ATC190305: Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation Legacy Report of the 5th Parliament (May 2014 - March 2019) 5 March 2019

Sports, Arts and Culture

  

Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation:Legacy Report of the 5th Parliament (May 2014 - March 2019) 5 March 2019

 

Reflection from the 4th Administration, 2009-2014

 

 

The 4th Administration recommended that the 5th Parliament dealt with the following issues regarding sport and recreation in South Africa:

 

 

Niche area

Recommendation made

Achieved/not achieved/partly achieved

 

Administration

The Committee to regularly brief staff members to ensure that the content and programs of the committee are clearly outlined and defined to improve the interaction with stakeholders.

 

Achieved

Implementation of the National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) vision 2020

The committee to lobby for the implementation of NSRP and ask for the Department to budget for the plan in order to achieve the vision 2020 and its objectives.

 

Partly achieved

Implementation of school sport and physical education

The new MoU be signed in the 5th administration between the Departments of Sport and Recreation and Basic Education to strengthen the implementation of physical education curriculum and the role out of school sport programmes.

 

Achieved

Transformation in South African Sport and Recreation sector

The committee to follow up on the issues of transformation of sport in the country. The Eminent Persons Group (EPG) report to be monitored to ensure that the Department and federations implement its objectives.

 

Achieved

Funding for sport and recreation development programmes

The committee to continue lobbying for funding for sport development in the country from different entities like lottery and big corporations.

 

Achieved

Provision and funding for sport facilities

The committee to monitor the process, planning and funding model used to build sport facilities which is in line with the National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP).

 

Achieved

Governance issues in sport

The committee to work with relevant stakeholders to correct issues of poor governance in sport, especially in federations that are struggling with maladministration and mismanagement of sport systems.

 

Partly achieved

Oversight visits

The committee to conduct oversight in order to achieve the strategic plan of the committee and be in line with the objectives of the NSRP, 2014-2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and National Development Plan (NDP) 2030

 

 

 

 

Achieved

Key highlights for the 5th Administration:

                                                           

  1. Reflection on Portfolio Committee programme per year and on whether the objectives of such programmes were achieved:

 

Over the 5-year period under review, the thrust of the work of the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation was on oversight aimed at improving the quality of sport and recreation. This included the basic functionality of sport and recreation and implementation of priorities linked to the 2014 – 2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and the National Development Plan (NDP).  The Committee also adapted its programmes to cover arising issues of concern in the sport and recreation sector.

 

The Committee discharged its responsibilities through several tools, including briefing sessions from the Department of Sport and Recreation (SRSA) and its entities, scrutiny of Budget Votes, Annual Reports, Strategic and Annual Performance Plans, site visits, the Budgetary Review and Recommendation Reports, Quarterly Reports and the utilisation of the Constituency period.

 

In terms of the areas of its functions, the Committee’s key achievements include the following:

 

  • The Committee produced its 5-year Strategy Plan, which was revised in 2016
  • The Committee monitored and oversaw the implementation of all key sector priorities linked to the 2014 – 2019 MTSF and the NDP 
  • The Committee oversaw the monitoring role of the Sport and Recreation South Africa over the Provincial Sport and Recreation Departments (DSR’s) as well as the formulation of national policies and their implementation.
  • The Committee held several conferral meetings with other Parliamentary Committees on matters of common interest
  • The Committee conferred with several relevant governmental and civil society organs on sport and recreation matters
  • Except the Northern Cape, the Committee managed to visit eight of the nine Provinces for oversight over the implementation of key priorities
  • During its oversight visits, the Committee ensured the participation of its various stakeholders and conferred with sport and recreation committees in the Provincial Legislatures.
  • The Committee dealt with various matters referred to it by the Speaker or the National Assembly, including petitions and reports pertaining to sport and recreation.

 

Although the Committee conducted oversight over the implementation of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant for sport facilities, no Bills were processed during the 5-year period under review:

 

  1. Committee’s focus areas during the 5th Parliament

 

The Committee’s focus areas for oversight during the 5th Parliament drew in large measure from the MTSF sub-outcomes for the basic education sector and the priorities of the NDP. They included the monitoring of the following:

 

  • The strengthening of accountability, improvement of management at SASCOC.
  • Monitor the operational and financial activities for SRSA, BSA and SAIDS.
  • Monitor the implementation of Transformation in sport and recreation.
  • Implementation of MIG portion for sport facilities.
  • Social cohesion and the national interest in sport and recreation.
  • Performance of the Department on international cooperation.
  • Governance issues in the sport sector.
  • Memorandum of Understanding between the Departments of Sport and Recreation and Basic Education on delivering school sport.
  • The role played by the Department in dealing with legislations and regulations that affect the functioning of sport industry i.e., ICASA regulation on PSL match broadcasting.

 

  1.      Key areas for future work

 

  • Monitoring the implementation of the recommendations of the 2018 Budgetary Review and Recommendation Report (BRRR).
  • Processing the delayed Sport and Recreation Amendment Bill upon referral to the Parliament.
  • Continuing to monitor the implementation of the Norms and Standards for sport infrastructure.
  • Continuing to monitor the implementation of the National Sport and Recreation Plan.
  • Continuing to monitor progress on the Department of Sport and Recreation, South African Sport Confederation and Olympics Committee, Boxing South Africa, South African Institute for Drug Free Sport and all other entities that seek to develop and promote sport and recreation.
  • Look at the issue of sport in the 4th Industrial Revolution.
  • Continuing to monitor the performance of the Municipal Infrastructure Grant portion for sport facilities.
  • Following up on the implementation of the recommendations of the Ministerial Committee on Recreation (ManRec). 
  • Continuing to monitor and assess the effectiveness and efficiency in the use of available sport facilities at municipal level, especially those built from the Department of Sport and Recreation’s ring-fenced budget allocation.

 

  1. Key challenges emerging

 

  • The delayed introduction of the National Sport and Recreation Bill to Parliament, covering a range of issues aimed at development and promotion of sport and recreation, inhibited the Committee’s plans to engage on legislation. It was a Section 76 Bill, so the involvement of the National Council of Provinces (NCOP) was important.
  • Repeated declined applications combined with budget constraints for study tours limited the international perspective of the Committee on key priorities such as management and provision of sport infrastructure, school sport programmes, recreation and domestic sport development and the whole transformation approach on sport industry.
  • The report on Malpractice and Mismanagement at South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee (SASCOC) came towards the end of the 5th Parliament, therefore there was no time to monitor the implementation of recommendations. 

