Hansard: NA: Unrevised Hansard

House: National Assembly

Date of Meeting: 21 Aug 2018

Summary

No summary available.


Minutes

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY TUESDAY, 21 AUGUST 2018
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TUESDAY, 21 AUGUST 2018

 

 
 



PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

 
 



The House met at 14:00.


The Speaker took the Chair and requested members to observe a moment of silence for prayer or meditation.


The SPEAKER: Hon members, before we begin, I wish to recognise a Palestinian delegation of activists, including the mother of the youngest child activist, 12, to be imprisoned. Welcome to South Africa. [Applause.]


NEW MEMBERS


The SPEAKER: Hon members, I wish to announce that the vacancy which occurred in the National Assembly owing to the resignation of Mr M C Ramaphosa had been filled

 

 

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by the nomination of Ms N P Mokonyane with effect from

30 July 2018. [Interjections.]


The vacancy which occurred owing to the resignation of Mr F A Mbalula had been filled by the nomination of Ms E N N Molekane with effect from 30 July 2018.


The vacancy which occurred owing to the resignation of Ms L Brown had been filled by the nomination of Ms T C Majola with effect from 30 July 2018.


The vacancies which occurred due to the passing of Ms N W Madikizela-Mandela and Ms F S Loliwe had been filled by the nomination of Mr A M Seabi and Ms N Abraham- Ntantiso, respectively, with effect from 30 July 2018 and 31 July 2018.


The vacancies which occurred in the National Assembly owing to the resignation of Mr M C Manana and Ms N G Tolashe had been filled by the nomination of Ms N F Shabalala and Mr D J Kabini, respectively, with effect from 31 July 2018.
 

 

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The vacancies which occurred in the National Assembly owing to the resignation of Mr C Nqakula and Mrs C Visser had been filled by the nomination of Ms  L D  Meso and Mr J J McGluwa, respectively, with effect from
17 August 2018 and 16 August 2018. [Applause.]


The vacancy which occurred due to the passing of Mr G S Radebe had been filled by the nomination of Ms C Ndlovu with effect from 17 August 2018.


The members had made and subscribed the oath and affirmation in the offices of the Speaker and Deputy Speaker, respectively. [Applause.]


CONSIDERATION OF REPORT OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HEALTH

– NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH INSTITUTE OF SOUTH AFRICA BILL


There was no debate.


The Chief Whip of the Majority Party moved: That the Report be adopted.
 

 

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Report accordingly adopted.


NATIONAL PUBLIC HEALTH INSTITUTE OF SOUTH AFRICA BILL



(Second Reading debate)


The MINISTER OF HEALTH: Speaker, my Cabinet colleagues and Deputy Ministers, my colleague the Deputy Minister of Health Dr Joe Phaahla, Chairperson of the Portfolio Committee on Health Ms Lindelwa Dunjwa, hon members of the Portfolio Committee on Health, hon members of the House, ladies and gentlemen, good afternoon.


Any country that does not have a reliable Intelligence Service is vulnerable to all manner of dangers brought by criminal syndicates, gangsterism, political machinations, and even opportunistic attacks that emerge internally or externally. A reliable Intelligence Service is meant to provide early warning so the country can counter the impending threat, thwart it before it starts or get ready to deal with it. In a similar manner that countries need forewarning about the above threats, it also needs
 

 

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forewarning about very small, invisible enemies: disease agents and disease processes. Though many countries do not necessarily practise this, the truth of the matter is it is an incontestable fact that prevention, early detection, and a response to a disease render that disease less dangerous than if it is allowed to fester and is only dealt with later. Successful control of disease and, consequently, the reduction of morbidity and mortality depend much on an effective surveillance and early-warning system.


On our continent, the well-known Ebola epidemic has taught us and the whole world a hard lesson. Thus, in the aftermath of the Ebola crisis, Africa decided to establish the Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention, Africa CDC, along the same lines as the world renowned Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States of America.


In our country, we had decided, even before the outbreak of the Ebola epidemic, to establish a National Public Health Institute of South Africa, Naphisa. It is not that
 

 

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we had zero surveillance systems in our country. No. There are indeed pockets of excellence of communicable and noncommunicable disease surveillance systems in South Africa. These surveillance systems are managed by different institutions, but there is a lack of unified institutional capacity for providing co-ordinated and integrated disease and injury surveillance. The Naphisa will be used as a vehicle to provide co-ordinated and integrated disease and injury surveillance data in the Republic and to enhance the effectiveness of health systems. Current evidence is subject to inaccuracies and may not sufficiently address national and regional needs.


The Naphisa model has been benchmarked against international best practice, against the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States, a well-established public health institute. There is also an established network of public health institutes positioned to provide peer support, collaboration and knowledge-sharing to new and existing institutes nationally and across the continent. The Naphisa will be composed of six divisions or units that will deal with
 

 

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the following: communicable diseases, noncommunicable diseases, occupational health, cancer surveillance, injury and violence prevention, and environmental health.


As you can see, most of these divisions already exist in the present surveillance system, for instance, the world- class National Institute for Communicable Diseases, NICD, the National Institute for Occupational Health, NIOH, and the National Cancer Registry. These three institutions will combine to form the Naphisa. Among the board members of the Naphisa will be six members specialising in each of the abovementioned units, as well as a seventh member who will specialise in the field of epidemiology. It is intended that the functions and role of the Naphisa will be positioned at national, regional, continental, and international levels.


At any rate, some of the existing active components of the Naphisa, that is the National Institute for Communicable Diseases, are already positioned at the level of international collaboration. All we have to do
 

 

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is pick the remaining components and place them at a similar level. I thank you.


Ms M L DUNJWA: Hon Speaker, hon Ministers, the Minister and Deputy Minister of Health, Members of Parliament, and our guests, I stand here to give testimony that the Bill came before the committee in May. After that, the national Department of Health did come and give a brief outline of the Bill to the committee.


On 16 and 17 August 2017, public hearings were conducted with stakeholders, departmental entities, interest groups, representatives from academia, and individuals who expressed an interest in the Bill. In the same month, the portfolio committee was then briefed by the Department of Health on issues that had been raised by stakeholders.


On 23 May 2018, the portfolio committee addressed the proposed amendments to the National Public Health Institute of South Africa Bill. The Bill was discussed clause by clause, and where necessary, amendments were
 

 

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made. To widen the scope of the Bill, the committee agreed to include provisions for monitoring environmental health, which will further enhance the prevention of and decrease the burden of disease. After all those deliberations, all parties present in the committee adopted and agreed on the Bill.


The preamble to the Bill captures the spirit and intention of what the Department of Health seeks to achieve: recognising that the right of all South Africans to quality health requires the state to take reasonable legislative and other measures within its available resources to achieve the realisation of this right.


The aim of the National Public Health Institute of South Africa Bill is to provide integrated and co-ordinated disease and injury surveillance, provide for specialised public health services, public health interventions, training and research directed towards the major health problems affecting persons in South Africa. Ultimately, the Bill will increase the capacity of the Department of Health to monitor communicable and noncomunicable
 

 

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diseases and injuries, thereby assisting in the early detection and prevention of, and response to these conditions. In the long run, this will contribute to the control of diseases and the reduction of mortality, thus increasing the life expectancy of South Africans and assisting people to live a healthy life.


The National Public Health Institute of South Africa Bill is another milestone in the health sector’s determination to reduce the quadruple burden of disease and to meet National Development Plan Mission 2030 health targets.
Every person has the right to achieve optimal health, and the ANC is committed to the promotion of health, so as to increase awareness that a healthy population is necessary for the social and economic development of the country.


I therefore present this Bill, and the ANC has agreed to and adopted it.


Ms S P KOPANE: Hon Speaker, finally, after a year and three months, this important Bill is being debated today.
 

 

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What a relief for the people of South Africa, and the regional and international community!


South Africa continues to be vulnerable to epidemics, as the country suffers from major challenges in our health care system, especially the failing public health care system. In addition, with the largest HIV-positive population in the world, South Africans are susceptible to communicable and other diseases, and those that are most vulnerable deserve comprehensive protection.


In this context, it is worrying that the passing of the National Public Health Institute of South Africa Bill has taken so long to finalise. However, it is important to indicate that the Portfolio Committee on Health really has been afforded sufficient time to deliberate on the Bill.


According to the World Health Organisation’s Joint External Evaluation mission report, it is clear that South Africa is not entirely prepared to deal with a major epidemic, and lack resources in several key areas.
 

 

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The lack of preparedness is due to a lack of urgency to finalise this Bill.


What are the costs for not passing and finalising this Bill on time? Currently, in our country – as the Minister and my colleague who spoke before me have said – it is clear that there is no integrated surveillance system.
Different institutes deal with different aspects of surveillance and there is also a lack of institutional capacity for effective surveillance. This compromises our ability to deal effectively with the ongoing threat of infectious diseases.


Furthermore, the public health entities have different mandates and institutional arrangements. The lack of co- ordinated human resources puts additional pressure on the very limited expertise. There is a need for a single, accountable authority. This lack of accountability contributes to fragmented surveillance, and the department continues to carry higher costs due to fragmented surveillance.
 

 

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The Bill aims to provide for the establishment of the National Public Health Institute of South Africa, Naphisa. This body will be responsible for co-ordinating and conducting disease and injury surveillance, and providing specialised public health services and interventions, training and research directed towards the major health challenges affecting our country.


The institute will also address the burden of diseases and injuries faced by South Africans under one umbrella organisation that will co-ordinate key public health functions and data systems. As already indicated by the Minister, it will also include the existing institutes, namely the National Institute for Communicable Diseases, the National Institute for Occupational Health, and the National Cancer Registry.


Two additional institutes will be developed, namely the National Institute for Non-Communicable Diseases and the National Institute for Injury and Violence Prevention.
The DA believes that such collaboration amongst these
 

 

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institutions will definitely ensure the full coverage of public health and safety issues in the country.


I would like to take this opportunity to thank all the stakeholders, my colleagues from the DA, and other political parties, for their contribution in the committee, especially their recommendations for amendments and the new clauses. These new amendments seek to strengthen the governance and control of Naphisa. They provide guidance on the composition and appointment of board members, the disqualification of membership of the board, vacation of office by a member, removal of a member from the board, dissolution of the board, board meetings, and how the annual report will be tabled before Parliament. More importantly, the new amendments ensure that performance agreements are in place, and provide for the appointment and removal procedures of the chief executive officer.


It is always important to remember that the Bill is premised on section 27 of our Constitution. This affords every person the right to have access to health care
 

 

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services. It also places an obligation on the state to take reasonable legislative measures within its available resources to achieve the progressive realisation of this right.


The Bill aims to fulfil these provisions of the Constitution. Therefore, the DA will fully support the Bill in its current form, and we believe that it will truly benefit all South African people. Thank you. [Applause.]


Dr S S THEMBEKWAYO: Hon Speaker, the Bill before the National Assembly is to establish a National Public Health Institute of South Africa. The National Assembly is to establish a National Public Health Institute of South Africa amongst other things will provide specialised public health services, public health interventions, training and research directed towards the major health challenges affecting many of our people - women, children, people living with disability and poor people.
 

 

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At the beginning of 2018, owing to the complaints from the public about the broken public healthcare system, we declared 2018 the year of public healthcare. South Africa’s public health care is broken beyond what we imagined. The only way to correctly characterise what is happening is that South Africa’s public health care system is killing our people.


Poor people across the country, including HIV patients have to leave their houses at 3 a.m. to queue for their medication and still queue the whole day. People involved in car accidents wait for hours before being treated and when treated they are sent home not properly treated so that they die at home. Elderly people in hospitals like Butterworth in the Eastern Cape sleep on benches owing to shortage of beds.


At Tshilidzini Hospital in Limpopo province, psychiatric ward was burnt, not repaired and patients with mental illness slept in bathrooms on the floor. There is no public health care for the poor, women and people living with disability in South Africa. Hospital buildings are
 

 

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falling apart, machines are not serviced and do not work, toilet facilities are filthy and do not work. This is the case across the public health care facilities. The Minister says more than 500 health facilities across the country do not have facility managers.


Hon Speaker, while as the EFF we do not object to the establishment of the National Public Health Institute of South Africa given the importance to build from nothing a functional and well capacitated public health care system, we do not want that based on past experience of meaningless institutions created to expand and build ANC patronage to give incompetent and unqualified ANC members positions. The institute must employ qualified administrators, qualified researchers and with the competent board with special knowledge as to the Bill.


To conclude, we need to do away with the dual nature of health care in this country – one for the rich and mainly white in the private sector and one poorly resourced for the poor and mostly black people in the public sector. We must therefore, move with speed in ensuring the National
 

 

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Health Insurance is implemented to provide universal health insurance to all our people. I thank you.


Mr N SINGH: Hon Speaker, colleagues, we as the IFP welcomes this Bill as it is certainly a progressive step in ensuring access to health care to all people in South Africa. More importantly, the coordinating role of conducting disease and injury surveillance and the provision of specialised public health services, training and research is to be welcome.


We support the creation of this institution but we trust that the intelligence services it provides in terms of communicable diseases is not like the intelligence services we get from the Department of Intelligence sometimes when certain incidences of attacking schools, burning government building, etc. take place in our country, the intelligence services don’t know a thing about them. We hope that this intelligence services in the health sector would be on top of things so that they can advice and warn the Ministry and the department in
 

 

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time if there is going to be any spread of diseases in our country.


As an aside hon Speaker, hon Minister, while intelligence is gathered on diseases, we need to also examine and monitor our health care facilities in South Africa. The recent visit by the Portfolio Committee as we read have resulted some alarming findings in many provinces in terms of our health care facilities. I think there will be a report on that soon that we will debate. Specialised public health care service is certainly very critical and to this end, I think the flagship of specialised health care services is the Inkosi Albert Luthuli Hospital and they are really have to be commended for the type of service that they provide to people not only from our country but also people from outside our country.


Lastly, International Co-operation is very important because nowadays diseases have no borders and we have to really make sure that when people travel from country going abroad, they pick up certain bacteria and infections. Sometimes when you come into our country it
 

 

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takes very long for our medical staff and medical practitioners to realise whether it is malaria or any other disease. I think that this kind of co-operation and creation of this body will help co-ordinate and bring together a better health care services for all of us in our country.


We support the Bill. Thank you.


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Hon Speaker, the NFP supports amendment to this Bill tabled here today. Yes, it is a good initiative that I think we must welcome and commend those who are responsible and all members of different committees that work together tirelessly to bring this Bill to fruition.


Hon Speaker, the NFP supports this Bill for a specific reason and it is not because previously we did not have mechanisms in place, we did. The problem is that previously in isolation different departments were dealing with the issue but now under one banner in this particular institute we will be able to monitor, co-
 

 

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ordinate and the surveillance will be done to the extend that we will be able to identify timeously some of the non-communicable and communicable diseases in South Africa.


I heard some of my colleagues talk about some of the challenges in health care and I think we should admit that the initiative by us in South Africa and the Minister as a whole in bringing the National Health Insurance, NHI, the universal health care together with this initiative, all augurs well. Yes, indeed, there are serious challenges in the country in terms of health care but there are serious challenges and let us not forget that they are a lot of what we inherited in terms of the logistics of where people live in the areas and how they have been deprived of water, sanitation, health care facilities and so on. Let us take an initiative of this nature and welcome it for the purpose that it is intended. If this institute that we are setting up is run efficiently and proficiently, I am sure that it will augur well and serve the interests.
 

 

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Some of the amendments that we find here which is very welcoming are the issue of the 180 days which is a maximum anyone could act. I think we found in this, particularly in many departments, we have officials that act, act and act and sometimes we think we are in the movie house but the restriction on 180 days I think is welcomed. The fact that in the board there will be no employee from National Public Health Institute of South Africa, NAPHISA, and also very importantly is that the board will in consultation with the Minister, we seem to have very often in South Africa where we have challenges in terms of discipline, misconduct, fraud and corruption, will be able to suspend the Chief Executive Officer, CEO, if necessary.


The NFP welcomes this Bill tabled here today. Thank you very much.


Ms C N MAJEKE: Hon Speaker, the United Democratic Movement supports the Bill. With regard to occupational health, we want to bring to the attention of government the fact that many workers, particularly in small-scale
 

 

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employment places, get injured daily and are not recognised. In this regard, we need to improve government capacity in monitoring compliance with the Bill by all employers.


Secondly, the correct emphasis on environmental health should save our communities from the risk arising from industrial activities. The inclusion of environmental health and the safety of our communities, as a consequence of work-related activities must be enhanced, so that it decreases and ultimately prevents the burden of disease on the citizens. We support the Bill.


Lastly, Minister, thank you very much for Victoria Hospital. I think the projects are taking place


Ms D CARTER: Speaker, in principle, the Congress of the People supports the National Public Health Institute of South Africa, Naphisa Bill, which facilitates and provides for the establishment of the long-awaited and much-needed National Public Health Institute of South Africa.
 

 

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The Naphisa Bill and the institute are intended to improve government’s capacity to identify disease outbreaks and health emergencies; and to provide specialised public health services, public health interventions, training and research directed towards the major health challenges affecting our citizens.


We lend our support in principle, because as the Congress of the People, we want to understand what has delayed the finalisation of this much-needed piece of legislation and we wonder whether the Life Esidimeni tragedy would have escalated to the wholesale massacre it became if the Naphisa Bill and the institute had been in place.


We lend our support in principle, because as the Congress of the People, we have witnessed various good, intended initiatives, such as the South African Social Security Agency Bill and the establishment of Sassa, abused and crippled for corrupt ends.


We lend our support in principle, because as the Congress of the People, we question, given the irresponsible
 

 

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management and bankrupting of the fiscus, whether government will have the financial resources to adequately provide for the proper establishment and operation of the institute.


Steps that would change Cope’s support, in principle, to unqualified support lie in: the appointment of appropriately qualified, skilled and experienced persons to the Naphisa Board — individuals who are not deployed or recycled cadres but rather individuals of good ethical standing whose interest is in serving society; the appointment of an appropriately skilled CEO and CFO who are beyond reproach and not conflicted and malleable; and an assurance that the institute will be adequately resourced.


This Bill and the establishment of the institute are important progressive steps in ensuring that all South Africans have access to adequate and responsive healthcare services. Cope lends its support with the provisos given.
 

 

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Mr P MAESELA: Hon Speaker, the Minister, Deputy Ministers, my colleagues and esteemed guests, the health services in South Africa still reflect the injustices and irrationalities of the apartheid system. In postapartheid South Africa, access to healthcare became a basic human right — a right which is incorporated in the Constitution and the Bill of Rights and enforced by law. Section 27 of the South African Constitution provides that every person has the right “to have access to healthcare services” and further places the state as a central role player in ensuring that it takes “reasonable legislative and other measures, within its available resources, to achieve the progressive realisation of these rights”.


The 53rd national conference of the ANC, after having noted the ever-increasing global burden of noncommunicable diseases, which in our country adds to the already high incidence of communicable diseases, such as HIV and Aids and TB, thus resolved to fast-track legislation and regulations, to deal with the risk factors of diseases and injury.
 

 

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Over the years, the ANC government has ensured that there are resources in place to ensure that surveillance of certain noncommunicable diseases and other epidemiological studies takes place.


