Questions & Replies: Basic Education

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2013-05-27

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Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 962
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 10105/2013
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER. 15/2013)

Mr M W Rabotapi (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) Since 1 January 2011, how many applications under the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act 2 of 2000, were received by (a) her department and (b) entities reporting to her, and in each case, how many were (i) granted, (ii) refused and (iii) deemed refused under section 27;

(2) since 1 January 2011, how many internal appeals under the Act were received by (a) her department and (b) entities reporting to her, and in each case, how many were (i) granted, (ii) refused and (iii) deemed refused under section 77(7);

(3) who is the information officer for (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her, and in each case, what are the contact details of the officer? NW1185E


RESPONSE

QUESTION 1


(a)
20
(i)- 15
(ii)- 4
(iii)- 1
(b) SACE-None

UMALUSI- 2
- both were redirected to the Department as they fell outside UMALUSl's scope of operation

QUESTION 2

(a)
1
(i)-
1
(ii)- 0
(iii)
0

(b) SAGE-NONE
UMALUSCNONE

QUESTION 3

(a)
Mr PB Soobrayan - 012 3574011; soobrayan.b@dbe.gov.za
(b)
UMALUSI - Mr Lucky Ditaunyane-Tel: 012 349 1510 Ext 208
SAGE - Mr Themba Ndlovu- Tel: 012 679 9722 or 9717
e-mail:
themba.ndhlovu@sace.org.za

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 941

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 10/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether the Ministerial committee to investigate the current promotion requirements and other related matters that impact on the standard of the National Senior Certificate, as gazetted in October 2012, has been appointed; if not, why not; if so, (a) who are the members of the committee and (b) what is the focus area within the terms of reference of the committee of each member of the committee;

(2) whether the work of the committee has commenced; if not, why not; if so, (a) who has been elected as the chairperson and (b) what are the details of the methodology to be used by the committee to achieve the required outcomes;

(3) whether a deadline has been determined by which the work of the committee must be completed; if not, why not; if so, what is the deadline;

(4) (a) what budgetary allocation has been assigned to the committee and (b) what payment (i) has been and (ii) will be made to each member of the committee? NW1163E

REPLY

1. Yes, the committee has been established. The Minister has approved the nominations of members to serve on the Committee. Based on the Ministerial approval of the nominations, the relevant persons were contacted to establish whether they would accept the nomination before final approval by the Minister.

All nominees accepted the invitation and the names of the members of the Committee will be published in the Government Gazette.

(a) Once the names of the appointed members have been published in the Government Gazette it will be provided.

(b) The terms of reference of the Ministerial Committee are:

(i) establish from current research and other media reports the main criticisms addressed against the National Senior Certificate;

(ii) conduct a comparative study of the promotion requirements of the National Senior Certificate and other similar exit qualifications in a few countries that are of international repute; and

(iii) consult with key recipients of the National Senior Certificate in the South African academic, workplace and business environment and identify their concerns about the National Senior Certificate and to determine how these can be rectified in the short to medium term.

2. No

(a) Once the names of the appointed members have been published in the Government Gazette it will be provided.

(b) Once the committee commences its work it will determine the methodology to be used to achieve the required outcomes.

3. A period of six months will be allocated for the completion of this research and the presentation of the findings and recommendations to the Minister.

4(a) A budget for R450 000 has been allocated for the work of the Ministerial Committee.

4(b) The following payment will be done to the appointed members:

(i) Members of the Ministerial Committee will be remunerated in terms of the Public Management Financial Act - Chapter 20.

(ii) Members of the Committee will also be paid for accommodation and travel cost incurred.

(iii) Ministerial Committee members attached to state departments will only receive subsistence and travel costs.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 850

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 03/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether the seven roles and associated competence for educators as described in the Norms and Standards for Educators, gazetted in terms of the Employment of Educators Act, Act 76 of 1998 (Gazette 20844, 4 February 2000), are still applied to measure the capacity of an educator to be an effective teacher; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the details of the norm that has replaced it; if so, how are the requirements applied? NW1069E

Reply:

(a) The seven roles and associated competence of educators in schools are currently measured in terms of the Integrated Quality Management System (IQMS) which was signed in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) as Agreement No. 8 of 2003. The IQMS is informed by Schedule 1 of the Employment of Educators Act, No. 76 of 1998 where the Minister is required to determine the performance standards for educators in terms of which their performance is to be evaluated.

Whilst it is acknowledged that the seven roles as reflected in Norms and Standards for Educators are inculcated during the training of an educator at an institution of higher learning, it is expected that an educator should demonstrate these competencies throughout his/her teaching career.

The roles and responsibilities of teachers and principals have been designed in such a way that teachers will be able to apply these competencies during their entire career.

(b) The IQMS instrument is used to assess the performance of all school-based educators, based on their respective roles and responsibilities.

The purpose of IQMS, amongst others, is as follows:

· To evaluate an educator's performance;

· To promote accountability; and

· To provide support for continued growth.

The performance of all educators is evaluated on 7 Performance Standards, which are as follows:

(1) Creation of a positive learning environment;

(2) Knowledge of curriculum and learning programmes;

(3) Lesson planning, preparation and presentation;

(4) Learner Assessment;

(5) Professional development in field of work and participation in professional bodies;

(6) Human relations and contribution to school development; and

(7) Extra-curricular and co-curricular participation.

The performance of educators on Post Level 2 (Head of Department) and Post Level 3 and 4 (Deputy Principal / Principal) are also evaluated in terms of Performance Standards that relate to their competence in management and leadership. These additional Performance Standards are:

(8) Administration of resources and records (Post Levels 2-4);

(9) Personnel (Post Levels 2-4);

(10) Decision making and accountability (Post Levels 2-4);

(11) Leadership, communication and servicing the Governing Body (Post Levels 3-4); and

(12) Strategic planning, financial planning and education management development (Post Levels 3-4).

Each educator is evaluated by his/her Development Support Group (DSG) which consists of the educator's immediate supervisor and one other educator (peer). The DSG is responsible for the annual summative evaluation of the educator as well as providing mentoring and support.

The above Performance Standards are aligned to the seven roles of an educator and are designed to evaluate his/her practical, foundational and reflexive competence in classroom practice as well as management and leadership.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 849
DATE OF PUBLICATlON OF INTERNAL QUESTION - PAPER: 03/05/2013 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013

Ms AT Lovemore (DA) lo ask the Minister 06 Basic Education:

Whether her department is assessing on an ongoing basis the current and future human resource needs of the country for the purpose of tailoring the school curriculum to produced appropriate skills; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the details of her plans to rectify this situation; if so: which person or unit is tasked with this assessment? NW1068E

REPLY

The aim of general school education is to ensure that all pupils have a broad and balanced curriculum during their Further Education and Training years and not to supply the economy with trained people for specific occupations. It is also not the purpose of the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 to supply trained learners on short term basis to fulfill the immediate specific needs required by the economy. School curricula are usually changed after a five-year period of implementation.

Successful modern economies and societies require citizens with a strong foundation of general education, the desire and ability to continue to learn, to adapt to, and develop new knowledge, skills and technologies, to move flexibly between occupations, to take responsibility for their personal performance, to set and achieve nigh standards, and to work co-operatively. The aim of the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-72 is therefore to provide learners the opportunity to acquire and apply knowledge and skills in ways that are meaningful to their own lives.

It is, however, important that school education should take cognisance of the shortage of skills in South Africa and regard it as 2 national priority. Although the schooling system on its own, cannot address these problems it could make an important contribution;. The National Curriculum Statement Grade R-12 does make provision for specific vocational subjects. Subjects such as Civil Technology, Electrical Technology, Mechanical Technology and Hospitality Studies do not make provision for specialisation or workplace experience. These subjects include various areas of specialization.

Taking the shortage of skills in South Africa into consideration, the technology subjects listed in the National Curriculum Statement Grades P-12 could be regarded to be more academic and do not allow learners, who can make good apprentices and skills specialists an opportunity to pursue this avenue..

To remedy this short coming a Ministerial Committee is currently busy reviewing the current Curriculum and Assessment policy statements for Technology subjects to make them more applicable for vocational training.

Apart from the compulsory two official languages and Life Orientation these new specialised subjects will be supplemented by other relevant subjects, such as Mechanical Science, Mechanical Mathematics.

The above change to the existing curriculum will allow for a dual education system where learners can choose between a more academic stream and a vocational stream. This is a common and very productive system in developed countries like Germany, Poland, Netherlands and Switzerland.
Furthermore, the department of Basic education developed a document on subject choices and career paths to assist learners in the Further Education and Training Phase in making sound subject choices for specific careers such as engineering and medicine.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 848

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 03/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1813 on 11 September 2012, what mathematical formula is applied to calculate the average learner to teacher ratio in each province;

(2) whether her department maintains a database of actual class sizes in each school; if so,

(3) how many (a) separate classes, in each grade, have been calculated to exist in each province and (b) of these classes have in excess of (i) 40 learners, (ii) 60 learners and (iii) 80 learners;

(4) whether her department has taken or is taking action to ensure that each province has a realistic plan in place to achieve target ratios within a reasonable time; if so, what are the details of such action? NW1067E

REPLY

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1813 on 11 September 2012, what mathematical formula is applied to calculate the average learner to teacher ratio in each province;

My Department applies a policy known as Post Provisioning Norms (PPN). It is regulated in terms of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998. Regulations made in terms of this Act determine that an MEC must create a pool of posts in accordance with funds available for this purpose after which the relevant Head of Department must distribute these posts among schools in accordance with the Post-Provisioning Model (PPM). The model is based on the principle that available posts are distributed among schools, proportionally to their number of weighted learners. In order to determine what a school's relative need for posts are, in relation to that of other schools, the PPM attaches weightings to all learners based on their relative needs for teachers and, in doing so, determines a weighted learner enrolment for each school.

(2) Whether her department maintains a database of actual class sizes in each school; if so,

No. My Department does not maintain a database of actual class sizes in each school due to the fact that the post-provisioning policy and model emphasize a holistic approach whereby the establishment of a school is based on learner-educator ratio (LER).

(3) How many (a) separate classes, in each grade, have been calculated to exist in each province and (b) of these classes have in excess of (i) 40 learners, (ii) 60 learners and (iii) 80 learners;

The Provincial Departments of Education utilize their staff establishments at school to keep a record of how many posts they have at each school. This also gives them information as to what the teacher/learner ratio is which helps them to manage the average class size. A class size is only determined once a timetable is drawn up by a school for each grade. Presently, there is no database that captures class sizes.

(4) Whether her department has taken or is taking action to ensure that each province has a realistic plan in place to achieve target ratios within a reasonable time; if so, what are the details of such action?

My Department has contracted a service provider through UNICEF funding to run a project that will design and implement a research instrument (tool) to review progress with the implementation of Post Provisioning Norms (PPN). The project aims to assess the impact of PPN on teacher provisioning, planning, utilisation and deployment in response to Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025 on a provincial level.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 829

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to question 658 on 22 April 2013, how many of the students in education who completed their studies in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012 had (i) mathematics and/or (ii) natural sciences as a major subject;

(2) (a) how many temporary teachers who are (i) not qualified, (ii) underqualified and (iii) professionally unqualified have been in a temporary post for longer than a year already and (b) what is the reason for this? NW1046E

REPLIES

(1) With reference to her reply to question 658 on 22 April 2013, how many of the students in education who completed their studies in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012 had (i) mathematics and/or (ii) natural sciences as a major subject?

The Department only compiles information on the number of FunzaLushaka Bursary Scheme beneficiaries. The numbers provided below do not represent all the education graduates in these subjects.

(a) 2009

(b) 2010

(c) 2011

(d) 2012

(i) Mathematics

395

234

593

504

(ii) Natural Sciences

201

113

254

247

(2) (a) How many temporary teachers who are (i) not qualified, (ii) under-qualified and (iii) professionally unqualified have been in a temporary post for longer than a year already and (b) what is the reason for this?

(i) Not qualified temporary longer than a year

(ii) Under-qualified temporary longer than a year

(ii) Professionally un-qualified temporary longer than a year

4258

560

Data currently not available

(b) 3 876 of unqualified educators employed longer than a year are in KwaZulu-Natal. KwaZulu-Natal has historically struggled to attract qualified educators, particularly in rural areas. Over the last few years the situation has been improving as the province absorbs the largest number of FunzaLushaka Bursary Scheme graduates. The number of graduates appointed in the province in 2013 was at 860 at the end of March 2013. Regarding the under-qualified educators, the numbers are decreasing annually and those that have enrolled for improvement of qualifications through the provincial bursary schemes are kept in posts on temporary appointments until they qualify.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 801
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) Whether she has declared the work-to-rule campaign (details furnished by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTL') illegal; if so, on what grounds;

(21 (a) how will she identify members of SAD? U who are participating, or have participated in the campaign, and (h) what action will she take against them?
NW1014E

REPLY:
(1) Whether she has declared the work-to-rule campaign (details furnished) by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTU) illegal; if so, an what grounds?


I did declare the work-to-rule campaign by the SA Democratic Teachers Union (SAU?'G) as not compliant with the Labour Relations Act. Teachers are in terms of the Employment of Educators Act and their conditions of service obliged on request to work outside the seven hours of teaching, and this includes taking part in in-service training commitments to improve their skills. It should be noted that work-to-rule also constitutes a strike since labour is being withheld. As a matter of fact, for industrial action. to comply with the LRA, negotiations in the bargaining council oil a matter of mutual interest should have failed and a certificate of non-resolution issued, to allow any parry m the dispute to engage in industrial action.

(2) (a) How wilt she identify members of SADTU who are participating, or have participated in the campaign, and (b) what action will she take against them?

(2) (a) How will she identify members of SADTU who are participating, or have participated to the campaign, and (b) what action will she take against them?

(a) Principals, as school managers, arc obliged to report and record non-compliant by educators in their schools. Therefore, I am confident that the Provincial Education Departments are in possession of the names of SADT members who are participating, or have participated in the campaign; and

(b) Depending an tile circumstances and merits of each case, involved educators should undergo formal disciplinary processes resulting in imposition of sanctions concomitant with the offence.

Reply received: July 2013

QUESTION 800
DATE
OF PUBLICATION OFINTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)
Mrs AT Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


( 1 ) In each province (a) how many young people of school going age, who suffer from special needs that require attention in a special school, are not able lo be accommodated in such a special school and (b) what are the numbers not accommodated per classification of special need;

(2) Whether plans are in place for each province to allow accommodation of all young people requiring special school education; if so, what are the relevant details per province; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such plans and (b) what action will she take lo ensure the (i) development and (ii) implementation of such plans;

(3) What are the derails of the action she is taking to ensure that every special school has a full complement of appropriately qualified staff? NW1013E

REPLY:

(1) (a) The table below provides the number of young people of school-going age, who require attention in a special school that still await placement in a special school because of capacity problems at special schools:

PROVINCE

NO. OF OUT OF SCHOOL YOUTH

Eastern Cape

1583

Free State

793

Gauteng

2278

Kwa-Zulu Natal

2595

Limpopo

134

Mpumalanga

241

Northern Cape

73

North West

44

Western Cape

2768

TOTAL

10 509


(1) (b) The following table provides the number of young people of school-going age that cannot be accommodated per classification of special need:

See attachment: Table-number of young people of school-going age per classification of special need:

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 799

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What are the reasons why she has investigated mechanisms, other than the signing of attendance registers, to monitor the attendance of educators;

(2) why she considers the biometric system to be appropriate;

(3) (a) when, (b) where and (c) at what cost will the system be piloted;

(4) what the cost will be to implement the system in all schools;

(5) whether she is investigating any other alternative systems of attendance monitoring; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1012E

REPLIES:

1) What are the reasons she has investigated mechanisms, other than the signing of attendance registers, to monitor the attendance or otherwise of educators?

As part of the strategy to enhance accountability in the Sector; methods of monitoring Time and Attendance of teachers is being researched. It is envisaged that whichever method is ultimately chosen, it will be reliable and will exert greater control over staff time and attendance records by preventing staff from clocking in for each other and ensuring data flows to one central database. Managers at schools, districts, provinces and national levels must be able to draw reports to facilitate management and planning processes.

This new tool should not be characterised as a policing mechanism, but rather as a means to gather data on teacher attendance in order to identify and develop effective methods to enhance teacher attendance and address challenges around absenteeism.

2) Why she considers the biometric system appropriate?

The biometric system is but ONE method of monitoring time and attendance of teachers that is being investigated.

3) (a) When, (b) where and (c) at what cost will the system be piloted?

(a) The process of piloting a Time and Attendance system will take place once all options have been properly investigated and the final method is decided upon.

(b) Only once (a) has taken place, will details as to when and where the pilot will be rolled out be made available.

c) The cost at this point in time is not known since investigation into different methods is still taking place.

4) What the cost will be to implement the system in all schools;

The DBE is currently investigating possible methods of monitoring Time and Attendance of teachers and the costs associated with implementation in all schools. Once this has been finalized, we will be better positioned to provide realistic estimates.

5) Whether she is investigating any other alternative systems of attendance monitoring; if so, what are the relevant details?

Alternative methods of monitoring Time and Attendance are at the initial stages of investigation and include the use of the South African School Administration Management System (SASAMS) and cellphone technology.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 774

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department increased the salaries of matric examination markers as agreed to in 2011; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW985E

REPLY:

My Department increased the salaries of matric examination markers in terms of Government Notice 187 in Gazette 34079 and not ELRC Collective Agreement 1 of 2011.

On 7 March 2011, I promulgated Government Notice 187 in Gazette 34079 to adjust the tariffs in accordance with the then applicable Consumer Price Index (CPI).

ELRCCollective Agreement 1 of 2011 was entered into in the ELRCon 7 April 2011. ThisAgreement was introduced to align the collective bargaining processes with the published Gazette34079. In this process the wrong figures/ tariffs were inserted in the Collective Agreement. The figures in the Agreement were in conflict with Gazette 34079 that was published on 7 March 2011 and the effect of this mistake was that government did not have the money in the budget to pay out at the price in the Collective Agreement 1 of 2011.The error led to a dispute with the trade unions which is now being handle by the Labour Court.

However, in order for the markers to be paid, the Department and the trade unions signed two Addendums to ELRC Collective Agreement 1 of 2011agreeing that markers should be paid according to the tariffs contained in the Gazette 34079 plus an inflation related upward adjustment.

Therefore,matric examination markers will receive a pay increase each year and this increase is inflation related. The percentage increase is the same as the annual adjustments that all other public servants receive.

Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 723
DATE OF PUBLICAYION OF INTERNAL QIUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2013
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs A
T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether she ensures that (a) the (i) national and (ii) provincial departments of education and .(b) every- (i) district and (ii) school comply with all (aa) requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety .4ct. Act 85 of 1993 and (bb) regulations gazetted in terms of the specified Act: if not, why nor: if so, what are the details of the compliance measures that are in place;

(2) whether she ensures that (a) the (i) national and (ii) provincial departments of education and (b) even1 (i) district and (ii) school comply u3ith all (aa) requirements of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act. Act 130 of 1993, and (bb) regulations gazetted in terms of' the specified Act: if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the compliance measures that are in place;

(3) for each Act mentioned above, which programme and/or directorate within her department assumes responsibility for (a) implementation and (b) oversight?
NW929E
REPLY
1. (a) (i) (ii) (b) (i) (ii) (aa) Yes, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) in its Head Office building fully complies with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993.

Further, in the Basic Education environment, the field of Occupational Health and Safety embraces two essential areas of impact: (i) during the provision (construction) of educational infrastnscture and (ii) thereafter during the occupation and use of completed educational infrastructure. In both a nationally and provincially driven programme, responsibility for OHS compliance is divested to implementing agents appointed by either the Department of Basic Education as in the case of the .ASIDI Programme o r by each of the nine provincial departments of Education in their respective provincial schools projects. During the implementation of the ASIDl programme the following clause is standard in agreements with the DBE:

"The work conducted under the supervision of the implementing Agent and Principal Agent must be compliant with the laws. regulations and bylaws of relevant municipalities having jurisdiction regarding the execution of the works (JBCC definition) and the implementation of the Infrastructure Programme Management Plan (IPMP) and shall also comply to, but not limited to: the:-

(i) National Building Regulations;
(ii) Guidelines Relating to Planning for Public School Infrastructure;
(iii) Occupation Health & Safety (OHS) Act, No 85 of 199.3; and
(iv) National Environmental Management Act (NEMA). No. 107 of 1998."

The Implementing Agents are to ensure that all preferred contractors submit their OHS plans before occupation of sites. The appointed professional service providers are responsible for monitoring compliance. At a provincial level, responsibility for compliance will rest with the implementing agent which in many cases is the provincial Department of' Public Works. These departments ensure compliance with OHS requirements by their appointed principal agents and contractors.

At occupation, the responsibility for adherence to the requirements of the OHS Act rests initially with the relevant provincial Department of Education to whom the completed school has been handed over by the contractor and implementing agent. Once the school (asset) has been registered on the asset register of the relevant provincial Department of Public Works, responsibility then rests with the Department of Public Works as it is assigned the custodianship role for the ongoing maintenance of government assets in terms of the Government Immovable Assets Management Act.

Each provincial Department of Education will however have its own structures to conduct both a liaison and monitoring function with its appointed implementing agents as well as with its district offices and school governing bodies. Incidents of non-compliance monitoring are through quarterly reporting, which are then forwarded to the DBE for a collaborative response.

(bb) The Department fully complies with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Act 85 of 1993.

The operations and maintenance of the Head Office accommodation for the DBE currently forms part of a Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement of which the mitigation of OHS risk is a measured output. Measures that have been put in place include an OHS policy, a Disaster Management Programme and House Rules. A joint committee regularly meets to mitigate the OHS risk.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 722

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many fraudulent certificates have been detected accompanying the applications for registration as teachers submitted to the SA Council for Educators (SACE) for the (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12 and (d) 2012-13 financial years;

(2) for each year, how many of the fraudulent certificates were submitted by (a) South African citizens and (b) foreign citizens;

(3) what measures does the SACE have in place to ascertain the veracity or otherwise of certificates submitted to the council;

(4) what action has been taken in the event of a fraudulent certificate being detected? NW928E

REPLIES:

(1) How many fraudulent certificates have been detected accompanying the applications for registration as teachers submitted to the SA Council for Educators (SACE) for the (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12 and (d) 2012-13 financial years?

(a) 2009-10 : 4 fraudulent certificates were detected;

(b) 2010-2011: 10 fraudulent certificates were detected;

(c) 2011-12 : 13 fraudulent certificates were detected; and

(d) 2012-2013: 1 fraudulent certificate was detected.

(2) For each year, how many of the fraudulent certificates were submitted by (a) South African citizens and (b) foreign citizens?

(a) South Africans-22 fraudulent certificate were submitted:

(i) 2009-10 is 2

(ii) 2010-11 is 7

(iii) 2011-12 is 12

(iv) 2012-13 is 1

(b) Foreigners-6 fraudulent certificates were submitted:

(i) 2009-10 is 2

(ii) 2010-11 is 3

(iii) 2011-12 is 1

(iv) 2012-13 is 0

(3) What measures does the SACE have in place to ascertain the veracity or otherwise of certificates submitted to the council?

SACE does verification of qualifications with the following organisations/ institutions: Departments of Higher Education and SAQA, UMALUSI, Home Affairs, and Universities.

(4) What action has been taken in the event of a fraudulent certificate being detected?

The case would be forwarded to the SACE Ethics Department where appropriate measures would be applied and the case would be reported to the police.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 721
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2013(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)
721. Mrs A T
Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether, with regard to learners who have previously been progressed through a grade in the further education and training phase and do not meet the pron7otion criteria for grade 12, there are any no-fee, part-time study opportunities available through provincial education departments to allow these learners to attain the promotional requirements; if not, (a) why not and (b) what will be done to rectify the situation;

(2) whether she intends to define any certificated exit points from the schooling system, other than grade 12; if not, why has she decided, specifically, against certificating grade 9;

(3) what recourse is available to a learner who wishes to attend a further education and training college post grade 9, but who is progressed, rather than promoted, through grade 9: and who has already been progressed through another grade in the senior phase? NW927E


REPLY

(1) Yes there are opportunities available for learners who have not met the requirements for the National Senior Certificate. These opportunities are offered freely and the learner can register for supplementary examinations, or can register as a repeat candidate either as a full time or part-time candidate.

(2) At tine moment there is no exit point other than the National Senior Certificate; However, the department has noted the gap created by the unavailability of an exit qualification other than the National Senior Certificate.

(3) Learners who wish to attend Further Education and Training post grade 9 can do so through the N programmes. The learner can start this programs from N1 and exit at N3 with a qualification equivalent to grade 12. The learner can then proceed to the field of work or enter a University of Technology provided the learner has acquired two languages at a qualification equivalent to grade 12.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 717

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mr D C Smiles (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

What support will her department provide towards the International Mathematical Olympiad that will take place in the country this year? NW923E

REPLY:

The International Mathematics Olympiad (IMO) will be held in 2014 in Cape Town not in 2013 as indicated by Mr DC Smiles. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is fully supporting the event together with the Department of Science and Technology.

The office of the Deputy Minister received a letter from Mrs Ellie Olivier, the Operational Manager of South African Mathematics Foundation (SAMF), requesting the Deputy Minister of Basic Education to write a message of support which SAMF is using to raise funds for the event which DBE did. The Deputy Minister's photo is on the brochure advertising the IMO. The Department of Basic Education will participate in the organizing committee for the event.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 684

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/201

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What measures are in place to ensure that a national go-slow by the SA Democratic Teachers′ Union (SADTU) members scheduled for when inland schools reopen on Tuesday, 9 April 2013, does not impact on learners negatively;

(2) will supplementary examinations that were written in February be affected in terms of being marked;

(3) whether this action is related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service, making it unlawful for teachers to strike; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW850E

REPLIES:

(1) What measures are in place to ensure that a national go-slow by the SA Democratic Teachers′ Union (SADTU) members scheduled for when inland schools reopen on Tuesday, 9 April 2013, does not impact on learners negatively?