 

 

 

  1. Introduction

 

  1.  Sport and Recreation in South Africa

 

The Department of Sport and Recreation was tasked to develop sport and recreation in the country and derives its mandate firstly from the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (1996), which requires sport and recreation to be transformed and democratised in accordance with the values of human dignity, equality, human rights and freedom, non-racism and non-sexism. Section 42(3) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 bestows the oversight function over the National Executive to the National Assembly (NA). The National Assembly Committees are required in terms of Section 5 of the Money Bills Amendment Procedure and Related Matters Act, 2009 (Act No. 9 of 2009) to annually assess the performance of each National Department, and to thereafter submit a Budgetary Review and Recommendation Report, which will provide an assessment on the Department’s service delivery performance given available resources; an assessment on the effectiveness and efficiency of the Departments use and allocation of available resources; and may include recommendations on the forward use of resources. Section 55(2) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996 stipulates that “the National Assembly (NA) must provide for mechanisms (a) to ensure that all executive organs of state in the national sphere of government are accountable to it; and (b) to maintain oversight of (i) national executive authority, including the implementation of the legislation; and (ii) any organ of state”.

The Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation oversees the implementation of the following Acts:

South African Boxing Act, 2001 (Act No. 11 of 2001), South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport Act, 1997 (Act No. 14 of 1997 as amended), The Public Finance Management Act, 1999 as amended by Act No. 29 of 1999, Occupational Health and Safety Act, 1993 (Act No. 85 of 1993), National Sport and Recreation Act, 1998 (Act No 110 of 1998 as amended), Public Service Act, 1994 (Act No. 103 of 1994 as amended), Safety at Sports and Recreational Events Act, 2010 (Act No. 2 of 2010), Bidding and Hosting of International Sport and Recreational Events Regulations, 2010 and the Recognition of Sport and Recreation Bodies Regulations, 2011.

 

2.1.2     Entities reporting to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation

 

Over the period under review entities and the Department fell within the committee’s portfolio, namely, Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA), the Boxing South African (BSA) and South African Institute for Drug Free Sport (SAIDS). The roles of these entities are as follows:

 

 

List of entities reporting to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation

Name of Entity

Mandate of Entity

 

Department of Sport and Recreation.

 

 

  • Implementing legislation, and policy as determined by the Minister.
  • Province sport and recreation to all South Africans.

 

South African Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee, SASCOC

National co-ordinating macro body for the promotion and development of high performance sport in the Republic:

  • May develop guidelines for the promotion and development of high performance sport.
  • must co-ordinate all activities relating to high performance sport including team preparations and must consult with all the relevant sport bodies in that regard.
  • Must enter service level agreement with SRSA in respect to any function assigned by Act 110 of 1998.
  • Must work with the Minister for Sport and Recreation to establish a national colours board.

 

National Sport Federations

National federations must:

  • Develop sport or recreational activity at club level in accordance with the service level agreement [‘’ Sports Confederation and national federations must, in the prescribed manner, enter into a service level agreement with Sport and Recreation South Africa in respect of any function assigned to them by [the National Sport and Recreation Act, Act 110 of 1998]];
  • Offer development programmes to promote equity, representability and redress in sport and recreation;
  • Submit the progress on such development to Parliament on an annual basis;
  • Assume full responsibility for the safety issues within their sport and recreation disciplines.

 

Sport Trust

 

  • The Sports Trust is a Registered PBO (Public Benefit Organisation) 930009535, with Section 18 A status, and operates as an NPO, although carries the name “Trust” to reflect the relationship between donors’ funding and the organisation.
  • The Sports Trust was established in 1994 after discussions and recommendations with Tata Madiba and late Minister of Sport, Mr Steve Tshwete, to incorporate sport as a vehicle to help bring about positive change and social cohesion in a country desperately in need of healing and stability.  The Trust was formed with its Vision and Mandate to provide sporting infrastructure, kit and equipment and programmes aimed at developing the young people of South Africa. 

 

LoveLife

  • The loveLife Games progamme is an energetic and vibrant engagement with young people that has been realised through the close cooperation and partnership with the Department of Sports and Recreation South Africa. This positive partnership has ensured that capacity building, youth development and positive lifestyle programmes are promoted and implemented at sports and recreation activities across South Africa.
  • Using sports, recreation, arts and culture as a platform to impart positive lifestyle messaging to its target audience has ensured the sustainability of the LoveLife strategy and, as an organisation.

 

Boxing South Africa (BSA)

BSA’s intention is:

  • To provide a new structure for professional boxing.
  • To ensure the effective and efficient administration of professional boxing;
  • To recognize amateur boxing and create synergy between professional and amateur boxing in the Republic.
  • To ensure effective and efficient administration of professional boxing in South Africa;
  • To create synergy between professional and amateur boxing and
  • To promote interaction between associations of boxers, managers, promoters, trainers and officials and BSA.
  • BSA considers applications for licenses from all stakeholders in professional boxing.
  • Also sanctions fights, implements the relevant regulations, trains boxers, promoters, ring officials, managers and trainers.

 

South African Institute for Drug-Free Sport (SAIDS)

All South African sports organisations and national federations are obliged to

  • Recognise the authority of SAIDS and comply with its directives following South Africa’s endorsement of the World Anti-Doping Code and the UNESCO convention on anti-doping.
  •  To promote participation in sport free from the use of prohibited substances or methods intended to artificially enhance performance, thereby rendering impermissible doping practices which are contrary to the principles of fair play and medical ethics, in the interest of the health and well-being of sportspersons; and to provide for matters connected therewith.

 

Its aim is to:

  • Promote participation in sport without the use of prohibited performance-enhancing substances and methods;
  • Counteract doping in sport and ensure fair play and ethics in sport;
  • Protect the health/wellbeing of sports persons and educate sports people about the harmful effects of doping.
  • Conduct and enforce a national anti-doping programme.

