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

695 238

0

0

0

0

695 238

604 571

90 668

0

131

GREATER GIYANI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

94 137

0

0

0

0

94 137

81 859

12 279

0

132

GREATER LETABA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 276 535

0

0

0

0

2 276 535

1 979 595

296 939

0

133

GREATER TZANEEN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

62 478 617

0

0

0

0

62 478 617

54 097 570

8 114 634

266 412

134

LEPELLE NKUMPI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

333 195

0

0

0

0

333 195

289 735

43 460

0

135

LEPHALALE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 968 872

0

83 097

0

0

13 051 969

11 340 038

1 702 157

9 774

136

MAKHADO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 837 585

0

0

0

0

40 837 585

35 510 944

5 326 642

0

137

MAKHUDUTHAMAGA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

36 690

0

0

0

0

36 690

31 904

4 786

0

138

MARULENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

27 376

0

0

0

0

27 376

23 805

3 571

0

139

MODIMOLLE-MOOKGOPHONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

24 901 644

0

19 975 470

12 956 758

541 353 824

599 187 696

430 035 176

63 881 053

105 271 466

140

MOGALAKWENA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 617 694

68 719

21 335

0

0

28 707 749

24 643 089

3 696 463

368 196

141

MOLEMOLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

369 567

0

0

0

0

369 567

321 362

48 204

0

142

MOPANI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

2 782 672

0

0

0

0

2 782 672

2 342 185

440 487

0

143

MUSINA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 281 246

0

0

0

62 547 185

76 828 431

52 507 211

7 863 053

16 458 168

145

POLOKWANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

110 045 238

0

0

0

0

110 045 238

95 690 601

14 354 637

0

146

SEKHUKHUNE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

2 727 234

0

0

0

0

2 727 234

2 424 021

303 213

0

147

THABAZIMBI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 035 505

0

0

0

194 660 974

203 696 479

147 869 991

21 522 136

34 304 352

148

THULAMELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

941 719

0

0

0

0

941 719

818 886

122 833

0

149

VHEMBE DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

6 121 581

15 215

1

0

0

6 136 796

5 310 296

796 827

29 673

 

MPUMALANGA

907 660 119

7 516 615

437 595 269

295 614 172

8 067 142 378

9 715 528 552

6 871 695 575

1 013 313 981

1 830 518 996

150

BUSHBUCKRIDGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 592 270

9 556

41 218

47 295

2 795 848

11 486 187

9 591 898

1 438 956

455 332

151

CHIEF ALBERT LUTHULI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 152 692

0

12 654 701

44 644

3 064 943

26 916 980

18 370 903

2 755 567

5 790 510

152

CITY OF MBOMBELA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

233 332 697

7 506 989

59 540 611

50 613 658

119 353 057

470 347 013

347 286 841

52 077 008

70 983 163

153

DIPALESENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 767 510

0

3 135 474

28 792

40 966 490

54 898 267

36 562 627

5 480 622

12 855 018

154

DR J S MOROKA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

45 430

0

46 800

0

0

92 230

149 401

-58 126

955

155

DR PIXLEY KA ISAKA SEME LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 194 699

0

0

0

0

11 194 699

9 734 521

1 460 178

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

Total VAT

(b)(ii) Total Interest

156

EMAKHAZENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 110 334

0

7 624 258

4 727 831

14 106 323

35 568 745

19 644 348

2 945 752

12 978 645

157

EMALAHLENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

202 206 778

0

184 122 466

105 468 608

3 765 940 297

4 257 738 149

2 980 551 539

438 233 357

838 953 253

158

GOVAN MBEKI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

118 537 253

70

75 977 923

56 430 543

1 845 400 427

2 096 346 216

1 491 685 244

220 881 471

383 779 501

159

LEKWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

51 751 210

0

35 985 637

27 920 218

1 061 620 169

1 177 277 234

771 943 754

113 585 356

291 748 124

160

MKHONDO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

23 505 497

0

19 843 787

10 989 345

140 688 284

195 026 912

143 033 710

21 658 341

30 334 861

161

MSUKALIGWA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 017 013

0

25 819 186

16 502 497

98 578 799

180 917 495

129 653 393

19 441 736

31 822 366

162

NKANGALA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

38 741

0

0

0

0

38 741

33 549

5 032

159

163

NKOMAZI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

18 159 927

0

19 840

0

0

18 179 768

15 801 662

2 370 249

7 857

164

STEVE TSHWETE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

79 812 695

0

38 668

0

10 023

79 861 386

69 443 904

10 416 429

1 053

165

THABA CHWEU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

53 638 796

0

9 123 742

8 066 497

731 152 976

801 982 010

607 390 361

87 677 266

106 914 383

166

THEMBISILE HANI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

273 419

0

0

0

0

273 419

237 756

35 663

0

167

VICTOR KHANYE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

35 523 158

0

3 620 958

14 774 245

243 464 742

297 383 103

220 580 164

32 909 122

43 893 817

 

NORTH WEST

841 754 173

2 233 012

257 373 301

114 059 427

1 616 955 797

2 832 375 711

2 045 584 616

303 446 819

483 344 276

168

CITY OF MATLOSANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

245 873 306

686 256

57 731 377

49 476 792

295 308 522

649 076 254

498 853 779

74 629 652

75 592 823

169

DITSOBOTLA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

19 888 630

9 034

15 811 342

10 967 219

580 419 857

627 096 083

403 251 980

58 948 453

164 895 650

170

DR RUTH SEGOMOTSI MOMPATI DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

76 928

0

43 745

0

0

120 673

104 973

15 700

0

171

GREATER TAUNG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 736 478

0

0

0

0

1 736 478

1 510 345

226 133

0

172

JB MARKS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

127 779 494

0

22 790 470

0

0

150 569 964

130 832 609

19 624 891

112 464

173

KAGISANO-MOLOPO LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

338 156

0

218 868

0

0

557 024

484 492

72 532

0

174

KGETLENGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

8 221 795

22 347

3 127 140

2 967 531

128 124 786

142 463 600

102 472 991

15 057 349

24 933 259

175

LEKWA-TEEMANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 374 286

11 979

5 295 415

4 105 005

28 438 977

54 225 662

45 013 631

6 752 309

2 459 722

176

MADIBENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

61 889 822

112 129

46 638 872

27 191 585

49 111 665

184 944 072

146 411 142

21 880 992

16 651 938

177

MAHIKENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

434 909

46 888

82 618

99 498

4 887 425

5 551 338

4 299 862

616 684

634 793

179

MAMUSA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

5 765 300

230 076

4 542 741

2 651 415

84 228 354

97 417 888

64 355 570

9 487 426

23 574 891

180

MAQUASSI HILLS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

17 729 506

1 037 353

4 969 338

5 017 932

10 719 534

39 473 662

29 198 825

4 354 983

5 919 854

181

MORETELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

822 572

0

0

0

0

822 572

705 339

105 799

11 434

182

MOSES KOTANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

548 174

0

0

0

0

548 174

476 087

72 087

0

183

NALEDI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 783 257

0

7 755 111

7 018 725

325 325 325

368 882 419

248 644 382

36 372 825

83 865 212

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

184

NGAKA MODIRI MOLEMA DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

-295 536

0

0

0

0

-295 536

-215 388

-80 148

0

185

RAMOTSHERE MOILOA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 014 105

76 950

6 463 760

4 232 882

45 036 315

64 824 013

49 482 277

7 418 730

7 923 006

186

RATLOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

946 515

0

0

0

0

946 515

823 499

123 015

0

187

RUSTENBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

281 951 757

0

81 890 831

318 076

470 551

364 631 215

270 476 067

40 580 472

53 574 676

 

