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06 April 2021 - NW699

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Masipa, Mr NP to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether, with reference to her reply to question 2817 on 21 December 2020, her department visited the Northern Cape in January 2021; if not, why not; if so, what were the findings?

Reply:

Yes, the visit was undertaken during the week of 23-26 March 2021 and the two districts being Namakwa and ZF Mgcau were visited. The findings of the visit was that indeed farmers who had applied for drought relief received vouchers to purchase fodder. A total of 3900 farmers across all categories have benefitted in all affected districts. The vouchers received by farmers were equivalent to more than 30 bags of fodder per farmer depending on the number of Livestock Units (LSUs) and this was confirmed by some farmers who were visited. The challenge reported by the farmers was that they are experiencing the aggressive infestation of Prosopis trees which consumes a lot of water. The province is working on this issue through the Land Care programme to eradicate the trees. The fodder bank project was also visited and it was indicated that more than 30 bales of 250kg were harvested and made available for the farmers. The fields were already being prepared for next planting of Lucerne which will be in May 2021. It was also observed that the recent summer rainfalls provided some relief in some areas across the province as there was noticeable veld improvement and also dams contained some rain water.

06 April 2021 - NW1012

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

Given that most interactions and/or meetings are now virtual, how is her Office ensuring that youth living in rural areas are included and/or involved in the youth machinery meetings that her Office hosts occasionally?

Reply:

The National Youth Machinery meeting has been established at the national sphere of government, to coordinate youth development by all relevant stakeholders within the youth sector. It is a professional space to share information and showcase good practices. The meeting provides a platform to different stakeholders, to share information about their strategies, plans, programmes, and projects. The participants are youth workers who are mainly youth focal points from youth led and youth serving organisations.

The National Youth Machinery meeting consist of representatives from:

  1. the National Youth Development unit in the DWYPD; to serve as the Convenor, Chairperson and Secretariat of the meeting;
  2. the line function department responsible for youth development at the national sphere;
  3. the youth units in the Offices the Premiers (representing each province);
  4. the NYDA;
  5. Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs;
  6. the South African Local Government Association (SALGA);
  7. the South African Youth Council (SAYC);
  8. non-government youth led organisations; and
  9. Representatives of the private sector.

There are similar structures at provincial and local levels, where provincial and local youth focal points representing Offices of the Premiers, provincial sector departments as well as district and local municipalities, also participate. The meeting participants are expected to engage directly with the clients they are servicing. This would mean that at provincial and local level, the youth workers (youth focal points), cascade information to majority of young people they are servicing including those residing in rural areas.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW517

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Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(1)Whether any staff member in her Office (a) performed work outside normal working hours in addition to the responsibilities related to his or her work in the past five financial years and (b) has been performing such work during the period 1 April 2014 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, in each case, how is it determined whether such work is being performed or not; if so, in each case, (i) what number of staff members and (ii) in what job and/or work categories are the specified staff members employed; (2) whether approval for such work was obtained in each case; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the policy of her Office in this regard, (b) by whom are such applications considered and approved, (c) what number of contraventions of this policy were brought to the attention of the National Treasury in the past five financial years and (d) what steps have been taken against the transgressors?

Reply:

(1) (a) Not in the Office of the Minister; (b) Not in the Office of the Minister as no employees requested approval to perform additional work; (i) not applicable; (ii) not applicable.

(2) Not in the Office of the Minister; all offers of employment stipulate that in terms of section 30(1) of the Public Service Act, 1994, they are required to obtain prior approval should they wish to perform any remunerative work outside the public service; (b) not applicable; (c) not applicable; (d) not applicable.

 

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW716

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Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

With reference to COVID-19 pandemic which has forced her Office to look toward incorporating Fourth Industrial Revolution measures and methodologies toward meeting its targets and, given this cost saving, what innovative plans does her Office have going forward to ensure all targets are met despite the impact that COVID-19 has had on regular functioning to ensure that the rights and needs of the youth are met?

Reply:

  • NYDA to speak on the Covid-19 grant programme launched as a result of COVID;
  • NYDA to speak to the 1000 businesses in a 100 days, and how success was achieved despite Covid. And what are the plans going forward.
  • Department to mention how they managed to consult young people throughout the pandemic

The Department will continue to engage young people and other stakeholders using both physical and virtual means. This will enable us to meet our targets and also meet the constitutional obligation of consulting those affected by policies and laws. The right to consultation has been centermost during the pandemic through using technology to engage youth for them to provide input into policy and legislation being developed by the Department.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW1013

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Cebekhulu, Inkosi RN to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

Whether she has been informed of the alleged ill-treatment of civilians by the SA National Defence Force members deployed to Mozambique; if not, why not; if so, what interventions has her department made?

Reply:

  1. The SANDF does not have members deployed to Mozambique.

06 April 2021 - NW725

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Steyn, Ms A to ask the Minister of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development

Whether her department was responsible for identifying beneficiaries for the stimulus support that was provided as part of the COVID-19 packages; if not, (a) who was responsible to identify the beneficiaries and (b) what criteria were used; (2) whether she will furnish Mrs A Steyn with the report that was produced in order to motivate for support packages of identified beneficiaries; if not, why not; if so, on what date?

Reply:

1. Yes, the Department of Agriculture, Land Reform and Rural Development (DALLRD) was responsible for identifying the Presidential Employment Stimulus Initiative (PESI) through an application process.

(a) Falls away.

(b) The Criteria used was dealt with in three distinct parts:

A: Compulsory Criteria;

B: Functional Criteria; and

C: Verification Criteria.

Graphical user interface, table

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Graphical user interface, text, application, email

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(2) Yes. The information on support packages is provided below. The support packages to subsistence producers was determined by the agricultural economists based on the following production sizes:

Commodity

Production size required for support

Vegetable and fruit

1 ha or smaller (smaller than 100 meters x 100 meters or one soccer field);

Maize/soya/cotton/sugar/ grain products/ other

1ha or smaller (smaller than 100 meters x 100 meters or one soccer field)

Poultry

Broilers

100 broilers or less

 

Layers

50 layers or less

Livestock

Small Stock Units

25 animals or less

 

Large Stock Units

5 animals or less

NOTE:

  • Award sizes will range between R1000 and R9000, and are dependent on the commodity type applied for and verified production scale.
  • The size of the non-financial e-voucher will be determined by the current scale of production after physical verification by the Department of Agriculture Land Reform and Rural development.

** Please note the verification process in underway **

Section C below unpacks the production sizes further.

Table

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06 April 2021 - NW718

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

What will be the cost of advertising with regard to the Director-General of her Office and her Ministry’s media engagements and roadshows on the National Youth Programme?

Reply:

On media engagements and roadshows on the National Youth Programme, the Department has already had numerous radio and television engagement on the work it does. These has no cost associated. The cost of future media engagements will be determined only in the absence of invitations to interviews.

