CGE Interviews: day 1

Appointment to the Commission for Gender Equality

13 March 2019
Chairperson: Ms N Ncube-Ndaba (ANC)
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Meeting Summary

The Committee interviewed the candidates for the filling of vacancies in the Commission for Gender Equality.

 

The Committee had shortlisted a total of 24 candidates to be interviewed over two consecutive days, 12 candidates on each day; this was the second day of the two.

 

The candidates were mostly tested on how they would contribute towards the realisation of gender equality, under the existing budgetary constraints and resource limitations. The candidates who had previously served as Commissioners in the Commission for Gender Equality were asked to indicate what they would do differently if they were to be reappointed. The Members also posed questions on issues relating to gender-based violence as well as violence against people living disabilities and other vulnerabilities. The candidates were asked to share some of the ways they would create awareness in rural areas about the existence, the functions and the powers of the Commission; and how they would also strengthen the voice of the Commission amongst other government departments. There were also discussions concerning the legislation of pertinent and controversial issues such as sex work, abortion, and lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community rights.

 

The Committee thanked all the candidates that honoured interview invitations and notified them that it would deliberate on the interviews and recommend the successful candidates to the National Assembly.

Meeting report

The Chairperson reminded all candidates as they began the interview that the interviews were open and transparent. She explained that Members were going to ask the candidates questions and that each candidate had 45 minutes with the Members, allowing her or him enough time to think and apply her or his mind when answering questions. The Chairperson pointed out that the candidate had three minutes for a response and would be stopped when the time had been exceeded. Candidates were requested not to give any history or background and was to try to get straight to the answer. Candidates were free to ask Members to repeat their questions where the questions were unclear.

 

Candidate One: Ms Elizabeth Lemmer

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She then asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed.

 

Ms M Morutua (ANC) noted that Ms Lemmer’s CV indicated that she done work with women in traditional rural areas, in Limpopo. She asked for the candidate’s views on Parliament’s concerns about the negative effects that the Traditional Courts Bill would have on women.

 

Ms J Maluleke (ANC) expressed the hope that the candidate would have a clue about the purpose and the mandate of the CGE. She asked her to state the functions of the CGE, as well as its power dynamics.

 

Ms T Stander (DA) recalled that Ms Lemmer had mentioned in her introduction that she had an economic focus based on the development of women in the ecocultural and ecotourism sectors. She also noted that the candidate seemed to be knowledgeable and experienced in dealing with the challenges faced by women in rural traditional environments, particularly those related to land reform. Ms Stander asked why exactly Ms Lemmer wanted to join the CGE and what role she would play as a Commissioner? How would she contribute to the mandate of the CGE?

 

Dr S Thembekwayo (EFF) noted that Ms Lemmer’s CV indicated that she had once worked at the Department of Education as a Cultural Officer. The candidate was the first to include people of all races and cultures against the policy culture that existed both locally and internationally. Dr Thembekwayo noted that one of the resolved principles of the CGE was to avoid the culture of ostentation. What was her understanding of the term ‘ostentation’? How would she ensure that the culture of ostentation was avoided?

 

Dr Thembekwayo noted that Ms Lemmer was a consultant trainer, specialising in training in conflict resolution. She asked how the candidate would apply her knowledge and experience to help resolve conflicts and misunderstandings that could arise within the CGE, should she be appointed.

 

Ms SM Khawula (EFF) was impressed that Ms Lemmer had worked with rural traditional communities in matters concerning land reform. She  indicated that there was a community in Limpopo, which had been residing in a homeland for several years, that was now being evicted. The owner of the land had given the community members only five days to leave. How would she assist in advocating for the women that were being mistreated in that manner within those communities? How would she help the fight to restore the land to their ownership, as rightful heirs who were meant to inherit it from their forefathers, if it wasn’t for the colonisation of Mr Jan Van Riebeeck?

 

Ms W Newhoudt-Druchen (ANC) recognised that Ms Lemmer’s commendable role and interest in ecotourism. She  asked Ms Lemmer if she had made contact with the person that was in charge of the CGE in Limpopo, who would have assist her (candidate) in the work that she was doing. She also asked Ms Lemmer how she would she use her position to assist women in the women commission with challenges they were facing, should she be appointed.

