Questions & Replies: Question & Replies No 351 to 400

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2008-11-26

[PMG note: Any gaps in the numbering are due to the replies not being provided yet]

QUESTION NO 351

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8)

Mr L W Greyling (ID) to ask the Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry:

(a) How many (i) municipal sewage treatment works are operating below acceptable standards and (ii) spillages of sewage into rivers across the countryside and/or streets or roads have occurred since 1 January 2008, (b) what are the reasons for the underperformance of the relevant works and (c) what steps are being taken by her department to rectify and eliminate possible future spillages in each case?

---00O00---

REPLY:

For the purpose of this reply, I will provide the information on a per province basis.

EASTERN CAPE

(a)(i) In the Eastern Cape position can be summarised as follows:

LEVEL OF COMPLIANCE

NUMBER OF SEWAGE TREATMENT WORKS

90 – 100%

48

80 – 89%

6

70 – 79%

57

60 – 69%

8

50 – 59%

25

>50%

16

10%

4 (Tsolo, Butterworth, Ntabankulu and Mthatha)

TOTAL

· Lack of maintenance of infrastructure, lack of budgeting and maintenance plans at municipal level, lack of staff for inspections and repairs, lack of monitoring and reporting.

· Inadequate infrastructure due to waste stream exceeding capacity of works, such as additional housing developed without upgrading existing infrastructure.

· Storm water routed illegally into sewage collection systems, lack of capacity to inspect and ensure compliance by residents.

· Lack of adequate operation and management including:

· Ponds discharging sewage to river instead of irrigating waste-water to designated lands.

· Final effluent not chlorinated, no chlorine and/or operators not trained and/or inadequate equipment.

· Solid screenings not properly disposed (i.e. collected and deposited into trenches, lime added and then covered with small bulldozer) but left unattended, exposed to scavengers and washed off into nearby streams.

· Power failures common not only due to recent outages but also historical lack of local capacity to repair and maintain electricity lines, transformers, lack of spare parts, slow response time, etc.

· Inadequate solid refuse collection systems within municipalities resulting in solid waste entering sewage disposal systems causing blockages and damage to sewer lines.

· Vandalism, theft of manhole covers, illegal dumping of large items into sewage system.

(c) Steps taken are:

· Establishment of a Regulatory Unit to monitor and ensure compliance.

· Establishment of a Sector Support Unit to assist local municipalities and Water Services Authorities (WSAs) in improving their ability to ensure adequate sanitation services to their residents: financial assistance, technical and engineering advisory support, operational training.

· Ongoing bio-monitoring of river systems to monitor the sustainability of receiving water resources, and to detect impacts on river health, biodiversity and other environmental effects.

FREE STATE

(a)(i) 15 of 20 (75%) of the municipal sewage works in the Free State are operating below standard.

(a)(ii) My Department's Free State Regional Office is aware of four incidences of sewage spills since January 2008. These incidences were reported by the public either through newspapers or a toll free line.

(b) Reasons for under performance:

· Unskilled Operators.

· Lack of Operators.

· Overloaded systems.

· No or little funding is budgeted for operation and maintenance.

(c) The Regional Office has Water Pollution Control Officers which conduct regular inspections at the sewage works and also the reticulation system. The findings of the inspections are communicated with the municipalities. The Region then assists municipalities to draft action plans to address the identified problems. The Regional Office is currently assisting eight Local Municipalities in the Free State with Operation and Maintenance Plans. Support is also provided in including Operation and Maintenance Plans in the Water Service Development Plans (WSDPs).

In 2007, the Regional Office initiated the training of the operators and also to assess the capacity at the municipalities to ensure proper sewage management. The Regional Office strongly believes in Sector Collaboration and has strong relationships with sector partners such as the Free State Provincial Department of Local Government and Housing (PDLG&H). Through this collaboration, the Department can assist PDLG&H with the correct allocation of Municipal Infrastructure Grants (MIG). Also, the Department of Public Service and Administration (DPSA) has deployed engineers at the municipalities to assist with infrastructure management.

The Regional Office is actively involved in the Councillor Development Training where issues such as drinking water and waste-water management are discussed.

Legal intervention:

To ensure that municipalities employ appropriate personnel, in numbers and qualifications, my Department will enforce Regulation 2834: Registration of waterworks and process controllers under the National Water Act, 1998 (Act No 36 of 1998).

The Free State Regional Office has established a Sub-directorate Compliance and Enforcement to perform the mandated regulatory function of my Department. Should a water quality failure persist, the WSA will be dealt with in terms of the Regulatory Framework for Compliance and Enforcement. This Framework is based on the Draft Enforcement Protocol for Organs of State. When sufficient support has been given to the municipalities by the Sub-directorate Drinking Water and Waste-water Management, but the failures still persists, these municipalities will be dealt with by the Sub-directorate Compliance and Enforcement.

GAUTENG

(a)(i) Less than 25% of municipal sewage works in Gauteng are operating below standards; and the reasons for the non-compliance are stipulated below, in item (b).

(a)(ii) As of 1 January 2008, 38 sewage spills were reported to my Department. These spillages predominantly occurred in Emfuleni, Embalenhle, Lesedi, Metsimaholo, Mogale City and Randfontein Municipalities and in the Ekurhuleni, City of Tshwane and City of Johannesburg Metropolitan Municipalities.

(b) The underperformance of WWTWs is because of the following reasons:

· Excessive rainfall and storm water infiltration.

· Old infrastructure.

· Insufficient or no capacity of the holding dams.

· Old technology not designed to handle the current organic load.

· High rate of development results in inadequate capacity.

· Shortage of trained staff and technical skills.

· Lack of funds to upgrade/refurbish the plants.

· Poor management and lack of prioritised funding at local authorities.

(c) It is the responsibility of all the municipalities to rectify and eliminate possible future spillages. In case of effluent spillages being reported to my Department, municipalities are requested to submit plans on how they will rectify the impact of the spillages and how they will eliminate future spillages. My Department monitors the implementation of those plans submitted by the municipalities. Furthermore, my Department also assists through funding and providing technical expertise to the local authorities in order to reduce sewage pollution.

In the case of Emfuleni Municipality (identified as the local authority in Gauteng with probably the most sewage-related problems), my Department has assisted by conducting a study and has identified the provision of a new regional waste-water care facility together with outfall sewers to eliminate most of the existing pump stations and the three existing water care facilities as the most feasible long term option for the area.

Another case is the Percy Stewart WWTW which belongs to the Mogale City Municipality. This plant has been identified as a priority and my Department has taken a co-operative government approach to rectify non-compliance. To date, an engineering firm has been appointed by Mogale City to assist them with immediate, medium and long term plans to deal with the non-compliance and capacity problems at the WWTW.

The implementation plan to correct the situation at these WWTWs has been presented to my Department and the Professional Service Provider (PSP) has subsequently been appointed.

KWAZULU-NATAL

(a)(i) At least 70% of municipal sewage works are operating below acceptable quality assurance standards at this time.

(a)(ii) Numerous sewage spillages do occur from time to time.

(b) These can be contributed to a number of factors, including poor operation and maintenance management, mainly because of capacity, expertise and skills shortage, but also in some cases because of power outages.

(c) Steps taken are:

· Extending monitoring and auditing activities to ensure compliance by municipalities.

· Support to municipalities to source funding through the MIG Programme for rehabilitation and expansion of capacity of works.

· Support to municipalities through International Donor Funded Programmes to implement proper asset management programmes.

· Assisting municipalities with capacity building and training of WWTWs operators.

· Continued liaison and support.

· Implement stricter control/enforcement when or where applicable.

MPUMALANGA

(a)(i) Of the 61 sewage treatment works and ponds in the province, 30 sewage works and ponds are operating below acceptable standards. Contributing to this situation is the fact that a number of current sewage treatment works are overloaded and under designed for the current sewage loads.

(a)(ii) Some 20 WWTWs have reported spillages since January 2008. These include spillages in Morgenson, Chrissiesmeer, Ermelo, Delmas, Bushbuckridge, Sheepmore and Emalahleni, just to mention a few.

(b) A few municipalities currently have adequate WWTWs with adequate capacity and infrastructure which are not in need of maintenance immediately, upgrading or expansion. In a recent survey, only one municipality indicated that they are currently not in need of immediate upgrading or expansion.

· Additionally, a shortage of relevant skills at the treatment works exacerbates the problem.

· Other reasons for the underperformance are:

- Inadequate planning;

- overloading of works due to rapid expansion;

- lack of maintenance on most of the equipment; and

- The power failures.

(c) It is clear that a large number of plants require immediate interventions in terms of expansion refurbishment or just replacement of key components. Due to the large load on some plants, it is currently very difficult for some municipalities to shut down a plant for even a small period of time in order to effect basic maintenance.

We have identified two levels of interventions. The first is on operations and maintenance (O&M), effecting repairs, training and process changes. At operational level, an amount of R12, 825 million has been approved by the Executive Council of Mpumalanga.

The second level on intervention involves the upgrading of the infrastructure to meet the anticipated loads. However, the immediate needs are immense; an amount of R22,2 million has been earmarked for this coming financial year. Additionally, an amount of R10 million has been provided to avert a crisis that occurred due to the heavy rains of 2007 resulting in high water tables.

NORTHERN CAPE

(a)(i) All municipal sewage works in the Northern Cape are operating below acceptable standards; some almost acceptable but others poor.

(a)(ii) Four spillages occurred in the Northern Cape since 1 January 2008: Magareng (Warrenton), Ga-Segonyane (Kuruman), Siyancuma (Douglas), and Siyathemba (Prieska).

(b) Lack of expertise, insufficient funding for operation and maintenance, overloading of works because of higher level of service, insufficient funding for upgrading/refurbishing of infrastructure.

