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30 October 2020 - NW2178

Profile picture: Singh, Mr N

Singh, Mr N to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

(1) What total number of households (a)(i) nationally and (ii) provincially have benefited from the Integrated National Electrification Programme (INEP) over the past five financial years and (b) who initially benefited from infrastructure under the mixed development category, no longer qualify for subsidisation of INEP and free basic electricity; (2) what is (a) total number of electricity meters have been installed under the INEP programme in the past financial year and (b) total amount is still outstanding for the installation of the electricity meters?

Reply:

(1)(a)

(i) The total number of households electrified over the past five financial years is 1,266,240.

(ii) Provincial breakdown of number of indigent households electrified in last 5 years:

(b) The Mixed Developer Policy Guideline was introduced in October 2018. Before this date, all applications received by the Department on mixed developer projects were treated as normal Bulk and Households applications. Funding for infrastructure under the mixed development category is provided for on a pro-rata basis based on the percentange consumption of indegent customers within the development. If the percentage power consumption of indegent customers within the development is 70% and above, the bulk infrastructure qualifies for fullfunding through the INEP Grant.

All indigent customers qualify for free basic electricity as per the Free Basic Electricity policy.

(2)

(a) A total of 214 517 households were electrified in the past financial and these households have electricity meters installed.

(b) No outstanding meter installations have been reported by our electrification programme implementing agents (Eskom and Municipalities).

30 October 2020 - NW1935

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether her department allocated R3,5 million for the maintenance and renovation of the Malembe Guest House in the Mopani District; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, why does her department not upgrade other established facilities which have more rooms available to quarantine repatriated South Africans?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure(DPWI) has established the referred property and according to the Deeds Office’s property report belongs to the Provincial Government of the Limpopo Province (See Annexure 1).Therefore, DPWI would not spend any maintenance or renovation costs to any property belonging to the provincial department.

30 October 2020 - NW1848

Profile picture: Tafeni, Ms N

Tafeni, Ms N to ask the Ms N Tafeni (EFF)asked the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructuree

(1) Whether her department owns the land next to the East London Airport where houses were demolished; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department went to court to obtain an order to demolish the houses; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. The Remainder of Portion 1 of the farm Grey-Dell No. 871, East London Registration Division as depicted on S.G.-diagram 1288/1900 and registered vide deed of transfer T409/1952 in the name of the National Government of the Republic of South Africa.

The property is 271, 9114 ha in extent and is commonly known as Bongweni.The property falls under the custodianship of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) in terms of the State Land Disposal Act, Act 48 of 1961.

2. Yes, the DPWI approached the HighCourt for intervention by taking legal action against the erection of illegal structures and this was granted on the 16th March 2017. In line with the Court Order, only unoccupied structures and structures under construction were demolished.

The demolition is in line with a Court Order that permits the landowner to prevent the illegal invasion of its property. This was a joint operation between DPWI, South African Police Service and Sheriff of the Court.

The illegal structures are within a restricted area in the direct flight path to/from East London Airport which also constitutes a serious risk to residents.

30 October 2020 - NW2168

Profile picture: Groenewald, Dr PJ

Groenewald, Dr PJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)Whether, in accordance with lockdown regulations with regard to travelling across international borders, any authorisation was given to the passengers who made use of a Falcon 900 airplane (VIP) from the SA National Defence Force on 8 September 2020 for a flight to Zimbabwe; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the full names of each passenger and (b) in accordance with which requirement of Chapter 5, clause 59(2) of Level 2 regulations was authorisation given to each respective Passenger; (2) will he be prepared to make a statement on the matter?

Reply:

Honourable member, the matter pertaining to the trip of passengers who made use of falcon 900 airplane from the South African National Defence Force on 08 September 2020 for a flight to Zimbabwe, were dealt with by the President of the country. He took a decision to sanction the Minister of Defence because there were irregularities in the manner in which the trip was undertaken under her stewardship. After the action by the President, I regard the matter as closed except that the Public Protector is doing her own investigations.

END

30 October 2020 - NW1943

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the details of the Sneeuwitjie Creche in Nieu-Bethesda that is part of the Non-State Sector Extended Public Works Programmes (EPWP) run by the Independent Development Trust and her department in terms of the (i) normal non-sector EPWP programme, (ii) Youth EPWP Covid-19 programme, and (iii) Non-State Sector EPWP School Cleaning programme, (b) on what date did the non-profit organisation commence with the programme, (c) what total number of beneficiaries are on the programme, (d) what are the rates paid to the beneficiaries, (e) what number of days do the beneficiaries work each month and (f) have the beneficiaries been issued with Protective Personal Equipment in each programme?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) as follows:

(a) (i) The NPO was appointed in October 2019 to implement the EPWP NSS NPO Programme for a period of two financial years ending 31 March 2021. The budget allocation for 2019/2020 financial year was R2 463 840.22

(ii) As at 14 August 2020, a total of 126 work opportunities were created, of which 116 (93%) are youth as shown in the table below.

Table 1: Breakdown of overall work opportunities created

Dr. Beyers Naude

103 (including Gender-Based Violence)

Blue Crane Route

9

Sundays River Valley

14

(iii) The Non-State Sector did not participate in the EPWP School Cleaning programme. The latter is implemented by provincial departments responsible for education function.Hence the NPO did not participate in the aforementioned programme.

(b) The Non-Profit Organisations (NPOs) Programme was first introduced as part of the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) in the 2009/10 financial year, and has since then been implementedby the Independent Development Trust. In 2020/21 financial year, 189 of the 339NPOs started implementing the EPWP COVID-19 project in support of the Department of Health Public Health Hygiene Strategy with effect from 01 June 2020.The implementationis currently under way through district municipalities and primary health care facilities in provinces.

(c) To date, 19 794 participants (i.e. 1 June – 31 July 2020) have been deployed to work at various sites, primarily within communities to demonstrate on how to wash hands, construct tippy taps, cleaning of public places such as taxi ranks and others.

(d) Guided by the EPWP Ministerial Determination, participants are paid a daily wage rate of R101.00 per person day of work.

(e) Participants work 7 days in a fortnight, that is, they work 4 days in week 1 and 3 days in the following week. Therefore all participants should work 14 days a month. However, the work schedule may be amended, as required.

(f) Personal Protective Equipment’s (PPEs) have been made available for all participants. It was recently discovered that some participants were not fully complying with the regulations linked to PPEs. This was raised with the Implementing Agent to be corrected immediately.

30 October 2020 - NW2159

Profile picture: Graham, Ms SJ

Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether she will furnish Ms S J Graham with the details of the role that the Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission (PICC) played in (a) the BeitBridge Border Fence project, (b) the determination of quarantine sites and (c) any other interventions within the purview of the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI); if not, why not; if so, what are the details of (i)(aa) which officials were involved, (bb) the scope of their involvement, (cc) the duration of their involvement and (dd) why they were seconded and/or used instead of DPWI officials and (ii) any cost to the DPWI for the interventions by the PICC?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(a) The Presidential Infrastructure Co-ordinating Commission Technical Task Team (PICC TTT) provided technical support during the investigation of BeitBridge BorderFence project.

(b) The PICC has a Geographical Information System (GIS) and geo-spacing capability

that was used to list and relocate sites proposed for quarantine. This list wasprovided to the Department of Health to conduct inspections and operationalize sitesas may be deemed necessary during the Covid-19 response.

(c) A specialist from the PICC TTT has been appointed as part of the IDT Exit Strategy TaskTeam that was tasked with investigating the sustainability of the IDT.

(i)

(aa) PICC TTT officials that provided technical support during the investigation of theBeitBridge project were Mr Tshepo Chuene, Mr Thabang Tladi, Mr MuzwandileButhelizi and Dr Hilton Macdonald.

(bb) The scope of the technical evaluation during the investigation focused on three keyaspects of the project, namely the contractual matters as related to the GeneralConditions of Contracts (GCC), analysis of the contract scope and costs ascontained in the Bills of Quantities (BoQ) as well as observations made during aproject site visit on 05 May 2020. This included:

  • Reviewing contractual matters as captured in project documents, including themotivation and conditions for the accelerated appointment of both the Contractorand Principal Agent. The review team also checked whether those conditions inthe appointment contracts were upheld / adhered to;
  • Analysing and comparing the rates of the 2016 BoQ with those of March 2020,in order to verify the compliance to the conditions set out in the motivation forthe emergency appointment of the Contractor and Principal Agent;
  • Developing an independent BoQ to determine a fair price of the contract,through the team’s own market research, site visit observations and analysis ofcontract documents; and
  • Assessing fitness for purpose and the quality of work of the implemented fencesolution, to effectively secure the 40km stretch of the border between SouthAfrica and Zimbabwe.

(cc) The duration of the Technical Task Team’s evaluation was an estimated 65 ours.

(dd) As departmental officials were involved in the implementation of the project andpossible conflict interest, the Department used an independent team to assist withthe technical aspects of the investigation. The team was complimenting theinvestigating team of the Department with engineering quantity surveying andproject management capabilities. The team is independent as it didn’t participate inthe planning and implementation of the project.

The Department recognised the need to work together with the PICC and SIU onthis investigation in order to enhance the effectiveness of dealing with corruption andmaladministration. The Department further recognised that effective and efficientmutual assistance in this investigation was fundamental to successful investigation,disciplinary proceedings, prosecution of crime and civil proceedings.

(ii) No cost to DPWI.

30 October 2020 - NW1786

Profile picture: Masipa, Mr NP

Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, in view of several job fund schemes that were agreed to with certain commodities groups (names furnished) with the Land Bank providing additional funding and with the Land Bank’s liquidity challenges, she will provide details of (a) her efforts to ensure that emerging beneficiaries who are targeted to receive the intended support do receive the supportand (b) on what date will the Land Bank resume lending to the farmers?

Reply:

(a) The Minister is aware that some commodity groups applied on their own to the Jobs Fund with the Land Bank agreeing to provide additional funding as per their agreement. However, the department was not party to most of those agreements nor was asked to intervene in anyway.