The Department has taken measures to ensure that the go slow does not impact on learning and teaching. Provincial Education Departments have been provided with learning support materials to give to learners and encourage them to use in times like this.

The principle of "no work, no pay" will be applicable to any teacher who is not present at school for a full day or part thereof. Furthermore, the Department has the Strike Management Plan which put the responsibility on managers and/or principals to ensure that they keep records and data of attendance of educators in their schools during industrial actions. Information provided by managers in terms of the Strike Management Plan to their Heads of Education Departments will assist in the application of the "no work, no pay" principle.

(2) Will supplementary examinations that were written in February be affected in terms of being marked?

Supplementary examinations that were written in February have not be affected in terms of being marked.

(3) Whether this action is related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service, making it unlawful for teachers to strike; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

This action is not related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service. Government's proposal that education be made an essential service did not mean that teachers are not allowed to strike, but to make education to become a societal priority.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 683

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she responded to accusations by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union that she undermines collective bargaining? NW849E

REPLY

Yes, the Minister has responded to accusations by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union that she does not undermine collective bargaining. Her department is engaged in the ELRC and PSCBC where negotiations take place. Her departmental officials have been present in all scheduled meetings of the ELRC and PSCBC. The unions have also been present and they have not disengaged the Department in these forums.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 677
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013 (lNTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 2013

Mr N J J van R Koornhof (Cope) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department intends to pilot a programme for the development of debating at school level, similar to other Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries; if not, why not? NW832E

REPLY

Yes, the Department of Basic Education will, as part of an overall, strategy to improve the level of literacy in schools, coordinate school debates. Currently, the Department of Basic Education is supporting the implementation of debating programmes like Road Safety Debates which follow the UN model of debate. In addition, the Department has an annual Moot Court competition which gives Grade 8-11 -learners an opportunity to have legal debates in a miniature Constitutional Court through a case study. Therefore, the form and shape of the debates will take into consideration all the different models and will be articulated in a framework document to be finalized this year.

Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 676

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:†

(1) How many new single medium schools were established for each of the 11 official languages

(a) in (i) 2009, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2011 and (iv) 2012 and (b) since 1 January 2013;

RESPONSE:

1 (a) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)

Table 1: Number of single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages, from 2008 – 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note 1: Single medium school refer to a school that uses one medium of instruction for all learners in all grades.

(b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(2) (a) how many single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages were closed (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013, (b) for which official languages in each case was provision made at these schools and (c) why were thespecified schools closed in each case;

RESPONSE:

(2) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 2: Number of single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages that were closed, from 2009- 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note1: Schools that did not responded to the survey from 2008 up until 2012 were declared closed.

(ii) (b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(3) (a) how many new dual medium schools were established (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) for which official languages in each case is provision made at these schools;

RESPONSE: (3) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 3:Number of dual or parallel medium ordinary schools, from 2008 – 2012 see attached table.

Source: Annual school surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note 1 This table doesnot depict all possible combinations for 11 official languages but focuses more on English and Afrikaans languages.

Note 2 Parallel medium of instruction refers to teaching that occurs in two or more languages of instruction in separate classes in the same grade.

Note 3 Dual medium of instruction refer to the use of two media of instruction by a teacher in a lesson, switching from one medium to the other on a 50: 50 percent basis.

(ii) (b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(4) (a) how many dual medium schools were closed (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013, (b) for which official languages in each case was provision made at these schools and (c) why were the specified schools closed in each case;

RESPONSE(4) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 4:Number of dual or parallel medium ordinary schools that were closed, from 2009- 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Survey from 2008 – 2012

(5) whether pupils who have been affected by the closing of schools have been placed in schools that provide tuition in the same languages as the schools that have been closed; if not, (a) why not and (b) how many pupils have found themselves in such a situation? NW820E

RESPONSE: (5)

(5) the DBE does not collect statistics on how the Provincial Education Departments deal with learners affected by the closure of schools.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 658

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:†

(1) (a) How many foreign teachers have been teaching in South African schools (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011 and (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) from which countries do they hail, in each case;

(2) how many of these foreign teachers (a) have English as their first language or mother tongue, (b) are teaching (i) Mathematics and (ii) Science and (c) have held (i) temporary posts for longer than a year and (ii) permanent posts;

(3) (a) how many students who have completed their studies in education were there (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011, (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) how many of these students started to teach in each specified year;

(4) (a) how many South African teachers have temporary posts and (b) what is the reason for this? NW818E

REPLIES:

(1) (a) How many foreign teachers have been teaching in South African schools (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011 and (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) from which countries do they hail, in each case?

See attached reply

(2) How many of these foreign teachers (a) have English as their first language or mother tongue, (b) are teaching (i) Mathematics and (ii) Science and (c) have held (i) temporary posts for longer than a year and (ii) permanent posts?

(a) Foreign educators applying for posts in public schools are only required to demonstrate fluency in the Language of Teaching and Learning (LOLT), which is English and thus the Department does not record whether or not English is their mother tongue.

(b) (i) and (ii) Over 80% of foreign educators currently in the system were appointed in terms of the quota work permit arrangement which started in 2009. The requirements are that an educator specialises in Mathematics, Science and Technology, are fluent in English and have five years teaching experience. This forms part of the conditions of their continued employment; and

(c) (i) (ii)

As at March 2010

As at March 2011

As at March 2012

As at JANUARY 2013

(i) TEMPORARY

1 037

861

2 377

1 204

(ii)PERMANENT

1 187

996

1 917

825

(3) How many students who have completed their studies in education were there (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011, (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) how many of these students started to teach in each specified year?

(a) The table below shows the number of graduates in each of the years requested as recorded in the Higher Education Information System (HEMIS) who had completed their studies in the preceding year and therefore available to start teaching.

(i)(aa) 2010

(completed in 2009)

(i) (bb) 2011

(completed in 2010)

(i) (cc) 2012

completed in 2011)

(ii) 1 January 2013

6 976

7 973

10 593

Data currently not available

(b) The Department, as part of the "Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025" has been monitoring the number of qualified teachers aged 30 years and younger entering the public education system for the first time each year since 2011. In 2011 and 2012, 7 744 and 8 227 new appointees aged 30 years and younger entered the public schooling system respectively, and it is likely that most of these were new graduates.

(4) (a) How many South African teachers have temporary posts and (b) what is the reason for this?

(a) As at the end of January 2013 there were 20 651 teachers with temporary appointments.

(b) There are a number of reasons why teachers are appointed on a temporary basis. Firstly, in order to effectively manage the deployment of teachers, provincial education departments have set dates by which they advertise posts to be filled permanently. All vacancies that occur before the advertisement date are filled on a temporary basis as no class should be without a teacher. Secondly, in terms of the regulations, only professionally qualified educators can be appointed permanently and therefore un-and under-qualified, and professionally unqualified educators can only be appointed on a temporary basis. As at the end of January 2013, about 7 150 educators fell into the aforementioned categories.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 630

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many claims were instituted against her department (a) in the (i) 2007-08, (ii) 2008-09, (iii) 2009-10, (iv) 2010-11 and (v) 2011-12 financial years and (b) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

SEE ANNEXURE A

(2) in respect of each specified financial year, (a) what amount was claimed, (b) how many claims were (i) finalised in court, (ii) settled out of court and (iii) are still outstanding and (c) what amount has been paid to each plaintiff in each case that was (i) finalised in court and (ii) settled out of court? NW789E

SEE ANNEXURE B

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 621

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mr D C Smiles (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what was the nature of the offence for each teacher who was (a) found guilty of misconduct and (b) granted conditional suspension from being struck off the roll in the (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12 financial years? NW780E

RESPONSE:

(a)

Teachers who received conditional suspension were charged and found guilty for committing one or more of the following offences:

1. Assault

1.1 Corporal punishment on learner/s;

1.2 Assault of learner/s;

1.3 Assault of colleague/s; and

1.4 Assault of parent/s or members of the community.

2 Dishonesty

2.1 supplying false information and/or statement;

2.2 Failure to disclose and co-operate with Council and/or authority;

2.3 Withholding relevant information from the Council;

2.4 Corruption relating to examination or promotional posts, etc;

2.5 Falsification of documents;

2.6 Mismanagement of school funds;

2.7 Fraud; and

2.8 Theft.

3. Conduct

3.1 Insubordination;

3.2 Undermining of colleague/s;

3.3 Disrespect and rudeness;

3.4 Intimidation;

3.5 Poor performance;

3.6 Humiliation of colleague/s;

3.7 Humiliation of learner/s;

3.8 Negligence; and

3.9 Verbal abuse towards learner/s and colleague/s.

(b)

(i) For the periods 2009/10, 71 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines;

(ii) For the period 2010/11, 17 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines; and

(iii) For the period 2011/12, 10 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 613

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what were the circumstances that allowed (a) certain educators to be suspended for a certain period, after which they would be free to apply for readmission to the teaching profession and (b) certain educators to be granted conditional suspension of the striking of their names from the roll of professional teachers;

(2) (a) what is the average time taken by the SA Council of Educators (SACE) to finalise a case involving a sexual offence and (b) why have 153 of the 189 cases reported between 2009 and 2012 not been finalised;

(3) what definition of sexual offence is used by the SACE? NW771E

RESPONSES:

1. With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what were the circumstances that allowed (a) certain educators to be suspended for a certain period, after which they would be free to apply for readmission to the teaching profession and (b) certain educators to be granted conditional suspension of the striking of their names from the roll of professional teachers;

The merits of each case determine the presiding officer's decision on the pronouncement of a sanction.

1(a) An educator's name may be struck off from the roll of educators for a certain period depending on the nature and the gravity of the offence with which he or she had been charged, his or her personal circumstances, etc. These circumstances are presented to a presiding officer at the time for him or her to make an informed decision and these were applicable to cases that happened before April 2011 as the SACE did not at the time have what is called "Mandatory sanctions for certain offences".

(b) A conditional suspension is given in instances where the presiding officer and ultimately Council found it fit not to remove an educator's name from the roll of educators owing to the nature of the offence with which he or she had been charged. Certain conditions get attached to the sanction, to be fulfilled by the educator. Failure to fulfill those may result in the educator's name being removed from the roll, either indefinitely or for a certain prescribed period.

2 What is the average time taken by the SA Council of Educators (SACE) to finalise a case involving a sexual offence and (b) why have 153 of the 189 cases reported between 2009 and 2012 not been finalized?

2(a) The turnaround time to finalise a case is 6 months.

2(b) Several factors play a role leading to the delay in the finalisation of cases. The unavailability of witnesses at times, non-cooperation by witnesses, and the refusal by parents to grant access to their children, lack of interest by complainants to proceed with their cases and resources play a major role.

3 What definition of sexual offence is used by the SACE?

In the SACE context, a sexual offence is any type of sexual contact that occurs with or without the explicit consent of a learner.

Sexual offence on colleagues is any type of sexual contact or behaviour that occurs without the explicit consent of the colleague in question.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 612

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether all provinces have appointed a Health Risk Manager in terms of the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such appointments in place, (b) why such appointments are not in place and (c) how are these applications managed in these provinces;

(2) for each province, (a) how many applications for incapacity leave were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average (i) time taken to process applications for incapacity leave and (ii) length of incapacity leave (aa) granted and (bb) taken;

(3) whether the granting of incapacity leave has facilitated the appointment of temporary teachers to fill the temporary vacancies in each province; if not, why not in each case;

(4) for each province, (a) how many applications for ill-health retirement were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average time taken to process applications for ill-health retirement;

(5) for each province, how many educators have been on incapacity leave for (a) longer than one year, (b) longer than two years and (c) longer than three years? NW770E

REPLY

1. Whether all provinces have appointed a Health Risk Manager in terms of the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such appointments in place, (b) why such appointments are not in place and (c) how are these applications managed in these provinces?

(a) All provinces have not appointed a Health Risk Manager.

(b) The Department of Public Service and Administration is responsible for the appointment of a Panel of Health Risk Managers from which Departments can select and contract a Health Risk Manager. The process of selecting and contracting by the Departments has been suspended pending the resolution of a legal challenge instituted by one unsuccessful service provider. An attempt to implement a contingency plan was also halted due to a possible lawsuit threat from the same service provider. This has resulted in all departments in all provinces not being able to appoint a Health Risk Manager until the legal matters are resolved by the DPSA.

(c) All applications are captured on a database to ensure that they could be submitted once a Health Risk Manager has been appointed and all applicants are duly informed of the delay.

2. For each province, (a) how many applications for incapacity leave were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average (i) time taken to process applications for incapacity leave and (ii) length of incapacity leave (aa) granted and (bb) taken?

Refer to the Table below for the response to 2 (a); (b)(i), (ii)(aa)(bb)

Province

(a)Applications (01/2009-12/2012)

(b)(i)Average Time taken to process (Months)

(b)(ii)(aa) Average length of incapacity leave granted (Months)

b)(ii)(bb) Average Length of Incapacity Leave taken (Months)

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

3 876

3 – 6

2

2

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

14 310

3

14 working days

22 working days

Limpopo

328

6

8

8

Mpumalanga

3 737

1

2

2

North West

744

3

6

6

Northern Cape

1 015

2

3

3

Western Cape

6 047

2

18 working days

27 working days

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Departments

3. Whether the granting of incapacity leave has facilitated the appointment of temporary teachers to fill the temporary vacancies in each province; if not, why not in each case?

Yes, temporary teachers are always appointed for the duration of the incapacity leave. This is at great cost to the Employer, but we are compelled to ensure that learners are not disadvantaged because of ill-health of a teacher.

4. For each province, (a) how many applications for ill-health retirement were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average time taken to process applications for ill-health retirement?

Refer to table below for the response to 4(a) and (b)

Province

(a)Applications (01/2009-12/2012)

(b)Average Time taken to process (Months)

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

235

3 – 6

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

441

7.8

Limpopo

47

12

Mpumalanga

248

1

North West

91

3

Northern Cape

159

2

Western Cape

469

3

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Departments

5. For each province, how many educators have been on incapacity leave for (a) longer than one year, (b) longer than two years and (c) longer than three years?

Refer to the Table below for the response to 5 (a), (b) and (c)

Province

As at the end of December 2012

(a) Longer than one year

(b) Longer than two years

(c) Longer than three years

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

Information not available at the time of reporting

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

45

34

83

Limpopo

7

0

0

Mpumalanga

1

0

0

North West

645

24

75

Northern Cape

8

2

0

Western Cape

12

1

3

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Department

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 536

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether any plans exist at the (a) national or (b) provincial level to remove Art from the school curriculum as an elective subject examinable via the National Senior Certificate examinations; if so, (i) why and (ii) what are the details of such plans? NW693E

REPLY:

There are no plans by the Department of Basic Education to remove any of the Arts subjects from the school curriculum, either at national or provincial level. Currently some schools (FET Schools) in South Africa are implementing the Arts Field National Curriculum Statements in Grades 10-12 as approved subjects of the organising fields of the NQF. These are Dramatic Arts, Dance Studies, Music, Design, and Visual Arts, and they are examinable through the National Senior Certificate.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 535
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/03/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1)(a) Why was (i) Woodwork and (ii) Home Economics removed from the high school curriculum and (b) when was it removed in each case;

(2) Whether any plans exist to reintroduce these and other practical subjects into public ordinary schools to be examinable in Grade 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW692E

REPLY:

1. Home Economics and Woodwork per say were not removed from the high schools curriculum and still forms part of the subject offering of high schools albeit in a more updated format as Consumer Studies and Technology respectively.

(i) Woodwork was combined with two other subjects, and it became known as Civil Technology. The new subjects, Civil Technology infused the skills of woodwork, civil and construction/building, and are currently offered to learners across the country

Based on a review of the current curriculum, a new curriculum for Technical high schools is currently in the process of being finalized. Civil Technology will be a subject offering three specialisations, namely construction, woodwork and civil technology. In September of 2013, the curriculum will be published for public comment and should be gazetted at the end of 2013. The following year, 2014, will be used to prepare the system for implementation by offering teacher training, converting the workshop to the specialization selected and screening and procuring textbooks. This curriculum will be phased at grade 10 level in 2015, grade 11 in 2016 and grade 12 in 2017.

(ii) In the case of Home Economics, with the introduction of the National Curriculum Statement in 2006, the narrow focus of Home Economics were changed to a much broader focus reflecting the needs of a changing South African and global society. Home Economics focused only on food preparation and the science of food, whereas the new subject, Consumer Studies encompasses much more than food preparation.

In addition to food preparation, it now focuses on teaching small production skills, marketing skills, consumer education, housing, clothing and interior design as well as textile and fabrics to learners. The over – arching aim of the subject is to develop entrepreneurial skills and to stimulate the growth of small scale home industry producing and marketing quality items.

Consumer Studies offer five practical options as oppose to the one practical option offered by Home Economics. The five options are production of clothing items, soft furnishing production, and knitting and crocheting, food production and patchwork quality by hand.

2. Consumer Studies and Civil Technology continues to be examinable subjects. In 2012, third six thousand and one (36001) learners sat for the Consumer Studies examination as par of the National Senior Certificate examination.

Both the Woodwork and Consumer studies examination consists of three components namely, an internal school based assessment (SBA) (25%), a practical examination for each option selected (25%) and a final externally set written examination (50%).

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 534
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTBBM PAPER: 22/03/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) "r ask the Minister of Basic Education:


1 What are the (a) targets, (b) time frames and (c) tine targets achieved in respect of the interventions in (i) the Eastern Cape and (ii) Limpopo in terms of section 100(1)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996;
2. which departmental official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province;
3. what is the mandate of her two-man team (names furnished) in the Eastern Cape;
4. what challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of particular targets difficult?
NW691E

REPLIES
EASTERN CAPE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
(a) TARGETS:


1. When the intervention in the Eastern Cape Department of Education commenced during 201 ! the following six targets were set:

▪To ensure that the post establishment is affordable, budget driven and timeously declared.

▪ To ensure timely procurement and distribution of textbooks and stationery

▪ To schools, especially non-section 21 schools in the Province.

▪ To ensure effective management and provisioning of a subsidized scholar transport programme across the Province.

▪ To ensure effective management and implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP).

▪ To ensure that the eradication of mud schools and provision of basic services through the Accelerated School infrastructure Delivery Initiative is on track.

▪ To establish systems and operations relating to planning and accountability budgeting and financial management, supply chain management and human resource capacity.

(a) - (c) Timeframes and Targets Achieved in Respect of the interventions:

To ensure that the post establishment is affordable, budget driven and timeously declared.


A joint Stats SA and Eastern Cape Education data verification project has been launched and is due for completion by end July 2013. The Department approached Stats SA to verify the exact number of schools in Eastern Cape as well as the number of Learners and Educators in each of the schools. The purpose of the project is to get reliable data for decision making. The focus is on establishing the precise number of schools that are within the borders of Eastern Cape Province, and the exact number of educators and learners thereof. The project is backed by National Treasury and the Department of Basic Education.

A snap survey was done at the beginning of the 2013 school year which indicated a decrease of about 2% in learner numbers compared to the 2012 school year, Based on the survey a post basket of 60 800 was declared for 2013.

The Department also intends declaring a three year post establishment that will be linked to the Medium Term Expenditure Framework. This will have a positive spin off to create the much needed stability at schools as the fluctuation in learner number and associated aspects used in determining a post establishment will be observed over a three year than on an annual basis.

To ensure timely procurement and distribution of textbooks and stationery to schools, especially non-section 21 schools in the province.

The timely provision of textbooks to schools to ensure that all learners have text books the first day schools reopen after the December holidays has always been problematic in the Eastern Cape Department of Education. The majority of schools in the Province were declared section 21 schools in terms of the South African Schools Act and should therefore receive their fund transfers in terms of the norms and standards, and then purchase their own text books. Only about 200 schools in the Province are still section 20 for which textbooks must be procured and provided by the Eastern Cape Department of Education.

For the 2013 school year, the Eastern Cape Department of Education initially planned to centrally purchase all LTSM. The reason for this decision is to benefit from the economies of scale and to manage the provision of textbooks hands-on, The Eastern Cape Department of Education negotiated with PASA to take care of their own warehousing and to deliver the text books directly to schools. PASA agreed to this on a reduced discounted order price. When schools reopened on I6 January 2013 total deliveries stood just over 90%. The outstanding percentage included challenges such as:

▪ Some textbooks for Accounting still outstanding from the publishers.
▪ A few schools still refusing deliveries and continuing to insist on receiving their funds and ordering for themselves.
▪ A small number of lost/delayed requisitions from schools.
▪ Some mopping-up quantities required.

A procedure manual for the future provision of LTSM in the Eastern Cape Department of Education has been drafted. The first steps for procuring LTSM for t i e 2014 school year have also been undertaken and the total process will be overseen by the same LTSM Oversight Committee that dealt with the provision of textbooks for 2013.

To ensure effective management and provisioning of a subsidized scholar transport programme across the Province.

This function was transferred from the Eastern Cape Department of Education to the Eastern Cape Department of Transport; from 1 April 2011. The responsibility to provide the Eastern Cape Department of Transport with the correct data on learners that require scholar transport in terms of national policy remains the responsibility of the Eastern Cape Department of Education. Two governance structures were established, namely, Provincial Steering Committee and Scholar Transport Technical Committee. These include ECDoT, ECDoE, Provincial Treasury, Service Providers and Transport Operators. Both structures are functioning well. Work on the redesign of routes and tendering in line with the assessed routes is continuing and must be completed in, May 2013 to be implemented in July 2013

To ensure effective management and implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP).

The program's procurement and delivery strategy has been reviewed from a centralised to a decentralized model; with ail Section 21 Schools getting full delegations for the delivery of the service. The Department has also commissioned ECSECC to review how the model is settling with schools. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) dealing with Financial Management, Financial Management and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) were developed and distributed to Districts and schools. Furthermore, the Department has requested that separate banking accounts for these funds be opened by schools for the 2013/24 financial year so that the NSNP funds are clearly distinguished from the funding for norms and standards. Organisational support mechanism include the appointment of a Program Director, appointment of 54 District Monitors to step up data management, as well as purchasing of service vehicles to support fieldwork.

All benefiting schools have now received cooking equipment (Stoves, Pots) and eating utensils, (Plates, Spoons and mugs) with the last cohort of schools receiving funds to procure these in the 2012/13 financial year. As part of the National initiative, Grant Thornton has been appointed by the Department of Basic Education to audit utensils and equipment used for the school nutrition programme in all the provinces.

To ensure that the eradication of mud schools and provision of basic services through the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery initiative is on track.

Infrastructure has always been a burning issue in the Eastern Cape Department of Education, and the Province still has the largest number of mud and other dilapidated schools, and schools without electricity and/or water. To exacerbate the situation, the Eastern Cape Department of Education could no: afford to allocate any substantial amount from its vote to infrastructure due to the cost of its personnel budget. The aim of the Section 100 intervention was to ensure that the province spent its entire infrastructure budget, eradicates backlogs in the shortest possible time so that more funds can be allocated to maintenance, thereby ensuring that facilities are conducive to quality teaching and learning.

Progress with replacement of inappropriate schools (442 schools in total):
▪ 2012/13 40 of 49 schools completed (balance end May 2013)
▪ 2013/14 432 schools programmed for implementation
▪ 2014/15 261 schools programmed for implementation

Progress with water provision to schools (6? 9 schools, 583 projects in total):
▪ 84 projects completed
▪ 499 projects due for completion in 202 3/14
Progress with sanitation (344 schools, 313 projects in total):
▪ 55 projects completed
▪ 258 programmed for completion in rest of 2012/13 & 2013/14
Progress with electrification (317 schools in total, 17 addressed by others):
▪ 85 schools completed, 1 5 under construction
▪ 200 schools in planning stage
▪ The Department also recognises the immense maintenance backlog that exists (currently estimated at between R5bn and R10bn) as a result of historical under funding in this category, and has committed itself to increasing the allocation to maintenance from tile Equitable Share. For 20:3114 R168m (7,8%) of the infrastructure budget has been allocated to maintenance.

Infrastnscture delivery achievements in the 2012/3 financial year:
▪ A total of 515 emergency classrooms were delivered during the past year to deal with over-crowding and schools affected by disasters
▪ We have exceeded by 10 the target of 26 public ordinary schools to be provided with specialist rooms
▪ 18 additional ECD Centres have to date been built
▪ 117 of the targeted 194 public ordinary schools have to date been provided with water supply 17 of the targeted 68 public ordinary schools have been provided with electricity, with the rest being finalised by end March 2013
▪ 25 of the targeted 200 public ordinary schools have so far provided with decent sanitation facilities. with the rest on track to being finalised by end March 2013
The Learner assessment Centre in Lady Frere is on track for completion in the 2013/14 financial year.
▪ The Zwelitsha Document Centre has been completed in the 20T2113 financial year.
▪ One Special School (Sigcau Special School), has taken practical completion and the other in the 0.R.Tambo is sill under construction. The target of two special schools which were due to commence in 2012113 has been exceeded by two, taking the number to four, which are Vukuzenzele, Khanyisa PE, Quest, and Sunshine Special Schools.
▪ 22 schools in the Cacadu have received minor maintenance arid repairs to the value of R7,6m (the work included paving, stone guard to windows, roof repairs, fencing repairs, storm water repairs and water tanks)

▪ One technical workshop has taken practical completion in the 2012/13 .financial year. Three others have experienced delays due to inclement weather during the summer season and therefore will be complete in the first quarter of the 2013/14 financial year.
▪ 72 schools have received emergency interventions with a budget of R 17 m
▪ 55 schools have benefitted from the SSDP II programme through IDT; with a Budget of R112 m.
▪ 12 schools in KWT and East London have already been upgraded as part of the support to the Presidential Visit schools project, with a budget of R 20 m.