 

Ms G Tseke (ANC) pointed that the person who nominated Ms Lemmer to be considered for an interview, Mr James Mange, had also attached his motivation for the nomination. She noted that Ms Lemmer, in her responses, emphasised the ‘harassing’ and constraints she had been subjected to by powerful, white businessmen and Chiefs of different traditional communities. She highlighted that there was a financial loss of over R37 million in projects that Ms Lemmer initiated. She  asked if Ms Lemmer had ever report the matter to the South African Police Services (SAPS) or the Polokwane (Limpopo) CGE offices. Do she know the Ward Councillor of her work area in Limpopo? Who is the Community Development Worker? Do she have relationships with these people?

 

Ms L van der Merwe (IFP) commended Ms Lemmer for her passion for women empowerment. She  pointed that the CGE was experiencing similar challenges that she was facing in her projects; such as lack of resources, lack of budget - handsprung in executing its mandate. She  asked Ms Lemmer if she considered the CGE to be a way she could get help for her projects.

 

Dr P Maesela (ANC) encouraged Ms Lemmer to seek for as much help as she could get from other women who are in key leadership structures in getting a recommendation letter she needed to obtain land on which she would implement one of her projects.

 

The Chairperson told Ms Lemmer that she would request her staff members to refer her (Ms Lemmer) to the Minister, located in Limpopo, who was responsible for rural development and land reform.

The Chairperson  encouraged Ms Lemmer to continue the noble and patriotic work she was doing for the betterment of the communities in need of help. She  thanked the candidate for honouring the invitation to the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Two: Ms Gertrude Mothupi

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed.

 

Ms Tseke asked Ms Mothupi if, in her own view, the CGE was still relevant in the present day, given the fact that there was a fully-fleshed ministry that also dealt with issues surrounding women. Did she think there was a duplication of mandates?

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen appreciated Ms Mothupi’s introduction, particularly because it was inclusive of the challenges faced by people living with disabilities and other vulnerabilities. She  asked Ms Mothupi how she, as a Commissioner, would assist in stopping the violence against such groups.

 

Ms Maluleke asked how Ms Mothupi would ensure a good working relationship with other Commissioners, given that she would be working with other Commissioners with different characters.

 

Ms Stander asked what Ms Mothupi what role the CGE played in legislation formulation.

 

Ms van der Merwe asked Ms Mothupi for her thoughts on the extent of CGE’s success in implementing its programs and operations, with the aim of advancing gender equality. What did she think were some of the challenges and limitations that the CGE faced in fulfilling its mandate? She also asked the candidate what would her input be in formulation of good legislation against the plight faced by sex workers.

 

Dr Thembekwayo asked about the budgetary constraints faced by the CGE and how the candidate would bring about improvement as a Commissioner within the CGE.

 

Dr Maesela asked Ms Mothupi what strategy she would use to solve the problem of inequality in society and shifting the paradigm that was against equality.

Ms Khawula raised the problem of unemployed graduates within the Municipalities. How could she assist in ensuring that women could work freely without being forced and blackmailed into doing certain things just to get employed?

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Three: Ms Rachel Mathlaba

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed.

 

Mrs D Robinson (DA) asked Ms Mathlaba what she would do to maximise the opportunities within the CGE given the budgetary constraints it was facing.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen noted that Ms Mathlaba would like to incorporate her skills and talents into the work she would do as Commissioner of the CGE. She  asked her to state examples of the specific skills and knowledge that she would offer, especially in assisting women living with disabilities and other vulnerable groups.

 

Ms Stander asked the candidate what view her views were on issues that were currently faced by women generally, sex workers, the LGBTIQA+ community, abortion as well as widows living within traditional leader jurisdictions. What was her view on the use of the existing pieces of legislation that governed those matters as a means to attain gender equality?

 

Ms Maluleke asked Ms Mothupi to share her understanding of the core functions and the powers of the CGE and also asked how she would ensure that they were fully implemented.

 

Dr Thembekwayo noted that the candidate was experienced in conducting research on needs analyses in accordance with outcomes. How would she use the needs analysis per outcome, paired with information dissemination, to determine the failures of the CGE? How would she advise those involved in legislation on the findings that she reached in order to ensure operating efficiency and inclusivity within the CGE?

 

Dr Maesela asked Ms Mothupi to outline the strategic objectives, to solve the problem of gender inequality, would she use if she were to be appointed.

 

Ms Khawula recalled that in the 1960s, women living areas such as Overport and Newlands East (in Durban) were forcefully evicted from their homes and were relocated to townships like KwaMashu and Umlazi. RDP houses were built for them: one-room, two-room and four-room houses. She also mentioned that there were vacant, unused pieces of land on which women would attempt to build their homes but would then be assaulted and chased away. She asked the candidate how she would assist in protecting those people.

