Questions & Replies: Question & Replies No 1601 to 1650

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2008-11-28

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[PMG note: Any gaps in the numbering are due to the replies not being provided yet]

QUESTION NUMBER 1601

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 19 SEPTEMBER2008

Mr S J F Marais (DA) to ask the Minister of Finance:

(1) (a) What are the current (i) funded posts and (ii) vacant posts by (aa) occupation, (bb) race and (cc) gender in the SA Revenue Service (SARS), (b) what has the staff turnover for SARS been in the past five years in respect of (i) occupation, (ii) race and (iii) gender and (c) what are the (i) qualifications, (ii) salaries and (iii) relevant experience of the top management within the SARS;

(2) whether a certain company (name furnished) has done any reports on service at SARS over the past five years; if not, why not; if so, what has been (a) the identified problem areas and (b) done to date in respect of each identified problem area by SARS;

(3) whether there are any anticipated problems with the (a) current and (b) pending financial year in respect of personal income tax submissions; if so, what are the relevant details? NW2350E

Reply:

(1)(a)(i) Current Funded Posts / Positions in SARS Per;-

Below are the total Current Funded Posts / Positions per Occupational Levels in SARS. It is important to understand the context of the below information relating to the SARS Modernisation program, the changes in the Operational model, the changes in types of jobs and movement of people for example the Contact Centre at the Alberton Campus.

Staff moved from MWP that will deal with telephone calls

Agents 192

Team Leaders 10

Operational managers 1

PA 1

Support 12

Staff moved from Alberton Assessment Centre to Alberton Contact Centre

Team members 293

Team leaders 22

Manager 1

PA 1

Total 533 of which 223 had to relocate to a new Campus.

The current Employee totals are Grouped into Permanent / Contracted (Fixed term Contract) and Temporary Workers.

Total Permanent / Contract Employees: 14 548 - 96.70% of the Total

Total Temporary Employees: 496 - 3.30% of the Total

Total Employees in SARS: 15 044

(aa) Current Funded Posts / Positions per Occupational Levels in SARS:

Occupational Level

Total

% of Total

Temporary Employees Excluded

Top Management

27

0.19%

Senior Management

835

5.74%

Professional and Mid-Management

1521

10.46%

Skilled and Junior Management

8158

56.08%

Semi-Skilled

3700

25.43%

Unskilled

307

2.11%

Grand Total

14548

Temporary Employees Excluded

496

3.30%

(bb) Current Funded Posts / Positions per Race in SARS:

Permanent / Contact Employees Race

Total

% of Total

Permanent Employees

African

7038

48.38%

Coloured

1507

10.36%

Indian

916

6.30%

White

5087

34.97%

Grand Total

14548

Temporary Employees Race

Total

% of Total

Temp Employees

African

342

68.95%

Coloured

66

13.31%

Indian

16

3.23%

White

72

14.52%

Grand Total

496

Total Employees Race

Total

% of Total

Employees

African

7380

49.06%

Coloured

1573

10.46%

Indian

932

6.20%

White

5159

34.29%

Grand Total

15044

(cc) Current Funded Posts / Positions per Gender in SARS:

Permanent / Contact Employees Gender

Total

% of Total

Permanent Employees

Female

9351

64.28%

Male

5197

35.72%

Grand Total

14548

Temporary Employees Gender

Total

% of Total

Temp Employees

Female

296

59.68%

Male

200

40.32%

Grand Total

496

Total Employees Gender

Total

% of Total

Employees

Female

9647

64.13%

Male

5397

35.87%

Grand Total

15044

(ii) Funded Vacancies

Current Vacancies in SARS:

The Current vacancies are grouped according to the Occupational Levels only:

Occupational Level

HC 28/03/08

Vacancies

Total

% of Vacancy Total

Top Management

27

1

28

3.58%

Senior Management

835

42

877

4.79%

Professional and Mid-Management

1521

76

1597

4.76%

Skilled and Junior Management

8158

408

8566

4.77%

Semi-Skilled

3700

185

3885

4.77%

Unskilled

307

15

322

4.66%

Grand Total

14548

727

15275

4.76%

(1)(b) Total Staff Turnover in the past five years:

SARS Total Net Staff Turnover

Year:

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

0.52%

5.91%

0.05%

3.74%

4.24%

Note: Net Staff Turnover: Calculated as the year to date figure of new appointments less the year to date figure of total attritions (Exists) as a percentage of the average Head Count for the reporting period.