 

 

 

2.1.3     Functions of the Committee:

 

Committees derive their mandate from the Rules of Parliament, based on the provisions of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, Act 108 of 1996. The Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation fulfils its mandate by performing, amongst others, the following functions:     

  • Conducting oversight over the executive, including monitoring and overseeing the financial and non-financial performance of the Department of Sport and Recreation and its entities to ensure that national objectives are met.
  • Processing and passing legislation and international protocols and conventions relating to sport and recreation in accordance with the Rules of Parliament and the Constitution.
  • Facilitating public participation during legislative and oversight processes.
  • Participating in National and International dialogues relating to sport and recreation.
  • Conferring with the National Council of Provinces on legislation pertaining to sport and recreation which affects the Provinces.
  • Conferring with relevant governmental and civil society organs on sport and recreation matters in order to participate in the development of strategies and policies aimed at ensuring the quality and integrity of the sport and recreation system.
  • Dealing with any other matters referred to the Committee by the Speaker or the National Assembly.

 

 

2.1.4     Method of work of the Committee

 

The Portfolio Committee employs the use of a Management Committee to deal with managerial matters – without having to specifically convene Portfolio Committee meetings (e.g. processing and completing Committee programmes, preparation for monitoring and oversight, drafting and giving input to draft reports etc.). The thrust of the work of the Portfolio Committee during the period under review was on oversight. In terms of its oversight approach, the Portfolio Committee calls statutory bodies to account to the Portfolio Committee and brief the Portfolio Committee on the implementation of priorities pertaining to Sport and Recreation.

 

The Committee also scrutinises Budget Votes, Quarterly Reports, Annual Reports and Strategic and Annual Performance Plans of the Department and its entities. In addition, the Portfolio Committee conducts study visits to Provinces and Municipalities in respect of the construction of sport facilities, social cohesion through sport participation and the Transformation of sport and recreation, particularly those linked to the Medium Term Strategic Framework and the National Development Plan, recognising that the South African sport and recreation system is vast, the Portfolio Committee resolved in its Five Year Strategic Plan to prioritise its focus on the implementation of National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) in order to make the greatest impact in the sport and recreation sector.

 

 

            2.1.4.1. Members of the Committee - 11 permanent members

 

Name        

Party

1.

Dlulane, Ms B N (Chairperson)

ANC

2.

Dlomo, Ms B J

ANC

3.

Abrahams, Ms B L 

ANC

4.

Ndlovu, Ms B C

ANC

5.

Mmusi, Mr S G

ANC

6.

Ralegoma, Mr S M

ANC

7.

Bergman, Mr D

DA

8.

Mhlongo, Mr T W

DA

9.

Moteka, Mr P G

EFF

10.

Ntshayisa, Mr L M

AIC

11.

Mabika, Mr M S

NFP

12.

Sithole, Mr K P (Alt)

IFP

13.

Filtane, Mr M L W (Alt)

UDM

 

 

 

2.1.4.2. Support staff

Position

Name of Staff

Unit Manager

Mr D Bandi

Content Adviser

Mr S Mahlobo

Researcher

Mr S Mthombeni

Committee Secretary

Ms Z Kula

Committee Assistant

Ms N Mahlanyana

Executive Secretary

Ms B Kulata

 

 

2.1.5     Purpose of the report

 

The purpose of this report is to provide an account of the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation work during the 5th Parliament and to inform the members of the new Parliament of key outstanding issues pertaining to the oversight and legislative programme of the Department of Sport and Recreation and its entities.

 

This report provides an overview of the activities the committee undertook during the 5th Parliament, the outcome of key activities, as well as any challenges that emerged during the period under review and issues that should be considered for follow up during the 6th Parliament. It summarises the key issues for follow-up and concludes with recommendations to strengthen operational and procedural processes to enhance the Committee’s oversight and legislative roles in future.

 

 

  1.    Stakeholders:

 

 

  1. Non-Governmental Organisations:
  • Sport Trust
  • LoveLife
  • SASCOC

 

  1. Government linked entities:
  • Boxing South Africa.
  • South African Institute for Drug Free Sport.
  • Auditor General of South Africa (AGSA)
  • National Treasury
  • The Culture, Art, Tourism, Hospitality, and Sport Sector Education and Training Authority (CATHSSETA).

 

  1.  Chapter 9 State Institutions Supporting Constitutional Democracy:
  • Parliament linked entities: Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO)

 

 

 

  1. Briefings and/or public hearings

 

Over the 5-year period under review, the Portfolio Committee received various briefings from the Department of Sport and Recreation (SRSA), its entities and other relevant stakeholders on key priorities of the sport and recreation sector. These priorities also feature in the 2014-2019 MTSF and the NDP vision 2030. The points below show briefings by the Committee and the Department on some key priorities over the 5-year period.

 

The Committee resolved to receive regular progress reports on the achievement of critical priorities that posed the most challenge to the sector. Based on the reports and briefings of the Department, progress was made in certain areas including in the following areas:

 

 

  1.   Appointment of Eminent Persons Group for Sport Transformation (EPG): Culminating in the National Sport and Recreation Indaba and adoption of the Transformation Charter for South African Sport in 2011 a major re-think was required in order to address the slow pace of transformation in South African sport sector, which was preceded by the White Paper on Sport and Recreation and the National Plan for Sport and Recreation.

The Minister appointed members of the Eminent Persons Group with a wide range of expertise as practitioners and professionals in Sports, academics in this field as well as policy experts. The main task of the EPG was to scientifically collect and analyse data which focuses on the implementation of the Transformation Charter and Scorecard.

The 2012/13 report laid the foundation for the 2013/14, 2014/15, 2015/16 transformation reports that followed involving 19 federations - amateur boxing, athletics, basketball, baseball, bowls, chess, cricket, football, gymnastics, hockey, jukskei, netball, rowing, rugby, softball, swimming, table tennis, tennis and volleyball based on revised data sheet layouts. Based on feedback received on the shape of the last year’s status report layout, the format for this year’s report, with respect to the tabulated comparisons between federations and the federation specific component, has been retained.

In the 5th Parliament, the 2014/15 the EPG introduced the notion of a Transformation Barometer. This was a more proactive approach with each code based on its particular circumstances setting targets for itself. Actual achievement against these self-set targets was monitored and subjected to penalties for non-achievement of at least 50% of these targets. Since 2015/16 the report has provided much more detail and analysis code by code.

This has provided the Federations with an informed ‘state of the code’ as a basis for future decision-making and action. In the 2016/17 the report in relation to the 19 sport codes; suffice to say that the performance within and across codes was uneven with signs of transformation at executive level (Presidents and Boards); improved team representability in some sporting codes, but clearly a long way to go in transforming and training vital support functions managers, coaches, referees, administrators, sports medical and science specialists etc.