 

Ms van der Merwe pointed out that not only did the CGE operate with limited resources, it also tended not to have good working relationships with other government departments. The CGE was often overlooked and a common perception of the organisation was that it did not have teeth to execute its core mandate of realising gender equality. What solutions would she propose to ensure that the CGE better held government departments to account for failing the women of South Africa?

 

Ms Tseke asked Ms Mothupi to elaborate on why she felt armed conflict was a significant challenge faced by the country and how it affected gender equality in the South African context.

 

The Chairperson asked the candidate if there were any questions and comments she had for the Members concerning the interview and the CGE in general. She  thanked her for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Four: Mr Bhekizenzo Tembe

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience he would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should he be appointed.

 

Ms Maluleke asked Mr Tembe how he would ensure that the CGE was visible in rural communities, should he be appointed Commissioner.

Ms Tseke stated that there was a duplication of mandates between those of the CGE and Women in the Presidency. She  asked how the candidate envisaged the relationship between the two structures. She  asked if he thought that the recommendations made by the CGE to government departments and other public and private entities when they conducted investigations, were sufficiently binding.

 

Ms Khawula asked Mr Tembe how he would assist rural housewives and widows who had handcraft-related talents to promote their work, form businesses, gain exposure to expand their customer market and ultimately employ others as a way of reducing poverty.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen asked the candidate how he would help prevent violence against people living disabilities and other vulnerable groups, should he be appointed.

 

Dr Maesela stated that the mandate of the CGE was to realise a transition from gender inequality and a patriarchal society in which systems were socially, systematically and structurally enforced within that society. He commented that those issues could not be legislated against because they are social phenomena. He  asked Mr Tembe to indicate the strategies he would bring to the CGE to help address this inequality.

 

Ms Robinson asked the candidate what programs or approaches he would use to address gender inequality and educational backlogs, bearing in mind that the CGE had budgetary constraints.

 

The Chairperson asked how the candidate would assist the CGE in fast-tracking the resolution of all gender-based violence cases that had been pending for a long time.

 

The Chairperson asked, on behalf of Ms Morutua, about the bail granted to the perpetrators in gender-based violence cases, and if it was serving the interests of the victims or the perpetrators themselves.

 

Dr Thembekwayo stated that the paradigm shift from gender inequality seemed to be a challenge. She 

asked Mr Tembe how he would act as an agent of change within the CGE to enforce acceptable and conflict-free working conditions. She also said that monitoring and evaluation was lacking in most programs and projects, despite existing on paper. She  asked if how he would ensure that the principles of monitoring and evaluating projects were adhered to, should he be appointed.

 

The Chairperson asked the candidate if he had any questions and comments for the Members concerning the interview and the CGE in general. She  thanked him for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished him well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Five: Ms Ohara Ngoma-Diseko

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed.

 

Ms van der Merwe was pleased to hear the candidate’s passion for women empowerment. In her assessment of the CGE, had she able to note if the Commission had made progress in achieving gender equality? Had she been able to pick up on the challenges and constraints that the CGE faced in fulfilling its mandate and if she had, how would she help them overcome them? Do she feel that the existing legislative and policy framework in South Africa was adequate to address gender equality?

 

Dr Thembekwayo asked the candidate how she would change the mind-set of citizens to facilitate the process of realising gender equality, if she were to be appointed as Commissioner.

 

Ms Stander asked the candidate to state her opinion on sex work, abortion and the challenges being faced by the LGBTQIA+ community; and how she thought the CGE was meant to establish equality in those matters.

 

Ms Maluleke noted that the candidate was passionate about women issues. She also stated that the CGE offices were mainly in urban areas. How would she ensure that a person in a rural area was aware of the work of the CGE? How would she ensure that the Commission was visible?

 

Ms Robinson was inspired by the candidate’s passion. She  asked what her thoughts were on the culture of rape and abuse. How would she influence people in distant, remote areas, who had limited resources, in bringing awareness about patriarchy and gender inequality? Did she have any views of the victims’ charter?

 

Ms Khawula asked Ms Ngoma-Diseko if she felt that the drive for gender equality was mainly advocating for women. What about men that are being raped and abused within their own homes? Was there not a way to teach children at school in order to avoid such cases at later stages in their lives?

 

Ms Tseke asked if she thought that the recommendations made by the CGE to government departments and other public and private entities, following investigations, were sufficiently binding.

