ATC210318: Report of the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education, Science and Technology on the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)2019/20 Financial and Service Delivery Performance, Dated 17 March 2021

Higher Education, Science and Technology

Report of the Portfolio Committee on Higher Education, Science and Technology on the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS)2019/20 Financial and Service Delivery Performance, Dated 17 March 2021

 

1. INTRODUCTION AND MANDATE OF THE COMMITTEE

The Portfolio Committee on Higher Education, Science and Technology (hereinafter referred to as the Committee), having considered the 2019/20 Annual Report of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS), reports as follows:

 

1.1. Purpose of the Report

The purpose of this report is to account in accordance with Rule 339 of the Rules of the National Assembly (NA) for the work done by the Committee in considering the 2018/19 Annual Reportof the NSFAS, which was tabled in accordance with Section 40 (1) of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act 1 of 1999); and as referred to the Committee on 5 February 2021 by the Speaker of the National Assembly in terms of the National Assembly Rule 338 for consideration and reporting in terms of Rules 339 and 340 respectively.

1.2. Mandate of Committee

Section 55(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa stipulates that “the National Assembly (NA) must provide for mechanisms (a) to ensure that all executive organs of state in the national sphere of government are accountable to it; and (b) to maintain oversight of (i) national executive authority, including the implementation of the legislation; and (ii) any organ of state”. Rule 227 of the Rules of the National Assembly (9th edition) provides for mechanisms contemplated in section 55(2) of the Constitution.

The Committee oversees the implementation of the following Acts, as amended:

Higher Education Act, 1997 (Act No.101 of 1997), National Student Financial Aid Scheme Act, 1999 (Act No. 56 of 1999), Continuing Education and Training Act, 2006 (Act No. 16 of 2006), National Qualifications Framework Act, 2008 (Act No. 67 of 2008), Skills Development Act, 1998 (Act No. 97 of 1998), Skills Development Levies Act, 1999 (Act No. 9 of 1999) and General and Further Education and Training Quality Assurance Act, 2001 (Act No. 58 of 2001). The Department of Higher Education and Training oversees the SETAs and the National Skills Fund in terms of the Skills Development Act and the Skills Levies Act.

1.3. National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) Mandate

The National Student Financial Aid Scheme was established in terms of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme Act, 1999 (Act No. 56 of 1999). Its main mandate is to provide loans and bursaries to eligible students, developing criteria and conditions for the granting of loans and bursaries to eligible students in consultation with the Minister of Higher Education and Training. The entity’s mandate is also to raise funds, recover loans, maintain and analyse its database, undertake research for the better utilisation of financial resources and to advise the Minister on matters relating to financial aid for students.

1.4. Method

In considering the Annual Report, the Committee had a briefing session with the Auditor-General of South Africa (AGSA) on the audit outcomes of the NSFAS 2019/20 annual financial statements and performance and the NSFAS on 10 February 2021.

 

2. OVERVIEW OF THE KEY POLICY FOCUS AREAS RELEVANT FOR THE NATIONAL STUDENTS FINANCIAL AID SCHEME

2.1. Relevant policy focus areas

2.1.1. The National Development Plan (NDP), Vision 2030 and the 2014 – 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF)

The NDP envisages that by 2030, South Africans should have access to education and training of the highest quality. The education, training and innovation system should cater for different needs and produce highly skilled individuals.The NDP commits NSFAS to support an increase in participation rates at Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Colleges and higher education institutions. It states that all students who qualify for the National Student Financial Aid Scheme should be provided with access to full funding through loans and bursaries to cover the costs of tuition, accommodation and other living expenses. 

 

The 2014-2019 MTSF which forms the first five-year implementation phase of the NDP commits government through the Department of Higher Education and Training to increasing the number of students enrolled at universities from 950 000 in 2013 to 1.07 million in 2019, and the number enrolled in TVET colleges from 670 455 in 2013 to 1.238 million in 2019. The NSFAS plays a very critical role in ensuring the expansion of access to education and training and thereby increasing the skills pool of the country to support an inclusive growth path.