NORTHERN CAPE

344 185 847

491 368

72 340 140

33 725 145

1 657 186 468

2 107 928 968

1 459 764 851

215 637 494

432 526 623

188

!KHEIS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

48 605

69 735

0

0

0

118 339

101 008

15 151

2 181

189

DAWID KRUIPER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

28 287 216

0

0

0

0

28 287 216

23 958 504

3 593 776

734 936

190

DIKGATLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 921 723

0

11 199 072

2 405 857

114 259 861

132 786 514

89 544 028

13 103 909

30 138 577

191

EMTHANJENI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 133 067

0

8 300 662

4 886 344

71 524 133

95 844 205

70 079 616

10 497 178

15 267 411

192

GAMAGARA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 057 404

0

10 154 304

10 199

229 882 298

280 104 206

204 883 347

30 542 311

44 678 547

193

GA-SEGONYANA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 881 579

0

0

0

0

16 881 579

11 686 218

1 752 933

3 442 428

194

HANTAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 883 373

0

0

0

0

2 883 373

2 507 281

376 092

0

195

JOE MOROLONG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 412 277

0

707 836

0

0

2 120 114

1 740 990

261 101

118 023

196

KAI !GARIB LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 161 264

0

6 550 145

4 832 837

318 372 016

338 916 262

233 828 207

34 086 755

71 001 300

197

KAMIESBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

823 637

353 168

1 213 979

997 020

19 450 858

22 838 661

17 337 681

2 589 369

2 911 612

198

KAREEBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

-270

0

0

0

0

-270

-512

242

0

199

KAROO HOOGLAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

30 511

0

0

0

0

30 511

26 531

3 980

0

200

KGATELOPELE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 289 068

0

0

0

0

3 289 068

2 211 400

331 710

745 958

201

KHAI-MA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 231 326

64 307

906 888

633 133

17 567 862

20 403 516

13 323 309

1 977 493

5 102 715

202

MAGARENG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 931 296

0

2 357 735

1 645 332

58 243 830

65 178 194

42 469 756

6 244 447

16 463 991

203

NAMA KHOI LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

10 417 488

0

8 818 618

6 424 048

110 568 882

136 229 036

90 015 279

13 537 080

32 676 677

204

PHOKWANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

19 782 404

0

5 952 228

5 309 723

116 395 538

147 439 893

105 562 316

15 735 134

26 142 443

205

RENOSTERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 477 358

0

1 185 868

989 069

88 517 636

92 169 930

55 603 383

8 014 615

28 551 933

206

RICHTERSVELD LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 962 553

4 158

1 434 466

1 146 780

8 269 265

12 817 222

9 932 841

1 489 888

1 394 493

207

SIYANCUMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 218 530

0

3 488 128

0

150 826 726

166 533 384

104 722 521

15 334 349

46 476 514

208

SIYATHEMBA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

3 388 979

0

2 709 253

1 774 437

63 576 385

71 449 053

50 090 782

7 391 879

13 966 392

209

SOL PLAATJE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

145 089 302

0

9 043

7 744

0

145 106 089

120 503 185

18 075 478

6 527 427

210

THEMBELIHLE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 990 003

0

1 654 177

1 227 199

77 900 543

82 771 921

49 523 127

7 197 184

26 051 609

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

211

TSANTSABANE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 003 441

0

3 368 820

60 023

147 252 789

163 685 073

106 538 739

15 626 285

41 520 049

212

UBUNTU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

2 621 811

0

2 131 961

1 375 400

64 577 847

70 707 019

45 485 525

6 645 686

18 575 807

213

UMSOBOMVU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 141 904

0

196 956

0

0

9 338 860

8 089 790

1 213 469

35 601

 

WESTERN CAPE

2 128 610 643

468 097

13 559 252

8 907 022

4 955 170

2 156 500 183

1 871 098 781

280 628 568

4 772 834

214

BEAUFORT WEST LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

16 618 073

2

1 350 357

0

0

17 968 433

15 290 788

2 293 692

383 953

215

BERGRIVIER LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

13 025 659

0

0

0

0

13 025 659

11 326 660

1 698 999

0

216

BITOU LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 779 187

367

0

0

0

14 779 554

12 851 778

1 927 776

0

217

BREEDE VALLEY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

46 785 107

0

0

0

0

46 785 107

40 682 700

6 102 407

0

218

CAPE AGULHAS LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

12 318 050

0

0

0

0

12 318 050

10 711 347

1 606 702

0

219

CEDERBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

11 422 826

129 097

9 243 198

6 468 139

3 421 849

30 685 109

25 517 245

3 827 587

1 340 277

220

CITY OF CAPE TOWN METROPOLITAN MUNICIPALITY

1 344 766 378

203 828

52 964

13 250

89 301

1 345 125 721

1 169 720 089

175 397 831

7 801

221

DRAKENSTEIN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

209 005 120

0

0

0

0

209 005 120

181 253 161

27 210 855

541 104

222

EDEN DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

66 031

0

0

0

0

66 031

57 192

8 579

260

223

GEORGE LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

71 141 484

0

0

0

0

71 141 484

61 862 160

9 279 324

0

224

HESSEQUA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 483 848

0

0

0

0

4 483 848

3 898 092

585 757

0

225

KANNALAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

4 738 693

0

2 901 594

2 425 633

1 444 020

11 509 940

8 530 103

1 279 516

1 700 321

226

KNYSNA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

27 494 603

15

1 431

0

0

27 496 048

23 908 113

3 586 217

1 718

227

LAINGSBURG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

469 439

0

0

0

0

469 439

407 232

60 963

1 244

228

LANGEBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

42 248 052

0

0

0

0

42 248 052

36 737 436

5 510 615

0

229

MATZIKAMA LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

14 285 691

0

0

0

0

14 285 691

11 833 676

1 775 051

676 964

230

MOSSEL BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

50 700 673

0

0

0

0

50 700 673

43 985 167

6 597 775

117 731

231

OUDTSHOORN LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

23 009 623

0

0

0

0

23 009 623

20 008 367

3 001 255

0

232

OVERSTRAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 485 198

0

0

0

0

40 485 198

35 204 520

5 280 678

0

233

PRINS ALBERT LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

1 646 075

0

52

0

0

1 646 126

1 431 369

214 705

52

234

SALDANHA BAY LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

40 339 866

96 939

0

0

0

40 436 804

35 161 624

5 274 246

935

235

STELLENBOSCH LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

52 626 589

37 845

9 337

0

0

52 673 770

45 803 178

6 870 478

115

236

SWARTLAND LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

33 945 087

0

320

0

0

33 945 407

29 517 468

4 427 614

325

237

SWELLENDAM LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 975 014

0

0

0

0

9 975 014

8 673 880

1 301 134

0

Name of Municipality

(a) Age

Total debt is made up of

 