(b) The Minister is not aware of when the Land Bank will resume landing as she has not been advised by the board or management.

30 October 2020 - NW2128

Profile picture: Gondwe, Dr M

Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether the recently commissioned lifestyle audits to be conducted on the (a) Executive Council members of the Eastern Cape, Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal and (b) senior officials in the specified provincial governments, fall within the competence of the State Security Agency; if so, (i) which legislation governs the conducting of such lifestyle audits and (ii) what (aa) exactly will the specified lifestyle audits entail and (bb) is the aim of the lifestyle audits?

Reply:

(i) The conducting of lifestyle audits are implied in the legal prescripts such as those, among others, that govern the enforcement of the provisions in the Prevention of Organised Crime Act, 1998 (Act 121 of 1998)(POCA) and the Prevention and Combatting of Corrupt Activities Act, 2004 (Act 12 of 2004)(PRECCA) by law enforcement agencies, as well as the conducting of vetting by the State Security Agency (SSA).

The SSA is mandated in terms of section 2(1)(b) of the National Strategic Intelligence Act, 1994 (Act 39 of 1994)(NSIA) to fulfil the national counter-intelligence responsibilities and for this purpose to conduct and co-ordinate counter-intelligence and to gather, correlate, evaluate, analyse and interpret information regarding counter-intelligence in order to-

(i) identify any threat or potential threat to the security of the Republic or its people;

(ii) inform the President of any such threat;

(iii) supply (where necessary) intelligence relating to any such threat to the South African Police Service for the purposes of investigating any offence or alleged offence; and

(iv) supply intelligence relating to any such threat to the Department of Home Affairs for the purposes of fulfilment of any immigration function;

(v) supply intelligence relating to any such threat to any other department of State for the purposes of fulfilment of its departmental functions; and

(vi) supply intelligence relating to national strategic intelligence to the National Intelligence Coordinating Committee (NICOC).

The performance of vetting investigations falls squarely within the definition of counter-intelligence in section 1 of the NSIA. Section 2A of the NSIA empowers the SSA to conduct vetting investigations to determine the security competence of a person, if such a person-

(a) is employed by or is an applicant to an organ of state; or

(b) is rendering a service or has given notice of intention to render a service to an organ of state, which service may-

(i) give him or her access to classified information and intelligence in the possession of the organ of state; or

(ii) give him or her access to areas designated national key points in terms of the National Key Points Act, 1980 (Act 102 of 1980).

“Security competence” is defined in section 1 of the NSIA to mean a person's ability to act in such a manner that he or she does not cause classified information or material to fall into unauthorised hands, thereby harming or endangering the security or interests of the State, and is measured against a person's-

(a) susceptibility to extortion or blackmail;

(b) amenability to bribes and susceptibility to being compromised due to his or her behaviour; and

(c) loyalty to the State and the relevant institution”.

Furthermore, the legislative and regulatory framework governing members of the Executive, and the Public Service provides for reporting, mandatory disclosure of financial interests and conflicts of interest, and the referral of cases of non-disclosure, which enable the institutionalisation of lifestyle audits. Where obligations are stipulated in legislation, regulations and Codes of Conduct governing the aforementioned persons, placing a duty on them to disclose personal financial interests and conflicts of interests, misconduct proceedings should be instituted against them for:

(i) failing to disclose personal financial interests or conflicts of interest; or

(ii) making incomplete, incorrect or misleading disclosures of personal financial interests and conflicts of interests.

There are concomitant legal implications for breaches of the relevant legislative and regulatory provisions and Codes of Conduct.

In addition, the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act 1 of 1999)(PFMA) sets the framework for accountable financial administration in the public service. Legislative imperatives on Risk Management that deal specifically with the financial and fraud risk categories are contained in sections 38 to 42 of the PFMA and regulation 3 of the Treasury Regulations, 2005. Section 38(1)(a)(i) of the PFMA requires the all departments, trading entities and constitutional institutions have and maintain effective, efficient and transparent systems of financial and risk management and internal control. Risk management processes, responsibilities and punitive measures for non-compliance are incorporated into the responsibilities of Accounting Officers and Audit Committees, and by extension to all Managers in terms of the provisions of section 45 of the PFMA. Regulation 3.2.1 of the Treasury Regulations requires that:

“The Accounting Officer must facilitate a risk assessment to determine the material risks to which the institution may be exposed and to evaluate the strategy for managing these risks. Such strategy must include a fraud prevention plan. The strategy must be used to direct internal audit effort and priority, and to determine the skills required to manage these risks.”

The internal audit unit must in accordance with regulation 3.2.7 of the Treasury Regulations prepare, in consultation with and for the approval of the audit committee, a rolling three-year strategic internal audit plan based on its assessment of key areas of risk for the institution, having regard to its current operations, those proposed in its strategic plan and its risk management strategy.

Hence, implementing lifestyle audits forms part of a risk management system and strategy, aimed at identifying risks related to unethical conduct, corruption and fraud.

(ii)

(aa) Lifestyle audits are a critical a critical assessment by means of an amalgamation of a variety of information sources in order to compare the subject’s lifestyle with his/her declared income streams. In essence, it is a test to determine whether wealth is commensurate to income.

During vetting investigations, the SSA in terms of the NSIA (section 2A (5), (5A) and (6)), may in the prescribed manner gather information relating to-

(a) criminal records;

(b) financial records;

(c) personal information; or

(d) any other information which is relevant to determine the security clearance of a person:

Provided that where the gathering of information contemplated in paragraphs (c) and (d) requires the interception and monitoring of the communication of such a person, the relevant members shall perform this function in accordance with RICA. Vetting Field Work Units within departments of State may, on request by the SSA, assist the SSA in gathering the information. The head of the SSA or any officials delegated by him or her in writing may, after evaluating the information gathered during the vetting investigation, issue, degrade, withdraw or refuse to grant a security clearance.

In addition, it should be noted that legislative provisions that affect the employee–employer relationship must be considered when conducting lifestyle audits, particularly the Constitution; the Basic Conditions of Employment Act, 1997 (Act 75 of 1997); the Labour Relations Act, 1995 (Act 66 of 1995)(LRA) and its accompanying Codes of Good Practice issued by the Department of Labour.

(bb) Lifestyle audits are utilised as a legitimate fraud prevention and detection mechanism and serve as a tool to understand the financial profile of an individual, in terms of legitimate declared income versus known and observed assets.

30 October 2020 - NW2174

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Marawu, Ms TL to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether, based on Mr Edwin Sodi’s recent testimony at the Judicial Commission of Inquiry into Allegations of State Capture, Corruption and Fraud in the Public Sector including Organs of State, which implicated her Deputy Minister as a beneficiary of Mr Sodi’s company, her Deputy Minister declared the funds he had received in accordance with the requirements of the Executive Members’ Ethics Act, Act 82 of 1998, to the Registrar of Members’ Interest in Parliament; if not, what (a) total number of contracts have been awarded to Mr Sodi’s company under his leadership in his current executive position and (b) is the monetary value of each specified contract so awarded?

Reply:

The Deputy Minister has submitted a Reply in this regard to the Parliament Office of the African Transformation Movement (ATM)

30 October 2020 - NW2189

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What are the full details of the persons who are the delegated officials with regard to the Subdivision of Agricultural Land Act, Act 70 of 1970?

Reply:

The delegations in terms of the Subdivision of Agricultural Land Act, No 70 of 1970 are attached to official posts and not persons. This has been purposefully provided to accommodate any changes arising from resignation and movement of officials without impacting on service delivery. Delegations are assigned to the posts of Director, Chief Director and Deputy Director-General levels as per table below:

SECTION

TYPE OF POWER

POSITION TO WHICH POWERS ARE DELEGATED

1(f) of the definition of agricultural land

To determine which land the Minister may after consultation with the executive committee concerned and by notice in the Gazette excludes from the provisions of this Act.

Non delegable.

3 (a-e)

To consent in writing that an action regarding subdivision of agricultural land which is otherwise prohibited, may be executed.

Chief Director: Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

3 (f)

To consent in writing that an action regarding establishment of a township or enlargement of activities other than agriculture which is otherwise prohibited, may be permitted.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

3(g)

To provide consent in writing regarding public notice to the effect that a scheme relating to agricultural land or any portion thereof has been prepared or submitted under the ordinance in question.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(1)(a)(ii)

To determine the place, form, plans and documentation which must accompany the application for the purpose of section 3 of the act.

Director: Land and Soil Management.

4(2)

To refuse or grant any such application on such conditions.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(3)

To enforce a condition in terms of section 4 (2.)

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

4(4)

To vary or withdraw any condition imposed by section 4 (2)(b), and if it has been registered against the title deed of the land, direct that it is varied or cancelled.

Deputy Director General: Agricultural Production, Health and Food Safety, Natural Resourcesand Disaster Management

6A (1) (a) (aA) (b) (2)

To give consent for the registration of servitudes over agricultural land and subdivision.

Chief Director: Natural Resources and Disaster Management.

7

To authorise any person to enter upon any land at all reasonable times to carry out thereon investigations or to perform thereon such other acts as are necessary for achieving the objectives of the Act.