2.1.2. 2019 State of the Nation Address (SONA)

In relation to NSFAS, the President, Mr C Ramaphosa during his 2019 State of the Nation Address (SONA)reiterated government’s commitment to the right of access to higher education for the poor and working class. The President indicated that in line with this commitment, government has in 2018 introduced fee-free higher education for qualifying students. The fee-free policy is being phased-in over five years, until all undergraduate students who qualify in terms of the criteria could benefit. The President further noted the government’s priority is to stabilise the business processes of the NSFAS to ensure that it is properly capacitated to carry out its critical role in supporting eligible students.

 

3. OVERVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF THE NSFAS 2019/20 BUDGET AND EXPENDITURE

3.1. Overview and assessment of the overall budget

Table 1: 2019/20 budget allocation and expenditure

2019/20 Financial year

2019/20

Revenue

 

 

 

Approved budget

R’000

Final budget

R’000

Actual amounts

R’000

Actual amounts

R’000

Administration fees

53 736

43 019

44 644

47 847

 

Administration of grants

280 588

306 888

306 888

269 120

 

Grants received for student awards

32 561 170

32 561 170

33 584 801

21 387 350

 

Interest Revenue

1 687 117

1 687 117

1 643 833

1 367 335

 

Commission Revenue sBux

-

-

163

8 144

Unallocated debtors receipts

-

-

1 165

 1539

Other income

28 843

28 843

880

5 865

Total

34 611 454

34 627 037

35 582 374

23 087 200

Total expenditure

32 960681

 

32 973432

 

28 456717

 

26 058 895

Surplus / (deficit) for the year

659,720

 

23349

 

4 478655

 

(5 045 952)

Source: NSFAS 2019/20 Annual Report

For the 2019/20 financial year, the NSFAS’s total revenue amounted to R35,582 billion as illustrated by the table above. The bulk of the revenue was from the grants for student awards, mainly, representing 94.4% of the total revenue for the year under review. The main source of NSFAS revenue was from the grant transfers from the Department of Higher Education and Training. It should also be noted that the NSFAS, besides receiving funds voted to administer the grants for bursaries, it also charges administration fees to administer loans on behalf of other government departments, entities such as the Sector Education and Training Authorities (SETAs) etc. Revenue from grants for students’ awards increased significantly by 56% from R21,387 billion received in the 2018/19 financial year. This increase was attributed to the implementation of the fee-free higher education policy, which was in its second-year of implementation. Notably, revenue generated from sBux commission and other income decreased significantly.

At the end of the 2019/20 financial year, the NSFAS had spent R28,456billion of its operational expenditure. Spending on bursaries for students in TVET colleges and universities constituted the highest expenditure items representing 98.1% of the total expenditure of the entity. The recorded underspending after the accounting loan book adjustments amounted to R4,478 billion, which translates to12.6% of the total revenue of the entity for the 2019/20 financial year. The total amount of cash reserves amounted to R5,854 billion. The bulk of the underspending was from the allocation for Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Bursaries University bursaries. The NSFAS has indicated to the Portfolio Committee that the surplus was committed funds for students’ bursaries, giventhe difference between the commencement of the academic year and the financial year.Spending on personnel costs at the end of the financial year amounted to R223,478 million and the general expenses amounted to R143,921 million, and consultants and professional fees amounted R45,272 million.

3.2. Irregular expenditure

NSFAS disclosed a cumulative irregular expenditure amounting to R6.8 billion (Note 30 in the financial statements). Of this irregular expenditure, R6.3 billion is as a carry-over balance from the prior year and R522.3 million was incurred in the 2019/20 financial year. For the year under review, the irregular expenditure amounting to R522.3 million was incurred due to Non-Compliance with Laws and Regulations (NOCLAR) and R219 000 incurred due to invalid variation.

However, the Auditor General of South Africa (AG) raised further concerns relating to additional irregular expenditure amounting to R50.1 billion not disclosed in note 30 as NSFAS did not include the required information on irregular expenditure in the notes to the financial statements, as required by section 55(2)(b)(i) of the PFMA.

4.2019/20 AUDIT OUTCOMES

4.1. Audit opinion

The Auditor-General (AG) awarded NSFAS a qualified audit opinion with material findings. This was the third consecutive qualified opinion that the entity received since 2017/18 financial year. The Auditor-General of South Africa reported more areas of qualifications compared to the previous financial year, 2018/19. The AG also reported to the Portfolio Committee regression of annual performance report. Though not disclosed in the AG report in the NSFAS Annual Report, the AG indicated that the entity received a disclaimer opinion on its annual performance report.