(c) Capacity development programs in municipalities, direct crisis intervention in O&M of works and assisting in securing funds for capital works for upgrading/refurbishing waste- water treatment works were steps that were initiated.

WESTERN CAPE

(a)(i)

and

(a)(ii) This is very difficult to accurately assess because local authorities very often fail to inform my Department when spillages occur. My Department often only becomes aware of an incident as a result of a complaint lodged by the public.

The data for WWTWs under review is for the period 1 January 2005 to 3 March 2008.

Ballpark compliance figures as percentage of the WWTWs under review:

· 0 to 50% compliance with effluent standards = 7% of the WWTWs.

· 51 to 75% compliance with effluent standards = 33% of the WWTWs.

· 76 to 100% compliance with effluent standards = 60% of the WWTWs.

Another factor that has caused spillages is load shedding by Eskom. The flow of sewage pump stations continues whether there is a power failure or not. If there is no power, then the pumps that are supposed to pump sewage to the nearest WWTW do not function and the sewage overflows at the pump station.

Although most pump stations have a holding sump with the capacity for a few hours, the local authority is still responsible for the availability of standby generators for these situations. The importance of having standby options will once again be emphasized to local authorities and all will be requested to complete a report on:

· How many pump stations they have.

· The locality and risk of each.

· Standby power options for each.

(b) The following would be contributing factors:

· Insufficient number of staff on site at WWTWs. The required number and skill of operating staff is determined by the classification of the works.

· Lack of skilled managerial staff for the operation of WWTWs (not necessarily on-site but part of the local authority).

· Insufficient funds made available for plant maintenance.

· Commitment from local authorities regarding:

- plant operation;

- plant maintenance; and

- plant staffing.

(c) The onus is on the local authority to maintain and operate their WWTWs in a responsible manner. My Department can possibly assist local authorities with funding for the upgrading of WWTWs in terms of hardware, but the education and empowerment of WWTW on-site operational staff should be a priority. My Department is also considering to place more emphasis on the correct staffing of WWTWs as per the grading of the works.

NORTH WEST

(a)(i) About 12 WWTWs and sewage works in the Crocodile-Marico area are operating below the standard.

(a)(ii) There has been continuous spillage from the sewage works as well as from manholes.

(b) The reasons for the spillages are related to the overflow of the treatment works, as well as operation and maintenance of the works. The Water Quality component of my Department's North West Regional Office has been extensively involved with the municipalities; however, there was never a significant progress made by the municipalities. Municipalities indicated that their challenges are funding to maintain and upgrade the works and the shortage of skills within the municipalities.

(c) Although the Water Quality component within Crocodile-Marico has taken extensive steps to address the situation, we are however limited in implementing enforcement activities because of the cooperative government approach.

LIMPOPO

(a)(i) This Province has 64 sewage works and 12 are not functioning well.

(a)(ii) 64 sewage works and eight have spillages to the veld.

(b) Reasons for not working well:

· Works overloaded.

· Works malfunctioning.

· No disinfection of the effluent.

·

·

· Poor operation.

(c) Steps taken to rectify the problems:

· Contractor appointed to rectify malfunctioning units.

· Posts advertised to appoint skilled operators.

· Municipalities are advised to construct contingency pollution dams.

· Plans are in place to construct additional ponds to reduce overloading.

· Plans to upgrade overloaded works are in place in case of Modimolle Municipality.

· Renovations are in progress in case of Penge Sewage Works.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 352

QUESTION NO 1260 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 16 – 2009)

Mr S B Farrow (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) Whether the fines and summonses issued under the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998, are invalid; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what was the reason for these errors and (b) what is the estimated value of the lost fines;

(2) whether he intends cancelling these fines as a result of this error; if not; why not; if so, when;

(3) when will the Act come into effect;

(4) whether e-Natis can handle the arrears and large amount of erroneous transgressions currently in the system; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1602E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) The great majority of fines and summonses issued in the Tshwane Municipality and City of Johannesburg are not invalid as they have been issued in accordance with the prescribed procedures. However, a significant minority of fines and summonses were not compliant with the provisions of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act (AARTO), 1998 (Act No 46 of 1998).

(a) The implementation of AARTO through pilot projects is intended to streamline

the current adjudication process in the Republic. During the early implementation stages of the pilot project there may be minor problems which will need to be addressed by the Department of Transport.

(b) Up until 31 October 2009, 675 881 notices were issued by Tshwane with a

value of R347,321,750.00. Of these, 31 240 notices were cancelled due to erroneous capturing/completion of forms or due to the 40 day service rule. 90% of these notices were cancelled even before they were served on the infringers with a total value of R16,496,450.00 (being 4.62% of the total notices served).

Of the notices served, 3 073 were cancelled due to successful representations received, with a value of R1,997,150.00 (being 0.45% of the total value of notices served).

(2) Yes, those fines that have not been issued in accordance with the required process will be cancelled once we have sorted out and identified those fines.

(3) Once the Department of Transport is certain,on the basisi of evaluating the current pilot projects being implemented in Tshwane and Johannesburg, that the adjudication of road traffic offences is running smoothly, the Department will implement the AARTO Act throughout the Republic. Implementation will be done in phases.

(4) eNaTIS has been enhanced to ensure that it is able to determine all the processes and procedures that are required in terms of the AARTO.

QUESTION NO: 353

PUBLISHED IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8 OF 07 MARCH 2008

DR. G W KOORNHOF (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF FOREIGN AFFAIRS:

(1) Given the fact that Government is committed to an interdepartmental approach to bring peace and stability to the African Continent and that the SANDF has been deployed in Peace Support Operations in various countries for the past number of years:

a. What contributions to political and economic stability have been made in such countries by other government departments? And if so, what successes have been achieved; and if not, why not

b. What form of interdepartmental planning, orchestration, control and regular feedback to Parliament exists to ensure the optimal use of resources? If so, what are the details; if not, why not?

(2) What are the responsibilities of other government departments to create political and economical stability in African countries during and after SANDF Peace Support Operations to prevent conflict from flaring up again?

(3) How are such activities coordinated, integrated and controlled between government departments, non-government organizations and private volunteer's organizations?

(4) How are such activities communicated to all stakeholders including the SANDF?

Reply:

(1) A. The South African Government has adopted an interdepartmental approach towards Post-Conflict Reconstruction and Development (PCRD). The International Relations, Peace and Security Cluster (IRPS) directs the coordination of SA's efforts in the promotion of political and economic stability in Africa.

In the DRC, the PCRD is guided by the DRC government programme's priorities which include: infrastructure, employment, education, water, electricity and health which involve SA's departments of Minerals and Energy, Public Enterprises, Education, Water Resources and Health. In this regard, the following SA Government Departments are involved: Departments of Foreign Affairs, Public Service and Administration, Defence, Home Affairs, the South African Police Service, Provincial and Local Government, Transport, SAMDI and the Independent Electoral Commission (IEC). Priority was given to areas critical to supporting governance structures, electoral support, and security sector reform. The DRC programmes are implemented within the framework of the Binational Commission (BNC) which meets twice a year and plan the implementation of programmes.

In Burundi, the SA Police (SAPS) focus is on areas identified by the Burundian Police which include transformation of the police into a coherent unit; training of trainers/instructors; transformation of a police force into a police service and the provision of core equipment such as computers, communication systems and police vehicles. This also applies to Sudan where a MoU on Development Assistance for Policing was signed in May 2007. The South African Police Services (SAPS) and the Department of Foreign Affairs have finalised a project proposal for the R50 million for Sudan that will be provided by the Government of Norway.

In Sudan, South Africa has developed a capacity building programme with the South Sudan known as the DFA-GOSS-UNISA Capacity and Institution Building Project for Southern Sudan. So far fourteen training programmes have been implemented and over 700 individuals have been trained. The Department of Foreign Affairs and UNISA undertook an assessment mission to Southern Sudan in September 2007 to align the Project with new priorities since the Project was conceptualized before the formation of the Government of Southern Sudan. In its efforts to promote peace in Sudan, the SA National Defence Force (SANDF) has deployed 750 troops and the SA Police (SAPS) has deployed 125 policemen to the United Nations/African Union Mission (UNAMID) in Darfur.

B. COORDINATION MECHANISM

An Intergovernmental Joint Task Team (JTT) has been established with its focal point at the DFA's Directorate: National Office for the Coordination of Peace Missions (NOCPM) which is mandated to support SA's role in the management of peace, security and post-conflict reconstruction in Africa. The Task team consists of the Department of Defence, South African Police Service (SAPS), Department of Correctional Services (DCS), SASS and NICOC and they meet monthly to discuss issues of deployment, management of peace missions and the early warning system for conflict prevention. Cabinet takes final decisions with respect to the deployment of peace missions. Feedback to Parliament is provided through portfolio committee meetings and as requested by relevant committees.

(2) Government departments play a key role in the promotion of stability and the prevention of conflict by engaging in the following manner:

  1. Institutional and capacity building in the public and private sectors;
  2. Strengthen mechanism for conflict prevention, peace building and post-conflict reconstruction and development;
  3. Building capacity in the military, police sector and assist with security sector reform;
  4. Contribute to efforts to restore macro-economic and fiscal stability;
  5. Assist in instituting legal and regulatory frameworks for trade and investment, financial markets, companies and the private sector;
  6. Support and assist in establishing equity in all institutions of governance and within civil society;
  7. Build capacity in education, training, health services and programmes to contain malaria, HIV/AIDS and other communicable diseases;
  8. Support for the development of infrastructure to facilitate intra-African trade and investment;
  9. Forge partnerships to improve agricultural production for local consumption and for export;
  10. Co-operate in scientific and technological research;
  11. Assist in the development of tourism and encourage cultural exchanges;
  12. Co-operate in the beneficiation of mineral resources and improve capacity in the energy sector;
  13. Support the development of organised civil society, youth and other formations.