Director: Land Use and Soil Management

10

Regulations

Non delegable

30 October 2020 - NW2075

Profile picture: Siwisa, Ms AM

Siwisa, Ms AM to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

Whether the contractor involved in the Beitbridge project is doing any other work for her department; if so, which projects is the company involved in?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that the contractor for Beitbridge Project, Caledon River Properties (Pty) Ltd T/A Magwa Construction, is involved with the following projects:

STATUS

STATUS DESCRIPTION

AWARD AMOUNT

AWARD DATE

PRACTICAL COMPLETION DATE

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

1,619,160.24

12/1/2006

1/28/2010

VARIOUS CENTRES: NORTH WEST, LABOUR CENTRE, POTCHESTROOM: RAMP FOLLOW ON CONTRACT: GROUP E

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,808,523.40

1/20/2009

2/19/2012

MEMEL, MAGISTRATE'S OFFICE, REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE PROGRAM

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

4,818,673.03

3/24/2010

3/28/2013

MOKOPANE, MAGISTRATE'S OFFICE, RAMP: FOLLOW-ON CONTRACT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

18,516,513.68

2/9/2007

2/7/2010

BRAY, BORDER POSTS , BOSHOEK AND MAKOPONG: RAMP OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE AND ELECTRICAL WORK

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

10,319,747.00

8/30/2007

11/30/2010

MANANGA, BORDER POST , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,898,927.68

9/6/2010

3/5/2014

GLENCOE, PRISON , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

6,776,392.33

3/19/2010

9/18/2013

NEWCASTLE, EKUSENI YOUTH DEVELOPMENT CENTRE , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

5,468,679.18

12/8/2010

11/9/2016

MANANGA, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL, MECHANICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

15,062,097.24

1/28/2011

7/14/2016

RAMATLABAMA, BRAY AND MAGOBISTAD, BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

17,411,120.42

1/25/2011

7/14/2016

SWARTKOP, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

3,340,148.70

3/11/2011

11/10/2016

KOSI BAY, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

20,234,569.08

12/11/2013

3/15/2017

SKILPADHEK, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

8

PROJECT COMPLETE

11,898,484.38

2/3/2012

10/4/2017

MAHAMBA, BOTHASHOOP AND EMAHLATHINI, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL INFRASTRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS AND MECHANICAL EQUIPMENT

7

FINAL DELIVERY

5,721,845.82

12/17/2008

12/19/2011

KROONSTAD, PRISON , FOLLOW ON CONTRACT:REPAIR AND MAINTENANCE OF CIVIL WORKS, ROAD, STORMWATER AND SERVICES

7

FINAL DELIVERY

7,986,888.56

9/29/2010

5/28/2012

ZONDERWATER, PRISON , REPAIR, MAINTENANCE AND OPERATIONS OF WATER SEWERAGE SERVICE

7

FINAL DELIVERY

15,612,816.42

1/30/2012

1/31/2017

MASERU BRIDGE, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND UPGRADING OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL INSTALLATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

6A

PRACTICAL COMPLETION

37,328,167.98

6/23/2016

10/22/2019

RAMATLABAMA, KOPFONTEIN AND DERDEPOORT, BORDER POSTS , 36 MONTH MAINTENANCE, SERVICE AND REPAIR OF BUILDINGS, CIVIL, ELECTRICAL AND MECHANICAL INSTALLATIONS AND INFRASTRUCTURE

5B

CONSTRUCTION

67,023,061.83

10/20/2016

 

BEIT BRIDGE, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

34,725,058.92

6/23/2016

 

GROBLERS BRIDGE AND STOCKPOORT, BORDER POST , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

19,638,243.06

3/30/2016

 

BRAY, MOGOBISTAD AND SWARTKOPFONTEIN, BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

30,216,992.15

1/23/2017

 

BORDER POS , BORDER POSTS , MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

36,362,828.52

3/3/2017

 

SKILPADHEK, BORDER POST , 36 MONTHS REPAIRS MAINTENANCE AND SERVICING OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL AND ELECTRICAL INSTALLATIONS

5B

CONSTRUCTION

37,176,843.50

3/18/2020

 

BEIT BRIDGE, BORDER POSTS , BEITBRIDGE BORDERLINE BASE: (PHASE 1) SANDF 40KM BORDERLINE FENCE INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATION ON THE BORDERS BETWEEN ZIMBABWE AND RSA

5B

CONSTRUCTION

16,466,905.20

7/7/2020

 

LPOE: BOESMANSHOEK, ONGELUKSNEK AND RAMATSELISO APPOINTMENT OF A SERVICE PROVIDER FOR THE MAINTENANCE AND REPAIRS OF BUILDING, CIVIL, MECHANICAL, ELECTRICAL INFRASTRUCTURE AND INSTALLATIONS FOR A 36 PERIOD MONTHS

30 October 2020 - NW2186

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether (a) the SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation pay any amounts to financial consultants; if so, what (i) are the full names of the financial consultants, (ii) amounts do the entities pay per month and (iii) total amount paid does each specified entity pay to each specified consultant? NW2755E

Reply:

a) SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee indicated that they do not utilize the services of Financial Consultants

b) The Sports Trust indicated that they do not utilize the services of Financial Consultants. They have a full time Accountant and Assistant Accountant to manage the day-to-day financial functions of The Sports Trust.

c) The following is the status from the federations that responded;

Federations

Responses

Badminton South Africa (Badminton SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Canoeing South Africa (Canoeing SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Cricket South Africa (CSA)

Cricket South Africa indicated that they use consultants for the elite part of pathway (National Teams and High Performance Programme). Nothing from the grant received from the Sports Ministry on Hubs and Development of Girls / Women is used on consultants

Darts South Africa (DSA)

Indicated that DSA does not utilize financial consultants

Karate South Africa (KSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Lifesaving South Africa (LSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Motorsport South Africa (Motorsport SA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Ringball Association of South Africa (RASA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Roller Sport South Africa (RSSA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

Rowing South Africa (Rowing SA)

Rowing South Africa indicated that they do not contract any financial consultants or make any payments to financial consultants

SA Association for the Intellectually Impaired (SAAII)

Sasa-II Indicated that they do not use services of financial consultants

South African Amateur Fencing Association (SAAFA)

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

South African Body Building Federation

Indicated that they do not pay any financial consultants

South African Confederation of Cue Sport (SACCS)

SACCS indicated that they do not pay any amounts to financial consultants

South African Ice Hockey Association (SAIHA)

Indicated that they do not make use of any financial consultants

South African Korfball Federation (SAKF)

South African Korfball Federation indicated that they do not engage any consultants

South African Powerlifting Federation (SAPF)

SA Powerlifting Federation indicated that they do not pay amounts to financial consultants

South African Rugby Union (SARU)

Indicated that they do not procure the services of financial consultants

South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB)

The South African Table Tennis Board (SATTB) indicated that they do not pay any amounts to any financial consultants

South African Tug-of War Federation (SATWF)

The South African Tug-of-War Federation indicated that they do not utilise financial consultants, nor do they pay any consulting fees to consultants

South African Weightlifting Federation (SAWF)

South African Weightlifting indicated that they do not make use of consultants

Squash South Africa (Squash SA)

Squash indicated that they do not pay any consultants. Their Treasurer is an accountant and has his own firm. He does not receive an Honorarium from the Federation

30 October 2020 - NW1925

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and RuralDevelopment

What (a) is her department doing to ensure 2019 winners of Youth in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Awards (i) receive their prize money and (ii) on what date will the prize money be paid out and (b) what has been the cause for the delay in paying out the prize money to the winners?

Reply:

(a)(i) It is regrettable that of the 8 winners,5 will not receive their prize money. The Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development sought approval from National Treasury for the shifting of funds to effect payment of the prize money, but the request was declined and National Treasury further advised the Department to discontinue annual prize awards hosted by the Department due to fiscal constraints. Therefore, the Department is in the process of procuring agricultural equipment and production inputs for the remaining 5 winners of the 2019 #Youth in Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries Awards (YAFF) who did not receive prize money. Of the 5 outstanding prize payments, one of the winners already received his equipment on 19 August 2020.

(ii) No prize money will be paid out to the remaining winners; instead they will receive equipment and agricultural production inputs. The procurement processfor equipment and agricultural production inputs for the remaining 4 winners is at an advanced stage and the Department anticipates concluding the procurement process for the remaining winners by 30 November 2020.

(b) Falls away. Please refer to (a)(i) above.

30 October 2020 - NW2224

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Gondwe, Dr M to ask the Minister of State Security

Whether the State Security Agency has the forensic capabilities to conduct lifestyle audits of the (a) Executive Councils of (i) the Eastern Cape, (ii) Gauteng and (iii) KwaZulu-Natal and (b) senior officials in each specified province; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The State Security Agency possess partial forensic capabilities to conduct lifestyle audits and where there is a lack, collaborate with other organs of state such as the South African Police Services (SAPS), Financial Intelligence Centre (FIC), e.t.c. to compensate the discrepancy.

The lifestyle audit framework currently at the drafting stages will, once completed, lay a foundation of the requisite capabilities to conduct a lifestyle audit.

30 October 2020 - NW2220

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)(a) What type of entity is Infrastructure South Africa (ISA), (b) under which legislative prescript was the ISA established and (c) where in the organogram of her department does the ISA sit; (2) under what legislative prescripts was the appointment of a certain person (name and details furnished) done; (3) whether the organisational structure for the ISA is available; if not, (a) who will draft the organogram and (b) by what date will the organogram be drafted; if so, will she provide Ms S J Graham with a copy of the organogram; (4) whether appointments will be made without an organogram being in place; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details of the position(s) in which appointments will be made (details furnished); (5) (a) where is the funding for the ISA emanating from, (b) how much funding has been allocated to ISA in the current financial year, (c) where is the budget and (d) how is the budget allocated?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

1. (a) ISA was not established as an entity but a function to oversee the implementation of the mandate of Infrastructure. It is part of the National Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (NDPWI) functional organisational structure reporting to the Minister, responsible for PICC & IDMS roles emanating from the National Macro Organisation of Government (NMOG) processes including the urgent need for targeted infrastructure investment.On the 27 May 2020, Cabinet resolved to create Infrastructure South Africa (ISA) to be housed within DPWI to serve the purpose of being a single-entry point and to ensure that DPWI has a system accounting for all infrastructure projects at all levels of government.

(b) Public Service Regulations, 25 (2)(a) states that, based on the strategic plan of the department, an executive authority shall determine the department’s organisational structure in terms of its core mandated and support function. Public Service Act, section 41 stipulates the alignment with the said regulations as well as the role of the Minister of Public Service and Administrations.

(c) The structure depicts ISA at a macro level within the department with the Head of ISA reporting to the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure.

2. Dr Kgosientsho Ramokgopa is appointed in the Presidency on contract. The Ministerrequested the permission of the Presidency to utilize the expertise of Dr Ramokgopa in introducing the functions of Infrastructure within DPWI.