4.2. AGSA findings

Contingent liabilities (student funding): The AG was unable to determine whether student funding had been properly disclosed, due to the status of the data supporting management’s estimate. The AG was unable to determine whether any adjustment was necessary to the contingent liability: student funding disclosure stated at R79.4 billion (2019: R38.8 billion) in note 25 to the financial statements.

Irregular expenditure: The entity did not include the required information on irregular expenditure in the notes to the financial statements, as required by section 55(2)(b)(i) of the PFMA. The entity did not consult with the Minister of Higher Education and Training when developing criteria and conditions for granting loans and bursaries to eligible students and did not publish the revised criteria and conditions in the Government gazette. This resulted in irregular expenditure of R50.1 billion. As the public entity did not quantify the full extent of the irregular expenditure, it was impracticable to determine the full understatement of irregular expenditure of R6.8 billion (2019: R6.3 billion) as disclosed in note 30 to the financial statements.

Prior period error: The public entity did not disclose previous period errors in note 28to the financial statements, as required by GRAP 3, Accounting policies, estimates and errors. The note states that the public entity will no longer be disclosing disbursements in excess of contract amount as irregular expenditure. The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence to substantiate the disclosure.

Amounts owing by institutions (exchange): The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence for the amounts owing by institutions due to a lack of reconciliation between the financial records of the NSFAS and those of institutions of higher learning. The AG was unable to confirm the receivable balance by alternative means. Consequently, the AG was unable to determine whether any adjustment was necessary to amounts owing by institutions (exchange), stated at R62.3 million (current) (2019: R184. 1 million) and R72.4 million (non-current) (2019: R20.4 million), bursaries – TVETcolleges stated at R5.9 billion (2019: R3.7 billion) and impairment loss - amounts owing by institutions (exchange), stated at R115 million (2019: R0) in the financial statements.

Prepayments to institutions: The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence that prepayments made to institutions had been properly accounted for, due to the status of the accounting records. The AG was unable to confirm the prepayments to institutions balance by alternative means. Consequently, was unable to determine whether any adjustments were necessary to prepayments to institutions, stated at R7.5 billion (2019: R3.5 billion), and amounts due to institutions (non-exchange), stated at R602 million (2019: R1.2 billion) in the financial statements.

Interest revenue (exchange): The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence that interest revenue earned on student loans had been properly accounted for, due to the status of the data in support of management’s calculation. The AG was unable to confirm the interest revenue amount by alternative means. Consequently, was unable to determine whether any adjustment was necessary to interest revenue, stated at R1.6 billion (2019: R1.3 billion), student loans, stated at R503.8 million (2019: R804.4 million), social benefit component on student loans issued, stated at R15. 6 million (2019: R532. 6 million) and model adjustments, stated at R3.1 billion (2019: R1.3 billion) in the financial statements. This impacted on the surplus for the period and on the capital fund.

 

Bursaries – Universities: The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence that bursary expenditure disbursed to universities for the previous year had been properly accounted for, due to the status of the accounting records. The AG was unable to confirm the expenditure by alternative means. Consequently, was unable to determine whether any adjustment was necessary to bursaries – universities, stated at R20.8 billion in the financial statements.

Emphasis of matters: The AG drew attention to the matters below. The opinion was not modified in respect of these matters. Material fair value and impairments adjustments. As disclosed in note 5 to the financial statements the public entity had student loan receivables with a nominal value of R36 billion as at March 31, 2020 (2019: R36 billion), which were reflected in the financial statements as R6 billion (2019: R9 billion), after cumulative fair value and impairment adjustments of R29 billion (2019: R26 billion).

Restatement of corresponding figures: As disclosed in note 28 to the financial statements, the corresponding figures for March 31, 2019, had been restated as a result of errors in the financial statements of the public entity, and for the year ended, March 31, 2020.

Adjustment of material misstatements: The AG identified material misstatements in the annual performance report submitted for auditing. These material misstatements were in the reported performance information of programme 2 -student-centred financial aid. As management subsequently corrected only some misstatements, the AG raised material findings on the usefulness and reliability of the reported performance information.