(3) As indicated above in 1B, intergovernmental mechanism exists for the coordination of government activities with respect to conflict situations in the continent. NGOs involved in developmental work as well as those who deal with the promotion of dialogue and reconciliation, are also engaged with the parties to a conflict e.g. ACCORD played a supportive role during the inter-Congolese dialogue.

(4) Interdepartmental planning and regular feedback is done through the established JTT which provides monthly reports to principals of all relevant departments. The Ministry in the DFA is updated through MEMORANDA issued by the SANDF for approval of deployment to peacekeeping missions. These MEMORANDA are scrutinised and supported where appropriate by DFA and the Ministry advised accordingly in order to update parliament on such deployment. Recently there were two projects jointly planned by the interdepartmental task team (JTT) which involved the 'Review of the White Paper on Peacekeeping' and Gender Mainstream in Peacekeeping'. Once these projects are completed and necessary approval given at Executive level, they will be presented to parliament for discussion and debate.

QUESTION 354

DATE OF PUBLICATION: Friday, 7 March 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8 of 2008

Dr S-B Huang (ANC) to ask the Minister of Home Affairs:

(1) Whether she and her Deputy Minister are monitoring her department's turnaround strategy that was launched in 2007; if not, why not; if so, what benchmarking mechanisms are being used in this regard;

whether this is bearing any fruit; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW957E

REPLY

(1) Yes. On a lower level, there is an Executive Committee (EXCO) that oversees the work done by the workstreams, and once in a month, the Deputy Minister, and myself get updated, and subsequently, give strategic direction, at a political level, by way of a Steering Committee (STEERCO) meeting on all matters pertaining to the Turnaround. Notwithstanding, the flash reports that are given to me on a weekly basis.

(2) Immense progress, thus far, is commendable. We have been able to realise the Turnaround plan through the 55 projects that have been set up. As we speak, the restructuring and the migration plan of the Department is being implemented.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 354

QUESTION NO 1265 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 11 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 16 – 2009)

Mr G R Krumbock (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(a) When is it expected that the pilferage claims will decline to internationally accepted standards and (b) what are the reasons for not implementing a task team earlier to eradicate pilferage of passenger luggage?

NW1610E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(a) Pilferage claims at all Airports Company South Africa (ACSA) airports are already

below the international accepted standard of one bag per 1 000 bags.

(b) A task team, the Baggage Protection Unit, has been in place for over two years and

was formed after the incidents of pilferage peaked. ACSA undertook to co-ordinate the

efforts of the responsible stakeholders, the airlines, to manage the problem.

Question number 355

DATE OF PUBLICATION 14 MARCH 2008

Mr L Zita (ANC) to ask the Minister of Finance:

(a) What is the total monetary value of procurements secured by all bodies and institutions reporting to him in each of the past five financial years and (b) who are the beneficiaries of government procurement of goods and services in terms of (i) racial groups, (ii) income categories and (iii) (aa) large and (bb) small business enterprises? NW958E

REPLY:

NATIONAL TREASURY

(a) Total monetary value of procurements secured:

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

R123,823,238.50

R164,067,330.17

R200,182,264.42

R308,117,983.46

R463,609,376.23

The procurements secured by National Treasury are in accordance with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, no 5 of 2000 which is intended to ensure that the procurement of goods and services promotes the historically disadvantage individuals (HDI). In terms of the PPPFA Regulations of 2001, HDI refers to South African citizens who due to the apartheid policy that had been in place, had no franchise in national elections prior to the introduction of the Constitution of the RSA,1983 (Act No 110 of 1983) or the Constitution of RSA, 1993 (Act No 200 of 1993) and /or females and persons with disability.

The data collected is in line with the Treasury Regulation 16A which did not define procurement by race or income category prior to 2004/05, and did not support the current format of reporting in terms of large and small business enterprises.

National Treasury started reporting in the manner prescribed in (b) only in August 2004, after the implementation of Practice Note Number SCM 3 of 2004.

(b) The breakdown of procurement of goods and services since 2004/05 is set out below:

Beneficiaries

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

R

%

R

%

R

%

(i) HDI

104,778,416.88

52.34

243,670,777.08

79.08

390,597,144.00

84.25

(i) Non HDI

95,403,847.54

47.66

64,447,206.38

20.92

73,012,232.23

15.75

Sub total

(HDI and Non-HDI)

200,182,264.42

100%

308,117,983.46

100%

463,609,376.23

100%

(iii) (aa)

Large Business Enterprises > R35m turnover

174,424,683.62

87.13

275,591,940.55

89.44

333,398,570.67

71.91

(iii) (bb)

Small Business Enterprises < R35m turnover

25,757,580.80

12.87

32,526,042.91

10.56

130,210,805.56

28.09

Subtotal

(Large and small)

200,182,264.42

100%

308,117,983.46

100%

463,609,376.23

100%

STATISTICS SOUTH AFRICA

(a) Total monetary value of procurements secured by Statistics South Africa

(b) Beneficiaries of government procurement of goods and services in terms of:

NB:

1. Procurement values secured by Statistics South Africa for the financial years 2002-03 and 2003-04 cannot be broken down as requested in (b). Statistics South Africa started reporting in the manner prescribed in (b) only in August 2004, after Practice Note Number SCM 3 of 2004 was issued.

2.(b)(ii) Beneficiaries according to income categories:Procurement is mainly based on institution's income and not individual's income. Once the institution's income is determined, then the company/institution can be classified either as large or small enterprises (which is (iii) (aa) and (bb) in this case).

SOUTH AFRICAN REVENUE SERVICE

SARS ensures that all procurements secured by the organisation are in accordance with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act (No 5 of 2000) which gives effect to section 217(2) (b) of the Constitution which is intended to ensure that the procurement of goods and services by government leads to the protection and advancement of vulnerable and previously disadvantaged persons and also the Broad Based black Economic Empowerment Act (No 53 of 2003) (TR16A 3.2 par (c)). The Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act obligates all spheres of government to actively pursue empowerment of such persons through implementation of preferential procurement policies.

The data collected is configured in the Procurement system to comply with the Supply Chain Rules (Treasury Regulation 16A) which does not define procurement by race of income category. The differentiation as set out below reflects business allocated to large corporate as opposed to that awarded to businesses complying with the definitions of small and Black owned enterprises.

The statistics for the years 2002/03 and 2003/04 have not been included in the tables below as the data may not be comparable on a year to year basis. Data contained in the legacy systems (prior to 2004/05) does not support the current format and does not differentiate between Large and Small Business Enterprises.

Total value of goods procured (Excluding people related costs)

Beneficiaries

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

R

%

R

%

R

%

(iii) (aa)

Large Business Enterprises > R35m turnover

1,477,943,400

99.96

1,550,395,027

92.62

567,017,865

41.53

(iii) (bb)

Small Business Enterprises < R35m turnover

587, 140

0.04

123,625,586

7.38

798,151,663

58.47

TOTAL

1,478,530,540

100

1,674,020,613

100

1,365,169,528

100

BEE Spent

Definitions

Black Owned Enterprises: Entities that are more than 50.1% owned by black persons

Black Empowered Enterprises: Entities that are more than 25.1% owned by black persons (most large enterprises fall within this category)

Black Women Owned: Entities that are more than 30% owned by black women

Current definitions in terms of the BBBEE Codes of Good Practice:

Large businesses are businesses with an annual turnover exceeding R35m;

Small businesses are businesses with an annual turnover of less than R35m. This is the current definition of large vs small and will change on an annual basis.

Total value of goods procured (Excluding people related costs) in terms of BEE rules

Beneficiaries

2002/03

2003/04

2004/05

2005/06

2006/07

R

%

R

%

R

%

Black Enterprises

259,373

0,02

352,952,181

21,08

335,522,157

24,58

Black empowered

291,915

0,02

591,437,828

35,33

398,169,660

29,17

Black women owned

35,855

0,00

57,967,588

3,46

64,009,839

4,69

SUB TOTAL BEE

587,133

0,04

1,002,357,597

59,87

797,701,656

58,44

Non-BEE

1,477,943,397

99,96

671,663,016

40,13

567,467,872

41.56

SUB TOTAL Non-BEE

1,477,943,397

99,96

671,663,016

40,13

567,467,872

41.56

TOTAL

1,478,530,540

100

1,674,020,613

100

1,365,169,528

100

FINANCIAL INTELLIGENCE CENTRE

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

1,187m

4,451m

8,452m

17,219m

25,707m

(b)

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

(i),038m

1,763m

4,783m

11,416m

7,466m

(ii)

,427m

.884m

1,541m

1,119m

(iii) (aa),1,149m

2,651m

5,464m

9,911m

18,105m

(bb)

1,373m

2,104m

5,767m

6,483m

FINANCIAL SERVICES BOARD

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

R 000

R 000

R 000

R 000

R 000

32,292

34,505

43,886

65,141

62,940

(b) Not Applicable

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

05-06

(i)

(ii)

(iii) (aa)

(bb)

DEVELOPMENT BANK OF SOUTH AFRICA

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

R32 297 959

R56 424 722

R84 722 059

R98 373 612

R88 492 468

(b)

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

05-06

(i)R11 612 642 or 36%

R24 494 433 or 43%

R51 1310662 or 60%

R58 413 088 or 59%

R45 510 311 or 51%

(ii) N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

(iii) (aa)R921 765

R2 241 552

R7 330 219

R10 075 556

R8 038 223

(bb)R10 690 877

R22 252 881

R43 801 442

R48 337 532

R37 472 088

Notes:

Point (a) refers to total procurement less remuneration and staff related costs; taxes and statutory fees and levies.