3. The organisational structure of ISA was concluded by the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure and submitted to the Minister of Public Service and Administration for his concurrence in accordance with the Public Service Act and Regulations and approved.

4. No, the Department of Public Service and Administration must approve the organogram, which was done in September 2020. The recruitment process has started.

5. The Department reprioritised the budget to fund the function of ISA which will be subject to approval by National Treasury. For the current financial year, an amount of R23.062 million has reprioritised to provide funding for compensation of employees. Other funding requests such as computers, software licenses, cell phones and office furniture will be procured from the centralised budget under Information and Communication Technology (ICT) and Supply Chain Management (SCM) budgets for goods and services and payments for capital services.

30 October 2020 - NW1726

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

How many hectares of land does the Ingonyama Trust own in KwaZulu-Natal; (2) what percentage of the specified land is considered viable for (a) agriculture, (b) livestock and (c) crop farming in particular; (3) how many hectares of the land is currently being used for (a) subsistence farming and (b) commercial farming; (4) what mechanisms are currently in place to allow occupants of Ingonyama Trust Board land to gain access to financing from (a) the Government and/or (b) commercial banks for agricultural purposes; (5) whether she has found that female farmers have equal access to land rights on Ingonyama Trust Board land as men; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(1) Approximately 2.8million hectares.

(2)(a),(b),(c) No study has been conducted to determine the viability of land.

(3)(a),(b) The Ingonyama Trust Board has not conducted any audit regarding the extent of land being used for subsistence or commercial farming.

(4)(a),(b) The Lease Tenure Instrument issued by the Ingonyama Trust Board (ITB) is accepted by all financial institutions, but has no influence on the funding criteria used by government and/ or commercial banks for agricultural projects.

(5) According to the information from the ITB, Yes every farmer has equal access to ITB land regardless of the gender.

30 October 2020 - NW2194

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Lotriet, Prof A to ask the Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

Whether (a) the SA Sport Confederation and Olympic Committee, (b) the SA Sports Trust and (c) any national federation pay any amounts to financial consultants; if so, what (i) are the full names of the financial consultants, (ii) amounts do the entities pay per month and (iii) total amount paid does each specified entity pay to each specified consultant? NW2755E

Reply:

(a). In instances where geographical names are changed, the costs associated to such changes will relate to the advertisements in local newspapers; venues of local consultation meetings; honoraria paid to the Provincial Geographical Names Committees and the South African Geographical Names Council for their sittings as well as the costs related to the replacing of road information signs by the South African Roads Agency (SANRAL) and affected Municipalities.

Such costs vary depending on process followed, number of consultations etc. Once process is finalised only then can final costs be determined and subsequently be provided to Hon Member.

(b). The South African Geographical Names Council (SAGNC) has not yet received the applications to change the names of (i) East London and (ii) King Williams Town.

30 October 2020 - NW1936

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether her department allocated R2,8 million to the Limpopo Department of Public Works to accommodate 11 technical assistants from Cuba, if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether her department allocated any funding for the accommodation of the Cuban officials; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, from which budget line item was the funding sourced?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) The Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) has not allocated funds to Limpopo Department of Public Works for 11 technical assistants from Cuba. Limpopo Department of Public Works is responsible for the payment of its own technical assistants from Cuba for salaries, accommodation, logistics or any other costs.

(2) Yes, DPWI has allocated funding for the accommodation of the Cuban Officials throughthe Department’s Cuban Technical Advisory programme

30 October 2020 - NW2223

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Sports, Arts and Culture

(a). What (i) is the total amount that was given by FIFA to the 2010 World Cup Trust, (ii) is the total amount that was spent on each specified project, (iii) was the nature of each project and (iv) is the name of each person who is a signatory to the account and (b) how were the projects approved?

Reply:

This is the reply to both question number: 2162 and 2223.

The FIFA 2010 World Cup Legacy indicated the following. That;

a) (i) FIFA donated R450,762,816 to the Legacy Trust. The Legacy Trust held this amount in interest bearing bank accounts.

(ii) The total amounts spent on each project are shown on the Management report. See the attached management report as at the end of August 2020, prepared by the appointed independent financial platform performed by EY South Africa.

(iii) The following is the nature of each project

1. Funding for development projects as identified by SAFA: R392,433,691

2. Funding to SAFA regions : R45,755,000

3. Funding to SAFA Local Football Associations : R10,750,000

4. NGO Funding : R36,079,107

i. Funding to the 20 Football for Hope centres

ii. Funding to NGO’s that use football for social development

5. Bursary allocation to approved beneficiaries within football : R2, 569,886

(iv) The following are persons who are signatory to the account

1. Yusuf Carrim – 2010 FWC Legacy Trust manager

2. Mansoor Parker – ENSafrica (Edward Nathan Sonnenbergs Inc)

(v) The projects are approved as follows;

1. The Legacy Trust’s management team compiles the applications for grant funding which it presents to the Legacy Trust’s board of trustees, the highest decision making body within the Legacy Trust, for approval.

2. The Trustees consider the applications for grant funding and approve (with or without modifications) or reject these applications at their Trustees’ meetings.

 

30 October 2020 - NW1857

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Tshwaku, Mr M to ask the Mr M Tshwaku (EFF)asked the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

What are the reasons that a certain company (name furnished) has been awarded the contract to manage the funeral of Mr A M Mlangeni while it is under investigation by the Standing Committee on Public Accounts for inflating invoices during the funerals of the former President, Mr N R Mandela and Mrs W N Madikizela-Mandela?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that at the time of awarding the bid, the specified company was not restricted from doing business with Government. It was part of six (6) companies that submitted quotations forthe service.

This company could not have been excluded by the Department without following due process for restriction. This could be construed to be anunfair process which may also be irregular on the basis of passing over the highest scoringNational Treasury SCM Instruction Note 3 of 2016/17.

The due process for restriction isoutlined in the Preferential Procurement Regulations 2017 and National Treasury SCMInstruction Note 3 of 2016/17. The Department has issued an internal Circular No 40 of2019 to establish a Restriction Committee and provide Standard Operating Procedures togive effect to the above-mentioned Prescripts.

The matter of restricting Crocia Events has subsequently served at the duly constitutedRestriction Committee and Crocia has been given 14 days to provide reasons why theDepartment must not recommend their restriction to the National Treasury.

30 October 2020 - NW2048

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Graham, Ms SJ to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)In light of the fact that small, medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) demand between 10% and 15% Preliminary and General (P&Gs) over and above the 30% to which they are entitled on some projects, what (a) steps is her department taking, especially through the Construction Industry Development Board, to educate and upskill SMMEs on (i) financial matters, (ii) contractual matters and (iii) any other related matters, (b) recourse do the contractors have where SMMEs threaten to close sites unless their demands are met in terms of the P&G and (c) intervention will her department offer in such a case; (2) whether her department will blacklist and/or penalise an SMME for closing down a site on a spurious issue such as P&G to which they are not entitled but demand anyway; if not, why not; if so, (3) whether her department is acknowledging the existence of the so-called Construction Mafia; if not, why not; if so, what steps is she taking to address the matter?

Reply:

The Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure:

(1) I was informed by the Department of Public Works and Infrastructure (DPWI) that the preliminary and General costs (P&Gs) are factored in and priced by the main contractor in the Bill of Quantities. As such, if 30 percent sub-contracting was imposed by the client when going out on tender, in terms the Preferential Procurement Regulations of 2017, the sub-contracting agreement must be 30 percent of the value of the entire contract amount awarded to the main contractor. This therefore means that the P&Gs would be factored in the contract amount due to the sub-contractor. In terms of this the subcontractor would then balance their rates from what was originally priced by the main contractor.

NB: the rates submitted, priced and contracted by the main contractor cannot be increased after the awarding of the contract, as this would mean the change of the original contract terms. Therefore sub-contractors cannot claim any amounts over above what is in the original contract.

(a) (i), (ii) and (iii) The CIDB has programmes to capacitate stakeholders, including SMME’s, and has produced emerging contractor tools and guidelines such as, the Contractor Management Guidelines (CMG 101), as well the basic guide on the 3Rs (Rights, Responsibilities and Risks).

(b) Threats by SMME’s to close off the sites or any interruptions to complete a project are a reportable violation of the CIDB code of conduct. The conduct as such is punishable in terms of Regulation 27A of the CIDB regulations. For any dispute that may push SMMEs to close off sites dispute resolution mechanisms are spelt out in the contract.

(c) The CIDB can only intervene upon such matters being reported in terms of Regulations 28 and as per the provisions of the contract between the conflicting parties.

(2) As stated above in (1) (b) threats to close off the sites or any interruptions to complete a project are a reportable violation of the CIDB code of conduct, and shall be dealt with according to the stipulations of the code.

(3) Yes, this is alleged criminal activities and is dealt with by the Security Cluster.

30 October 2020 - NW1872

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Roos, Mr AC to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total number of identity documents has his department issued to matric learners as a result of the roll-out of mobile units to assist the specified learners to obtain identity documents since June 2020?

Reply:

Since the start of the schools project to assist leaners with identity documents on 16 June 2020, the total number of identity documents issued to learners is 229 954.

END

29 October 2020 - NW2417

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What progress has been made to fill the important vacant positions of hospital management in Gauteng after such staff were implicated in alleged corruption related to the procurement of personal protective equipment; (2) whether the implicated officials have been officially charged for their misconduct; if not, what are the reasons for this; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. The Gauteng Provincial Department of Health confirms that there are alleged corruption implications laid against some Hospital managers in the Gauteng Health Department related to the procurement of personal protective equipment. However, investigations are still underway by the Security Agencies. The Hospital Managers are still occupying the posts and therefore no process to fill the posts has commenced yet. It should be noted that in accordance with the Public Service Regulations, only vacant funded posts can be advertised to be filled.