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

Current

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

(b)(i) Total Capital

238

THEEWATERSKLOOF LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

9 787 132

0

0

0

0

9 787 132

8 510 552

1 276 579

0

239

WEST COAST DISTRICT MUNICIPALITY

1 194 027

0

0

0

0

1 194 027

1 038 255

155 738

34

240

WITZENBERG LOCAL MUNICIPALITY

31 253 122

3

0

0

0

31 253 124

27 176 630

4 076 494

0

04 November 2020 - NW2132

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the (a) Daily electrical megawatt savings achieved through load shedding (i) In each province and (ii) In each metro over the past 60 days of load shedding and (b) Total amount of accumulated man-hours which have been load shed (i) In each province and (ii) In each metro over the past 60 days? NW2695E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(i) The estimated daily megawatts load shed in each Eskom operating unit (OU) is as set out in Annexure A.

Most of Eskom OUs are aligned to the provincial boundaries with the following exceptions:

  1. Gauteng OU also includes most North West province
  2. Limpopo OU includes the Rustenburg region of the North West province
  3. Western Cape OU includes the Kalahari region of the Northern Cape province
  4. Free State OU includes the Kimberley region of the Northern Cape province

(a)(ii) Daily megawatts load shed in each metro is to be sought from the metros.

(b) Eskom does not have a measurement of man-hours which have been load shed. On the assumption that the intention was to request information on the megawatt- hours (MWh) that have been load shed.

(b)(i) The estimated daily megawatt-hours load shed in each province is as set out in Annexure B.

(b)(ii) The estimated daily megawatt-hours load shed is to be sought from the metros.

Annexure A

Estimated megawatts load shed per Eskom Operating UnitPeriod: 1 July to 3 September 2020

 

10-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

N/A

N/A

203

133

198

210

138

0

Gauteng

N/A

N/A

378

316

255

287

402

0

KwaZulu Natal

N/A

N/A

134

126

125

208

140

0

Free State

N/A

N/A

180

118

38

93

241

0

Limpopo

N/A

161

162

172

121

176

148

0

Eastern Cape

N/A

70

65

60

68

78

74

0

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

196

143

178

173

196

0

 Total

N/A

412.29

1317

1069

982

1225

1338

0

 

11-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00 - 00:00

Western Cape

152

110

210

109

206

138

188

N/A

Gauteng

314

339

429

343

354

346

488

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

127

116

168

103

123

153

147

N/A

Free State

122

210

86

175

68

149

191

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

164

153

129

162

168

158

95

Eastern Cape

N/A

59

67

53

40

56

57

60

Mpumalanga

N/A

158

156

181

207

154

182

196

Total

715

1156

1268

1093

1160

1163

1411

350

 

12-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

102

185

239

344

109

122

249

N/A

Gauteng

298

337

396

298

376

405

293

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

215

138

176

147

218

138

100

N/A

Free State

63

160

101

154

89

238

52

N/A

Limpopo

98

114

159

151

131

169

130

63

Eastern Cape

56

72

74

64

37

55

67

30

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

147

181

189

158

156

181

Total

832

1187

1291

1339

1149

1284

1047

274

 

13-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

131

118

162

134

90

110

175

N/A

Gauteng

274

347

349

353

350

332

324

327

KwaZulu Natal

120

113

108

129

86

145

128

N/A

Free State

88

236

142

75

161

152

180

N/A

 

13-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Limpopo

N/A

164

148

152

120

159

117

140

Eastern Cape

N/A

84

88

60

49

78

84

37

Mpumalanga

N/A

173

196

126

182

147

181

189

Total

613

1235

1191

1028

1039

1122

1189

694

 

14-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

130

185

123

203

208

177

172

N/A

Gauteng

375

441

571

490

314

387

285

216

KwaZulu Natal

107

128

112

121

144

142

165

N/A

Free State

151

205

140

56

100

260

147

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

158

162

161

121

176

148

152

Eastern Cape

N/A

70

82

64

74

98

97

50

Mpumalanga

N/A

182

196

143

178

173

196

126

Total

763

1368

1386

1237

1138

1413

1210

543

 

15-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

37

96

78

226

132

215

115

N/A

Gauteng

421

495

312

208

309

395

306

336

KwaZulu Natal

41

66

54

134

158

206

152

N/A

Free State

117

36

40

50

161

225

120

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

78

63

161

166

158

162

172

Eastern Cape

N/A

38

19

45

65

80

89

56

Mpumalanga

N/A

162

187

213

154

182

196

143

Total

617

971

753

1037

1145

1460

1141

708

 

16-Jul-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

102

107

64

167

92

273

138

N/A

Gauteng

0

163

233

204

120

391

204

363

KwaZulu Natal

93

97

62

144

106

212

N/A

N/A

Free State

0

85

134

80

231

108

154

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

78

64

141

158

153

71

N/A

Eastern Cape

N/A

42

43

37

52

78

62

N/A

Mpumalanga

N/A

147

181

189

158

156

181

N/A

Total

195

718

781

960

917

1369

809

363

 

13-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

165

160

189

140

92

222

143

N/A

Gauteng

287

289

327

335

351

361

459

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

126

110

110

138

83

102

112

N/A

Free State

77

223

136

105

149

141

175

N/A

Limpopo

122

176

148

143

114

159

151

141

Eastern Cape

76

87

95

65

67

65

88

38

Mpumalanga

N/A

173

196

126

182

147

181

189

Total

852

1217

1201

1052

1037

1197

1310

368

 

14-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00 - 00:00

Western Cape

165

160

113

157

113

63

76

N/A

Gauteng

354

363

488

492

327

347

191

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

128

127

135

106

180

79

N/A

N/A

Free State

124

185

103

37

83

150

7

N/A

Limpopo

173

158

162

158

122

83

89

N/A

Eastern Cape

76

87

95

65

67

65

88

38

Mpumalanga

154

182

196

143

178

173

196

126

 

1174

1261

1291

1159

1070

960

646

164

 

18-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

136

204

132

N/A

Gauteng

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

402

477

312

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

166

169

139

N/A

Free State

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

221

147

98

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

169

148

152

120

Eastern Cape

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

91

111

84

60

Mpumalanga

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

173

196

126

182

 

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

1358

1452

1042

362

 

19-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

189

66

158

93

187

133

164

N/A

Gauteng

306

383

374

355

494

571

309

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

111

79

119

112

141

157

178

N/A

Free State

81

169

70

142

192

148

54

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

158

161

173

150

157

172

122

Eastern Cape

N/A

47

51

63

68

83

98

63

Mpumalanga

156

181

207

154

182

196

143

178

 