 

Ms Morutua asked the candidate how she would contribute in curbing the crime of human trafficking. She also asked what the candidate thought were the biggest obstacles preventing the realisation of gender equality within the context of the Church and how those could be addressed.

 

The Chairperson thanked Ms Ngoma-Diseko for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Six: Mr Mbuyiselo Botha

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel the relevant educational qualifications and work experience he would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should he be reappointed as a Commissioner.

 

The Chairperson asked the candidate how young boys could be educated about how women should be treated.

 

Ms van der Merwe appreciated that she frequently saw Mr Botha on television, speaking and advocating for women. She  asked why most government departments disregarded the findings of the CGE. She noted that Mr Botha, in his 20-year review report, had highlighted the CGE’s relationship with the state as a primary cause for the lack of funding for the CGE. She  asked how he would solve those problems, should he be reappointed.

 

Ms Stander indicated that the CGE had experienced challenges with its internal dynamics. As a recently serving Commissioner, how would he contribute towards establishing team cohesion between the Commissioners? What had he been particularly responsible for within the CGE in his previous term? What would he want to accomplish within the next five years, should he be reappointed?

 

Ms Robinson commended Mr Botha for his contribution in turning around the CGE and achieving a clean audit. She also pointed out that there was a lack of knowledge of rights and very little support for people living in deep rural areas. She asked what he would do to strengthen the input of the CGE, given the budgetary constraints it operated under; how would he also hold government and the justice system accountable to protecting women.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen asked Mr Botha to indicate what was done by the CGE, during his term, for people living with disabilities. She suggested that deaf people were the most marginalised group because they did not have access to information; the CGE’s awareness of its role in that regard was non-existent. She added that there were many inappropriate images of deaf people on social media and mentioned a rape case of a deaf man who had been arrested for sleeping with his own children, but he could not access an interpreter during his trial in a remote area. The case was subsequently dismissed by the Judge. She  asked the candidate how he would use his position to ensure that disabled people would have access to information, should he be reappointed to the Commission.

 

Ms Morutua asked Mr Botha about the role of men in the attainment of gender equality. She asked how else ] they could actively champion it gender equality.

 

Ms Khawula asked how Mr Botha would expand the reach of the CGE into rural communities and create awareness about disability rights in such areas. She also asked how he would help disabled children whose access to education was limited because of their disability.

 

Ms Maluleke stated that the CGE offices were mainly in urban areas. How would she ensure that a person in rural areas was aware of the work of the CGE? How would she make the commission visible?

Dr Maesela commented that it would be not helpful to over-compensate gender equality through teaching only the young boys about how to treat women – it would have to be done equally for both genders. How would he achieve the strategic objectives of realising a patriarchy-free society?

 

Dr S Thembekwayo recognised that Mr Botha was a regular commentator on gender-related topics and that he hosted radio programs that speak on these topics. She  asked if there were any restrictions to the content, verbal or written, of his presentations. Was the content guided by the needs identified by the communities themselves? How had he bypassed the unaffordability of print media in using more affordable ways to create awareness?

 

Dr Thembekwayo stated that one of the principles of the CGE was to avoid the culture of ostentation and asked Mr Botha if he was aware of whether that principle was being upheld or not, and, if not, how he would improve the situation?

 

Ms Tseke stated that South Africa was one of the United Nations member states that had adopted the sustainable development goals. She  asked how Mr Botha would ensure that gender was mainstreamed in the achievement of sustainable development goal number two which aimed to end hunger, to achieve food security, improved nutrition and promote sustainable agriculture.

 

The Chairperson thanked Mr Botha for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished him well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Seven: Ms Grace Mazibuko

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be reappointed as a Commissioner.

 

Ms Khawula appreciated the work performed by the candidate over the years and asked if she would still champion the mission of realising gender equality and ending discrimination against disabled people as well as those living with albinism within rural communities.

 

Ms Stander asked the candidate how she had directly contributed to the CGE and, if reappointed, what project she would implement to promote gender equality.

 

Ms Robinson commended Ms Mazibuko for the work she had done for the CGE and as a member of a United Nations Committee. She  asked how she would influence government to ensure the establishment of a human rights culture that was inclusive of all citizens, including those living with disability and albinism.

 

Dr S Thembekwayo noted that Ms Mazibuko had mentioned that, during her tenure with the CGE, she addressed the complaints administration mandate. She  asked if she had received complaints concerning delayed, cancelled or destroyed police files for gender-based violence cases. If she did, how did she deal with them? She also asked she how would approach the 16 Days of Activism against violence against women and children.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen asked the candidate how, if re-appointed, she would help to reduce and to prevent the violence against people living disabilities and other vulnerable groups.