To establish systems and operations relating to planning and accountability, budgeting and financial management, supply chain management and human resource capacity.

Accruals relating to service providers tallied more than R 324 million at the beginning of the 2012/13 financial year but by 31 March 2013, majority (71%) of them have been dealt with. Some of the claims date back as far as 2004 which makes the audit process complicated. But Price Waterhouse Coopers is assisting the Eastern Cape Department of Education with the audit verification process.

The budget for 2012113 (CoE and operational) was reprioritised to firstly find funds for the accruals and secondly to move funds to the highest priorities where needed. Thirdly, the Department put austerity measures in place to cattail expenditure within certain parameters for the remainder of the financial year. The measures put in place proved to be successful and the books were balanced at the end of the financial year without any over expenditure.

The total budget needs for 2013/14 was worked through in detail and tie functions reprioritised. Money then followed priorities. The Annual Performance Plan was also aligned accordingly. From this exercise it was learnt that the Eastern Cape Department of Education pays exorbitant prices for many goods and services. This is due to not having economical contracts in place. in some cases contracts that expired a long time ago have just been continued with. It is important to note that savings of millions of Rand could be achieved by addressing this issue, which is now being done.

2. Which departmental official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province:

▪ The two Departmental officials appointed to oversee the intervention are Mr Tywakadi and Mr Benade in the Eastern Cape Department of Education.

3. What is the mandate of her two-man (names Furnished), in the Eastern Cape

▪ The mandate of the intervention team is to address the six areas identified as bottlenecks in the system as identified in (a).

4. What challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of: particular targets difficult? RNW691E

The main challenges in the Eastern Cape include but not limited to -
Funding continues to be a challenge that the Provincial and National Treasury seek to address.

Education infrastructure provisioning is also one of the challenges however plans are in place to address the backlogs.

LIMPOPO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

(a) TARGETS:

1. What are the (a) targets, (b) time frames and (c) the targets achieved in respect of the interventions in (i) the Eastern Cape and ( ii ) Limpopo in terms of section 101{1)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996;


The following targets were set for the intervention -

There was an inability by the provincial education department to fund key strategic educational priorities, thus resulting in essential national standards or the established minimum standards for the provisioning of quality basic education in Limpopo not being met. For instance

▪ Financial Management, Budget Control and Supply Chain Management

▪ To acquire funding for transfers to schools in terms of the Norms and Standards for the Funding of School:

▪ To develop effective, efficient and accountable system of financial, supply chain, contract, assets, records and cash flow management and controls

Human Resources Management

▪ To fill critical vacancies for cash management. Budgeting and public finance monitoring.

▪ To stabilize escalating Compensation of Employees budget.

Curriculum Implementation, Teacher Development, LTSM

▪ To ensure proper planning and funding for the procurement and delivery of learning and teaching support materials, especially the CAPS-aligned textbooks for Grade 1-3 and 10 before the end of 2011/12;

▪ To train educators in the Implementation of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) IN Grade 1-3 in 2012;

▪ To coordinate and administer Annual National Assessment (ANA) for Grade 1-6 and 9, and the National Senior Certificate (NCS) examination for Grade 12.

(b)-(c) Timeframes and Targets Achieved in respect of the Intervention:

Financial Management, budget Control and Supply Chain Management

The financial and budget management and controls, procedures and practice are implemented and monitored. The National Treasury is also in the process of developing specialised expertise to assist with prioritized functions developed from the PFMA, 1999. Measurable successes have been recorded in implementing cost containment and cash flow management measures –e.g, travel & telephone costs have been brought down; Training and workshops at commercial venues have been reduced or completely eliminated.

The implementation of the PSCPC Resolution 01 of 2012 has begun to lower expenditure related to the CoE; ad hoc educators are only appointed by prioritised needed; etc. The Goods and Services budget have also been stabilized The Provincial Treasury in the process of replacing the FINEST system with LOGIS with the targeted completion date being 31 March 2013.

The Annual Performance Plan has bee strategically linked to budget allocation and all unfunded programmes removed from the APP. 2011/12 accruals ( more than R390 million) were prioritised in the 2012/13 financial year, there was no evidence of the unauthorised expenditure. Outstanding amount expected from the Provincial Treasury is R1.396 billion.

Human Resource Management

The intervention intends to ensure that a focused organisational structure is in place populated appropriately by adequately qualified and experienced staff. First draft has been completed with inter-Branch consultations. Plans to clean up PERSAL are currently under way. In compliance with the PCSBC Resolution 01 of 2012, the 2013 PPN process has been delayed to September 2013. The declaration of interests and security clearance is ongoing and will made an annual process.

Curriculum Implementation, Teacher Development, LTSM

Biggest bulk of LTSM were already delivered to schools, currently the delivery mop-up is going. CAPS training conducted for Grades 4-5 and 11. Plans are afoot for the roll-out of training for Grades 7-9 and 12. The 2012 ANA and the NSC examinations results are currently being analysed and intervention programmes will be implemented.

2. Which department official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province;

Initially Mr R Swartz was appointed to serve as the administrator in the Limpopo Department of Education. He subsequently resigned. Dr A Karodia was the appointed as his successor . Dr Karodia has since been replaced by the current Administrator – Mr M Matthews Who was deployed fro the Department of Basic Education by the Minister of Basic Education. He also serve as the Accounting Officer appointed by the Minister of Finance in terms of section 36 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999

3. What is the mandate of her two-man team (names furnished) in the Eastern Cape;

Not Applicable

4. What challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of particular targets difficult? NW691E

The main challenges in Limpopo include but not limited to -

▪ Funding continues to be a challenge that the Provincial and National Treasury seek to address.

▪ Education infrastructure provisioning is also one of the challenges however plans are in place to address the backlogs.Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 962
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 10105/2013
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER. 15/2013)

Mr M W Rabotapi (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) Since 1 January 2011, how many applications under the Promotion of Access to Information Act, Act 2 of 2000, were received by (a) her department and (b) entities reporting to her, and in each case, how many were (i) granted, (ii) refused and (iii) deemed refused under section 27;

(2) since 1 January 2011, how many internal appeals under the Act were received by (a) her department and (b) entities reporting to her, and in each case, how many were (i) granted, (ii) refused and (iii) deemed refused under section 77(7);

(3) who is the information officer for (a) her department and (b) each entity reporting to her, and in each case, what are the contact details of the officer? NW1185E


RESPONSE

QUESTION 1


(a)
20
(i)- 15
(ii)- 4
(iii)- 1
(b) SACE-None

UMALUSI- 2
- both were redirected to the Department as they fell outside UMALUSl's scope of operation

QUESTION 2

(a)
1
(i)-
1
(ii)- 0
(iii)
0

(b) SAGE-NONE
UMALUSCNONE

QUESTION 3

(a)
Mr PB Soobrayan - 012 3574011; soobrayan.b@dbe.gov.za
(b)
UMALUSI - Mr Lucky Ditaunyane-Tel: 012 349 1510 Ext 208
SAGE - Mr Themba Ndlovu- Tel: 012 679 9722 or 9717
e-mail:
themba.ndhlovu@sace.org.za

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 941

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 10/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether the Ministerial committee to investigate the current promotion requirements and other related matters that impact on the standard of the National Senior Certificate, as gazetted in October 2012, has been appointed; if not, why not; if so, (a) who are the members of the committee and (b) what is the focus area within the terms of reference of the committee of each member of the committee;

(2) whether the work of the committee has commenced; if not, why not; if so, (a) who has been elected as the chairperson and (b) what are the details of the methodology to be used by the committee to achieve the required outcomes;

(3) whether a deadline has been determined by which the work of the committee must be completed; if not, why not; if so, what is the deadline;

(4) (a) what budgetary allocation has been assigned to the committee and (b) what payment (i) has been and (ii) will be made to each member of the committee? NW1163E

REPLY

1. Yes, the committee has been established. The Minister has approved the nominations of members to serve on the Committee. Based on the Ministerial approval of the nominations, the relevant persons were contacted to establish whether they would accept the nomination before final approval by the Minister.

All nominees accepted the invitation and the names of the members of the Committee will be published in the Government Gazette.

(a) Once the names of the appointed members have been published in the Government Gazette it will be provided.

(b) The terms of reference of the Ministerial Committee are:

(i) establish from current research and other media reports the main criticisms addressed against the National Senior Certificate;

(ii) conduct a comparative study of the promotion requirements of the National Senior Certificate and other similar exit qualifications in a few countries that are of international repute; and

(iii) consult with key recipients of the National Senior Certificate in the South African academic, workplace and business environment and identify their concerns about the National Senior Certificate and to determine how these can be rectified in the short to medium term.

2. No

(a) Once the names of the appointed members have been published in the Government Gazette it will be provided.

(b) Once the committee commences its work it will determine the methodology to be used to achieve the required outcomes.

3. A period of six months will be allocated for the completion of this research and the presentation of the findings and recommendations to the Minister.

4(a) A budget for R450 000 has been allocated for the work of the Ministerial Committee.

4(b) The following payment will be done to the appointed members:

(i) Members of the Ministerial Committee will be remunerated in terms of the Public Management Financial Act - Chapter 20.

(ii) Members of the Committee will also be paid for accommodation and travel cost incurred.

(iii) Ministerial Committee members attached to state departments will only receive subsistence and travel costs.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 850

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 03/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether the seven roles and associated competence for educators as described in the Norms and Standards for Educators, gazetted in terms of the Employment of Educators Act, Act 76 of 1998 (Gazette 20844, 4 February 2000), are still applied to measure the capacity of an educator to be an effective teacher; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the details of the norm that has replaced it; if so, how are the requirements applied? NW1069E

Reply:

(a) The seven roles and associated competence of educators in schools are currently measured in terms of the Integrated Quality Management System (IQMS) which was signed in the Education Labour Relations Council (ELRC) as Agreement No. 8 of 2003. The IQMS is informed by Schedule 1 of the Employment of Educators Act, No. 76 of 1998 where the Minister is required to determine the performance standards for educators in terms of which their performance is to be evaluated.

Whilst it is acknowledged that the seven roles as reflected in Norms and Standards for Educators are inculcated during the training of an educator at an institution of higher learning, it is expected that an educator should demonstrate these competencies throughout his/her teaching career.

The roles and responsibilities of teachers and principals have been designed in such a way that teachers will be able to apply these competencies during their entire career.

(b) The IQMS instrument is used to assess the performance of all school-based educators, based on their respective roles and responsibilities.

The purpose of IQMS, amongst others, is as follows:

· To evaluate an educator's performance;

· To promote accountability; and

· To provide support for continued growth.

The performance of all educators is evaluated on 7 Performance Standards, which are as follows:

(1) Creation of a positive learning environment;

(2) Knowledge of curriculum and learning programmes;

(3) Lesson planning, preparation and presentation;

(4) Learner Assessment;

(5) Professional development in field of work and participation in professional bodies;

(6) Human relations and contribution to school development; and

(7) Extra-curricular and co-curricular participation.

The performance of educators on Post Level 2 (Head of Department) and Post Level 3 and 4 (Deputy Principal / Principal) are also evaluated in terms of Performance Standards that relate to their competence in management and leadership. These additional Performance Standards are:

(8) Administration of resources and records (Post Levels 2-4);

(9) Personnel (Post Levels 2-4);

(10) Decision making and accountability (Post Levels 2-4);

(11) Leadership, communication and servicing the Governing Body (Post Levels 3-4); and

(12) Strategic planning, financial planning and education management development (Post Levels 3-4).

Each educator is evaluated by his/her Development Support Group (DSG) which consists of the educator's immediate supervisor and one other educator (peer). The DSG is responsible for the annual summative evaluation of the educator as well as providing mentoring and support.

The above Performance Standards are aligned to the seven roles of an educator and are designed to evaluate his/her practical, foundational and reflexive competence in classroom practice as well as management and leadership.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 849
DATE OF PUBLICATlON OF INTERNAL QUESTION - PAPER: 03/05/2013 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013

Ms AT Lovemore (DA) lo ask the Minister 06 Basic Education:

Whether her department is assessing on an ongoing basis the current and future human resource needs of the country for the purpose of tailoring the school curriculum to produced appropriate skills; if not, (a) why not and (b) what are the details of her plans to rectify this situation; if so: which person or unit is tasked with this assessment? NW1068E

REPLY

The aim of general school education is to ensure that all pupils have a broad and balanced curriculum during their Further Education and Training years and not to supply the economy with trained people for specific occupations. It is also not the purpose of the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-12 to supply trained learners on short term basis to fulfill the immediate specific needs required by the economy. School curricula are usually changed after a five-year period of implementation.

Successful modern economies and societies require citizens with a strong foundation of general education, the desire and ability to continue to learn, to adapt to, and develop new knowledge, skills and technologies, to move flexibly between occupations, to take responsibility for their personal performance, to set and achieve nigh standards, and to work co-operatively. The aim of the National Curriculum Statement Grades R-72 is therefore to provide learners the opportunity to acquire and apply knowledge and skills in ways that are meaningful to their own lives.

It is, however, important that school education should take cognisance of the shortage of skills in South Africa and regard it as 2 national priority. Although the schooling system on its own, cannot address these problems it could make an important contribution;. The National Curriculum Statement Grade R-12 does make provision for specific vocational subjects. Subjects such as Civil Technology, Electrical Technology, Mechanical Technology and Hospitality Studies do not make provision for specialisation or workplace experience. These subjects include various areas of specialization.

Taking the shortage of skills in South Africa into consideration, the technology subjects listed in the National Curriculum Statement Grades P-12 could be regarded to be more academic and do not allow learners, who can make good apprentices and skills specialists an opportunity to pursue this avenue..

To remedy this short coming a Ministerial Committee is currently busy reviewing the current Curriculum and Assessment policy statements for Technology subjects to make them more applicable for vocational training.

Apart from the compulsory two official languages and Life Orientation these new specialised subjects will be supplemented by other relevant subjects, such as Mechanical Science, Mechanical Mathematics.

The above change to the existing curriculum will allow for a dual education system where learners can choose between a more academic stream and a vocational stream. This is a common and very productive system in developed countries like Germany, Poland, Netherlands and Switzerland.
Furthermore, the department of Basic education developed a document on subject choices and career paths to assist learners in the Further Education and Training Phase in making sound subject choices for specific careers such as engineering and medicine.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 848

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 03/05/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1813 on 11 September 2012, what mathematical formula is applied to calculate the average learner to teacher ratio in each province;

(2) whether her department maintains a database of actual class sizes in each school; if so,

(3) how many (a) separate classes, in each grade, have been calculated to exist in each province and (b) of these classes have in excess of (i) 40 learners, (ii) 60 learners and (iii) 80 learners;

(4) whether her department has taken or is taking action to ensure that each province has a realistic plan in place to achieve target ratios within a reasonable time; if so, what are the details of such action? NW1067E

REPLY

(1) With reference to her reply to question 1813 on 11 September 2012, what mathematical formula is applied to calculate the average learner to teacher ratio in each province;

My Department applies a policy known as Post Provisioning Norms (PPN). It is regulated in terms of the Employment of Educators Act, 76 of 1998. Regulations made in terms of this Act determine that an MEC must create a pool of posts in accordance with funds available for this purpose after which the relevant Head of Department must distribute these posts among schools in accordance with the Post-Provisioning Model (PPM). The model is based on the principle that available posts are distributed among schools, proportionally to their number of weighted learners. In order to determine what a school's relative need for posts are, in relation to that of other schools, the PPM attaches weightings to all learners based on their relative needs for teachers and, in doing so, determines a weighted learner enrolment for each school.

(2) Whether her department maintains a database of actual class sizes in each school; if so,

No. My Department does not maintain a database of actual class sizes in each school due to the fact that the post-provisioning policy and model emphasize a holistic approach whereby the establishment of a school is based on learner-educator ratio (LER).

(3) How many (a) separate classes, in each grade, have been calculated to exist in each province and (b) of these classes have in excess of (i) 40 learners, (ii) 60 learners and (iii) 80 learners;

The Provincial Departments of Education utilize their staff establishments at school to keep a record of how many posts they have at each school. This also gives them information as to what the teacher/learner ratio is which helps them to manage the average class size. A class size is only determined once a timetable is drawn up by a school for each grade. Presently, there is no database that captures class sizes.

(4) Whether her department has taken or is taking action to ensure that each province has a realistic plan in place to achieve target ratios within a reasonable time; if so, what are the details of such action?

My Department has contracted a service provider through UNICEF funding to run a project that will design and implement a research instrument (tool) to review progress with the implementation of Post Provisioning Norms (PPN). The project aims to assess the impact of PPN on teacher provisioning, planning, utilisation and deployment in response to Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025 on a provincial level.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 829

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to question 658 on 22 April 2013, how many of the students in education who completed their studies in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012 had (i) mathematics and/or (ii) natural sciences as a major subject;

(2) (a) how many temporary teachers who are (i) not qualified, (ii) underqualified and (iii) professionally unqualified have been in a temporary post for longer than a year already and (b) what is the reason for this? NW1046E

REPLIES

(1) With reference to her reply to question 658 on 22 April 2013, how many of the students in education who completed their studies in (a) 2009, (b) 2010, (c) 2011 and (d) 2012 had (i) mathematics and/or (ii) natural sciences as a major subject?

The Department only compiles information on the number of FunzaLushaka Bursary Scheme beneficiaries. The numbers provided below do not represent all the education graduates in these subjects.

(a) 2009

(b) 2010

(c) 2011

(d) 2012

(i) Mathematics

395

234

593

504

(ii) Natural Sciences

201

113

254

247

(2) (a) How many temporary teachers who are (i) not qualified, (ii) under-qualified and (iii) professionally unqualified have been in a temporary post for longer than a year already and (b) what is the reason for this?

(i) Not qualified temporary longer than a year

(ii) Under-qualified temporary longer than a year

(ii) Professionally un-qualified temporary longer than a year

4258

560

Data currently not available

(b) 3 876 of unqualified educators employed longer than a year are in KwaZulu-Natal. KwaZulu-Natal has historically struggled to attract qualified educators, particularly in rural areas. Over the last few years the situation has been improving as the province absorbs the largest number of FunzaLushaka Bursary Scheme graduates. The number of graduates appointed in the province in 2013 was at 860 at the end of March 2013. Regarding the under-qualified educators, the numbers are decreasing annually and those that have enrolled for improvement of qualifications through the provincial bursary schemes are kept in posts on temporary appointments until they qualify.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 801
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) Whether she has declared the work-to-rule campaign (details furnished by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTL') illegal; if so, on what grounds;

(21 (a) how will she identify members of SAD? U who are participating, or have participated in the campaign, and (h) what action will she take against them?
NW1014E

REPLY:
(1) Whether she has declared the work-to-rule campaign (details furnished) by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union (SADTU) illegal; if so, an what grounds?


I did declare the work-to-rule campaign by the SA Democratic Teachers Union (SAU?'G) as not compliant with the Labour Relations Act. Teachers are in terms of the Employment of Educators Act and their conditions of service obliged on request to work outside the seven hours of teaching, and this includes taking part in in-service training commitments to improve their skills. It should be noted that work-to-rule also constitutes a strike since labour is being withheld. As a matter of fact, for industrial action. to comply with the LRA, negotiations in the bargaining council oil a matter of mutual interest should have failed and a certificate of non-resolution issued, to allow any parry m the dispute to engage in industrial action.

(2) (a) How wilt she identify members of SADTU who are participating, or have participated in the campaign, and (b) what action will she take against them?

(2) (a) How will she identify members of SADTU who are participating, or have participated to the campaign, and (b) what action will she take against them?

(a) Principals, as school managers, arc obliged to report and record non-compliant by educators in their schools. Therefore, I am confident that the Provincial Education Departments are in possession of the names of SADT members who are participating, or have participated in the campaign; and

(b) Depending an tile circumstances and merits of each case, involved educators should undergo formal disciplinary processes resulting in imposition of sanctions concomitant with the offence.

Reply received: July 2013

QUESTION 800
DATE
OF PUBLICATION OFINTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)
Mrs AT Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


( 1 ) In each province (a) how many young people of school going age, who suffer from special needs that require attention in a special school, are not able lo be accommodated in such a special school and (b) what are the numbers not accommodated per classification of special need;

(2) Whether plans are in place for each province to allow accommodation of all young people requiring special school education; if so, what are the relevant details per province; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such plans and (b) what action will she take lo ensure the (i) development and (ii) implementation of such plans;

(3) What are the derails of the action she is taking to ensure that every special school has a full complement of appropriately qualified staff? NW1013E

REPLY:

(1) (a) The table below provides the number of young people of school-going age, who require attention in a special school that still await placement in a special school because of capacity problems at special schools:

PROVINCE

NO. OF OUT OF SCHOOL YOUTH

Eastern Cape

1583

Free State

793

Gauteng

2278

Kwa-Zulu Natal

2595

Limpopo

134

Mpumalanga

241

Northern Cape

73

North West

44

Western Cape

2768

TOTAL

10 509


(1) (b) The following table provides the number of young people of school-going age that cannot be accommodated per classification of special need:

See attachment: Table-number of young people of school-going age per classification of special need:

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 799

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 26/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 13/2013)

MrsA T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What are the reasons why she has investigated mechanisms, other than the signing of attendance registers, to monitor the attendance of educators;

(2) why she considers the biometric system to be appropriate;

(3) (a) when, (b) where and (c) at what cost will the system be piloted;

(4) what the cost will be to implement the system in all schools;

(5) whether she is investigating any other alternative systems of attendance monitoring; if so, what are the relevant details? NW1012E

REPLIES:

1) What are the reasons she has investigated mechanisms, other than the signing of attendance registers, to monitor the attendance or otherwise of educators?

As part of the strategy to enhance accountability in the Sector; methods of monitoring Time and Attendance of teachers is being researched. It is envisaged that whichever method is ultimately chosen, it will be reliable and will exert greater control over staff time and attendance records by preventing staff from clocking in for each other and ensuring data flows to one central database. Managers at schools, districts, provinces and national levels must be able to draw reports to facilitate management and planning processes.

This new tool should not be characterised as a policing mechanism, but rather as a means to gather data on teacher attendance in order to identify and develop effective methods to enhance teacher attendance and address challenges around absenteeism.

2) Why she considers the biometric system appropriate?

The biometric system is but ONE method of monitoring time and attendance of teachers that is being investigated.

3) (a) When, (b) where and (c) at what cost will the system be piloted?

(a) The process of piloting a Time and Attendance system will take place once all options have been properly investigated and the final method is decided upon.

(b) Only once (a) has taken place, will details as to when and where the pilot will be rolled out be made available.

c) The cost at this point in time is not known since investigation into different methods is still taking place.

4) What the cost will be to implement the system in all schools;

The DBE is currently investigating possible methods of monitoring Time and Attendance of teachers and the costs associated with implementation in all schools. Once this has been finalized, we will be better positioned to provide realistic estimates.

5) Whether she is investigating any other alternative systems of attendance monitoring; if so, what are the relevant details?

Alternative methods of monitoring Time and Attendance are at the initial stages of investigation and include the use of the South African School Administration Management System (SASAMS) and cellphone technology.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 774

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department increased the salaries of matric examination markers as agreed to in 2011; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW985E

REPLY:

My Department increased the salaries of matric examination markers in terms of Government Notice 187 in Gazette 34079 and not ELRC Collective Agreement 1 of 2011.

On 7 March 2011, I promulgated Government Notice 187 in Gazette 34079 to adjust the tariffs in accordance with the then applicable Consumer Price Index (CPI).

ELRCCollective Agreement 1 of 2011 was entered into in the ELRCon 7 April 2011. ThisAgreement was introduced to align the collective bargaining processes with the published Gazette34079. In this process the wrong figures/ tariffs were inserted in the Collective Agreement. The figures in the Agreement were in conflict with Gazette 34079 that was published on 7 March 2011 and the effect of this mistake was that government did not have the money in the budget to pay out at the price in the Collective Agreement 1 of 2011.The error led to a dispute with the trade unions which is now being handle by the Labour Court.

However, in order for the markers to be paid, the Department and the trade unions signed two Addendums to ELRC Collective Agreement 1 of 2011agreeing that markers should be paid according to the tariffs contained in the Gazette 34079 plus an inflation related upward adjustment.

Therefore,matric examination markers will receive a pay increase each year and this increase is inflation related. The percentage increase is the same as the annual adjustments that all other public servants receive.

Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 723
DATE OF PUBLICAYION OF INTERNAL QIUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2013
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs A
T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether she ensures that (a) the (i) national and (ii) provincial departments of education and .(b) every- (i) district and (ii) school comply with all (aa) requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety .4ct. Act 85 of 1993 and (bb) regulations gazetted in terms of the specified Act: if not, why nor: if so, what are the details of the compliance measures that are in place;

(2) whether she ensures that (a) the (i) national and (ii) provincial departments of education and (b) even1 (i) district and (ii) school comply u3ith all (aa) requirements of the Compensation for Occupational Injuries and Diseases Act. Act 130 of 1993, and (bb) regulations gazetted in terms of' the specified Act: if not, why not; if so, what are the details of the compliance measures that are in place;

(3) for each Act mentioned above, which programme and/or directorate within her department assumes responsibility for (a) implementation and (b) oversight?
NW929E
REPLY
1. (a) (i) (ii) (b) (i) (ii) (aa) Yes, the Department of Basic Education (DBE) in its Head Office building fully complies with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act, Act 85 of 1993.