The National Development Plan envisions a health system that works for everyone and produces positive health outcomes. It notes that through concerted efforts, it is possible to significantly reduce the burden of disease. Goal 6 of the National Development Plan addresses the need for a complete reform in health systems, through integrating the different parts of the health system.


Naphisa will comprise the three existing institutes: the National Institute for Communicable Diseases; the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, in addition to the safety through the current National Institute of Occupational Health; and the National Cancer Registry.


It is worth noting that currently, there is no integrated surveillance system in the country. Different institutes
 

 

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deal with different aspects of surveillance and there is a lack of institutional capacity for effective surveillance. Thus, there is a need for a single accountable authority and the lack of this accountability to date is a root cause of fragmented surveillance.


A strategic objective listed in the national Department of Health’s Strategic Plan for 2015 to 2020 is to improve the performance of the national health system and thereby enhance health system effectiveness. The establishment of Naphisa will help to enhance health systems effectiveness.


The core functions of Naphisa will be to co-ordinate surveillance systems that monitor diseases and injuries; provide specialised reference laboratory and referral services; provide training and workforce development; and conduct research and support public health intentions aimed at reducing the burden of disease.


As already mentioned, Naphisa will comprise of three already existing institutes. In addition to this, two new
 

 

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institutes will be developed - the National Institute for Non-Communicable Diseases and the National Institute for Injury and Violence Prevention.


South Africa has significant strength in the core essential public health functions and operations: surveillance and assessment of the population’s health and well-being; identifying health problems and health hazards in the community; and health related research.


The creation of Naphisa will bring these functions together in a focused and unified manner: health protection operations, which are environmental, occupational, food safety and others; evaluation of quality and effectiveness of personal and community health services; and assuring a competent public health and personal healthcare workforce.


It cannot be emphasised more that every person has the right to achieve optimal health, and that the ANC is committed to the promotion of health, using the primary healthcare approach as the underlying philosophy for
 

 

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restructuring the health system. The ANC remains committed to the promotion of health through preventive measures and the establishment of the Naphisa will be one such method towards achieving the intended health goals and objectives of the country. Thank you.


Mr S M JAFTA: Hon Speaker, the draft National Public Health Institute of SA, Naphisa, Bill establishes the National Public Health Institute. The founding objectives of the Bill seek to establish a framework so as to conduct disease and injury surveillance and to provide specialised public health services, public health interventions, and training and research directed towards the major health challenges affecting South Africa’s population.


The primacy of the Bill is to complement the National Health Insurance, NHI, Bill, especially in relation to improving public health services as well as developing public health technology.
 

 

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In other jurisprudence in the world, public health institutes are primarily exploited to unearth new research areas. In the United States, the work of the Public Health Institute is uniquely remarkable. The USA’s health institute unveils new research findings quarterly, publishes new insights into health education and specialises in areas such as alcohol, tobacco, drugs, mental health, chronic disease prevention, data technology and innovation, environmental health, global health, healthy communities and systems research.


The Minister of Health has set about rebuilding the public health service edifice. Consistent with his pronouncements, the funding of the Public Health Institute must be a national imperative. It should not matter how austere the spending of the public health sector allocation is. South Africa has to prioritise the proposed Public Health Institute. The AIC therefore supports the Bill. I thank you.


Mr A F MAHLALELA: Hon Speaker, Ministers, Deputy Ministers and hon members, both the National Development
 

 

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Plan, NDP, and the World Health Organisation converge around the fact that a well-functioning and effective health system is a bedrock for the attainment of outcomes as envisaged in the NDP and Sustainable Development Goals of 2030.


The trajectory for the 2030 vision therefore commences with strengthening and improving the health system to ensure that it is efficient and responsive. Strengthening the effectiveness of the health system is the foundation on which successful interventions to improve health outcomes must be built.


The establishment of Naphisa will help to enhance health systems effectiveness by performing some of the following functions: Co-ordinate, develop and maintain surveillance systems to collect, analyse and interpret health data to guide national health interventions; strengthen capacity in public and occupational health surveillance in order to reduce the burden of disease and injury; use surveillance data and other sources of information, where appropriate, to advise on the setting of health policies,
 

 

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priorities and planning; strengthen cross-border, regional and international collaboration on communicable diseases, noncommunicable diseases, injury and violence prevention and occupational health; use public health information for the monitoring and evaluation of policies and interventions; and strengthen advocacy, social mobilisation and partnerships in order to address the scourge of communicable diseases, noncommunicable diseases, cancer surveillance, injury and violence prevention and occupational health.


The full implementation of the Bill, once it becomes law, will have financial implications over the next three to five financial years. The Bill makes provision for five divisions, namely the National Institute of Communicable Diseases, NICD, the National Institute of Noncommunicable Diseases, NINCD, the National Cancer Registry, NCR, injury and violence, NIVIP, and occupational health, NOIH.


The Bill will, however, initially focus on communicable diseases and cancer registry. Clause 15 provides for the
 

 

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finances of Naphisa. It states that Naphisa is funded by money appropriated by Parliament, fees received from services rendered, income earned on surplus money deposited or invested, grants, donations and bequests, royalties, and money received from any other sources.


The process of amalgamation has already begun with the merger of the NICD and the NCR. In addition, funding to create new information and financial management systems have been provided for through the National Treasury during the 2016-17 financial year. This will significantly reduce the cost of transition.


There are advanced discussions with the services around shared corporate functions during the transition process, thereby reducing the need for more additional funding that needs to be made available.


There is also a reduced financial implication for personal budgets due to the decision taken to align the staff of Naphisa with the scales and conditions of
 

 

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service of the Department of Public Service and Administration.


In clause 14, the Bill seeks to protect any work, invention, discovery or improvement derived from indigenous knowledge, originally held by any person or community, in such a manner that the person or community participates in the benefits arising from such protection.


Since the Bill contains provisions pertaining to customs of traditional communities, the Bill was subsequently referred to the National House of Traditional Leaders for its comments in terms of section 18 (1)(a) of the Traditional Leadership and Governance Framework Act of 2003.


The international experience points to the fact that only a strengthened health system, further fortified by effective intersectoral collaboration to address social determinants of health, can improve health outcomes. Some countries formed their national public health institutes
 

 

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in response to a specific public health threat or gap, and later expanded the focus to other public health issues.


Canada, for example, established its Public Health Agency of Canada in 2004 as a response to the outbreak of severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002-03 which highlighted deficiencies in its public health system.


In 1946 the USA established the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, CDC, to focus on malaria control and other communicable diseases ... co-ordinated laboratory epidemiologic functions. Over several decades, the CDC has expanded its focus to include noncommunicable diseases, injuries, birth defects, occupational and environmental health, and emergency preparedness. The CDC is now the USA’s prime public organisation and the CDC’s leadership has expanded the agency’s core functions to include workforce development, health promotion and prevention, and monitoring the country’s health status.
 

 

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Mexico and China provide examples of middle-income countries that have formed their national public health institutes to improve and co-ordinate public health functions. The Mexican National Public Health Institute was created in 1987 to strengthen its health system and improve its response to public health challenges by consolidating functions within one organisation, including research, academic training to develop the public health workforce and continuing education to address Mexico’s emerging public health issues. Among other successes, for example, of Mexico’s National Public Health Institute has been its ability to influence important public health policies related to tobacco control, obesity, and cancer prevention and control among women.


In 1998, China formed the Shanghai China Center for Disease Control and Prevention to address the country’s increasing life expectancy, and communicable and noncommunicable diseases. Under the Shanghai CDC, China experienced several benefits such as more co-ordinated
 

 

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and efficient public health resources, better programme management, fewer duplicative functions and cost savings.


As I conclude, we in the ANC are of the belief that Naphisa will serve as the national focus for developing and analysing disease prevention and control, provide leadership to provinces and local authorities, deal with the challenges of environmental health and help in relation to health promotion, as well as educational activities which are designed to improve the health of the masses of our people. It is in this context, therefore, that we as the ANC support the Bill. Thank you very much. [Applause.]


The MINISTER OF HEALTH: Hon Speaker, let me start by thanking all the political parties for the overwhelming and unanimous support of this Bill. It can only be in the interest of South Africa.


Firstly, let me state that there are three reasons why countries around the world need this type of institution. Problem number one is climate change. We do not know what
 

 

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diseases or ailments climate change is going to bring to countries, and so we had better be ready.


Problem number two ... I mean, reason number two, is the existence of the new concept of antimicrobial resistance where organisms are just refusing to die when we use the ordinary antimicrobials we have been using for ages.


Reason number three is that humanity is fast encroaching on the habitat of other species in search of food and accommodation, and that is also causing a problem.


Secondly, let me salute the EFF and the NFP for their strong support for the NHI. Yes, for your strong support. I salute you. It can only be in the interest of the country. [Interjections.] I will see you when we start debating the NHI Bill itself.


Lastly, for those who doubt our intentions and believe that the wrong people will be hired, let me remind you that Naphisa is bringing together three institutions that already exist. All three are world-class, especially the
 

 

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biggest component which is the NICD. They have world- class scientists whom everybody in the world respects. The NICD is the only institution on the whole continent of Africa which has the biosafety level four, BSL-4, laboratory. The rest on the continent are at levels one, two and three, and they were there. The Medical Research Council, the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, the Foundation for Research Development and the Human Sciences Research Council are all world- class institutions. It should not be us here who undermine them because the whole world respects them.
Thank you very much. [Applause.]


Debate concluded.


Bill read a second time.


CONSIDERATION OF REQUEST FOR APPROVAL BY PARLIAMENT OF THE REVISED ADDIS CONVENTION ON THE RECOGNITION OF STUDIES, CERTIFICATES, DIPLOMAS, DEGREES AND OTHER ACADEMIC QUALIFICATIONS IN HIGHER EDUCATION IN AFRICAN STATES IN TERMS OF SECTION 231(2) OF CONSTITUTION
 

 

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Mr C D KEKANA: Speaker, I have replaced hon September because she is attending other pressing matters. Can I?


The SPEAKER: Yes, please.


Mr C D KEKANA: The Arusha Convention was adopted in 1981. It is replaced by the Addis Convention which was adopted by many countries in Africa in 2014. South Africa supported but did not adopt then. We, today request that it be ratified by Parliament so that it can be officially adopted.


The replacement of the Arusha Convention by the Addis Convention is meant to align, harmonise the qualification of academic and other qualification that will create job opportunities in Africa. This is to align our qualifications with the international qualification and the continental qualifications in Africa. The purpose of harmonising is also to develop Africa according to high standards, high quantity of qualifications as expected by the modern world. We therefore, come to the Parliament
 

 

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and request it to officially adopt this convention. I thank you. [Applause.]


CONSIDERATION OF REPORT OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING ON OVERSIGHT VISIT TO THE UNIVERSITY OF CAPE TOWN


CONSIDERATION OF REPORT OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING ON OVERSIGHT VISIT TO EASTERN CAPE


CONSIDERATION OF REPORT OF PORTFOLIO COMMITTEE ON HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING ON OVERSIGHT VISIT TO GAUTENG



The SPEAKER: Again, the Chairperson was expected, but of course, she is not able to do it. I will now recognise the hon Chief Whip of the Majority Party.


The CHIEF WHIP OF THE MAJORITY PARTY: Hon Speaker, I move

that the House adopts all these Reports from this committee. Thank you very much.
 

 

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The SPEAKER: Hon members... Are you going to introduce the Reports? I recognise the member of the committee, hon Killian.


Ms J D KILLIAN: Hon Speaker, on behalf of the committee Chairperson, I hereby introduce the three Reports as they appear in today’s order paper. Orders four, five and six. The committee compiled these Reports after oversight visits to several higher education and training institutions in Gauteng and the Eastern Cape and also to the University of Cape Town.


The committee undertook oversight visits to the Eastern Cape from 23 to 26 of January this year and to Gauteng from the 30th of January to the 1st of February. The visits to the Eastern Cape institutions enabled the committee to engage with the institutional stakeholders of the Walter Sisulu University, the University of Fort Hare, the King Sabata Dalindyebo and the Buffalo City Technical and Vocational and Education Training Colleges, tvet colleges, in the Eastern Cape.
 

 

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The Gauteng visits included engagements with stakeholders from the University of South Africa, Unisa, University of Pretoria and the University of Johannesburg. The stakeholders included Students Representative Councils, University Councils and the Management of Institutions as well as Labour Unions.


These oversight visits were to assess the 2018 registration process, to assess the preparedness of these institutions in implementing the 2018 academic programmes, to assess the 2017 overall academic performance and to undertake side visits to infrastructure projects, student accommodation facilities as well as registration facilities for incoming students this year. The committee was generally pleased with the smooth registration process at institutions visited except for Unisa where they were long queues and where there the ICT system failed.


However, we were concerned about some of the practical arrangement – and I will just highlight a few. The general observations were that the institutions responded
 

 

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positively to the new Fee-free policy pronouncement. We were also pleased with the determination and the commitment of the institutions in responding to some of the government’s key policy interventions. However, the committee was very concerned about complains related to the roll out of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, NSFAS, student centred model.


All the institutions visited complained about the delays by NSFAS in the payment of allowances, due to students and owing to the very frequent changes in the rules and guidelines for administering the new student centred model. The committee was also concerned that colleges did not have funds to maintain new infrastructure. Obviously, we know that that changed with the introduction of this year’s budget.


The committee was concerned about the inadequate maintenance plan of some the institution particularly, the tvet colleges and some of the university institutions also had serious challenges with the maintenance of, and actually the development of infrastructure programmes.
 

 

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Student accommodation is a major concern. Many thousands of students are accommodated in students’ residences and we all know that academic performance is enhanced if they have a proper accommodation. In fact, at the Walter Sisulu University, we were extremely concerned that they were... Apparently, some of the students were living in some of the residences and they were operating tuck shops but they were not officially registered with the University of Walter Sisulu. Obviously, the committee asked the management to address those matters.


Hon Speaker, our observations are that we are very concerned about NSFAS and we are very happy - in fact, may I say now that the hon Minister of Higher Education and Training has intervened decisively to put NSFAS on better management terms. Because the [inaudible] roll out of the new student centred model in universities as well as in the tvet colleges sectors was a matters of concern for the committee.


I would like to conclude by saying that we listed in every institution, everything that we found was
 

 

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commendable as well as what is of a major concern as far as the University of Cape town is concerned. It is very important for us that our institutions are transforming and making these institutions a very comfortable place for students, from disadvantaged areas as well as black academics to stay and to deliver and make a contribution to the future of our young people of this country.
I would like to commend these Reports to the House for adoption. I thank you.


Debate concluded.


Question put: That the Report be adopted.


Report accordingly adopted in terms of section 65 of the Constitution.


Mr M Waters: Speaker, there is no objection but, we would like to make a declaration, please. Thank you.


Declarations of vote:
 

 

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Prof B BOZOLLI: Hon Speaker, over four years ago I appointed out at Parliament and elsewhere that funding for higher education has steadily fallen over 20 years in relations to the number of students being registered.
Funding has now been falling in real terms for the further nearly five years and that fact is now part of convention or wisdom. Don’t be fooled by the vast of amounts of money being used to pay for students’ fees, little of that affects a subsidy being paid to universities and colleges, which is very far from being sufficient in spite of additions being made recently.
This is reflected in this report.


Money is far from being the only problem however affecting higher education. The oversight role of this portfolio committee allows us to see and track a range of worrying trends all of them eroding our institutions. At the University of Cape Town, UCT, for example, which we visited during the fees-must-fall protest we found a troubled institution plagued by violence, bitterness and anger. It is burned, destroyed and cover-up art works have never been restored and the poison that accompanies
 

 

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identity politics remains there today after the protests have died down.


The legacy of fees-must-fall is neutral hatred on multiple levels and perhaps the suicide of one of the most eminent black academics at the university.
University of South Africa, Unisia’s, particular plague is the prevalence of the National Education, Health and Allied Workers’ Union, Nehawu’s, strikes which this year closed down registration in the most important week of the year. What we saw there was chaotic as well as multiple administrative inefficiencies and shortages of competent and properly qualified lectures.


At the University of Pretoria, a generally stable campus, we found that this previously relatively wealthy university was now reaching the point where it too will be unable to sustain itself on what was coming in.
University of Johannesburg, UJ, we found that that was plagued by the inefficiencies of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, NSFAS, system of students centred
 

 

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grant distribution leading to students having to vacate their accommodation in some cases.


At Walter Sisulu we found many reasons for despair. This ones effective institution was grounded down to the bone by financial shortages, corruption, ungovernability, broken down infrastructure and students and union militancy. At Fort Hare we saw the blackened shells of the burned down buildings, and this month we read of a week’s long strike by Nehawu which put classes to a halt.


The two colleges we saw, King Sabata Dalindyebo, KSD, Tvet College and Buffalo City, each have their own problems. In the case of the former the building of a new residence was held up by mismanagement and corruption, and in the later we were shocked by the filthy kitchen and lack of maintenance. Therefore, each institution is absorbed in its own problems and believes it can address with a little bit of help here and there. The department, whose staffs is approaching burnout gives ad hoc help where it can. However, what is clear is that here we have a sector in overall decline.
 

 

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Like a game of work or more, once one problem is smashed down and conquered another one pops up. This is unending. Vice chancellors are abandoning our universities in extremely worrying numbers, many of them citing that there are multiple problems as the major reason: Students analysis, campus unpleasantness, students and union brutality and violence, distraction of property, some of them such as libraries and art galleries irreplaceable, maintenance backlogs, corruption and patronage within the system, NSFAS inadequacies and many, many others are rendering the sector almost ungovernable.


It might be that the ANC government thinks fee-free education for the poor will help this situation. It won’t. Students will continue to protest violently, now that they have learnt that it works, most of the other problems or nothing to do with student fees. None of these problems will be easy to fix, all of them will take years to overcome. We have seen before our eyes the steady decay of higher education - shame on this government for what it has done to it. Thank you. [Applause.]
 

 

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Mr T RAWULA: A visit to any institution of higher learning in this country will show you a system failed its largest and most important stakeholders, the students. Across our country NSFAS is collapsing. At institutions of higher learning in the Eastern Cape, Gauteng and every other province students are not receiving their NSFAS allowances on time with some students, yet to receive an allowance eight month into the year. University management is blaming NSFAS and NSFAS blames university management. However, in the end none is held accountable and students in the process are losing out.


In the four years we have been Members of Parliament and in the Portfolio Committee of Higher Education, we have identified fundamental problems with the NSFAS and have made various recommendations, but still today nothing is changed and the same mistakes are repeated. NSFAS is now in a state of crisis and is trying to cover up for the years of mismanagement, corruption and the flout approach to students funding. However, this is little too late, what is needed now is the funding model that provides
 

 

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free education for all, and anything less will see the same problems continue to be repeated. In the future our youth will be sacrificed because government is not willing to take the necessary steps.


IsiXhosa:

Abanye bayasibuza ukuba le mali yemfundo yasimahla iza kuvela phi? Bazenza izidenge kwaye bezimfamekisa kuba kaloku zinkampani zabucala ezithi zixhamle xa aba bantwana benezidanga zobuchwephesha besayensi nezezimali. Ukuba zizo ezixhamlayo, simele ukuba sivelise irhafu yezemfundo eza kuhlawulwa ngoongxowankulu. Enkosi. [Kwaqhwatywa.]