 

3.2. Provision of adequate Sport Infrastructure: Pre-2004 there was a national grant for municipal sports infrastructure managed by Sport and Recreation South Africa (SRSA). This funding was incorporated into the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG). In 2011, Parliament recommended that the P-component of the MIG be ring-fenced exclusively for sports and recreation infrastructure. SRSA submitted a grant concept proposal in April 2013, National Treasury commented on the proposal and SRSA submitted a revised and more detailed grant proposal in July 2013.

 

Proposed grant responded to policy objectives in the NDP and National Sport and Recreation Plan with benefits for health and social cohesion. Revised proposal showed extensive consultation with other stakeholders (DBE, Lottery, Sports Trust etc.) on possible synergies. SRSA had submitted a proposal to introduce a separate grant for municipal sports infrastructure from 2014/15.

 

3.3 The Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the Departments of Sport and Recreation and Basic Education: This MoU between the Department of Basic Education and Sport and Recreation was a product of thorough consultation between the two Departments which culminated in the signing of the MoU in November 2011. As indicated in the MoU, school sport programme was developed to ensure that the optimal condition for a child’s participation in sport and recreation was one of the best investments the government could make.

The purpose of this MoU was to address the challenges that prevented the establishment of a well-coordinated and seamless school sport system in South Africa as a critical factor in the development of young people; ensuring that institutional structures were in place to implement and monitor the delivery of a school sport system; regulating access and delivery of school sport for all learners, irrespective of ability, across all schools based on the principle of equity and access and to clarify the roles and responsibilities of all role players for both delivery and funding of school sport programmes.

 

  1. Legislation:

 

The draft National Sport and Recreation Amendment Bill that was envisaged for referral to the 5th Parliament was referred to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation on 7 November 2018 and subsequently the Committee was briefed on the Bill by the Department of Sport and Recreation on 20 November 2018. After deliberations and legal advice from a legal adviser, the Committee agreed that it was not going to be possible to process the Bill due to time constraints because it was already towards the end of the 5th Parliament.

 

 

  1. Oversight trips undertaken:

 

Key oversight and monitoring visits were conducted to Provinces and Entities accounting to the Committee. These oversight visits focussed on areas such as the construction of sport infrastructure in municipalities, transformation of sport and recreation, malpractice and mismanagement of finances by SASCOC and the governance of public entities reporting to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation.

 

The Committee also held several strategic and operational meetings with the Department of Sport and Recreation, focusing on ways of addressing key challenges. In addition, the Committee Chairperson as well as individual Members participated in numerous engagements on sport and recreation, including presiding over the handing over of newly built sport infrastructure and sport kits for clubs in communities.

 

The following table lists key oversight visits that were undertaken during the 5th Parliament. The objectives of each oversight, key recommendations that could be monitored further and responses to the recommendations (in some cases) are clearly stated. Comprehensive reports of each oversight visit, including the observations and a full list of recommendations made by the Committee, are available in the Parliamentary records online.

 

 

Key Oversight visits undertaken in the 5th Parliament

In the past five years, the committee emphasised the need to build capacity in order to enhance its constitutional function for oversight and accountability. The Committee continued to identify areas for oversight based on research, interaction with the concerned departments and stakeholders, and legislation passed in the past few years. The role of the Committee in conducting oversight has improved, especially with the introduction of the National Sports and Recreation Plan and its alignment to the NDP, the scope of the Committee mandate required more oversight of the implementation of legislation. Whilst the Committee’s previous oversight has focused more on sport infrastructure and implementation of sport development programmes, the Committee needed to improve its monitoring and oversight role on the implementation of legislation by the relevant parties.

 

 

Date

Area Visited

Focus area

Status of Report

 

 

 

 

2014

 

 

 

24 – 27  November 2014

Limpopo and Mpumalanga Provinces

  • How Municipalities utilised the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) potion for sport infrastructure development.

 

Adopted + Tabled

2015:

 

 

 

26 – 28 March 2015

Limpopo Province

  • Follow up on the use of MIG.
  • follow up visit and distribution of Rugby kit.

 

Adopted + Tabled

20-25 July 2015

Eastern Cape (Port Elizabeth, East London and King William's Town) and Gauteng (Johannesburg, Pretoria

  • Assessing the use of the DORA (Division of Revenue Act) grant allocated to the province for the implementation of Sport and Recreation programmes for providing sport opportunities to communities;
  • exploring whether provincial plans are aligned to the mandate of SRSA of implementing the NSRP vis-à-vis provincial outcomes;
  • assessing the impact of facilities built for sport and recreation through the assistance Sport for Social Change Programme; and
  • monitoring the implementation of the model on sport focused schools in assisting talented athletes to achieve their potential.

 

Adopted + Tabled

14 -17 September 2015

KwaZulu-Natal

(Pietermaritzburg, Durban, Richards Bay, Hluhluwe.

  • Assessing the use of the DORA (Division of Revenue Act) grant allocated to the province for the implementation of Sport and Recreation programmes for providing sport opportunities to communities;
  • exploring whether provincial plans are aligned to the mandate of SRSA of implementing the NSRP vis-à-vis provincial outcomes;
  • Assessing the impact of facilities built for sport and recreation through the assistance Sport for Social Change Programme; and
  • monitoring the implementation of the model on sport focused schools in assisting talented athletes to achieve their potential.

 

Adopted + Tabled

2016:

 

 

 

18-23 September 2016

Western Cape Province

  • How Municipalities utilised the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) potion for sport infrastructure development.

 

Adopted + Tabled

2017:

 

 

 

29 Jan -03 Feb 2017

North West Province

  • How Municipalities utilised the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) potion for sport infrastructure development.

 

Adopted + Tabled

2018:

 

 

 

10 – 14 September 2018

Western Cape Province

  • How Municipalities utilised the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) potion for sport infrastructure development.

 

Adopted + Tabled

 11 November 2018

PACOFS, Bloemfontein in thePACOFS, Bloemfontein Free State Province.

  • To incentivize and applaud individual athletes, teams and administrators who continue to make our nation proud by displaying exceptional performance and attaining remarkable results.