843

1082

1139

1091

1413

1444

1119

362

 

20-Aug-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

163

195

192.4

101

228

149

249

N/A

Gauteng

405

305

396

421

224

138

300

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

97

89

130

96

152

115

151

N/A

Free State

115

173

116

211

106

175

77

N/A

Limpopo

N/A

131

141

172

153

158

161

173

Eastern Cape

N/A

65

39

60

70

44

63

61

Mpumalanga

147

181

189

164

156

181

207

154

Total

927

1139

1204

1226

1088

959

1207

388

 

01-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

101

182.6

204

234

311

413

373

N/A

Gauteng

292

292

309

309

941

941

817

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

166

133

168

171

334

299

394

N/A

Free State

89

79

186

280

355

335

328

N/A

Limpopo

153

158

133

173

317

296

309

280

Eastern Cape

66

44

30

67

112

132

122

114

Mpumalanga

161.55

187

213

160

346

394

350

360

 

1028

1076

1241

1393

2716

2810

2693

754

 

02-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00 - 20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

101

183

204

234

311

413

373

N/A

Gauteng

292

292

309

309

941

941

817

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

166

133

168

171

334

299

394

N/A

Free State

89

79

186

280

355

335

328

N/A

Limpopo

153

158

133

173

317

296

309

280

Eastern Cape

66

44

30

67

112

132

122

114

Mpumalanga

162

187

213

160

346

394

350

360

Total

1028

1076

1241

1393

2716

2810

2693

754

 

03-Sep-20

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

08:00-10:00

10:00-12:00

12:00-14:00

14:00-16:00

16:00-18:00

18:00-20:00

20:00-22:00

22:00-00:00

Western Cape

332

355

389

203

359

458

351

N/A

Gauteng

864

981

871

857

607

724

688

N/A

KwaZulu Natal

293

266

344

326

254

256

271

N/A

Free State

302

287

262

343

328

271

292

N/A

Limpopo

290

248

269

283

297

253

283

283

Eastern Cape

107

133

99

120

110

139

N/A

N/A

Mpumalanga

346

394

350

360

347

394

350

354

Total

2534

2664

2583

2491

2302

2495

2235

636

Annexure B

Estimated megawatt-hours per Eskom Operating UnitPeriod: 1 July to 3 September 2020

Date

Western Cape

Gauteng

Kwazulu Natal

Free State

Limpopo

Eastern Cape

Mpumalanga

TOTAL

Stages

                   

Fri 10-Jul-2020

1764

3275

1466

1341

830

830

2134

11 639

Stage 2

Sat 11-Jul-2020

2226

5225

1875

2000

2058

783

2465

16 633

Stage 2

Sun 12-Jul-2020

2700

4805

2264

1714

2026

911

2388

16 808

Stage 2

Mon 13-Jul-2020

1840

5312

1658

2068

1998

959

2387

16 222

Stage 2

Tue 14-Jul-2020

2396

6158

1834

2118

2153

1069

2385

18 114

Stage 2

Wed 15-Jul-2020

1798

5564

1624

1499

1921

786

2471

15 663

Stage 1/2

Thu 16-Jul-2020

1886

3356

1427

1580

1327

626

2024

12 227

Stage 1/2

Thu 13-Aug-2020

2222

4818

1562

2014

2304

1161

2387

16 468

Stage 2

Fri 14-Aug-2020

1694

5128

1508

1377

1888

1161

2692

15 448

Stage 2

Tue 18-Aug-2020

944

2383

948

933

1176

691

2749

9 825

Stage 2

Wed 19-Aug-2020

1980

5585

1791

1712

2186

943

2790

16 988

Stage 2

Thu 20-Aug-2020

2555

4377

1657

1947

2178

804

2757

16 275

Stage 2

Tue 01-Sep-2020

1884

2962

1337

1180

1665

809

2066

11 903

Stage 2

Wed 02-Sep-2020

3636

7802

3330

3304

3637

1372

4344

27 425

Stage 2/4

Thu 03-Sep-2020

4894

11183

4020

4170

4408

1414

5791

35 880

Stage 4

Additional Information

An overview of the days were load shedding was implemented and the corresponding stages between 1 July to 3 September 2020 is as set out in the table below.

Date

Load shedding Stage

Date

Load shedding Stage

10-Jul-20

Stage 2

14-Aug-20

Stage 2

11-Jul-20

Stage 2

18-Aug-20

Stage 2

12-Jul-20

Stage 2

19-Aug-20

Stage 2

13-Jul-20

Stage 2

20-Aug-20

Stage 2

14-Jul-20

Stage 2

01-Sep-20

Stage 2

15-Jul-20

Stage 1 / 2

02-Sep-20

Stage 2 /4

16-Jul-20

Stage 1 / 2

03-Sep-20

Stage 4

13-Aug-20

Stage 2

   

04 November 2020 - NW1986

Profile picture: Van Minnen, Ms BM

Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What (a) Total volume of coal that Eskom purchased at (i) Above average and (ii) Acceptable pricing since 2007 was found to be unsuitable and was therefore unused for power generation and (b) Is the name of each company that the unsuitable coal was purchased from in each year?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a)(i) and (ii) All coal at Eskom’s coal stockyards will be used for power generation.

The request to disclose the prices and names of associated suppliers is commercially sensitive. The utility is currently progressing coal supply negotiations with existing and potentially new coal suppliers. By disclosing the requested information to parliament and to the public, suppliers could potentially use this information to erode Eskom’s bargaining power.

(b) Not applicable.

21 September 2020 - NW1197

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Cachalia, Mr G K to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) What are the relevant details of private shareholders who (a) have held shares in the SA Express Airways SOC Ltd (SA Express) since it was established and (b) currently hold shares; (2) What are the relevant details of shares traded during the life of SA Express, including the details of the (a) shares traded, (b) share sellers, (c) share purchasers and (d) amounts paid for shares? NW1502E

Reply:

 

  1. (a) In 2007, Transnet divested its interest in SA Express when the airline was established in terms of the SA Express Act (No. 34 of 2007), promulgated in December 2007, which provided for the transfer of SA Express shares and interests from Transnet to the state. The Act further granted the conversion of SA Express into a public company with share capital. In 2009, Government took 100% shareholding in SA Express.

 

The Company is a pre-existing company as contemplated in Item 2 of Schedule 5 of the Companies Act, (No 71 of 2008), as amended, and was incorporated in accordance with the Legal Succession to the South African Transport Services Act No. 9 of 1989 to and, in terms of its enabling legislation.

(b) There are no private shareholders who currently hold shares in SA Express. The company is also subject to the provisions of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999, (PFMA) as amended. The government is the sole shareholder of the shares in the company and the rights attached to those shares are exercised by the Minister of Public Enterprises.