English:

Mr X NGWEZI: Hon Speaker, I will be declaring on behalf of the hon Inkosi E M Buthelezi. The IFP supports the adoption of the committee report following the oversight visits to various tertiary institutions earlier this year. In the assessment of the preparedness of the institutions in implementing the 2018 academic programmes as well as the registration processes, we are pleased
 

 

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that at many institutions the running of the administrative operation has been mostly successful.


However, the IFP still holds that former President Jacob Zuma’s last minute election campaign push for free higher education has left many institutions with an administrative backlog. Payments of the 2017 and 2018 NSFAS has still not been finalised, and this has compelled the Minister to suspend the 2019 NSFAS applications. This of course, means that thousands of poor and vulnerable students bear the brunt of a system which has been inefficient, poorly managed and had been left to its own devices for far too long. It now has basically collapsed.


We are pleased to note that our call for the dissolution of the NSFAS board has been acceded to. We remain hopeful that essential entity will be turned around and be properly constituted to deliver funds and support to vulnerable students in our higher education and training facilities. The IFP supports. Thank you.
 

 

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Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Hon Speaker, the National Freedom Party supports the report here on the oversight visits to the Eastern Cape. Now, I’m presenting this report on behalf of my colleague, hon Professor Khubisa, who is not available today. My understanding is this that in the oversight that took place the committee identified some very serious challenges in terms of the conditions, particularly of the residences where some of our students live.


Over and above that, they found challenges of racism in some of the universities, particularly in the University of Cape Town and Witwatersrand, Wits, University. They have found that blacks were being treated differently in some of these tertiary institutions. Now, the department has made some recommendations and one of them is that the shocking state of the facilities, the students’ facilities, at the Walter Sisulu University must be addressed urgently by the department. Therefore, we call as the National Freedom Party on the Minister of Higher Education to pay greater emphasis on the challenges that our learners seem to be facing in all the different
 

 

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tertiary institutions, not particularly in those that they have visited.


Now, the NSFAS funding, Minister, is a grave concern because some of our learners are not even able to register for the next academic year as a result of that. However, I do understand and appreciate that the Minister is making interventions and that is welcomed as well.


Another matter of concern has been the number of deaths end of violence that has been reported in some of the tertiary institutions. Now, Minister, I think that what is very, very important is this that we need to follow up on the challenges that we have identified that was established in these tertiary institutions so that we could find solutions to them and that they are not repeated year in and year out. However, I am quite convinced on behalf of the National Freedom Party with the initiatives that the Minister is making in this regard that we will, in a very, very short space of time, find solutions to the problem.
 

 

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The one other serious problem is accommodation. If you take the one particular university, and pardon me if my pronunciation is not correct, is Zamukulungisa Campus where apparently with 720 beds were expected to accommodate 3 000 students. However, obviously there are serious challenges that exist, but work is also going on. Therefore, we call on the department, particularly the Minister to intervene to find solutions that will benefit us. Thank you very much. The National Freedom Party supports the report tabled here today.


Ms D CARTER: Hon Speaker, at the outset the Congress of the People wishes again to express sincere condolences to the family of Professor Bongani Mayosi. The deteriorating and toxic environment that engulfs our universities and places of higher education played a role as his family and others have testified and his untimely passing. May he rest in peace and may his family find solace.


We pointed out on the Budget Vote on Higher Education that education is the best means with which to break the chains of poverty, unemployment and inequality and that
 

 

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good systems, structures and institutions of education are a vital importance if we are to achieve a growth and development as a nation. We pointed out during the Budget Vote debate and as this oversight visits confirm that our universities are growingly vulnerable and are under threat that our places of higher learning are financially vulnerable because government grant funding to universities has been decreasing whilst the number of students has been increasing and that free higher education means but the fees of the students are subsidised.


I know that universities are obtaining more much needed capital on operation or funding and that academically our universities are vulnerable because basic education is producing students unsuitable for university level study. There is a growing loss of academic staff, who finds conditions on our campuses untenable, but our institutions of higher learning are vulnerable in the face of institutionalisation of violence on campuses and that they face the white ending of the independence and autonomy by government.
 

 

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Now, we know the placement of NSFAS on the administration. I have taken note of the oversight visit, we asked of Minister of Higher Education the same question we posed during the Budget Vote debate and that is: What assurances can government give us that our universities and places of higher education went like elsewhere in Africa post liberation ultimately collapsed. Thank you. [Applause.]


Ms S MCHUNU: Speaker, the ANC rises in support of the oversight report as tabled. The committee conducted oversight visits to three provinces that is; Western Cape, Eastern Cape and Gauteng. With regards to Western Cape, the University of Cape Town was visited on 25 October 2017. The oversight was necessitated by the ongoing student protests which were threatening the completion of the academic programme.


The committee engaged with stakeholders including the council, management and the student representative council. Despite the challenges that the university experienced, it remained a high ranking university in the
 

 

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country, in the continent and its international rankings has improved. There was a good stakeholder relationship and commitment to both management and council to address he challenges that plagued the institution. Transformation remains an important aspect of the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, PSAT. This is re-enforced in White Paper 3 and White Paper on Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test, Psat. One of the important issues that was re-enforced in the oversight visit was the lack of transformation in the university. We support the important work conducted by South African Human Rights Commission, SAHRC, and the ministerial oversight committee on transformation and we will continue to monitor the progress in this regard.


We have noted reports by students on the high rate of students’ suicide at the university and we recommended that the university investigates and put mechanisms in place to address the psychosocial challenges experienced by both students and staff. In relation to the oversight visits in the Western Cape and Gauteng between 23 January and 01 February 2018, the purpose of the two oversight visits was to assess the registration process and the
 

 

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preparedness of the institution in implementing the 2018 academic programmes, to undertake onsite visit to infrastructure projects, students’ residences and registration facilities.


In the Eastern Cape, the committee visited Walter Sisulu University, King Sabata Dalindyebo Technical and Vocational Education and Training, Tvet, the University of Fort Hare and Buffalo City Tvet. In Gauteng we visited University of South Africa, Unisa, University of Pretoria and the University of Johannesburg. Hon Bozzoli, what you have forgotten to mention is that in all the institutions we have visited, they welcomed the announcement of fee- free education policy for the poor and working class although there were concerns regarding clarity on the implementation of the policy.


Systems were put in place by universities and Tvet colleges to ensure smooth registration process. The committee noted challenges at Unisa where there were long queues of prospective students and challenges with information technology, IT, system. Institutions raised
 

 

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concerns with regards to National Student Financial Aid Scheme, NSFAS, delays in disbursement of allowances, outstanding funding allocation for 2017 and the inadequate rule out of student-centred model. The committee noted a concern expressed by Walter Sisulu University, WSU, and Fort Hare about water shortages and under representation of black women in senior management positions was also noted. Universities made a plea to have a single national bargaining forum for the entire higher education sector and harmonisation of conditions of service of in-sourced workers.


The committee made recommendations in the report amongst others; the strengthening of the safety measures at all institutions, expansion of students’ accommodation and adherence to the employment equity policies. We reiterate that the welfare of the students remains primary and therefore there should be nothing that prevents them from accessing and succeeding in the post-school education and training sector. We laud the Minister for the interventions that she has already made to ensure that NSFAS improves its systems by appointing an administrator
 

 

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and this will enhance effective closure of the 2017 and 2018 student funding decisions and disbursements. We support the review of NSFAS student-centred model which will be undertaken in the next few months. This will assist NSFAS to carry out its mandate to ensure that students from poor and working class are effectively supported to succeed in their studies. As the ANC we support the oversight report. I thank you. [Applause.]


Agreed to.


DEBATE ON NATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY: WOMEN UNITED IN MOVING SOUTH AFRICA FORWARD.


IsiZulu:

NGQONGQOSHE WEZABESIFAZANE EHHOVISI LIKAMENGAMELI:

Somlomo ohloniphekile, Amalungu ePhalamende, amaqhawe omzabalazo wenkululeko yabantu baseNingizimu Afrika ...


English:

... ladies and gentlemen, fellow South Africans, allow me to begin by reminding us that our participation in
 

 

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this august house was set off by the words of Mama Nontsikelelo Albertina Sisulu, who stood up and said, “Mr Chairperson, I nominate Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela for election as President. Thank you. ”[Applause.] This year on 9 August, in a symbolic act of remembrance, close to
8 000 women walked through Mbekweni in Paarl in the footsteps of our forebears, our foremothers and a young mom, Mildred Lesia was part of the delegation that was led by president Chief Albert Luthuli at the same place.


We gather here today to debate and commemorate 62 years since the 1956 march. I invite us to ask ourselves a question, how far have we come in the struggle for the emancipation of women and what have we done to fight the demon of patriarchy? Mama Sisulu saw through many stages of the organisation of women and saw through the organic growth of women’s struggles and the women’s movement. She was part of the conference of the youth league; actually, she was the only woman. She was part of the campaign for the Women’s Charter, the Freedom Charter as well as the 1956 march. We have not yet achieved the total emancipation of women and therefore the struggle for
 

 

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women’s emancipation continues. The women of 1956 taught us the importance of unity amongst women from all backgrounds. I would like to address myself on the issue of unity. Unity is not hollow. Unity is not blind. Unity is not neutral. Unity is always based on a programme of action and a single platform of action. Once people talk about neutral programmes for women, you must understand that they want to deface our struggles.


We have to recognise and own up to these struggles that were waged by the gallant fighters of the calibre of Mama Nontsikelelo Sisulu, Charlotte Maxeke, Winnie Madikizela- Mandela, Rahima Moosa, Bertha Gxowa, Lillian Ngoyi, Helen Joseph, Dorothy Nyembe, Dulcie September, Sophie De Bruyn, Mildred Lesia, Rita Nzanga, Gertrude Shope, Phila Ndwandwe, Nomkhosi Mini, Jabu Ndlovu and Amina Cachalia and many other women. They are not a whole lot, they are human beings and they are not statistics. Unity or nonpartisan does not mean that women are homogenous and saying that gender-based violence cuts across women of all strata, does not diminish the faces of our struggle. There is no agenda that is gender-neutral and before we
 

 

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engage on a single platform of action we must be conscious of the fact that we come from different backgrounds and we must also understand that once people talk about gender-neutrality they want to come up with a gender-blind approach that lumps women into one corner without a programme of action. The department is mandated to lead the fulfilment of a constitutional vision of gender equality, the empowerment of women and girls and building a nonsexist South Africa. Our mandate is derived from multiple instruments from the national level through the National Development Plan, NDP, 2030 and our Constitution; at a regional level the African Union, AU, Agenda 2063 and Gender Strategy, Southern African Development Community, SADC, Gender and Development Protocol and internationally through Sustainable Development Goals, SDGs, Beijing Platform of Action as well as the Convention on the Elimination of all Forms of Discrimination Against Women, CEDAW.


As part of our calendar for Women’s Month, we are also inspired, amongst others, by Mama Sisulu’s testimony at the World Court of Women in March 2001, for paying
 

 

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tribute to all women who were incarcerated and therefore this year we are going to celebrate women that were incarcerated. At all times when we speak about political prisoners we must think of Kroonstad as well as Number Four where we have the Constitutional Hill today. [Interjections.] On 28 August we are going to hold a men’s dialogue in QwaQwa where you must attend and tell us your understanding of what women mean to you. Men must tell us what they understand about gender equality. Men have to commit themselves to be agents of change. They must not always talk about the empowerment of women when they need to be empowered themselves. They must not talk about trying to mentor women when they have to be mentored themselves. They must not always think that they are going to lead us as women. They must understand the Constitution of the country and the equality clause and those women’s rights are human rights.


Mama Sisulu’s larger-than-life career began during her primary school years. She was elected a head girl and received a scholarship for her duration at high school level. In her youth she was active and saw the
 

 

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establishment of the Federation of S A, Fedsaw, which mobilised women from all backgrounds and that organisation had to fight against patriarchy and ensure that women worked together. She was also the first co- president of the United Democratic Front, UDF. Even though she was detained without trial, incarcerated and tortured on multiple occasions and despite the apartheid government banning her from public gatherings for more than 20 years, she came out at the end of it declaring that:


Although politics has given me a rough life, there is absolutely nothing I regret about what I have done and what has happened to me and my family throughout all these years.


Years later, Archbishop Desmond Tutu told the world that MaSisulu was one of the people who convinced the international community about sanctions that were applied to the apartheid state and that are what actually banned the apartheid state because its core depended on economic development.
 

 

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For commitment to social justice she received she received numerous humanitarian awards including the Rotary International Award for Women and Children. She was a true internationalist through and through. As we dedicate government’s commitments to her, our responsibility is to assimilate her courageous resolve for justice and equality in both public and private lives.


As a department we are hosting a series of dialogues in various forums and sectors including women professionals, in academia, intellectuals, women in business, rural women and girls living in rural areas, traditional leadership and young women. We are also focussing in institutions of higher learning. Fellow South Africans, we have witnessed high levels of femicide and our country is sitting on a ticking time bomb. Through these dialogues young women have said to us, “we are afraid.” “We think we are the next victim.” And because South Africa is a patriarchal country, all institutions are made to defend men and therefore institutions of higher learning came up with policy that was going to defend the
 

 

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administration on sex-for-marks and that is why our kids are dying up until today.


The time has come for institutions of higher learning to come up with policy and not sit as if time belongs to us. Our children are dying on a daily basis and we must say as a country and as this august house, “enough is enough” Thank you. [Interjections.]


Ms D ROBINSON: Hon Speaker and friends in the gallery, I salute Mama Albertina Sisulu for being one of the great mbokodo, who laid the foundations for uniting women and moving South Africa forward.


Today, our biggest challenge is “Building one South Africa,” and encompassing some of the great values that were enshrined in the charter drawn up by the farsighted multiparty women’s resistance organisation against depression - Federation of South African Women, FEDSAW.


Amongst others, they called for the equality of opportunity, equal pay for equal work, maternity leave,
 

 

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and child care for working mothers, including women living under customary law, having access to land and security of tenure for women.


Forty years later, the Women’s Charter for Effective Equality was adopted and handed to former President Mandela on 9 August 1994. A good foundation was laid but was it followed in the interests of women and children and the progress of the nation at large?


Here we are, now embarking on a yet another process of updating the charter. Nothing much has changed for the majority of women, especially those in rural areas where poverty and hunger are biting, hence the exodus to the urban areas.


The demands then, remain the same for women now. This is an indictment of the government in which corruption has become endemic, where luxury cars, extravagant housing and top-heavy administrations with budgets in the red are more important than providing services to the electorate, the poor and marginalised.
 

 

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This is also an indictment on a government which turns a blind eye to the scourge of “carpet interviews”, where women have to submit themselves to sexual acts in order to secure employment. Patriarchy and all the evil it generates in the lives of women and children, still rules.


Those brave women aimed to fight and combat sexism within the state. Does this sound familiar? Do you remember the tragic case of Fezekile Kuzwayo or Khwezi - a young woman who was raped and assaulted within the home of an
uncle and was humiliated and vilified as she went to court by the baying crowd - her political sisters, in defence of the charming perpetrator, who had betrayed her and taken advantage of her vulnerability.


Was this not a point raised in the conference yesterday, that woman do not defend or support one another in speaking up about sexual offences, domestic violence, femicide and even business ventures?
 

 

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Why do our male parliamentarians not speak up and speak out against these outrages? Although the Constitution speaks to gender equality and policies relating to land redistribution, emphasising gender equity, prioritising women to gain access to land; nationally, women constitute only 23% of land restitution beneficiaries.


What the DA stresses is that there should be security of tenure, especially for women so that they can farm productively and efficiently, have access to finance and thus being able to feed their families.
Should the husband die, the widow cannot be evicted as the property is in her name. This protection is needed as there is sometimes collusion between traditional leaders and the woman’s male relatives.


The government’s support and extension services to new landowners are vital so that farmers can prosper and become successful producers of food. Yet, women receive less than 10% of available credit and 7% of extension services. We must remember that empowering women also
 

 

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empowers the families, especially in education and nutrition.


At 29,5%, the unofficial employment rate for women is higher than for men at 25,3%. Some would argue, however, that there has been some progress.


Indeed, there are more women in politics, business and the professional world but the odds are still stacked in favour of men with the glass ceiling still firmly in place and many women having to submit to carpet interviews in order to secure jobs.


Sex for promotion, sex for good academic results, sex to make dockets in court disappear, sex for good positions on party lists. Is this what South Africans wants? No, we want a country that is governed efficiently, where there is no corruption, where budgets are spent on the needs of the people. More funding for police ... [Interruptions.]
 

 

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Let us unite and build one South Africa, where there are jobs, safety and security and freedom. Nkosi sikelela i- Afrika. [Time Expired.] [Applause.]


Ms N K F HLONYANA: Hon Chairperson, we are once more gathered here as representatives of our people to engage in verbal gymnastics and pass hollow words about the status of women in this country as it has become custom every single year. By the end of the day, today, after our hollow words here, over a 100 women would have been victims of sexual crimes perpetrated by men in this country.


By the end of the day, a woman somewhere in remote South Africa would have been murdered by a man close to her.
Her murder will go on unreported because rural women in this country are silenced in life as they are silenced in death.


By the end of the day, thousands of women will go to bed bruised, beaten up by men they call husbands and boyfriends. Somewhere in rural Eastern Cape today, under
 

 

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the pretext of a cultural practice called ukuthwala, a young girl will be abducted from school and forced to marry an old man who carries diseases.


Were our words not as hollow? Were we resolute about pulverising the toxic notions of masculinity in this country? Khensani Maseko would not have died such a lonely death after having been raped by a person she thought was a boyfriend.


Had we, as the legislature been serious about holding the executive to account, we would have ensured that law enforcement agencies do their jobs and that today, the person who raped Khensani would be behind bars.


But this is not because it has become custom for us to speak about women issues only in August and then men amongst us here will go back to their women bashing conduct. Khensani is one name in a long list of names of women who have lost their lives at the hands of men who feel entitled to women’s bodies. Some include Ntombizodwa Dlamini, Zolile Khumalo, Siam Lee, Anene Booysen, Reeva
 

 

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Steenkamp, Karabo Mokoena and many more, who were not reported.


What have we done to our sons, our brothers, our fathers and our lovers? Why are you killing us like flies?
While women feel chained in a country of their own birth, the President saw it fit to have someone as inept as Bathabile Dlamini as a Minister responsible for women.


The ANC saw it fit to give us as a President, a person who has condemned as widows more than 34 women whose husbands were murdered at the insistence of Mr Ramaphosa in Marikana. The women of Marikana today are forced to raise their children alone, with no assistance from anyone, thanks to Mr Ramaphosa.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, would you just take your seat, please. Why are you rising, hon member?


Mr P J MNGUNI: Chairperson, the hon member in the podium is casting aspersions on the good conduct of the
 

 

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President. If she wants to go ahead, she may do so through a substantive motion. She knows that very well. Thank you.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): I will check the Hansard and make a considered ruling. Continue, hon member!


Ms N K F HLONYANA: We have as a Deputy President, a person well known for using his money and influence to sleep his way around in Mpumalamga. As the EFF, we believe there needs to be systematic approach to empowering women to ensure that they are never at the mercy of men for their livelihoods.