Strategic planning and performance management: Procedures for the facilitation of effective performance monitoring, evaluation and corrective action through quarterly reports were not established, as required by treasury regulation 30.2.1.

Expenditure management: Effective and appropriate steps were not taken to prevent irregular expenditure, as required by section 51(1) (b)(ii) of the PFMA. The value as disclosed in note 30, was not complete as management was still in the process of quantifying the full extent of the irregular expenditure. The majority of the irregular expenditure disclosed in the financial statements was caused by non-compliance with section 19(1) of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme Act, 1999 (Act No. 56 of 1999).

Financial statements: The financial statements submitted for auditing were not prepared in accordance with the prescribed financial reporting framework and supported by full and proper records, as required by section 55(1) (a) and (b) of the PFMA. Material misstatements identified by the auditors in the submitted financial statements were not adequately corrected and the supporting records could not be provided subsequently, which resulted in the financial statements receiving a qualified opinion.

  • Internal control deficiencies

Leadership: a credible action plan was not devised to address the root causes of the findings identified, which resulted in repeat findings on the financial statements and findings on the performance report as well as continued material non-compliance with applicable laws and regulations. The entity continued to incur significant amounts of irregular expenditure.

Financial and performance management: A lack of credible source information produced by a reliable system and adequate reviews of underlying source information in support of the financial and performance reports has resulted in a number of material misstatements. The chief financial officer and general manager: finance positions were not permanently filled, which also contributed to the slow response by senior management to improve the audit outcome. The audit outcome remained qualified on the financial statements, with a regression in the credibility of performance information reported in the annual performance report.

Material irregularities in progress: The AG identified other material irregularities during the audit and notified the Administrator thereof as required by material irregularity regulation 3(2). The AG reported that by the date of this auditor’s report, the responses of the Administrator were not yet due for some material irregularities and for the remainder, the AG had not yet completed the process of evaluating the responses from the Administrator. These material irregularities will be included in the next year’s auditor’s report.

Report on the audit of the Annual Performance Report

The AG evaluated the usefulness and reliability of the reported performance information and made the following findings:

Usefulness and reliability on Programme 2 – Student-Centred Financial Aid: The AG was unable to obtain sufficient appropriate audit evidence for the reported achievements in the annual performance report of the indicators of the key performance indicators as illustrated in table 2 below.This was due to a lack of technical indicator descriptions, proper performance management systems and processes with formal standard operating procedures that predetermined how the achievement would be measured, monitored and reported. The AG was unable to confirm that the reported achievements of these indicators were reliable by alternative means. Consequently, the AG was unable to determine whether any adjustments were required to the reported achievements.

Table 2: Insufficient Appropriate Audit Evidence of key performance indicators

Indicator

Indicator Descriptor

APR reported performance

KPI 3.1

Reduced administrative backlog

95%

KPI 3.2

Efficient disbursement to students

98%

KPI 3.3

Payments and remittances reconciled across institutions

 

85%

KPI 3.4

Efficient disbursement to institutions

43%

KPI 3.5

Level of outstanding payments

Achieved payments to clear the backlog R7.3 billion

KPI 4.1

Percentage of funding decisions of valid applicants received by 30 November processed before registration.

 

75%

KPI 5.2

Increase capacity for TVET support

Team established

 

 

5.OVERVIEW AND ASSESSMENT OF THE NSFAS 2019/20SERVICE DELIVERY PERFORMANCE

Table 3: The NSFAS’s Programmes, with their related achievement against the performance targets for the 2019/20 financial year

NATIONAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID SCHEME

APP Targets 2019/20

Achieved

Not achieved

% Achievement

1. Administration

6

4

2

67%

2. Student-centred financial aid

11

9

2

82%

Overall Total

17

13

4

76%

 

During the year under review, the NSFAS’s two budget programmes, Administration and Student-Centred Financial Aid had a combined total of 17 predetermined targets. The NSFAS achieved 13 of the 17 targets, translating into 76% achievement. This is an improvement from the previous year performance of 12.5%. Notwithstanding this improved performance, the AG noted that only 36% of the key performance indicators reported achievement was reliable. Four targets were not achieved as planned.

The performance targets that were not achieved as planned included:

Administration

The programme’s goal is to implement effective and efficient processes and operations to ensure stakeholder objectives are achieved.