 

  1. The Memorandum of Incorporation (MOI) provides that the company is authorised to issue 1000 (one thousand) Shares. The 2013 MOI provides that the shares in issue are 452 (four hundred and fifty two) ordinary shares, all of which are held by the shareholder, as represented by the Minister of Public Enterprises.
    1. shares traded where 102 shares
    2. share seller was Transnet

c). share purchaser was Government, represented by the Minister of Public Enterprises

d) amount paid was R140 million.

The company received a total of R1 549 000 000.00 during the 2018/19 and 2019/20 financial years. The company was required to provide the Minister with a commensurate request to increase the authorised and issued shares, accordingly. The process was not finalised and the provisional liquidator will only be able to address the matter, subject to prescribed requirements.

21 September 2020 - NW2080

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

With reference to his department’s appearance before the Portfolio Committee on Public Enterprises on 19 August 2020, where the Director-General indicated that Rand Merchant Bank has been appointed as transaction advisors to ensure that the best option of securing funding is chosen, what (a) process was followed to appoint Rand Merchant Bank as the transaction advisors, (b) is the contract value of the specified agreement, (c) are the deliverables in the agreement and (d) are the timelines of the contract?

Reply:

(a) The Rand Merchant Bank had been appointed as transaction advisor to oversee the Strategic Equity Partner (SEP) transaction of Air Chefs by SAA, the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) expanded the scope in line with procurement prescripts to include a similar scope on the SAA group, in line with Treasury Regulation 16A6.6.

(b)The contract value is capped at R12 million as retainer fee and R25 million as success fee for concluding a partnership for S

(c) The deliverables are;
i. Initial evaluation
ii. Due diligence and agreeing heads of agreement
iii. Final Due Diligence, definitive Transaction agreements, Transaction approvals and closing

(d) The timeline for the contract is 12 months. But the project may be concluded earlier due to the urgency of the matter, and the Department of Public Enterprises (DPE) has an option of exiting within 15 days, a month’s notice or by mutual agreement.

21 September 2020 - NW1889

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that (a) The grievance lodged by a certain person (name furnished) regarding the interdict of the appointment of Eskom Group Treasurer was ignored, (b) Eskom misled the chairperson of the grievance process by supplying an incorrect advert of the position and (c) A certain person (name furnished) was a member of the interview panel that appointed Eskom Treasurer when the specified person is not a member of the board or an employee of Eskom? NW2397E

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a) The Grievance was attended to in line with the Eskom HR Management priscipts and the outcome was provided to the aggrieved employee.

(b) The advert that had been provided initially was the copy of the working draft. The error was corrected when it was posted out. There were no material differences between the working draft and final version published.

 

Table 1: Comparison of pdf copy of the advert vs advert on the Eskom recruitment site

 

Advert on the pdf copy

Advert  on       the  Eskom        recruitment

portal

Position: GM TREASURY

Position Task Grade: EEE – GENERAL MANAGER

Purpose: Ensure Eskom has necessary policies, strategies, processes and systems to optimize Eskom’s financial liquidity through providing an effective Treasury function.

Business Unit: Office of the CE/Chairman

Location: Megawatt Park Reference Number: 041120191 Closing Date: 07 November 2019 Line Manager: Jabu Mabuza

Position : GM Treasury Task Grade : E-Band

Area of Specialization: Ensure Eskom has necessary policies, strategies, processes and systems to optimize Eskom’s financial liquidity through providing an effective Treasury function.

Department : Chief Financial Officer Business Unit : Office of the CFO              Location : South Africa (Gauteng)              Reference Number : 041120191 Closing Date : Monday, 11 November 2019

 

(c) The Eskom recruitment and selection process make provision for a subject matter expect to form part of an interview panel. Ms Ramos was brought in on this basis.

None of the candidates of the candidates interviewed expressed discomfort or objected to discomfort with the composition of the interview panel.

21 September 2020 - NW1746

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Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1) Whether his department and/or the entities reporting to him currently provide free basic electricity under programmes other than the Free Basic Electricity programme; if not, why not; if so, (a) to whom and (b) what are the relevant details; (2) whether the installation and maintenance of electricity prepaid meters would be (a) subsidised or (b) free under certain parameters; if not, why not; if so, (i) under what parameters and (ii) what are the relevant details; (3) whether his department and/or the entities reporting to him prescribe electricity tariffs and rates to municipalities in order to ensure that the most vulnerable and indigent communities receive free basic electricity; if not, why not; if so, (a) in what manner and (b) what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) No the Department of Public Enterprises and its entities do not provide free basic electricity under programmes other than the Free Basic Electricity (FBE) programme.

(1)(a) Not applicable (1)(b) Not applicable

(2)(a) Under the FBE programme, installation and maintenance of electricity prepaid meters is not subsidised.

(2)(a)(i) and (ii) Not applicable

(2)(b)(i) and (ii) The installation of electricity prepaid meters is free under the Government’s Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP). INEP is funded by the Department of Mineral Resources and Energy as per the Division of Revenue Act, 2013 (Act No.2 of 2013) schedule 6.

Eskom maintains prepaid electricity meters. Eskom has a maintenance budget for repairs and maintenance for its infrastructure and this is allocated from the tariff.

(3) Eskom does not prescribe electricity tariffs and rates to any of its customers but charge all its customers tariffs approved by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA). The Electricity Regulation Act prohibits Eskom from charging its customers any other tariffs other than those approved by NERSA.

(3) (a) Not Applicable

(3) (b) Not Applicable

09 September 2020 - NW1891

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether the Chief Executive Officer of Transnet intends to sell the assets of Transnet to the private sector; if not, what is the position in this regard, if so, (a) which assets will be sold, (b) what process is followed to decide which assets should be sold and (c) what are the reasons that Transnet is selling its assets?

Reply:

According to the information received from Transnet

No, Transnet is not planning to sell assets to the private sector. However, it is in the process of considering how its asset base is best positioned to deliver on the requirements of the business. We are however looking for opportunities to partner with the private sector. This is in order to promote economic transformation and to mobilise private sector capital for important projects.

(a) Not applicable

(b) Not applicable

(c) Not applicable

09 September 2020 - NW1204

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)(a) At what stage are the negotiations with the unions regarding the unbundling of Eskom into three separate subsidiaries, and (b) which unions are involved in the process?(2) How will (a) the outstanding debt of Eskom be accrued to each of the three potential subsidiaries, and (b) Eskom debit to creditors be secured prior to the unbundling process?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

(1)(a) In terms of the Collective Agreement, Eskom engages with organised labour at various

participative structures. National structures include - Strategic Forum, Central Consultative Forum and Central Bargaining Forum. There are also Group Structures and Business Unit Level. The purpose of these structures is for Eskom to engage (share information, consult and bargain) with organised labour on matters that have direct impact on the employee’s conditions of employment in line with legal prescripts.

Post the publication of the Eskom Roadmap in October 2019, Eskom has had two formal consultative meetings with the leadership of NUM, NUMSA and Solidarity where Eskom shared the Strategic Turnaround Plan and Operating Model, the latter detailing the divisionalisation plans in support of the Eskom Roadmap. The table below lists engagements that have taken place as well as those planned.