 

Oral

  1. Challenges that has emerged

 

The following challenges emerged during the oversight visits:

 

  • Technical/operational challenges:

In terms of a Cabinet decision taken on 5 March 2003, all infrastructure funds allocated by national departments were incorporated into the Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) as from April 2005. This resulted in the termination of the Building for Sport and Recreation Programme of the Department of Sport and Recreation (SRSA). Within that arrangement, the main responsibilities of SRSA were defined to be policy formulation, advocacy and monitoring the performances of municipalities in the provision of the relevant sector infrastructure.

 

The Cabinet decision resulted in SRSA losing the momentum in addressing the backlog in sport and recreation facilities with municipalities prioritising MIG funding for the delivery of basic services rather than building sport facilities. In 2015, the SRSA proposed a R1 billion to be ring-fenced for the construction of sport facilities.

 

The first R300 million Municipal Infrastructure Grant (MIG) Fund project identification was a challenge because not all municipalities cooperated especially on the issue of the suggested transversal tender. Municipalities wanted to use their own procurement processes in undertaking the MIG projects.

 

This was resolved by allowing municipalities to appoint their own professional service providers (PSPs). The Department also continues to install multi-purpose courts in partnership with Sports Trust as a way of strengthening local service providers.

 

 

 

 

  1. Special Invitations/Engagements (Per Year):

Date

Event

Attending

Objective

Cost

22-24 September 2014

National Lotteries Board

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Stakeholder engagement

R52,751.80

4 October 2014

National Anti-doping Seminar (SAIDS)

Committee members

Support

R14,343.00

5 May 2015

Attending signing of memoranda of understanding between the Minister of Sport and Recreation and five pilot sporting codes, and the announcement of the Eminent Persons Report on Transformation in Sport. The event will be held on 5 May 2015, from 10:00 to 16:00, Johannesburg

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Monitoring and oversight on implementation of National Sport and Recreation Plan

N/A

28 August 2015

Attending Box and Dine event at Graceland Casino on 28 August 2015 on invitation of the Department of Sport and Recreation.

Ms D P Manana

Stakeholder engagement

R 1 528,00

31 August - 4 September 2015

Accompany the bid team from 31 August - 4 September 2015 for the Commonwealth Games 2022 presentation. Invitation from SASCOC

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Support

R 62 500,00

25 April 2016

Eminent Persons Group on Sport Transformation

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Oversight visit

R22,802.86

24-29 September 2017

Indigenous Games Festival 2017

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Support

N/A

2 February 2018

Boxing South Africa  Awards

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane

Stakeholder engagement

R9,314.03

24 – 25 March 2018

Closing Weekend for Volleyball National League

Committee members

Support

N/A

11 November 2018

Sport Awards

Committee and support staff members

Stakeholder engagement

R72,053.18

30 January 2019

Strategic Stakeholder Engagement– National Lottery Commission 2019

 

Chairperson, Ms BN Dlulane; Committee member Mr TW Mhlongo, Ms Z Kula & Mr S Mahlobo

To Lobby the NLD to support the Banyana Banyana in preparing for 2019 FIFA Soccer World Cup in France

R3 600.00

 

 

 

  1. Sponsorship received by the Committee

Date

Event

Sponsored by

Amount

31 August - 4 September 2015

Commonwealth Games 2022 Bid City announcement/presentation in Auckland, New Zealand.

The chairperson Ms Dlulane has received an invitation from SASCOC to accompany the bid team from 31 August - 4 September 2015 for the Commonwealth Games 2022 presentation.

SASCOC

R 62 500,00

 

 

  1. Study tours undertaken

 

The Portfolio Committee did not undertake any International Study Tours during the period under review. The Committee had planned to undertake its study tour to Cuba as programmed for 2018 but this did not materialise due to budgetary constraints and other issues beyond the Committee’s control. This non-participation in international study tours had placed a significant frustration among the committee members.

 

However, the delegation of the Committee for Sports of the German Bundestag had visited Parliament and met with the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation. The Committee on Sport and Recreation met with the delegation of the Committee for Sports of the German Bundestag to discuss sports and youth development projects and areas of cooperation. After a brief introduction, both committees promptly decided to get straight into discussion due to the limited time available and therefore agreed on having two rounds of questions.

 

The main topics of discussion in the first round included the importance of sport for society; the need for transformation in sport; the need for professional coaching/training; development projects; alternative sporting options to introduce, and the funding of these projects. The second round was shorter in time, but broadly discussed issues around the importance of grassroots programmes; facilities for sport to develop; relations between the main role players in sport and government; as well as a sporting curriculum in school systems and legislation. The German delegation suggested a range of programmes that were available that could assist South Africa in developing their own successful sporting programmes. They did however mention that they also faced problems, despite their relative success, and that they would be costly to implement properly in South Africa. Their support focussed on “help you to help yourself” type of programmes, investing in people rather than in establishing facilities.

 

 

  1. International Agreements:

 

None were referred during the period under review.

 

 

  1. Statutory appointments:

 

The Committee conducted interviews for the Safety at Sport and Recreation Events Act (SASREA) Appeal Board candidates. The Portfolio Committee had to speedily complete the process of recommending candidates for an independent board to hear and decide on appeals against decisions made in terms of the Safety at Sports and Recreational Events Act (SASREA), Act 2 of 2010, to give a full effect to the implementation of the Act.

 

 

  1. Petitions

 

The following petitions were referred to and considered by the committee:

 

Title

Date referred

Current status

 

Petition from Residents of Orlando East requesting intervention regarding plans to build student housing on Number One Grounds, a rugby field used by the community, submitted in terms of Rule 312 (Mr TW Mhlongo, MP).

 

5 May 2015 – Referred 13 October 2015

Report adopted and tabled.

 

 

 

  1. Obligations conferred on Committee by legislation:

 

In terms of Section 5 of the Money Bills Amendment Procedures and Related Matters Act, No. 9 of 2009 the National Assembly, through its Committees, must annually compile Budgetary Review and Recommendation Reports (BRRR) that assess service delivery and financial performance of the Department of Sport and Recreation and may make recommendations on forward use of resources. The BRRR is also a source document for the Committees on Appropriations when considering and making recommendations on the Medium Term.

The Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation, for the last five years, completed its Budgetary Review and Recommendation Reports (BRRR) as prescribed. Among other relevant authorities, the Office of the Auditor-General of South Africa was called to brief the Committee on Audit Outcomes of the Department of Sport and Recreation, Boxing South Africa and South African Institute for Drug Free Sport.