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

06 April 2021 - NW831

Profile picture: Mphithi, Mr L

Mphithi, Mr L to ask the Minister in The Presidency for Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities

(a) What were the key issues emanating from the National Youth Machinery meeting (details furnished) and (b) who attended the meeting?

Reply:

(a) The key issues that are emanating from the National Youth Machinery meetings relate to progress on youth development interventions in the form of policies and programmes. In the meeting which was recently held on 02 March 2021, the following were discussed:

(i) Update on the launch of the National Youth Policy 2020-2030 (NYP2030) to create awareness on its approval and call for its implementation;

(ii) progress on the draft Monitoring and Evaluation Framework to track the implementation of the NYP2030. The aim was to solicit inputs from participants;

(iii) presentation on the Amendment of the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA) Bill to solicit inputs from participants. The NYDA Act is amended to optimise and intensify delivery of services to the youth by making the NYDA’s broad mandate to be more focused, improve its governance and increase its reach through establishing NYDA’s offices and district and local levels in line with the District Development Model;

(iii) update on the draft Integrated Youth Development Strategy (IYDS) by the NYDA. The aim was to solicit further inputs from participants on the strategy which seeks to give effect to implementation of the NYP2030 through targeted programmes by government, business and civil society role players.

(iv) presentation of Techno girl Trust Program. The purpose of Techno Girl programme is to close the existing barriers of inadequate exposure of girls in the space of Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. The programme seek to reduce youth unemployment; provide second-chance; expose young people to 4IR; create needs innovative solutions; and provide youth with thorough training for businesses and employment opportunities. The purpose of the presentation was to solicit partnership in implementation of the programme.

(v) progress on the 4IR Youth Skills and Employment Initiative, which was presented to participants to appraise them that it will soon be presented to Cabinet. The initiative seeks to equip the youth with digital skills, so that South Africa and Africa, can reap the benefits from the 4th Industrial Revolution. The presentation was intended to encourage partnerships.

(b) The National Youth Machinery meeting was attended by youth focal persons in national line function departments; Offices of the Premiers; civil society organisations; South African Youth Council; and the National Youth Development Agency (NYDA). These attendees are the same participants who are targeted to attend all the National Youth Machinery meetings. The participants from business sector are also invited and attend the meetings on ad-hoc basis. The following are a list of organisations usually invited to send the representative/s to the meeting:

(i) Department of Women, Youth and Persons with Disabilities (Chair and Secretariat);

(ii) Department of Social Development;

(iii) Department of Sports, Arts and Culture;

(iv) Department of Public Services Administration;

(v) Department of Home Affairs;

(vi) Department of Basic Education;

(vii) Department of Higher Education;

(viii) Department of Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation;

(ix) Department of Economic;

(x) Department of Health;

(xi) Department of Minerals and Energy;

(xii) Department of International Relations and Cooperative Governance;

(xiii) Department of Small Business Development;

(xiv) Department of Employment and Labour;

(xv) Department of Justice and Correctional Services;

(xvi) Department of National Treasury;

(xvii) Department of Tourism;

(xviii) Department of Human Settlements;

(xix) South African Police Services;

(xx) Department of Communications and Digital Technologies;

(xxi) Department of Defence;

(xxii) Department of Employment and Labour;

(xxiii) Department of International Relations and Cooperation;

(xxiv) Department of Transport;

(xxv) Department of Public Works and Infrastructure;

(xxvi) Department of Small Business Development;

(xxvii) Department of Trade and Industry

(xxviii) Department of Planning, Monitoring & Evaluation;

(xxix) Department of Telecommunication and Postal Services;

(xxx) Department of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs;

(xxxi) The Presidency;

(xxxii) Offices of the Premiers in all nine provinces;

(xxxiii) National Development Agency

(xxxiv) South African Youth Council

(xxxv) National non-Government Organisations

(xxxvi) South African Local Government Association (SALGA)

(xxxvii)Black Business Council

(xxxviii) Business Unity South Africa

(xxxix ) Development partners (e.g. UNFPA, UNICEF, GIZ)

_________________________

Approved by Minister

Ms M Nkoana-Mashabane, MP

Date _____________________

01 April 2021 - NW960

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

Whether it is the official position of his department that applicants for mineral prospecting rights have to fulfil Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment requirements for mineral prospecting rights to be granted, as indicated in the presentation before the Portfolio Committee on Mineral Resources and Energy on 3 March 2021; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Section 17(4) of the MPRDA (as amended) provides that the Minister may, having regard to the type of mineral concerned and the extent of the proposed prospecting project, request the applicant to give effect to the provisions of section 2(d) of the Act, by substantially and meaningfully expanding opportunities to Historical Disadvantaged South Africans to benefit from the exploitation of the nations mineral and petroleum resources development.

01 April 2021 - NW796

Mohlala, Mr M to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What are the reasons that the Sefogole Sepeke Secondary High School in the Sekhukhune District Municipality in Limpopo is still using pit toilets and (b) by what date will she ensure that (i) the school buildings are refurbished and (ii) proper sanitation is provided to the learners and teachers?

Reply:

The question has been referred to the Limpopo Department of Education and a response will be submitted as soon as it is received.

01 April 2021 - NW755

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       What (a) total number of schools were vandalised (i) in (aa) 2019 and (bb) 2020 and (ii) from 1 January 2021 to date in each province, (b) number of the specified schools were vandalised during the (i) school holidays and (ii) lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 and (c) is the total cost of the damages in each case in each province; (2) whether all the schools will be (a) repaired and (b) re-open; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details, (3) where are the affected learners accommodated where schools close due to vandalism?

Reply:

1. (a) (i) (aa) 957 schools were vandalised in 2019

            (bb) 1633 schools were vandalised in 2020

        (ii) 148 schools have been vandalised since 01 January 2021 to date.

    (b) (i) 23 schools were vandalised during school holidays;

            (ii) 1716 schools were vandalised during lockdown

    (c) The total cost of repairs amount to R74.6million.

2. (a) Yes

    (b)  YES, All schools are open and operational irrespective of the vandalism.

3. Not applicable   

01 April 2021 - NW582

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

What total number of mining rights applications have been (a) completed and (b) issued in each of the past five years within the 300-day time frame set down by the one environmental system? NW638E

Reply:

a) Seventeen (17) mining rights have been completed within the time frame specified.

b) Five (05) mining rights have been issued within the time frame specified.

01 April 2021 - NW208

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Lorimer, Mr JR to ask the Minister of Mineral Resources and Energy

1) Whether the minerals which are subject to a prospecting right renewal application, in terms of section 18 of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002, are sterilised and/or unavailable for other applicants while the applicant awaits the processing and/or return, grant, refusal of the renewal application; if not, why not; 2) What total number of outstanding prospecting right renewal applications have been received which have not yet been processed, returned, granted, refused (a) within 60 working days from date of receipt and (b) within 12 months and (c) for a period of more than 3 years from the date of receipt; 3) Whether the renewal applications that are received after the expiry date of the relevant prospecting right were refused; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, is the date of expiry of the prospecting right calculated from the date of the granting of the right according to the judgment in Mawetse SA Mining Corporation (Pty) Ltd v Minister of Mineral Resources and Others or from the date of the execution of the prospecting right? NW211E

Reply:

1. In terms of section 18(5) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002 a prospecting right in respect of which an application for renewal has been lodged shall, despite it stated expiry date, remain in force until such time as such application has been granted or refused.