Eskom is also party to the NEDLAC process where only NUM is in attendance as prescribed by the NEDLAC regulations.

Consultative Forum

Dates of past meetings

Discussions

Organised labour representation

Planned meetings

Strategic Forum (SF)

26 May 2020

Eskom shared the Eskom Strategic Turnaround Plan and Operating Model.

NUM/NUMSA/Solidarity leadership.

The engagements are targeted at Secretary General level.

26 November 2020

 

21 July 2020

A follow up meeting to engage further on issues tabled at the meeting.

   

Central  Consultative Forum (CCF)

-

The Eskom Turnaround Plan as shared at the Strategic form meetings of 26 May and 21 July.

NUM/NUMSA/Solidarity

The engagements are targeted at local leadership.

The CCF meeting is scheduled to take place on 22 September 2020. With another meeting scheduled for 3 December 2020.

NEDLAC

15 October 2019

4 December 2019

11 February 2020

The Roadmap for Eskom in a reformed electricity supply industry 2019

As per NEDLAC’s prescribed regulations.

Dates and agenda is set by NEDLAC.

(1)(b)The recognised trade unions at Eskom are National Union of Metalworkers of South Africa

(NUMSA), National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) and Solidarity.

(2)(a)In line with the divisionalisation decision, proforma financial statements: income statement

and balance sheet, etc. have been formulated for each of the units to enable proper performance monitoring by the established divisional boards. However, the decision on the group debt remains an outstanding matter and a solution will be finalised before the debt is allocated to each division and prior to attainment of the legal separation.

(2)(b) The decision on a long term solution will include engaging and reaching agreement with

the creditors, after taking into account the regulatory methodology and the profitability of the proposed subsidiaries. It would be premature at this stage to provide a definitive decision on this matter, as the work has not been concluded.

09 September 2020 - NW1887

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the reasons that a certain person (name furnished) was appointed as the Chairperson of the Eskom Pension Fund when a letter of appointment for the same position was already drafted and sent to another person (name furnished)?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

The term of the Eskom Pension and Provident Fund (EPPF) Board, ofwhich Ms Mantuka Maisela was the Chairperson, expired on 31 May 2020. However, because the governance process was not in place on 31 May 2020 and Eskom did not want to be the cause of a non-constituted Board, which had been a finding of the Financial Sector Conduct Authority (FSCA) against the EPPF previously, Ms Maisela and the other two trustees were appointed to avoid such an occurrence.

The appointment letters were drafted to appoint them for a full term because the rules of the Fund did not provide for temporary appointments, but for replacements, where Eskom had the right to replace an employer board member at any time on reasonable grounds.

In a letter dated 29 May 2020, Ms Maisela was informed that her appointment was subject to the finalisation of the governance process and that it was to be read in conjunction with rule 3.5(1) of the EPPF rules, which provides that an employer board member could be replaced by Eskom at any time on reasonable grounds.

Eskom followed an appointment process for the EPPF Chairperson position with the assistance of an executive search company. Shortlisted candidates were interviewed by an Eskom panel that consisted of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO), Senior Manager Human Resources, and Recruitment Manager, and all internal governance processes were adhered to. Ms Maisela was not part of the process because she was not shortlisted.

In its decision not to extend Ms Maisela’s appointment, Eskom also considered the fact that Ms Maisela had acted in various roles on the EPPF Board since 2004, which made a total of 16 years, for 12 of which she had been appointed by Eskom. This tenure considerably exceeded the recommended period for a non-executive director in terms of governance processes.

Eskom took the above into consideration and decided that it would not be in the interest of good governance for the EPPF and Eskom to reappoint Ms Maisela as the Chairperson of the EPPF Board.

The CFO recommended the successful candidate’s name to the Group Chief Executive (GCE), and the GCE, in consultation with the Chairman of the Board, recommended the appointment to the People and Governance Committee (P&G), a subcommittee of the Board, for approval. The P&G approved the submitted name and recommended approval of the appointment by the Minister. It must be noted that this is merely a formality as the Minister is not involved in the process identifying new members of the Board. There were delays in soliciting the P&G approval due to the lockdown. The P&G recommendation reached the Minister on 15 May 2020.The Minister approved the recommended candidate on 9 June 2020. Eskom appointed the Chairperson with effect from 1 July 2020, and the name was submitted to the EPPF Board for final approval.

The EPPF Board approved the appointment of Ms Caroline Henry on 15 July 2020, and therefore, Eskom did not have authority to extend Ms Maisela’s appointment beyond 30 June 2020.

It should be noted that Ms Maisela was not the only trustee who was replaced in terms of rule 3.5(1) of the EPPF rules on 30 June 2020, as she was replaced along with two other trustees.

09 September 2020 - NW1892

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Mkhaliphi, Ms HO to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What qualifications do certain persons (names furnished) hold; (2) whether the qualifications of the specified persons were verified; if not, why not; if so, which institutions were used to verify their qualifications?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

(a) and (b)

The table below captures the details requested for each person.

Title

Initials and surname

Designation

Qualification

Verification by

Mr

A M

de Ruyter

Group Chief Executive

  • Bachelor of Arts in English and Psychology - (University of Pretoria)
  • Bachelor of Civil Law - (University of Pretoria)
  • Bachelor of Law - (University of South Africa)
  • Master of Business Administration - (Nijenrode University - Netherlands)

Lexis RefCheck

Mr

C

Cassim

Chief Financial Officer

  • Bachelor of Commerce - (University of Natal)
  • Honours Bachelor of Accounting Science - (University of South Africa)
  • Masters in Business Leadership – (University of South Africa)
  • Member of the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants

Internal recruitment department - 2006

Title

Initials and surname

Designation

Qualification

Verification by

Mr

J A

Oberholzer

Chief Operating Officer

  • Bachelor’s degree in Electrical Engineering - (University of Pretoria)
  • Master of Business Leadership - (University of South Africa)
  • Executive Leadership Programme - (University of Michigan – USA)
  • Electrical Engineering Certificate of Competency (SA)

Internal recruitment department
Previously employed by Eskom since 1983

Mr

N

Harris

Senior Manager: Information Management

  • Bachelor of Commerce Education - (Rand Afrikaans University)
  • Diploma in Data Metrics - (University of South Africa)
  • Master of Business Leadership – Brunel University, UK – (Henley Management College)

Internal recruitment department.

Previously employed by Eskom since 1982

Mr

R

Vaughan

General Manager: Treasury

  • Bachelor of Commerce – (Rhodes University)
  • Higher Diploma in Accountancy - (Rhodes University)
  • Member of the South African Institute of Chartered Accountants

LexisNexis Risk Management

27 August 2020 - NW1572

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Maotwe, Ms OMC to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What numbers of persons have been appointed at Eskom on the basis of (a) race, (b) position, (c) qualification, (d) salary level, (e) experience and (f) gender since the appointment of the Chief Executive Officer at Eskom, Mr André de Ruyter?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom:

As at 13 July 2020, Eskom appointed 139 employeessince the appointment of the Group Chief Executive, Mr André de Ruyter.