(1)(b)(i) Total Staff Turnover per Occupational Level in the past five years:

Net Staff Turnover Rate per Occupational Level

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

Top Management

0.00%

-6.25%

9.76%

3.77%

-3.77%

Senior Management

6.79%

0.34%

-1.45%

9.77%

4.23%

Professional and Mid-Management

0.39%

-1.94%

-3.38%

1.91%

1.04%

Skilled and Junior Management

0.03%

2.88%

-2.62%

0.22%

2.10%

Semi-Skilled

2.98%

15.06%

5.26%

7.43%

11.52%

Unskilled

-0.43%

-3.69%

8.72%

32.86%

0.00%

(1)(b)(ii) Total Staff Turnover per Race in the past five years:

Net Staff Turnover Rate per Race

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

African

4.91%

15.66%

0.00%

9.40%

8.16%

Coloured

2.79%

9.21%

0.00%

1.94%

4.59%

Indian

8.11%

7.16%

0.00%

1.87%

2.37%

White

-3.41%

-5.01%

0.00%

-2.77%

-1.23%

(1)(b)(iii) Total Staff Turnover per Gender in the past five years:

Net Staff Turnover Rate per Gender

04/05

05/06

06/07

07/08

08/09

Female

1.54%

6.25%

0.63%

2.17%

2.71%

Male

0.79%

5.27%

-1.02%

6.62%

6.93%

Note: Net Staff Turnover: Calculated as the year to date figure of new appointments less the year to date figure of total attritions (Exists) as a percentage of the average Head Count for the reporting period.

(1)(c)(i)(iii) The Executive Management of SARS has various relevant degrees and diplomas with a wide range of experience in both the public as well as the private sector such as Banking, Production, ICT, Information and Communication, Technology, Education and Public Administration. SARS strive to have an Executive Management team that not only have expertise in their specialised area of work but have cross cutting experience within the organisation.

(ii)The below table provides the salaries of the Top Management in SARS as at the end of March 2008 as reflected in the SARS 2007/08 Annual report:

SARS Executive Management

2008 R'000

Commissioner for SARS

1,928

GM: Strategy, Modernisation and Technology

1,841

GM: Corporate Services

1,484

GM: Risk Management

1,004

Deputy Chief Operations Officer

817

GM: Enforcement and Risk

1,084

GM: Enforcement

760

GM: Finance

779

GM: Legal and Policy

1,156

Chief Operations Officer

1,627

Deputy Chief Operations Officer

990

GM: Large Business Centre

1,411

Chief Information Officer (2008: 6 Months)

752

GM: Office of the Commissioner

680

GM: Corporate Relations

990

(2) No, this company has not undertaken any evaluation of service. SARS conducts its own evaluations, benchmarking against other administrations and OECD standards. In addition a major diagnostic was undertaken in the past on the tax services and another in respect of customs by the WCO.

(3)(a)(b) Tax Season 2008 is going well. For the first time this year, the annual Tax Season campaign comprised two elements: The first part was in respect of employers who were required to submit their PAYE reconciliation declaration and copies of all employee tax certificates (IRP5/IT3(a)) within a 60 day period between 1 July and 29 August. The second part is in respect of the submission of income tax returns by individuals, corporates, trusts and exempt institutions according to staggered deadlines.

Progress report:

· Tax Season for Employers: By 30 September 2008, 226 228 employers out of a total of 250 000 active on the register had submitted EMP501 reconciliation declarations accompanied by 14 294 962 employee tax certificates. This represents an increase of over 20% compared to 2007.