The lodgement of the renewal application is an expression of further interest by the holder to prospect for such mineral(s) and as such this cannot amount to sterilization as the activities would assist in determining the occurrence of such mineral(s).

2. (a) 19

     (b) 84

      (c) 236

3. In terms of section 56(a) of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, Act 28 of 2002, a right issued is deemed lapsed whenever it expires (expiry date), and such it would be refused whenever it is lodged for renewal under these circumstances.

01 April 2021 - NW816

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to SA Tourism and its communication with local stakeholders about relaxing travel restrictions, (a) what communication has been undertaken, (b) with whom has her department communicated, (c) what were the contents of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each case?

Reply:

a) SA Tourism has regularly conducted media interviews on the topic with a wide array of media publications across online, print and broadcast. These interviews ensure that the message around the relaxation of travel restrictions filtered down either through the media publication or the promotion of the interviews via social media platforms.

Furthermore, SA Tourism is constantly liaising with counterparts in the private sector in order to align on efforts to ensure that the message filters down to the trade both nationally and internationally. The last meeting of this sort was held with the following private sector stakeholders, TBCSA, SATSA, SAACI and BARSA.

b) SA Tourism has communicated with Provincial tourism authorities, the private sector and media.

c) Please refer to ( a) above for the content.

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

01 April 2021 - NW655

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What communication with international stakeholders has been undertaken by the SA Tourism about the relaxing of travel restrictions, (b) who are the stakeholders, (c) what has been the content of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each instance?

Reply:

a) SA Tourism has regularly conducted media interviews on the topic with a wide array of media publications across online, print and broadcast. These interviews ensure that the message around the relaxation of travel restrictions filtered down either through the media publication or the promotion of the interviews via social media platforms.

Furthermore, SA Tourism is constantly liaising with counterparts in the private sector in order to align on efforts to ensure that the message filters down to the trade both nationally and internationally. The last meeting of this sort was held with the following private sector stakeholders, TBCSA, SATSA, SAACI and BARSA.

b) The stakeholders are Trade, the Private sector and the Media.

c) Please refer to (a) above for the contents

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

.

01 April 2021 - NW761

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Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What eco-tourism strategies and/or plans has her department developed and implemented to encourage growth in the tourism sector?

Reply:

The Department of Tourism implements a number of initiatives that support eco-tourism. These include amongst others support for projects in National and Provincial Parks, Heritage Sites and Rural areas in terms of product development and enhancement. Furthermore, the department’s enterprise development programme targets SMMEs that operate within and adjacent to these areas to ensure accrual of benefits to local communities from the growth of tourism activities in such areas. These activities cover amongst others tour operations, accommodation, food etc. An important addition in this regard has been the joint development by the Department of Tourism, SANParks and National Treasury of the framework for concessions, which ensures that transformation imperatives are firmly upheld in the granting of concessions, thereby supporting inclusivity in the growth eco-tourism.

01 April 2021 - NW954

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Van Der Walt, Ms D to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

(1)       With regard to the proposed Grade RR as part of the schooling system (a) what are the current details of the plan, (b) on what date will the plan be implemented, (c) what funding will be made available and (d) what total number of educators will be added to the system; (2) whether sufficient infrastructure will be provided; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

Question 1

a) The Departments of Basic Education and Social Development are working together to develop a plan that will see the ECD function migrated from DSD to the DBE. Joint teams have been allocated to workstreams to deliberate on the technical detail and specifics. 

b) The ECD function shift to DBE is planned for 1 April 2022.

c) The details of the funding will be determined through the finalisation of the function shift process.

d) The Department of Basic Education will develop a Human Resource Development Strategy in the 2021/22 financial year, to detail with the professionalisation of the ECD workforce and its implications for ECD practitioners. 

Question 2

a) The availability of appropriate facilities is important in the provision of ECD services. In this regard, the Department of Basic Education will develop an Infrastructure Strategy to be implemented using the ECD conditional grant. 

01 April 2021 - NW421

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Selfe, Mr J to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

Whether every regulation issued, since 30 May 2019, in terms of section 134 of the Correctional Services Act, Act 111 of 1998, has been referred to the relevant Parliamentary committees overseeing his department, as is required by subsection 134(5); if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

No, the Department has not referred any regulations as none have been drafted nor published since 30 May 2019 to date.

END

01 April 2021 - NW941

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King, Ms C to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) is the national vacancy rate of teachers in the Republic, (b) is the total breakdown of the number of posts that have remained vacant in each province and (c) are the details of the vacancy rate in the (i) 2016, (ii) 2017, (iii) 2018, (iv) 2019 and (v) 2020 academic years?

Reply:

(a) 5.8% as at the end of February 2021

(b)The vacancy rate reported is in terms of the actual vacancies at schools in relation to posts that each school was allocated for 2021. Provincial Education Departments are currently redeploying educators that are additional to the allocated post establishments at some schools to schools that have vacancies. Once this process has been finalised and the residual vacant posts have been filled through appointment of educators from outside the system the actual number of vacancies will be lower than the current rate.

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2021

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

50 705

3 718

5.4%

Free State

20 490

842

3.9%

Gauteng

64 950

2 282

3.4%

KwaZulu-Natal

87 351

7 274

5.7%

Limpopo

51 637

5 375

9.2%

Mpumalanga

32 543

2 161

6.1%

North West 

26 556

1 433

5.3%

Northern Cape

9 181

354

4.5%

Western Cape 

29 099

1 117

4.3%

Grand Total

372 512

24 556

5.8%

Source: PERSAL, February 2021

(c) 

(i) 2016

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2016

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

53 998

1 739

3.2%

Free State

20 432

662

3.2%

Gauteng

59 848

684

1.1%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 356

2 712

3.1%

Limpopo

64 155

6 654

10.4%

Mpumalanga

32 783

792

2.4%

North West 

25 329

1 200

4.7%

Northern Cape

8 678

2 252

26.0%

Western Cape 

29 803

1 024

3.4%

Grand Total

381 382

17 719

4.6%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2016

(ii) 2017

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2017

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54 747

4 593

8.4%

Free State

20 974

845

4.0%

Gauteng

61 761

580

0.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

90 698

1 710

1.9%

Limpopo

52 097

4 920

9.4%

Mpumalanga

32 700

644

2.0%

North West 

25 908

666

2.6%

Northern Cape

8 231

512

6.2%

Western Cape 

30 225

1 218

4.0%

Grand Total

377 341

15 688

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2017

 