The breakdown is as follows:

  • 25 external appointments, of which 18 were T-Systems employees who were transferred into Eskom in accordance to Section 197 of the Labour Relations Act, 1995. Only 7 were true external recruits.
  • 114 were appointed on Fixed Term Contracts.

Annexure A provides details, according to (a) race, (b) position, (c) qualification, (d) salary level, (e) experience and (f) gender.

21 August 2020 - NW522

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

Whether all of the SA Airways Group Companies including (a) SA Airways SOC (Limited), (b) Mango Airlines SOC (Limited), (c) Air Chefs SOC (Limited), (d) SAA Technical SOC (Limited) and (e) SA Airways City Centre SOC (Limited), but not exclusively, are under business rescue; if not, why not?

Reply:

The only company in business rescue is South African Airways SOC Limited (SAA).

SA Airways City Centre SOC (Limited) has been placed in voluntary liquidation before the business rescue proceedings.

None of the other companies in the group are in business rescue as the boards have not placed the companies under voluntary business rescue, nor has any other process in terms of the Companies Act been given effect to.

21 August 2020 - NW1544

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Zungula, Mr V to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether he will disclose the recipient(s) of the R5 billion allegedly paid to an Eskom service provider by mistake; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) What steps has he taken to: (a) Bring those persons responsible for the reckless conduct to book and (b) Retrieve the R5 billion?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

1. The R5.5 billion is the total value of Eskom’s claim against Tegeta Resources and Exploration, which is in business rescue.

Relevant details are as follows:

Tegeta is a company owned by Oakbay which is a Gupta related company. Tegeta owns the Optimum coal mine.

The Business rescue proceedings of the Optimum coal mine commenced in February 2018 when the Optimum Board of Directors resolved to place the company under voluntary business rescue and proceeded to file a notice of commencement of business rescue proceedings with the Companies and Intellectual Property Commission on 19 February 2018. The Optimum coal mine had been supplying coal to Hendrina Power Station.

Eskom has submitted a claim of approximately R5.5 billion against Optimum in these proceedings, composed of undelivered coal and poor quality of delivered coal:

A. pre - commencement (of business rescue) September 2016 to January, 2018 = R1,1 billion ( 1,1 million tons)

B. post – commencement (of business rescue process) February, 2018 to December, 2018

= R4.4 billion (3.8 million tons of Coal)

At a meeting of creditors convened on 10 December 2019, the quantum of Eskom’s claim was challenged and it was resolved to refer Eskom’s claim for determination by an independent expert. Creditors contended that Eskom’s claim is inflated and as such Eskom should not have been afforded voting rights on the contingent and disputed part of its claim in Optimum. Eskom’s disputed claim was determined by way of an expedited arbitration presided over by retired judge Fritz Brand, jointly appointed by the creditors.

At the arbitration hearing held in March 2020, the majority of creditors (excluding Oakbay – also a creditor in Optimum), Eskom and the BRPs reached an agreement regarding the quantum of Eskom’s claims. Eskom’s claim, both pre- and-post-business rescue, was determined to be the sum of R1 276 031 278.48 (one billion two hundred and seventy six million thirty one thousand two hundred and seventy eight rand and forty eight cents). Eskom’s voting share was determined at 24% to be exercised by Eskom in any manner it wishes to do.

Current Status of BR proceedings:

During the arbitration hearing in March it was also agreed that the revised business rescue plan would be published on or before the 2 April 2020. It was further agreed that the meeting of creditors, to vote on the preferred offer and adopt the business rescue plan, would be convened on or about 20 April 2020. The BRPs did not publish the plan in April due to the 2 remaining bidders, namely Lurco and IZM, failing to secure funding to acquire the mine.

In light of the above, in May 2020 the BRPs invited other prospective bidders to submit proposals to acquire the mine. Bids were submitted mid-June 2020 and the BRPs are currently reviewing the offers received from the 3 bidders. Eskom currently awaits the outcome of the review. Preferred bidders will be incorporated in the revised BR plan to be published in due course.

Towards the end of June 2020, the BRPs also received an alternative proposal to rescue the mine. The alternative offer was submitted by Centaur Ventures Ltd, one of the largest creditors of Optimum. According to the BRPs, the alternative plan, if supported by the BRPs and creditors, will also be incorporated in the revised business rescue plan and be triggered in the event that the preferred bidders fail to secure sufficient funding to acquire the assets. Eskom has not yet been furnished with the alternative proposal for consideration.

The BRPs have not committed to a specific date for publication of the revised business rescue plan. In the event that the revised plan is published end July, 2020 then the meeting of creditors for purposes of voting and adopting the plan would have to be convened early August i.e. within 10 days of the date of publication of the plan.

2. (a) Not applicable.

(b) As explained in (1) above, Eskom submitted a claim in the business rescue proceedings which are still underway.

21 August 2020 - NW1681

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Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What: (a) are the details of the current age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom and (b) amount of the debt is made up of (i) principal debt, (ii) interest and (iii) penalties ineach case?

Reply:

According to the information received from Eskom

a) The total debt owed by municipalities as at June 2020 is R43.9 billion, of which R30.9 billion is overdue debt. The details of the age analysis of the total debt owed by each municipality to Eskom, as at June 2020 are set out in Annexure A.

b) (i) and (ii) The total debt of R43.9 billion, is made up of the capital amounts of R32.4 billion, interest of R6.7 billion and VAT of R4.8 billion. The makeup of total debt in terms of capital and interest for each municipality, as at June 2020 is set out in Annexure A.

c) (iii) The total Notified Maximum Demand (NMD) exceedance charge for June 2020 is R46.9 million and R104 million for the financial year to date. This is a penalty for NMD exceedance raised in terms of the NMD Rules approved by the National Energy Regulator of South Africa (NERSA) to discourage future exceedances and is included in the capital amount. The NMD exceedance charge, for each municipality as at June 2020 is set out in Annexure B.

24 July 2020 - NW1154

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Wessels, Mr W to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether his department purchased any goods and/or services below the amount of R500 000 connected to the Covid-19 pandemic; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) is the name of each company from which the specified goods and/or services were purchased, (b) is the amount of each transaction and (c) was the service and/or product that each company rendered;

Reply:

Goods and services were procured in relation to Covid-19 pandemic and the information is indicated in the table below.

(a) Name of the budiness

(b) Amount

(c) Service/ Product

Biologica Pharmaceuticals

R26 650.00

Mask surgical

Tripple N Medical

R2 044.00

Mask surgical

Ekhaya Investments

R11 500.00

Mask cloth

Evergreen Latex

R2 517.20

Gloves surgical and examination natural rubber

Lechoba Medicals

R15 187.50

Hand Sanitizers

Promed Technologies

R2 700.00

Disinfectant surface

Promed Technologies

R3 600.00

Temperature scanners

Multisurge

R4 600.00

Temperature scanners

Recreative Creativity

R27 950.00

Dispenser wipes

Oks iInvestment 2009

R89 700.00

Fumigation/ Building sanitization

Bizmak Trading

R17 000.00

Hand sanitizer dispensers

 

R39 000.00

Hand spray sanitizer

 

R6 000.00

Face shield

(2) Whether there was any deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures in the specified transactions; if so, (a) why and (b) what are the relevant details in each case;

Answer:

There was no deviation from the standard supply chain management procedures.