2. The implicated officials have not yet been officially charged because the investigations are still proceeding and no further details can be provided to safeguard the interest of the investigation process.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2391

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

What plans does he have in place to ensure that the communities of Tlhabane, between Delareyville and Vryburg in North West, have unrestricted access to health services, in view of the fact that the mobile clinic service visits the specified communities only twice a month?

Reply:

The village mentioned as Tlhabane could not be identified in this area, between Delareyville and Vryburg as stated in this Question. There is however a village called Broedesput in the area. Tlhabane is a township in Rustenburg in Bojanala District. Broedesput is a village between Delareyville and Vryburg and has a population of 780. Initially, this village was part of Ngaka Modiri Molema (NMM) District but it was redemarcated into Naledi Sub-district in Dr. Ruth Segomotsi Mompati District.

Given the population size, there is no fixed health structure in this area, but the community is serviced through mobile clinic from both Dr Ruth Segomotsi Mompati (Naledi Sub District) and NMM,which services are delivered as follows:

1. Mobile clinic from Naledi Sub-district visits the area fortnightly, twice a week each fortnight; The first day of the visit is focused on the youth and children and the second day is dedicated for Chronic health services;

2. Mobile clinic from NNM visit the area once a month; and

3. The Medical Officer from Naledi Sub-district assisted by a Professional Nurse also visit the area twice a month.

The latest patient headcounts are as follows:

MONTH

NALEDI HEADCOUNT

NMM MOBILE CLINIC

July

362

45

August

202

41

September

201

37

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2402

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Ceza, Mr K to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

How will she ensure that immediate measures are taken by her department to limit the use of consultant firms in compiling financial statements in municipalities in order to reduce unnecessary expenditure?

Reply:

Capacity gap is one of the root causes for use of consultants by municipalities. The Department is in the process of promulgating Municipal Staff Regulations, which set out uniform standards for staff members below the senior management level. The regulations includes amongst others:

    • Providing a governance framework for appointment of municipal employees with the necessary technical and professional skills;
    • Incorporates a competency framework occupational classes in local government that regulates minimum standards for recruitment, selection, appointment, performance management laying the basis for skills audit and skills development programmes.

In addition, the Department will roll out a training in 2020/21 financial year on the implementation of Municipal Staff Regulations.

While the Department focus on the governance and institutional matters that seeks to address capacity gap, the National Treasury provides measures and capacity building to municipalities on financial reporting including preparation of annual financial statements.

I THANK YOU.

29 October 2020 - NW2191

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

(1)What total number of (a) persons must work at the Sterkspruit office in line with the organogram and (b) positions are (i) filled and/or (ii) vacant; (2) by what date will all the vacant positions be filled; (3) whether the Sterkspruit office is fully functional on a daily basis; if not, what main challenges are experienced; if so, what are the relevant details; (4) by what date does he envisage will the Sterkspruit office be fully functional on a daily basis?

Reply:

(1)(a) Fifteen (15) officials, in terms of the Organogram, must work at the Sterkspruit Local Office

(1)(b)(i) (a) 1x1 Office Manager - Filled,

(b) 1x1 Civic Service Supervisor - Filled,

(c) 1x1 Mobile Operator - Filled,

(d) 1x1 Messenger - Filled,

(e) 5x1 Admin Clerks – Filled

(f) 2x1 Immigration Officers - Filled,

(g) 1x1 Cleaner – Filled

(1)(B)(ii) (a) 2x1 Admin Clerks – Vacant-Unfunded

(b) 1x1 Control Immigration – Vacant-Unfunded,

2. Vacant posts will be filled when funds are available.

3. The office is fully functional, except when the Network is down.

4. The Sterkspruit Local Office is fully functional, on daily basis.

END

 

29 October 2020 - NW2398

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Hlengwa, Ms MD to ask the Minister of Health

(1)What (a) total number of the suppliers of the government-wide Covid-19 tender were unlicensed by the SA Health Products Regulator to provide medical devices therefore not subject to regulatory oversight and (b) are the names of the specified suppliers and their board of directors; (2) (a) what total number of the unlicensed suppliers supplied class A low risk and class B low-moderate risk medical devices and (b) did any unlicensed suppliers provide class B medical devices to hospitals; (3) whether any amendments to procurement guidelines and medical regulations were made to facilitate the awarding of contracts to unlicensed providers; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what measures were taken to ensure that the amendments were monitored and enforced?

Reply:

(1) (a) The awarding of tenders to supply Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for COVID-19 does not fall within the mandate of the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA) therefore, SAHPRA does not have record of the unlicensed suppliers in this regard. SAHPRA publishes a list of licence holders who are authorised to manufacture, distribute (including import and export) and wholesale medical devices and in-vitro medical devices (IVDs). This list is available on the SAHPRA website which can be accessed at this address: www.sahpra.org.za

(b) SAHPRA does not have record of the names of government-wide unlicensed suppliers for PPE tenders and their Board of Directors.

(2) (a)-(b) Not applicable to SAHPRA. The Entity does not have record of unlicensed suppliers who were awarded tenders to supply Class A and Class B medical devices to hospitals.

(3) There were no amendments made to the guidelines and regulations made in terms of the Medicines and Related Substances Act, 1965 (Act 101 of 1965) as amended, to facilitate the awarding of contracts to unlicensed providers. SAHPRA has published a series of communication documents during the pandemic to communicate the existing regulatory requirements and processes to stakeholders in accordance with SAHPRA’s mandate.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2211

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

With reference to reports being received that highly qualified medical personnel are being turned down for positions in hospitals and other public health institutions in KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) because they do not meet the BEEE criteria, what (a) exactly are the criteria and/or protocols for employing specialised personnel in his department, (b) are the reasons that specialised personnel are being denied positions which are (i) not filled and (ii) being re-advertised after being rejected for the same positions and (c) is the current vacancy statistics for (i) paediatricians, (ii) dieticians, (iii) surgeons and (iv) other specialists in the KZN hospitals?

Reply:

In accordance with Section 11 of the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended, appointments and the filling of posts in the public service shall be in accordance with equality and the other democratic values and principles enshrined in the Constitution. Thus, all persons who qualify for the appointment, transfer or promotion concerned shall be considered; and the evaluation of persons shall be based on training, skills, competence, knowledge and the need to redress the imbalances of the past to achieve a public service broadly representative of the South African people, including representation according to race, gender and disability.

The Department is not aware of any unfair discrimination to qualifying applicants and when there were no applicant from a targeted group in terms of Employment Equity Targets institutions requests deviation on Employment Equity targets as per Departmental prescripts namely Human Resource Management Circular number 82 and 90 of 2017.

(a) The criteria for recruiting all prospective employees including but not limited to medical personnel within KZN Department of Health is done in line with the Recruitment and Selection Policy circulated under Human Resource Management Circular number 08 of 2018.

The Department is also mandated to comply with section 20 of the Employment Equity Act number 55 of 1998, as amended.

(b) (i) Human Resource processes are followed to fill the posts.

(ii) Posts being re-advertised are filled following HR processes.

(c) (i),(ii),(iii) The vacancy rate as at 30September 2020 the overall vacancy rate for Medical Specialists is 26.1% and for Dieticians is 15,6% while for the various Pediatrics and Surgery specialties, the average vacancy rate is 18, 5%.

Specified Ranks

Filled Post

Vacant Post

Grand Total

Vacancy rate

Allied Health: Dietician

179

33

212

16%

Medical Specialist

639

226

865

26%

(iv) Other specialists in the KZN hospitals

Discipline

Filled Posts

Vacant Posts

Grand Total

Vacancy Rate

ANAESTHETICS

55

29

84

34.5%

CARDIOLOGY

7

5

12

41 .7%

Discipline

Filled Post

Vacant Post

Grand Total

Vacancy Rate

CARDIOTHORACIC SURGERY

7

6

13

46.20/0

DERMATOLOGY

6

1

7

14.3%

ENDOCRINOLOGY

2

2

4

50.0%

FAMILY MEDICINE

13

3

16

18.8%

GASTROENTEROLOGY

 

1

1

100.0%

INTENSIVE CARE UNIT

10

9

 

47.4%

INTERNAL MEDICINE

49

12

61

19.7%

MAXILLO FACIAL & ORAL SURGEON

4

2

6

33.3%

MEDICINE

28

 

47

40.4%

NEONATOLOGY

19

2

21

9.5%

NEPHROLOGY

10

 

10

0.0%

NEUROLOGY

9

1

10

10.0%

NEUROSURGERY

6

2

8

25.0%

OBSTETRICS & GYNAECOLOGY

76

18

94

19.1%

ONCOLOGY

6

3

9

33.3%

OPHTHALMOLOGY

15

8

23

34.8%

ORTHO SURGERY & OPHTHALM.

3

2

5

40.0%

ORTHOPAEDICS

40

14

54

25.9%

OTORHINOLARYNGOLOGY

10

7

17

41 .2%

PAEDIATRICS & NEONATOLOGY

9

 

9

0.0%

PAEDIATRIC SURGERY

10

 

10

0.0%

PAEDIATRIC NEUROLOGY

2

 

2

0.0%

PAEDIATRICS

57

12

69

17.4%

PATHOLOGY FORENSIC

6

1

7

14.3%

PATHOLOGY HAEMATOLOGICAL

3

 

3

0.0%

PLASTIC SURG

6

3

9

33.3%

PSYCHIATRY

30

15

45

33.3%

PUBLIC HEALTH

2

3

5

60.0%

PULMONOLOGY

4

 

4

0.0%

RADIATION ONCOLOGY

 

2

2

100.0%

RADIOLOGY

27

13

40

32.5%

RHEUMATOLOGY

5

 

5

0.0%

SURGERY

72

13

85

15.3%

TRAUMA & EMERGENCY

23

11

34

32.4%

UROLOGY

8

7

15

46.7%

TOTAL (MEDICAL SPECIALISTS

639

226

865

26.1%

 

29 October 2020 - NW2331

Profile picture: Wilson, Ms ER

Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)On what date did the senior clinical manager at the Mankweng Hospital near Polokwane in Limpopo, who reportedly does not have sufficient experience to have been appointed as a clinical manager, (a) attain his medical degree and (b) complete his internship; (2) what (a) total number of years did the specified doctor practise as a general practitioner before his promotion and (b) are the regulations regarding experience required for a doctor to serve as a clinical manager; (3) what action will he take in this regard?