(iii) 2018

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2018

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54 026

4 497

8.3%

Free State

20 619

142

0.7%

Gauteng

60 302

1 243

2.1%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 420

412

0.5%

Limpopo

54 214

4 511

8.3%

Mpumalanga

32 799

552

1.7%

North West 

25 906

560

2.2%

Northern Cape

8 039

326

4.1%

Western Cape 

29 826

1 309

4.4%

Grand Total

377 341

15 688

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2018

(iv) 2019

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2019

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

54029

3 281

6.1%

Free State

20608

843

4.1%

Gauteng

60027

1 140

1.9%

KwaZulu-Natal

86737

2 729

3.1%

Limpopo

51724

5 101

9.9%

Mpumalanga

32651

538

1.6%

North West

26260

319

1.2%

Northern Cape

9046

296

3.3%

Western Cape

31246

1 445

4.6%

Grand Total

372328

15 692

4.2%

Source: PED Quarterly Report, September 2019

 

(v) 2020

 

Province

Number of posts allocated for 2021

Vacant Posts

Vacancy Rate

Eastern Cape

52 632

2 848

5.4%

Free State

20 240

343

1.7%

Gauteng

59 138

452

0.8%

KwaZulu-Natal

86 737

6 216

7.2%

Limpopo

56 468

4 538

8.0%

Mpumalanga

34 854

1 772

5.1%

North West

25 863

509

2.0%

Northern Cape

9 149

40

0.4%

Western Cape

28 944

101

0.3%

Grand Total

374 025

16 819

4.5%

Source: PERSAL, December 2020

01 April 2021 - NW573

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(1)Whether her department has established what percentage of tourism can be attributed to eco-tourism annually for the past five years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) (a) what growth has been identified in eco-tourism since the inception of the Green Tourism Incentive Programme (GTIP) and (b) will the growth be plotted annually since the GTIP inception

Reply:

(1) No, the department does not collect statistics under a category called eco-tourism. Department monitors the tourism sector’s performance through classified industries related to the Tourism Satelite Account as per System of Industrial Classifications. These include, accommodation, food and beverages, transportation, travel agencies and other reservation services, cultural industries, sports and recreational industries, and retail trade (tourism connect goods). This is an approach that is followed worldwide, including by National Statistical agencies and the UNWTO in the measurement of the sector’s performance and provides standardisation of economic data and comparability thereof.

(2) (a) and (b) GTIP is not an eco-tourism focused incentive. It provides businesses with grant support for energy and water efficiency technology, including retro-fitment. Thus, there is no direct relationship between eco-tourism and the Green Tourism Incentive Programme.

01 April 2021 - NW891

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Ngcobo, Mr S to ask the Minister of Basic Education to ask the Minister of Basic Education

What (a) total number of schools have been affected by (i) vandalism and (ii) the weather since the start of the current academic year and (b) is the extent of the damage in monetary terms?

Reply:

(a)  (i) 148 schools have been vandalised since the start of the current academic year; 

        (ii) 288 schools have be affected by the weather since the start of the current academic year.

(b)  The cost estimates to repair the schools affected by the weather is R196 695 374.01

01 April 2021 - NW688

Profile picture: Chetty, Mr M

Chetty, Mr M to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether (a) her department and/or (b) any entity reporting to her makes use of private security firms; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, in each case, what is the (i) name of each firm, (ii) purpose, (iii) value and (iv) duration of each specified contract?

Reply:

a) Whether the department makes use of private security firms.

(i) Name of each firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Octaves Group (PTY) LTD

Physical security guarding services

R 5 057 488.84

( For full contract)

3 Years

( 1 July 2020 to 30 June 2023)

b) Whether the entity makes use of private security firms.

(i) Name of each firm

(ii) Purpose

(iii) Value

(iv) Duration of each specified contract

Fidelity Security Services (Pty) Ltd,

Registration: 1997/013274/07

Provision of 24-7-365 days Security and Guarding services to SA Tourism, Head Office

R4,367,942.29

( For full contract)

( Exl Country Offices)

5 Years

(1 February 2020 to 31 January 2025)

01 April 2021 - NW772

Profile picture: Spies, Ms ERJ

Spies, Ms ERJ to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

Whether, perhaps in collaboration with the SA Local Government Association, her department will consider introducing a mandatory programme accredited by the SA Qualifications Authority which is similar to the programme for newly appointed municipal officials, for all newly elected municipal councillors to capacitate them to fulfil their duties; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

The Department in collaboration with South African Local Government Association (SALGA) and key stakeholders developed an Integrated Councillor Induction Programme (ICIP). The programme is accredited by Local Government Sector Education and Training Authority (LGSETA at NQF Level 3. It is a mandatory programme for all newly elected municipal councillors and traditional leaders who are identified to participate in the proceedings of municipal councils. Upon successful completion of the five-day training session, participants are awarded a certificate of competence.

The ICIP is followed by the municipal specific induction programme which entails the induction of councilors by their respective municipalities. The focus of the programme is to equip councilors with knowledge on the environment they will operating within the municipal jurisdiction.
This includes inter alia the development of applicable municipal by-laws, rules of order in council, specific responsibilities of each councilor in respect of committees which they serve.

The other mandatory programme relates to the portfolio-based induction. This programme is designed to orientate councilors in specific portfolios aligned to their respective functional responsibilities in the municipality. These will include various council committees such as Municipal Public Accounts Committee (MPAC) and Oversight Committees.

Furthermore, municipal councillors are also encouraged to enroll for an accredited NQF Level 5 Training Programme, which is designed for an individual career pathway for those who have formal and experiential learning as they have served as councillors before. Career pathway incorporates councilor induction as a starting point of councilor development during the term of office of the council.

 

01 April 2021 - NW806

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

What number of (a) programmes has her department created to promote domestic tourism and (b) jobs were created by these programmes?

Reply:

a) As part of reigniting demand, domestic tourism market has been prioritised for recovery of the sector. In this regard, the Department of Tourism and its entity SA Tourism are running a domestic tourism campaign. This is supported by the continuation of the Sho’t left campaign, which supports a deal driven and consumer based approach. It also includes outreaches by the Minister and Deputy Minister to take the campaign to some of the best attractions across the rural areas, small towns and townships that don’t always get as much coverage. Thus, there is only one domestic tourism campaign supported by various initiatives including support for compliance with COVID19 operational safety requirements. Going forward, the Department of Tourism and SA Tourism will add a domestic events campaign focusing on both business and other events.

B) Tourism sector jobs are accounted for through the Tourism Satellite Account and, also through estimates by the World Travel and Tourism Council (WTTC). The latest available figures are for 2019 from the WTTC, which indicate that direct employment was at 759,900 jobs, and combined (direct and indirect) employment was at 1,483,200 jobs. It is imporatant to note that in measurement of impact, such as employment, there is no separation between jobs from domestic tourist activities and those from activities by international tourists as services are provided to both tourists’ categories alike. However, the Department of Tourism anticipates that the jobs reported for the 2019 period would have been severely impacted upon by the outbreak of the pandemic.