(3)        What were the reasons that the goods and/or services were purchased from the specified companies;

Answer:

Businesses awarded through request for quotations met the specifications and their prices were the cheapest as compared to other competitors.

08 June 2020 - NW524

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Lees, Mr RA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What are the details of (a) all government guarantees (i) issued to the SA Airways (SAA) and (ii) utilised by SAA and (iii) for what purpose have they been utilised, (b) all SAA loan debt liabilities including the (i) name of each lender, (ii) amount owed to each lender, (iii) interest rates charged by each lender and (iv) repayment date of each loan, (c) all current liabilities including the (i) name of creditor, (ii) amount owed to each creditor and (iii) due date for payment to each creditor and (d) all non-current liabilities excluding loan debt as at 29 February 2020?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Business Rescue Practitioners of South African Airways: see the link

https://pmg.org.za/files/RNW524-SAA.docx 

 

08 June 2020 - NW234

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Van Minnen, Ms BM to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)       In view of his confirmation to the Standing Committee on Public Accounts on 19 February 2020 that each state-owned entity (SOE) must be evaluated for viability, (a) by what date will the process of evaluating the 131 SOEs commence, (b) who will be carrying out the evaluation and (c) what will be the criteria for such evaluations; (2) (a) what does his department intend to achieve with the evaluations and (b) how will the evaluations be connected to the financial viability of the SOEs; (3) how does he intend to deal with SOEs that are found not to be adding value and/orthat are not financially viable?

Reply:

(1)

Government as a whole is concerned about the number of state-owned enterprises and entities, and their respective governance operational and financial status. A process of review has been discussed and the relevant departments are establishing which entities can be merged, closed or retained. This will be an on-going process with regular reports to government.

Once the Presidential SOC Council begins its work, further measures and initiatives will be put in place.

(2)

As above:

In addition, Boards as the accounting authority in terms of the PFMA, will also be responsible for ensuring operational performance and financial viability of entities.

(3)

Government, in consultation with the relevant Departments, will determine the response to financial and other issues. The example of restructuring of Eskom as a result of the governance, operational and financial challenges arising from corruption and state capture.

Government initiated a process to change the business model, restructure the generation, transmission and distribution components with a view to better transparency, and focus on operational performance and financial efficacy.

The repositioning of state owned entities will continue to receive intense focus – particularly, ensure that dependence on the fiscus is stopped.

08 June 2020 - NW126

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Shivambu, Mr F to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)What total amount have certain persons (names furnished) been paid since their appointment as business rescue practitioners for the SA Airways (SAA); (2) whether the specified business rescue practitioners benefited from the Development Bank of Southern Africa equity bridge loan facility to SAA; if so, (a) what amount did they get paid for that specified intervention and (b) how are they paid?

Reply:

The following information was provided by the Business Rescue Practitioners of the South African Airways Response:

1. The business rescue practitioners have been paid in accordance with the hours worked and set down rate for business rescue practitioners. The amounts paid to Matuson & Associates and Adamantem as at 26 May 2020 are as follows:

Matuson and Associates – R22 208, 689

Adamantem (Pty) Ltd – R14 002,112

(2) The business rescue practitoners did not benefit from the intervention relating to the DBSA bridge facility, other than payment in the normal course of the business rescue process done based on hours spent on the transaction and set down rate for that practitioner.

08 June 2020 - NW85

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Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

What is the total number of (a) persons who are currently employed at each state-owned entity and/or public enterprise and (b) what number of the specified employees at state-owned entities or enterprises are appointed at (i) senior and (ii) middle management levels (2) What is the average remuneration package of employees appointed at (a) senior management and (b) middle management levels at state-owned entities or enterprises; (3) What is the current total amount spent on salaries for senior and middle management managers at state-owned entities or enterprises? NW91E

Reply:

According to the information received from Alexkor

(1)(a)

The number of employees are currently employed at ALEXKOR is 205 as at end of December 2019.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

12

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

9

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R3 323 538,75

(b)

Middle Management

R1 411 488,89

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

R15 617 673,20

(b)

Middle Management

R4 873 830,00

 

According to the information received from Denel:

(1)(a) As at February 2020 the total workforce of Denel is 3426.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

45

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

700

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R2,653,454m

(b)

Middle Management

R958,088m

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

R76,771,451m

(b)

Middle Management

R684,391,669m

REPLY:

According to the information received from Eskom

(1)(a)

The number of employees are currently employed at Eskom is 45353 as at end of December 2019.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

372

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

6734

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R1 846 032

(b)

Middle Management

R1 144 138

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

R686 723 910

(b)

Middle Management

R7 616 533 256

 

According to the information received from SAFCOL

(1)(a)

The number of employees are currently employed at Safcol is 1479 as at end of December 2019.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

7

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

82

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R 131 726/ 1580 712 p/a

(b)

Middle Management

R 80 977/ 971 724 p/a

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

Middle Management

R 7 643 211/ 91 718 532/pa

(b)

   

 

According to the information received from SAX

(1)(a)

The number of employees are currently employed at SAX is 671 as at end of December 2019.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

81

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

43

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R1 093 485 per annum

(b)

Middle Management

R598 330 per annum

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

Middle Management

R16 828 815.00.

(b)

   

 

According to the information received from Transnet:

(1)(a)

The number of employees are currently employed at Transnet is 58051 as at end of December 2019.

 

Level

Number of employees

(1)(b)(i)

Senior Management

1041

(1)(b)(ii)

Middle Management

5296

(2)

 

Level

Average remuneration

(a)

Senior Management

R 1 522 753

(b)

Middle Management

R 758 755

(3)

 

Level

Amount Salary Spent

(a)

Senior Management

Middle Management

R5.6 billion p/a

(b)

   

Response from SAA is still outstanding and will be submitted as soon as the information becomes available.

08 June 2020 - NW878

Profile picture: Brink, Mr C

Brink, Mr C to ask the Minister of Public Enterprises

(1)Whether his department will offer any form of Covid-19 financial or other relief to small businesses; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether the Covid-19 financial or other relief will only be allocated to qualifying small businesses according to the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment Act, Act 53 of 2003, as amended; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) on what statutory grounds and/or provisions does he or his department rely to allocate Covid-19 financial or other relief only to small businesses according to the specified Act and (b) what form of Covid-19 financial or other relief, if any, will be made available to other small businesses?

Reply:

The government has put in place a support package for small businesses.

The Department of Small Business Development will provide the details of the support available. The support, is available from various departments, for example: Agriculture and Tourism