 

This was held prior to the Portfolio Committee considering the Annual Reports of the Department and entities. This process culminated in the production of the Portfolio Committee Budgetary Review and Recommendation Report (BRRR). The 6th Parliament will need to monitor the implementation of the 2018 BRRR key recommendations to the Department of Sport and Recreation and the entities. These are as follows:

 

  • To maintain the audit outcomes.
  • Continue to intensify the implementation of the National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) vision 2020 for sport to reach all participants.
  • Provide the necessary support to the relevant Municipalities to ensure effective and efficient utilization of conditional grants. The Department of Sport and Recreation should monitor the implementation of norms and standards for the grants under its control, with well-defined performance indicators that can be tracked consistently across project cycle stages for all Municipalities receiving sport facility funding from the Department of Sport and Recreation and performance indicators should be based on quality, cost and time factors. A process should be put in place to hold to account those Municipalities that do not comply.
  • Fast track the effective implementation of the Memorandum of Understanding between the Departments of Sport and Recreation and Basic Education to promote school sport in all the Provincial Departments since this was linked to the imperatives of the NDP.
  • Consideration should be made to increase the budget of Boxing South Africa and South African Institute for Drug Free Sport.
  • Strengthen the monitoring and implementation of Provincial APP’s in line with the National Department of Sport and Recreation in order to minimise issues of non-compliance.
  1. Other matters referred by the Speaker/Chairperson (including recommendations of the High Level Panel)

 

Title of the paper

Referral date

Consideration date

Adoption date

Publication date of report in the ATC

Consideration date by the House

The following paper is referred to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation for consideration

  1. Commission for Gender Equality: Public Hearing Report on Gender Transformation in South African Football – 28 June 2012.

 

18 February 2015

20 October 2015

20 October 2015

9 November 2015

Lapsed.

 

 

 

  1. Issues for follow up in the 6th Parliament

 

            Submission of Bills:

In terms of legislation, the Minister of Sport and Recreation introduced the Bill in the National Assembly and the Bill was published in the government gazette as a section 76 Bill. It was then submitted to the Bills office and there was no timeframe as to how long the Bill was going to be edited. The Bill was to be tabled as soon as the parliamentary processes were finalised and the office of the chairperson was to assist in fast tracking the process. Priority should be given to the National Sport and Recreation Amendment Bill when it is tabled in the 6th Parliament.

 

Implementation of the National Sport and Recreation Plan:

The 6th Parliament should consider monitoring the implementation of the recommendations and findings of the National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP). The NSRP is an eight-year implementation plan for the sport and recreation policy framework as captured in the White Paper. The NSRP is monitored annually to identify any hindrances that may negatively affect effective implementation and it will be reviewed in 2020.

 

The National Sport and Recreation Plan (NSRP) was developed through an intense and thorough consultative process with robust debates and constructive contributions from all role-players that comprised the sport and recreation sector in the country. There can be no doubt that true accessibility and equitability can only be visible in a transformed sport and recreation sector.

 

 It is for this reason that at the core of the NSRP is a Transformation Charter whose purpose is to transform the delivery of sport in South Africa and to reap such benefits as the establishment of a competitive and demographically representative sports system. Aligned to the Charter is a multi-dimensional Transformation Performance Scorecard that will enable the sports system to measure progress made towards a transformed sport and recreation sector.

 

International study tour:

The Committee on Sport and Recreation in the 5th Parliament met with the delegation of the Committee for Sports of the German Bundestag to discuss sports and youth development projects and areas of cooperation. The 6th Parliament must look at the possibility of undertaking a study tour to German. The Committee should visit German in order to have first-hand experience of projects and programmes that were presented by the German sport committee in October 2014. This can help the Committee to advise the Department of Sport and Recreation on the direction to take with regards to administration of sport and recreation in the country, especially the implementation of school sport programme in the South African school system. This study tour will form part of orientation and induction of the 6th Parliament members within the Committee on Sport and Recreation.

 

Sport Betting in South Africa:

The National Gambling Board which oversees and regulates the land-based gaming destinations of South Africa has legislation that clearly outlines the different forms of gambling that are permitted in the country, including sports betting. In South Africa, sport betting is mostly on soccer, which is the biggest sport code in the country but football federations, and structures are not benefiting from such betting. The 6th administration should invite the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI), South African Football Association (SAFA) and other relevant stakeholders to engage further on this matter in order to find consensus.

 

Implementation of Ministerial Advisory Committee on Recreation (MACRe):

When considering the integration of the National Development Plan (NDP) into government plans the planning processes carried out by the Department of Sport and Recreation (SRSA) have a vital role to play in bringing the vision and proposals contained in the NDP to fruition. Following a thorough examination of the NDP the proposals that have direct relevance to sport and recreation have been incorporated into the existing strategies and activities of SRSA.

 

The NDP recognises that sport plays an important role in promoting wellness and social cohesion, and treats sport as a cross-cutting activity, with related proposals in the chapters on education, health and nation building. However, the impact of recreation is less emphasised hence the advisory committee was established to address the issue of lack of recreation structures and policy perspective in the country. The 6th administration should take this matter forward by engaging different stakeholders on this issue. The Committee should also lobby for the implementation of the recommendations made by experts and academics on the recreation report.

           

            Reports to be tabled for consideration in the National Assembly:

Members will need to make sure that oversight reports are tabled for consideration in the plenary in order to make sure that the recommendations are implemented accordingly.

 

  1. Five-Year Strategic Objectives of the Committee 2014-2019

 

The 5th Parliament was established shortly after the May general elections. These elections coincided with the celebrations of 20 years of democracy in South Africa and were the first since the passing away of our icon, who was the first democratically elected President, former President Nelson Mandela.  Parliament is elected to represent the people, ensure government by the people under the Constitution, and represent the provinces in the national sphere of government.

 

The 5th Parliament was constituted following the general elections in May 2014 which saw representatives from various political parties and all the nine provinces duly elected to Parliament. Thirty political parties contested the general election held in May. Only 13 received enough votes to secure representation in the National Assembly and the number of National Assembly representatives to which they were entitled depended on how many votes each party received. These representatives become Members of Parliament, and are allocated to various committees of the two Houses (National Assembly [NA] and the National Council of Provinces [NCOP]) to carry out specific functions of Parliament as stipulated in chapter 4 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa (Act 108 of 1996).