Point (b)i refers to the BEE component of the total procurement.

Point (b)ii cannot be completed because vendors and suppliers are not classified in terms of Income Categories

Point (b)(iii)(aa) refers to the 'Large Black Business' component of the total BEE (point (b)i)

Point (b)(iii)(bb) refers to the remainder of the BEE component after 'Large Black' was subtracted – therefore representing Small and Medium Black business as well as Black Women Owned businesses.

INDEPENDENT REGULATORY BOARD FOR AUDITORS

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

0

0

0

0

16 166 856

(b)

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

06-07

(i)0

0

0

0

BEE compliant entities – 11 455 812

(ii)0

0

0

0

Can't provide accurate information

(iii) (aa)0

0

0

0

8 629 034

(bb) 0

0

0

0

7 537 822

SOUTH AFRICAN SPECIAL RISK INSURANCE ASSOCIATION

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

R4,603,932

R8,114,413

R11,047,496

R9,743,865

R9,211,353

(b)

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

05-06

(i) R2,946,516

R5,598,945

R8,175,147

R7,697,653

R7,737,537

(ii) R1,513,006

R4,223,697

R7,430,082

R5,172,391

R5,248,091

(iii) (aa) R2,792,296

R3,357,718

R2,893,160

R4,062,002

R3,627,924

(bb) R1,811,636

R4,756,695

R8,154,336

R5,681,863

R5,583,429

refers to procurement from historically disadvantage individuals (HDI)

refers to procurement from institutions with income of less than R 10 million.

ACCOUNTING STANDARDS BOARD

(a)

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006-07

R164 665

R1 069 623

R890 611

R1 068 578

R1 357 183

(b)

02-03

03-04

04-05

05-06

2006-07

(i) White

White

White

White

White

(ii) Low

Low

Low

Low

Low

(iii) (aa)

(bb)

PUBLIC INVESTMENT CORPORATION

The Public Investment Corporation (PIC) was established on 1 April 2005 when the Public Investment Corporation Act, 2004 (Act 23 of 2004) took effect. The PIC ensures that the procurement of goods and services by the company is done in accordance with its Procurement Policy. The PIC's Procurement Policy is in line with the Preferential Procurement Policy Framework Act, 2000 (Act 5 of 2000) and the requirements set by the Treasury Regulations promulgated under the Public Finance Management Act 1999 (Act 1 of 1999). The PIC's financial systems, however, do not allow for the capturing of transactions by race, income category or Large and Small Business Enterprises and therefore the required information is not available.

Total procurement since PIC's establishment:

R' Amount

FY 2006

FY 2007

Total

52 322 125,77

40 280 530,80

92 602 656,57

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 355

QUESTION NO 1281 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 18 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 17 – 2009)

Mr S B Farrow (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) Whether a Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) board has been appointed in accordance with section 6(1) of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act, Act 46 of 1998; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the names of the board members, (b) what procedures were followed when appointing them and (c) what is the remuneration for each board member;

(2) whether a registrar of the RTIA has been appointed in accordance with section 8(1) of the said act; if not, why not; if so, who was appointed?

NW1604E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) The current interim Board of the Road Traffic Infringement Agency (RTIA) was not appointed in terms of the provisions of the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences Act (AARTO), 1998 (Act No 46 of 1998), but for the sole purpose of operationalising the Administrative Adjudication of Road Traffic Offences as embodied in the AARTO Act through a pilot process.

(a) The following members serve on the interim Board of the RTIA:-

§ Mr A Mawela (acting as the Chairperson)

§ Mr T M Malaza

§ Dr J D Sampson

§ Adv T Dicker

§ Adv P du Rand

(b) Members were selected based on the knowledge of Road Traffic

Management and others from the Directorate of Public Prosecutions, based on their knowledge of the prosecutions process in the Republic.

(c)The remuneration of each board member is as follows:-

· Chairperson - 3 days preparation and 1 day attendance (Rate per day = R2,674).

· Other members - 2 days preparation and 1 day for attendance (Rate per day = R2,111).

(2) As stated above, the process of appointment, including the Registrar of the RTIA, was not done in accordance with the provisions of the AARTO Act, due to the fact that when the advert calling for nominations to serve on the Board was published in 2007, no suitable candidate applied. Currently, Mr R J Rakgoale, Chief executive Officer of the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) serves as the interim Registrar.

Once, the operationalisation process has been completed, the Department of Transport will appoint the RTIA Board and personnel in terms of the provision of the AARTO Act.

QUESTION NO. 356

(Internal Question Paper No 8 – 2008)

Mr L Zita (ANC) to ask the Minister for Provincial and Local Government:

(a) What is the total monetary value of procurements secured by all municipalities in each of the past five financial years and (b) who are the beneficiaries of government procurement of goods and services in terms of (i) racial groups, (ii) income categories and (iii) (aa) large and (bb) small business enterprises?

ANSWER

(a) The Department of Provincial and Local Government does not monitor municipal procurement as this is the responsibility of the National Treasury.

(b) Falls away.

QUESTION NO 359


DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8)

Mr M W Sibuyana (IFP) to ask the Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry:

(1) Whether she has been informed that the Sigagula community is sharing water with animals from a dam constructed by the former Gazankulu government specifically for animals; if so,

(2) whether she will take any steps to rectify this situation; if not, why not; if so, what steps? NW962E

---00O00---

REPLY:


Prior to 2004, the community of Sigagula, was supplied by two boreholes with pumps driven by diesel engines. The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry subsequently converted these into electrically driven pumps. However, these boreholes were not yielding sufficient water to meet the needs of the community. In 2004, the Department also installed a water treatment package plant that takes the water from the dam the Honourable Member refers to, purifies it and then supplies the village. Currently the village is supplied with potable water from the dam and although the water in the dam is also used for stock-watering, the water supplied to the community is safe to drink after is has been treated.

If there is a problem with the treatment plant, the boreholes are used to supply water while the plant is being repaired. Departmental personnel are seconded to the Municipality to continuously monitor the supply to the plant as part of their normal day to day duties.

QUESTION: NO 361

(Internal Question Paper No – 2008)

Ms D Kohler-Barnard (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation:

Whether the Local Organising Committee or host cities will be using security services during the 2010 Soccer World Cup event; if so, what

(a) are the names of the successful service providers,

(b) is the rand value of contracts awarded,

(c) is the nature of the security services to be provided and

(d) are the dates of implementation for contracts already awarded?

NW964E

RESPONSE:

a) The Local Organising Committee and Host Cities have specific responsibilities contained in the Host City agreement, the Organising Association Agreement (OAA), regarding security usage. Yes, security services will be used. This service like all others, will be procured through existing supply chain polices of the respective structures. Each Host City has its own security plan that will determine needs and resource requirements which will be used in determining the public tenders as required by MFMA.

b) The only services which are contracted currently are used in guarding the construction sites of the relevant stadia in the Host Cities and those are provided for by the contractors in terms of their obligations of service as appointed by the Host Cities. LOC venue office centres are to be accommodated in existing premises of the various Host Cities which have existing security.

c) The service is specific to guarding the equipment, materials, machinery, general safety of personnel & access and control to the site.

d) Dates of start and finish for these contracts are already incorporated into the stadium construction programme agreement which is entered between the respective Host City and the construction contractor. Once the stadium is completed, the each Host City will take full responsibility of securing its own stadium. As was mentioned earlier, the LOC security involvement is engaged later in the operational activity of its staff deployment in managing the event and designated venues of meetings, operations offices and competition facilities. LOC has not yet awarded any contracts to this effect.

v

QUESTION NO. 365

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 8)

Mr E W Trent (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

Whether she has considered any intervention in the Eastern Cape health department in terms of section 100 of the Constitution to prevent public health services in the province from degenerating further and to ensure adequate public health care; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW968E

REPLY:

No. I have not considered any intervention in terms of section 100 of the Constitution at this stage. I have only asked certain sections of the department to work with the province to improve certain areas. For example, our Maternal and Child Health Unit, together with the Committees I established on child deaths have been working with the province to analyse the causes of child deaths in some parts of the province and to develop steps to prevent further deaths.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 365

QUESTION NO 1340 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 18 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 17 – 2009)

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) Whether his department has kept a register for the past three financial years with regard to senior level officials in his department who have financial interests and/or involvement in tenders awarded; if not, why not; if so,

(2) whether he will make a copy of the register available; if not, why not; if so, what is the (a) tender number, (b) tender name, (c) date awarded, (d) name of the receiver of the tender, (e) names of officials involved and (f) value of each of the tenders (i) in each of the past three financial years and (ii) during the period 1 April 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

(3) whether his department has any policy in place pertaining to any involvement in awarded tenders; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1690E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) No, the Department of Transport has not kept a register for the past three financial years with regard to senior level officials in the Department who have financial interests and/or involvement in tenders awarded, as no tender has been awarded to any organisation in which an official has any interests. All bidders and officials who serve on bid evaluation panels are required to declare any interests. The declarations of interest are filed on the relevant bid files.

The financial disclosures of all senior level officials that are prescribed in terms of Section C1 of Chapter 3 of the Public Service Regulations are kept on the relevant officials' personnel files.

(2) A copy of the register cannot be made available, because a register of financial interests was not kept.

(a), (b), (c), (d), (e) and (f) (i) and (ii) Fall away.