· Tax Season for Individuals: A number of enhancements have been introduced this year to the process of income tax return submission. The most significant of these have been the introduction of pre-populated income tax returns for employees whose employers have provided their tax certificate information. A second key change has been the requirement for taxpayers to order a customised income tax return containing only those income and deduction sections relevant to the taxpayer's unique circumstances. Taxpayers are able to request a tax returns in four ways:

o Via mail: A letter was sent to all taxpayers who submitted manual returns in 2007 explaining the process this year and providing them with a form to request their 2008 income tax return.

o Via phone: A new toll-free call centre number (0800 00 SARS) was introduced on 1 September which allows taxpayers to order a tax return by following automatic voice prompts.

o Via a branch: Taxpayers can visit any SARS branch along with their relevant tax information where a return can be issued and completed for them.

o Via eFiling: Using eFiling, taxpayers can construct their own unique income tax return.

While we are only one month into the current campaign, indications are that taxpayers are responding well to the changes.

· Efiling: The growth of eFiling as a preferred channel of submission among both tax practitioners and taxpayers continues to exceed expectations. Following the introduction of eFiling for individual income tax returns in 2006 when approximately 30 000 taxpayers adopted it, this service grew to over 1 000 000 returns submitted via eFiling in 2007 and we are on track to issue over 1 500 000 returns issued in respect of 2008. Equally encouraging was the adoption of eFiling and the free SARS software known as e@syFile by employers to submit their EMP501 declarations and employee tax certificates. Over 90% of these were submitted electronically to SARS this year.

Anticipated problems in respect of current tax year (2008): There are no significant problems anticipated during Tax Season 2008. Two challenges have presented themselves to date in the campaign – both related to the submission of employee tax certificate information by employers to be used to pre-populate the income tax returns of employees. Pre-populating employees' income tax returns requires three key things:

  • Accurate information about the tax and deductions of employees
  • Up-to-date personal information on certificates so we can match them to taxpayers
  • The provision of this information before taxpayers request their returns
  • Due to the implementation of changes to the process this year, a number of businesses and practitioners requested additional time to meet this requirement. In response, the deadline for submission was extended by 14 days until 12 September 2008. This resulted in a knock-on effect in terms of which the electronic channels of return issuing and submission of individual income tax returns (eFiling and our branch system) were also postponed by the same period (although manual channels were available as planned from 1 September).

    In respect of accuracy of information, some tax certificates SARS has received did not contain a tax reference number or had different ID numbers or names to those on SARS's records. Others show no records at all. This has impacted on the ability of SARS to pre-populate all employee income tax returns. Currently we anticipate being able to pre-populate approximately 75% of all employee income tax returns. The remainder will receive blank returns and follow the same process of completion and verification as in 2007.

    Anticipated problems in respect of 2009 tax year: The past two years (2007 and 2008) have seen significant changes to the income tax return process aimed at improving the efficiency and effectiveness of this process for SARS and all its stakeholders (taxpayers, employers and practitioners). These have required a change in behaviour by all parties. The fundamental changes are now in place and it is anticipated that the 2009 tax year will provide an opportunity for stakeholders to gain in confidence and experience in the new process.

    QUESTION NO. 1603 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28 of 2008

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: 19 September 2008

    Mr G R Morgan (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism:

    (1) Whether his department will make representation to Statistics South Africa about amending the measurement of what is a valid tourist arrival to include a stay of at least one night in the country; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (2) (a) how many of the total number of tourists that arrived in 2007 departed on the same day that they arrived and (b) for the first six months of 2008, (i) what was the total number of tourist arrivals and (ii) how is this figure broken up according to market?