Further, in the Basic Education environment, the field of Occupational Health and Safety embraces two essential areas of impact: (i) during the provision (construction) of educational infrastnscture and (ii) thereafter during the occupation and use of completed educational infrastructure. In both a nationally and provincially driven programme, responsibility for OHS compliance is divested to implementing agents appointed by either the Department of Basic Education as in the case of the .ASIDI Programme o r by each of the nine provincial departments of Education in their respective provincial schools projects. During the implementation of the ASIDl programme the following clause is standard in agreements with the DBE:

"The work conducted under the supervision of the implementing Agent and Principal Agent must be compliant with the laws. regulations and bylaws of relevant municipalities having jurisdiction regarding the execution of the works (JBCC definition) and the implementation of the Infrastructure Programme Management Plan (IPMP) and shall also comply to, but not limited to: the:-

(i) National Building Regulations;
(ii) Guidelines Relating to Planning for Public School Infrastructure;
(iii) Occupation Health & Safety (OHS) Act, No 85 of 199.3; and
(iv) National Environmental Management Act (NEMA). No. 107 of 1998."

The Implementing Agents are to ensure that all preferred contractors submit their OHS plans before occupation of sites. The appointed professional service providers are responsible for monitoring compliance. At a provincial level, responsibility for compliance will rest with the implementing agent which in many cases is the provincial Department of' Public Works. These departments ensure compliance with OHS requirements by their appointed principal agents and contractors.

At occupation, the responsibility for adherence to the requirements of the OHS Act rests initially with the relevant provincial Department of Education to whom the completed school has been handed over by the contractor and implementing agent. Once the school (asset) has been registered on the asset register of the relevant provincial Department of Public Works, responsibility then rests with the Department of Public Works as it is assigned the custodianship role for the ongoing maintenance of government assets in terms of the Government Immovable Assets Management Act.

Each provincial Department of Education will however have its own structures to conduct both a liaison and monitoring function with its appointed implementing agents as well as with its district offices and school governing bodies. Incidents of non-compliance monitoring are through quarterly reporting, which are then forwarded to the DBE for a collaborative response.

(bb) The Department fully complies with the requirements of the Occupational Health and Safety Act. Act 85 of 1993.

The operations and maintenance of the Head Office accommodation for the DBE currently forms part of a Public Private Partnership (PPP) agreement of which the mitigation of OHS risk is a measured output. Measures that have been put in place include an OHS policy, a Disaster Management Programme and House Rules. A joint committee regularly meets to mitigate the OHS risk.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 722

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many fraudulent certificates have been detected accompanying the applications for registration as teachers submitted to the SA Council for Educators (SACE) for the (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12 and (d) 2012-13 financial years;

(2) for each year, how many of the fraudulent certificates were submitted by (a) South African citizens and (b) foreign citizens;

(3) what measures does the SACE have in place to ascertain the veracity or otherwise of certificates submitted to the council;

(4) what action has been taken in the event of a fraudulent certificate being detected? NW928E

REPLIES:

(1) How many fraudulent certificates have been detected accompanying the applications for registration as teachers submitted to the SA Council for Educators (SACE) for the (a) 2009-10, (b) 2010-11, (c) 2011-12 and (d) 2012-13 financial years?

(a) 2009-10 : 4 fraudulent certificates were detected;

(b) 2010-2011: 10 fraudulent certificates were detected;

(c) 2011-12 : 13 fraudulent certificates were detected; and

(d) 2012-2013: 1 fraudulent certificate was detected.

(2) For each year, how many of the fraudulent certificates were submitted by (a) South African citizens and (b) foreign citizens?

(a) South Africans-22 fraudulent certificate were submitted:

(i) 2009-10 is 2

(ii) 2010-11 is 7

(iii) 2011-12 is 12

(iv) 2012-13 is 1

(b) Foreigners-6 fraudulent certificates were submitted:

(i) 2009-10 is 2

(ii) 2010-11 is 3

(iii) 2011-12 is 1

(iv) 2012-13 is 0

(3) What measures does the SACE have in place to ascertain the veracity or otherwise of certificates submitted to the council?

SACE does verification of qualifications with the following organisations/ institutions: Departments of Higher Education and SAQA, UMALUSI, Home Affairs, and Universities.

(4) What action has been taken in the event of a fraudulent certificate being detected?

The case would be forwarded to the SACE Ethics Department where appropriate measures would be applied and the case would be reported to the police.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 721
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19/04/2013(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)
721. Mrs A T
Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether, with regard to learners who have previously been progressed through a grade in the further education and training phase and do not meet the pron7otion criteria for grade 12, there are any no-fee, part-time study opportunities available through provincial education departments to allow these learners to attain the promotional requirements; if not, (a) why not and (b) what will be done to rectify the situation;

(2) whether she intends to define any certificated exit points from the schooling system, other than grade 12; if not, why has she decided, specifically, against certificating grade 9;

(3) what recourse is available to a learner who wishes to attend a further education and training college post grade 9, but who is progressed, rather than promoted, through grade 9: and who has already been progressed through another grade in the senior phase? NW927E


REPLY

(1) Yes there are opportunities available for learners who have not met the requirements for the National Senior Certificate. These opportunities are offered freely and the learner can register for supplementary examinations, or can register as a repeat candidate either as a full time or part-time candidate.

(2) At tine moment there is no exit point other than the National Senior Certificate; However, the department has noted the gap created by the unavailability of an exit qualification other than the National Senior Certificate.

(3) Learners who wish to attend Further Education and Training post grade 9 can do so through the N programmes. The learner can start this programs from N1 and exit at N3 with a qualification equivalent to grade 12. The learner can then proceed to the field of work or enter a University of Technology provided the learner has acquired two languages at a qualification equivalent to grade 12.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 717

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mr D C Smiles (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

What support will her department provide towards the International Mathematical Olympiad that will take place in the country this year? NW923E

REPLY:

The International Mathematics Olympiad (IMO) will be held in 2014 in Cape Town not in 2013 as indicated by Mr DC Smiles. The Department of Basic Education (DBE) is fully supporting the event together with the Department of Science and Technology.

The office of the Deputy Minister received a letter from Mrs Ellie Olivier, the Operational Manager of South African Mathematics Foundation (SAMF), requesting the Deputy Minister of Basic Education to write a message of support which SAMF is using to raise funds for the event which DBE did. The Deputy Minister's photo is on the brochure advertising the IMO. The Department of Basic Education will participate in the organizing committee for the event.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 684

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/201

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What measures are in place to ensure that a national go-slow by the SA Democratic Teachers′ Union (SADTU) members scheduled for when inland schools reopen on Tuesday, 9 April 2013, does not impact on learners negatively;

(2) will supplementary examinations that were written in February be affected in terms of being marked;

(3) whether this action is related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service, making it unlawful for teachers to strike; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NW850E

REPLIES:

(1) What measures are in place to ensure that a national go-slow by the SA Democratic Teachers′ Union (SADTU) members scheduled for when inland schools reopen on Tuesday, 9 April 2013, does not impact on learners negatively?

The Department has taken measures to ensure that the go slow does not impact on learning and teaching. Provincial Education Departments have been provided with learning support materials to give to learners and encourage them to use in times like this.

The principle of "no work, no pay" will be applicable to any teacher who is not present at school for a full day or part thereof. Furthermore, the Department has the Strike Management Plan which put the responsibility on managers and/or principals to ensure that they keep records and data of attendance of educators in their schools during industrial actions. Information provided by managers in terms of the Strike Management Plan to their Heads of Education Departments will assist in the application of the "no work, no pay" principle.

(2) Will supplementary examinations that were written in February be affected in terms of being marked?

Supplementary examinations that were written in February have not be affected in terms of being marked.

(3) Whether this action is related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service, making it unlawful for teachers to strike; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

This action is not related to a government proposal that education be made an essential service. Government's proposal that education be made an essential service did not mean that teachers are not allowed to strike, but to make education to become a societal priority.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 683

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she responded to accusations by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union that she undermines collective bargaining? NW849E

REPLY

Yes, the Minister has responded to accusations by the SA Democratic Teachers' Union that she does not undermine collective bargaining. Her department is engaged in the ELRC and PSCBC where negotiations take place. Her departmental officials have been present in all scheduled meetings of the ELRC and PSCBC. The unions have also been present and they have not disengaged the Department in these forums.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 677
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013 (lNTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 2013

Mr N J J van R Koornhof (Cope) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department intends to pilot a programme for the development of debating at school level, similar to other Southern African Development Community (SADC) countries; if not, why not? NW832E

REPLY

Yes, the Department of Basic Education will, as part of an overall, strategy to improve the level of literacy in schools, coordinate school debates. Currently, the Department of Basic Education is supporting the implementation of debating programmes like Road Safety Debates which follow the UN model of debate. In addition, the Department has an annual Moot Court competition which gives Grade 8-11 -learners an opportunity to have legal debates in a miniature Constitutional Court through a case study. Therefore, the form and shape of the debates will take into consideration all the different models and will be articulated in a framework document to be finalized this year.

Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 676

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPERS: 19/04/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 12/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:†

(1) How many new single medium schools were established for each of the 11 official languages

(a) in (i) 2009, (ii) 2010, (iii) 2011 and (iv) 2012 and (b) since 1 January 2013;

RESPONSE:

1 (a) (i) (ii) (iii) (iv)

Table 1: Number of single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages, from 2008 – 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note 1: Single medium school refer to a school that uses one medium of instruction for all learners in all grades.

(b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(2) (a) how many single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages were closed (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013, (b) for which official languages in each case was provision made at these schools and (c) why were thespecified schools closed in each case;

RESPONSE:

(2) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 2: Number of single medium schools for each of the 11 official languages that were closed, from 2009- 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note1: Schools that did not responded to the survey from 2008 up until 2012 were declared closed.

(ii) (b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(3) (a) how many new dual medium schools were established (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) for which official languages in each case is provision made at these schools;

RESPONSE: (3) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 3:Number of dual or parallel medium ordinary schools, from 2008 – 2012 see attached table.

Source: Annual school surveys from 2008 – 2012

Note 1 This table doesnot depict all possible combinations for 11 official languages but focuses more on English and Afrikaans languages.

Note 2 Parallel medium of instruction refers to teaching that occurs in two or more languages of instruction in separate classes in the same grade.

Note 3 Dual medium of instruction refer to the use of two media of instruction by a teacher in a lesson, switching from one medium to the other on a 50: 50 percent basis.

(ii) (b) 2013 data is not available. Annual School Survey for 2013 is being finalised.

(4) (a) how many dual medium schools were closed (i) in (aa) 2009, (bb) 2010, (cc) 2011 and (dd) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013, (b) for which official languages in each case was provision made at these schools and (c) why were the specified schools closed in each case;

RESPONSE(4) (a) (i) (aa) (bb) (cc) (dd)

Table 4:Number of dual or parallel medium ordinary schools that were closed, from 2009- 2012 see attached table

Source: Annual School Survey from 2008 – 2012

(5) whether pupils who have been affected by the closing of schools have been placed in schools that provide tuition in the same languages as the schools that have been closed; if not, (a) why not and (b) how many pupils have found themselves in such a situation? NW820E

RESPONSE: (5)

(5) the DBE does not collect statistics on how the Provincial Education Departments deal with learners affected by the closure of schools.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 658

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:†

(1) (a) How many foreign teachers have been teaching in South African schools (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011 and (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) from which countries do they hail, in each case;

(2) how many of these foreign teachers (a) have English as their first language or mother tongue, (b) are teaching (i) Mathematics and (ii) Science and (c) have held (i) temporary posts for longer than a year and (ii) permanent posts;

(3) (a) how many students who have completed their studies in education were there (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011, (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) how many of these students started to teach in each specified year;

(4) (a) how many South African teachers have temporary posts and (b) what is the reason for this? NW818E

REPLIES:

(1) (a) How many foreign teachers have been teaching in South African schools (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011 and (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) from which countries do they hail, in each case?

See attached reply

(2) How many of these foreign teachers (a) have English as their first language or mother tongue, (b) are teaching (i) Mathematics and (ii) Science and (c) have held (i) temporary posts for longer than a year and (ii) permanent posts?

(a) Foreign educators applying for posts in public schools are only required to demonstrate fluency in the Language of Teaching and Learning (LOLT), which is English and thus the Department does not record whether or not English is their mother tongue.

(b) (i) and (ii) Over 80% of foreign educators currently in the system were appointed in terms of the quota work permit arrangement which started in 2009. The requirements are that an educator specialises in Mathematics, Science and Technology, are fluent in English and have five years teaching experience. This forms part of the conditions of their continued employment; and

(c) (i) (ii)

As at March 2010

As at March 2011

As at March 2012

As at JANUARY 2013

(i) TEMPORARY

1 037

861

2 377

1 204

(ii)PERMANENT

1 187

996

1 917

825

(3) How many students who have completed their studies in education were there (i) in (aa) 2010, (bb) 2011, (cc) 2012 and (ii) since 1 January 2013 and (b) how many of these students started to teach in each specified year?

(a) The table below shows the number of graduates in each of the years requested as recorded in the Higher Education Information System (HEMIS) who had completed their studies in the preceding year and therefore available to start teaching.

(i)(aa) 2010

(completed in 2009)

(i) (bb) 2011

(completed in 2010)

(i) (cc) 2012

completed in 2011)

(ii) 1 January 2013

6 976

7 973

10 593

Data currently not available

(b) The Department, as part of the "Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025" has been monitoring the number of qualified teachers aged 30 years and younger entering the public education system for the first time each year since 2011. In 2011 and 2012, 7 744 and 8 227 new appointees aged 30 years and younger entered the public schooling system respectively, and it is likely that most of these were new graduates.

(4) (a) How many South African teachers have temporary posts and (b) what is the reason for this?

(a) As at the end of January 2013 there were 20 651 teachers with temporary appointments.

(b) There are a number of reasons why teachers are appointed on a temporary basis. Firstly, in order to effectively manage the deployment of teachers, provincial education departments have set dates by which they advertise posts to be filled permanently. All vacancies that occur before the advertisement date are filled on a temporary basis as no class should be without a teacher. Secondly, in terms of the regulations, only professionally qualified educators can be appointed permanently and therefore un-and under-qualified, and professionally unqualified educators can only be appointed on a temporary basis. As at the end of January 2013, about 7 150 educators fell into the aforementioned categories.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 630

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Dr A Lotriet (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many claims were instituted against her department (a) in the (i) 2007-08, (ii) 2008-09, (iii) 2009-10, (iv) 2010-11 and (v) 2011-12 financial years and (b) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

SEE ANNEXURE A

(2) in respect of each specified financial year, (a) what amount was claimed, (b) how many claims were (i) finalised in court, (ii) settled out of court and (iii) are still outstanding and (c) what amount has been paid to each plaintiff in each case that was (i) finalised in court and (ii) settled out of court? NW789E

SEE ANNEXURE B

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 621

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mr D C Smiles (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what was the nature of the offence for each teacher who was (a) found guilty of misconduct and (b) granted conditional suspension from being struck off the roll in the (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12 financial years? NW780E

RESPONSE:

(a)

Teachers who received conditional suspension were charged and found guilty for committing one or more of the following offences:

1. Assault

1.1 Corporal punishment on learner/s;

1.2 Assault of learner/s;

1.3 Assault of colleague/s; and

1.4 Assault of parent/s or members of the community.

2 Dishonesty

2.1 supplying false information and/or statement;

2.2 Failure to disclose and co-operate with Council and/or authority;

2.3 Withholding relevant information from the Council;

2.4 Corruption relating to examination or promotional posts, etc;

2.5 Falsification of documents;

2.6 Mismanagement of school funds;

2.7 Fraud; and

2.8 Theft.

3. Conduct

3.1 Insubordination;

3.2 Undermining of colleague/s;

3.3 Disrespect and rudeness;

3.4 Intimidation;

3.5 Poor performance;

3.6 Humiliation of colleague/s;

3.7 Humiliation of learner/s;

3.8 Negligence; and

3.9 Verbal abuse towards learner/s and colleague/s.

(b)

(i) For the periods 2009/10, 71 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines;

(ii) For the period 2010/11, 17 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines; and

(iii) For the period 2011/12, 10 teachers were given conditional suspensions including fines.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 613

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what were the circumstances that allowed (a) certain educators to be suspended for a certain period, after which they would be free to apply for readmission to the teaching profession and (b) certain educators to be granted conditional suspension of the striking of their names from the roll of professional teachers;

(2) (a) what is the average time taken by the SA Council of Educators (SACE) to finalise a case involving a sexual offence and (b) why have 153 of the 189 cases reported between 2009 and 2012 not been finalised;

(3) what definition of sexual offence is used by the SACE? NW771E

RESPONSES:

1. With reference to her reply to oral question 54 on 14 March 2013, what were the circumstances that allowed (a) certain educators to be suspended for a certain period, after which they would be free to apply for readmission to the teaching profession and (b) certain educators to be granted conditional suspension of the striking of their names from the roll of professional teachers;

The merits of each case determine the presiding officer's decision on the pronouncement of a sanction.

1(a) An educator's name may be struck off from the roll of educators for a certain period depending on the nature and the gravity of the offence with which he or she had been charged, his or her personal circumstances, etc. These circumstances are presented to a presiding officer at the time for him or her to make an informed decision and these were applicable to cases that happened before April 2011 as the SACE did not at the time have what is called "Mandatory sanctions for certain offences".

(b) A conditional suspension is given in instances where the presiding officer and ultimately Council found it fit not to remove an educator's name from the roll of educators owing to the nature of the offence with which he or she had been charged. Certain conditions get attached to the sanction, to be fulfilled by the educator. Failure to fulfill those may result in the educator's name being removed from the roll, either indefinitely or for a certain prescribed period.

2 What is the average time taken by the SA Council of Educators (SACE) to finalise a case involving a sexual offence and (b) why have 153 of the 189 cases reported between 2009 and 2012 not been finalized?

2(a) The turnaround time to finalise a case is 6 months.

2(b) Several factors play a role leading to the delay in the finalisation of cases. The unavailability of witnesses at times, non-cooperation by witnesses, and the refusal by parents to grant access to their children, lack of interest by complainants to proceed with their cases and resources play a major role.

3 What definition of sexual offence is used by the SACE?

In the SACE context, a sexual offence is any type of sexual contact that occurs with or without the explicit consent of a learner.

Sexual offence on colleagues is any type of sexual contact or behaviour that occurs without the explicit consent of the colleague in question.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 612

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 28/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 10/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether all provinces have appointed a Health Risk Manager in terms of the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such appointments in place, (b) why such appointments are not in place and (c) how are these applications managed in these provinces;

(2) for each province, (a) how many applications for incapacity leave were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average (i) time taken to process applications for incapacity leave and (ii) length of incapacity leave (aa) granted and (bb) taken;

(3) whether the granting of incapacity leave has facilitated the appointment of temporary teachers to fill the temporary vacancies in each province; if not, why not in each case;

(4) for each province, (a) how many applications for ill-health retirement were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average time taken to process applications for ill-health retirement;

(5) for each province, how many educators have been on incapacity leave for (a) longer than one year, (b) longer than two years and (c) longer than three years? NW770E

REPLY

1. Whether all provinces have appointed a Health Risk Manager in terms of the Policy and Procedure on Incapacity Leave and Ill-Health Retirement; if not, (a) which provinces do not have such appointments in place, (b) why such appointments are not in place and (c) how are these applications managed in these provinces?

(a) All provinces have not appointed a Health Risk Manager.

(b) The Department of Public Service and Administration is responsible for the appointment of a Panel of Health Risk Managers from which Departments can select and contract a Health Risk Manager. The process of selecting and contracting by the Departments has been suspended pending the resolution of a legal challenge instituted by one unsuccessful service provider. An attempt to implement a contingency plan was also halted due to a possible lawsuit threat from the same service provider. This has resulted in all departments in all provinces not being able to appoint a Health Risk Manager until the legal matters are resolved by the DPSA.

(c) All applications are captured on a database to ensure that they could be submitted once a Health Risk Manager has been appointed and all applicants are duly informed of the delay.

2. For each province, (a) how many applications for incapacity leave were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average (i) time taken to process applications for incapacity leave and (ii) length of incapacity leave (aa) granted and (bb) taken?

Refer to the Table below for the response to 2 (a); (b)(i), (ii)(aa)(bb)

Province

(a)Applications (01/2009-12/2012)

(b)(i)Average Time taken to process (Months)

(b)(ii)(aa) Average length of incapacity leave granted (Months)

b)(ii)(bb) Average Length of Incapacity Leave taken (Months)

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

3 876

3 – 6

2

2

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

14 310

3

14 working days

22 working days

Limpopo

328

6

8

8

Mpumalanga

3 737

1

2

2

North West

744

3

6

6

Northern Cape

1 015

2

3

3

Western Cape

6 047

2

18 working days

27 working days

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Departments

3. Whether the granting of incapacity leave has facilitated the appointment of temporary teachers to fill the temporary vacancies in each province; if not, why not in each case?

Yes, temporary teachers are always appointed for the duration of the incapacity leave. This is at great cost to the Employer, but we are compelled to ensure that learners are not disadvantaged because of ill-health of a teacher.

4. For each province, (a) how many applications for ill-health retirement were received for the period 1 January 2009 to 31 December 2012 and (b) what was the average time taken to process applications for ill-health retirement?

Refer to table below for the response to 4(a) and (b)

Province

(a)Applications (01/2009-12/2012)

(b)Average Time taken to process (Months)

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

235

3 – 6

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

441

7.8

Limpopo

47

12

Mpumalanga

248

1

North West

91

3

Northern Cape

159

2

Western Cape

469

3

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Departments

5. For each province, how many educators have been on incapacity leave for (a) longer than one year, (b) longer than two years and (c) longer than three years?

Refer to the Table below for the response to 5 (a), (b) and (c)

Province

As at the end of December 2012

(a) Longer than one year

(b) Longer than two years

(c) Longer than three years

Eastern Cape

Verification in process at the time of reporting.

Free State

Information not available at the time of reporting

Gauteng

Information not available at the time of reporting

KwaZulu-Natal

45

34

83

Limpopo

7

0

0

Mpumalanga

1

0

0

North West

645

24

75

Northern Cape

8

2

0

Western Cape

12

1

3

Source: Reporting from Provincial Education Department

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 536

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether any plans exist at the (a) national or (b) provincial level to remove Art from the school curriculum as an elective subject examinable via the National Senior Certificate examinations; if so, (i) why and (ii) what are the details of such plans? NW693E

REPLY:

There are no plans by the Department of Basic Education to remove any of the Arts subjects from the school curriculum, either at national or provincial level. Currently some schools (FET Schools) in South Africa are implementing the Arts Field National Curriculum Statements in Grades 10-12 as approved subjects of the organising fields of the NQF. These are Dramatic Arts, Dance Studies, Music, Design, and Visual Arts, and they are examinable through the National Senior Certificate.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 535
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/03/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1)(a) Why was (i) Woodwork and (ii) Home Economics removed from the high school curriculum and (b) when was it removed in each case;

(2) Whether any plans exist to reintroduce these and other practical subjects into public ordinary schools to be examinable in Grade 12; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW692E

REPLY:

1. Home Economics and Woodwork per say were not removed from the high schools curriculum and still forms part of the subject offering of high schools albeit in a more updated format as Consumer Studies and Technology respectively.

(i) Woodwork was combined with two other subjects, and it became known as Civil Technology. The new subjects, Civil Technology infused the skills of woodwork, civil and construction/building, and are currently offered to learners across the country

Based on a review of the current curriculum, a new curriculum for Technical high schools is currently in the process of being finalized. Civil Technology will be a subject offering three specialisations, namely construction, woodwork and civil technology. In September of 2013, the curriculum will be published for public comment and should be gazetted at the end of 2013. The following year, 2014, will be used to prepare the system for implementation by offering teacher training, converting the workshop to the specialization selected and screening and procuring textbooks. This curriculum will be phased at grade 10 level in 2015, grade 11 in 2016 and grade 12 in 2017.

(ii) In the case of Home Economics, with the introduction of the National Curriculum Statement in 2006, the narrow focus of Home Economics were changed to a much broader focus reflecting the needs of a changing South African and global society. Home Economics focused only on food preparation and the science of food, whereas the new subject, Consumer Studies encompasses much more than food preparation.

In addition to food preparation, it now focuses on teaching small production skills, marketing skills, consumer education, housing, clothing and interior design as well as textile and fabrics to learners. The over – arching aim of the subject is to develop entrepreneurial skills and to stimulate the growth of small scale home industry producing and marketing quality items.

Consumer Studies offer five practical options as oppose to the one practical option offered by Home Economics. The five options are production of clothing items, soft furnishing production, and knitting and crocheting, food production and patchwork quality by hand.

2. Consumer Studies and Civil Technology continues to be examinable subjects. In 2012, third six thousand and one (36001) learners sat for the Consumer Studies examination as par of the National Senior Certificate examination.

Both the Woodwork and Consumer studies examination consists of three components namely, an internal school based assessment (SBA) (25%), a practical examination for each option selected (25%) and a final externally set written examination (50%).

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 534
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTBBM PAPER: 22/03/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 09/2013)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) "r ask the Minister of Basic Education:


1 What are the (a) targets, (b) time frames and (c) tine targets achieved in respect of the interventions in (i) the Eastern Cape and (ii) Limpopo in terms of section 100(1)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996;
2. which departmental official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province;
3. what is the mandate of her two-man team (names furnished) in the Eastern Cape;
4. what challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of particular targets difficult?
NW691E

REPLIES
EASTERN CAPE DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
(a) TARGETS:


1. When the intervention in the Eastern Cape Department of Education commenced during 201 ! the following six targets were set:

▪To ensure that the post establishment is affordable, budget driven and timeously declared.