 

After the establishment of the 5th Parliament, at the time of the drafting of this strategic plan, the institutional plan was not yet complete. This process is important as it will be taken in accordance with the provisions of the Financial Management of Parliament Act, 10 of 2009, under the direction of the Executive Authority, and will include the active participation of Presiding Officers, Office Bearers, Leaders of Political Parties and Members of Parliament. The process should incorporate elements such as vision sharing, envisioning encounters, the drafting of a policy framework and the translating of the political direction into a strategic plan.

 

The Strategic Plan creates a common vision for all at Parliament, establishing a high level of synergy and understanding regarding the direction in which the organisation is moving, whilst also directing the operational components in their daily activities. In this, our strategic planning is aimed at positioning the Portfolio Committee “many years from now”, whilst our business planning is directed at implementing this within “the next few years”, thereby directing the Medium Term Expenditure Framework cycle.

 

The Committees Section of the administrative side of Parliament ensures that the various NA and NCOP committees function properly and carry out their constitutional mandate. It is expected of the Committees to outline their programmes of action for the next five years, also known as strategic plans. These strategic plans will serve to guide the work and activities of the committees hence this strategic plan for the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation.

 

 

            Strategic Plan 2014-2019

Key Strategic Objective 1

Enhance Parliament’s oversight and accountability over the work of the Executive to ensure implementation of the objectives of the Medium- Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) 2014-2019

Specific Objectives

  1. Enhance scrutiny of the budgeting process.
  2. Ensure sufficient time is allocated to do committee work
  3. Improved team work amongst staff to support the committee and members.
  4. Quality reports and timeous submission
  5. Provision of adequate facilities to conduct committee work.

 

Specific Objectives

Activities

Indicators/means of verification

Target 

1.1   Enhance scrutiny of the budgeting process.

 

1.1.1  Regular oversight over the department and its entities

1.1.2  Input on budget allocations of department and its entities

1.1.3  Quarterly meeting with department to assess expenditure trends

 

  1. Committee meetings and deliberations
  2. Briefings by the Departments and its entities
  3. Onsite visits to provinces and events
  4. Budget report
  5. Budget reviews and recommendations report
  6. Quarterly reports

 

  1. Quarterly reports
  2. Annual reports
  3. Strategic Plans
  4. Annual Performance Plans

1.2   Ensure sufficient time is allocated to do committee work

 

1.2.1  Planning ahead

1.2.2  Align committee programme with Parliamentary programme

1.2.3  Ensure sufficient time is allocated for meeting

 

  1. Committee’s programme
  2. Parliamentary Programme
  3. Strategic Plan of the Committee
  1. Strategic Plan
  2. Programme of the Committee

1.3   Improved team work amongst staff to support the committee and members

 

1.3.1 Hold regular Manco meetings

1.3.2 Improved communication amongst the support staff

1.3.3 Allow input to documents by the team

1.3.4 Facilitate a platform for staff engagement

 

  1. Documents
  2. Emails
  3. Manco minutes
  4. Collective programming
  1. Committee reports
  2. Committee minutes
  3. Quarterly programme

1.4   Quality reports and timeous submission

 

1.4.1  Timeous drafting of reports

1.4.2  Quality check, draft and edited reports

1.4.3  Research inputs in the report.

  1. Research input
  2. Draft and edited documents
  3. Proof of emails to check the time of submission
  1. Committee documents considered and adopted on time
  2. Improved minutes
  3. Research led opinion

1.5   Provision of adequate facilities to conduct Committee work.

1.5.1   Booking of committee venue on time

1.5.2  Ensure delivery of documents well on time

1.5.3  Use the members' facilities to communicate

 

  1. Adequate facilities for meetings and other committee related activities

 

  1. Venue with the right capacity and suitable for committee business.

Key Strategic Objective 2

Undertake an effective process of scrutinising and overseeing executive action and monitoring entities reporting to relevant departments

Specific Objectives

2.1    Conduct oversight

2.2    Ensure accountability by departments and entities

2.3    Scrutinise departmental strategies and mechanisms for service delivery

2.4    Monitor departmental expenditure

Specific Objective

Activities

Indicators / Means of verification

Target

2.1     Conduct oversight

 

2.1.1 Pre-trip research

2.1.2 Undertake oversight visits on identified priority areas

2.1.3 Produce committee reports / account for visits taken

  1. Concept papers
  2. Committee reports
  3. After-trip reports

As required

2.2     Ensure accountability by the departments and the entities

2.2.1 Hold briefings on the work of departments and their entities

2.2.2 Analysis of various reports produced for accounting purposes e.g. quarterly Treasury reports

2.2.3 Hold briefings on annual reports, budget/expenditure, etc.

  1. Committee meetings, minutes and reports
  2. Production of papers analysing various accounting reports by the departments
  1. Weekly
  2. As required

2.3     Scrutinise departmental strategies and mechanisms for service delivery

2.3.1 Access departmental documents on strategies to achieve their mandates

2.3.2 Analyse these strategies and mechanisms to inform committee deliberations and/or decisions

  1. Papers analysing the strategies
  2. Presentations to the committee

As required

2.4     Monitor departmental expenditure

2.4.1 Review and analyse quarterly expenditure reports

  1. Review and analysis reports

As required

           

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 3

Ensure that the public is central in the processing of legislation & scrutinising of executive action

Specific Objectives

3.1      Conduct hearings in the provinces

3.2      Participate in public engagement events

Specific Objective

Activities

Means of verification

Target 

3.1   Conduct public hearings in the provinces

 

3.1.1   Work in collaboration with provincial legislatures in conducting public hearings in the passing of legislation. 

  1. Provincial public hearings

 

As required

3.2   Participate in public engagement events

3.2.1   Take part in Parliament’s organised public events such as Taking Parliament to the people.

3.2.2   People’s assembly, Youth Assembly etc.

  1. Committee reports

Annually

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 4

Disseminate information and documents through various media platforms

Specific Objectives

4.1      Issue media statements

4.2      Conduct interviews in various media platforms

4.3      Increase awareness about the committee’s work

Specific Objective

Activities

Indicators / Means of verification

Target

4.1   Issue media statements

4.1.1   Regular update with the parliamentary media officer on the work of the committee

Parliamentary media statements

Regularly

4.2   Conduct interviews on various media platforms

4.2.1   Participate in interviews related to the work of the committee

4.3.1   Timeous preparation for interviews to ensure effective communication

Media briefs

Media coverage

Invitations

 