01 April 2021 - NW424

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Yako, Ms Y to ask the Minister of Justice and Correctional Services

What total number of prisoners has he had to release prematurely during the COVID-19 pandemic in order to manage the numbers at correctional centres?Nw477E

Reply:

Out of the 19 000 estimated Low Risk Sentenced offenders who have or will reach their minimum detention periods within a period of sixty (60) months from 27 April 2020, a total of 13 765 (12 980 males and 785 females) have been placed in the system of Community Corrections to continue serving their sentences were released as at the 19 February 2021, in managing overcrowding and mitigating the spread of COVID-19 virus in Correctional Centres. Other offenders who were initially eligible for the dispensation were discovered to have further charges and as such they no longer qualify. This process is still continuing as some of those who qualify are required to attend rehabilitation programmes.

END

31 March 2021 - NW931

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)Whether, in view of the construction of the new hydrographic vessel known as Project Hotel nearing completion, and the first of the three inshore patrol vessels known as Project Biro also nearing delivery date, (a) her department, (b) the SA National Defence Force and/or (c) Armscor is/are in a position to make the payments to the two contracting firms in terms of the two contracts; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) from what source will the specified contractual payments be made and (ii) what are the further relevant details in this regard; (2) whether any funding will and/or has been transferred to Armscor for any prime mission equipment acquisition payments; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what are the penalties that will be imposed on her department in terms of the contracts if the agreed payments are not possible?

Reply:

1. (i) Sufficient budget allocation is available in the Special Defence Account to meet the contractual obligations related to Project HOTEL.

(ii) The department has however conducted a reprioritisation exercise to allocate the remaining SDA budget and to ensure that sufficient funding will be available to meet the contractual obligations on Project BIRO.

(iii) The Special Defence Account has been reduced by approximately R9 billion from 2018 after the Project BIRO contractual commitments were already finalised.

2. Funding is not transferred to Armscor for prime mission equipment acquisition. Armscor as the procurement agency for the department manages the procurement and contracting process on behalf of the department. The payment is then released directly to the supplier from the DOD account via the Reserve Bank. The payments are made after Armscor, as the contract manager, has confirmed the achievement of the specific milestone on the contract.

31 March 2021 - NW760

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

What strategy does her department have to incentivise tourism to rural areas and not just in urban areas and metros, as global travel restrictions are lifted?

Reply:

In response to the lack of travel amongst South Africans especially the previously disadvantaged communities, the Domestic Tourism Scheme was developed to respond to the challenges highlighted in the DTGS and encourage group travel.

The Scheme is one of the tools that the department uses to promote and encourage domestic tourism, particularly amongst the previously disadvantages communities, thus increasing the number of domestic travellers. It is used to familiarise the new travellers with the services of tour operators, who can organise holiday trips on individual’s behalf and remove the burden from the unseasoned traveller. Often this traveller is not familiar with booking these services. The scheme makes it easier for ordinary South Africans to travel and know their country. The Department has developed a Domestic Tourism (incentive) Scheme, which has been piloted through partnerships with national parks and provincial reserves. The program is envisioned to design and galvanize different social tourism groups; from rural and urban areas; to buy in and participate in the program.

A Social Tourism Directory has also been developed with the most recent information on tourism attractions. The directory is targeting the previously untraveled communities which will include the youth, people with modest to low income, senior citizens, stokvels/social groups and people living with disabilities. This directory is a tool to make information available and accessible regarding tourism attractions, services and places of interest to the identified target groups. Its purpose is to encourage travel amongst South Africans by making the information available and accessible, so that more South Africans can travel and enjoy the benefits thereof.

Product diversification efforts that aim to enhance rural and township related experiences shall also serve as an incentive for rural tourism.

31 March 2021 - NW896

Profile picture: Powell, Ms EL

Powell, Ms EL to ask the Minister of Finance

Whether the National Treasury intends to take any action against government departments that fail to publish the details of personal protective equipment procurement on the website of the National Treasury in accordance with the instruction to all government departments by the President, Mr M C Ramaphosa; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

In terms of Instruction No.11 of 2020/21 (PFMA institutions) and Circular 105 (MFMA institutions), all institutions are required to report procurement transactions on a monthly basis. All procurement transactions related to the emergency procurement for COVID-19 PPE items, fabric masks as well as other goods, works or services that were procured to prevent an escalation of the national state of disaster, declared on 15 March 2020 (the Disaster) or to alleviate, contain or minimise the effects of the Disaster, must be reported. This includes, inter alia, expenditure for quarantine and isolation services, humanitarian relief, etc.

The reports are published monthly in the public domain and serves as a transparency mechanism to lay bare non-compliant government institutions. It is therefore the responsibility of the accounting officers and accounting authorities to ensure that the information provided to the National Treasury is credible, accurate and auditable.

National Treasury has thus far followed up with National Departments, in writing, to make the accounting officers aware of the non-compliance to Instruction no. 11 of 2020/21. It must, however, be noted that not all non-reporting is necessarily regarded as non-compliance as some departments do not procure on a monthly basis. There are instances where departments have not reported in a certain month because no procurement was done in that month.

National Treasury has also engaged the Auditor-General to request that AGSA follow up with selected government institutions whether any expenditure was actually incurred and whether the institutions reported the expenditure in accordance with Instruction no. 11 of 2020/2021 or Circular 105. This will be included in the next annual audit cycle.

31 March 2021 - NW872

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) On what date will the Rail Tourism Survey Report be completed and (b) what (i) is the objective of the Rail Tourism Survey and (ii) are the details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey?

Reply:

a) The Rail Tourism Survey Report will be completed on 31 March 2021

b) (i) Objective of the Rail Tourism Survey is:

To understand the rail tourism environment through exploring and assessing various aspects (nature of the concept, market demand and supply issues, planning and operational modalities, funding, monitoring and evaluation mechanisms with key stakeholders), with the objective to inform policy, viability processes, support rail tourism analysis functions, route utilisation strategies, regional planning assessments, rail tourism economic models, rail scheme assessments and station catchment analysis.

(ii) The details of the steps towards the completion of the Rail Tourism Survey.

The approach covers the following steps:

(a) Project Orientation that lead to an Inception Report

(b) Literature Review and Survey Framework that lead to a Survey framework

(c) Data collection that lead to a data collection report

(d) Survey Analysis that lead to a Data Analysis Report

(e) Reporting and Project Closure that lead to the final Survey Report and close- out Report

31 March 2021 - NW822

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)With reference to the modified Land Cruisers’ mobility packages that have been in service for three years as part of Operation Corona, (a) what number of these vehicles (i) were deployed and (ii) are still in use and (b) in what configuration are they in use (details furnished); (2) whether there have been any vehicle losses; if so, what (a) number and (b) were found to be the causes of the losses?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to Operational matters that are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW654

Profile picture: De Freitas, Mr MS

De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) How is the new Marketing Investment Framework linked to the Tourism Recovery Plan, (b) what are the details of the new Marketing Investment Framework, particularly in response to the COVID-19 in the affected core markets, (c) how are travel restrictions going to affect the implementation of the new Marketing Investment Framework, (d) what are the new markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework and (e) what is the focus of the new Marketing Investment Framework with regard to (i) African, (ii) Asian, (iii) European, (iv) North American and (v) South African markets?