(3) No, the Department of Transport does not have a policy, but subscribes to the relevant legislation that regulates the environment within which bids should be considered when such bids are submitted by persons employed by the State or by persons connected with or related to persons employed by the State. Employees must obtain written permission to perform other remunerative work in terms of sections 30 and 31 of the Public Service Act, 1994. A declaration of interest, form SBD4, forms part of the standard bidding documents in terms of Supply Chain Management Practice Notes SCM 1 of 2003 and 7 of 2009/10. Supply Chain Management Practitioners must declare any interests in terms of the Code of Conduct for Supply Chain Management Practitioners (Practice Note SCM 4 of 2003). In terms of the Code of Conduct for Bid Adjudication Committees, issued on 24 March 2006, a declaration of confidentiality and impartiality is signed for each bid that is evaluated. A Supply Chain Management official or any other role-player must declare any conflict of interest or any interest in a contract to be awarded, and withdraw from participating in the process relating to that contract in terms of Treasury Regulations 16A8.3 and 16A8.4. The Bidding Committee considers all declarations that may have been made before adjudicating a bid.

QUESTION NO. 366

(Internal Question Paper No 8 – 2008)

Mr E W Trent (DA) to ask the Minister for Provincial and Local Government:

(1) Whether it is policy, in the interest of sound financial management, that all spheres of government must settle their debts within a specified time, e.g. 30 days, 60 days or 90 days; if not, why not; if so, what is time period for (a) national and (b) provincial government departments;

(2) whether any (a) national and (b) provincial government departments are in arrears of the specified time in respect of amounts owed to municipalities; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what amounts are overdue for the specified period for (i) national and (ii) provincial government department;

(3) whether government departments are required to pay interest on overdue accounts; if so, what steps should be taken to ensure that they do so;

(4) whether the failure of national and provincial government departments to settle the amounts due to municipalities timeously have a negative effect on their ability to manage their financial affairs effectively; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what action (a) has he taken or (b) will he take to correct this unacceptable state of affairs;

(5) whether the failure of the national and provincial government departments to settle their debts to municipalities timeously could lead to unnecessary increases in rates and other service charges; if not, why not; if so, what action (a) will he take or (b) has he taken to prevent such increases?

ANSWER

(1) Yes.

(a) and (b): Section 38(1)(f) of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999), provides that the accounting officer of a national or provincial government department must settle all contractual obligations and pay all money owing, including intergovernmental claims, within the prescribed or agreed period.

Further, item 8.2.3 of National Treasury Regulations that were issued in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999), provides that all payments due to creditors must be settled within 30 days from the receipt of an invoice.

(2) Yes.

(i) and (ii): The National Treasury has been requested to provide the Department of Provincial and Local Government with this information, and it will be submitted to the Honourable Member as soon as it is received.

(3) In terms of section 64(2)(g) of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003), the accounting officer of a municipality is responsible for the management of the revenue of the municipality, and must take all reasonable steps to ensure that the municipality charges interest on arrears, except where the council has granted exemptions in accordance with its budget-related policies, and within a prescribed framework.

In terms of these provisions, government departments are required to pay interest on overdue accounts, unless otherwise exempted in terms of the provisions quoted above.

(4) Yes.

(a) and (b): As indicated above, the payment of debt owed to municipalities by national and provincial government departments is provided for in the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999). Also, section 64(3) of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003), requires the accounting officer of a municipality to immediately inform the National Treasury of any payments for municipal tax or municipal services by government departments that are regularly in arrears for periods of more than 30 days.

As the National Treasury is the custodian of the above pieces of legislation, the Department of Provincial and Local Government is in the process of ascertaining the following from the National Treasury:

§ compliance regarding the reporting of debt that is owed to municipalities by government departments, trading entities and constitutional institutions, in terms of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999 (Act No. 1 of 1999); and

§ compliance by the accounting officer of a municipality regarding the reporting to the National Treasury of any outstanding payments by any organ of state that is regularly in arrears for periods of more than 30 days, in terms of the Local Government: Municipal Finance Management Act, 2003 (Act No. 56 of 2003).

The Department of Provincial and Local Government intends making use of the responses from the National Treasury to develop a targeted approach to assist municipalities in recovering such outstanding debt.

(5) A general response in this regard cannot be provided as this will be informed by the magnitude of the debt that each municipality is owed by national and provincial government departments.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 366

QUESTION NO 1350 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 18 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 17 – 2009)

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

Whether, in light of the fact that he supports the call of the United Nations to reduce road

fatalities by half by 2019 (details furnished), he has any plans to ensure that the

objectives of this initiative are met; if not, why not; if so, (a) what plans, (b) how have

they been communicated within (i) his department and (ii) provinces and (c) what budget

has been allocated in this regard?

NW1706E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(a)

Yes, a plan has been put in place to reduce road fatalities. During the latter half of 2008, the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) embarked on a process to review the "Road to Safety Strategy 2006 Onwards" and the joint co-operative development of a "2009 - 2015 Road Traffic Safety Management Plan". The main objectives of this Plan are to:-

• reduce road traffic crashes by half by 2015;

• reduce critical road traffic offences that lead to road crashes by half by 2015;

• commit to educating the general public on road safety matters - taking into consideration special road user groups;

• improve service delivery to the public;

• promote professionalism and skills development of all officials operating in the road traffic management environment;

• reduce the occurrence of fraud and corruption within the road traffic management environment;

• improve the collection, management and use of data for day-to-day tactical planning and performance management purposes within all the functional areas in road traffic management;

• promote the use of technology in all functional areas in road traffic management;

• research, set and achieve controllable and measurable targets to contribute to achieving the goal of optimising service delivery in all areas in road traffic management;

• harmonize road traffic management action plans at national, provincial and local spheres of government;

• establish and strengthen partnerships between government and non-government organisations towards the promotion of road traffic safety;

• review the current post structures within the various functional areas in road traffic and create additional posts where required;

• identify, manage, allocate and control the various sustainable income sources for road traffic safety management; and

• mainstream road traffic safety in national and provincial transport policies.

(b) (i)

Early in 2008, the RTMC prepared a list of strategic priorities for an effective and efficient road traffic safety management system towards attaining the vision, mission and goals of the Corporation. These priorities are:-

• Develop a comprehensive 5 to 6-year road traffic management program for the Corporation and its partners;

• organisational development, transformation and capacitation of the Corporation, as well as its provincial and local authority partners in traffic management;

• institutional development, transformation and empowerment of government role players;

• co-ordinated planning and implementation of road traffic law enforcement by all role players and on all levels of government; and

• co-ordinated road traffic management training, communication, promotion and education.

Based on these pillars, a discussion document titled "Proposed Framework and Process Towards the Development of the 2009 - 2015 Road Traffic Safety Management Plan" was developed within the Corporation, after which it was discussed and approved by the Board of the RTMC and the Minister of Transport.

(b) (ii)

Two-day workshops were arranged in each of the nine Provinces. To obtain the buy-in of the Provinces in the process of developing the 2015 Plan, the Minister of Transport requested in writing the support of the various MECs, as Members of the Shareholders Committee. To further pave the way forward, the Chief Executive Officer of the Road Traffic Management Corporation (RTMC) arranged a series of meetings and consultations with some of the MECs and all the Provincial Heads of Departments to discuss the detail of the process. All the Provinces agreed to the conducting of workshops and participation in the joint development of the 2015 Plan, and also assisted in the arrangements thereof.

(c) The 2015 Plan will serve as a Blueprint over the next five years and form the basis for all national, provincial, metropolitan and local authorities whose portfolios are connected to any or all of the identified road traffic safety management functions for the preparation of their individual Annual Business, Operations, Performance and Financial Plans. The implementation of the 2015 Plan will therefore be mainly funded from the normal allocated funds for road traffic matters by each individual provincial, metropolitan and local authority. However, the Corporation is in the process to identify additional sustainable income sources that will be shared by all authorities for major road traffic safety projects.

QUESTION NO. 367

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 8)

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

In respect of the most recent specified financial year for which information is available, (a) what was the total budget of each specified hospital in Limpopo, (b) what amount was owed to each hospital in unpaid fees, (c) how much of this debt has been owed for more than 12 months and (d) what amount did each hospital receive in fee income? NW970E

REPLY:

The Limpopo Provincial Department of Health is still attending to the question, and the information will be forwarded as soon as it is received from that Province.


UESTION NO. 368

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 8)

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

In respect of the most recent specified financial year for which information is available, (a) what was the total budget of each specified hospital in North West, (b) what amount was owed to each hospital in unpaid fees, (c) how much of this debt has been owed for more than 12 months and (d) what amount did each hospital receive in fee income?