4.3   Increase awareness about the committee’s work

4.3.1     ATC publication of notices of the work of the Committee

4.3.2     Timeous calls for submission of papers

4.3.3    Notification of public hearings

 

 

 

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 5

Ensure cooperative governance

Specific Objectives

5.1      Elicit departmental inputs relating to work of the committee

5.2      Strengthen Portfolio Committee collaboration with all stakeholders

5.3      Strengthen co-operative government / co-operation/ governance with all stakeholders for oversight

Specific Objectives

Activities

Means of verification

Target 

5.1   Elicit SRSA input relating to work of the committee

5.1.1     Invite SRSA to brief the committee on specific issues affecting a particular sport entity or federation

  1. Invitations to relevant stakeholders or federations

As identified by the committee

5.2   Strengthen Portfolio Committee collaboration with all stakeholders

5.2.1     Visits to federations' events and programmes

5.2.2     Continued interaction with sport federations

  1. Visits to provinces
  2. National activities

As identified and allowed for by NA programme

5.3   Strengthening co-operative governance with all relevant stakeholders for oversight

5.3.1     Improve interaction with provincial legislatures for better collaboration on oversight

5.3.2     Engagement with Institutions Supporting Democracy, Stats SA, DPME, National Treasury and SALGA for better and improved delivery of sport and recreation services

  1. Oversight meetings
  2. Request for documents
  3. Regular briefs

Annually

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 6

Expand knowledge through international exposure

Specific Objectives

6.1      Establish partnership with various stakeholders

6.2      Conduct study tours to enhance committee work and inform deliberations on specific policy related matters

6.3      Monitor and evaluate the implementation of international treaties and agreements by the department and its entities

Specific Objective

Activities

Means of verification

Target 

6.1      Establish partnerships with various stakeholders.

 

6.1.1   Identify and establish partnerships with national and international organisations that will enhance the work of the committee

  1. Partnerships established

Annually

6.2      Conduct study tours to enhance committee work and inform deliberations on specific policy related matters

 

 

6.2.1   Determine areas of priority related to government’s programme of action relevant to the departments within the mandate of the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation 

  1. Document on key issues in government programme of action related to the departments within the committee's mandate

As required

6.3      Monitor and evaluate the implementation of international treaties and agreements by the department and its entities

6.3.1   Determine the implications of the memoranda of agreement and treaties

6.3.2   Monitor the implementation of programmes and financial implications thereof.

6.3.3   Evaluate the impact/usefulness of agreements and treaties.

  1. Country reports
  2. Annual reports
  3. Quarterly reports
  4. Memorandum of agreements and treaties
  5. List of activities related to international treaties

 

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 7

 

Develop efficient support systems to enhance the efficient functioning of the committee.

Specific Objectives

7.1      Ensure proper document management and storage

7.2      Provide quality research to the committee programme

7.3      Compile proper and relevant content advise to the committee

7.4        Prepare and hold MANCO meetings

Specific Objective

Activities

Means of verification

Target 

7.1        Ensure proper document management and storage

 

7.1.1   Save minutes and committee reports on hard-drive

7.1.2   Timeous preparation of the BRRR, Annual reports, Budget report and oversight reports

7.1.3   Provide quality control o of all committee documents

7.1.4   Timeous adoption of reports and minutes of the meetings

  1. Minutes
  2. Reports

 

 

Weekly

7.2        Provide quality research to the committee programme

 

7.2.1   Conduct pre-visit study on oversight

7.2.2   Present a research paper on current issues

7.2.3   Attend and conduct workshops on topical issues

7.2.4   Conduct a quarterly and annual analysis of the budget and performance of SRSA and entities

  1. Research papers
  2. Pre-visit Report
  3. Reports

Annually

Quarterly

7.3        Compile proper and relevant content advise to the committee

7.3.1   Regular content brief for meetings

7.3.2   Provide strategic advice to the committee

7.3.3   Ensure that the committee programme is aligned to strategic plan

  1. Briefing notes
  2. Strategic Plan
  3. Annual Plan

Weekly

Annually

7.4        Prepare and hold MANCO meetings

7.4.1   MANCO meetings held

7.4.2   Agenda of MANCO relevant to committee work

  1. Minutes

Weekly

 

 

Key Strategic Objective 8

Enhanced ability of Parliament to exercise its legislative power through consolidation and implementation of integrated legislative processes by 2019 in order to fulfil its constitutional responsibility

Specific Objectives

8.1        Process and pass legislation

8.2        Monitor implementation of passed legislation

Specific Objectives

Activities

Indicators/means of verification

Target 

8.1   Process and pass legislation

 

8.1.1   Efficiently process Bills referred to the Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation to support the Departments in attaining their strategic objectives pertaining to their mandates.

8.1.2   Identify and monitor progress in implementing the applicable pieces of legislation.

  1. Committee meetings and deliberations
  2. Briefings by the various Departments on relevant topics
  3. Public hearings in provinces

 

  1. Weekly
  2. As required annually

8.2   Monitor implementation

 

8.2.1   Identify relevant legislation

8.2.2   Devise monitoring mechanisms 

  1. Review legislation
  2. Briefings by various departments
  3. Develop an M&E tool
  1. As required annually

 

 

 

  1. Master attendance list – Copy Attached

 

 

  1.  Conclusion

 

This report has highlighted issues of transformation of sport and recreation and political interventions that the Parliament’s Committee on Sport and Recreation has undertaken to address overall issues of sport and recreation in the country. It also gives a brief background about other work done within the 5th Parliamentary term. The history of South Africa makes it important to deal with issues of inequalities and skewed allocation of resources to previously disadvantaged communities and this Committee has fulfilled its mandate.

 

Participation in sport and recreation is recognised as a fundamental right and government’s strategic plan has been linked to all Departmental 5-year business plans with the first phase of the 2014-2019 Medium Term Strategic Framework (MTSF) and National Development Plan (NDP). The Committee has implemented recommendations stipulated in a 2009-2014 Legacy Report and also succeded to achieve and implement the strategic plan of the 5th administration.

 

With the current status on sport and recreation in South Africa, such successes need to be highlighted and celebrated although we all know that the road to achieve the overall transformation in our sport is still a daunting task. The 6th administration will need to work on the current recommendations and continue with the task at hand to make sport and recreation accessible to all South Africans.

 

 

 

  •                                    ________________

Ms B N Dlulane, MPDate

Chairperson: Portfolio Committee on Sport and Recreation

 

 

Documents

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