Reply:

a) In 2016/17, SA Tourism, in partnership with the Tourism industry, developed a Marketing Investment Framework (MIF) that was focused on identifying markets, optimising marketing investments across the identified target markets, and distributing resources to help meet the set objectives. Every three to five years, SA Tourism then reviews its portfolio in order to improve its ability to dynamically and effectively allocate and manage its budgets and resources

In 2020, SA Tourism initiated a revision of the Marketing and Investment Framework using 2019 as the base year to review the portfolio. The review came at an opportune time as the global markets are facing the challenges presented by COVID 19 pandemic. The framework will further assist in the implementation of the strategic interventions of the recovery plan. The process of the review made use of key variables related to performance, outlook, South Africa’s ability to win in the market, return on past investments, and other criteria.

It should be noted that the Tourism Recovery Plan is currently in the process of being submitted to cabinet.

b) Details of the new Marketing Investment Framework. The framework process considered four (4) main stages of evaluating the markets. 

Level 0 - Data availability


For market prioritisation, the framework considered all the 54 countries in the continent, and shortlists markets based on their data availability across mandatory indicators such as Urban population, GDP PPP per capita purchasing power parity rates) , currency exchange rate, political stability index and education index.

Level 1 - Attractiveness (The size of travel in each country and what drives it)


The purpose of this stage is to quantify which macroeconomic indicators are important in driving travel. Considered indicators in the final model were political stability index, GDP PPP (purchasing power parity rates), Inflation rate, Unemployment percentage, Inequality in income, Currency exchange rate, education index, urban population, internet penetration and proximity to SA.

Level 2 Travel potential

The purpose of this stage is to rate countries based on their travel potential. A regression model is developed using the following indicators such as total outbound trips, size of domestic trips, passport index, tourist outbound expenditure, propensity to travel short haul vs long haul, business outbound trips, holiday trips, spend in SA and length of stay in SA.

Level 3 – SA’s ability to attract those markets

The purpose is to assess how easy would be for SA to operate in those countries. The indicators looked at visa regulation by SA. Furthermore, the model looked at SA’s presence in those countries, trading across border index, airports with direct flight, average cost of travel, hygiene index (covid19)

c) The challenges of the unprecedented COVID-19 pandemic have decimated the ability of many of these source markets to travel to South Africa. Source market travel restrictions, international government regulations and slashed airline routes will continue to severely impact the ability of international travel to South Africa for several months to come.

Consequently, the relative priority of the 24 markets (as mentioned in (d)) must be considered, in conjunction with dynamic and up to date information of variables that will affect the likelihood of travel from each market. This includes:

  • COVID-19 pandemic severity and outlook: Which is detailed by the current total cases of COVID-19, the current growth rate of COVID-19 (measured as weekly change per 10 000 of the population), and the projected COVID19 growth rate for Quarter 1 of 2021.
  • Government Stringency Index: Source market government policies to control the pandemic, such as border control, travel advisories which include quarantine (isolation), and local movement regulations which will influence the readiness of individuals to external travel.
  • Accessibility: Level of impact of travel to and from South Africa (land, air and sea).
  • Vaccination rollout: The pace, impact and resultant confidence levels for traveld) New markets that have been incorporated in the new Marketing Investment Framework.

In total, 24 markets / countries are identified for prioritisation, segmented into 16 “`Growth” and 8 “Defend” markets, with an additional set of markets ear marked as “Watchlist”. The 24 prioritised markets accounted for 92% of all international trips in 2019. The selection, to meet the 21 million target, comprises:

      • Eight (8) Africa Land markets
      • Two (2) Africa Air markets
      • Three (3) American markets
      • Seven (7) European markets
      • Four (4) Australasia and Middle East Markets (AAME )

The selection portfolio in 2019 accounted for

      • 83% of holiday arrivals,
      • 77% of MICE arrivals ( Meetings Incentives Conference and Exhibitions)
      • 92% of total international arrivals to South Africa in 2019

e) For the next 12-15 months, given the fast-changing dynamic of the COVID-19 pandemic and related uncertainty, the broader South African Tourism strategic focus is on domestic, regional and select global markets. In each market, a dual business and leisure focus will be adopted, as follows:

(i) South African Markets

Accelerate domestic demand and associated revenue for sustained growth

(ii) African Markets (Land and Air Markets)

Develop break through communication and content that drive brand positivity messaging to increase arrivals and spend for sustainable growth.

(iii) Global Markets (Europe, Americas and Asia)

Return the core business to marketing.

31 March 2021 - NW1000

Profile picture: George, Dr DT

George, Dr DT to ask the Minister of Finance

In light of the scourge of violent crime in the Republic, how does the National Treasury justify the 5,27% nominal cut to Vote 28: Police for the 2021-22 financial year relative to the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

Parliament approved a fiscal framework that proposes significant adjustments to spending over the medium term in order to stabilize government debt and reduce the pace of growth in debt servicing costs in October 2020. This approval by Parliament meant all spheres of government and all department’s budgets would be reduced to achieve debt stabilization. Furthermore, Parliament passed the 2021 fiscal framework tabled by the Minister of Finance in February 2021 proposing the same fiscal consolidation through lowering the levels of expenditure. The decision to reduce departmental budgets was not a National Treasury decision but a Cabinet decision.

Table 1 provides a summary of expenditure trends and estimates for Vote 28: Police. Between 2020/21 and 2021/22, the department’s budget for compensation of employees is expected to decrease from R76.1 billion to R75.3 billion, while its budget for goods and services is expected to decrease from R19.2 billion to R16.3 billion. The main items influenced under goods and services are non-essential in nature, e.g. advertising, consultants, catering, and travel and subsistence, and will be managed through cost-containment. Reductions on compensation of employees will be managed through salary freezes and non-filling of less critical post vacancies.