NW971E

REPLY:

The following table reflects the situation in this regard

A

B

C

D

INSTITUTIONS

BUDGET

OUSTANDING AMOUNTS

DEBT> 12 MONTHS

RECEIPTS

1

Bloemhof Hospital

70,000

703,474.90

701,113.81

66,164.32

2

Brits Hospital

1,197,000

2,786,300.55

1,862,315.27

612,714.28

3

Carletonville Hospital

-

1,694,662.76

1,235,338.63

16,013.13

4

Christiana Hospital

241,000

2,080,468.01

1,898,507.22

46,093.10

5

Delareyville Hospital

204,000

565,083.50

366,239.34

47,889.12

6

Ganyesa Hospital

143,000

297,315.81

156,694.89

93,098.78

7

Gelukspan Hospital

249,000

348,200.68

267,262.39

160,757.86

8

Gen Delarey Hospital

925,000

2,302,336.68

1,894,860.98

358,052.03

9

George Stegman Hospital

409,000

1,604,193.71

885,928.91

225,614.45

10

Klerksdorp Prov Hospital

6,657,000

11,912,654.29

23,962,372.77

3,333,722.13

11

Koster hospital

243,000

1,268,534.03

1,026,779.27

191,869.98

12

Lehurutshe Hospital

286,000

3,035,147.94

1,769,519.78

145,702.86

13

Mafikeng Prov Hospital

2,074,000

15,787,499.23

8,295,024.36

2,805,922.78

14

Nic Bodenstein Hospital

448,000

2,036,849.89

1,725,470.59

127,035.86

15

Ottosdal Hospital

143,000

309,690.67

206,562.57

63,799.53

16

Potchefstroom Prov Hospital

4,986,000

32,833,291.08

28,090,757.15

3,156,786.10

17

Reivelo Hospital

35,000

161,382.28

104,951.20

18,660.59

18

Rustenburg Prov Hospital

2,752,000

17,340,010.29

9,714,075.17

1,056,180.68

19

Sannieshof Hospital

60,000

220,353.34

148,558.49

43,014.21

20

Schweizer Reneke Hospital

141,000

1,940,053.47

1,358,708.01

204,328.34

21

Stella Hospital

31,000

103,282.25

28,718.00

14,014.78

22

Swartruggens Hospital

207,000

456,309.69

273,021.36

138,785.81

23

Taung Hospital

849,000

2,472,293.94

2,233,533.41

253,608.59

24

Thusong Hospital

177,000

1,534,365.67

898,426.88

124,981.55

25

Ventersdorp Hospital

350,000

1,283,240.97

1,069,462.06

87,511.30

26

Vryburg Hospital

316,000

1,489,144.76

737,197.69

171,687.52

27

Witrand Hospital

368,000

2,068,534.58

1,064,041.34

461,917.24

28

Zeerust Hospital

625,000

818,403.55

660,116.61

223,299.53

24,186,000

109,453,078.52

92,635,558.15

14,030,883.90

QUESTION NO. 369

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 8)

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

In respect of the most recent specified financial year for which information is available, (a) what was the total budget of each specified hospital in KwaZulu/Natal, (b) what amount was owed to each hospital in unpaid fees, (c) how much of this debt has been owed for more than 12 months and (d) what amount did each hospital receive in fee income?

NW972E

REPLY:

(a) The table below reflects budget allocation for each public hospital for the current financial year 2007/08.

INSTITUTION

BUDGET ALLOCATION - 2007/08

(RM)

UGU(DC21)

DUNSTAN FARRELL

13,812, 000

GJ CROOKES

89,005, 000

MURCHISON

83,327, 000

PORT SHEPSTONE

169,432,000

ST. ANDREWS

55,593,000

UMGUNGUNDLOVU(DC22)

APPELSBOSCH

43,387,000

DORRIS GOODWIN

15,614,000

EDENDALE

366,281,000

FORT NAPIER

50,480,000

GREY'S

302,899,000

NORTHDALE

139,837,000

RICHMOND CHEST

31,785,000

TOWNHILL

67,416,000

UMGENI

49,253,000

UTHUKELA(DC23)

ESTCOURT

51,220,000

EMMAUS

89,420,000

LADYSMITH

191,924,000

UMZINYAHTI(DC24)

CHARLES JOHNSON MEMORIAL

88,005,000

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND

83,901,000

DUNDEE

67,051,000

GREYTOWN

62,491,000

AMAJUBA(DC25)

MADADENI

261,977,000

NEWCASTLE

108,182,000

UTRECHT

23,670,000

ZULULAND(DC26)

BENEDICTINE

109,743,000

CEZA\THULASIZWE

44,484,000

ITSHELEJUBA

41,255,000

NKONJENI

72,165,000

ST FRANCIS

27,824,000

VRYHEID

90,072,000

UMKHANYAKUDE(DC27)

BETHESDA

62,158,000

HLABISA

83,788,000

MANGUZI

78,338,000

MOSVOLD

68,748,000

MSELENI

64,740,000

UTHUNGULU(DC28)

CATHERINE BOOTH

46,335,000

EKOMBE

37,577,000

EKUPHUMELENI

3,711,000

ESHOWE

92,160,000

LOWER UMFOLOZI

102,795,000

MBONGOLWANE

41,760,000

NGWELEZANA

237,224,000

NKANDLA

64,247,000

ST MARY'S KWAMAGWAZA

43,928,000

(ILEMBE)DC29

MONTEBELLO

48,412,000

STANGER

164,880,000

UMPHUMULO

47,117,000

UNTUNJAMBILI

44,591,000

SISONKE(DC43)

CHRIST THE KING

56,786,000

EAST GRIQUA & USHER

58,834,000

RIETVLEI

53,528,000

ST. APPOLLINARIS

52,145,000

ST MARGARET'S

19,976,000

UMZIMKULU

43,377,000

ETHEKWINI

ADDINGTON

360,926,000

CHARLES JAMES

18,800,000

CLAIRWOOD

93,522,000

DON MCKENZIE

22,179,000

FOSA HOSPITAL

22,380,000

HILLCREST

29,424,000

INKOSI ALBERT LUTHULI

941,290,000

KING EDWARD VIII

439,548,000

KING GEORGE V

141,873,000

MAHATMA GHANDI

161,930,000

ORAL AND DENTAL

10,562,000

OSINDISWENI

69,697,000

PRINCE MSHIYENI MEMORIAL

432,508,000

RK KHAN

240,324,000

ST. AIDANS

70,423,000

WENTWORTH

94,971,000

(b) & (d) The table below reflects patient revenue collected and patient revenue

outstanding at each public hospital.

INSTITUTION

TOTAL PATIENT

REVENUE COLLECTED

TOTAL PATIENT

REVENUE OUTSTANDING

UGU(DC21)

DUNSTAN FARRELL

0

0

GJ CROOKES

1,153,865

837,156

MURCHISON

298,730

67,668

PORT SHEPSTONE

1,974,949

1,922,974

ST. ANDREWS

1,039,654

1,186,284

UMGUNGUNDLOVU(DC22)

APPELSBOSCH

98,751

3,078

DORRIS GOODWIN

0

0

EDENDALE

2,524,364

4,256,961

FORT NAPIER

4,316

0

GREY'S

4,016,060

3,280,517

NORTHDALE

939,341

503,133

RICHMOND CHEST

0

0

TOWNHILL

339,709

306,101

UMGENI

37,475

199,567

UTHUKELA(DC23)

ESTCOURT

277,636

362,987

EMMAUS

166,187

41,620

LADYSMITH

1,672,617

2,026,853

UMZINYAHTI(DC24)

CHARLES JOHNSON MEMORIAL

533,839

103,819

CHURCH OF SCOTLAND

306,981

142,088

DUNDEE

2,339,882

1,800,929

GREYTOWN

610,810

345,820

AMAJUBA(DC25)

MADADENI

1,128,043

519,954

NEWCASTLE

3,714,685

1,936,134

UTRECHT

248,874

170,578

ZULULAND(DC26)

BENEDICTINE

517, 016

872,717

CEZA\THULASIZWE

66,142

98,028

ITSHELEJUBA

341,402

449,420

NKONJENI

251,895

25,604

ST FRANCIS

53,693

15,831

VRYHEID

1,296,653

3,381,944

UMKHANYAKUDE(DC27)

BETHESDA

217,732

26,256

HLABISA

392,193

249,425

MANGUZI

282,509

84,025

MOSVOLD

441,493

150,965

MSELENI

185,758

64,904

UTHUNGULU(DC28)

CATHERINE BOOTH

77,191

60,882

EKOMBE

87,064

74,808

EKUPHUMELENI HOSP

7,520

0

ESHOWE

1,141,340

263,876

LOWER UMFOLOZI

184,335

29,902

MBONGOLWANE

143,912

16,059

NGWELEZANA

995,264

709,152

NKANDLA

311,347

224,884

ST MARY'S KWAMAGWAZA

404,699

390,644

ILEMBE(DC29)

MONTEBELLO

119,498

4,788

STANGER

1,864,581

671,103

UMPHUMULO

315,861

142,788

UNTUNJAMBILI

261,937

14,907

SISONKE(DC43)

CHRIST THE KING

432,997

201,707

EAST GRIQUA & USHER

854,174

1,411,945

RIETVLEI

211,203

0

ST. APPOLLINARIS

261,227

86,661

ST MARGARET'S

125,935

0

UMZIMKHULU

187

0

ETHEKWINI

ADDINGTON

7,685,969

6,874,187

CHARLES JAMES HOSP

0

0

CLAIRWOOD

503,560

350,968

DON MCKENZIE HOSP

0

0

FOSA HOSPITAL

0

0

HILLCREST

334,335

222,717

INKOSI ALBERT LUTHULI

9,686,860

4,547,537

KING EDWARD VIII

5,493,297

3,382,892

KING GEORGE V

108,752

637,992

MAHATMA GHANDI

1,002,310

268,493

ORAL AND DENTAL

255,373

0

OSINDISWENI

535,372

76,637

PRINCE MSHIYENI MEMORIAL

4,137,127

3,740,117

RK KHAN

5,504,822

8,716,068

ST. AIDANS

526,858

1,472,783

WENTWORTH

1,075,914

3,839,112

TOTAL

72,124,075

63,687,471

(c) It is not possible to provide the information requested as each hospital operates on a manual system and an age analysis of outstanding debts is not possible.


QUESTION 373

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 7 MARCH 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: 8-2008

MR M SWART (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE

(a) Who is the Chief Financial Officer of his department, (b) when was this person appointed to this position, (c) what qualifications does this person have and (d) what experience does this person have relevant to the position of CFO;

whether the CFO of his department received a performance bonus in 2007; if so, (a) how much and (b) why was the performance bonus awarded?

-------ooo0ooo------- NW977E

REPLY

The Department does not have a CFO. The post of CFO is currently vacant but in the process of being staffed. At present the Chief Director Financial Services has been appointed as the Acting CFO.

No.