Mr G A GARDEE: Order, order, House Chairperson!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Hon member, would you just take your seat. Yes, hon member!


Mr P J MNGUNI: Order, House Chairperson.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Yes, hon member!


Mr P J MNGUNI: House Chairperson, this House has Rules and this hon member can never come to podium without having a semblance of what is contained here.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: On what Rule are you rising on, hon member?


Mr P J MNGUNI: I am rising on the same principle I was rising before, the principle that she is now casting aspersions on the good conduct of the Deputy President. She is allowed to do so but only through a substantive motion.


Mr G A GARDEE: Order, Chairperson.


Mr P J MNGUNI: She must then withdraw that ... [Interruptions.]


Mr G A GARDEE: Can we call for order.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Thank you. I will be with you, hon member.


Mr P J MNGUNI: ... and submit a substantive motion for consideration issues.


Mr G A GARDEE: We can’t be moving.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Thank you, hon member.


Mr G A GARDEE: Order!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Hon member, why are you rising?


Mr G A GARDEE: You have made a ruling. You must live with it. You are going to consult Hansard and come back to the House. So, he must just chill and sit down.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Hon member, would you take your seat, please? That was a ruling on the previous comments of the member that she made.
 

 

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Mr T RAWULA: Order, Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: I am still busy with this ruling, hon member. Hon member, I heard the remarks that you made with regard to the Deputy President. Will you withdraw those remarks, please?


Mr T RAWULA: Order, Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: No, I am dealing with this.


Mr T RAWULA: My order is exactly on that, Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: I will come back to you, hon member.


Mr T RAWULA: Chairperson, the Rules don’t apply to offices. They apply to members.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: I will come back to you.


Mr T RAWULA: The member has not referred to any person.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: I will come back to you.


Mr T RAWULA:  She referred to the office. So, asking her to withdraw is unfair.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Take your seat.


Mr T RAWULA: The order is spurious.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Take your seat, hon member. Hon member, you must withdraw that remark.


Mr G A GARDEE: Order, Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: No, hon member!


Mr G A GARDEE: No.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: I gave you an opportunity. I am now dealing with the member.
 

 

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Mr G A GARDEE: No, Chairperson, don’t start. We have passed that stage.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: No, hon member!


Mr G A GARDEE: Wait, Chairperson. Just chill, don’t be agitated.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: In terms of which Rule are you rising now?


Mr G A GARDEE: We are rising on Rule 45, Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Rule 45?


Mr G A GARDEE: Yes.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: What does Rule 45 says?


Mr G A GARDEE: Chairperson, we have ... [Interruptions.]
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Rule 45 says that a quorum is required for taking decisions.


Mr G A GARDEE: No, wait.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: That is not Rule 45.


Mr G A GARDEE: We are rising on a Rule of a point of order.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: You are wrong hon member. You quoted the wrong Rule.


Mr G A GARDEE: Yes, I quoted a wrong Rule but I am rising on a point of order on you as a Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: So, what is the point of order now?


Mr G A GARDEE: The point of order is that the speaker on the podium ... You have made a ruling against the member there. The member must live with that ruling. For you now
 

 

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to revisit and review your own ruling because he rose for the second time, it is wrong. And there is nothing about the Deputy President where there are aspersions being cast here. Just allow the House to flow. You will come back to the House with a ruling.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Thank you, hon member. Thank you. Will you take your seat now?


Mr G A GARDEE: We will take a seat. Can the speaker continue, Chairperson?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: No, hon member. I expect the speaker at the podium to withdraw the remark.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: House Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Yes.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: Although I didn’t mention a person but said an office, I withdraw.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON: Continue, hon member.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: We want women given equal opportunities to men, to be paid equally for the same job as men, to be given rights to land and to control over their bodies without men mediating what is right or not about their bodies.


In honour of Mama Zondeni Veronica Sobukwe, who has joined the realm of the ancestors, we recommit ourselves to that timeless ideal for which her, who her life was dedicated to complete liberation of African people from the yoke of neo-colonialism and oppression.


We the EFF, commit ourselves to working day and night to ensure that as we march forward to ensure complete freedom from patriarchy and oppression, we leave no women behind. Thank you. [Time Expired.]


Ms S J NKOMO: House Chairperson, the theme is so beautiful, August is such a beautiful month because it is a month where we celebrate as well as ululate all the
 

 

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work that has been done by the women in our country, South Africa.


On 9 August 1956, more than 20 000 women converged to Pretoria where they were actually going to offer their petitions in complaint of the apartheid system. The President by then did not even acknowledged them and was not even prepared to talk to them, could have even maimed them, but they could not because most of them were even carrying white babies they were taking care of.


Well, August once again, like all other days in the 365 days, is a month which is very important to us as women. I must state that amongst the speakers today, who appear on today’s list, we do find that there are only three men that will be talking in front here during this important session on women. That is a disappointment. It actually shows that even in this House, men’s still do not take this debate seriously as it should.


We, as the IFP applaud Mrs Sisulu for the 100 years and we know the work that she has done. We applaud a lot of
 

 

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the women that have gone past in their lives and they have done so much. We also state that we do take note that the August month, we have quiet few legends that have also gone past. We have Aretha Franklin, who is the queen of soul, who has gone past. We have our hon Baba Koffi Annan, who has gone past. We have got quiet a few that have gone past, including some of the students that have committed suicide. All of that is the problem to us. But the most important thing to us as well in August is an issue which happened on 16 August, more or less 16 years back


Tshivenḓa:

Mufumakadzana Vho S J NKOMO: Zwino ndi khou amba navho Vho Maṱamela. Ho itiwa zwiṅwe zwithu hangei Marikana. Vho vhuya vha amba hafha riṋe vha ri vha ḓo ya Marikana na Vho Julius vha EFF u amba na vhathu vha Marikana. Vha ḓo ya lini? Ri khou vhudzisa uri vha ḓo ya lini ngauri vho amba hafha uri vha ḓo ya Marikana. Kha vha ri vhudze uri vha ḓo ya lini u amba na vhafumakadzi havhaḽa, vha dovhe
 

 

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vha ambe na vhana, zwikwara, magovha, vhathu vhoṱhe na mimuya ya vhathu vhe vha lovha hanengei.


English:

We applaud this month and we take courage as the IFP that this country will move forward in everything that we are doing. I thank you. [Applause.]


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Hon House Chair, allow me to start off by recognising the role played by some of our former leaders, one such lady, Winnie Madikizela-Mandela. I think to a very large extent, she was underreported in South Africa, particularly in the role that she played in liberating us and particularly the women of South Africa.


Let me also recognise the role played by Mama Albertina Sisulu, Fatima Meer and others and also recognising the role of my own leader, VZ Magwaza-Msibi, the role that she has played, particularly in the Zululand District Municipality and many of the women seated here today, including my late mom, my late sister, who played mammoth
 

 

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task in where I am today. But hon Chairperson, I have a problem.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: You don’t have a wife?


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM. I have a problem, House Chair. [Interjections.] Once again, I see hypocrisy at its highest level. I heard the member of the EFF in this podium talking about women’s involvement, women’s emancipation and protection of women’s rights. But what about the lives of Maggie Klaasen and Mogu Komane, who have been brutally assaulted and abused by their members? They do little or nothing about it. Shouldn’t charity begin at home?


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Order, Chair.


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Shouldn’t you have done something in your own home. Isn’t it the way it should start?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon Shaik Emam, will you take your seat, please?
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Chair, I am rising on Rule 92.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon Shaik Emam, take your seat please. [Interjections ]


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Sit down!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, what is your point of order?


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Chair, this member must stick to his speech. He must not even try to start with EFF because what he is raising now is something that is not even there. He must not enter into politics of the EFF. This member must answer on the money he has stolen from his workers. He must tell us how much he stole from the workers, chief.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member! Hon member, will you take your seat please? Hon member, take your seat please! [Interjections.]
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Don’t start us.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon Shaik Emam, will you continue please?


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: House Chair, the question is: Why there is one law for the EFF and another law for everyone else? When different parties had challenges here, they are the one that are grandstanding here.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Chairperson?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, will you take your seat, please? Yes, hon member, why are you rising?


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Chairperson, I rise on a point of order.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Yes.
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: So, I am sure this person speech is not about the EFF. He must refrain from talking about something that he does not know. He is not going to continue with his speech. He stole the money from his workers.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, take your seat. [Interjections.]


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Policemen were here looking for him. He is a thief. We are going to show you. Who are you?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, take your seat. Why are you rising, hon member?


Mr P J MNGUNI: House Chair, I would have really loved the House to proceed and there is ... [Inaudible.]


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): What is your point of order, hon member?
 

 

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Mr P J MNGUNI: Firstly, the point of order is that members must refer to each other in a respectful manner. But secondly, to refer to a member and say that he is a thief is completely unparliamentary and unacceptable. She must then withdraw it. Thank you.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Thank you, hon member. Hon member, will you withdraw the remark, please?


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: I am not going to withdraw. The policemen were here, Chair.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, you must withdraw the remark. [Interjections.]


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Chair, let me remind you. Do you remember when the police came to this House looking for this thief?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, I am not debating the matter with you. [Interjections.]
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: No, Chair.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): I expect you to withdraw the remark.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: You also called him because the police were looking for him. He is a thief. This one took people’s money.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, you must withdraw that remark.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: What?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): You must submit redentions in the form of a substantive motion as per the Rules. You must withdraw the remark.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Switch my microphone. Chairperson!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Yes.
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: But what is the use of debating in this House if we are going to withdraw the truth? Do you also remember when you intervened on his case when the police were looking for him?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, you must withdraw the remark.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: No, I am not.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Then you must leave the House, hon member, please. [interjections.]


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Yes, I will leave the House.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Thank you.


Ms H O MKHALIPHI: He is a thief. This one will remain a thief. [Interjections.] Shut up!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): You must leave the House, hon member. [Interjections.]
 

 

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Ms H O MKHALIPHI: Shut up!


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Order, hon members![Interjections.] Continue, hon member.


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: House Chair, if the hon member wants to talk about stealing, she must answer about where the R20 million that is missing from her party’s accounts at the moment.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: On a point of order, House Chair.


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Maybe, that is what she should be telling us.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: On a point of order, House Chair.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Shaik Emam, will you take your seat, please? Why are you rising, hon member? [Interjections.]
 

 

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Ms N K F HLONYANA: House Chair, can the hon member stick to his speech? Can he speak about a matter on hand?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): That is not a point of order. Continue, hon member.


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: House Chair, let me start by referring to the issues on hand in our country at the moment. Only 5% of women hold chief executive officer, CEO, positions in South Africa. Let me also explain some of the challenges that came to me in the last couple of days of a woman in Johannesburg with a four-year-old child that was kidnapped by the husband. Police could do absolutely nothing because he is the father and he can’t kidnap his own child until General de Lange, Provincial Commissioner assisted.


Let me talk about a mother in the Western Cape, who has a four-year-old child that the father took away on Friday afternoon and she only saw the child on a Monday. Then again, the child goes on a Tuesday and comes back on a Wednesday. The justice system says there is nothing wrong
 

 

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with that – a four-year-old child. This is what is happening in South Africa at the moment. Women are being raped and murdered everyday. Yet, the legislations that we have in South Africa is not in enough to deal with the challenges.


So, rather than come here and grandstand, what I think is very important is that the women of today should get together and put in mechanisms to be able to deal with the challenges faced by our people. Thank you. [Time expired.] [Applause.]


Ms C N MAJEKE: Honourable House Chairperson and hon members, on Thursday, 9 August, being the Women’s Day, the body of Khensani Maseko was lowered to its resting place. This was the saddest depiction of the country South Africa has become.


It was a massive blow on the community our universities have become. Maseko took her life after posting words that should echo loud and clearly in our country — “nobody deserves to be raped”. One should input further
 

 

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on that and state clearly that nobody deserves to be violated in whatever form.


Some have claimed that the death of Khensani shook the nation because her rape had happened at an institution of higher training. This is because, given the prestige of the place, one would not expect such abnormal and dehumanising behaviour.


The nation recently experienced a chilling moment when Zolile Khumalo, a student at the Mangosuthu University of Technology, was brazenly killed by her ex boyfriend in one of the institution’s residences. Upon her death there was an outcry on violence, safety and security of universities’ residences.


Again from an institution of higher learning, a video went viral from the University of Fort Hare where a male student was seen physically assaulting a woman student until she fell on the floor. Women students retaliated by parading the assaulter through campus as a way of shaming him for his deeds.
 

 

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There are numerous stories that never make it to the media about the unsafe nature of the university space for women. Clearly our universities are no welcoming safe spaces for women. Instead, they have become sites of precarious, fear-filled, existence.


What is behind this crisis? Is the education project failing? Should we expect more from students born from this society of intergenerational abuse and degradation of women? It may seem futile to pose the question: is the education project failing? It seems the education project has generally always failed when it comes to humanising society. There are no easy answers anyway but the first part is for leadership in these institutions to come out to the nation and confess that they are leading institutions that are haunted by perilous cultures that need to be dealt with soon.


These cultures pierce themselves through in many ways: They are felt by female academics struggling to gain promotion; they are felt by women being paid different to their male counterparts; they are felt by women seeking
 

 

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to go on maternity leave being presented with impossible demands; and they are felt by women who feel they cannot take advantage of working through the night because their safety is not guaranteed.


The university councils and managements can no longer treat the cultures that oppress women as mere incidents that troubleshoot from time to time. [Time expired.] Thank you very much.


Mr W W WESSELS: House Chair, there is no doubt that women are the backbone of society. It is also so that women and children suffer the most as a result of atrocities such as wars, violence, poverty and discrimination.


Women have, amidst marginalisation, played a crucial role in the history of South Africa and in all societies and communities of South Africa.


More than 50 000 women and children including black women and children died in concentration camps during the
Anglo-Boer War. In 1902, there were more than 160 000
 

 

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Afrikaner women and children and a 130 000 black women and children in concentration camps.


During history, woman has played a very important role; to be a voice in the struggles of South Africans. Also in Afrikaner history, women played a crucial role; on 4 August 1915, 6 000 women also marched to the Union buildings, 22 June 1940 10 000 women marched and then we know the history of 9 August we are talking about today.


The history of women’s month and Women’s Day should include the history of all groups in South Africa. We should not only pay lip service to women’s rights.


Whilst there are more than a 116 rapes per day in South Africa, we cannot say that we are serious with regards to the safety and the rights of women. Whilst only one out of four rapes is reported in South Africa, we cannot say that we are serious. Only 14% of perpetrators in rape cases are convicted, then there is something terribly wrong and that should be addressed.
 

 

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True equality is not in the hands of quotas but should start with an attitude towards women. Whilst women are regarded, in almost all cultures in South Africa, as possessions and as something that we use as window dressing and where we have some kind of zebra-type quota system, we are not talking about equality.


Women are equal to men and they do not any quota system. A quota system means that a woman needs that quota to be regarded as equal. If we talk about true equality then we do not need any affirmative system but a change of attitude and we should regard our women as important. [Time expired.] I thank you.


Ms D CARTER: House Chairperson, the values of a family at what constitutes a functional family unit needs to be inculcated and promoted amongst our youth within our schooling system, in the precursor to adulthood and our boys must be sensitised and taught to respect the rights of women. We have to be careful not to exclude our boy child in everything that we do.
 

 

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Family dysfunctionality of absent fathers and female- headed households continues. This brings me to maintenance issues: The Children’s Act and section 28 of the Constitution protects our children. Maintenance is the right of the child and it is not about the parents.


The moratorium on hiring of staff in our maintenance courts needs to be lifted immediately, as it is one of the biggest problems in the maintenance courts. A Soweto court has one magistrate, 50 cases a day and a waiting period of five months to get a maintenance case on the court role.


Maintenance cases are dealt with in a criminal court by prosecutors and magistrates dealing with day to day criminal prosecution. We, as Members of this Parliament must ensure that we have exclusive courts dealing with maintenance and domestic violence and bring back the position of maintenance prosecutors.


The Schools Act does not take into consideration maintenance agreements where the father reneges on paying
 

 

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school fees, the mother is still liable. That is just an example because it happens with opposite sexes as well.


Why is it that a 18 year old must take their parents to court for maintenance? Surely that child must be concentrating on passing his matric.


Maintenance defaulters willingly resign from work to avoid paying maintenance. There should be a simpler process to claim from pension funds in events like that. Other defaulters sell their moveable and immoveable property to get out of a warrant of execution to pay arrears maintenance.


Maintenance defaulters should be flagged at entry and exit ports of our country like we do in Australia.


It now brings me to the Customary Marriage Act of 1998. Whilst the Act provides for the recognition of marriages performed African Customary Law, there have
been inordinate delays in resolving the ongoing violation
 

 

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of the human rights of women in traditional Muslim marriages.


Lastly, but not least important, why is it that we find boxes and boxes of these in all colours and flavours everywhere but we do not find this that every girl child and every woman needs? [Applause.]


Surely it cannot be right that this is a stamp of the Department of Health but there is just no money for this. Why can’t this be a priority? What is our legacy? Let us as members of parliament change legislation, ensure that we solve our historic and current injustices. [Time expired.] Thank you. [Applause]


Mrs C DUDLEY: Chair, as our topic today is “Women united in moving South Africa forward” I am reminded that as women we have much in common but we are also uniquely crafted for many very different purposes. We are young. We are old. We are abled in many respects and disabled in others. Some of us live in rural areas; some of us are city girls. Some have been previously advantaged and
 

 

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others are presently advantaged. Some have been previously disadvantaged and far too many are presently disadvantaged.


We have been each others champions and - sadly - we have been each other’s worst enemy. Unity will take both discipline and a renewing of our minds - that default mode of ‘preferring men’, for example - is a good place to start! We are not less, but we are different. Let’s give ourselves and each other permission to be ourselves. As Dr Seuss says, “Today you are You, that is truer than true. There is no one alive who is Youer than You.” While we as a nation are collectively grappling with the issue of land and land ownership, the ACDP recognises that women are legitimately concerned. We want a truly integrated and inclusive economy and fair and just land reform, but without gender equity, development initiatives and opportunities are likely to be largely in the hands of - and benefitting - men.


As women gain ownership and control of property and or land, they should have stronger bargaining power, higher
 

 

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incomes and more influence in communities and within their own households. However, research shows that even when women own property and land, their husbands and other male family members are still perceived as household heads and have better access to resources.


The ACDP supports policy that is gender sensitive as empowering women and girls, will require interventions that go beyond land redistribution. Power relations and gender norms within a household play a major role. It is not enough for a woman to know her rights - men in the household must be equally informed.


The degree of equality or inequality in both rural and urban society is dependent on what children learn from the role models in their homes and schools. Families and teachers should be encouraged to share responsibilities and pass on skills, including agricultural and technical skills and knowledge - equally to both, daughters and sons, girls and boys, from a young age.
 

 

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Incentives for sharing domestic responsibilities - for example - should be a consideration when talking about the empowerment of women and in this regard the Labour Laws Amendment Bill - originally proposed by the ACDP and passed by the National Assembly and the NCOP today by the way - is a positive step toward building a culture of sharing both child care and other domestic responsibilities. I thank you.