  • Unqualified Audit Opinion of the AGSA: the actual achievement was a qualified opinion. The NSFAS ascribed the qualified audit opinion to misstatement of the cash flow, amounts due to institutions(non-exchange) and bursary expenditure.
  • Status level for Corporate Governance Information and Communications Technology Assessment Standard (CGICTAS) Level 3 achieved. The actual was Level 1, which was ascribed to the delay in the third-party certificate. The NSFAS further noted that its systems were old and unstable and the ICT governance policy framework was being developed.

Student-Centred Financial Aid

The programme’s goal is to increase access to funding for eligible students by raising funds, maximising loan recoveries and creating a student-centred model through improved communication support for students and a central application process.

  • Amount of money recovered (Rand value) from the NSFAS debtors: 10% increase on the 2018/19 actual collections (R691.5m). The actual achievement was R551.3 million. the lower than projected recoveries were attributed to the slowdown in the economy and rising unemployment, which had a negative impact on household income and affecting servicing of debt in general. The NSFAS further indicated that the Growth Domestic Product (GDP) fell by 2% in Quarter 1 of 2020 and followed by two consecutive drops in Quarters 3 and 4of -0.8% and -1.4%. The NSFAS has activated a project to improve on collections.
  • Increase capacity for TVET colleges support byestablishing aTeam to focus on TVET colleges specific issues by April 30, 2019. The NSFAS reported that no one was appointed during this reporting period. Appointments would be taking place in the new financial year.

 

 

6.OBSERVATIONS

The Committee, having considered and deliberated on the 2019/20 Annual Report of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme (NSFAS) made the following key observations and findings:

 

6.1.       The Committee welcomed the appointment of the new Accounting Authority and the Chief Executive Officer at the NSFAS and hoped that they will work towards bringing stability at the entity.

6.2.       The lack of improvement in the audit outcome of the entity was noted with great concern. The Committee expressed a serious concern that the entity received the third qualified audit opinion, and there were more material findings during the year under review compared to the previous financial year. There was also a regression in the annual performance report, which the AG indicated that it was a disclaimer, though the opinion was only reflected in the management report.The regression was due of serious concern was that the entity had regressed during the administration period and there had not been an improvement with the internal control systems. The AG also found that while the entity had recorded that it had achieved 76 percent of its targets, the actual number was only 36 percent.

6.3.       The Committee was concerned about repeat audit findings which was an indication that action plans developed to address the audit findings were not implemented and monitored. The Internal Audit Committee was only appointed later when the 2019/20 audit process had been concluded by the AG. Additionally, there was also inadequate evidence to suggest that consequence management had been implemented against those who failed to implement audit action plans.

6.4.       The increase in the irregular expenditure identified by the AG amounting to R50.1 billion incurred due to the entity not consulting with the Minister of Higher Education and Training when developing criteria and conditions for granting loans and bursaries to eligible students and the failure by DHET to publish the revised criteria and conditions in the Government Gazette was of great concern. Furthermore, the reported unquantified irregular expenditure was incurred due to non-compliance with section 17C of the NSFAS Act of 1999 as amended, by not seeking the approval of the Minister of Finance in determining the remuneration and allowances paid to the Administrator’sadvisors appointed in terms of section 17B of the Act.

6.5.       The delays with the filling of the outstanding senior management positions were noted with concern. The NSFAS noted that it was awaiting for the finalisation of the review of the organisational structure by the Ministerial Commission of Inquiry in order for it to commence with the filling of posts. However, the process for the appointment of the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) was underway and would be concluded before the end of March 2021. It was reported that labour had been consulted with regard to the organisational review and it was anticipated that this process would not lead to job losses.

6.6.       The delays in addressing ICT related challenges and the continued patch work done on the current ICT systems were noted with concern. The entity indicated that it had ageing systems that were not fit for purpose and this affected the scheme’s ability to deliver on its mandate. The inadequate ICT systems impacted on the reconciliation of data with institutions and bursary recipients.

6.7.       The Committee expressed a concern with respect to the inadequate oversight role played by the Department over the NSFAS during the administration period.