▪ To ensure timely procurement and distribution of textbooks and stationery

▪ To schools, especially non-section 21 schools in the Province.

▪ To ensure effective management and provisioning of a subsidized scholar transport programme across the Province.

▪ To ensure effective management and implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP).

▪ To ensure that the eradication of mud schools and provision of basic services through the Accelerated School infrastructure Delivery Initiative is on track.

▪ To establish systems and operations relating to planning and accountability budgeting and financial management, supply chain management and human resource capacity.

(a) - (c) Timeframes and Targets Achieved in Respect of the interventions:

To ensure that the post establishment is affordable, budget driven and timeously declared.


A joint Stats SA and Eastern Cape Education data verification project has been launched and is due for completion by end July 2013. The Department approached Stats SA to verify the exact number of schools in Eastern Cape as well as the number of Learners and Educators in each of the schools. The purpose of the project is to get reliable data for decision making. The focus is on establishing the precise number of schools that are within the borders of Eastern Cape Province, and the exact number of educators and learners thereof. The project is backed by National Treasury and the Department of Basic Education.

A snap survey was done at the beginning of the 2013 school year which indicated a decrease of about 2% in learner numbers compared to the 2012 school year, Based on the survey a post basket of 60 800 was declared for 2013.

The Department also intends declaring a three year post establishment that will be linked to the Medium Term Expenditure Framework. This will have a positive spin off to create the much needed stability at schools as the fluctuation in learner number and associated aspects used in determining a post establishment will be observed over a three year than on an annual basis.

To ensure timely procurement and distribution of textbooks and stationery to schools, especially non-section 21 schools in the province.

The timely provision of textbooks to schools to ensure that all learners have text books the first day schools reopen after the December holidays has always been problematic in the Eastern Cape Department of Education. The majority of schools in the Province were declared section 21 schools in terms of the South African Schools Act and should therefore receive their fund transfers in terms of the norms and standards, and then purchase their own text books. Only about 200 schools in the Province are still section 20 for which textbooks must be procured and provided by the Eastern Cape Department of Education.

For the 2013 school year, the Eastern Cape Department of Education initially planned to centrally purchase all LTSM. The reason for this decision is to benefit from the economies of scale and to manage the provision of textbooks hands-on, The Eastern Cape Department of Education negotiated with PASA to take care of their own warehousing and to deliver the text books directly to schools. PASA agreed to this on a reduced discounted order price. When schools reopened on I6 January 2013 total deliveries stood just over 90%. The outstanding percentage included challenges such as:

▪ Some textbooks for Accounting still outstanding from the publishers.
▪ A few schools still refusing deliveries and continuing to insist on receiving their funds and ordering for themselves.
▪ A small number of lost/delayed requisitions from schools.
▪ Some mopping-up quantities required.

A procedure manual for the future provision of LTSM in the Eastern Cape Department of Education has been drafted. The first steps for procuring LTSM for t i e 2014 school year have also been undertaken and the total process will be overseen by the same LTSM Oversight Committee that dealt with the provision of textbooks for 2013.

To ensure effective management and provisioning of a subsidized scholar transport programme across the Province.

This function was transferred from the Eastern Cape Department of Education to the Eastern Cape Department of Transport; from 1 April 2011. The responsibility to provide the Eastern Cape Department of Transport with the correct data on learners that require scholar transport in terms of national policy remains the responsibility of the Eastern Cape Department of Education. Two governance structures were established, namely, Provincial Steering Committee and Scholar Transport Technical Committee. These include ECDoT, ECDoE, Provincial Treasury, Service Providers and Transport Operators. Both structures are functioning well. Work on the redesign of routes and tendering in line with the assessed routes is continuing and must be completed in, May 2013 to be implemented in July 2013

To ensure effective management and implementation of the National School Nutrition Programme (NSNP).

The program's procurement and delivery strategy has been reviewed from a centralised to a decentralized model; with ail Section 21 Schools getting full delegations for the delivery of the service. The Department has also commissioned ECSECC to review how the model is settling with schools. Standard Operating Procedures (SOPS) dealing with Financial Management, Financial Management and Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) were developed and distributed to Districts and schools. Furthermore, the Department has requested that separate banking accounts for these funds be opened by schools for the 2013/24 financial year so that the NSNP funds are clearly distinguished from the funding for norms and standards. Organisational support mechanism include the appointment of a Program Director, appointment of 54 District Monitors to step up data management, as well as purchasing of service vehicles to support fieldwork.

All benefiting schools have now received cooking equipment (Stoves, Pots) and eating utensils, (Plates, Spoons and mugs) with the last cohort of schools receiving funds to procure these in the 2012/13 financial year. As part of the National initiative, Grant Thornton has been appointed by the Department of Basic Education to audit utensils and equipment used for the school nutrition programme in all the provinces.

To ensure that the eradication of mud schools and provision of basic services through the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery initiative is on track.

Infrastructure has always been a burning issue in the Eastern Cape Department of Education, and the Province still has the largest number of mud and other dilapidated schools, and schools without electricity and/or water. To exacerbate the situation, the Eastern Cape Department of Education could no: afford to allocate any substantial amount from its vote to infrastructure due to the cost of its personnel budget. The aim of the Section 100 intervention was to ensure that the province spent its entire infrastructure budget, eradicates backlogs in the shortest possible time so that more funds can be allocated to maintenance, thereby ensuring that facilities are conducive to quality teaching and learning.

Progress with replacement of inappropriate schools (442 schools in total):
▪ 2012/13 40 of 49 schools completed (balance end May 2013)
▪ 2013/14 432 schools programmed for implementation
▪ 2014/15 261 schools programmed for implementation

Progress with water provision to schools (6? 9 schools, 583 projects in total):
▪ 84 projects completed
▪ 499 projects due for completion in 202 3/14
Progress with sanitation (344 schools, 313 projects in total):
▪ 55 projects completed
▪ 258 programmed for completion in rest of 2012/13 & 2013/14
Progress with electrification (317 schools in total, 17 addressed by others):
▪ 85 schools completed, 1 5 under construction
▪ 200 schools in planning stage
▪ The Department also recognises the immense maintenance backlog that exists (currently estimated at between R5bn and R10bn) as a result of historical under funding in this category, and has committed itself to increasing the allocation to maintenance from tile Equitable Share. For 20:3114 R168m (7,8%) of the infrastructure budget has been allocated to maintenance.

Infrastnscture delivery achievements in the 2012/3 financial year:
▪ A total of 515 emergency classrooms were delivered during the past year to deal with over-crowding and schools affected by disasters
▪ We have exceeded by 10 the target of 26 public ordinary schools to be provided with specialist rooms
▪ 18 additional ECD Centres have to date been built
▪ 117 of the targeted 194 public ordinary schools have to date been provided with water supply 17 of the targeted 68 public ordinary schools have been provided with electricity, with the rest being finalised by end March 2013
▪ 25 of the targeted 200 public ordinary schools have so far provided with decent sanitation facilities. with the rest on track to being finalised by end March 2013
The Learner assessment Centre in Lady Frere is on track for completion in the 2013/14 financial year.
▪ The Zwelitsha Document Centre has been completed in the 20T2113 financial year.
▪ One Special School (Sigcau Special School), has taken practical completion and the other in the 0.R.Tambo is sill under construction. The target of two special schools which were due to commence in 2012113 has been exceeded by two, taking the number to four, which are Vukuzenzele, Khanyisa PE, Quest, and Sunshine Special Schools.
▪ 22 schools in the Cacadu have received minor maintenance arid repairs to the value of R7,6m (the work included paving, stone guard to windows, roof repairs, fencing repairs, storm water repairs and water tanks)

▪ One technical workshop has taken practical completion in the 2012/13 .financial year. Three others have experienced delays due to inclement weather during the summer season and therefore will be complete in the first quarter of the 2013/14 financial year.
▪ 72 schools have received emergency interventions with a budget of R 17 m
▪ 55 schools have benefitted from the SSDP II programme through IDT; with a Budget of R112 m.
▪ 12 schools in KWT and East London have already been upgraded as part of the support to the Presidential Visit schools project, with a budget of R 20 m.

To establish systems and operations relating to planning and accountability, budgeting and financial management, supply chain management and human resource capacity.

Accruals relating to service providers tallied more than R 324 million at the beginning of the 2012/13 financial year but by 31 March 2013, majority (71%) of them have been dealt with. Some of the claims date back as far as 2004 which makes the audit process complicated. But Price Waterhouse Coopers is assisting the Eastern Cape Department of Education with the audit verification process.

The budget for 2012113 (CoE and operational) was reprioritised to firstly find funds for the accruals and secondly to move funds to the highest priorities where needed. Thirdly, the Department put austerity measures in place to cattail expenditure within certain parameters for the remainder of the financial year. The measures put in place proved to be successful and the books were balanced at the end of the financial year without any over expenditure.

The total budget needs for 2013/14 was worked through in detail and tie functions reprioritised. Money then followed priorities. The Annual Performance Plan was also aligned accordingly. From this exercise it was learnt that the Eastern Cape Department of Education pays exorbitant prices for many goods and services. This is due to not having economical contracts in place. in some cases contracts that expired a long time ago have just been continued with. It is important to note that savings of millions of Rand could be achieved by addressing this issue, which is now being done.

2. Which departmental official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province:

▪ The two Departmental officials appointed to oversee the intervention are Mr Tywakadi and Mr Benade in the Eastern Cape Department of Education.

3. What is the mandate of her two-man (names Furnished), in the Eastern Cape

▪ The mandate of the intervention team is to address the six areas identified as bottlenecks in the system as identified in (a).

4. What challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of: particular targets difficult? RNW691E

The main challenges in the Eastern Cape include but not limited to -
Funding continues to be a challenge that the Provincial and National Treasury seek to address.

Education infrastructure provisioning is also one of the challenges however plans are in place to address the backlogs.

LIMPOPO DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION

(a) TARGETS:

1. What are the (a) targets, (b) time frames and (c) the targets achieved in respect of the interventions in (i) the Eastern Cape and ( ii ) Limpopo in terms of section 101{1)(b) of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa, 1996;


The following targets were set for the intervention -

There was an inability by the provincial education department to fund key strategic educational priorities, thus resulting in essential national standards or the established minimum standards for the provisioning of quality basic education in Limpopo not being met. For instance

▪ Financial Management, Budget Control and Supply Chain Management

▪ To acquire funding for transfers to schools in terms of the Norms and Standards for the Funding of School:

▪ To develop effective, efficient and accountable system of financial, supply chain, contract, assets, records and cash flow management and controls

Human Resources Management

▪ To fill critical vacancies for cash management. Budgeting and public finance monitoring.

▪ To stabilize escalating Compensation of Employees budget.

Curriculum Implementation, Teacher Development, LTSM

▪ To ensure proper planning and funding for the procurement and delivery of learning and teaching support materials, especially the CAPS-aligned textbooks for Grade 1-3 and 10 before the end of 2011/12;

▪ To train educators in the Implementation of the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statements (CAPS) IN Grade 1-3 in 2012;

▪ To coordinate and administer Annual National Assessment (ANA) for Grade 1-6 and 9, and the National Senior Certificate (NCS) examination for Grade 12.

(b)-(c) Timeframes and Targets Achieved in respect of the Intervention:

Financial Management, budget Control and Supply Chain Management

The financial and budget management and controls, procedures and practice are implemented and monitored. The National Treasury is also in the process of developing specialised expertise to assist with prioritized functions developed from the PFMA, 1999. Measurable successes have been recorded in implementing cost containment and cash flow management measures –e.g, travel & telephone costs have been brought down; Training and workshops at commercial venues have been reduced or completely eliminated.

The implementation of the PSCPC Resolution 01 of 2012 has begun to lower expenditure related to the CoE; ad hoc educators are only appointed by prioritised needed; etc. The Goods and Services budget have also been stabilized The Provincial Treasury in the process of replacing the FINEST system with LOGIS with the targeted completion date being 31 March 2013.

The Annual Performance Plan has bee strategically linked to budget allocation and all unfunded programmes removed from the APP. 2011/12 accruals ( more than R390 million) were prioritised in the 2012/13 financial year, there was no evidence of the unauthorised expenditure. Outstanding amount expected from the Provincial Treasury is R1.396 billion.

Human Resource Management

The intervention intends to ensure that a focused organisational structure is in place populated appropriately by adequately qualified and experienced staff. First draft has been completed with inter-Branch consultations. Plans to clean up PERSAL are currently under way. In compliance with the PCSBC Resolution 01 of 2012, the 2013 PPN process has been delayed to September 2013. The declaration of interests and security clearance is ongoing and will made an annual process.

Curriculum Implementation, Teacher Development, LTSM

Biggest bulk of LTSM were already delivered to schools, currently the delivery mop-up is going. CAPS training conducted for Grades 4-5 and 11. Plans are afoot for the roll-out of training for Grades 7-9 and 12. The 2012 ANA and the NSC examinations results are currently being analysed and intervention programmes will be implemented.

2. Which department official(s) oversees the progress of the interventions in each province;

Initially Mr R Swartz was appointed to serve as the administrator in the Limpopo Department of Education. He subsequently resigned. Dr A Karodia was the appointed as his successor . Dr Karodia has since been replaced by the current Administrator – Mr M Matthews Who was deployed fro the Department of Basic Education by the Minister of Basic Education. He also serve as the Accounting Officer appointed by the Minister of Finance in terms of section 36 of the Public Finance Management Act, 1999

3. What is the mandate of her two-man team (names furnished) in the Eastern Cape;

Not Applicable

4. What challenges, if any, are rendering the achievement of particular targets difficult? NW691E

The main challenges in Limpopo include but not limited to -

▪ Funding continues to be a challenge that the Provincial and National Treasury seek to address.

▪ Education infrastructure provisioning is also one of the challenges however plans are in place to address the backlogs.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 475

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 15/03/2013 (INTERNAL OUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)
Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:*

(1) How many pupils from each of the 11 official language groups (a) in the basic phase of school education (details furnished) are currently receiving tuition in their mother tongue in terms of the National Curriculum Policy and (b) will continue to receive mother tongue tuition after the basic phase;

(2) (a) Why are children receiving tuition in another language after the basic phase and (b) what is the Government doing to ensure that pupils continue to receive education in their mother tongue even after the basic phase? NW634E

REPLY

(1) (a) The Department encourages learners to learn through their Home Languages wherever it is feasible and practicable. This is particularly so in the lower grades (Foundation Phase) where learners learn important basic literacy skills such as reading, writing and counting the Annual School Survey 2011 provides number of Foundation Phase learners by LoLT as per illustration Table below

Language

Foundation Phase

English

436 377

Afrikaans

347 320

IsiNdebele

27 926

IsiZuIu

856 568

IsiXhosa

655 891

Siswati

71 639

Sepedi

341 013

Sesotho

165 102

Setswana

293 171

Tshivenda

64 160

Xitsonga

112 912

SA Sign Language

206


Details of learners in each grade attached at Annexure A and by province at Annexure B.

(b) Only English and Afrikaans speaking learners continue to receive tuition in their mother tongue beyond the Foundation Phase. African languages are only used as languages of learning and teaching in the Foundation Phase. Thereafter they switch to English as LoLT from the intermediate Phase and beyond. The Eastern Cape is piloting six years of mother tongue education in 73 schools in Comfimvaba District; thereby affording IsiXhosa speaking learners to learn through their home language in the Intermediate Phase. The pilot was fist implemented in 2012.

(2) (a) The reasons why children use language(s) other than their own for tuition is multifaceted. South Africa is a multilingual country: though there are areas where monolingualism is prevalent. Most urban areas, including cosmopolitan are multilingual. It is not easy to enforce mother tongue education in such setups, hence the Department allows for dual medium schools to exist alongside each other. It looks simple to enforce mother tongue education in rural setup where there is one dominant language. However, the opposite is the case. Parents, particularly Africans, are not aware that learners learn best through their home languages. They strongly associate mastery of English with academic achievements.

(b) The Department, through the Incremental Introduction of African Languages Strategy, is planning to extend wage of African languages for tuition in the Intermediate Phase by 2016 (Grade 4), 2017 (Grade 5) and 2018 (Grade 6). The strategy will see to it that all learners in all public schools learn an African language as a subject before the end of their schooling. The strategy will also strengthen the teaching of English First Additional language

Reply received: August 2013

QUESTION 437
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013
(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013
)
Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) What (a) were the School Monitor Survey 2011 findings in respect of school compliance with a basic level of school infrastructure and (b) is the current level of compliance, expressed as a (i) number and (ii) percentage of schools. With the requirements of a very basic level of school infrastructure;

(2) when will the results of the School Monitoring Survey 2011 be made public;

(3) whether she has found the target of 92% for the 2012-13 financial year will be achieved; if not, what percentage level of compliance is set to be achieved;

(4) whether the compliance target for 2013-14 will be kept at 100%; if so, how will it be achieved;

(5) whether a school monitoring survey will be conducted in 2013? NW588E

Response

(1) The report is to be release and will be published in September 2013.
(a) N/A

(B) This will be provided as both a percentage & number when the provincial infrastructure report is finalised.
(i) N/A
(ii) N/A

(2) The findings of the School Monitoring Survey will be made public in September 2013.

(3) The final infrastructure report for the 2012/13 financial year is yet to be finalised based on reports from provinces. The process is expected to be completed in June 2013.

(4) The target for 2013/14 will be received based on the target achieved in 2012/13. Once the 2013/14 infrastructure report is finalised a decision on retaining or revising the 100% target will be considered.

(5) The Department is intending to conduct a School Monitoring Survey in 2013/14.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 432

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How does her department determine the percentage of learners with their own textbooks for each subject;

(2) what are the results of such determination in each province in the (a) 2011, (b) 2012 and (c) 2013 academic years;

(3) what is her department's textbook allocation target for the 2014 academic year;

(4) how will her department ensure that every province achieves the national target? NW582E

REPLY:

(1) The Department of Basic Education has conducted research into the identification of levels of access of learners to textbooks. The Technical Report of the 2011 DBE School Monitoring Survey looked into the percentage of learners having access to relevant LTSM for their grade for Mathematics and Language. The findings revealed that, overall, 78% of Grade 6 learners in South Africa had access to a Language textbook. The percentage across provinces ranged from 58% in the Free State to 93% in the North West. In Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and the Free State less than 70% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Language book. Overall 83% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Mathematics textbook. The percentage across provinces ranged from a low 50% in the Free State to 98% in the Western Cape. In Mpumalanga and the Free State less than 70% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Mathematics book. However this does not necessarily imply that every learner had his/her own copy as in some cases textbooks are shared between learners.

(2) The Department of Basic Education has developed the Grades 1-6, 10 and 11 Catalogues in line with the implementation of CAPS. The Grades 1-3 and 10 National Catalogues have been implemented in 2012 and the Grades 4-6 and 11 National Catalogue is currently being implemented in 2013. The Grades 7-9 and 12 National Catalogues is currently being developed and it is due to be released on 31 March 2013 for implementation in 2014.

These catalogues provide textbooks for the subjects per grade and guide provinces on which textbooks should be purchased for each learner.

Provinces are responsible for the provision of textbooks per subject per grade. The funding for LTSM and procurement models differs from province to province. While most provinces manage the procurement of textbooks for both Section 21 and non Section 21 schools for the CAPS implementing grades in Gauteng and KwaZulu Natal funds are transferred to Section 21 schools who do their own procurement for textbooks. The data generated by the textbook procurement process is used to provide information in regard to the percentage of learners with their own textbooks for each subject.

In addition to the provision of textbooks to learners, the department provides departmentally produced workbooks to all learners in grades 1-6.

(3) The data generated as a result of the textbook procurement processes during the past three years in provinces reveals that while provinces have not achieved the goal of one textbook per subject per learner, year by year all provinces are moving ever closer to achieving this goal. It is expected that the goal of one textbook per subject per grade per learner will be achieved by the end of 2014.

(4) The Department is intending to achieve 100% universal coverage in 2014. Measures are being put in place to ensure that cost-effective textbooks can be procured in order to achieve the goal of universal coverage in 2014.

The DBE developed a time frame based Sector Plan which is used to implement the development of National Catalogues, Procurement of LTSM, Delivery of LTSM to schools and to report monthly on deliveries and shortages.

The Plan has dates for Delivery of LTSM to all schools by provinces. Furthermore, the Department is in a process of Developing an LTSM Policy, which will be Gazetted in 2013.

The provision of cost-effective textbooks will facilitate the achievement of universal coverage in 2014.

The policy is intended to make sure that learners and teachers have access to quality learning and teaching materials to meet the requirements of the curriculum. The national Minimum Schoolbag guideline, describes the minimum quantity and quality of materials that every learner must have access to.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 430

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many learners in each province are currently repeating (a) grade 10 and (b) grade 11;

(2) what (a) remedial assistance has her department developed to assist learners who will progress to grade 12 without meeting promotion requirements and (b) options will be available to learners who have repeated a grade in the further education and training phase and do not meet the National Senior Certificate certification requirements? NW580E

REPLY:

(1) The latest estimates for repetition in Grade 10 and Grade 11 are around 15% to 19%, accounting for around 220 000 learners. We are gratified to note however, that drop out rates in the same grades have declined according to the National Income Dynamics Survey results released in 2012, and the number of out of school youth has also declined according to household data released by Statistics South Africa in 2011 and recently presented to the National Assembly Portfolio Committee on Basic Education.

(2) (a) Learners who repeat Grade 10 and 11 must meet promotion requirements before progressing to Grade 12. This contributes to the high repetition rates observed in these grades. As a more general intervention in the later grades, teacher development and support programmes have been designed using the results of the qualitative assessments of learners' responses from scripts which identified areas of weaknesses and gaps in learner performance in the National Senior Certificate Examination. Thereafter, a remedial plan was developed with identified gaps and what teachers need to do to address the content gaps. This remedial plan was shared with provinces during the DBE Road-shows in March 2013 and also during discussions with District Managers.

Support materials have also been developed in the form of Mind the Gap self study guides, developed by subject specialists and exemplar papers – all of which are available on the Department of Basic Education's website. Extra classes in the form of Saturday schools have been convened using expert teachers. These classes will be extended during winter and spring vacations.

(b) For learners who have not met the National Senior Certificate requirements, supplementary examinations are conducted in March each year to give them an opportunity to pass the examination. In addition, learners who do not satisfy supplementary examination requirements are allowed to register as part-time repeaters for one or two subjects that may be outstanding for the achievement of the National Senior Certificate. Provinces also offer supplementary programmes for adult learners who may register as part-time candidates.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 407

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she will investigate the challenges with regard to the sporting infrastructure at several schools in Chatsworth, KwaZulu-Natal? NW554E

RESPONSE:

The matter has been referred to the KwaZulu Natal Department of Education to investigate and provide a response. On completion of the investigation by the province, a response will be forwarded.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 401

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mr P F Smith (IFP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she has found that a question that appeared on the 2012 grade 12 Mathematical Literacy paper to which learners had to confirm whether Christmas Day is on 25 December in South Africa serves any mathematical purpose; if so, what are the relevant details? NW435E

RESPONSE:

The question reads as follows: State whether the following event is certain, most likely or impossible: Christmas day is on December 25 in South Africa.

The question assesses the concept of 'probability and therefore serves a Mathematical purpose. The Mathematical Literacy Subject Assessment guidelines, which serves as the framework for the design of this question paper requires learners to be able to use probability in making predictions of outcomes in real life situations (and in the context of games). Learners are also required to express probability values in different ways, in words or numerically as fractions, ratios or percentages.

In the case of the said question, it was required that the probability of the event be expressed in words such as certain, impossible or most likely. The event chosen in this question, namely "Christmas Day is on 25 December in South Africa" is a true statement in the context provided and the probability is 100% or 1 or can be expressed in words such as "certain". Note that the question, is not establishing whether learners know the date on which Christmas occurs, but rather it assesses the candidates' understanding of simple probability concepts as prescribed for Mathematical Literacy. This question is also relevant when it is considered that Christmas day is not universally celebrated on the 25 December by all communities (for example the Russian Orthodox Church celebrates Christmas day on another date).

In addition, it needs to be noted that every question paper is structured to cater for low, medium and higher order questions. This specific question is a lower order question carrying two (2) marks and there are other questions that are pitched at the medium and higher order levels. In both these papers, i.e. Paper 1 and Paper 2, candidates were required to answer questions on financial maths, interpret relationships both in the form of formulae and of graphs, calculate perimeter, area and volume, and read maps and plans, which confirms the scope and depth of Mathematical Literacy..

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 375

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr J F Smalle (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Which companies received the tender for textbooks aligned to the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for grades 4, 5, 6 and 11 in Limpopo in 2013;

(2) (a) what was the tender value paid, (b) for what period was the tender awarded and (c) were the companies BEE-compliant;

(3) was the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, regulations and supply chain management procedure followed? NW522E

REPLY:

(1) The provision of the CAPS aligned textbooks for grade 4-6 and 11 followed a process of direct procurement from publishers listed on the National Catalogue and not through any company.

(2) (a) The Unit price of each textbook was predetermined on the National Catalogue. Through further negotiations with publishers the LDoE was able to further derive cost savings on orders.

(b) and (c) Procurement of textbooks was for the 2013 school calendar year and was procured from publishers listed on the National Catalogue.