Ms T STANDER: Molweni, checking into Ezibeleni Police Station I met a woman begging a police officer to arrest her husband. I remember watching the blood from her soaked T-shirt drip onto the floor and looked up to find her shredded face. The officer answered my questions that all officers were still out monitoring the service delivery protests that the vehicles were transporting the accused assailants to another police station and that the victims unit was not available. A devastated woman went to the first place she thought she would find help but found none. Women live in fear of being raped in our streets. They have to endure endless delays supplying for
 

 

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maintenance orders and don’t believe criminals receive appropriate sentences.


The forced marriages and Traditional Courts Bill have not been updated and gathered dust while women’s rights are abused because the ANC shuts down Parliament for 75 days putting its internal squabbles ahead of the people of South Africa. [Interjections.]


Stop the conversation and take action. Train employees, equip and deploy more police into communities for visible presence; fund more shelters and places of safety; and resource courts to efficiently handle maintenance, applications and mechanisms to enforce them. Women are often imprisoned in abusive relationships because they cannot participate in economy to enjoy financial freedom.


Ms Z S DLAMINI-DUBAZANA: Hon House Chair, I rise on the point of privilege. I am checking whether is it parliamentary or are we still within the proper Chapter 2 of the Constitution because we don’t know whether that person whose picture is hanging there in the whole world
 

 

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had the permission for her picture of her face to be hanging there. Is it parliamentary?


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Well, hon member from where I sit, I can’t see the image that is being displayed. [Applause.] However, I want to ... no, I didn’t ask for to see it, hon member. [Interjections.] I want to make a request to members that the primary functions of the Houses is to debate, and although we allow members to display an object, we must do it in a measured way not to distract us from the debate that is taking place.


I would request the Chief Whips’ forum to discuss this matter and I would also refer the matter to the subcommittee of the rules so that we can be more explicit about what is being allowed into the House and also how it is displayed in the House. Surely, it is unprecedented that we have this situation like this taking place and although the faces of the victims are not clear. [Interjections.] Hon member, I did not ask for your comment. Although the face of the victim is not clear, we
 

 

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must be sensitive to anyone whose faces are being displayed in the House.


Ms T STANDER: I am intimately associated with the woman. So, ...


IsiZulu:

... thula! [Ubuwelewele.]


English:

When women do not receive equal pay or occupy at least 50% of top management positions, barriers exist and urgent interventions are acquired. If we do not provide women with learning and training opportunities to develop leadership skills and scarce skills for the fourth industrial revolution, they are going to be left behind. No man occupies a position of manager - just ... nje ...


He was trained and mentored and developed into that role. We need to give that same training and mentorship to women. What we don’t need is this: [Interjections.] ...
 

 

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IsiZulu:

... linda, linda, linda ... [Ubuwelewele.]


English:

I am sorry, it’s too low. Interjections.] Anyway, basically what I wanted to show you is Susan Shabangu saying that Karabo Mokoena was weak. From today, let us stop wasting time and money on dialogues, conferences and summits and discuss issues facing women.


Ms Z S DLAMINI-DUBAZANA: Hon House Chair, I rise on Rule

84 that the member when addressing another member she needs to address the member of this House properly.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): That’s correct hon member. You cannot refer to members on first name terms. We must refer to members in a respectable way.


Ms T STANDER: I am sorry that has escaped me, but it has given me time to do this. [Interjections.]


IsiZulu:
 

 

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Thula! [Ubuwelewele.]


English:

We know the issues. They appeared in the 65-year-old Women’s Charter and they are evident in the statistics published in so many reports. Apartheid broke our society and our humanity. Yes, government alone cannot fix it.
Civil society must take individual and collective responsibility for redress and reconciliation to build one South Africa for all. However, we know that the President with his “Thuma Mina” has been exposed as nothing but ...


IsiXhosa:

... ukuthetha nje, akukho nxaxheba.


English:

He is submissive to the ANC, consumed by trying to hang on to a vapour of unity while the body count of women increases and the gender equality gap widens. If you share the DA’s mission to build a safe, secure ... [Time expired.]
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Order, hon members! Hon Stander, will you just remove your aids and material that you used on the podium, please. Your actions are delaying the debate.


Ms M R MORUTOA: Hon Chairperson, Ministers and Deputy Ministers, guests, hon Members of Parliament, I greet you all. I would like to start by paying respect to a fallen hero, a giant of the women’s struggle, Mama Sobukwe. Her family and friends are in our thoughts at this trying time in their lives. May her spirit live on!


The year 2018 signifies 100 years since the formation of the first women’s organisation, which is the Bantu Women’s League. The Bantu Women’s League was formed at a very difficult time for women, especially for black women. Thula wena! [You keep quiet!] The women at that time, had no rights at all, even the SA Native National Congress was not permitting women to become members of the ANC.
 

 

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The women’s rights at that time were not the focus even for the now transformed ANC. The brave move by women who pioneered the formation of the Bantu Women’s League is to be commended because, despite the political climate of the time, women stood up and opposed introduction of pass laws for women. South African women have never been afraid of organising themselves across racial and party lines to fight for injustices levelled against women.


The strength and resilience of these women is something that the young women of today need to emulate. Imagine organising a petition, which gained about 5000 signatures without the current technology. This shows the character of pioneers of the black women. Women in this country have a history of being active in politics and social transformation. We fought side-by-side with our male counterparts, and we were subjected to the same inhuman treatment by the apartheid government.


Torture, loss of children, detention and death sentences were the order of the day, but women never cowered away.
 

 

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Even when our very own male comrades were treating women as second-class citizens, women took them head on. It was through the efforts of the Black Women’s League that compelled the ANC to accept women into full membership in 1943, and ultimately to the formation of the ANC Women’s League in 1948.


The Bantu Women’s League is not only a forerunner for the formation of the ANC Women’s League, but also paved the way for the formation of the multi- party women’s organisation, Federation of South African Women, Fedsaw. It is the Fedsaw that came up with the Women’s Charter in 1954. This is the very same Women’s Charter that influenced provisions of the Freedom Charter.


The Black Women’s League was a launch pad for women to resist any discriminatory actions against them. The Women’s National Coalition, which is another multi-party women’s organisation, successfully challenged the exclusion of women during Convention for a Democratic South Africa, Codesa, negotiations. The same Women’s National Coalition, through the Women’s Charter for
 

 

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effective equality, was able to influence the Constitution to provide protection and equal rights for women.


The Bantu Women’s League was founded and led by Charlotte Maxeke. Charlotte Maxeke was a gender activist, the first black woman to be a university graduate. The defiance and militancy of Charlotte Maxeke was evident when she organised and led a march against the promulgation of the infamous Native Land Act of 1913 as well as various antipass resistant actions.


Having an educated woman at the helm meant that the organisation was able to independently conduct its affairs without the assistance of males. The Black Women’s League was able to address government officials of the day directly, without an interpreter or a spokesman. This independence did not sit very well with government and political organisations at that time.


Charlotte Maxeke was not just an activist; she was also an intellectual and an educated woman. She used her
 

 

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education to empower other women; she portrayed that women are capable of excelling in anything and she paved a way for all women to get education. This is an important message to young women and girls today.


Young women and girls of today are facing different challenges and struggles, but I urge them to adopt and learn from the exemplary attitude portrayed by Charlotte Maxeke and other pioneers of the Black Women’s League.
The sad reality for all women is that, even with the history of being active in the liberation struggle, women are still not adequately represented in politics.


We are still in a time where as women we must fight for imposition of mandated gender quotas to ensure 50/50 representation. We are still in a time when female comrades are only acknowledged, honoured and appreciated when they pass on. The struggle for liberation for women continues even for the young women and girls of the present day.
 

 

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Women are also still subjected to a plethora of social ills like violence; women are still overly represented in low-paying jobs like domestic work, including unpaid care work. It is up to women of today to take the baton and run with it. Charlotte Maxeke and other pioneers did their part. The time is now, for young women and girls to stand up and fight. The political climate is no longer hostile; we have a caring government that is pro-women, and we also have legislation that favours women.


There are various opportunities that are available for women and girls than it was the case during the time of Charlotte Maxeke. The issue of land dispossession was a focus area for women even as far back as 1913. The current debate about land must be engendered and take into consideration gender specific situations.


We are on the brink of the Fourth Industrial Revolution, and young women and girls need to embrace it to ensure that they are not displaced by the shift. The Fourth Industrial Revolution brings with it opportunities for women to exploit technology and come up with creative
 

 

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ways of handling the current struggles that women are facing. Thank you.


Mr S T JAFTA: Hon House Chair, exactly 23 years ago, we marked the first commemoration of the 1956 march on the Union Buildings by 20 0000 women in Pretoria. Sixty two years later, this historic march has heralded in a new enterprise underpinned by gender parity and all the customary markers of democracy including equality, human dignity and freedom of security of women to make: Firstly, decisions concerning reproduction; secondly, to security in and control over their bodies; and lastly, not to be subjected to medical or scientific experiments without their informed consent.


According to a report commissioned by the Department of Labour entitled Women in SA Labour Market 1995 to 2005, women accounted for 55% of the growth in total employment, substantially in excess of their share of employment in 1995 of 39%. These significant strides, however, are merely a footnote if one considers the
 

 

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burden of interminable poverty and gender-based violence affecting women.


These disparities are documented on the Commission of Employment Equality report 2016-17 which shows that, 22% of women are in top management, compared to 78% of their male counterparts.


Women in solidarity have the collective power to triumph socioeconomic barriers. In history, women have established and maintained social enterprises that have been the bedrock of successful nations.


In the fight against patriarchy, women have sought not to entrench matriarchy because they understood that the two are equally backward.


Hon House Chair, Pregs Govender of the Human Rights Commission has appealed to Parliament to recognise and respect the power of rural women leaders. In my considered view, the collective urgency to move South Africa forward is incapable of completion without rural
 

 

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women participation. It is these women that have directly borne the brunt of rural poverty and hunger as a result of skewed land distribution. It is the duty of the vanguard ... Thank you, very much. [Time expired.]


Ms P T KARLSEN: Hon House Chairperson, let me begin my speech by honouring the women of 1956, who on 9 August, despite their different political affiliations, race, religion or cultural beliefs came together to march against pass laws. We say to those women, and especially Mama Dora Tamana who at the march said and I quote:


We, women, will never carry these passes. This is something that touches my heart. I appeal to you young Africans to come forward and fight. These passes make the road even narrower for us. We have seen unemployment, lack of accommodation and families broken because of these passes. We have seen it with our men. Who will look after our children when we go to jail for small technical offence? ... not having a pass.
 

 

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We say to the late Mama Dora; sikuvile Mama. [We heard you, Mama.]


And continue the struggle for women’s emancipation, we shall. We stand on your shoulders and of those of the other women who marched in 1956 and continue to fight against the struggles the women of today face.


It was an honour on the 1st of August to join a march of women and gender and nonconforming people from all over South Africa in protest against gender-based violence.


I was saddened to hear that the ANC refused to join in this march unless it was leading it.


Hon House Chairperson, gender-based violence knows no political affiliation; gender-based violence knows no race; gender-based violence knows no class, religion or culture. Gender-based violence affects us all and does so daily.
 

 

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It is for that reason I find the thought of a “Women’s Month” ridiculous. It is a month of platitudes, empty promises, clichés, recycled speeches and annoying expressions of faux-horror, such as oh my gosh, a woman has been abused during Women’s Month, as if it is okay any other month. [Applause.]


Women’s issues must be front and centre and ingrained in all departments and in all policies. We demand gender equality. Mere quotas are not enough. We demand equal pay for women, and equal access to resources, opportunities and economic participation. We demand the end of the indignity women have to suffer in having to engage in carpet interviews for jobs. We demand that workplaces be friendlier towards working mothers. We demand that women who have to skip school because they cannot afford sanitary towels be provided with them. [Applause.]


And also, we demand that the police must take reports of domestic violence seriously” and not say, go sort ...


Hon House Chairperson, can I be protected.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon member, you are protected. Continue.


Ms P T KARLSEN: They are heckling me.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Just continue, hon member. Hon members, let us just give the hon member an opportunity to continue. Order hon members!


Ms P T KARLSEN: It is the sign and the fact that the ANC benches are so empty, you do not care about women’s issues! [Applause.]


We also demand that men be part of the conversation regarding tackling the issues women face today.


It cannot be women talking to each other, but men, must be there to listen and take action.


I believe it begins with how men are brought up. I learned from a New York Times article “How to Raise a Feminist Son.”
 

 

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Allow your sons to cry. Boys are often taught that anger is acceptable, but that they are not supposed to show other feelings, like vulnerability. Never tell your son,” you are being a girl”, using a being female as an insult.


Make sure your son has good role models, both male and female. Talk to them about the achievements of women you know. Encourage them to read, including about women who have excelled in their chosen vocations. Ending patriarchy and ensuring that gender-based violence and rape are eradicated requires that women are taken seriously as contributing members of society. It requires a whole of society approach. We must come together as a country, bring up our sons correctly, support victims of abuse, and ultimately reach the goal of gender equality. [Time expired.] [Applause.]


[Interjections.]


IsiZulu:

ILUNGU ELIHLONIPHEKILE: Ukhalelani?
 

 

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Nkk P T KARLSEN: Ngikhalela abafazi!


Setswana:

Moh N P KHUNOU: Modulasetulo, Batlotlegi ba Palamente, baeti ba rona, Afrika Borwa ka bophara, ke a le dumedisa mo leineng la mmopi wa rona. Go diane tse pedi tse re tlholang re di utlwa mme re sa di tseye tsia. Re di bua ka metlha fela ga re di tlhaloganye. Mmangwana o tshwara thipa ka fa bogaleng, o tla tlhabiwa, ee, fela go
nale gore go tlhabiwe bao a ba tihokometseng, go kanna ga gobala ena.


Se sengwe se are, ya etelelwa pele ke e namagadi ,ya wela ka lengope. Le kae lengope? fa re sa tlole re tshwara dipasa, re bone tokologo re le ma Afrika Borwa ka ntlha ya bokgatlhamela masisi jwa bomme. Basadi ba dira bonnete ba gore go nne le ditlamorago tse di siametseng setšhaba ka bophara. Fa o ba neile tšhono ya go etelela pele ba tlisa diphetogo. Nako ya di dipuisano le di kgogakgogano e fetile, re batla go bona phetogo.
 

 

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Modulasetulo, ke mang a ka reng, mo lefatsheng ga a ise a kopane le mofuta o o tshwanang le bo Mme Charlotte Maxeke, Albertina Sisulu, Winnie Madikizela Mandela, Sophie de Bruyn, Ncumisa Kondlo ...


English:

... she was part of us here, Martha Gxowa and many others? She had already conceived the process in the womb of her spirit in the consciousness of the hour. The hour has come where the women and mothers of our country needs to manifest the changes. As a nation in transition, the women are to birth and bring forth the untapped potentialities of this nation in every sector, in governance and in all sectors of our societies.


The recent statistics shows that out of 57 million citizens, 51% is women. If we are really willing and ready to bridge the gap of inequality, we need to start with the programmes on empowering of our rural women and those women staying in farms. For instance, if we empower or allocate resources to all those who have benefited already, the gap will continue to be widened. We need to
 

 

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stabilize the country by concentrating more on the demographics of the country. The brave can take up the shield and rather hurt themselves than to hurt the ones they are taking care of.


Hon members, it has been scientifically proven that SMME’s create more employment worldwide. The question is; is it done? Yes, but is it effective? No. Resources don’t reach the real people that should be the beneficiaries of the development.


Our President Ramaphosa emphasized when we were celebrating 62 years of the Freedom Charter, that the real meaning of Radical Economic Transformation, is what the Freedom Charter is quoted saying:


“The people shall share in the country’s wealth across all racial lines and gender”.


We need to empower and give proper skills to our women. We need to emphasize on education. We need government to implement gender responsive budget. We need women in
 

 

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mining, construction, IT, science, and agriculture and not as labourers but; as manufacturers too.


If we are to succeed economically as a country, women must participate at both the micro and macro levels of the economy. They must not be entrusted to informal economy and unpaid domestic work as has been the case. We are though encouraged by wide range of policy initiatives that have been undertaken such as the Preferential Procurement Act and Local Procurement Regulations. We said under the ANC government, this will be realized.


It has been a strong political commitment that enabled ANC led government to craft gender sensitive legislation to promote the achievement of empowerment and equality. It is against this backdrop that the main goal of the ANC is to radically transform the socioeconomic status of women. Implementation of radical socio economic programs can be achieved through the transformation agenda of state institutions and monitoring of existing policies.
 

 

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Hon members and Chairperson, South Africa is the one of the leading economy in our continent and; it is important for us to develop appropriate responses to our challenges with key reference to the Forth Industrial Revolution that my Chairperson spoke about. As it poses a challenge for us due to the legacy of our past, we believe that as we lead in automation; women are developed with innovative tools to take advantage of this through Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, CSIR, they can create platforms such as square meter array, health science, and other projects can also be a catapult to our economy.


Let’s not fold our arms and complain of automation as it will take lots of intensive labour that we have benefited from as women, let us not wait for the 11th hour when the bus has left as usual.


Hon members, through our fight as Members of Parliament, we have made it a point that you can never beat passion. Our mothers didn’t have business skills but had passion to do something on their own to carry through their
 

 

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families. I am sure a lot of you were educated through your parents selling tomatoes and other veggies on the streets.


The government has a programme that started in Department of Trade and Industry called National Informal Business Upliftment Strategy. It has developed a lot of small businesses and some are exploring their products. Hon members, in the Eastern Cape, a woman at the age of 38 started a company called Sibong’ukukhanyo to set up recycle waste.


IsiXhosa:

Umama uza kundibulala kuba ungumXhosa.


English:

I don’t know why I can’t read that. They used baggage as plastics and rubber bins and recycle to produce high density of polyethylene pellets. These pellets then produce plastic bags such as refuse bags and irrigation pipes. On the l7 November 2017, Industrial Development Corporation, IDC’s Credit Committee approved R142 million
 

 

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and further R4,3 million for wash plant purchase for this woman. This project has created 63 full time employment and 74 will be indirect jobs. These are the people to collect waste, and separate them. They don’t only feed their children but also will clean environment.


In Polokwane on Basic metals and mining, IDC has committed R5 million to fund a youth project where 50% will be women and they will create 16 jobs. For industrial infrastructure development, there is an example in Howick KwaZulu-Natal, where 38 jobs were directly created. Black industrialist in energy sector where we have never featured as blacks is part of this and today, I am proud as a woman to say, we are going forward Chairperson. We are going to take that bait that you are talking about. [Applause.]


In Marabastad, 18 women were employed with 90% of them being youth, have created and designed products using handcraft skills felt fabric and beads. This is the market where foreigners or rich guys will come and exploit - buy cheap and sell expensive - this is what
 

 

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government must guard against. There is so much that we have achieved in law or legislation. Implementation remains key challenge to all of us. Our multiparty women’s caucus and the Portfolio Committee on Women will robustly conduct its oversight on all departments to check progress on gender, budgeting and mainstreaming.


Not only looking at the number of officials that you have employed but; how many children are we keeping full or hungry or not depend on the government when they can feed themselves. How many are benefitting? It’s our responsibility – all of us - to make sure we empower women to bridge the gap, because no matter how much you will produce and grow more, the gap will bring you back and your progress will be difficult to calculate scientifically.