QUESTION NO 374

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8)

Mr M Swart (DA) to ask the Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry:

(1) (a) Who is the Chief Financial Officer (CFO) of her department, (b) when was this person appointed to this position, (c) what qualifications does this person have and (d) what experience does this person have relevant to the position of CFO;

(2) whether the CFO of her department received a performance bonus in 2007; if so, (a) how much and (b) why was the performance bonus awarded?

NW978E

---00O00---

REPLY:

(1)(a) Mr O O Ayaya.

(1)(b) 1 July 2007.

(1)(c) B.Com (Hons), MBA (Finance and Accounting Concentration); Diploma (Tax and Law); CPA, ACMA.

(1)(d) Apart from Mr Ayaya's experience in other sectors, including academic institutions, his immediate assignment before joining the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry was with National Treasury for more than three years as Senior Financial Advisor, Public Sector Financial Reforms.

(2)(a) No. No bonus has been paid to the current CFO since he had only joined the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry on 1 July 2007. An employee's performance assessment for the consideration of awarding a performance bonus is only done after he/she has completed a full performance cycle (1 April to 31 March).

(2)(b) Not applicable.

QUESTION 375

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 07 MARCH 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: 8-2008

ADV H C SCHMIDT (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE

1. (a) How many Augusta helicopters had been delivered to the SA Air Force as at 1 February 2008 and (b) when is the final delivery scheduled to take place;

2. whether the specifications as determined in the original contract of purchase have been met; if not, (a)why not and (b) what are the reasons for any deviations from the original contract?

-------ooo0ooo------- NW979E

REPLY

1. (a) A total of twenty-two (22) A109 helicopters were delivered as on 01 Feb 08.

(b) The last aircraft, the 30th, is scheduled for delivery on 31 March 2009.

2. A few minor specifications as determined in the original contract have not been met, however, these are in the process of being rectified. The specification deviations resulted from a new communication system (locally supplied) that requires minor software upgrades and a change to the cyclic and collective fight controls to accommodate a 5 to 95 percentile person in the cockpit. Prototype controls have already been successfully tested and the production to retrofit the fleet will now commence.

It is not foreseen that there will be any deviations remaining at the final delivery of the last helicopter and on final handover of the system to the SA Air Force.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 375 QUESTION NO 1388 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18 – 2009)

Mr S B Farrow (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) How much has the SA National Roads Agency Limited (Sanral) raised in (a) foreign loans and (b) bonds in order to fund its R44 billion toll road and infrastructure plans;

(2) what (a) are the terms of redemption of these (i) loans and (ii) bonds and (b) interest rates are applicable;

(3) whether the necessary feasibility studies have been undertaken to establish the long-term recovery of these loans and bonds on a project-by-project basis; if not, why not; if so, what are the established timeframes for breakeven;

(4) whether any forward cover has been taken out on the foreign portions of the loans in order to reduce risk; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1742E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) (a) The South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) has negotiated a loan facility from the European Investment Bank (EIB) in South African Rand (ZAR), which it has not drawn on yet. It must be noted that this is not a foreign currency loan and that SANRAL is not exposed to any foreign exchange risks.

(b) The various bonds in the market place, as at September 2009 – traded on the

Bond Exchange of South Africa (BESA) – are shown in the table under (2) (a) below. The table shows all the details of the bond.

(2) (a) (i) and (ii) and (b) Please refer to the table below.

THE SANRAL SUITE (September 2009)

BOND EXCHANGE AWARD: BEST BORROWER 2008

BOND

COUPON

MATURITY

COUPON DATES

ISSUE AMOUNT (Rmillion)

TYPE

NRA013

4.25

31 October 2013

30 April / 31 October

1 560

CPI

NRA014

11.25

30 April 2014

30 April / 31 October

140

Fixed

NRA018

12.25

30 November 2018

31 May / 30 November

2 556

Fixed

NRA022

12.25

31 October 2022

30 April / 31 October

2 200

Fixed

NRA023

5.00

31 May 2023

31 May / 30 November

515

CPI

NRA028

12.25

30 November 2028

31 May / 30 November

2 671

Fixed

HWAY20

9.75

31 July 2020

31 January /

31 July

2 365

Fixed

HWAY34

9.25

31 July 2034

31 January /

31 July

1 235

Fixed

(3) Prior to promoting a project, feasibility studies are carried out to establish the viability of the project.

(4) Since SANRAL has no loans denominated in foreign currency (see above) it has no need for any forward cover.

Question no. 376

QUESTION PAPER DATE: FRIDAY, 07 March 2008

376: Adv H C Schmidt (DA) to ask the Minister of Minerals and Energy:

(1) Between the promulgation of the Mineral and Petroleum Resources Development Act, (MPRDA), Act 28 of 2002, on 1 May 2004 and 29 February 2008, how many (a) applications for (i) prospecting rights, (ii) mining rights, (iii) mining permits and (iv) conversions of (a) prospecting and (bb) mining rights were received, (b) appeals were lodged with (i) her and (ii) the Director-General in terms of section 96(1) of the MPRDA against the refusal of such rights and (c) of these appeals were (i) successful and (ii) unsuccessful;

(2) what does her department intend doing about improving the quality of its decision-making in view of (a) the settlement of a third of all judicial review applications and (b) its failure to oppose most of these applications?

REPLY

(1) Between 1 May 2004 and 29 February 2008 the Department received 8196 prospecting rights (ii) mining rights-1359,(iii) mining permits-4244, (iv) (aa) the period for conversion of prospecting rights expired in April 2006, a total of 378 conversions were received.(bb) mining rights conversions -549

(1) (b) (i) and (ii) A total of 504 appeals were received during the aforementioned period. What is however important to note at this stage, is that the majority of so-called appeals received by the Department, has been processed in terms of section103(4)(b) of the MPRDA, as it relates to Ministerial decisions taken under delegated authority, which as a result rendered an appeal in terms of section 96 of the Act, incompetent.

(c) (i) Of the appeals received, 23 were successful and (ii) 48 unsuccessful

The remainder of the appeals were either withdrawn (38), suspended pending litigation (32) or negotiations (48) or still pending (315).

2. (i) The department has not identified quality of decisions as a cause for settlement with parties, settlement is as per agreement between the Applicants and the Department, thus meaning that the matters were in effect settled between the parties.

(ii) As referred in 2(i) majority of matters not opposed is because of the agreements between the parties.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 N0VEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 376

QUESTION N0 1394 TRANSFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18 – 2009)

Mr M S F de Freitas (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) Which of the bus rapid transit (BRT) projects in each province are being constructed by his department in conjunction with provincial governments and local authorities;

(2) what (a) is the budget per project, in each (i) city and (ii) province, (b) are the expenditures to date and (c) mechanisms, processes and procedures are in place to monitor expenditures of his department against budgeted amounts, timeframes, timelines and milestones;

(3) what is the nature of the partnership with other tiers of government in the construction of these projects, in each case?

NW1749E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) The Bus rapid Transit (BRT) projects are mandated by both the Public Transport Strategy and Action Plan of 2007 and the National Land Transport Act, 2009 (Act No 5 of 2009). The implementation of BRT projects is done by Municipal Government, but requires the support of both National and Provincial Government, the former in a policy oversight role and the latter to ensure co-ordination of municipal plans. National and Provincial Government are therefore

not involved in any construction of the BRT projects – as mentioned, this is done at a municipal level with a Public Transport Infrastructure Systems (PTIS) Conditional Grant from National Government.

(2) Currently BRT Phase 1 projects are implemented in four cities only, i.e. Johannesburg, Cape Town, Tshwane and Nelson Mandela Bay.

(a) (i)

Budget and Expenditure per City

City of Cape Town

The City of Cape Town IRT Project Financial provisions (past expenditure, current year and future provisions) are as follows:-

Funding Source

Expended in 2007/08 (R million)

Expended in 2008/09 (R million)

2009/10 Budget Provision (R million)

2010/11 Provision (R million)

2011/12 Provision (R million)

PTI&SG Budgeted Funds

0

225.643

282.7

647.27

800

City Funds

5.524

47.12

291.53

55.00

0

Total

5.524

272.755

574.23

702.27

800

(b) Expenditure to date amounts to R454 million (actual payments made) as recorded on 29 October 2009.

City of Tshwane

(a) and (b)

The following table indicates the expenditures to date, as well as the Division of Revenue Act (DORA) allocations for the three year Medium Term Revenue and Expenditure Framework (MTREF):-

2008/09

2009/10

2010/11

2011/12

Budget

R35 200 190

R290 784 832

R804 180 000

R240 000 000

Expenditure

R35 200 190

R33 351 481

City of Johannesburg

(a) and (b)

PERIOD (DoT Financial Year)

BRT BUDGET

FUNDING RECEIVED FROM CITY OF JHB

FUNDING RECEIVED FROM DoT (PTIS)

EXPENDITURE

REMARKS

AMOUNT

R Million

AMOUNT

R Million

AMOUNT

R Million

AMOUNT

R Million

2006/07

205.0

21

184

99.2

2007/08

564.9

235.9

329

433.9

2008/09

599.0

0

599

599

2009/10

652.0

0

625.0

625

PTIS allocation for 2010/11 is R1,070 billion. The City of Johannesburg plans to spend R605 million of this in 2009/10 through obtaining a bridging loan from the banks.

Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality (NMB)

(a) and (b)

Up to and including the 2009/10 financial year NMB had budgeted R228,646,240 and have spent R142,487,339.