Reply:

In accordance with Section 11 of the Public Service Act, 1994, as amended, appointments and the filling of posts in the public service shall be in accordance with equality and the other democratic values and principles enshrined in the Constitution. Thus, all persons who qualify for the appointment, transfer or promotion concerned shall be considered. Also, the evaluation of persons shall be based on training, skills, competence, knowledge and the need to redress the imbalances of the past to achieve a public service broadly representative of the South African people, including representation according to race, gender and disability.

1. Currently there is no one appointed as Senior Clinical Manager at Mankweng Hospital, as this post does not exist on the approved organisational structure of the Hospital.

(a) Not applicable;

(b) Not applicable.

2. Not applicable.

3. Not applicable.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2266

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Health

Whether his department has any plans to source goods from black industrialists sponsored and/or funded by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition for items such as (a) bed linen and (b) food?

Reply:

The following responses were received from the Provincial Departments of Health:

1. Eastern Cape

The Department complies with the requirements of Local Content for the designated items.

a) Linen

The Department issued a competitive (and transparent) bid through the government tender bulletin. The bid requirements included compliance with Local Content, including SBD 6.2 and relevant Annexures for declaration. Awards were made to companies that complied with this requirement.

b) Food

The department procures patient food for the ECDOH facilities and where processed vegetables are procured; Local Content requirements are complied with. The department currently has a combination of procurement strategies which include long term rate-based contracts and quotations, compliance to this requirement is monitored on an ongoing basis.

The Department did not do any limited bidding specifically targeted support by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition department.

2. Free State

The Department procures goods, services and works in line with the applicable laws and regulations governing Public Sector Supply Chain Management Systems in the Country. The procurement of (a) bed linen and (b) food may only be done directly from aforementioned group on directive and/ or instruction by the Minister of Finance at National Treasury.

3. Gauteng

The Department has adopted a radical approach to transform health economy by encouraging sub-contracting to Township Enterprises and designated groups through the value chains of health sector markets which have proven to be monopolistic in nature. This will assist the department to achieve by embracing the system thinking approach and involving the current market structures towards inclusive health economies.

The Department gives preference to targeted groups including township suppliers when procuring the following:

a) Procurement of Patient Clothing and Hospital Linen from Women Cooperatives.

b) Food supplies

    • Meat, fish & Poultry
    • Bread and confectionary
    • Milk and milk products
    • Processed Vegetables
    • Fruits and vegetables

In addition, and where possible, the Department has enforced Subcontracting of building alterations during procurement of medical equipment.

4. KwaZulu-Natal

The Department source goods from black industrialists sponsored and/or funded by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition for items such as:

a) Bed linen

Yes

(b) Food

Yes

5. Limpopo

(a)-(b) The procurement of goods or any services within the public sector is guided by Section 217 of the Constitution of South Africa which says “When an organ of state in the national, provincial or local sphere of government, or any other institution identified in national legislation, contracts for goods or services, it must do so in accordance with a system which is fair, equitable, transparent, competitive and cost-effective”.

The Department does not object to any plans to source goods from black industrialists sponsored and/or funded by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition. At this stage the Department is unaware of the procurement process that includes the DTI & Competition or any approval from National Treasury for procurement of goods through set asides.

It is the position of the Department to implement Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2017REGULATION 4” (Pre-Qualification Conditions) in order to advance designated groups when advertising tenders where possible.

6. Mpumalanga

a) The Department is in the process of finalizing a specification for the supply and delivery of bed linen and patient clothing for advertisement in the new future. The specification will include requirement for minimum threshold for local content and production. The bed linen are currently procured on a contract that was extended on a month-to-month basis for a period not exceeding six months effective from 01st June 2020. The Department will also consider the use of pre-qualification criteria in terms of the Preferential Procurement Regulations, 2017 to address black ownership.

b) The following bid with a closing date of 08th November 2019 was advertised in the Mpumalanga Provincial Supply Chain Management Bid Bulletin Volume No. 283 published on 09th October 2019:

NR

DESCRIPTION

BID NUMBER

1

SUPPLY AND DELIVERY OF PERISHABLE AND NON-PERISHABLE FOOD FOR HOSPITALS AND INSTITUTIONS IN THE MPUMALANGA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH FOR A PERIOD OF THREE (03) YEARS

HEAL/046/19/MP

The above bid was evaluated, adjudicated and awarded to twenty-three service providers effective from 01st June 2020. Any plans to source goods from black industrialists sponsored and/or funded by the Department of Trade, Industry and Competition can only be considered after expiring of the existing contract

7. Northern Cape

a) The Northern Cape department of Health is considering procurement from companies listed on the Department of Trade and Industry and Competition on bed linen.

b) Not yet.

8. North West

As the Provincial Health Department we always strive to source items from black-owned companies regardless of whether or not they are sponsored and/or funded by DTI and Competition. It is usually difficult to determine who funds the companies, as it is usually not a requirement, in terms of PPR 2017 (Preferential Procurement Regulations 2017) when requesting bids for items. In the case where there are no black companies in the relevant sector i.e. Medical Equipment, we ensure their participation through sub-contracting of 30% of the total cost of the bid amount to SMME’s.

9. Western Cape

Western Cape Government Health (WCGH) currently has no such plans, however:

a) WCGH procures its linen from Service Products (Supported Employee Enterprises) which is an entity of the Department of Labour; and

b) WCGH is compliant to the requirements regarding local content & production regarding designated sectors, which include agro-processing, textiles/leather and footwear and furniture, with awards being made to bidders who are compliant to local content requirements and who score the highest total preference points.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2500

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Arries, Ms LH to ask the Minister of Health

(a) On what date will he ensure that the Reivilo Clinic in the North West has (i) a sufficient number of nurses and (ii) enough medicine and (b) how is the specified clinic expected to operate without nurses and medicine?

Reply:

(a) (i) A sufficient number of nurses

We can confirm today that Reivilo Community Health Centre (CHC) has ten (10) professional nurses. These include eight (8) permanent nurses and two (2) community service professional nurses. The headcount for 2019/2020 was 18,722 and the headcount seen by professional nurses is 17,722. The workload per professional nurses is 11.9 per day. The headcount for the year 2020/2021 (April – September 2020) is 8,506. The workload is nine (9). The workload per professional nurse to date is 9 clients/professional nurse per day. The normal workload per professional nurses is 25 clients per day. This means that Reivilio CHC has sufficient number of nurses

(ii) Enough medicine

The availability of medicines as at 26 October 2020 was 94% against a target of 80%. This is regarded as enough medicines in terms of drug availability and Stock Availability System (SVS).

b) Based on the above workload the number of professional nurses and 80% medicine availability, at Reivilo CHC will be able to operate well to render quality health services.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2276

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

What (a) total number of wastewater treatment plants are in a serious state of decay in the Republic, (b) measures has she put in place to refurbish and maintain the specified plants and (c) impact will there be if she fails to refurbish and maintain the plants?

Reply:

(a) The total number of Waste Water Treatment Works (WWTW) that are in a state of decay in the Republic are 265

(b) Maintenance and refurbishment of Waste Water Treatment Works is the primary responsibility of the Water Service Authorities (WSAs), i.e. municipalities. However, the Department of Water and Sanitation (DWS) works together with the Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs (COGTA) and the South African Local Government Association (SALGA) to ensure that municipalities receive the necessary support and grant funding to refurbish and maintain their assets. Water Service Authorities, through their Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) allocation for water and sanitation, have allocated funding for the refurbishment of some of WWTW.

The Department also funds certain refurbishment and upgrading projects that meet the criteria of the different funding programmes such as Regional Bulk Infrastructure Grant (RBIG) and Water Services Infrastructure Grant (WSIG). Some of the specified plants have been included in these programs depending on availability of funds availed to the Regions. The intended outcome is to improve the performance of the plants which will, in turn, improve the quality of effluent discharged into the water resources.

Further, the DWS conducts regular inspections and requires local authorities to develop Operation and Maintenance plans as a mandatory activity. These plans must provide system operators in the municipalities with comprehensive guidelines, procedures, and the necessary technical references to efficiently operate wastewater plants. Local authorities are required to amend the plans whenever there is a change in the treatment works design, construction, operations or maintenance which substantially changes the treatment works operations and maintenance procedures.

(c) Non-functional Waste Water Treatment Plants leads to the pollution of water resources. Pollution contributes to the deterioration of water quality which impacts on the sustainability of the ecosystems in the water resources. Poor water quality increases water treatment costs. Pollution of water resources also poses a health risk to the citizens as high microbial counts in the water may cause waterborne diseases like diarrhoea which may lead to loss of life. It can also impact on the economy of the country since it is a risk to irrigated crops and exports market, and therefore can result in the loss of investors and business opportunities.

29 October 2020 - NW2278

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Ndlozi, Dr MQ to ask the Minister of Health

(a) Which company and/or companies is/are responsible for the Covid-19 App, (b) how was the contract awarded and (c) what (i) is the total value of the contract and (ii) total amount has the company and/or companies been paid to date?

Reply:

a) Discovery Health supported the Department of Health to develop the CovidAlert App;

b) The Department has not awarded any procurement contract for the CovidAlert App. The Department received an offer of support from Discovery Health’s CEO. The Department in its press release/media statement on 1st September 2020 mentioned that: “COVID Alert SA was developed at no cost to the Department, through a partnership with world-class developers at Discovery Health, Apple and Google”;

c) (i) Total value of the contract is 0.

(ii) The Department has not paid any money for the CovidAlertApp.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2077

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Minister of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation

Given that about 250 housing beneficiaries in the Missionvale Reconstruction and Development Programme project in Port Elizabeth are still waiting for houses to be built on concrete foundation slabs laid since 2014, (a) by what date will her department complete the construction of the specified houses, (b) what is the name of the contractor that was appointed to build the houses and (c) what total amount has the specified contractor been paid to date?