(3) By the process of applying the National Catalogue and further direct negotiations with publishers, the province was fully compliant with SCM processes and is not time bound.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 374

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr J F Smalle (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department was a signatory to the service level agreement with a certain company (name furnished) for the delivery of textbooks aligned to the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for grades 4, 5, 6 and 11 in Limpopo in 2013; if so, (a) when was the agreement signed and (b) who does the specified company report to? NW521E

RESPONSE:

The procurement and delivery of textbooks is a provincial responsibility. The service level agreement is between the Limpopo Department of Education and the contracted service provider.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 369

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether the minimum schoolbag specifications have been finalised for all grades; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) when will the specifications be (i) promulgated and (ii) enforced? NW516E

REPLY:

The draft minimum school bag guidelines have been finalized for all grades. (a) it includes specifications for core LTSM and stationery. (b) The document is an annexure to the draft LTSM policy and (i) will be released when the policy is released during 2013 and (ii) implemented in 2014.

QUESTION 368

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether a new e-education strategy has been developed to replace the 2004 White Paper on e-Education; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will such a strategy be developed and released; if so, what are the relevant details? NW515E

REPLY:

(a) No, however a new implementation plan has been developed to guide and inform the 2004 White Paper on e-Education and aims to:

· Implement the strategic objectives of the White Paper on e-Education (2004)

· Support the attainment of the relevant goals (16 and 20) of Action Plan to 2014

· Support the activities of all strategies that support the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA).

(b) The new implementation plan is currently being finalised and will be released in due course.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 367

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether criteria to combat oversized classes have been developed; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will these criteria be developed; if so,

(2) whether these criteria have been incorporated into the national post provisioning norms; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this be achieved? NW514E

REPLY

(1) Whether criteria to combat oversized classes have been developed; if not, (a) why not and

(1)(a) The existing post provisioning model applies the norms for maximum class size and ideal class for grades 1-9 (class size of between 35-40) and grades 10-12 (class size of between 6-38) respectively. However, the actual class size at school is determined by a number of factors especially the availability of classroom space and teachers. These two factors combined or individually may lead to oversized class sizes. To a lesser extent the distribution of learner numbers by grade and subject in a particular school may also contribute to inconsistent class sizes in schools. Certain numbers of learners in a grade may be difficult to split into ideal class sizes without affecting time tabling (period loads and teacher contact time).

(b) when will these criteria be developed; if so,

(b) As indicated in the response to (a) above, the existing post provisioning norms do take into account the class size.

(2) whether these criteria have been incorporated into the national post provisioning norms; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this be achieved?

(2)(a) In order to address the challenge of oversized class sizes, the Department bid for additional funding for the MTEF period 2009/10-2011/12 with the expectation that PEDs will factor in the amounts as part of their baseline budgets commencing in the 2012/13 financial year. The aim of additional funding is to appoint additional teachers to schools that experience large class sizes. This intervention will obviously benefit schools that have adequate class room space to accommodate extra classes.

(b) when will this be achieved?

(b) PEDs are currently assisting schools that experience oversized class sizes. There is also emphasis on monitoring enrolments at schools to ensure that schools enroll according to their capacity.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 341

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Adv A de W Alberts (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether she is aware that Afrikaans-speaking learners have been turned away from a certain single-medium school (name furnished), as this school offers tuition in isiXhosa only, which has led to these learners' parents having to pay higher transportation costs in order to send them to the nearest Afrikaans school; if not,

(2) whether she will investigate these incidents; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether she will intervene and compel the school to accommodate the Afrikaans learners, such as is the case with (a) Ermelo High School and (b) Randburg High School; if not, (i) why not and (ii) based on what (aa) policy and (bb) legal grounds? NW486E

REPLIES:

(1) Whether she is aware that Afrikaans-speaking learners have been turned away from a certain single-medium school (name furnished), as this school offers tuition in isiXhosa only, which has led to these learners' parents having to pay higher transportation costs in order to send them to the nearest Afrikaans school; if not,

No. The Minister is not aware of Afrikaans-speaking learners who have been turned away from any isiXhosa medium public school.

(2) Whether she will investigate these incidents; if so, what are the relevant details?

Upon receiving such request, the Minister would set up a transversal team to investigate this matter fully, following all the steps necessary to resolve cases of this nature.

(3) Whether she will intervene and compel the school to accommodate the Afrikaans learners, such as is the case with (a) Ermelo High School and (b) Randburg High School; if not, (i) why not and (ii) based on what (aa) policy and (bb) legal grounds?

The Minister's intervention will be based on a full investigation of the facts of the case and compliance to all relevant policies, as well as being considerate of any legal implications that may pertain to her recommendations to the school.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 339

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs J M Maluleke (ANC) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she is aware of the challenges of the current post provisioning model in that (a) it does not allow for the diversification of the school curriculum and (b) there are not enough teachers for all the subjects covered by the specified model; if so, what steps does she intend to take in this regard? NW484E

REPLY

Whether she is aware of the challenges of the current post provisioning model in that (a) it does not allow for the diversification of the school curriculum and

(a) The current post provisioning model does allow for the diversification of the school curriculum. Norms for provisioning for each of the subjects and learning areas are weighted and factored into the model. These norms are based on the principle of equitable distribution of a limited resource (teachers) and schools, especially secondary schools, which offer a complex curriculum. This may invariably disadvantage some schools e.g. the offering of subjects that are not weighted and result in a much lower than the average learner educator ratio. This places stress on teacher provisioning. Allocating teachers to such schools may mean taking posts from other schools. Schools that need to change their curriculum need to request permission from the Head of Department to ensure that all relevant factors are taken into consideration before approval is granted. These factors include compliance to the curriculum policy, the number of funded posts and the viability of offering subjects that require low learner numbers.

(b) there are not enough teachers for all the subjects covered by the specified model; if so, what steps does she intend to take in this regard?

As explained in the question (a) above, the overall basket of posts declared is constrained by the budget available. The post distribution model can only distribute the number of posts that have been declared. The larger the basket of posts created overall, the more posts will be allocated to each school and greater are the possibilities of catering for highly diversified curriculum offering. The Department is aware of shortages in certain subjects mainly mathematics, physical sciences, home language teachers in the foundation phase and senior phases generally and more acutely in indigenous languages. However, we believe that initiatives such as the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme and provincial bursary schemes with their focus on scarce skills are making a significant contribution towards ensuring the supply of teachers in scarce skills. For the first time since its inception the number of teachers that graduated through the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme has exceeded 3000 and each of these educators is qualified in one or more of the scarce skills.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 335

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr M Johnson (ANC) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Why, in view of the fact that most learners in the Gamtoos Valley of the Kouga Municipality explore vacation jobs in the agricultural sector, has Agriculture as a subject not been included in the school curriculum of the Eastern Cape in the farming communities? NW479E

REPLY:

Currently all schools in South Africa are implementing the National Curriculum Statements in Grades 1 to 12. In grades 10-12, Agricultural subjects such as Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Management Practices and Agricultural Technology are offered as choice subjects to learners. Schools can offer these subjects providing that they have a qualified teacher to teach these subjects as well as the necessary practical facilities to offer these Agricultural subjects.

Agricultural Management Practices and Agricultural technology are offered by fully fledged Agricultural Secondary schools because these subjects require learners to have access to a farm as well as to be partaking in production activities. Currently the number of schools offering Agricultural subjects in the Eastern Cape is as follows:

Province

Agricultural subject

Number of schools offering the subject

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Sciences

548

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Management Practices

6

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Technology

2

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 333

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr D A Kganare (Cope) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

With reference to the one per cent pass rate of learners in grade 8 who pass matric and obtain a C symbol or higher in Mathematics and Physical Science, what steps has she taken to bring our pass rate on par with low-income countries like Swaziland, Kenya and Tanzania? NW469E

REPLY:

The Department of Basic Education is not aware of any research findings that confirm that one percent of Grade 8 learners who pass matric and obtain a C symbol or higher in Mathematics and Physical Science.

The published findings of the Trends in Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS) written by Grade 8 learners in 2002 and 2011 (conducted on learners when in Grade 9) show an improvement in scores in both Mathematics and Science. TIMSS is the only external assessment conducted on learners in Grade 8 in our schools in Mathematics and Science, which provides empirical evidence based on the kind of assessment conducted.

Trends in the achievement in Mathematics and Science in South African have shown the following scores since 1995 to 2011, and indicate an improvement in performance in 2011:

MATHEMATICS

Ave scale

score (SE)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2011

352 (2.5)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2002

285 (4.2)

Grade 8 TIMMS 2002

264 (5.5)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1999

275 (6.8)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1995

276 (6.7)

SCIENCE

Grade 9 TIMMS 2011

332 (3.7)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2002

268 (5.5)

Grade 8 TIMMS 2002

244 (6.7)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1999

243 (7.8)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1995

260 (7.9)

The only valid comparison between South Africa and Tanzania, Swaziland and Kenya comes from the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) It is true that these 3 countries performed better than South Africa on average (see attached). This however applies to mathematics and reading in grade 6.

Figure 1: Reading achievement in SACMEQ 2 and 3 by country

Note: A star signifies that the change was significantly different from zero (p< 0.95)

Figure 2: Mathematics achievement in SACMEQ 2 and 3 by country

Note: A star signifies that the change was significantly different from zero (p< 0.95)

· The following steps have been taken to improve learner performance in Mathematics and Physical Science:

· Development of the Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025, which encapsulates 27 goals on improving learner achievement as well as support in this regard. Targets have been set for all provinces and are monitored on an annual basis.

· The implementation of the Action Plan to 201: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025 is carried out through the National Strategy for Learner Attainment which is reviewed annually to enhance implementation. Quarterly reports are analysed to monitor progress in this regard.

· The strengthening of school-based assessment is done through the development of exemplar assessment items and provided to schools to use.

· The DBE has recently established a quality assurance team which will standardised all external assessments administered by provinces and districts.

· In addition to the already provided Mathematics workbooks, the DBE has, in partnership with SASOL INZALO, developed and distributed Natural Science and Technology (NST) workbooks to all Grade 4-6 learners.

· The Literacy and Numeracy Strategy which contains set targets and activities to realize these targets is being implemented in the Sector.

· The Sector has also introduced the Dinaledi project (seats of excellence) to focus on increasing participation and the success rate of learners, with an emphasis on girl learners, in Mathematics and Physical Science.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 316

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether her department, in light of the attrition rate, is progressively dealing with chain of supply of and demand for educators;

(2) whether she has found that the delivery of textbooks is taking place according to the numbers and destinations that have been determined; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) is there any progress in addressing scarce infrastructure in schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW395E

RESPONSE:

(1) Whether her department, in light of the attrition rate, is progressively dealing with chain of supply of and demand for educators?

The trends in educator attrition rate in public education for the last five years show that the rate ranges between 3.2% - 3.6%. This is by no means an alarming rate of attrition for an education system of a country of South Africa's development level. A number of developments in the sector including the introduction of the Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD) and the growth of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme have contributed to the generation of renewed interest in teacher education. The numbers of enrolments and graduates have been steadily increasing. For the first time since its inception, the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme has produced more than 3000 graduates at the end of 2012 and these will be placed in schools during the course of 2013.

(2) Whether she has found that the delivery of textbooks is taking place according to the numbers and destinations that have been determined; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Yes. Through the monitoring of the procurement and delivery of LTSM in provinces, the DBE found that the delivery of textbooks took place as planned in provinces. As at 28 February 2013 delivery of textbooks to schools was at 99.26%.

(3) is there any progress in addressing scarce infrastructure in schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The Department of Basic Education has made significant progress in improving the state of Education infrastructure in the country, particularly in the building of new schools, providing access to water, sanitation and electrification to our schools. A substantial amount has already been invested in the schools building programme through the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) and the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI).

The provincially planned and driven programme is funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) and Equitable Share (ES). For the 2012/13 financial year it comprises of a national budget of R8, 5 billion with 9454 projects already located at varying stages in the planning/delivery pipeline.

The second national programme is the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI).This programme is funded through a Schedule 7 conditional grant, the School Backlogs Infrastructure Grant (SBIG). The programme targets both the introduction of water, sanitation and electricity to schools lacking any form of these services, as well as the eradication of inappropriate structures. R8.2bn is allocated to the programme of which R3.1bn is already committed within the programmes being implemented through an expanded range of implementing agents.

The scope of the ASIDI programme comprises the following:

· 510 schools with inappropriate structures are being replaced with brand new schools that meet the department's standards of basic functionality.

· 939 schools that previously did not have any access to sanitation will be supplied with a basic level of sanitation

· 932 schools will get electricity for the first time

· 1145 will be provided with basic water supplies for the first time.

What the Department of Basic Education has achieved so far:

· 16 of the 49 inappropriate schools have been completed since the beginning of 2012

· 107 schools have been electrified countrywide

· 196 schools have been provided with sanitation countrywide and

· 131 schools have been provided with water countrywide

DBE has also importantly invested in the maintenance of existing infrastructure. Inadequate maintenance on existing infrastructure merely adds to future infrastructure backlogs. The Department of Basic Education developed facilities maintenance guidelines for public schools to assist provinces in implementing maintenance strategies.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 304

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Adv A de W Alberts (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What is the educational theory at the heart of the decision that matric pupils may fail twice before being promoted automatically;

(2) how will she ensure that pupils who have failed twice are going to receive schooling of such quality that they will pass matric as persons who are ready for the job market;

(3) whether, in the light of how South Africa weighs up against international standards, she is planning to promote an appreciation for higher standards in school education; if not, why not; if so, how does she plan to ensure higher standards in school education? NW381E

REPLY:

(1) This is not something new because since 1998 provision has been made for repetition of a grade, namely in paragraph 31 of the Admission policy for ordinary public schools as published as Government Notice 2432 in the Government Gazette, Vol. 400, No. 19377 of 19 October 1998.

The norm for repetition of a grade is based on the age cohort of the grade and is one year per phase. This policy was adopted by all provinces and in some instances codified in law.

Multiple repetition in Grades 10 and 11 must not be used for gate-keeping purposes. Learners repeating either Grade 10 or 11 must receive the relevant support to enable him or her to progress with their cohort to the next grade the following year.

Retaining learners in Grade 11 will not allow them to sit for the National Senior Certificate examination as a part-time candidate as only Grade 12 learners may enroll for the final examination. A progression to Grade 12 will at least allow them an opportunity to complete the outstanding requirements.

In some cases learners have been retained for three to four years in a single grade. These learners will leave school with a school report of the last grade promoted in, with no opportunity to complete a school leaving certificate. There are cases where a learner has only failed a compulsory subject, e.g. the Home language, passed all other subjects but has failed the grade and therefore was retained until the language is passed.

It is, however, imperative to note that progression to Grade 12 does not imply that a learner will be issued with a National Senior Certificate at the end of Grade 12. To obtain a National Senior Certificate which is a three-year qualification all learners must comply with the certification requirements as stipulated in policy and regulations.

(2) Learners repeating a grade must be offered adequate additional support in order to achieve an appropriate competence. Teachers must assist the learners in those subjects which they failed by means of extra classes in the afternoon. Many schools make use of this method, even for learners who have passed to enable them to get better results. Parents must be kept informed on a regular basis on the progress of the repeaters.

(3) I am fully committed in maintaining high standards in the South African school system and has therefore ensured that the National Senior Certificate is registered as a 130 credit certificate at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and that it must comply, amongst others with the objectives of the NQF, and where applicable, be internationally comparable.

The Department of Basic Education is also supported by Umalusi, the Quality Council for General and Further Education and Training, which will ensure that the integrity and credibility of the General and Further Education and Training sub-framework on the NQF is maintained.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 288
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013 (INTERNATIONAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)
Mrs A T Lovernore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) What definition of rural is applied by her department when referring to rural schools;

(2) what (a)(i) is the breakdown of teacher shortages for each subject and (ii) are the implications of such shortages, (b) compensation (i) monetarily and (ii) none-monetarily does each provincial education department offer to teachers working in rural schools and (c) reasons are provided by certain bursars (name furnished) who indicate that they do not wish to teach in rural areas;

(3) whether such bursars are obliged by her department to work in these areas?
NW364E

REPLIES

(1) What definition of rural is applied by her department when referring to rural schools?


A rural area is defined as ''farms and traditional areas characterised by low population densities, low levels of economic activity and low levels of infrastructure" Government Gazette 34346, June 6, 2011.

(2) What (a)(i) is the breakdown of teacher shortages for each subject and (ii) are the implications of such shortages, (b) compensation (i) monetarily and (ii) non-monetarily does each provincial education department offer to teachers working in rural schools and (c) reasons are provided by certain bursars (name furnished) who indicate that they do not wish to teach in rural areas?

(a) (i) The Department uses the number of temporarily appointed un/under-qualified teacher as a proxy to monitor teacher shortages. As at the end of December 2012 there were approximately 9300 un/under-qualified educators employed in the system of which about 70% was in KwaZulu-Natal. There is currently no breakdown in terms of subject areas of shortages available. The Department is currently developing a system to profile the qualifications of each teacher in terms of specialisation and what they are actually teaching.

(ii) In order to ensure that there is no class without a teacher, un/under-qualified teachers are appointed in vacant posts. However, the number of un/unqualified educators is decreasing every year due to the contribution of the Funza Lushaka graduates and the general increase in the number of teacher education graduates in recent years.

(b) (i) In terms of the policy on teacher incentives, PEDs can pay a minimum amount equal to 10% of the first notch of an entry salary of a teacher with a four year qualification (currently K1440 per month), and

(ii) only monetary incentives are provided for.

(c) The Department does not record reasons per bursas. However, bursars mention issues such as transport. accommodation and general living conditions in the rural areas.

3) Whether such bursars are obliged by her department to work in these areas?

In terms of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme contractual obligation, a bursary can be placed at any public school, including rural schools. A bursar who declines a post offered for whatever reason, including that a post is in a rural school, is in breach of contract and his her bursary is converted into a loan.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 287

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) (a) With reference to her reply to question 452 on 18 May 2012, on what date was the national literacy and numeracy strategy developed and (b) what are the details of the roll-out of the strategy referred to in her reply;

(2) what (a) are the major components of the strategy and (b) research at (i) provincial or (ii) national level formed the basis of the strategy;

(3) has the strategy been implemented; if not, when will it be implemented; if so, when was the strategy implemented;

(4) what (a) provinces have a literacy and numeracy strategy and (b) action has been taken to provide a workable strategy to provinces without a strategy;

(5) whether her department (a) has instructed a team to visit each province to assess the probable efficacy of each province's literacy and numeracy strategy and (b) will make a decision on the necessity for a national strategy based on its findings in the province; if so, what are the relevant details? NW363E

REPLY:

(1) (a) The National literacy and Numeracy Strategy was developed in October 2011 in response to strengthening learning outcomes in Literacy and Numeracy from Grades R to 9. It has given impetus to the implementation of Action Plan 2014 towards Schooling 2025.

(b) The Strategy has been aligned to the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA).

Communication and advocacy for the strategy took the form of provincial and district

road shows that were conducted in April-May 2012 as well as the NSLA MAGOTLA

that took place in February and October 2012. The roll-out of the Strategy in 2012, highlighted Literacy and Numeracy interventions and gave effect to provincial, district and school improvement plans.

(2) (a) The major components of the strategy are written into a short to medium term implementation plan in pursuit of attaining the literacy and numeracy targets that have been benchmarked for Grades 1-9 as outlined in Action Plan 2014, Towards Schooling 2025. The components are as follows:

- Integrate several sub-strategies , specifically teacher development and support, provisioning and utilisation of Learning and Teaching support materials(LTSM), ICT in education and accountability systems ;

- Prioritise poor performing schools in poor performing districts for special and sustained monitoring and support;

- Strengthen Early Childhood Education (ECD) by improving quality of learning and teaching programmes and the qualifications and training of teachers and practitioners;

- Strengthen classroom practice by supporting and coaching teachers on the use of the Workbooks, analysing of continuous diagnostic learner assessments, implementation of appropriate methodologies to improve the teaching of Reading, Writing and Mathematics;

- Provide support programmes for School Management Team(SMT) on curriculum management, leadership and implementation at school level;

- Provide Teacher training and support programmes aimed at improving teacher's conceptual knowledge, pedagogy and curriculum delivery at classroom level;

- Provide and monitor the effective utilisation of Learning and Teacher Support Materials (LTSM);

- Strengthen district development and support by skilling and training district officials to take a leading role in providing support to schools;

- Improve the level of accountability amongst school and district managers for learner performance and school functionality;

- Strengthen oversight, monitoring , support and intervention activities that will focus on provincial plans, district support initiatives and school implementation plans for effective delivery of numeracy and literacy programmes;

- Strengthen advocacy amongst parents such that parents and caregivers are persuaded to get involved in improving their children's literacy and numeracy abilities:

- Mobilise NGOs, business and social partners to support the roll-out of the implementation plan.

(b) Research:

(i) At National level the research findings of the Annual National Assessments (which have been conducted from 2008), the Progress in International Reading and Literacy Study(PIRLS), the Third International Mathematics and Science (TIMSS) and Southern and Eastern Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) have informed the interventions of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy.

(ii) At Provincial level, the research studies conducted by the Western Cape to evaluate the effectiveness of their Literacy and Numeracy Strategy have been used to inform the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy. It is evident from the Western Cape experience that improvement in learner performance is a slow and painstaking goal and that there must be a concise and coherent plan of action that will enable continuous oversight, monitoring and support across all levels of the system.

(3) Yes. The interventions in the implementation plan feature in Provincial strategies and have been implemented across the system since 2011.

(4) All (9) Provinces have a Literacy and Numeracy Strategy. The challenge is that most Provinces have not set aside a dedicated budget to implement the interventions.

(5) (a) A National Ministerial Task Team conducted a National Reading Audit in all Provinces in November –December 2012 and is currently engaged in National Mathematics, Science and Technology Audits. The audits are aimed at gathering information from provincial, district officials, as well as School Management Teams and Teachers. The National Reading Audit Report has been analysed and a Reading Remedial Plan for each province has been developed and disseminated to all Provincial Heads.

b) The recommendation of the National Reading Audit Report has given impetus to the strengthening of the implementation of the interventions of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy across all levels of the system. Individual Provincial Remedial Reading Plans aligned to the audit findings have been drawn up for each province. These Reading Remedial Plans have been submitted for approval to HEDCOM.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 281

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) (a) How many markers of grade 12 examinations were there in each province in 2012 and (b) how many underwent a competency test in each province;

(2) were the same competency tests used in all provinces; if not, why not;

(3) did the results of the tests facilitate the placement of markers as planned; if so, what are the relevant details? NW356E

RESPONSE

Provinces

Markers

Senior Markers

Deputy Chief Markers

Chief Markers

Internal Moderators

Mpumalanga

2 981

592

59

73

51

Northern Cape

593

134

0

63

63

North West

1 891

348

53

84

84

Western Cape

2 512

408

43

66

66

Free State

1576

315

48

84

84

Limpopo

3 906

759

174

69

32

KZN

7650

1512

202

70

72

Gauteng

6784

804

73

139

139

Eastern Cape

3432

671

126

77

77

Total

31 325

5 543

778

(1) With reference to reported non- or late payment of teachers' salaries and the incidences of ghost teachers in the Eastern Cape, (a) what payroll systems or applications are used by the provincial department and (b) when were such systems implemented?

a) The Department of Education in the Eastern Cape uses the PERSAL payroll systems as do all other provincial and national departments.

(b) The PERSAL system was implemented in 1991 across the country.

(2) Whether the Eastern Cape education department has sufficiently trained and dedicated personnel to operate the payroll systems; if not, what steps are being taken to ensure effective professional human resource and payroll management as an essential element of good governance; if so, what are the relevant details?

Yes. The Eastern Cape Education Department has sufficiently trained and dedicated personnel to operate the payroll (PERSAL) system. There are three (3) dedicated officials in each of the 23 districts and nine (9) at Head Office. Each of these officials has undergone formal training in PERSAL modules related to appointments and salaries. .

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 186
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/02/2013 (INTERNATIONAL QUESTION PAPER: 2/2013)
Mr AM Mpontshane (IFP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) W k i steps are being taken to ensure that the Triple T strategy of teachers, textbooks and time is (a) implemented and (b) fully functional across all provinces,

(2) whether all textbooks have been delivered to schools in (a) Limpopo and (b) the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether any steps have been taken to ensure that teachers' unions do not (a) disrupt classes this academic year and (b) hold the education system to ransom over salary demands; if not, why not; if so, what steps? NWl99E

REPLY

(1) What steps are being taken to ensure that the Triple T strategy of teachers, textbooks and time is (a) implemented and (b) fully functional across all provinces?

The Department of Basic of Education has deployed 68 external moderators across all provinces to monitor. amongst others:

(a) These moderators visit schools daily according to an approved scheduled in order to monitor the implementation of the integrated Quality Management System (IQMS). They also provide onsite feedback and support During their visits, the implementation

of the Triple T's is monitored through an assessment of the school's functionality as well as the school's management of the curriculum. A signed report with the moderators' findings and recommendations is left after each school visited.

(b) Consolidated reports on the findings and observations of the moderators as well as individual school reports are forwarded to the provinces for their intervention on the areas identified for further support and action. Follow-ups on the reports are also undertaken by both the external moderators as well as the provincial IQMS coordinators.

(2) As at the 30 January 2013, the percentage of delivery of textbooks to schools is as follows:

Limpopo- 99.7%
The appointed service provider has reported the completion of the two (2) phases of the delivery process - the first was completed towards the end of the 2012 school calendar year, and the second after schools reopened in January 2013. The second phase was intended lo ensure that the shortages and/or corrections in the consignments delivered In November/December 2012 indicated on the Proof of Delivery. are ultimate& delivered to the schools. The province is determined to ensure full CAPS-aligned textbook coverage for Grades 4, 5: 6, and 11. Surplus stock purchased to remediate for any shortages have been delivered to district warehouses to ensure rapid remediation. Schools that report shortages to the district offices have been notified and are collecting from the warehouse. Reports from District managers are that the process is working well.