                                   

Table 1. Expenditure trends and estimates: Vote 28 (Police)

Economic classification

 Audited outcome

 Adjusted

appropriation

Average

growth

rate

(%)

Average:

Expen-

diture/

Total

(%)

 Medium-term expenditure

estimate

Average

growth

rate

(%)

Average:

Expen-

diture/

Total

(%)

R million

 2017/18

 2018/19

 2019/20

 2020/21

 2017/18 - 2020/21

 2021/22

 2022/23

 2023/24

 2020/21 - 2023/24

Economic classification

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Current payments

82 469.3

86 118.7

92 232.1

95 366.4

5.0%

95.7%

91 570.7

92 036.9

92 097.1

-1.2%

95.2%

Compensation of employees

67 124.5

71 282.4

76 357.7

76 147.0

4.3%

78.1%

75 300.5

75 299.7

75 297.1

-0.4%

77.5%

Goods and services

15 344.8

14 836.3

15 874.5

19 219.4

7.8%

17.5%

16 270.2

16 737.2

16 800.1

-4.4%

17.7%

Transfers and subsidies

1 049.3

1 268.5

1 225.1

1 613.7

15.4%

1.4%

1 333.5

1 258.4

1 267.2

-7.7%

1.4%

Provinces and municipalities

44.5

49.5

52.8

53.2

6.1%

0.1%

55.6

57.6

61.4

4.9%

0.1%

Departmental agencies and accounts

39.7

45.6

52.9

51.0

8.7%

0.1%

49.9

51.4

53.5

1.6%

0.1%

Non-profit institutions

  –

1.0

  –

1.0

0.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

Households

965.1

1 172.5

1 119.5

1 508.5

16.1%

1.3%

1 228.0

1 149.4

1 152.2

-8.6%

1.3%

Payments for capital assets

2 947.9

2 894.7

2 440.6

2 580.8

-4.3%

2.9%

3 451.3

3 562.3

3 719.3

13.0%

3.4%

Buildings and other fixed structures

575.4

686.3

513.3

497.7

-4.7%

0.6%

946.7

960.9

1 003.2

26.3%

0.9%

Machinery and equipment

2 340.4

2 201.4

1 927.3

2 078.7

-3.9%

2.3%

2 497.3

2 593.8

2 708.2

9.2%

2.5%

Biological assets

5.9

7.0

  –

4.4

-9.2%

0.0%

7.3

7.6

7.9

21.4%

0.0%

Software and other intangible assets

26.2

  –

  –

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

0.0%

0.0%

Payments for financial assets

13.9

15.6

32.3

  –

-100.0%

0.0%

  –

  –

  –

0.0%

0.0%

Total

86 480.4

90 297.5

95 930.2

99 560.9

4.8%

100.0%

96 355.5

96 857.6

97 083.6

-0.8%

100.0%

 

 

Over the medium term, compared to other departments in the Peace and Security function group, Table 2 confirms that the Police services baseline decreases least, i.e. a marginal rate of only 0.2 per cent. Government’s support to the attainment of the objectives and outcomes set out under priority 6 (social cohesion and safer communities) of the 2019-2024 medium term strategic framework is therefore corroborated.

Table 2. Peace and security function expenditure

 

2020/21

Medium term expenditure estimate

Percentage of total MTEF allocation

Average annual MTEF change

R million

Revised estimate

2021/22

2022/23

2023/24

   

Defence and state security

53 968

46 656

47 811

48 132

22.5%

-3.7%

Police services

106 603

104 570

105 946

105 994

49.9%

-0.2%

Law courts and prisons

48 263

48 482

49 632

49 919

23.3%

1.1%

Home affairs

9 780

8 862

9 463

9 372

13.4%

-1.4%

Total

218 615

208 570

212 853

213 417

100.0%

-0.8%

31 March 2021 - NW130

Profile picture: Schreiber, Dr LA

Schreiber, Dr LA to ask the Minister of Finance

(1)With reference to his reply to question 2000 on 14 October 2020 wherein he required the identification numbers, will he now advise whether any public funding of any nature whatsoever has been paid to (a) a certain person (name and details furnished) and (b) a certain person (name and details furnished) since 27 April 1994; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details; (2) whether there was an application of any nature to obtain state funding and/or tenders by the specified persons; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details

Reply:

1(a) National Treasury only has access to payments information from national and provincial departments using the BAS payment system. In order to search for information against individuals, the National Treasury would need the identification numbers as a search by names may result in inaccurate results.

1(b) A search was done on the BAS payment system for the period 1 April 2017 to date and no payments were found that were made to the entities or initiatives mentioned. (name and details furnished)

2 The National Treasury is not aware of any application of any nature to obtain state funding and/or tenders by the specified persons, entities and/or initiatives.

31 March 2021 - NW930

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Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(a) What total number of horseback-mounted infantry men from the SA Army Specialised Infantry Capability are deployed along the borders of the Republic and (i) Zimbabwe, (ii) Mozambique and (iii) Lesotho, (b) where are they deployed, (c) what number had initially been deployed and (d) what number of the soldiers are still in service?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to matters of

Border Safeguarding and are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW817

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

With reference to her department and its communication with local stakeholders about relaxing travel restrictions, (a) what communication has been undertaken, (b) with whom has her department communicated, (c) what were the contents of such communication and (d) on what date did such communication take place in each case?

Reply:

a) Communication undertaken related to implications of COVID19 outbreak, as well as clarification and awareness raising around the Ministerial directions issued in terms Disaster Management Act. The department’s engagements also focused on health protocols to give confidence to tourists and to ensure that the sector supports the country’s efforts to minimize the spread of COVID19 infection. Finally, the focus was also on recovery and long-term sustainability of the sector post the pandemic.

b) The communication was with the industry, media, other departments and organs of the state and the international community.

c) Please refer to (a) above for the contents

d) Communication started shortly before the first COVID19 case in South Africa and continues to date as the country implements the Risk Adjusted Strategy to maintain a balance between lives and livelihood in the management of the pandemic.

31 March 2021 - NW929

Profile picture: Marais, Mr S

Marais, Mr S to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

What total number of (a) motorcycle-mounted infantry men are deployed along the borders of the Republic and (i) Zimbabwe, (ii) Mozambique and (iii) Lesotho, (b) men have been deployed, (c) men are still in service and (d) losses have been registered?

Reply:

The information required in this Parliamentary question relates to matters of

Border Safeguarding and are security sensitive.

The response to this question can be disclosed in a closed session of the Joint Standing Committee on Defence and/or Joint Standing Committee on Intelligence.

31 March 2021 - NW653

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De Freitas, Mr MS to ask the Minister of Tourism

(a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism, (b) what are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines in this regard, (c) what functions and services will be prioritised and (d) how will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured?

Reply:

a) What is being done to reduce the outsourcing of functions and services within SA Tourism.

South African Tourism strictly monitors the appointment of consultants as evidenced by the fact that consultants may only be appointed after a comprehensive gap analysis has been approved by the Chief Executive Officer. The outsourcing model remains relevant as the entity requires specilised agency services like marketing content creation, production, creative, media, activation etc, as there are currently no internal human resource, systems capacity and expertise to carry out these services. In order to ensure the most effecient way of outsourcing marketing services, South African Tourism during the current year changed the agency fee model from fixed retainer to an activity based fee structure.

South African Tourism is currently in the process of reviewing all contracts in the ICT space with the aim of reducing reliance on external consultants especially in the helpdesk and support service as well as system support and database space.

b) What are the (i) time frames, (ii) timelines and (iii) deadlines.

The conversion for marketing services from a fixed retainer to an activity based fee will be concluded in the 2021/22 financial year.

(c) The following services in the ICT services wil be prioritised.

– helpdesk & support services and

– support and database services.

.

d) How will this be (i) monitored and (ii) measured.

(i) Will be monitored through expenditure.

(ii) Measured through efficiencies.