Reply:

(a) The Eastern Cape Department of Human Settlements (ECDHS) reported that the planned total yield of the Missionvale Project is 2 498, of which 2 291 housing units have been completed and the remaining balance is 207. The date for completion of the construction of the specified houses cannot be confirmed at this stage because the Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality (NMBMM) is yet to submit an application to the ECDHS for the unblocking of the project. The said application must be accompanied by proof which confirms that the bulk infrastructure services are fully functional.

(b) The ECDHS appointed Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality as the developer for the Missionvale Project. Subsequently, the NMBMM appointed Small, Medium and Micro Enterprises (SMMEs) for the construction of the houses.

With regards to the request for name(s) of contractors involved in the housing project referred to in this question, I am constrained and prohibited by the document titled “Guide to Parliamentary Questions in the National Assembly” from providing the Honourable Member with the name of the contractor. The document referred to states that:

Questions are to be framed as concisely as possible. All unnecessary adjectives, references and quotations are omitted. Names of persons, bodies and, for example, newspapers are only used in questions if the facts surrounding the case have been proven. As the mere mention of such names could be construed as publicity for or against them, it should be clear that this practice is highly undesirable. If a question will be unintelligible without mentioning such names, the Departments concerned are notified of the name (-s) and this phrase is used: ".......a certain person (name furnished)”

(c) The Nelson Mandela Bay Metropolitan Municipality has advised that it has expended an amount of R157 639 933.26, to date, to the contractors for the work and value they created at the Missionvale Project.

29 October 2020 - NW1915

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McGluwa, Mr JJ to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

Whether, with reference to his reply to question 1307 on 20 July 2020, he confirms that he was aware of the outbreak of Covid-19 since November 2019?

Reply:

As I have previously responded, as far as I know the outbreak of COVID-19 was announced to have started in December 2019 and not November 2019.

END

29 October 2020 - NW2362

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Health

With regard to the Level 1 lockdown regulations to curb the spread of Covid-19, what are the reasons that day students travelling between Eswatini and the Republic are not required to undergo Covid-19 tests but weekly boarders do?

Reply:

Yes, daily students travelling from Eswatini are not required to produce COVID-19 test results as they are screened daily on arrival and departure through the point of entry by health officials to determine if they are experiencing symptoms consistent with COVID-19. Weekly learners are taken through the same screening protocol at the border, however this is conducted once weekly on entry and departure. As the weekly learners do not travel daily, a health official is not in a position to detect whether or not they are symptomatic during their weekly stay. Should a student potentially become symptomatic during their weekly stay, this may result in further transmission as well as importation of COVID-19 as they would not have undergone the daily screening by a health official. It is important to also note that the Department of Basic Education has issued a directive  that all schools conduct daily screening of  learners so both day students and weekly boarders are screened.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2497

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has any plans to employ community healthcare workers on a permanent basis at B J Vorster Hospital, in Kareedouw; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether he has assessed the impact of the 16 community healthcare workers who were employed at the hospital on a temporary basis; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the further relevant details?

Reply:

According to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health,

1. Community Health Workers (CHWs) at BJ Vorster Hospital in Kareedouw in the Eastern Cape Province were employed on a temporary basis for a fixed term contract to specifically capacitate the Health Services to respond to the additional demand for services due to Covid-19 at the Hospital. These CHWs were contracted with funding for Covid-19, of which the term will end on 31 March 2021.Assessment of anyfurther employment of these CHWs will be conducted towards the end of their contract and a decision will be taken then, which would also be guided by the availability of funding.

2. Performance of CHWs in the Province is continuously being assessed and this includes the 16 CHWs contracted at BJ Vorster Hospital and necessary support is provided to ensure that their performance is of acceptable standards, since CHWs play a critical support function in the management of Covid-19 in the Province.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2260

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van der Merwe, Ms LL to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What total amount has his department spent on advertising in media such as (a) radio, (b) television, (c) newspapers and (d) social media; 2) whether he will provide Ms L L van der Merwe with a list of media institutions that benefited from the advertising in the past 12 months; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

1. (a) Radio - R 10,596,343.00

1. (b) Television - R 2,558,411.13

1. (c) Newspapers - R 3,477,185.20

1. (d) Social Media - R 636,500.00

2. List of Media Institutions:

(a) Radio

  • Mediamark
  • Msg Afrika Technologies
  • Primedia Broadcasting
  • Sabc
  • United Stations
  • Community Radio
  • Alex Fm

(b) Television

  • E SAT TV
  • Dstv Media Sales
  • Mediamark
  • Sabc
  • Media Mansion
  • Mediamark
  • MVM Multimedia
  • Zallywood Ltd

(c) Newspapers

  • Arena Holdings
  • Independent Newpapers
  • Media 24
  • Vuk’uzenzele
  • Ads 24
  • Onshelf Trading Forty Four
  • The Citizen
  • Tiso Blackstar Group

(d) Social media

  • Arena Holdings
  • Independent Newspapers
  • Media24

Remarks: Reply: Approved / Not Approved

 

Mr J W McKay Dr PA Motsoaledi, MP

A/Director-General Minister of Home Affairs

Date: Date:

 

29 October 2020 - NW2404

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Waters, Mr M to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

What are the mechanisms that her department has put in place to ensure that the City of Ekurhuleni is supported and its capacity strengthened to manage and pay its water bill in full for each month since 1 July 2020? NW2998E

Reply:

The Provincial CoGTA Department together with Gauteng Provincial Treasury has already set up a Government Debt Management Committee. The objectives of the Committee are to fast-track payment of monies owed to Municipalities by National and Provincial Government Department. The committee meets on a quarterly basis and the National CoGTA plays an oversight. The Government Debt Management Committee comprises of at least:

  • Official representatives of all owing National and Provincial Departments
  • Debt Managers from Parastatals (Rand Water, Eskom, Prasa, Telkom and Transnet),
  • Revenue Managers from all Municipalities.

The Provincial CoGTA Department is planning to deploy revenue experts specifically within the City to assist the City to facilitate the integration of Revenue Enhancement and Debtor Management. Furthermore, the experts will develop Integrated Revenue enhancement and debtor Management and support its implementation. The Municipality is paying within 30 days as per the legislative definition of a current account.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2329

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Wilson, Ms ER to ask the Minister of Health

(1)On what date did the senior clinical manager (name furnished) at the Mahwelereng Hospital in Mokapane, who reportedly does not have sufficient experience to have been appointed as a clinical manager, (a) attain his medical degree and (b) complete his internship; (2) what (a) total number of years did the specified doctor practise as a general practitioner before his promotion and (b) are the regulations regarding experience required for a doctor to serve as a clinical manager; (3) what action will he take with regard to the appointment should the specified doctor not have the requisite qualifications?

Reply:

1. (a) The Senior Clinical Manager (SCM) of Mokopane Hospital attained his medical degree on the 31st December 2013;

(b) He completed his medical internship during the period 1 January 2014 to 31 December 2015.

2. (a) The SCM had 2 years and 6 months as a medical practitioner before his promotion on 1 July 2018. The breakdown is as follows: Medical Practitioner: Community Service (01 January – 31 December 2016) and Medical Practitioner: Independent Practice (1 year 6 months as (01 January 2017 – 30 June 2018).

(b) The experiential requirements for the post of SCM is “a minimum of 3 years as Medical Practitioner after registration with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA).

Even though, the SCM did not have the three years minimum years of experience at the time of promotion, since he had only two (2) years and six (6) months experience as a medical practitioner, he was considered as a suitable candidate following a directive by the Executive Authority that where the Province is unable to recruit a suitable candidate during interviews, candidates acting as Clinical Managers can be considered for appointment, provided they are deemed compete during the selection process by the interviewing panel. At the time of promotion, the SCM was an Acting Clinical Manager at WF Knoble Hospital.

3. No action will be taken as the candidate concerned has the requisite qualifications as a medical practitioner certified by the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA). Furthermore, the Executive Authority exercised her wrights in terms of Sub-Section 67 (7) of the Public Service Regulations, 2016 that (7) ”If the selection committee is unable to recommend a suitable person for appointment from those who applied in terms of sub regulation (5), the Executive Authority may, after that selection process has been completed, approve the head-hunting of one or more persons with the requisite competencies and subject such person or persons to the same selection process as those who applied.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2389

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

What (a) total number of complaints have been lodged with the Health ProfessionsCouncil of South Africa against a certain doctor (name and details furnished), (b) are the details of each complaint, (c) number of the specified complaints resulted in an investigation that included, but was not limited to, site visits to his practice to verify that he maintains proper patient records that are in line with his medical fees and treatments he claims to provide, (d) number of the complaints resulted in him being charged and (e) were the outcomes of each complaint?

Reply:

a) Four (4) complaints were lodged against Dr Pretorius;

b) The details of each complaint are as follows:

    1. Complications following cancer treatment;
    2. Incompetence;
    3. Use of off-label insulin to treat cancer; and
    4. Negligence related to cancer treatment: allegations of misrepresentation as a cancer treatment doctor and further investigation related to whether the amount of R400,000.00 charged over a period of 7 months was in line with the treatment provided.

c) All the complaints were investigated but the investigations did not include a site visit to his practice;

d) Below is the list of cases and (e) the outcomes of each complaintare as follows:

Case

Outcome

(i) Complications following cancer treatment

The complaint was withdrawn in Feb 2020 at Inquiry by the complainant. File closed

(ii) Incompetence

At Inquiry awaiting an expert opinion and the matter will be set down for a hearing

(iii) Use of off-label insulin to treat cancer

Inquiry matter. Hearing set down for February 2021

(iv) Negligence

Matter under investigation. Lodged in Oct 2020

END.

29 October 2020 - NW1838

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Tito, Ms LF to ask the Minister of Home Affairs

What (a) total number of Home Affairs offices have been closed since the beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19, (b) services have been affected the most and (c) measures has his department put in place to deal with the backlog?