Eastern Cape-99%
Provinces were busy doing a '"mop-up" to check l=that all textbook shortages are remediated.

(3) Whether any steps have been taken to ensure that teachers' unions do not (a) disrupt classes this academic year and (b) hold the education system to ransom over salary demands; if not, why sot; if so, what steps?

(a) Unions and the State as employer concluded a multi term collective agreement on 31 July 2012 on the improvement of salaries and other conditions of service of all public servants including teachers. This agreement is contained in PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2012 and it provides among others for salary adjustment of 7% from 1 ,May 2012 to 31 March 2013, an average projected CPI plus 1% for the period 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014 and from 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015 a CPI plus 1%. Therefore, a salary strike in tile sector is unlikely as this agreement prevents all parties from engaging in industrial action for the duration of the agreement. During the State of the Nation Address of 14 Felir3ary 2013 as well as the during the National Teaching award that took place on 0'7 March 2013, the President prioritised the remuneration of teachers and set up a Presidential Remuneration Commission to investigate the appropriateness of the remuneration and conditions of service especially of teachers. This will further stabilize the education sector from any disruption of classes.

(b) Action will be taken against educators who participated in the class disruptions (strikes) that are not in compliance with the LRA. Depending on the circumstances and merits of each case; involved educators will undergo formal disciplinary processes resulting in imposition of sanctions that may include dismissal. The Principle of' "No work, No pay" will however apply irrespective of whether the strike is compliant or not.

Reply received: February 2013

QUESTION 136

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr S Esau (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many legal matters were dealt with by her department (a) in the (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12 financial years and (b) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

(2) (a) how many of the specified legal matters were dealt with by (i) the State Attorney and (ii) private attorneys during the specified periods and (b) what are the reasons why her department was not represented by the State Attorney in each specified case;

(3) what total amounts were paid by her department to (a) the State Attorney and (b) private attorneys during the specified periods? NW142E

Response

(1) See Annexure 1

(2)

(3) (a)(i) All legal matters were dealt with by the State Attorney

(ii) None

(4) (a) See Annexure A

(b) None

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 103

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr D J Stubbe (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether (a) her department and (b) any entities reporting to it paid any bonuses to senior officials in December 2012; if so, in each specified case, (i) to whom and (ii) what amount was paid;

(2) whether the specified bonuses were performance-based; if not, what is the justification for each bonus; if so, in each case, from which budget were the performance bonuses paid;

(3) whether, in each case, (a) a performance agreement was signed with the official and (b) regular performance assessments were conducted; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW109E

Response

NO

DEPARTMENT

⃰ ELRC

SACE

UMALUSI

1.(i)

(ii)

No

Not applicable

Yes

Chief Financial Officer, Senior Manager: Collective Bargaining and Senior Manager: Corporate Services

No

Not applicable

No

Not applicable

2.

Not applicable

R42,258.00, R30,471.00 and R33,944.00 respectively

Not applicable

Not applicable

3.(a)

(b)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Yes

Yes

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

NB Performance bonuses were for the assessment period 2011/12 paid late.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 70

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr A C Steyn (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(a) How many tickets did (i) her department and (ii) any of its entities purchase to attend business breakfasts hosted by a certain newspaper (name furnished) (aa) in the (aaa) 2010-11 and (bbb) 2011-12 financial years and (bb) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what was the total cost in each case? NW76E

RESPONSE

(a) None, the Department has never purchased any tickets to attend business breakfasts hosted by The New Age.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) N/A

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 44

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

44. Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What criteria are used to assess the efficacy of school governing bodies (SGBs);

(2) whether a scoring system exists; if not, on what basis are SGBs determined to be dysfunctional; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) what are the details of the support offered to SGBs identified as dysfunctional;

(4) whether the responsibilities of SGBs considered dysfunctional are assumed by an appropriate structure until such SGBs achieve functionality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW46E

RESPONSES:

(1) What criteria are used to assess the efficacy of school governing bodies (SGBs)?

The criteria to assess SGB functionality is contained in the Whole School Evaluation (WSE) Tool. Section 3 of the tool evaluates school governance matters. The criteria evaluate the establishment and effectiveness of the SGB, provision of clear direction by the SGB, performance of SGB functions within its legal and financial mandate and the functions relating to the employ of staff employed by the SGB.

(2) Whether a scoring system exists; if not, on what basis are SGBs determined to be dysfunctional; if so, what are the relevant details?

The WSE tool uses the rating scale rather than scores. The scale has five levels namely, needs urgent support, needs improvement, acceptable, good and outstanding. The scale can easily be converted into scores from 1 to 5 (A five-point Likert scale).

(3) What are the details of the support offered to SGBs identified as dysfunctional?

All SGBs receive generic training at first and thereafter focused training in terms of specific needs as identified through the monitoring and evaluation process by Circuit Managers or Whole School Evaluation officials. A dysfunctional SGB receives targeted support according to its identified area/s of weakness.

The Department has supplied all Circuit Managers and principals with Capacity Building Programmes for School Governing Bodies Guidelines to assist them with knowledge and skills to support SGBs better.

(4) Whether the responsibilities of SGBs considered dysfunctional are assumed by an appropriate structure until such SGBs achieve functionality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Section 25 of the South African Schools Act provides for the provincial Head of Department, if the SGB fails to perform one or more of functions allocated to it, to appoint sufficient persons to perform such functions on behalf of the SGB for a period of time until a new SGB is elected or has been capacitated to can assume its responsibilities.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 475
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 15/03/2013 (INTERNAL
OUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)
Dr C P Mulder (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:*

(1) How many pupils from each of the 11 official language groups (a) in the basic phase of school education (details furnished) are currently receiving tuition in their mother tongue in terms of the National Curriculum Policy and (b) will continue to receive mother tongue tuition after the basic phase;

(2) (a) Why are children receiving tuition in another language after the basic phase and (b) what is the Government doing to ensure that pupils continue to receive education in their mother tongue even after the basic phase? NW634E

REPLY

(1) (a) The Department encourages learners to learn through their Home Languages wherever it is feasible and practicable. This is particularly so in the lower grades (Foundation Phase) where learners learn important basic literacy skills such as reading, writing and counting the Annual School Survey 2011 provides number of Foundation Phase learners by LoLT as per illustration Table below

Language

Foundation Phase

English

436 377

Afrikaans

347 320

IsiNdebele

27 926

IsiZuIu

856 568

IsiXhosa

655 891

Siswati

71 639

Sepedi

341 013

Sesotho

165 102

Setswana

293 171

Tshivenda

64 160

Xitsonga

112 912

SA Sign Language

206


Details of learners in each grade attached at Annexure A and by province at Annexure B.

(b) Only English and Afrikaans speaking learners continue to receive tuition in their mother tongue beyond the Foundation Phase. African languages are only used as languages of learning and teaching in the Foundation Phase. Thereafter they switch to English as LoLT from the intermediate Phase and beyond. The Eastern Cape is piloting six years of mother tongue education in 73 schools in Comfimvaba District; thereby affording IsiXhosa speaking learners to learn through their home language in the Intermediate Phase. The pilot was fist implemented in 2012.

(2) (a) The reasons why children use language(s) other than their own for tuition is multifaceted. South Africa is a multilingual country: though there are areas where monolingualism is prevalent. Most urban areas, including cosmopolitan are multilingual. It is not easy to enforce mother tongue education in such setups, hence the Department allows for dual medium schools to exist alongside each other. It looks simple to enforce mother tongue education in rural setup where there is one dominant language. However, the opposite is the case. Parents, particularly Africans, are not aware that learners learn best through their home languages. They strongly associate mastery of English with academic achievements.

(b) The Department, through the Incremental Introduction of African Languages Strategy, is planning to extend wage of African languages for tuition in the Intermediate Phase by 2016 (Grade 4), 2017 (Grade 5) and 2018 (Grade 6). The strategy will see to it that all learners in all public schools learn an African language as a subject before the end of their schooling. The strategy will also strengthen the teaching of English First Additional language

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 432

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How does her department determine the percentage of learners with their own textbooks for each subject;

(2) what are the results of such determination in each province in the (a) 2011, (b) 2012 and (c) 2013 academic years;

(3) what is her department's textbook allocation target for the 2014 academic year;

(4) how will her department ensure that every province achieves the national target? NW582E

REPLY:

(1) The Department of Basic Education has conducted research into the identification of levels of access of learners to textbooks. The Technical Report of the 2011 DBE School Monitoring Survey looked into the percentage of learners having access to relevant LTSM for their grade for Mathematics and Language. The findings revealed that, overall, 78% of Grade 6 learners in South Africa had access to a Language textbook. The percentage across provinces ranged from 58% in the Free State to 93% in the North West. In Mpumalanga, Northern Cape and the Free State less than 70% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Language book. Overall 83% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Mathematics textbook. The percentage across provinces ranged from a low 50% in the Free State to 98% in the Western Cape. In Mpumalanga and the Free State less than 70% of Grade 6 learners had access to a Mathematics book. However this does not necessarily imply that every learner had his/her own copy as in some cases textbooks are shared between learners.

(2) The Department of Basic Education has developed the Grades 1-6, 10 and 11 Catalogues in line with the implementation of CAPS. The Grades 1-3 and 10 National Catalogues have been implemented in 2012 and the Grades 4-6 and 11 National Catalogue is currently being implemented in 2013. The Grades 7-9 and 12 National Catalogues is currently being developed and it is due to be released on 31 March 2013 for implementation in 2014.

These catalogues provide textbooks for the subjects per grade and guide provinces on which textbooks should be purchased for each learner.

Provinces are responsible for the provision of textbooks per subject per grade. The funding for LTSM and procurement models differs from province to province. While most provinces manage the procurement of textbooks for both Section 21 and non Section 21 schools for the CAPS implementing grades in Gauteng and KwaZulu Natal funds are transferred to Section 21 schools who do their own procurement for textbooks. The data generated by the textbook procurement process is used to provide information in regard to the percentage of learners with their own textbooks for each subject.

In addition to the provision of textbooks to learners, the department provides departmentally produced workbooks to all learners in grades 1-6.

(3) The data generated as a result of the textbook procurement processes during the past three years in provinces reveals that while provinces have not achieved the goal of one textbook per subject per learner, year by year all provinces are moving ever closer to achieving this goal. It is expected that the goal of one textbook per subject per grade per learner will be achieved by the end of 2014.

(4) The Department is intending to achieve 100% universal coverage in 2014. Measures are being put in place to ensure that cost-effective textbooks can be procured in order to achieve the goal of universal coverage in 2014.

The DBE developed a time frame based Sector Plan which is used to implement the development of National Catalogues, Procurement of LTSM, Delivery of LTSM to schools and to report monthly on deliveries and shortages.

The Plan has dates for Delivery of LTSM to all schools by provinces. Furthermore, the Department is in a process of Developing an LTSM Policy, which will be Gazetted in 2013.

The provision of cost-effective textbooks will facilitate the achievement of universal coverage in 2014.

The policy is intended to make sure that learners and teachers have access to quality learning and teaching materials to meet the requirements of the curriculum. The national Minimum Schoolbag guideline, describes the minimum quantity and quality of materials that every learner must have access to.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 430

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many learners in each province are currently repeating (a) grade 10 and (b) grade 11;

(2) what (a) remedial assistance has her department developed to assist learners who will progress to grade 12 without meeting promotion requirements and (b) options will be available to learners who have repeated a grade in the further education and training phase and do not meet the National Senior Certificate certification requirements? NW580E

REPLY:

(1) The latest estimates for repetition in Grade 10 and Grade 11 are around 15% to 19%, accounting for around 220 000 learners. We are gratified to note however, that drop out rates in the same grades have declined according to the National Income Dynamics Survey results released in 2012, and the number of out of school youth has also declined according to household data released by Statistics South Africa in 2011 and recently presented to the National Assembly Portfolio Committee on Basic Education.

(2) (a) Learners who repeat Grade 10 and 11 must meet promotion requirements before progressing to Grade 12. This contributes to the high repetition rates observed in these grades. As a more general intervention in the later grades, teacher development and support programmes have been designed using the results of the qualitative assessments of learners' responses from scripts which identified areas of weaknesses and gaps in learner performance in the National Senior Certificate Examination. Thereafter, a remedial plan was developed with identified gaps and what teachers need to do to address the content gaps. This remedial plan was shared with provinces during the DBE Road-shows in March 2013 and also during discussions with District Managers.

Support materials have also been developed in the form of Mind the Gap self study guides, developed by subject specialists and exemplar papers – all of which are available on the Department of Basic Education's website. Extra classes in the form of Saturday schools have been convened using expert teachers. These classes will be extended during winter and spring vacations.

(b) For learners who have not met the National Senior Certificate requirements, supplementary examinations are conducted in March each year to give them an opportunity to pass the examination. In addition, learners who do not satisfy supplementary examination requirements are allowed to register as part-time repeaters for one or two subjects that may be outstanding for the achievement of the National Senior Certificate. Provinces also offer supplementary programmes for adult learners who may register as part-time candidates.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 407

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she will investigate the challenges with regard to the sporting infrastructure at several schools in Chatsworth, KwaZulu-Natal? NW554E

RESPONSE:

The matter has been referred to the KwaZulu Natal Department of Education to investigate and provide a response. On completion of the investigation by the province, a response will be forwarded.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 401

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/2013)

Mr P F Smith (IFP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she has found that a question that appeared on the 2012 grade 12 Mathematical Literacy paper to which learners had to confirm whether Christmas Day is on 25 December in South Africa serves any mathematical purpose; if so, what are the relevant details? NW435E

RESPONSE:

The question reads as follows: State whether the following event is certain, most likely or impossible: Christmas day is on December 25 in South Africa.

The question assesses the concept of 'probability and therefore serves a Mathematical purpose. The Mathematical Literacy Subject Assessment guidelines, which serves as the framework for the design of this question paper requires learners to be able to use probability in making predictions of outcomes in real life situations (and in the context of games). Learners are also required to express probability values in different ways, in words or numerically as fractions, ratios or percentages.

In the case of the said question, it was required that the probability of the event be expressed in words such as certain, impossible or most likely. The event chosen in this question, namely "Christmas Day is on 25 December in South Africa" is a true statement in the context provided and the probability is 100% or 1 or can be expressed in words such as "certain". Note that the question, is not establishing whether learners know the date on which Christmas occurs, but rather it assesses the candidates' understanding of simple probability concepts as prescribed for Mathematical Literacy. This question is also relevant when it is considered that Christmas day is not universally celebrated on the 25 December by all communities (for example the Russian Orthodox Church celebrates Christmas day on another date).

In addition, it needs to be noted that every question paper is structured to cater for low, medium and higher order questions. This specific question is a lower order question carrying two (2) marks and there are other questions that are pitched at the medium and higher order levels. In both these papers, i.e. Paper 1 and Paper 2, candidates were required to answer questions on financial maths, interpret relationships both in the form of formulae and of graphs, calculate perimeter, area and volume, and read maps and plans, which confirms the scope and depth of Mathematical Literacy..

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 375

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr J F Smalle (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Which companies received the tender for textbooks aligned to the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for grades 4, 5, 6 and 11 in Limpopo in 2013;

(2) (a) what was the tender value paid, (b) for what period was the tender awarded and (c) were the companies BEE-compliant;

(3) was the Public Finance Management Act, Act 1 of 1999, regulations and supply chain management procedure followed? NW522E

REPLY:

(1) The provision of the CAPS aligned textbooks for grade 4-6 and 11 followed a process of direct procurement from publishers listed on the National Catalogue and not through any company.

(2) (a) The Unit price of each textbook was predetermined on the National Catalogue. Through further negotiations with publishers the LDoE was able to further derive cost savings on orders.

(b) and (c) Procurement of textbooks was for the 2013 school calendar year and was procured from publishers listed on the National Catalogue.

(3) By the process of applying the National Catalogue and further direct negotiations with publishers, the province was fully compliant with SCM processes and is not time bound.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 374

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr J F Smalle (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether her department was a signatory to the service level agreement with a certain company (name furnished) for the delivery of textbooks aligned to the Curriculum and Assessment Policy Statement (CAPS) for grades 4, 5, 6 and 11 in Limpopo in 2013; if so, (a) when was the agreement signed and (b) who does the specified company report to? NW521E

RESPONSE:

The procurement and delivery of textbooks is a provincial responsibility. The service level agreement is between the Limpopo Department of Education and the contracted service provider.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 369

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether the minimum schoolbag specifications have been finalised for all grades; if not, why not; if so, (a) what are the relevant details and (b) when will the specifications be (i) promulgated and (ii) enforced? NW516E

REPLY:

The draft minimum school bag guidelines have been finalized for all grades. (a) it includes specifications for core LTSM and stationery. (b) The document is an annexure to the draft LTSM policy and (i) will be released when the policy is released during 2013 and (ii) implemented in 2014.

QUESTION 368

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether a new e-education strategy has been developed to replace the 2004 White Paper on e-Education; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will such a strategy be developed and released; if so, what are the relevant details? NW515E

REPLY:

(a) No, however a new implementation plan has been developed to guide and inform the 2004 White Paper on e-Education and aims to:

· Implement the strategic objectives of the White Paper on e-Education (2004)

· Support the attainment of the relevant goals (16 and 20) of Action Plan to 2014

· Support the activities of all strategies that support the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA).

(b) The new implementation plan is currently being finalised and will be released in due course.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 367

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether criteria to combat oversized classes have been developed; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will these criteria be developed; if so,

(2) whether these criteria have been incorporated into the national post provisioning norms; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this be achieved? NW514E

REPLY

(1) Whether criteria to combat oversized classes have been developed; if not, (a) why not and

(1)(a) The existing post provisioning model applies the norms for maximum class size and ideal class for grades 1-9 (class size of between 35-40) and grades 10-12 (class size of between 6-38) respectively. However, the actual class size at school is determined by a number of factors especially the availability of classroom space and teachers. These two factors combined or individually may lead to oversized class sizes. To a lesser extent the distribution of learner numbers by grade and subject in a particular school may also contribute to inconsistent class sizes in schools. Certain numbers of learners in a grade may be difficult to split into ideal class sizes without affecting time tabling (period loads and teacher contact time).

(b) when will these criteria be developed; if so,

(b) As indicated in the response to (a) above, the existing post provisioning norms do take into account the class size.

(2) whether these criteria have been incorporated into the national post provisioning norms; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this be achieved?

(2)(a) In order to address the challenge of oversized class sizes, the Department bid for additional funding for the MTEF period 2009/10-2011/12 with the expectation that PEDs will factor in the amounts as part of their baseline budgets commencing in the 2012/13 financial year. The aim of additional funding is to appoint additional teachers to schools that experience large class sizes. This intervention will obviously benefit schools that have adequate class room space to accommodate extra classes.

(b) when will this be achieved?

(b) PEDs are currently assisting schools that experience oversized class sizes. There is also emphasis on monitoring enrolments at schools to ensure that schools enroll according to their capacity.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 341

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Adv A de W Alberts (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether she is aware that Afrikaans-speaking learners have been turned away from a certain single-medium school (name furnished), as this school offers tuition in isiXhosa only, which has led to these learners' parents having to pay higher transportation costs in order to send them to the nearest Afrikaans school; if not,

(2) whether she will investigate these incidents; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether she will intervene and compel the school to accommodate the Afrikaans learners, such as is the case with (a) Ermelo High School and (b) Randburg High School; if not, (i) why not and (ii) based on what (aa) policy and (bb) legal grounds? NW486E

REPLIES:

(1) Whether she is aware that Afrikaans-speaking learners have been turned away from a certain single-medium school (name furnished), as this school offers tuition in isiXhosa only, which has led to these learners' parents having to pay higher transportation costs in order to send them to the nearest Afrikaans school; if not,

No. The Minister is not aware of Afrikaans-speaking learners who have been turned away from any isiXhosa medium public school.

(2) Whether she will investigate these incidents; if so, what are the relevant details?

Upon receiving such request, the Minister would set up a transversal team to investigate this matter fully, following all the steps necessary to resolve cases of this nature.

(3) Whether she will intervene and compel the school to accommodate the Afrikaans learners, such as is the case with (a) Ermelo High School and (b) Randburg High School; if not, (i) why not and (ii) based on what (aa) policy and (bb) legal grounds?

The Minister's intervention will be based on a full investigation of the facts of the case and compliance to all relevant policies, as well as being considerate of any legal implications that may pertain to her recommendations to the school.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 339

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mrs J M Maluleke (ANC) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Whether she is aware of the challenges of the current post provisioning model in that (a) it does not allow for the diversification of the school curriculum and (b) there are not enough teachers for all the subjects covered by the specified model; if so, what steps does she intend to take in this regard? NW484E

REPLY

Whether she is aware of the challenges of the current post provisioning model in that (a) it does not allow for the diversification of the school curriculum and

(a) The current post provisioning model does allow for the diversification of the school curriculum. Norms for provisioning for each of the subjects and learning areas are weighted and factored into the model. These norms are based on the principle of equitable distribution of a limited resource (teachers) and schools, especially secondary schools, which offer a complex curriculum. This may invariably disadvantage some schools e.g. the offering of subjects that are not weighted and result in a much lower than the average learner educator ratio. This places stress on teacher provisioning. Allocating teachers to such schools may mean taking posts from other schools. Schools that need to change their curriculum need to request permission from the Head of Department to ensure that all relevant factors are taken into consideration before approval is granted. These factors include compliance to the curriculum policy, the number of funded posts and the viability of offering subjects that require low learner numbers.

(b) there are not enough teachers for all the subjects covered by the specified model; if so, what steps does she intend to take in this regard?

As explained in the question (a) above, the overall basket of posts declared is constrained by the budget available. The post distribution model can only distribute the number of posts that have been declared. The larger the basket of posts created overall, the more posts will be allocated to each school and greater are the possibilities of catering for highly diversified curriculum offering. The Department is aware of shortages in certain subjects mainly mathematics, physical sciences, home language teachers in the foundation phase and senior phases generally and more acutely in indigenous languages. However, we believe that initiatives such as the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme and provincial bursary schemes with their focus on scarce skills are making a significant contribution towards ensuring the supply of teachers in scarce skills. For the first time since its inception the number of teachers that graduated through the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme has exceeded 3000 and each of these educators is qualified in one or more of the scarce skills.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 335

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr M Johnson (ANC) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

Why, in view of the fact that most learners in the Gamtoos Valley of the Kouga Municipality explore vacation jobs in the agricultural sector, has Agriculture as a subject not been included in the school curriculum of the Eastern Cape in the farming communities? NW479E

REPLY:

Currently all schools in South Africa are implementing the National Curriculum Statements in Grades 1 to 12. In grades 10-12, Agricultural subjects such as Agricultural Sciences, Agricultural Management Practices and Agricultural Technology are offered as choice subjects to learners. Schools can offer these subjects providing that they have a qualified teacher to teach these subjects as well as the necessary practical facilities to offer these Agricultural subjects.

Agricultural Management Practices and Agricultural technology are offered by fully fledged Agricultural Secondary schools because these subjects require learners to have access to a farm as well as to be partaking in production activities. Currently the number of schools offering Agricultural subjects in the Eastern Cape is as follows:

Province

Agricultural subject

Number of schools offering the subject

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Sciences

548

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Management Practices

6

Eastern Cape

Agricultural Technology

2

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTION 333

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 08/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 06/2013)

Mr D A Kganare (Cope) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

With reference to the one per cent pass rate of learners in grade 8 who pass matric and obtain a C symbol or higher in Mathematics and Physical Science, what steps has she taken to bring our pass rate on par with low-income countries like Swaziland, Kenya and Tanzania? NW469E

REPLY:

The Department of Basic Education is not aware of any research findings that confirm that one percent of Grade 8 learners who pass matric and obtain a C symbol or higher in Mathematics and Physical Science.

The published findings of the Trends in Mathematics and Science Survey (TIMSS) written by Grade 8 learners in 2002 and 2011 (conducted on learners when in Grade 9) show an improvement in scores in both Mathematics and Science. TIMSS is the only external assessment conducted on learners in Grade 8 in our schools in Mathematics and Science, which provides empirical evidence based on the kind of assessment conducted.

Trends in the achievement in Mathematics and Science in South African have shown the following scores since 1995 to 2011, and indicate an improvement in performance in 2011:

MATHEMATICS

Ave scale

score (SE)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2011

352 (2.5)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2002

285 (4.2)

Grade 8 TIMMS 2002

264 (5.5)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1999

275 (6.8)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1995

276 (6.7)

SCIENCE

Grade 9 TIMMS 2011

332 (3.7)

Grade 9 TIMMS 2002

268 (5.5)

Grade 8 TIMMS 2002

244 (6.7)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1999

243 (7.8)

Grade 8 TIMMS 1995

260 (7.9)

The only valid comparison between South Africa and Tanzania, Swaziland and Kenya comes from the Southern and Eastern Africa Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) It is true that these 3 countries performed better than South Africa on average (see attached). This however applies to mathematics and reading in grade 6.

Figure 1: Reading achievement in SACMEQ 2 and 3 by country

Note: A star signifies that the change was significantly different from zero (p< 0.95)

Figure 2: Mathematics achievement in SACMEQ 2 and 3 by country

Note: A star signifies that the change was significantly different from zero (p< 0.95)

· The following steps have been taken to improve learner performance in Mathematics and Physical Science:

· Development of the Action Plan to 2014: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025, which encapsulates 27 goals on improving learner achievement as well as support in this regard. Targets have been set for all provinces and are monitored on an annual basis.