 

Ms van der Merwe lauded Ms Mazibuko for her passion for gender-related issues and commended her for the inspirational work she had done during her previous term. She  asked her how she would strengthen the relationship between the CGE and government to ensure that the CGE’s findings and recommendations were taken more seriously. How would she propose the issue of sex work be dealt with?

 

Dr Maesela highlighted the importance of educating society that disabled people were equal to everyone else and that they should not be hindered in any way. What would the candidate do to ensure that the mandate of the CGE was fulfilled?

 

The Acting Chairperson, Ms Tseke, thanked Ms Mazibuko for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Eight: Dr Tlaleng Mofokeng

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed as a Commissioner.

 

Ms van der Merwe commended Dr Mofokeng for the great work she was doing in society, and in her profession. She  pointed out that the CGE was limited in terms of its footprint and its ability to adequately address problems around gender equality. She asked what would be the focus areas Dr Mofokeng would prioritise and how she would expand the footprint and extend the reach of the CGE. She asked her to share her thoughts regarding gender-based violence and what would her inputs be in addressing those cases, should she be appointed.

 

Dr Maesela asked Dr Mofokeng to state four drivers of gender inequality, in priority order, and how she would address them as a Commissioner. He  stated that the reproductive chain should be treated with utmost reverence and care; how would she encourage women to really focus on the development of their children during their early childhood years.

 

Ms Maluleke noted that the candidate seemed to be mostly focused on gender inequality within the medical care environment and  asked what her understanding of the function and the powers of the CGE was. She also asked how she would ensure the visibility of the CGE in rural communities.

 

Ms Stander asked Dr Mofokeng how GCE positioned itself within local and international politics. GCE represented the country in the South African Development Community and at the United Nations. How should the CGE position itself in international debates? Did it support everyone regardless of country-specific government policy or should it tailor its support for UN implementation to the policies within a given country?

 

Dr Thembekwayo quoted Dr Mofokeng’s introductory remarks: “people are stuck in survival mode and are not able to thrive”. She asked how Dr Mofokeng would use her recognition and stature to pull people out of survival mode and enable them to thrive on their own so that the principle of CGE could be engraved in their hearts and minds.

 

The Chairperson stated that young women were experiencing different reproductive health issues and asked how Dr Mofokeng would assist in alleviating those sicknesses.

 

Ms Tseke asked Dr Mofokeng if she would find time in her busy schedule to serve as a Commissioner in the CGE, should she be appointed.

 

The Chairperson thanked Dr Mofokeng for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Nine: Prof Thidziambi Phendla

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed as the Commissioner.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen asked the candidate how she would help reduce and prevent the violence against people living disabilities and other vulnerable groups, including the LBGTQIA+ community and people living with albinism, should she be appointed.

 

Dr Maesela asked the candidate to state some of the oppressive factors that caused gender inequality and how she would combat them.

Ms Stander asked the candidate how she, as a Commissioner, would influence the cultural issues and the workplace problems.

 

Dr Thembekwayo noted that the candidate was a leader in research-related fields and asked what the major challenges were concerning the implementation, evaluation and monitoring of the CGE; and also asked what new ideas she would bring to curb these challenges.

 

Ms Tseke asked the candidate what steps she would follow in ensuring consequences for the bodies that disregarded and neglected the findings and recommendations of the CGE, in the context of the CGE Act and the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. She also asked her to state the powers and functions of the CGE, as outlined in the CGE Act.

 

Ms Khawula stated that were women living areas such as Overport and Newlands East (in Durban) who had been forcefully evicted out of their homes and relocated to townships like KwaMashu and Umlazi. One-room, two-room and four-room RDP houses had been built for them. There were vacant, unused pieces of land which originally belonged to their forefathers and on which women would attempt to build their homes, but they would be assaulted and chased away. She asked the candidate how she would assist in protecting those people.

 

The Chairperson thanked Prof Phendla for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Ten: Ms Nomvulazana Jafta

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed as a Commissioner.

 

Ms Tseke affirmed that the candidates must be fit for appointment and that included having an ethical background, free from unaccountable controversies and scandals. She  pointed out that the Committee had received a report from the State Security Agency that stated that Ms Jafta had a debt of about R56 000 owing to the South African Revenue Services. She stated that she was giving her a chance to account for the debt and to clarify the situation to the Committee.