Be a shining woman so that your daughter will have a role model and your son will know what to look for in a woman when he is a man. Invest for tomorrow. It might rain today and all dams full but two months to come, it might
 

 

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be dry. Let’s prepare to buy each other and share the country’s wealth. We have ours tools.


Setswana:

A re semeleleng re ye go berekela setšhaba sa Aforika Borwa.


English:

Chairperson, Maya Angelou said:


“A Woman in harmony with her spirit is like a river flowing. She goes where she will without pretence and arrives at her destination prepared to be herself and only herself”


Happy women’s month, but I will not conclude without saying this to Ms Hlonyana from EFF. When you come and belittle women and talk about what you heard and what you have not proven; this is why men are going to look down on us. We want to be respected. We want to be part of those women. We will take the like bait of the women of
 

 

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1956 and take it forward and make sure that there is empowerment in this country.


Ms N K F HLONYANA: On a point of order Chair; I would like to understand if belittling women is parliamentary.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T FROLICK): Hon member that is not a point of order.


Setswana:

Moh N P KHUNOU: Ga re batle go utlwa go tilwe gate, o se o se bone gonne ...


English:

... these are the pulling down syndrome that we talk about in women’s meetings every year but there is nothing that is changing.


Hon Stander, I hope your pictures were permitted by those people because you are also degrading them by coming here and showing them here when they didn’t give you permission. Chairperson, I hope you are going to take
 

 

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this seriously by talking to that lady and making sure that she gave hon Stander permission to come here and post her pictures. Even your own Chief Whip, hon Steeinhuizen, didn’t clap hands for you because you were really - shame on you. This is women’s month. [Applause.]


Hon Van Damme, you must come and attend women’s caucus. We have achieved one thing that we are proud of this term. Once a month, we have dedicated Thursday for women to come and talk about our frustrations and say what we do with the challenges that we have. How do we move the country forward? So I invite all of you as women to be part of those women caucus. They happen once a month and it’s something that we have been fighting for from 1994 when comrade Lulu Xingwana was a Chairperson until now because; we have a Chairperson who really wants to make sure that there is improvement in women’s lives. I thank you. Amandla! Happy women’s month. [Applause.]


The MINISTER OF WOMEN IN THE PRESIDENCY: Thank you very

much. Hon Stander, why do you put a black woman here? Does your subconscious mind tell you that abuse happened
 

 

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in black communities only? [Interjections.] Hon members

23 June ... [Interjections.]


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): Hon Minister, will you just take your seat. Why are you rising, hon member?


Ms T STANDER: On a point of order, I believe the Minister is casting aspersions by insinuating that I put a particular face up there. She should debate the issues and the failure of the ANC-led government to look after that woman; so that she didn’t have to be there in the first place.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Mr C T Frolick): No, hon member that is not the point of order. Please read the rules and then you can stand up on a point of order. Continue hon Minister.


The MINISTER OF WOMEN IN THE PRESIDENCY: Hon members, on

the 23 June 2017 President Uhuru Kenyatta signed the law
 

 

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on the provision of sanitary pads to girls, we must learn from him.


I would like to pay a tribute to Kofi Annan for the work he has done to drive the agenda of women since he became the Secretary-General, SG in 1997; and the cardinal point of the Federation of South African Women, FEDSAW, is that it was an organisation or a movement of progressive women that were fighting oppression. It was not just a jamboree of everyone who did not have an understanding of the struggle at the time. So let us not make things convenient for ourselves.


One other thing is that African families were destroyed by the poll tax, and we all know when the poll tax started. It was when our fathers were forced to go and work for you great grandfathers.


The issue of recognising the work of women “equal pay for equal work” is not a recitation. It is about recognizing the work that women do on a daily basis. It is about ensuring that the work of women is put in the GDP.
 

 

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[Applause.] It is also about recognising and formalising the work that women are doing to look after vulnerable communities. So, it is not just a recitation.


The issues of LGBTQQIA+ acronym, lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, questioning, intersex, asexual - let us stop killing them; and let us not allow people to behave or show a picture that says “before in Africa this was not there” so that we turn against our people and kill them.


Africans had a way of dealing with that, and you never heard anyone in the history of Africa saying LGBTQQIA+ was killed. That is why the ANC came up with the issue of the equality clause in the Constitution and the recognition of all people.


Hon member, Van Damme we want access to land. We demand that women must be recognised. We want to get more land because the land we stay in right now is overpopulated. Land is power. Land is property and women are the workers of the land. [Applause.]
 

 

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Therefore, that is why we want access to land, not all these things that we are bringing here that we have read about somewhere and trying to be dynamic. We need to understand the issues that are at the core of women emancipation. [Applause.]


We must not allow people to tell us whatever they like. We must not allow people to tell us to attend a march that are organized by men that are fighting with other men and therefore behaving as if everything they are doing is neutral. There is nothing neutral. Women’s issues are political. Thank you very much, Chairperson. [Applause.] [Time expired.]


Debate concluded.


The CHIEF WHIP OF THE MAJORITY: House Chair, the ANC moves without notice:


That the House –
 

 

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notes with shock and sadness, the passing of former United Nations Secretary-General and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Kofi Annan on Saturday, 18 August 2018, after a short illness, at the age of 80;


further notes that Mr Kofi Annan was the 7th UN Secretary-General and the first from sub-Saharan Africa;


recognises that he was a career diplomat who projected quiet charisma and is widely credited for raising the world body’s profile in global politics during his two terms as UN chief, from 1997 to 2006;


understands that as part of the collective of eminent persons formed by President Nelson Mandela, The Elders, he remained a point of reference, a voice of reason and a guiding light on human development, peace and unity;
 

 

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remembers his address in the special joint sitting of Parliament in March 2006 when he called for unity, peace and development as a means to deal with mountains of human misery still facing millions of people in South Africa and in the continent;


recalls that Kofi Annan was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, along with the UN, in 2001, for their work for a better organised and more peaceful world;


believes that he will be remembered for leading the UN into the new millennium with matchless dignity and determination; and


conveys its condolences to his family, friends and colleagues.


Agreed to.


Mr S C MOTAU: Chair, I hereby move on behalf of the DA:
 

 

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That this House –


notes that the International Water Association awarded a certificate to the City of Cape Town for being the first city in the world to reduce its water consumption by 50% in just three years [Applause];


further notes that other cities, such as Melbourne in Australia, were only able to achieve this goal within 12 years.


recognises measures that were taken by the City of Cape Town, including the 50 Litre Life campaign with steep water tariffs, installation of water management devices, speedy leak detection services, water pressure reduction and water restrictions;


acknowledges that around the same time in 2017, the City of Cape Town’s dams were at 29% capacity
 

 

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- however at this time they are at 58,8% of dam storage;


congratulates the City of Cape Town for the historic achievement and encourages all residents to continue saving water in order to avoid Day Zero.


The motion was objected to, and it will be converted into a Notice of Motion.


Mr T RAWULA: I hereby rise on behalf of the EFF to give motion without notice:


The the House –


notes that as we sit here today, the EFF Student Command is at the Union Buildings to hand over memorandum and will be sleeping there until all students convicted, arrested, expelled and suspended because of their involvement in the Fees Must Fall protest are granted amnesty;
 

 

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further notes that between 2015 and 2017, and once again even in 2018, thousands of students at institutions of higher learning made a revolutionary demand for free quality decolonised education;


acknowledges that education is one of the few mechanisms that young black people have available to them to lift themselves and their families out of the generational structural poverty;


further acknowledges that the cost of studying has excluded many who are academically qualified from studying while leaving those lucky enough to access funding in desperate situations where they are barely able to survive and constantly have their academic performance compromised by lack of accommodation, food, study material and funds;
 

 

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further recognises that during the protest for free quality decolonised education, students were brutalised by private security and the police;


notes that the institutions of higher learning and police singled out students for victimisation, resulting in hundreds of students being unjustly arrested, convicted, expelled and suspended;


(7)        resolves therefore that all students who were arrested and charged during the Fees Must Fall campaign should have all charges against them dropped and all students that were expelled and suspended by student institutions of higher learning must be reinstated with immediate effect.


The motion was objected to, and it will be converted to a Notice of Motion.
 

 

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Mr T MAKONDO: I move without notice on behalf of the ANC:


That the House –


notes with deep and profound sadness the death of legendary singer Aretha Louise Franklin, at the age of 76, on Thursday, 8 August 2018, at her home in Detroit, USA;


further notes that the music icon, who influenced generations of singers with unforgettable hits such as Respect, Natural Woman and I Say a Little Prayer, succumbed to a battle with advanced pancreatic cancer;


acknowledges that Ms Franklin, a preacher’s daughter whose powerful voice made her the long- reigning queen of soul, rose from singing gospel in her father’s church to regularly topping rhythm and blues and pop charts in the 1960s and 1970s;
 

 

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further acknowledges that she won 18 Grammy Awards and had some 25 gold records to her name;


remembers that she was the first woman to be admitted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, with 88 Billboard chart hits during the rock era;


further remembers that former President George W Bush presented her with the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honour, in 2005, for those who have made contributions to national security, world peace or culture;


recalls that Ms Franklin sang at the inaugurations of presidents Jimmy Carter, Bill Clinton and Barrack Obama and performed at the funeral of slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King;


further recalls that the singer's final public performance was last November, when she sang at an Elton John AIDS Foundation gala in New York;
 

 

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believes that over the course of a professional career that spanned more than half a century, Franklin's songs not only topped the charts but became part of the vernacular;


further believes that Aretha brought joy to millions of lives worldwide and her extraordinary legacy will thrive and inspire many generations to come; and


conveys its condolences to her family and supporters.


Agreed to.


HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon members, let’s remind one another that it is one minute and 30seconds for every motion that you raise. Can we please stick to the time! It is not right for me to stop you before you conclude, especially on motions because we have to understand what you are relaying forth. So, let us assist one another here.
 

 

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IsiZulu:

Nk M S KHAWULA: Ngiyabonga Sihlalo, yazi angimazi, uthi aka “move” aka “move” uyasuka uhlala phansi la ebemi khona. [Uhleko.] Hhayi, bekufuneka asuke ashone kwenye indawo. [Uhleko.]


USIHLALO WENDLU (Nk M G Boroto): Kulungile, isiNgisi sikhulunywa ngezindlela eziningi Mama. Asiqhubekeni.


Mr N SINGH: Hon Chairperson, I hereby move without notice on behalf of the IFP:


That the House –


notes that Eid al-Adha, also called, “The festival of sacrifice”, which is the second and most important of the Islamic holidays, commences this evening;


further notes that the festival is to commemorate the willingness of Abraham to surrender to the will of Allah by sacrificing his son and that
 

 

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this should remind us all of our commitment to God;


acknowledges that even though the festival involves the sacrifice of livestock, it is done so peacefully and is symbolic of Abraham’s selfless sacrifice;


further acknowledges that this is a time when millions of Muslims around the world gather for celebration, prayer, family gatherings, exchange of gifts and the sharing of goodwill;


recalls that Eid al–Adha marks the end of the Hajj pilgrimage, which is one of the five pillars of the Islamic religion; and



celebrates this joyous day together, peacefully, with our Muslim brothers and sisters in South Africa and throughout the world.
 

 

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Agreed to.



EVICTIONS IN THE WESTERN CAPE



(Draft Resolution)


Mr A M SHAIK EMAM: Hon House Chair, on behalf of the National Freedom Party I move without notice:


That the House –


notes that the farm workers in the Western Cape continue to be evicted and one such an example is the community of Stellenbosch;


further notes that despite negotiations for the purchase of the land, evictions continues resulting in a great loss to the already disadvantaged shack-dwellers;


notes further that despite the request to national government to stop all evictions pending the
 

 

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process of expropriation without compensation evictions in the Western Cape continues;


also notes that despite assurances from the provincial Department of Human Settlements in the Western Cape, the community of Steen Villa were evicted and Eastridge in Mitchells Plain continue to be harassed, intimidated and threatened by the City of Cape Town with eviction;


calls upon to condemn the unlawful evictions, harassment and intimidation of the communities of Steen Villa, Eastridge and Stellenbosch; and


calls on government to intervene on such cases.


Not agreed to.


WITS NEW CHANCELLOR


(Draft Resolution)
 

 

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Mrs J D KILLIAN: Chairperson, on behalf of the African National Congress I move without notice:


That the House –


congratulates Dr Judy Dlamini, a medical doctor by training, leading business woman, entrepreneur, author and philanthropist for her appointment as the first black woman chancellor for the University of the Witwatersrand;


notes that Dr Dlamini will takeover as chancellor from the retired Justice Dikgang Moseneke on 01 December 2018;


also notes that Dr Dlamini is the first woman chancellor appointee in the 96 years of Wits University’s existence;


further believes that she is an inspiration to many young black people and women in particular,
 

 

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to become successful academics and future leaders of our institutions;


realises the importance of celebrating and recognising black excellence, in particular, excellent black woman who occupy the echelons within various institutions of higher education and training; and


wishes her well in her position of responsibility going forward.


Agreed to.


CRIMINAL ATTACKS ON AMBULANCES



(Draft Resolution)


Mr M L W FILTANE: Hon Chair, on behalf of the United Democratic Movement I move without notice:


That the House –
 

 

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notes that over the past six months there have been 15 criminal attacks on ambulances which have resulted in three ambulances being in a badly damaged state and 15 medics who are now placed on office duty due to post traumatic stress disorder from these incidents;


further notes that the Eastern Cape is a province that is under resourced with ambulances, especially in the Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality where there are only 35 operational ambulances when it is supposed to have 115;


calls on government to prioritise the safety of medics who risk their lives whilst serving the state and its citizens who desperately need it and deliver the correct number of ambulances that are needed in the metro; and


further calls on local municipalities to assist in protecting these vital services by having a
 

 
















Agreed to.

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metro police car deployed at all times in areas that are deemed as hot spots for attacks on ambulances.
 

 




WELFARE INSTITUTION SECTORS


(Draft Resolution)


Mr M BAGRAIM: Chairperson, I move on behalf of the Democratic Alliance without notice:


That the House -


notes the national minimum wage is likely to be introduced in 2019 and would be devastating for the welfare institution sector;


further notes that the representations were made by institutions including Epilepsy South Africa to the Department of Labour confirming that they are
 

 

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a national non-profit organisation rendering specialised and comprehensive services to persons with and affected by epilepsy;


acknowledges that these institutions are only financially sustainable because of the fundraising efforts and the input they receive from local, provincial and national government;


further acknowledges that despite the fact that the Department of Labour said that these organisations can apply for exemptions from the national minimum wage the regulation proposed only a 10% exemption amounting to R2 per hour which would result in workshops becoming unsustainable and the majority having to close;


recognises that the enormous amount of work done by the welfare institutions cannot be replicated by government; and
 

 

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further recognises that the impact of the national minimum wage on these organisations would likely lead to the collapse of some services particularly economic development programmes and would lead to the destruction of welfare workshops across the country.


Motion objected.


PLIGHT OF PATIENTS IN GAUTENG HOSPITALS



(Draft Resolution)


Mr T E MULAUDZI: House Chair, I move on behalf of the Economic Freedom Fighters without notice:


That the House –


notes the plight of the sick and dying patients at Mamelodi and Kalafong Hospitals;
 

 

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further note that there is a shortage of nurses and doctors at both hospitals;


notes that we are killing our nurses and doctors because of the unbearable workload which is causing exhaustion and depression and they are also the most likely to die from contagious diseases such as Tuberculosis, TB, because of the work environment;


further notes that we received a complain that at the two hospitals patients collecting their antiretroviral, ARVs, had to get up at 03:00 a.m. because the queues are too long;


note that we also received a complain that a young boy who was involved in a car accident had to wait for five hours at the hospital without being treated;


we must recognise that this is all due to the lack of staff;
 

 

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further note that we also continue to receive complain on how the elderly are forced to sleep on the floor because there is a lack of beds; and


must call upon the Department of Health to investigate and to address the problem at Mamelodi and Kalafong Hospitals.


Motion objected.


PROFESSOR BONGANI MAYOSI DIES



(Draft Resolution)


Ms L A MNGANGA-GCABASHE: Chairperson, I move on behalf of the ANC without notice:


That the House –


notes with great sadness the passing of ... [Interjections.]
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Can you stop the clock.


IsiZulu:

Nk M S KHAWULA: Sihlalo, nginephuzu lokukhalima okuphambukayo. Ngempela, ngempela kuyadlalwa yini kulento, kungathi kukhulunywa into ebalulekile abantu behlukumezekile kuthiwe kuyachithwa? Hayi! Akungadlalwa ngathi lana.


English:

The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon MaKhawula, please, take your seat. Let us continue, ANC.


Ms L A MNGANGA-GCABASHE: Chairperson, on behalf of the ANC I move without notice:


That the House -


notes with great sadness the passing of the Dean of the Faculty of Health Sciences of the University of Cape Town, Professor Bongani
 

 

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Mayosi, on Thursday 02 August 2018, at the age of 51;


further notes that Professor Mayosi was the country’s top cardiologist and appointed as dean two years ago;


recalls that he was awarded the country’s highest honour, the Order of Maphungubye in 2009, for his contribution in scientific advancement;


recognises that Professor Mayosi was a highly revered chief specialist, a brilliant academic, researcher as well as world renowned cardiologist;


further recognises that he was respected both as a clinician and as a competent administrator both as the Head of the Department of Cardiology at Groote Schuur Hospital and the Dean in the Faculty of Health Sciences which
 

 

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incorporates medicine in the University of Cape Town;


acknowledges that he dedicated his talent, skills and his whole life to saving the lives of others and trained many more in the art of healing as a specialist and lecturer in internal medicine and cardiology;


believes that Professor Mayosi represented the actualisation of the dreams and aspirations of those who follow in his footsteps; and


also believes that he represented the best in black excellence. [Time expired.]


Agreed to.


Mr T RAWULA: The ANC must not blackmail us with moral motions. We support the motion.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon Rawula, please, don’t do that. We continue now, Cope. [Interjections.]


IsiZulu:

Nk M S KHAWULA: He-e! Sihlalo. Asike silungiseni.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon member, on which point are you rising now?


Ms M S KHAWULA: We are not children and we are not coming to play here. [Interjections.]


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): On which Rule? Which Rule are you standing on?


IsiZulu:

Nk M S KHAWULA: Wu-Rule 15 kulungile. [Uhleko.] Kwenzeke iphutha. bekungafanele ahlale laphaya nezingubo ezibomvu, manje udukile nengqondo idukile. [Ubuwelewele.]
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): I am now switching your microphone off. That is not a point of order, hon MaKhawula.


Agreed to.


KEVIN ANDERSON BECOMES RUNNER UP AT WIMBLEDON TOURNAMENT


(Draft Resolution)


Mrs C DUDLEY: Hon House Chair, I move without notice:


That the House —


Congratulates the South African tennis player, Kevin Anderson, who recently became runner up to the Wimbledon mens title against Novak Djokovic after defeating American John Isner in the second longest match in the history of major tournaments lasting six         hours and 36 minutes;
 

 

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commends Anderson on his persistence and exertion in the marathon semifinal match and his striving for the title despite injury to his right arm caused by the semifinal;


notes that Anderson started playing tennis at the age of 6 and as a 12-year-old, he had regularly competed against future world number one Rafael Nadal on the juniors circuit;


acknowledges that in 2016, he contributed to world tennis by cofounding a tennis instructional and lifestyle website titled “Real Life Tennis” which offers online instruction and access to life on the professional tennis circuit;


commends Raven Klaasen and K G Montjane who also had a magnificent fortnight at Wimbledon; and
 

 

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applauds Anderson on being ranked internationally as number six in the mens tennis world and for bringing credit to South Africa.