· The implementation of the Action Plan to 201: Towards the Realisation of Schooling 2025 is carried out through the National Strategy for Learner Attainment which is reviewed annually to enhance implementation. Quarterly reports are analysed to monitor progress in this regard.

· The strengthening of school-based assessment is done through the development of exemplar assessment items and provided to schools to use.

· The DBE has recently established a quality assurance team which will standardised all external assessments administered by provinces and districts.

· In addition to the already provided Mathematics workbooks, the DBE has, in partnership with SASOL INZALO, developed and distributed Natural Science and Technology (NST) workbooks to all Grade 4-6 learners.

· The Literacy and Numeracy Strategy which contains set targets and activities to realize these targets is being implemented in the Sector.

· The Sector has also introduced the Dinaledi project (seats of excellence) to focus on increasing participation and the success rate of learners, with an emphasis on girl learners, in Mathematics and Physical Science.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 316

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mr R B Bhoola (MF) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether her department, in light of the attrition rate, is progressively dealing with chain of supply of and demand for educators;

(2) whether she has found that the delivery of textbooks is taking place according to the numbers and destinations that have been determined; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) is there any progress in addressing scarce infrastructure in schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW395E

RESPONSE:

(1) Whether her department, in light of the attrition rate, is progressively dealing with chain of supply of and demand for educators?

The trends in educator attrition rate in public education for the last five years show that the rate ranges between 3.2% - 3.6%. This is by no means an alarming rate of attrition for an education system of a country of South Africa's development level. A number of developments in the sector including the introduction of the Occupation Specific Dispensation (OSD) and the growth of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme have contributed to the generation of renewed interest in teacher education. The numbers of enrolments and graduates have been steadily increasing. For the first time since its inception, the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme has produced more than 3000 graduates at the end of 2012 and these will be placed in schools during the course of 2013.

(2) Whether she has found that the delivery of textbooks is taking place according to the numbers and destinations that have been determined; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

Yes. Through the monitoring of the procurement and delivery of LTSM in provinces, the DBE found that the delivery of textbooks took place as planned in provinces. As at 28 February 2013 delivery of textbooks to schools was at 99.26%.

(3) is there any progress in addressing scarce infrastructure in schools; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

The Department of Basic Education has made significant progress in improving the state of Education infrastructure in the country, particularly in the building of new schools, providing access to water, sanitation and electrification to our schools. A substantial amount has already been invested in the schools building programme through the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) and the Accelerated School Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI).

The provincially planned and driven programme is funded through the Education Infrastructure Grant (EIG) and Equitable Share (ES). For the 2012/13 financial year it comprises of a national budget of R8, 5 billion with 9454 projects already located at varying stages in the planning/delivery pipeline.

The second national programme is the Accelerated Schools Infrastructure Delivery Initiative (ASIDI).This programme is funded through a Schedule 7 conditional grant, the School Backlogs Infrastructure Grant (SBIG). The programme targets both the introduction of water, sanitation and electricity to schools lacking any form of these services, as well as the eradication of inappropriate structures. R8.2bn is allocated to the programme of which R3.1bn is already committed within the programmes being implemented through an expanded range of implementing agents.

The scope of the ASIDI programme comprises the following:

· 510 schools with inappropriate structures are being replaced with brand new schools that meet the department's standards of basic functionality.

· 939 schools that previously did not have any access to sanitation will be supplied with a basic level of sanitation

· 932 schools will get electricity for the first time

· 1145 will be provided with basic water supplies for the first time.

What the Department of Basic Education has achieved so far:

· 16 of the 49 inappropriate schools have been completed since the beginning of 2012

· 107 schools have been electrified countrywide

· 196 schools have been provided with sanitation countrywide and

· 131 schools have been provided with water countrywide

DBE has also importantly invested in the maintenance of existing infrastructure. Inadequate maintenance on existing infrastructure merely adds to future infrastructure backlogs. The Department of Basic Education developed facilities maintenance guidelines for public schools to assist provinces in implementing maintenance strategies.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 304

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Adv A de W Alberts (FF Plus) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What is the educational theory at the heart of the decision that matric pupils may fail twice before being promoted automatically;

(2) how will she ensure that pupils who have failed twice are going to receive schooling of such quality that they will pass matric as persons who are ready for the job market;

(3) whether, in the light of how South Africa weighs up against international standards, she is planning to promote an appreciation for higher standards in school education; if not, why not; if so, how does she plan to ensure higher standards in school education? NW381E

REPLY:

(1) This is not something new because since 1998 provision has been made for repetition of a grade, namely in paragraph 31 of the Admission policy for ordinary public schools as published as Government Notice 2432 in the Government Gazette, Vol. 400, No. 19377 of 19 October 1998.

The norm for repetition of a grade is based on the age cohort of the grade and is one year per phase. This policy was adopted by all provinces and in some instances codified in law.

Multiple repetition in Grades 10 and 11 must not be used for gate-keeping purposes. Learners repeating either Grade 10 or 11 must receive the relevant support to enable him or her to progress with their cohort to the next grade the following year.

Retaining learners in Grade 11 will not allow them to sit for the National Senior Certificate examination as a part-time candidate as only Grade 12 learners may enroll for the final examination. A progression to Grade 12 will at least allow them an opportunity to complete the outstanding requirements.

In some cases learners have been retained for three to four years in a single grade. These learners will leave school with a school report of the last grade promoted in, with no opportunity to complete a school leaving certificate. There are cases where a learner has only failed a compulsory subject, e.g. the Home language, passed all other subjects but has failed the grade and therefore was retained until the language is passed.

It is, however, imperative to note that progression to Grade 12 does not imply that a learner will be issued with a National Senior Certificate at the end of Grade 12. To obtain a National Senior Certificate which is a three-year qualification all learners must comply with the certification requirements as stipulated in policy and regulations.

(2) Learners repeating a grade must be offered adequate additional support in order to achieve an appropriate competence. Teachers must assist the learners in those subjects which they failed by means of extra classes in the afternoon. Many schools make use of this method, even for learners who have passed to enable them to get better results. Parents must be kept informed on a regular basis on the progress of the repeaters.

(3) I am fully committed in maintaining high standards in the South African school system and has therefore ensured that the National Senior Certificate is registered as a 130 credit certificate at Level 4 on the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) and that it must comply, amongst others with the objectives of the NQF, and where applicable, be internationally comparable.

The Department of Basic Education is also supported by Umalusi, the Quality Council for General and Further Education and Training, which will ensure that the integrity and credibility of the General and Further Education and Training sub-framework on the NQF is maintained.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 288
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013 (INTERNATIONAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)
Mrs A T Lovernore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) What definition of rural is applied by her department when referring to rural schools;

(2) what (a)(i) is the breakdown of teacher shortages for each subject and (ii) are the implications of such shortages, (b) compensation (i) monetarily and (ii) none-monetarily does each provincial education department offer to teachers working in rural schools and (c) reasons are provided by certain bursars (name furnished) who indicate that they do not wish to teach in rural areas;

(3) whether such bursars are obliged by her department to work in these areas?
NW364E

REPLIES

(1) What definition of rural is applied by her department when referring to rural schools?


A rural area is defined as ''farms and traditional areas characterised by low population densities, low levels of economic activity and low levels of infrastructure" Government Gazette 34346, June 6, 2011.

(2) What (a)(i) is the breakdown of teacher shortages for each subject and (ii) are the implications of such shortages, (b) compensation (i) monetarily and (ii) non-monetarily does each provincial education department offer to teachers working in rural schools and (c) reasons are provided by certain bursars (name furnished) who indicate that they do not wish to teach in rural areas?

(a) (i) The Department uses the number of temporarily appointed un/under-qualified teacher as a proxy to monitor teacher shortages. As at the end of December 2012 there were approximately 9300 un/under-qualified educators employed in the system of which about 70% was in KwaZulu-Natal. There is currently no breakdown in terms of subject areas of shortages available. The Department is currently developing a system to profile the qualifications of each teacher in terms of specialisation and what they are actually teaching.

(ii) In order to ensure that there is no class without a teacher, un/under-qualified teachers are appointed in vacant posts. However, the number of un/unqualified educators is decreasing every year due to the contribution of the Funza Lushaka graduates and the general increase in the number of teacher education graduates in recent years.

(b) (i) In terms of the policy on teacher incentives, PEDs can pay a minimum amount equal to 10% of the first notch of an entry salary of a teacher with a four year qualification (currently K1440 per month), and

(ii) only monetary incentives are provided for.

(c) The Department does not record reasons per bursas. However, bursars mention issues such as transport. accommodation and general living conditions in the rural areas.

3) Whether such bursars are obliged by her department to work in these areas?

In terms of the Funza Lushaka Bursary Scheme contractual obligation, a bursary can be placed at any public school, including rural schools. A bursar who declines a post offered for whatever reason, including that a post is in a rural school, is in breach of contract and his her bursary is converted into a loan.

Reply received: April 2013

QUESTION 287

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) (a) With reference to her reply to question 452 on 18 May 2012, on what date was the national literacy and numeracy strategy developed and (b) what are the details of the roll-out of the strategy referred to in her reply;

(2) what (a) are the major components of the strategy and (b) research at (i) provincial or (ii) national level formed the basis of the strategy;

(3) has the strategy been implemented; if not, when will it be implemented; if so, when was the strategy implemented;

(4) what (a) provinces have a literacy and numeracy strategy and (b) action has been taken to provide a workable strategy to provinces without a strategy;

(5) whether her department (a) has instructed a team to visit each province to assess the probable efficacy of each province's literacy and numeracy strategy and (b) will make a decision on the necessity for a national strategy based on its findings in the province; if so, what are the relevant details? NW363E

REPLY:

(1) (a) The National literacy and Numeracy Strategy was developed in October 2011 in response to strengthening learning outcomes in Literacy and Numeracy from Grades R to 9. It has given impetus to the implementation of Action Plan 2014 towards Schooling 2025.

(b) The Strategy has been aligned to the National Strategy for Learner Attainment (NSLA).

Communication and advocacy for the strategy took the form of provincial and district

road shows that were conducted in April-May 2012 as well as the NSLA MAGOTLA

that took place in February and October 2012. The roll-out of the Strategy in 2012, highlighted Literacy and Numeracy interventions and gave effect to provincial, district and school improvement plans.

(2) (a) The major components of the strategy are written into a short to medium term implementation plan in pursuit of attaining the literacy and numeracy targets that have been benchmarked for Grades 1-9 as outlined in Action Plan 2014, Towards Schooling 2025. The components are as follows:

- Integrate several sub-strategies , specifically teacher development and support, provisioning and utilisation of Learning and Teaching support materials(LTSM), ICT in education and accountability systems ;

- Prioritise poor performing schools in poor performing districts for special and sustained monitoring and support;

- Strengthen Early Childhood Education (ECD) by improving quality of learning and teaching programmes and the qualifications and training of teachers and practitioners;

- Strengthen classroom practice by supporting and coaching teachers on the use of the Workbooks, analysing of continuous diagnostic learner assessments, implementation of appropriate methodologies to improve the teaching of Reading, Writing and Mathematics;

- Provide support programmes for School Management Team(SMT) on curriculum management, leadership and implementation at school level;

- Provide Teacher training and support programmes aimed at improving teacher's conceptual knowledge, pedagogy and curriculum delivery at classroom level;

- Provide and monitor the effective utilisation of Learning and Teacher Support Materials (LTSM);

- Strengthen district development and support by skilling and training district officials to take a leading role in providing support to schools;

- Improve the level of accountability amongst school and district managers for learner performance and school functionality;

- Strengthen oversight, monitoring , support and intervention activities that will focus on provincial plans, district support initiatives and school implementation plans for effective delivery of numeracy and literacy programmes;

- Strengthen advocacy amongst parents such that parents and caregivers are persuaded to get involved in improving their children's literacy and numeracy abilities:

- Mobilise NGOs, business and social partners to support the roll-out of the implementation plan.

(b) Research:

(i) At National level the research findings of the Annual National Assessments (which have been conducted from 2008), the Progress in International Reading and Literacy Study(PIRLS), the Third International Mathematics and Science (TIMSS) and Southern and Eastern Consortium for Monitoring Educational Quality (SACMEQ) have informed the interventions of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy.

(ii) At Provincial level, the research studies conducted by the Western Cape to evaluate the effectiveness of their Literacy and Numeracy Strategy have been used to inform the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy. It is evident from the Western Cape experience that improvement in learner performance is a slow and painstaking goal and that there must be a concise and coherent plan of action that will enable continuous oversight, monitoring and support across all levels of the system.

(3) Yes. The interventions in the implementation plan feature in Provincial strategies and have been implemented across the system since 2011.

(4) All (9) Provinces have a Literacy and Numeracy Strategy. The challenge is that most Provinces have not set aside a dedicated budget to implement the interventions.

(5) (a) A National Ministerial Task Team conducted a National Reading Audit in all Provinces in November –December 2012 and is currently engaged in National Mathematics, Science and Technology Audits. The audits are aimed at gathering information from provincial, district officials, as well as School Management Teams and Teachers. The National Reading Audit Report has been analysed and a Reading Remedial Plan for each province has been developed and disseminated to all Provincial Heads.

b) The recommendation of the National Reading Audit Report has given impetus to the strengthening of the implementation of the interventions of the National Literacy and Numeracy Strategy across all levels of the system. Individual Provincial Remedial Reading Plans aligned to the audit findings have been drawn up for each province. These Reading Remedial Plans have been submitted for approval to HEDCOM.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 281

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 01/03/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 04/2013)

Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) (a) How many markers of grade 12 examinations were there in each province in 2012 and (b) how many underwent a competency test in each province;

(2) were the same competency tests used in all provinces; if not, why not;

(3) did the results of the tests facilitate the placement of markers as planned; if so, what are the relevant details? NW356E

RESPONSE

Provinces

Markers

Senior Markers

Deputy Chief Markers

Chief Markers

Internal Moderators

Mpumalanga

2 981

592

59

73

51

Northern Cape

593

134

0

63

63

North West

1 891

348

53

84

84

Western Cape

2 512

408

43

66

66

Free State

1576

315

48

84

84

Limpopo

3 906

759

174

69

32

KZN

7650

1512

202

70

72

Gauteng

6784

804

73

139

139

Eastern Cape

3432

671

126

77

77

Total

31 325

5 543

778

(1) With reference to reported non- or late payment of teachers' salaries and the incidences of ghost teachers in the Eastern Cape, (a) what payroll systems or applications are used by the provincial department and (b) when were such systems implemented?

a) The Department of Education in the Eastern Cape uses the PERSAL payroll systems as do all other provincial and national departments.

(b) The PERSAL system was implemented in 1991 across the country.

(2) Whether the Eastern Cape education department has sufficiently trained and dedicated personnel to operate the payroll systems; if not, what steps are being taken to ensure effective professional human resource and payroll management as an essential element of good governance; if so, what are the relevant details?

Yes. The Eastern Cape Education Department has sufficiently trained and dedicated personnel to operate the payroll (PERSAL) system. There are three (3) dedicated officials in each of the 23 districts and nine (9) at Head Office. Each of these officials has undergone formal training in PERSAL modules related to appointments and salaries. .

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 186
DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 22/02/2013 (INTERNATIONAL QUESTION PAPER: 2/2013)
Mr AM Mpontshane (IFP) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:


(1) W k i steps are being taken to ensure that the Triple T strategy of teachers, textbooks and time is (a) implemented and (b) fully functional across all provinces,

(2) whether all textbooks have been delivered to schools in (a) Limpopo and (b) the Eastern Cape; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether any steps have been taken to ensure that teachers' unions do not (a) disrupt classes this academic year and (b) hold the education system to ransom over salary demands; if not, why not; if so, what steps? NWl99E

REPLY

(1) What steps are being taken to ensure that the Triple T strategy of teachers, textbooks and time is (a) implemented and (b) fully functional across all provinces?

The Department of Basic of Education has deployed 68 external moderators across all provinces to monitor. amongst others:

(a) These moderators visit schools daily according to an approved scheduled in order to monitor the implementation of the integrated Quality Management System (IQMS). They also provide onsite feedback and support During their visits, the implementation

of the Triple T's is monitored through an assessment of the school's functionality as well as the school's management of the curriculum. A signed report with the moderators' findings and recommendations is left after each school visited.

(b) Consolidated reports on the findings and observations of the moderators as well as individual school reports are forwarded to the provinces for their intervention on the areas identified for further support and action. Follow-ups on the reports are also undertaken by both the external moderators as well as the provincial IQMS coordinators.

(2) As at the 30 January 2013, the percentage of delivery of textbooks to schools is as follows:

Limpopo- 99.7%
The appointed service provider has reported the completion of the two (2) phases of the delivery process - the first was completed towards the end of the 2012 school calendar year, and the second after schools reopened in January 2013. The second phase was intended lo ensure that the shortages and/or corrections in the consignments delivered In November/December 2012 indicated on the Proof of Delivery. are ultimate& delivered to the schools. The province is determined to ensure full CAPS-aligned textbook coverage for Grades 4, 5: 6, and 11. Surplus stock purchased to remediate for any shortages have been delivered to district warehouses to ensure rapid remediation. Schools that report shortages to the district offices have been notified and are collecting from the warehouse. Reports from District managers are that the process is working well.

Eastern Cape-99%
Provinces were busy doing a '"mop-up" to check l=that all textbook shortages are remediated.

(3) Whether any steps have been taken to ensure that teachers' unions do not (a) disrupt classes this academic year and (b) hold the education system to ransom over salary demands; if not, why sot; if so, what steps?

(a) Unions and the State as employer concluded a multi term collective agreement on 31 July 2012 on the improvement of salaries and other conditions of service of all public servants including teachers. This agreement is contained in PSCBC Resolution 1 of 2012 and it provides among others for salary adjustment of 7% from 1 ,May 2012 to 31 March 2013, an average projected CPI plus 1% for the period 1 April 2013 to 31 March 2014 and from 1 April 2014 to 31 March 2015 a CPI plus 1%. Therefore, a salary strike in tile sector is unlikely as this agreement prevents all parties from engaging in industrial action for the duration of the agreement. During the State of the Nation Address of 14 Felir3ary 2013 as well as the during the National Teaching award that took place on 0'7 March 2013, the President prioritised the remuneration of teachers and set up a Presidential Remuneration Commission to investigate the appropriateness of the remuneration and conditions of service especially of teachers. This will further stabilize the education sector from any disruption of classes.

(b) Action will be taken against educators who participated in the class disruptions (strikes) that are not in compliance with the LRA. Depending on the circumstances and merits of each case; involved educators will undergo formal disciplinary processes resulting in imposition of sanctions that may include dismissal. The Principle of' "No work, No pay" will however apply irrespective of whether the strike is compliant or not.

Reply received: February 2013

QUESTION 136

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr S Esau (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) How many legal matters were dealt with by her department (a) in the (i) 2009-10, (ii) 2010-11 and (iii) 2011-12 financial years and (b) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

(2) (a) how many of the specified legal matters were dealt with by (i) the State Attorney and (ii) private attorneys during the specified periods and (b) what are the reasons why her department was not represented by the State Attorney in each specified case;

(3) what total amounts were paid by her department to (a) the State Attorney and (b) private attorneys during the specified periods? NW142E

Response

(1) See Annexure 1

(2)

(3) (a)(i) All legal matters were dealt with by the State Attorney

(ii) None

(4) (a) See Annexure A

(b) None

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 103

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr D J Stubbe (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) Whether (a) her department and (b) any entities reporting to it paid any bonuses to senior officials in December 2012; if so, in each specified case, (i) to whom and (ii) what amount was paid;

(2) whether the specified bonuses were performance-based; if not, what is the justification for each bonus; if so, in each case, from which budget were the performance bonuses paid;

(3) whether, in each case, (a) a performance agreement was signed with the official and (b) regular performance assessments were conducted; if not, why not, in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NW109E

Response

NO

DEPARTMENT

⃰ ELRC

SACE

UMALUSI

1.(i)

(ii)

No

Not applicable

Yes

Chief Financial Officer, Senior Manager: Collective Bargaining and Senior Manager: Corporate Services

No

Not applicable

No

Not applicable

2.

Not applicable

R42,258.00, R30,471.00 and R33,944.00 respectively

Not applicable

Not applicable

3.(a)

(b)

Not applicable

Not applicable

Yes

Yes

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

Not applicable

NB Performance bonuses were for the assessment period 2011/12 paid late.

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 70

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

Mr A C Steyn (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(a) How many tickets did (i) her department and (ii) any of its entities purchase to attend business breakfasts hosted by a certain newspaper (name furnished) (aa) in the (aaa) 2010-11 and (bbb) 2011-12 financial years and (bb) during the period 1 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available and (b) what was the total cost in each case? NW76E

RESPONSE

(a) None, the Department has never purchased any tickets to attend business breakfasts hosted by The New Age.

(i) N/A

(ii) N/A

(b) N/A

Reply received: March 2013

QUESTION 44

DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)

44. Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) to ask the Minister of Basic Education:

(1) What criteria are used to assess the efficacy of school governing bodies (SGBs);

(2) whether a scoring system exists; if not, on what basis are SGBs determined to be dysfunctional; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) what are the details of the support offered to SGBs identified as dysfunctional;

(4) whether the responsibilities of SGBs considered dysfunctional are assumed by an appropriate structure until such SGBs achieve functionality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NW46E

RESPONSES:

(1) What criteria are used to assess the efficacy of school governing bodies (SGBs)?

The criteria to assess SGB functionality is contained in the Whole School Evaluation (WSE) Tool. Section 3 of the tool evaluates school governance matters. The criteria evaluate the establishment and effectiveness of the SGB, provision of clear direction by the SGB, performance of SGB functions within its legal and financial mandate and the functions relating to the employ of staff employed by the SGB.

(2) Whether a scoring system exists; if not, on what basis are SGBs determined to be dysfunctional; if so, what are the relevant details?

The WSE tool uses the rating scale rather than scores. The scale has five levels namely, needs urgent support, needs improvement, acceptable, good and outstanding. The scale can easily be converted into scores from 1 to 5 (A five-point Likert scale).

(3) What are the details of the support offered to SGBs identified as dysfunctional?

All SGBs receive generic training at first and thereafter focused training in terms of specific needs as identified through the monitoring and evaluation process by Circuit Managers or Whole School Evaluation officials. A dysfunctional SGB receives targeted support according to its identified area/s of weakness.

The Department has supplied all Circuit Managers and principals with Capacity Building Programmes for School Governing Bodies Guidelines to assist them with knowledge and skills to support SGBs better.

(4) Whether the responsibilities of SGBs considered dysfunctional are assumed by an appropriate structure until such SGBs achieve functionality; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

Section 25 of the South African Schools Act provides for the provincial Head of Department, if the SGB fails to perform one or more of functions allocated to it, to appoint sufficient persons to perform such functions on behalf of the SGB for a period of time until a new SGB is elected or has been capacitated to can assume its responsibilities.

Reply received: May 2013

QUESTlON 43
DATE OF PUBI,ICATION OF INTERNAL OUESTION PAPER: 14/02/2013 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 1/2013)
43 Mrs A T Lovemore (DA) TO ASK THE Minister of Basic Education:

(
1) With reference lo the requirement set out in section 3(3) of South African Schools Act, ACT 84 of 1996, ( the Act) (a) how often are Members of Executive Councils (MECs) required to make this determination and (b) what are the details of the criteria utilised by MECs to make the determination required;

(2) whether the determination made by the MECs takes into account the number of independent schools in the relevant provinces; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether ail MECs for Education have complied with the requirements of section 3(3) of the Act (a) in the 2011 - 2012 financial year and (b) during the period 01 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if not, which MECs did not comply with the requirement;

(4) whether any MECs have reported any shortage of schools (a) in the 2011 – 2012 financial year and (b) during the period 01 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, what are the relevant details of such reports;

(5) whether annual reports on progress have been supplied by each affected MEC, as required by section 3(4) of the Act; if not, why so, what are the relevant details ? NW45E


RESPONSES:
(1) With reference to the requirement set out in section 3(3) of South African Schools Act, ACT 84 of 1996, ( the Act) (a) bow often are Members of Executive Councils (MECs) required to make this determination and (b) what are the details of the criteria utilised by MECs to make the determination required?


(a) The MEC makes a determination every year to ensure that all children of school-going age are admitted.
(b)The MEC will establish systems to determine number of schools required. These include:

i. Enrolment figures submitted by schools every year;
ii. Annual Reports;
iii. School Readiness Verification reports;
iv. The number of schools in relation to the population around those schools; Establishment of informal settlements;
v. Drastic increase in learner numbers; and
vi. Overcrowding that exist at the nearest schools.

(2) Whether the determination made by the MECs takes into account the number of independent schools in the relevant provinces; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

The determination made by the MECs does not take into account the number of independent schools because the department does not depend on such schools for the placement of learners. Provision of schools and the placement of learners is a government function in schools under government control.

(3) Whether all MECs for Education have complied with the requirements of section 3(3) of the Act (a) in the 2011 - 2012 financial year and (b) during the period 01 April 2013 up to the latest specified dare for which information is available; if not, which MECs did not comply with the requirement?

Yes. all MECs have complied with the requirement of tile Act in the 2011/2012 financial year. hence all learners seeking accommodation have been placed in schools

(4) Whether any MECs have reported any shortage of schools (a) in the 2011 – 2012 financial year and (bf during the period 01 April 2012 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, what are the relevant details of such reports?

(a) & (b) Shortages are reported regularly as they form the basis for requests for additional funding by province.;

(5) Whether annual reports on progress have been supplied by each affected MEC, as required by section 3(4) of the Act; if not, why so, what are the relevant details?

The Minister and the Council of Education Ministers receive annual reports and progress reports on infrastructure development per province.