 

Ms Tseke asked that the candidate followed up on the matter and informed the Committee of the situation.

 

Dr Maesela stated that it all boiled down to who owned the primary production and the labour so it all boiled down to the land issue. It was always assumed that it was a man-related issue, and no one talked about how gender inequality was an issue of socialisation. When the candidate talked about work for women, did she only look at the salary or did she look at the ownership and encourage women to work for themselves? He asked the candidate how she would solve the problem of gender inequality.

 

Ms Khawula stated that there were widows whose husbands had worked for government, but government taxed their inheritance and their pension. Was it possible to change the law to make things easier for widows?

 

The Chairperson thanked Ms Jafta for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Eleven: Ms Busisiwe Deyi

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed as a Commissioner.

 

Ms Stander asked the candidate to elucidate on her thoughts concerning the third marker gender theory that was starting to gain traction. She also asked how she saw her role as a potential Commissioner in the CGE; what would she come in and change within the institution?

 

Dr Thembekwayo noted that the candidate had compiled training manuals for human rights lawyers in public interest and constitutional litigation and had worked at the Constitutional Court for a year. She  asked the candidate what changes she believed could be made to the criminal justice system to improve the conditions of women, presumably through the use of the manuals she had compiled.

 

Dr Thembekwayo  pointed out that several gender-based police cases were outstanding, delayed, cancelled or missing and  asked how the candidate would address that matter, should she be appointed.

 

Dr Maesela asked how the candidate would contribute towards realising gender equality. On a broader scale, he also asked what equality society was really fighting against – inequality within ourselves or the inequality created by those who possess the means of production?

 

Ms Maluleke asked how the candidate would ensure the visibility of the CGE in rural communities and how she would create awareness about the LGBT community.

 

Ms Morutua asked Ms Deyi about how accommodating she found law makers in other African states on the topic of enforcing LGBTQIA+ rights in society.

 

Ms Khawula stated that there were hostels dwellers that were living in poor conditions and felt neglected and excluded from social benefit and security. What could she do to position them to get the help they needed in order to restore their dignity and hope?

 

The Chairperson thanked Ms Deyi for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

Candidate Twelve: Ms Ayanda Mfusi

The Chairperson introduced all the panel members. She  asked the candidate to briefly share with the panel, the relevant educational qualifications and work experience she would bring to the Commission of Gender Equality, should she be appointed as the Commissioner.

 

Ms Newhoudt-Druchen asked the candidate how she would help reduce and prevent the violence against people living disabilities and other vulnerable groups, including the LBGTQIA+ community, people living with albinism, etc., should she be appointed.

 

Ms Tseke noted that the majority of young people were unemployed; there were high teenage pregnancy rates; and many young girls missed school when menstruating because of the lack of sanitary products. She  asked the candidate how she would contribute towards improving those conditions.

 

Ms Morutua spoke about how society was on the brink of the Fourth Industrial Revolution and that the resulting technological advancements would have both advantages and disadvantages for men and women. She asked the candidate to share her thoughts on what some of those advantages and disadvantages would be.

 

Dr Thembekwayo noted that Ms Mfusi made reference to her involvement with transformation within the corporate and entrepreneurial spaces and the advancement of black excellence. She pointed out that the CGE Act was inclusive of all age groups, did not enforce geographical differentiation and did not specify literacy levels, but some of those factors were not enforced. She  asked how the candidate would contribute to realising the successful enforcement of those aspects of the CGE Act.

 

Mr Maesela asked how the youth of South Africa coped with the pressure that was imposed by the phenomenon of gender inequality within society generally, as well as in the corporate world, while they were learning to cope with both simultaneously.

 

Ms Khawula stated that women in South Africa were creative and could find ways to cooperatively create sustainable incomes through structures like Stokvels. What did she think are some of the other ways they could expand and build wholesalers in which they could be able to employ the youth?

 

The Chairperson asked Ms Mfusi, since she was in the financial sector, how she would assist in addressing the inequalities that hindered young people from getting work and business opportunities within the financial sector.

 

The Chairperson also asked about the resolutions and declarations that had been made in the financial sector summit that had taken place at the end of 2018. How was she going to ensure that those decisions were being implemented within the CGE?

 

The Chairperson thanked Ms Deyi for honouring the invitation for the interview and wished her well with the outcome of the interview. She also permitted the candidate to ask any questions she may have had.

 

Refer to audio for responses

 

The meeting was adjourned.

 

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