(c) Mechanism, processes and procedures to monitor expenditure

The Public Transport Branch of the Department of Transport (DoT) has been monitoring and supporting the cities implementing BRT systems from a strategic perspective, while at an operational level, the DoT's WC 2010 Division (in partnership with the National Treasury) has been monitoring spending in terms of the conditions of the PTIS grant. The WC 2010 Division has a panel of experts for monitoring and evaluation, as well as project management services. The panel consists of transport practitioners (civil engineers, transport planners and transport economists), who regularly visit municipalities, conducting site inspections, and attending project meetings. They submit reports to the DoT on a monthly basis, reporting on project progress (according to set time lines), expenditure, identified risks, as well as conducting value for money assessment on all projects funded through the Public Transport Infrastructure and Systems Grant.

The key milestone for these projects in terms of the 2007 Public Transport Strategy and Action Plan is to have a Phase 1 Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network or BRT projects fully operational by May 2010. To date, the City of Johannesburg is on track and Nelson Mandela Bay Municipality is currently negotiating with local operators and will be able to make a firm commitment within two months. The City of Cape Town is on track for at least the 2010 component of the Phase 1A BRT, although the City has indicated that they can do more if additional funding is committed from the PTIS grant. The City of Tshwane will not roll out a full Phase 1 by May 2010, due to project capacity delays. They have, however, committed to rolling out their full Phase 1 by 2011 and by May 2010 will run a special 2010 service that makes use of some of the BRT infrastructure that will be ready by then.

Municipalities also have in place oversight procedures in terms of the Municipal System's Act and Municipal Finance Management Act, including Section 79 and Section 80 Committees, internal audit committee processes and the auditing of books by the Auditor General.

In addition, some of the cities have specific monitoring mechanisms in addition to the above. For example, the City of Tshwane established a project management office (PMO) to monitor progress against planned progress and expenditure. The progress is reported to the Mayoral Committee and Department of Transport on a monthly basis. The City of Johannesburg's Risk and Audit Services has also employed a Probity Advisor to oversee all aspects of the Rea Vaya BRT and the Council has approved a number of stakeholder consultation and oversight committees, including a BRT Steering Committee made up of all relevant City departments and an External Advisory Forum made up of external stakeholders and transport experts. The City of Cape Town monitors its project expenditure and progress through its established Progressive Capital Expenditure Reporting (PCER) system.

(3) Please refer to my response to part (1) of the Question above.

QUESTION NO 378

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 7 MARCH 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 8)

Mr M M Swathe (DA) to ask the Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry:

(1) Whether her department has visited the Percy Stewart water works sewerage plant outside Krugersdorp in the Mogale City Municipality in the past three years; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what date did each visit take place, (b) which departmental officials were part of each team visiting the site and (c) what were the findings in each case;

(2) whether she has been informed that the physical infrastructure at the plant has been grossly neglected for some time and that the plant is suffering from a significant skills shortage, with a 60% vacancy rate; if so,

(3) whether her department has determined who is responsible for this state of affairs; if not, why not; if so, who is responsible;

(4) whether her department has taken any action against those responsible; if not why not; if so, what action;

(5) whether her department has taken any steps to rectify both the infrastructure and the skills shortage problem; if not, why not; if so, what steps? NW982E

---00O00---

REPLY:

(1) The Department of Water Affairs and Forestry's Regional Office in Gauteng does quarterly audits for all Waste-Water Treatment Works (WWTWs). These coincide with routine effluent quality audits. During the audit in June 2007 it was discovered that the Percy Stewart WWTW was not complying with the permit requirements as it failed to discharge effluent of acceptable quality. Several non-compliance notices were sent to the Municipality. After the Municipality failed to rectify the problems following two DWAF notifications, the Department's Regulatory Unit intervened. It is important to note that this Treatment Works received recognition in 2005 and 2006 for excellent operations.

(2) A detailed site investigation was conducted on 8 November 2007 by my Department's Regulatory Unit, my Department's Gauteng Regional Office and officials from the Mogale City Municipality.

- 2 -

(3) The under-performance of the WWTWs is due to of the following reasons:

Old infrastructure;

old technology not designed to handle the current organic load;

high rate of development which result in inadequate capacity;

shortage of trained staff and technical skills;

funds not allocated to upgrade/refurbish the plant; and

poor management.

(4) This plant has been identified as a priority and my Department has taken a co-operative government approach to have the situation rectified. To date, an engineering firm has been appointed by the Mogale City Municipality to assist them with immediate, medium and long term plans to deal with the non-compliance and capacity problems at the WWTWs. The implementation plan to correct the situation at the WWTWs was presented to my Department and officials are busy studying the content. The Municipal Management has shown good leadership and co-operation since the intervention by the Regulatory Unit.

(5) After the intervention by my Department's regulatory unit, the Mogale City Municipality as the Water Services Authority (WSA) has provided funds for the refurbishment of the WWTW which is underway. Short term issues as identified by Departmental investigations are being addressed. A medium and long term plan has been submitted to my Department. There is a concern about skills shortages. The Mogale City Municipality faces the same challenges in recruiting and retaining suitably qualified staff as other sectors in this country that require engineers and scientists. This is the reason they have appointed an engineering firm to address the problem in the interim. The implementation plan mentioned in my reply to part 4 of the question, above will also include acquisition of suitably qualified staff.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY FOR ORAL REPLY WEDNESDAY, 04 NOVEMBER 2009

QUESTION NO 379

QUESTION NO 1435 TRANFERRED FROM WRITTEN TO ORAL REPLY IN TERMS OF RULE 117

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 09 DECEMBER 2009

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 25 SEPTEMBER 2009 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 18 – 2009)

Mr G R Krumbock (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) (a) Why is the incidence of reported baggage pilfering at the OR Tambo International Airport double the international average, (b) what target did his department set for the maximum incidence of reported baggage pilfering per 1000 bags at the airport and (c) what date has his department set for the target to be reached;

(2) whether any steps have been taken to address this problem; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW1793E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1) (a) The incidence of baggage pilferage at O R Tambo International Airport is currently below the international accepted standard.

(b) Theft from passenger baggage at airports is a worldwide problem. It is, however, pleasing to note that progress continues to be made in reducing baggage pilferage incidents at O R Tambo International Airport. The Airport processes approximately 20 000 pieces of checked-in luggage (departing flights) each day, and a similar volume of arriving baggage. Measured against the global standard of one bag pilfered per 1 000 handled, O R Tambo International Airport achieved a rate of 0.9 bags per 1 000 during the 2008 – 2009 financial year. This is a 10% improvement against the worldwide benchmark.

(c) ACSA's Management Team has set an ambitious target of a threefold improvement to 0.3 bags per 1 000 for the fiscal year 2009 - 2010.

(2) A task team, the Baggage Protection Unit, has been in place for over two years and was formed after the incidents of pilferage peaked. ACSA undertook to co- ordinate the efforts of the responsible stakeholders (the airlines) to manage the problem.

QUESTION NO 382

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07 MARCH 2008: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER No. 382

Mrs D van der Walt to ask the Minister of Arts and Culture:

(1) What are the details of his department's objective to promote linguistic diversity, particularly with regard to the public service?

NE988E

REPLY:

(1) The key objective of the Department of Arts and Culture is to support and promote linguistic diversity as a resource in empowering South Africans to participate fully in their country's social, political and economic life. Based on this premise, we have set ourselves specific objectives as a means to attain this goal.

It could thus be said that my department's objectives are to-

  • Facilitate the development of language policies;
  • Facilitate the implementation of the National Language Policy Framework;
  • Provide a translation and editing service to all government departments;
  • Develop and coordinate terminology for all eleven official languages; and
  • Develop a partnership methodology as a means to manage active involvement of all key interest groups and role players in promoting the indigenous official languages;
  • Recognising the need to create access to services to develop a partnership methodology as a means of managing activities through all the official languages of the country, my department is embarking on a campaign to facilitate the establishment of language units at each of the national departments. We have some notable successes of departments who have made some strides in promoting linguistic diversity as they expanded/set up language units to accommodate the use of African languages within the public service. For instance the South African Police Service; Department of Justice and Constitutional Development; and the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry are cases in point. The GCIS is notably also in the process of establishing its language unit. My department is also embarking on a project with the Department of Provincial and Local Government to facilitate the provision of language services at local government level.

    QUESTION: 389

    (Internal Question Paper 41 – 2007)

    Mr T D Lee (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation:

    (1) Whether there are any quotas for the South African team to the Olympics; if not, why not; if so, (a) which codes will be affected by the quotas, (b) what process was followed in deciding to impose quotas and (c) what were the reasons for imposing quotas;

    (2) whether sports federations were consulted about the quotas; if not, why

    not; if so, what are the relevant details?

    NW995E

    RESPONSE:

    1) There are no quotas for the selection of the Olympic team as the SA Sports Confederation and Olympic Committee applies a two tier selection system based on criteria agreed with the national federations and on the International Olympic Committee's principle of "universlity".

    a) However, SASCOC has established targets in consultation with all the national federations.

    b) The national federations signed an agreement with SASCOC, all of which are on the SASCOC website except the agreement with ASA which has not been signed.

    c) Targets, not quotas, are established to address the principle of "universlity".

    2) This has been elaborated above save to say that we have confirmed Government policy on the issue of quotas on numerous occasions.

    QUESTION 397

    INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER [NO 8-2008]

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: 7 MARCH 2008

    397. Mr A H Nel (DA) to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Land Affairs:

    (1) Whether the Regional Commissioner of Restitution in Limpopo has been arrested for corruption; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) when and (b) on what charges;

    (2) whether the said person was suspended; if not, why not; if so, when;

    (3) whether she will make a statement on the matter? NW1006E

    MINISTER FOR AGRICULTURE AND LAND AFFAIRS:

    (1) Yes.

    13 December 2007.

    (b) Fraud, alternatively theft, and obstructing or defeating the administration of justice.

    (2) Yes. 18 March 2008.

    (3) No.