Reply:

a) A total of 92 offices were closed since beginning of the lockdown to curb the spread of Covid-19.

b) The following services were affected during the period:

  1. Death registration
  2. Births Registration
  3. Temporary Identity Certificates
  4. Re-issuance of Births Certificates
  5. Collection of Identity Documents
  6. Late Registration of Birth (LRB)
  7. Registration and Solemnization of Marriages
  8. Smart ID Cards applications for leaners
  9. Applications for amendments and rectifications
  10. Withdrawal of records at the back office

c) The Department initiated a recovery plan to workout production lost from various branches as follows:

  1. Implementation of rotational plans or introduction of shift system to cater for those who might be infected by COVID-19.
  2. Gradual re-introduction of services or products to clients using a phased approach
  3. Use of virtual meetings to monitor and report progress.
  4. Continuous communication to clients and the public on new services that were introduced or reopened.
  5. The department has public awareness on services that were reintroduced or reopened.
  6. Use of community Radio and virtual launches on certain products such Smart ID Cards to learners, particularly matriculants.
  7. Use of mobile offices to reach out to communities.
  8. Segmentation of services and directing clients to different catchment areas using pamphlets, provincial managers and local managers to inform clients.

END

 

29 October 2020 - NW2388

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Chirwa, Ms NN to ask the Minister of Health

(1)Whether his department has a system in place to scrutinise the quality of personal protective equipment in all (a) hospitals and (b) clinics; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) where do healthcare workers report quality issues and (b) how does his department intervene when such grievances are raised by healthcare workers?

Reply:

1. The National Department of Health in collaboration with South African Bureau of Standards (SABS) and the South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA), the National Regulator for Compulsory Specifications (NRCS) set the quality standards for the various personal protective equipment items. Each province is responsible for ensuring that the quality standards of PPE procured are maintained. The National Department of Health has also supported the provinces with availing a Policy on Respiratory Protective Equipment and a list of PPE specifications that provinces can utilise to guide the PPE procurement process. In addition, PPE quality assurance training was conducted for provinces. The Department of Trade, Industry and Competition (DTIC) also provides support to the manufacturers and distributors in respect of applicable standards and conformity assessments to assist them to prepare for the licensing and approval processes. The Department of Health intends to approach National Treasury to seek approval for single sourcing of Quality Assurance Companies to undertake assessment of the PPE procured and to be delivered in all health care facilities for quality assessment. This will ensure that such PPE is of acceptable quality and standards. This intervention will be executed in line with or in compliance to section 79 of the Public Finance Management Act, which allows organs of state to apply for deviations from open competitive bidding process based on good grounds and urgency of this matter in protecting health care workers. This is to further ensure that health care workers are provided with PPE that is complaint to standards and quality requirements subject to concurrence and approval of National Treasury.

2. Each province, district and facility have Occupational Health and Safety Committees that since 1 October 2020 are verifying the availability of PPE reported by health facilities on the Stock Visibility System on a weekly basis. The Occupational Health and Safety grievance processes are followed at a local level and escalated accordingly.

END.

29 October 2020 - NW2202

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Ismail, Ms H to ask the Minister of Health

(1)With reference to the arbitration held on 27 July 2020 between the (a) Public Servants Association of South Africa, (b) National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union, (c) Democratic Nursing Organisation of South Africa and (d) Health & Other Services Personnel Trade Union of South Africa and his department with case number PSHS 769-19/20 relating to about 1 200 members, (i) on what date was the arbitration awarded and (ii) what was the outcome of the case; (2) whether the resolutions of the award have been implemented; if not, why not; if so, what are the full relevant details?

Reply:

1. (i) on 27 July 2020;

(ii) Accordingly, the ruling in the award is following:

(a) The respondent is to table a sustainable model with salary levels and notches for FPO, s within 30 days of receipt of this award.

(b) There is no order as to costs.

2. Yes, the National Health Council Technical Committee met on 17 September 2020, wherein the issue of Forensic Pathology Officer sustainable model was one of the agenda items as per the award, which agree that the draft sustainable model be shared with the respective recognised unions through the General Secretary of the Public Health and Social Development Sectoral Bargaining Council (PHSDSBC).

Council met on the 16th October 2020, for the parties (Employer and Labour unions) to deliberate on the model. The model was presented in this meeting by the employer. It was agreed that the matter will be discussed further on 7 November 2020 after consultations with the labour union constituencies.

END.

27 October 2020 - NW2381

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

Whether she has engaged with the Minister of Finance on the closure of foreign missions in order to save costs; if so, (a) which foreign missions will be closed and (b) what impact will the closure of the specified foreign missions have on the bilateral countries?

Reply:

Yes, there was consultation with the Minister of Finance on the possible closure of some foreign missions.

(a) The Missions proposed to be closed are still to be considered.

(b) Once considered, consulations will be embarked upon with the relevant host countries to ensure that bilateral relations are not affected.

27 October 2020 - NW2300

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Technology

(1)In view of the series of student deaths that have occurred at the University of Fort Hare (details furnished), which seem to be reflective of broader trends in the higher education sector, what immediate steps has his department taken in response to the tragic state of affairs; (2) whether there are systems in place to monitor universities and colleges’ level of compliance with legal investigations following the death of a student; if not, what steps does his department intend to take to remedy the situation; if so, what are the relevant details of the monitoring systems?

Reply:

1. The University of Fort Hare (UFH) experiences a significant number of student deaths each year. The University keeps a record of all student deaths, although not all deaths occur on campus or while students are at the University. The causes of death include natural causes (illness), car accidents, suicides, and/or violent deaths as a result of stabbing or assault. In 2019, a student drowned in the University pool, which was reported to the Department. The University has provided the following summary of student deaths with causes, during 2019 and 2020:

Cause of Death

2019

2020

Natural causes (Illness)

3

7

Suicide

4

2

Car accident

3

2

Stabbing

1

4

Assault

 

1

Hit and run accident

 

1

Drowning

1

 

Injuries sustained in a fire

1

 

Total

13

17

The University and the Department are deeply concerned about the prevalence of preventable deaths, specifically suicide and assault (including stabbing). The Department engages with the institution regularly and receives reports from the University when a tragic event occurs, particularly if they are on campus. 

Last year, the University employed two part-time social workers to work with its psychologists. The Student Affairs Division has also partnered with the Social Work and Psychology Departments to provide support to students in distress, over and above the work done by the Student Counselling Unit. Residences have started the process of replacing Wardens with Residence Student Assistants. The Residence Student Assistants are mainly selected from among senior students from the Psychology and Social Work Departments. In 2019, the Student Affairs Division started a group called Champions Against Gender-Based Violence. These students are mainly selected from Social Work, Psychology and Criminology Departments and they create awareness on campus, support victims, and attend social gatherings. Just before the national lockdown, the Student Affairs Division was in conversation with the Eastern Cape Liquor Board to explore areas of collaboration to curb substance abuse amongst students. The Student Counselling and HIV/Aids Units holds regular information sessions with students in the evenings.

Higher Health has introduced innovative measures and solutions to support the mental health of students at universities, such as the 24-hour toll-free number mental health support service managed by a dedicated team of experienced psychologists, social workers, and counsellors. The service is available to all students within universities, and Technical and Vocational Education and Training colleges. 

The Department also engages with Universities South Africa on matters relating to the mental health of students, and safety and security on campus on a regular basis. 

2. The University cooperates with government agencies tasked with conducting investigations when a death occurs. The University also provides reports to the Department where cases are subject to legal investigations. The Department monitors the implementation of the recommendations of the reports provided and lends further support if requested by the University. 

27 October 2020 - NW1804

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What total number of black farmers have received assistance to get licensed and establish reputable farms with complete infrastructure and international exposure in the cannabis industry for medicinal use, which stands to be worth more than R30 billion by 2030?

Reply:

None.

27 October 2020 - NW1727

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Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

What (a) total amount has the Ingonyama Trust (IT) invested in agriculture since 1 January 2010 and (b) are the relevant details of the projects in which the IT invested?

Reply:

a) he Ingonyama Trust (IT) is not an investor in Agriculture as it holds monies in trust on behalf of tribes and communities.

b) Falls away.

27 October 2020 - NW2382

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Msane, Ms TP to ask the Minister of International Relations and Cooperation

In view of the increasing damage being caused by the current insurgency in Mozambique, especially the displacement of its citizens, by what date does she envisage will the Southern African Development Community (SADC) invoke Article 6(1) of the 2003 SADC Mutual Defence Pact, which stipulates that an armed attack against a state party shall be considered a threat to regional peace and security and such an attack shall be met with immediate collective action?

Reply:

The Troika of the Southern African Developent Community (SADC) Organ on Politics, Defence and Security Cooperation is seized with the matter of the security situation in the Republic of Mozambique. Currently, there is no envisaged specific date to invoke Article 6(1) of the 2003 SADC Mutual Defence Pact. Collective action will be decided upon in accordance with the Roadmap, which is being awaited from the Republc of Mozambique. Article 7(1) of the same SADC Mutual Defence Pact should be kept in mind, which reads as follows: “State Parties undertake to respect one another’s territorial integrity and sovereignty and, in particular, observe the principle of non-interference in the internal affairs of one another”. Article 7(2) of the 2003 SADC Mutual Defence Pact further states that “no action shall be taken to assist any State Party in terms of this Pact, save at the State Party’s own request or with its consent”.

27 October 2020 - NW1729

Profile picture: Mbabama, Ms TM

Mbabama, Ms TM to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department has taken any steps to ensure that the Ingonyama Trust adheres to section 2(5) of the KwaZulu-Natal Ingonyama Trust Act, Act 3KZ of 1994, which prohibits it from leasing, encumbering, pledging, alienating and/or disposing of any land under its custodianship without the prior written consent of the traditional authority and/or community authority; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Yes, the Minister has taken steps to improve governance in the affairs of the Board. The Department is finalizing a Shareholder Compact with the Ingonyama Trust Board (ITB) to enhance accountability of the ITB to ensure compliance with the KwaZulu-Natal Ingonyama Trust Act, 1994 (Act No. 3 of 1994).