APPOINTMENT OF DR SILAS RAMAITE


(Draft Resolution)


Mr G J SKOSANA: Hon House Chair, I move without notice:


That the House —


congratulates Dr Silas Ramaite for his appointment as the Acting National Director of Public Prosecutions, NDPP, on Tuesday, 14 August 2018;


notes that this appointment follows a ruling by the Constitutional Court that found the appointment of Adv Shaun Abrahams as the
 

 

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National Director of Public Prosecutions, invalid;


recalls that Dr Ramaite was the National Prosecuting Authority, NPA, Deputy National Director responsible for administration and the office for witness protection, and has served as the Deputy Director of the NPA for 15 years, prior to his new appointment;


believes that his appointment will go a long way in ensuring that the nation regains confidence in the NDPP and its integrity, stability and effectiveness of the criminal justice system; and


wishes him well in his new position of responsibility.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon members, are there any objections to the motion? Hon Rawula.
 

 

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Mr T RAWULA: The EFF rejects the ANC deployees.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Alright. Thank you, very much. In light of the objection, the motion without notice may not be proceeded with. It will now become a notice of motion on the Order Paper. AIC.


PASSING AWAY OF KOFI ANNAN


(Draft Resolution)


Mr S M JAFTA: Hon House Chair, I move without notice:


That the House —


notes Kofi Annans’s passing is a great loss to the Organisation of the African Unity, OAU;


also notes that under his tutelage the United Nation’s Secretary General the AU policy of noninterference, which was a tragicomic for accountable leadership in Africa, was replaced
 

 

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by a progressively accentuated nonindifference policy stance;


recognises that the Annan’s Pan-Africanist demeanour contributed towards the adoption of the African Union Vision 2030;


acknowledges that his silence strength in mediating the violent conflict in Sudan, which had led in an interminable interregnum of government, remains one of his greatest achievements; and


commiserates with his family.


Ms T V TOBIAS: Hon Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Yes.


Ms T V TOBIAS: Hon Chairperson, the motion is out of order because the Chief Whip of the Majority Party has already read it.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): I was going to address that. I was first going to ask if: Is there any objections? [Interjections.]


No objections. Hon members, I think we must clarify this with the Rules Committee about raising the same motion from different parties for next time. However, we will allow it for today. Let us look at it after this. [Interjections.]


The CHIEF WHIP OF THE OPPOSITION: House Chairperson, House Chairperson.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Yes, hon member.


The CHIEF WHIP OF THE OPPOSITION: House Chairperson, I rise on a point of order. My point of order is: You have made a ruling, but just to say that it puts this House in a problematic position because this then becomes the resolution of the House. The House has already resolved on this matter when we dispensed with the Chief Whip’s one. This one, you know, should fall away because it is a
 

 

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matter which the House has already disposed with. It is a matter which has already been discussed.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): I do understand, that is why I say it must be clarified with the Rules Committee so that people know exactly what is happening and I do agree with you. Thank you, very much.


Ms T V TOBIAS: But Chair, can we get ... [Interjections.]


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): We cannot for now allow that one to stand that is why I had to say this after he has finished speaking. Thank you, very much. The hon Moteka. Am I right, neh! Yes.


Mr P G MOTEKA: Yes, you are right “sharp”.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): “Ja”.


Mr P G MOTEKA: Chair, I just want to check if you have hired an advisor? Because, she is acting as your advisor. [Interjections.]
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): No, hon Moteka. That is not a point of order. She is correct by rising on a point of order.


Mr P G MOTEKA: No, she is out of order today.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon member, please take your seat. Thank you. Agang SA! Is Agang SA here?
ANC!


PASSING AWAY OF LINDA PRO KID MKHIZE


(Draft Resolution)


Ms V P MOGOTSI: Hon House Chair, I move without notice:


That the House —


notes with great shock the untimely passing on of one of South Africa’s most talented and celebrated hip-hop artist ever to emerge in this
 

 

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country, Linda Mkhize popularly known as Pro Kid on 8 August 2018;


further notes that Pro kid was a trail blazer and a pioneer of township or kasi rap in our country;


recalls that Pro Kid broke tradition from the Western hip-hop style of music and introduced a style of rap that combined both township vernacular and English;


further recalls that his music narrated the daily trials and tribulations of a black child growing up in the township;


remembers that Pro Kid released his first album Head and Tails under Gallo Records in 2005 and later released his second album DNA in 2006, and would be remembered for hits such as Ghetto Science and Uthini ngo Pro;
 

 

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further remembers that he graced the biggest music festivals and concerts around the country and was a top bill at clubs gigs;


believes that his music resonance with ordinary young people across the townships and villages of our land;


also believes that Pro Kid was a truly authentic artist that contributed immensely to the development of the art and in particular hip-hop genre in South Africa; and


conveys its heartfelt condolences to his family and the entire music industry.


PASSING AWAY OF VERONICA ZONDENI SOBUKWE



(Draft Resolution)


Mr T GODI: House Chair, I move without notice:
 

 

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That the House —


note with sadness the passing away of Mme Zondeni Veronica Sobukwe last week at the age of 91 years;


salute her as an exemplary mother partner and leader;


honour her determination and steadfastness throughout the trials and tribulations of her life as a student nurse during the liberation struggle till her last day on earth;


recognise that she apply represents those in the liberation struggle who served, suffered and sacrificed without being seen giving rousing speeches in rallies or leading defiant marches, but who bore the pain and anxiety of having to keep families together on their own feeling the pain of their partners in detention, underground or in exile;
 

 

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further recognise that she was not just Robert Sobukwe’s wife, she had a life of her own and she is honoured for who she was, dignity personified with a calm iron determination on the right of the African indigents to national self-determination;


wishes the preparations and the funeral itself to be as dignified as she has led her life; and


thanks the President for according her a special state funeral category two; and


lastly, conveys to the House heartfelt condolences and solidarity with the family and the Pan-Africanist Congress of Azania. I thank you.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon Godi, I think you understand the rules of Notice of Motion very well that they have to be circulated before they can be read in the House. And you know very well that you have not
 

 

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done that, so I am not going to put the question. I am sorry. The PAC, DA.


AG REPORT ON PRASA REVEALS TOTAL INSTITUTIONAL BREAKDOWN


(Draft Resolution)


Mr M S F DE FREITAS: House Chair, I move without notice:


That the House –


notes that Passenger Rail Agency of South Africa, Prasa, is yet to submit last year’s 2016-17 Annual Report, which is now 318 days overdue, and that it should release the report immediately,


further notes that Prasa systems are inadequate to identify irregular, fruitless and wasteful expenditure; are inadequate in ensuring that tender processes and procedures are compliant; and are inadequate in ensuring that remuneration
 

 

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processes and procedures for executives are complaint,


recognises that the Minister has undertaken to get this entity back on track and calls on the Minister to do so immediately; and


calls on the Transport Portfolio Committee to commence with its planned inquiry into Prasa immediately.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): In light of that, the motion becomes a notice of a motion.


CONGRATULATIONS TO 20 SA ATHLETES IN TEAM REPRESENTING AFRICAN CONTINENT AT IAAF CONTINENTAL CUP


(Draft Resolution)


Mr S M RALEGOMA: House Chairperson, I move without notice:
 

 

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That the House –


congratulates 20 South African athletes who are part of the team representing the African continent at the upcoming International Association of Athletics Federations, IAAF Continental Cup to be held in Ostrava, Czech Republic between September 8-9 2018;


recalls that among the athletes are Cornel Fredericks, who will defend his Continental Cup crown after winning 400m hurdles gold at the previous edition of the showpiece in Morocco four years ago and an experienced athlete Khotso Mokoena, who returns in search of another win after securing silver in 2014,


understands that the African team, consisting of athletes from 18 different countries, was selected based on performances at the 21st Confederation of African Athletics CAA African Senior Championships in Asaba this month;
 

 

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acknowledges that other South Africans in the squad include versatile middle-distance star Caster Semenya, in-form long jump star Ruswahl Samaai and sprinter Akani Simbine;


recognises that the IAAF Continental Cup, a team event which will be contested based on a points system with athletes competing in straight finals over two days of competition, will feature squads from Africa, the Americas, Europe and Asia-Pacific; and


congratulates all these athletes who have made the African team and trust they will defend the honour of the continent and of our country.


Agreed to.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon members that concludes motions without notice, the next ... oh ... hon Chief Whip?
 

 

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The CHIEF WHIP OF THE MAJORITY: House Chair, I am rising on a point of privilege, we want to assure the AIC that if they were to circulate that motion on Mama Sobukwe we will fully support it. [Interjections.]


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Thank you. Nobody is barred from bringing it again into the House.


Mr N T GODI: I am just correcting the AIC stuff, it is the APC. [Interjections.]
The CHIEF WHIP OF THE MAJORITY PARTY: APC! My apologies.

[Laughter.]


ANC APPLAUDS LAUNCH OF CAMPAIGN TO MAKE SCHOOLS ABLUTION FACILITIES SAFER


(Member’s Statement)


Ms N GINA (ANC): The ANC welcomes the launch of the Sanitation Appropriate for Education, Safe, initiative by President Cyril Ramaphosa, at the Sheraton Hotel in Pretoria on Tuesday, 14 August 2018.This initiative is
 

 

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aimed at encouraging collective action to save lives and restore the dignity of tens of thousands of our nation’s children as demanded by our constitution. Given the overwhelming scale of backlogs and the current state of the economy, it became clear that government are not able address this important basic human right without assistance from the private sector. Therefore, this Safe initiative was launched.


The ANC firmly believes that the Safe initiative will spare generations of young South Africans the indignity, discomfort and danger of using pit latrines and other unsafe facilities in our schools. We are of the view that schools should be places where children must be safe, supported, nurtured and empowered. Thus the ANC is pleased with the immense response from the private sector and is humbled by many more who pledged their commitment to assist. The ANC is thus making an urgent plea to other business communities to assist in order to make the Safe initiative a success. In the year in which we honour former President Nelson Mandela and celebrate the centenary of this global icon, who valued education above
 

 

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all else, this will be a fitting tribute to our beloved former statesman to eradicate pit latrines and restore dignity to South African children in his honour. I thank you Chair.


SAPS UNRESPONSIVENESS FAILS TOURISM INDUSTRY


(Member’s Statement)


Ms H S BOSHOFF (DA): Chair, nearly 100 local and overseas tourists were last week kept hostage for three days at the Blyde River Canyon, A Forever Resort by the communities of the nearby villages in Mpumalanga. The communities were protesting for the lack of service delivery by Thaba Chweu Municipality. They do not have constant running water and electricity. The roads are in a state of disrepair and sanitation is not up to scratch. These protests are ongoing.


We respect the fact that protest actions may take place but when the lives of citizens are at stake then SA Police Service, SAPS, must intervene as a matter of
 

 

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urgency. I was alerted to this by one of the local tourists saying community members threatened they would burn down the resort if their demands were not met. The local SAPS and senior officials within SAPS did not respond to their pleas but the DA came to the rescue through hon Kohler-Barnard who made contact with General Sithole who immediately sent out a Public Order Police, POP, team to evacuate the tourists on Thursday evening. Tourism in our country is directly related to jobs. If tourists do not feel safe they will not come and people will lose jobs. SAPS needs to account for their failure to act, why do these senior police officers still have jobs when they allow the sabotage of our people’s employment prospects. Thank you.


AMENDMENT OF SECTION 25 OF CONSTITUTION GAINS TRACTION


(Member’s Statement)


Mr T RAWULA (EFF): Chairperson, in the last months the people of South Africa made their voice heard as they demanded the amendment of Section 25 of the Constitution.
 

 

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Thousands of South Africans provided clear and articulate reasons as to why Section 25 of the Constitution must be amended and land expropriated without compensation. In hearings that took place in all nine provinces our people who had been dispossessed of their land and the dignity that comes with it were able to express their pain, anger and hope. We saw young and old, black and white all expressing their opinions without fear or favour in a process that was fair and democratic. The hearing showed that hunger for land which burns within them and made it clear that the only way forward is the amendment of Section 25 and expropriation without compensation. We want to thank and commend the people of South Africa for participating in the public hearings, making them a success and example of the potential which our democracy holds. The people of South Africa have done their part and mandated us here as the representatives of the people to amend Section 25 of the Constitution, and expropriate land without compensation, ours is to execute this mandate and ensure that the land is returned to the people. The struggle for land dispossession is finally coming to fruition. Thank you, Chair.
 

 

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HIGH COSTS OF DATA SERVICES




(Member’s Statement)


Mr C H M MAXEGWANE (ANC): The ANC, a movement of the people, is deeply concerned about the negative impact that the high cost of data services has on ordinary South Africans, especially workers, youth, students and women. We believe that as a result of the high cost of data, the majority of South Africans are unable to enjoy the benefits of the digital economy, and furthermore growth and development of small businesses is stifled.


We share the view that lowering the cost of data is a catalyst for economic growth, as it will unlock economic opportunities and thus contribute to economic growth and job creation. We therefore encourage Government to take urgent steps to ensure full implementation of all policies and regulations in support of the #Data Must Fall campaign, working together with the regulator Independent Communications Authority of South Africa, Icasa and all mobile operators in our country.
 

 

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The ANC is encouraged by some operators who have taken the first step to lower data prices since the popular call for lowing data costs. However, this is not enough. We therefore make a clarion call for all mobile operators to demonstrate goodwill and lower data prices. I thank you.


Mr N SINGH (IFP): Hon Chairperson, I very recently had the pleasure of being Mrs Eddy Lane and her nonprofit organisation, forever changed, as a keynote speaker of the conference on cancer policy in the workplace.
Chairperson the dread disease cancer affects us whether directly or indirectly through family friends and colleagues in our places of work.


Recent statistics informs us that one in three people will die from cancer. It is a stuck reality that cancer is prevalent in employees in the majority of workplaces in South Africa it is in this respect Chairperson therefore that it is imperative that we as the responsive and responsible government enact cancer specific legislative regulatory and policy provision to meet the
 

 

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many and various needs and challenges of cancer sufferers who are employed during the period in which they are diagnosed and treated and even upon the return to employment.


The IFP therefore calls upon the ministers of health and labour to engage on this issue and to present legislative proposals on developing a cancer policy in the workplace to be submitted to this house for consideration, thank you


ABUSE OF THE LAND ISSUE



(Member’s Statement)


Afrikaans:

Dr P J GROENEWALD (FF PLUS): Agb Voorsitter, ek het by verskeie geleenthede in hierdie Huis gesê dat grond ’n emosionele saak is. Ek het by verskeie geleenthede ’n beroep op ploitieke partye gedoen om met omsigtigheid met grond om te gaan.
 

 

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Tans word die grondkwessie op ’n onverantwoordelike manier deur politieke partye vir populistiese steun misbruik, met die oog op volgende jaar se algemene verkiesing.


Dis uiters onverantwoordelik; dit verdeel die gemeenskap; en dit is ’n gevaarlike standpunt wat ingeneem word, wat die emosies in Suid-Afrika sodanig verhoog, dat ons op die einde van die dag met ’n verdeelde Suid-Afrika gaan sit.


Die VF Plus doen ’n beroep op alle politieke partye om rasioneel met grond om te gaan. Politieke partye moet ophou om die grondkwessie, veral onteiening sonder vergoeding te misbruik, as gevolg van hul eie onvermoë om kiesers te lok, ten koste van die ekonomie.


Die ANC, wat uit dubbele monde praat en wat eindelik ’n gevaarlike standpunt inneem moet dit staak, anders gaan daar onvoorsiene gevolge vir Suid-Afrika wees. [Tyd verstreke.] Dankie.
 

 

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THE ANC COMMEMORATES THE ANNIVERSARY OF THE MARIKANA TRAGEDY



(Member’s Statement)


Mr Z M D MANDELA (ANC) The ANC joined the millions of South Africans in remembering and commemorating the sixth year anniversary of the Marikana tragedy, a tragedy that represents a sad and unfortunate chapter in the life history of our dispensation that should never have happened. The ANC calls upon all South Africans to remember this tragedy to work towards building a peaceful and cohesive society where violence has no place. We believe that only when all South Africans come together and reaffirm the founding values of our nation as embodied in the Constitution, shall we make progress in healing the wounds of Marikana.


The ANC thus urges its government to move with urgency in implementing the recommendations as directed by the Farlam Commission and particularly pay attention to interventions aimed at alleviating the plight of the
 

 

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affected families. The ANC also requests the mining companies to do like- wise and move with speed in implementing their commitment to improving the socioeconomic conditions of these communities.


We believe this will assist in building a forward momentum that heals the nation, and therefore it should be our collective responsibility as a nation, despite our differences, to find each other and make our respective contributions towards building a South Africa that is at peace with itself. I thank you.


THE PLIGHT OF WOMEN WORKERS



(Member Statement)


Mr N T GODI (APC): Hon Chair, the APC owing to its revolutionary character and content has always championed the cause of the motive force of progress. On this Women’s Month we once again highlight the plight of almost exclusively women workers whose conditions of employment caused by the state are no better than farm
 

 

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workers. The APC is here talking about the home-based carers, Early Childhood Development, ECDs, Expanded Public Works Programme, EPWP, lay counsellors, borehole operators, etc. Not only do they suffer starvation wages but also tenuous job security, all these happening in the public sector and not in private sector. We call on all our people to support their struggle for a living wage and secured conditions of employment.


The APC calls, especially on the Departments of Basic Education and Health to take full responsibility for these workers and do away with NGOs. We equally call out on the plight of truck drivers. The Department of Transport needs to be responsive to the numerous representations. The APC condemns the unchecked unpatriotic practises of capital of disregarding locals in favour of non-South Africans as a means of maximising profit. I thank you.


ANC STATEMENT ON BBBEE


(Member Statement)
 

 

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Ms S R VAN SCHALKWYK (ANC): The ANC not surprised by the DA's flip-flopping on BBBEE. As the DA’s ideological confusion on the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment, BBBEE policy continues to play itself out in the public domain, the ANC wishes to reiterate its consistent and unambiguous position on this policy instrument. We have continuously exposed the DA as a party committed to defending white privilege and preserving the status quo. Their opposition and resistance to BBBEE are therefore understandable. Beneficiaries of economic apartheid cannot be expected to support policy measures that broaden access to economic opportunities for the majority of South Africans, and in the process shake the very foundation of white economic privilege. [Applause.]


For the DA to claim that they are ditching black economic empowerment, BEE because it is “just not working”. It is extremely misleading and an excuse for their deep-seated resistance to economic transformation. Even though we admit that the benefits of BBBEE are still to reach the vast majority of our people, but these challenges cannot
 

 

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be raised as excuses to reject the policy. [Interjections.] Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment is a critical policy instrument aimed at redressing past economic injustices and inequalities we inherited. I thank you. [Time expired.]