    NW2352E

    MR G R MORGAN (DA)

    SECRETARY TO PARLIAMENT

    HANSARD

    PAPERS OFFICE

    PRESS

    1603. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM ANSWERS:

    (1) The department (DEAT) has been working closely with Statistics South Africa (Stats SA) and the Department of Home Affairs (DHA) in this regard. Stats SA has developed a model to calculate the length of stay of all foreign arrivals for the period of 2007. This model will enable us to identify valid tourists from the total foreign arrivals released by DHA. The model has been presented to DEAT's management, MIPTECH and MINMEC for noting. Stats SA is currently working closely with DHA to verify if the valid length of stay could be automatically calculated using the Movement Control System which is used to capture arrivals and departures.

    (In addition, South Africa like other member states of the World Tourism Organization (WTO) has adopted the standardized tourism definitions of the WTO and therefore DEAT, Stats SA and South African Tourism (SAT) are currently using definitions which are aligned with WTO definitions for tourism and include the definitions for a tourist as someone who stays one or more nights outside their usual environment / residence and a visitor is defined as someone who visits a place but does not stay for one night.)

    (2) (a) Stats SA is in the process of finalizing the 2007 report including the same day and overnight visitors, duration of stay and total number of tourists. However, it is currently estimated that about a quarter of the total number of the tourist that arrived in 2007 were same day visitors. The exact figure will be known once Stats SA has released the report.

    (b) (i) The total foreign arrivals (excluding workers and contract workers) for January to June 2008 was 4, 7 million compared to the same period in 2007. Foreign arrivals from Africa and overseas were 3, 6 and 1, 1 million respectively.

    (ii) Table A attached hereto indicate the total number of foreign arrivals for January to June 2008 compared to the same periods in 2007 according to markets.

    QUESTION NO. 1604 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28 of 2008

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: 19 September 2008

    Mr G R Morgan (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism:

    (1) What is the estimated number of tour guides not registered in terms of the Tourism Second Amendment Act, 2000 (Act No. 70 of 2000);

    (2) what (a) are the total number of registered tour guides and (b) is the distribution of such tour guides according to each province;

    (3) what are the minimum requirements for registration as a tour guide;

    (4) what steps are being taken to increase the number of registered tour guides?

    NW2353E

    MR G R MORGAN (DA)

    SECRETARY TO PARLIAMENT

    HANSARD

    PAPERS OFFICE

    PRESS

    1604. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM ANSWERS:

    (1) 4000, of which 2443 are guides who have not re-registered.

    (2) (a) 8689 and (b)

    No.

    Province

    Number of Registered Tour Guides

    1.

    Eastern Cape

    637

    2.

    Free State

    39

    3.

    Gauteng

    2896

    4.

    KwaZulu-Natal

    1088

    5.

    Limpopo

    307

    6.

    Mpumalanga

    1299

    7.

    Northern Cape

    86

    8.

    North West

    259

    9.

    Western Cape

    2078

    Total Registered Tour Guides

    8689

    (3) A person must be 21 years old to qualify for registration as a tourist guide and should have acquired training from a training provider accredited by the Tourism Hospitality and Education Training Authority (THETA) or should have been assessed for competencies resulting from informal learning, i.e., recognition of prior learning (RPL).

    (4) DEAT and the provinces have funded people from the previously disadvantaged backgrounds to be trained as guides, including training in foreign languages. Furthermore, DEAT together with the industry are engaging to determine areas for intervention through training. I am glad to inform you that, in the 1st quarter of this year, the Professional Hunters Association (PHASA) have joined the guiding industry and are registering as guides in accordance with the Act. This applies to the underwater divers and their diverse associations.