6.8.The Committee was concerned that the entity was also unable to provide appropriate audit evidence ofamounts owed by and paid toinstitutions. The entity indicated that it had initiated a process wherein university auditors were requested to confirm the funds received and whether the funds were allocated for their intended purposes. In addition, the entity had solicited assistance from the service provider to assist it to reconcile the backlog of the numbers.

           

6.9.  The Committee expressed a serious concern with the spending on consultants amounting to R45 million during the year under review, without building in-house capacity to render the services.

6.10.  The Committee expressed a concern about the underspending amounting to R4 billion during the year under review. The entity indicated that the underspending reflected on funds that were not spent by the end of the financial year, 31 March 2020. However, the money had been allocated for its intended purposes thereafter.

6.11. The Committee noted with concern the low rate of recoveries recorded during the year under review. The entity indicated that it used a soft approach to recoup funds from its debtors. The entity also relied on the data from the South African Revenue Services (SARS) to determine whether its former bursary recipients were employed. The entity also decided to embark on outreach programmes to encourage its debtors to repay their debts.

 

6.12.  The Committee expressed a concern with respect to the delays with the purchasing and distribution of laptops/devices to the NSFAS recipients. The entity indicated that the initial order was placed based on the numbers received, and 180 000 devices would be distributed in April 2021.

 

7. SUMMARY

The 2019/20 financial year was the last year of the 2014 – 2019 Medium-Term Strategic Framework (MTSF). The NSFAS 2019/20 Annual Report was also the last report in the 2014 – 2019 MTSF period. The entity continues to play a critical role of expanding access to education and training, and contributing to human and economic development. For the year under review, the entity had a total revenue amounting to R35,582 billion and the expenditure at the end of the financial year amounted to R28,456billion. The surplus at the end of the financial year amounted R4,478 billion. The total amount of cash reserves amounted to R5,854 billion, which the AG noted that it was favourable to the financial wellbeing of the entity to cover any unforeseen expenditure.

 

The entity disclosed irregular expenditure amounting R522 million. However, the AG identified additional irregular expenditure amounting to R50,1 billion due to inadequate processes followed with the revision to the bursary guidelines and regulations. The entity received a qualified audit opinion for the year under review, which the Committee noted as a grave concern, given that it was the third consecutive qualified opinion. Furthermore, material findings increased under the administration intervention, compared to the previous financial year.

 

The Committee urged for collaboration between the Department, NSFAS, and the Office of the AG to stabilise the entity and ensure that it discharges its mandate effectively. The commitment shown by the new NSFAS leadership to turn-around the situation at the entity was welcomed by the Committee. The Committee emphasised the important contribution of the NSFAS in expanding access for students coming from poor and working class households, and urged the new leadership to assist in ensuring that it continues to fulfil its mandate. The Committee committed to monitoring the situation at the entity and also indicated that the new leadership would be afforded a chance to fix the problems that could not be addressed during the two years of the administration period.

 

8. RECOMMENDATIONS

The Committee, having assessed the Annual Report 2019/20of the National Student Financial Aid Scheme recommends that the Minister of Higher Education, Science and Innovation and the Minister of Finance should consider the following recommendations:

8.1.       The Department should strengthen its oversight function over the NSFAS.

8.2.       The NSFAS should develop an action plan to address the AG audit findings.       Furthermore, the accounting authority should ensure that consequence          management is implemented against officials who do not implement action             plans to address audit   findings to prevent a recurrence.

8.3.       The NSFAS should quantify the unreported irregular expenditure incurred due to non-compliance with section 17C of the NSFAS Act of 1999 as amended, by not the seeking approval of the Minister of Finance in determining the remuneration and allowances paid to the Administrator and Advisors/persons appointed in terms of section 17B of the Act and report to the Committee.

8.4.       The NSFAS expedites implementation of plans to address the current ICT system capacity challenges.

8.5.       The NSFAS should ensure that there is a credible information management system in place to ensure proper record keeping.

8.6.       The NSFAS should report to the Portfolio Committee on a quarterly basis, so that the Committee can assess and monitor progress on the implementation of  the action plans developed to address the AG findings.

8.7.       The NSFAS should ensure critical posts are filled and to build in-house capacity to reduce over-reliance on consultants.

8.8.     The entity should consider undertaking a study to determine which courses lead to employment for students so that it could invest more resources in such courses.

 

Report to be considered.

 

Documents

No related documents