BEE LAWS AND CHANGE



(Member’s Statement)


Ms G NGWENYA (DA): Chairperson, we recognise the historical injustices that apartheid meted out in black South Africans. The ANC’s policy of black economic empowerment, BEE, has been a monumental failure of policy of inclusion in South Africa. [Applause.] How has it succeeded in furthering inclusion? The ANC could thumb suck an answer as it is their practice. But the truth is that they don’t know, and how could they know because there is no comprehensive evaluation of the impact of the BEE.
 

 

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Let’s perhaps help them out. Perhaps the BEE has spared employment; wrong. In 2017 unemployed has reached its worst level in 14 years. How about small business? We are creating a lot of those surely. According to the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, the percentages aged 18 to 64 who intend to start a business in South Africa, has dropped by more that a third since 2013.


Maybe BEE has helped blacks South Africans accumulate wealth. No, our savings rate is declining and those with a fund or retirement annuity has decreased by nearly 10% since 2014. The ANC’s BEE is not helping people to get jobs, it’s not helping to create an environment for successful businesses and it is not helping the majority to accumulate wealth.


Let us redesign the model and work towards a model that works for the people out there, and not the people in here. [Applause.]


AFRISAM - MACSAND MINE POSES HEALTH HAZARDS
 

 

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(Member’s Statement)


Mr S P MHLONGO (EFF): Chairperson, the logic of capital, as it is and will always be about, is profit over people. Here in the Western Cape, AfriSam - Macsand Mine is destroying the lives of the people at Enkanini in Khayelitsha. This sand mine is only a few hundred metres away from where 22 000 men, women and children are staying. Everyday sand and dust from the mine covers the shacks, laundry and food of the community.


But our main concern, as the EFF, is the biggest risk caused by the mine - the health risk that the mine poses to the community especially to the young children and the old. We have received reports from members of the community that because of the sand coming from the mine, there are extremely high levels of malignant TB and other bronchial infections which affect the community and the surrounding area. This was also confirmed and verified by the local clinic.
 

 

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The health of the people at Enkanini is being sacrificed for the pursuit of profit by AfriSam, a company which Pembani Group, a holding company linked to the President of this country, has shares in. All mining companies are meant to commit to social labour plans, and we have written to the Minister of Mineral Resources asking what commitment did the AfriSam - Macsand Mine has made [Time expired.] and why is it allowed to destroy the health of our people. We so move.


THUMA MINA CAMPAIGN RECEIVES POSITIVE RESPONSES



(Member’s Statement)


Mrs Y N PHOSA (ANC): Chairperson, the ANC is pleased with the successful nationwide Thuma Mina campaign roll-out.
We are overwhelmed by the huge ongoing support and interest in this campaign since its inception. The ongoing Thuma Mina campaign is premised on ANC structures reconnecting and linking up with communities through addressing their daily challenges as well as facilitating immediate resolution of their problems.
 

 

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The ANC appreciates the support it continues to get from the people, their continuous participation and their dedication to the campaign. Furthermore, the ANC also appreciates the commitment of its volunteers, who embody the spirit of compassion and selfless service displayed by Tata Nelson Mandela and Mama Albertina Sisulu, to improve the lives of all South Africans, especially the poor and vulnerable in our communities.
We are deeply encouraged by the positive feedback of the ongoing nationwide roll-out of the Thuma Mina campaign, as it deepens connection with communities and places the ANC at the centre of leading society. Thank you.


OVERNMENT SERVICE DELIVERY IGNORANCE RECEIVES COMMUNITIES NEGATIVE RESPONSES


(Member’s Statement)


Mr S M JAFTA (AIC): Hon Chair, the AIC cautioned our government against rewarding violent protest in the past. Instead of addressing legitimate community challenges,
 

 

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our government has adopted an ostrich approach. It is regrettable that the people of Kwanyamazana in Mpumalanga and Matatiele in the Eastern Cape have to resort to self- help to demonstrate their frustration. Communities resort to protest after engaging government and this is often done to find amicable and peaceful solutions with relevant heads of departments. When this fail and when government is not responsive, protest thus become unavoidable.


As the AIC we don’t entirely support this method of engagement with government functionaries whereas government has to be responsive to the demands of its citizens. It should not occur to anyone that its inability to do so validate any destruction of property. With this patriotic remark we call upon the Ministry of Roads and Transport to urgently intervene on the issue of Matatiele where roads seem to be the main problem. The Eastern Cape provincial legislature has failed dismally to address this problem. Thank you.


10TH BRICS SUMMIT HELD IN SOUTH AFRICA
 

 

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(Member’s Statement)


Ms P NKONYENI (ANC): Chairperson, the ANC believes that the 10th Brazil, Russia, India, China, South Africa, Brics, Summit that took place in South Africa from 25 to
27 July 2018 has been a huge success which saw many agreements being endorsed. This year's summit was a crucial milestone, as it marked a decade of Brics co- operation. The summit was characterised by fruitful engagements which led to productive outcomes. The Brics leaders committed to the full implementation of the United Nation’s 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development and its 17 sustainable development goals. The bloc emphasised the need for Brics countries to heighten co- operation on peacekeeping activities.


The summit also pledged to support African development, industrialisation and infrastructure development as contained in the New Partnership for Africa's Development, Nepad, programmes and African Union’s Agenda 2063. An initiative of enhancing Brics co-operation in
 

 

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health through the establishment of a Brics vaccine centre which will promote research and development in the medical field was also endorsed.   The leaders also agreed to woman empowerment and the establishment of a Brics women’s forum. That is also highly appreciated.


As the ruling party we are particularly proud that in Brics South Africa [Time expired.]


POLICE BRUTALITY LANDS ON WARD COUNCILLORS


(Member’s Statement)


Mr M WATERS (DA): Chair, two DA councillors were attacked and assaulted by police at the Edenvale Police Station on Friday, 10 August. The assault began when Councillor Lourenco began video recording the poor treatment that another citizen received at the hands of these officers. Both councillors were assaulted by the SA Police Service, SAPS, members, resulting in Councillor Lourenco suffering a chipped bone to her ankle with a detached ligament.
 

 

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The Edenvale Police Station is notorious for police brutality with the abuses having been exposed on Carte Blanche. It is unfortunate that little has changes at the station despite promises by both the national and provincial SAPS structures.            Charges have been laid against these police officers and the Independent Police Investigation Directorate has been made aware of the matter so as to conduct an internal investigation.


In addition, the DA has launched a petition calling on the National Police Commissioner to institute an inquiry into the station. It is unacceptable that residents of Edenvale live in fear of the police. We need the police service that is professionally trained, which upholds the law and not break it. The DA is committed to ensure that police are trained appropriately and deliver the best service to all South Africans. I thank you.


ANC WELCOMES PROGRESS IN EXPANDING ACCESS TO APPROPRIATE HIV/AIDS TREATMENT


(Member’s Statement)
 

 

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Ms M L DUNJWA (ANC): The ANC commends the government’s commitment to intensify efforts to improve the health of our people, particularly in the context of devastating impact of the Aids epidemic. This programme is progressing very well, judging by the results of the study that was conducted by the Human Sciences Research Council. The results indicate that the new HIV infections have significantly declined over the past five years with the HIV incidence rate of 0,48% observed in 2017 compared to the 2012 infection rate of 0,85%. Despite this progress, new HIV infections figure is still very high.


Notably, however, is the worrying factor and a concern from the findings of the survey which indicated that the high infection levels are among the youth aged between 12 and 25. The survey also found that the HIV prevalence rate was generally higher among females aged between 15 and 24 and a number of these infections were three times higher than that of their male counterparts. The ANC welcomes the progress in expanding access to appropriate treatment, testing, care and support. We urge government
 

 

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to focus its resource more in aggressive prevention against ... [Time expired.]


SAPS UNRESPONSIVENESS FAILS TOURISM INDUSTRY


APPEAL TO DA TO MAKE PUBLIC TOILETS IN GUGULETHU AND KHAYELITSHA SAFER FOR WOMEN


(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF POLICE: House Chairperson, the first one is the contradiction from the member of the DA where she said that the senior police do not listen while she also boasted about the hon Kohler-Barnard phoning and the police commissioner responding. I don’t know which is which now. I hope she will really understand what a nonresponse of a senior police official is when that thing happens and this proves that police listen in the ordinary and everybody does work on that.


The second one is about police being unprofessional, I don’t know about this. I would request, especially people
 

 

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from the Western Cape to join us to work on the issues of policing and also issues of environmental design so that they can help us to police better. If you can go to Gugulethu, there is always a long queue of women who use the toilet from 4 o’clock in the morning until 8 o’clock, and that is where they are raped. Please build toilets for them so that they don’t wake up too early to go to the toilets. The other thing I am requesting you to do is to fix some cameras in Gugulethu. In Khayelitsha there is an eight-year camera that has not been working and it will help us to monitor. When we talk about policy ... [Interjections.]


The CHIEF WHIP OF THE OPPOSITION: Can I rise on a point of order? I am quite concerned that the national Minister of Police does not know that Edenvale is in fact in Gauteng and not in the Western Cape.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Please hon member, that is not a point of order. Continue hon member.
 

 

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The MINISTER OF POLICE: House Chairperson, I am not a provincial MEC, I am the Minister even here in the Western Cape. So, I am just advising you to help us in Edenvale and here in the Western Cape. Next time, deal with environmental issues here - where people can live better, especially on those places you do not know, for example Makhaza, Khayelitsha and all that. Please help us by assisting black lives here.


HIGH COSTS OF DATA SERVICES



(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS AND POSTAL SERVICES:

House Chair, I would like to respond and thank the hon Maxengwana who is encouraging us to put policy and regulation to make sure that data must fall. As members may know, we have already issued policy direction to Independent Communications Authority of SA, Icasa. They are now halfway and they have started with market review to make sure that there is effective competition. We will also ask the Competition Commission who are busy with the
 

 

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inquiry which they will complete by March next year. In addition, the Cabinet has directed us to look at additional measures while we are waiting for this.


Firstly, we will be looking at resources to expand our WiFi programme which improve access to the internet for people, particularly our young people. Secondly, we are busy training and we look at expanding our local small, medium and micro enterprises, SMMEs, to be internet service providers because they tend to be cheaper than the other providers. We will also be considering reviewing our current tenders as government to make sure that we associate ourselves with those who give lower cost of data to our people. Thirdly, we will also be looking at the efficient utilisation of our universal service funds and include our rapid deployment policy to make sure that we reduce the costs of deployment. Lastly, it is about the spectrum allocation which is in two ways. We are moving forward with our programme to establish where we will make sure that there are more people in the market and that there is more competition and if there is additional spectrum we then allocate it to the other
 

 

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telcos, telecommunications company, to reduce congestions. Thank you very much.


ANC STATEMENT ON BEE LAWS AND CHANGE


(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF TRADE AND INDUSTRY: House Chairperson, the hon Van Schalkwyk is absolutely right that every time the DA tries to address itself to the issue of black economic empowerment, BEE, they end up with confusion. I recall that back in 2013, the then DA parliamentary leader Lindiwe Mazibuko stood up in this Parliament – in this House, and announced for the first time that they will support a piece of legislation, only to find out a few weeks later in the NCOP that they have concocted some reasons why they would not support the legislation. At the time I was in the NCOP debate and I said that the stated reasons were not valid. Later I found out that through the biography of the then leader of the DA, “Madam Colonialism” herself has rown into the caucus and said that BEE is not their policy. I think that the hon
 

 

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member from the DA who was speaking on this matter has called for the fundamental redesign in the model. I would invite the DA to actually tell us how they think the BEE model ought to be redesigned because I know that when they get into the details, they are going to dig themselves into a hole. There is an important debate about improving the impact of BEE, supporting more productive involvement of black people in the economy, and actually making BEE a more important vehicle of transformation. Now, I rather suspect that the DA would not be part of that because ideologically and politically
- given their base, they are actually against transformation, not just one model of it. Thank you very much. [Interjections.]


ANC WELCOMES PROGRESS IN EXPANDING ACCESS TO APPROPRIATE TREATMENT OF CHRONIC DISEASES


(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF HEALTH: House Chair, with regard to the Human Sciences Research Council study, I just want the
 

 

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House to note that earlier on we were debating about South Africa’s capacity for research and I want to confirm that this study is the biggest of its kind in the whole world. There is no other country that such a study has ever been undertaken. During this 100th anniversary of Madiba, we should also note that the first study of this type was commissioned by him, Mandela, through the Nelson Mandela Foundation, and we thank him. Lastly on this issue, I just want the House to note that we are using two methods to fight HIV and Aids; it is prevention and the use of ARVs. You should know that in 2014, when the International Aids Society Conference adopted the 90- 90-90 targets - we call it treatment for prevention because when you put many people - at least 90% of them on ARVs, then the virus is no longer transmitted. That kind of treatment is prevention, just like prevention of mother-to-child transmission, PMTCT. I don’t want us to underplay it because once you reach that stage then the epidemic is defeated.


With regard to cancer – I am not sure why the statement is about cancer in the workplace. There is an explosion
 

 

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of cancer in the whole world. If you go back to the state of the nation address, the President said that we must launch a cancer campaign, reminisce to the HIV/Aids campaign. We are busy and we will launch it somewhere in October. There is an explosion of cancer in the whole country, especially five types of cancers and they are finishing us off; that is breast cancer cervical cancer in women, prostate cancer in men, lung cancer in both men and women, especially in men who smoke and colorectal cancer. And when I take a stand to fight smoking, please fight with me. Thank you.
A CALL FOR ACCESS TO LAND FOR THE DISPOSSESSED MAJORITY


(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF HIGHER EDUCATION AND TRAINING: House

Chairperson, I would agree with the hon members who say that there is a hunger for land in our country, particularly among those who have not enjoyed ownership and access to land. I therefore would argue that really in this Parliament, where we have said we will address human dignity, access for all and equality, our task is
 

 

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to ensure that indeed all the people of South Africa - particularly the dispossessed majority, enjoy access to land. What leaders in this Parliament should do, those who are attached to the Constitution, is work together – all of them, to find solutions to this deeply challenging problem and not stand here and equivocate and threaten.
Our people in South Africa – millions of them, have no access to land, no access to assets and it is our task to ensure that they enjoy such access. Thank you very much.


AMENDMENT OF SECTION 25 OF CONSTITUTION GAINS TRACTION



(Minister’s Response)


The MINISTER OF RURAL DEVELOPMENT AND LAND REFORM: House

Chairperson, land is our economic asset.


Sepedi:

Tau tša hloka seboka di šitwa ke nare e hlotša. Le se ke la bolela polelo yeo e sego gona mo go Molaotheo wa rena ka gore ka tsela ye le nyaka gore le tšee batho ba baso gape, le ba bušetše kua melaleng.
 

 

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English:

We have a Constitution that respects land reform and rural development. So, land is our economic asset and ...


IsiZulu:

Kuye kuze kuyovalwa.


Sepedi:

Le tla re hwetša gona kua gae, le gona mo le tla re hwetša.


English:

You cannot debate out of land access. You cannot! I so submit.


The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Hon Mantashe, do you need assistance? [Interjections.] Hon Mantashe, I am sorry, if you are going to respond to statements, we already had six and the Rules only allow us up to six.


The MINISTER OF MINERAL RESOURCES: You can have seven.
 

 

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The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): No, I cannot; the Rules do not allow me.


The MINISTER OF MINERAL RESOURCES: Because I wanted to help the EFF on this AfriSam ... [Interjections.]
The HOUSE CHAIRPERSON (Ms M G Boroto): Okay, no, let it be done next time. Thank you very much, hon Minister.
Unfortunately the spots are all taken.


NOTICES OF MOTION


Ms N GINA: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC that in its next sitting:


That the House debates safety of facilities in schools, especially when it comes to a lack of decent ablution facilities.


Thank you.
 

 

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Ms N W A MAZZONE: House Chair, on behalf of the DA, at the next sitting of this House, I shall move:


That the House debates the future of sustainable energy in South Africa and its impact on jobs and investment given the unjustifiable number of bailouts afforded to Eskom in the past and its control over the South African energy sector.


Thank you.


Mr T RAWULA: House Chair, I hereby rise on behalf of the EFF, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the introduction of the Bill that will declare South African work places to employ a 50/50 workforce between male and female.
This will go a long way with regards to addressing economic power relations with regards to gender.


Thank you.
 

 

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Mr Z M D MANDELA: House Chair, I hereby move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates finding alternative solutions to prevent job losses in the mining sector.


Thank you.


Mr N SINGH: House Chair, I hereby move on behalf of the IFP, that in its next sitting:


That the House —


debates the cancer policy that the Minister of Health referred to;


also that apart from other interventions, we discuss a cancer policy in the workplace.


Thank you.
 

 

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Mr A M SHAIK-EMAM: House Chair, I move on behalf of the NFP, that at its next sitting:


That the House deliberates and resolves on the immediate unconditional downgrading of the South African embassy in Israel to a liaison office until Israel respects international law, respects the rights of Palestinian people and complies with all international resolutions and agreements. [Applause.]


Thank you


Ms L DUNJWA: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates ensuring patients diagnosed with TB are notified, treated appropriately and defaulters followed up to prevent the spread of the country’s leading killer disease.


Thank you.
 

 

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Mr M L W FILTANE: Hon House Chair, I hereby move on behalf of the UDM, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the lengthy and costly process when it comes to municipalities approving building plans. The house should consider in its debate the advantage of shortening and simplifying this regulatory environment to aid development without compromising structural integrity.


I so move.


Prof B BOZZOLI: House Chair, on behalf of the DA, I move that on its next sitting:


That the House debates the appalling state of affairs in the National Student Financial Aid Scheme, NSFAS, and the likely consequences of this for students in 2018 and 2019.


Thank you.
 

 

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Dr S S THEMBEKWAYO: House Chair, I rise on behalf of the EFF, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the introduction of incentives to schools and matriculants who have done well in their Grade 12 results.


Thank you.


Ms S R VAN SCHALKWYK: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates curtailing the proliferation and thriving inflow of illegal cigarettes into South Africa that suffocates local businesses and cause job losses.


I so move.


Mrs C DUDLEY: House Chair, on behalf of the ACDP, I hereby move that in its next sitting:
 

 

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That the House debates the concern that decriminalising prostitution has less to do with the human rights of women and more to do with the multibillion-dollar prostitution and human trafficking industry globally.


Thank you.


Ms N P NKONYENI: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the strengthening of global partnerships and organisations to reform the International Monetary Fund, IMF, and the World Bank.


Thank you.


Mrs Y N PHOSA: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:
 

 

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That the House debates ensuring that G20 discussions remain focused on stabilising the world economy, eradicate global poverty and realisation of a more equitable global economic system.


Thank you.


Mr J R B LORIMER: House Chair, I move on behalf of the DA, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the effects of the investment- smashing Mining Charter and the disastrous Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Amendment Bill, MPRDA Bill, on job losses.


Thank you.


Mr C H M MAXEGWANA: House Chair, I move on behalf of the ANC, that in its next sitting:


That the House debates the negative impact that the high cost of data services has on ordinary South
 

 

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Africans, especially workers, youth, students and women.


I so move.


The House adjourned at 18:18.