31 March 2021 - NW540

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Shelembe, Mr ML to ask the Minister of Defence and Military Veterans

(1)(a) Whether any recommendations and/or advice on matters pertaining to the military veterans and their beneficiaries were submitted to her by the Advisory Council on Military Veterans in the past five years; if so, (2) whether those recommendations were implemented by her; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details; (3) what amount was spent by members of the Advisory Council in the past five years that constitute their term of office?

Reply:

(1) Yes

(2) There are ongoing discussions on all aspects affecting military veterans and currently a task team is headed up by the Deputy President to attend to pressing matters affecting military veterans.

(3) R 4 852 145.00

31 March 2021 - NW244

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Tourism

Whether her department has existing training programmes to capacitate local informal businesses based in the (a) townships and (b) rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Reply:

(a) And (b) The Department of Tourism provides specific support programmes for both businesses in the townships and rural areas. Informal businesses that approach the Department for assistance are guided to platforms where they can obtain assistance and relevant support packages including being guided on the requisite compliance measures to access such support.

30 March 2021 - NW645

Profile picture: Sithole, Mr KP

Sithole, Mr KP to ask the Minister of Transport

What is the breakdown of the total amount in income that the tolls on the national road between Johannesburg and Durban generate per (a) month and (b) year?

Reply:

Important to note that toll income from toll roads are used to:

  • Repay the debt raised to fund the capital cost of the initial road construction works and other major capital costs implemented during the life of the project (typically 30 years) to ensure that there is sufficient road capacity to cater for increasing traffic demand.
  • Cover the cost of road maintenance including pavement rehabilitation and resurfacing to ensure the economic sustainability of this crucial national asset over the life of the project.
  • Operation and maintenance of the toll collection system, including the toll plazas over the life of the project.
  • Undertake routine maintenance including grass cutting, minor road repairs, road marking and signage over the life of the project.
  • Provide route patrols including incident management, emergency response and road user assistance over the life of the project.

(a)(b) Toll revenue along the National Route 3 (N3) per month and year are derived as follow:

  • SANRAL – Marrianhill toll plaza - This is state toll road driven by Government with no profit objective, and
  • N3TC Concession - De Hoek Plaza, Wilge Plaza, Tugela Plaza, Mooi River Plaza and associated ramp plazas. – This is a 30-year concession with the private sector to secure off balance sheet funding and investment into infrastructure, with the associated private sector investor Return on Investment (ROI) objectives. Returns are however regulated through the concession agreement.

The monthly breakdown for 2019/20 audited financial year is provided in the Table below. The 2019/20 audited financial year is used since 2020/21 audited figures are not yet available. The 2020/21 numbers are expected to be approximately 25% lower due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

(a) Month

SANRAL

Concession

Total

Jan-19

R 20 648 213.00

R 153 991 519.00

R 174 639 732.00

Feb-19

R 19 574 170.00

R 145 981 460.00

R 165 555 630.00

Mar-19

R 23 042 389.00

R 171 846 953.00

R 194 889 342.00

Apr-19

R 22 039 547.00

R 164 367 896.00

R 186 407 443.00

May-19

R 22 988 554.00

R 171 445 459.00

R 194 434 013.00

Jun-19

R 22 941 076.00

R 171 091 378.00

R 194 032 454.00

Jul-19

R 23 778 803.00

R 177 339 031.00

R 201 117 834.00

Aug-19

R 23 931 447.00

R 178 477 429.00

R 202 408 876.00

Sep-19

R 22 814 467.00

R 170 147 146.00

R 192 961 613.00

Oct-19

R 24 179 326.00

R 180 326 076.00

R 204 505 402.00

Nov-19

R 23 469 829.00

R 175 034 742.00

R 198 504 571.00

Dec-19

R 23 059 412.00

R 171 973 911.00

R 195 033 323.00

(b) Total 2019/20 FY

R 272 467 233.00

R 2 032 023 000.00

R 2 304 490 233.00

30 March 2021 - NW593

Buthelezi, Ms SA to ask the Minister of Cooperative Governance and Traditional Affairs

In light of the fact that the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996, envisages a role for traditional leadership in decision-making in the Republic’s constitutional democracy, and in view of her department’s indication that one of the District Development Model priorities is the acceleration of the implementation of Agrarian Revolution by ensuring that land is made available for agricultural projects by traditional leaders, what consultation has been undertaken with traditional leadership houses at (a) national and (b) provincial level in this regard?

Reply:

During the opening of the National House of Traditional Leaders (NHTL) on 25 February 2020, the President of the Republic of South Africa called on traditional leaders to lead in the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme. Through the NHTL, traditional leaders in all provinces were mobilized to make land available in their respective communities for agricultural programmes and projects.

In ensuring that traditional leaders acceded to the call of making land available for the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme, Traditional Leaders were consulted through Provincial Houses of Traditional Leaders and the Chairperson Forum. All Provincial Houses were requested to cascade information to respective Local Houses of Traditional Leaders. Furthermore, the Chairperson visited provinces where he encouraged traditional leaders to pledge land for agricultural purposes.

To date, as per the table below, one million five hundred thousand (1.5 million) hectares of land has been pledged by traditional leaders for agricultural programmes and projects in areas under the jurisdiction of traditional leadership. Working with the relevant government departments and stakeholders, the implementation of the agrarian revolution programme will be in line with the District Development Model (DDM).

The details of the land pledged are as follows:

PROVINCE

DISTRICT

HECTARES PLEDGED

TOTAL P/PROVINCE

Limpopo

Waterberg

684943

685043

 

Mopani

100

 

Mpumalanga

All Districts

 

66109

Northern Cape

John Taolo Gaetsewe

4 410

4410

Free State

Thabo Mofutsanyane

100

2100

 

Mangaung

2000

 

Eastern Cape

OR Tambo

804038

810 250

 

Chris Hani

4 300

 

Gauteng

City of Tshwane

2010

2010

KwaZulu-Natal

iLembe

30

30

TOTAL

   

1 569 952

30 March 2021 - NW325

Profile picture: Winkler, Ms HS

Winkler, Ms HS to ask the Minister of Transport

What total amount did each provincial licensing authority receive in private charter licence fees for the 2020-21 financial year?

Reply:

The Provincial Authorities does not derive any revenue in respect of the license fees pertaining to Aviation license fees and private chartered flights.

As it relates to Chartered bus services, the permit fees are receivables for provinces. In this regard provinces shall be approached to provide the requisite information.

30 March 2021 - NW858

Profile picture: Hicklin, Ms MB

Hicklin, Ms MB to ask the Minister of Public Works and Infrastructure

(1)Whether she has been informed of challenges posed to the professional standing of female councillors in the SA Council for the Architectural Profession, (SACAP), particularly by their male counterparts; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what (a) steps is she taking to protect female councillors from harassment by their male counterparts in SACAP and (b) policies are in place to protect whistle-blowers in SACAP; (2) whether she has been informed of allegations against the current President of SACAP relating to an abuse of power; if n