    QUESTION NO. 1605 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28 of 2008

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: 19 September 2008

    Mr G R Morgan (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism:

    (1) Whether there has been any illegal clearing of forests or other land cover in the iSimangaliso Wetland Park for the purpose of agriculture; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what is the location and (b) approximate extent of the clearing in each case;

    (2) whether any individuals have been arrested for this activity; if not, why not; if so, what action was taken against them;

    (3) whether any action was taken to prevent this activity from persisting; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (4) (a) in terms of what (i) legislation and (ii) regulations is such activity regarded as an offence and (b) what are the maximum applicable penalties? NW2354E

    MR G R MORGAN (DA)

    SECRETARY TO PARLIAMENT

    HANSARD

    PAPERS OFFICE

    PRESS

    1605. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM ANSWERS:

    (1) Yes. When the Park was proclaimed in 2000 under the World Heritage Convention Act, 1999 (Act No. 49 of 1999) sections within the proclaimed park where legally occupied by people. Outside of these sections of the Park there were also areas where unauthorised / illegal agriculture occurred, namely Dukuduku / uMfolozi floodplain and Ozabeni. Neither of these sections of the Park has ever been fenced.

    Dukuduku / uMfolozi – from the late 1980s (despite several attempts by the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry (DWAF) to relocate people) there have been successive land invasions with approximately 3000 homesteads now residing and pursuing agricultural and other activities in the DukuDuku / uMfolozi. The extent of these activities covered about 5000ha of which 264ha is on the uMfolozi floodplain section. In December 2007 and February 2008 the National and KZN Provincial Cabinet's approved the legalising and formalisation of settlements within in Dukuduku, subject to the unsustainable activities on the uMfolozi floodplain being curtailed and relocated from it and the fencing off of the Futululu section.

    The Ozabeni section of iSimangalso is approximately 66 000ha in extent – a land claim in this area was lodged in the late 1990's. It was settled in 2002. The settlement agreement made provision for a 5000ha cattle grazing area. At the time of the Parks proclamation in 2000 and the land claim settlement there was illegal agriculture in the cattle grazing area. Since the promulgation of Regulations in terms of the National Environmental Management: Protected Areas Act, 2003 (Act No. 57 of 2003) ("NEMPAA") to date an estimated additional 13.6ha has been cleared bringing the total area cleared to approximately 40ha. Agricultural fields outside the cattle grazing area have been closed and rehabilitated.

    (2) Arrests are made through the South African Police Service (SAPS). The following process has been followed:

    Dukuduku / uMfolozi – On the 28th of August 2008 the National Minister of Water Affairs and Forestry, Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism and the KZN MEC for Local Government, Housing and Traditional Affairs informed affected communities of government's decision at a meeting of about 5000 people. A task team lead by Local Government and Housing and including, Transport, Housing, Health, Education, Economic Development, Agriculture and Environmental Affairs, Community Safety and Liaison, the National Departments of Water Affairs and Forestry, Environmental Affairs and Tourism, Land Affairs, Minerals and Energy and the Land Claims Commission, Mtubatuba Local Municipality, uMkhanyakude District Municipality, iSimangaliso Wetland Park Authority, Mpukunyoni Traditional Council, Eskom and Telkom has been charged to oversee its implementation. A full time project team is place.

    DWAF is in the process of releasing the uMfolozi floodplain and Futulu sections to DEAT in terms of the National Forestry Act enabling the Park to manage this area as a conservation area within the regulatory framework provided by NEMPAA.

    The removal of illegal clearing from the uMfolozi floodplain will take place under the auspices of the task team and in accordance with Cabinets' decisions regarding Dukuduku. The process is being led by the KZN Department of Local Government and Housing.

    The process is now being implemented and includes issuing of the necessary warning letters in terms of NEMPAA to those with illegal fields on the uMfolozi floodplain and arresting individual attempting to open new fields.

    Ozabeni – 68 individuals have been arrested. Outside of the designated cattle grazing area offenders have been evicted and the areas rehabilitated. The cattle grazing area has been ring-fenced and a process is being undertaken which includes relocation of fields together with the simultaneous provision of alternatives.

    A budget has been allocated for the fencing of this section of the Park – this will be first time in the history of the Park that this particular area will be fenced. 41km of this 103km fence has been completed.

    (3) The Park has adopted a two-pronged approach to compliance viz., education with alternatives and law enforcement.

    Law enforcement -

    Prior to the Regulations published in terms of NEMPAA the legislation regulating activities in the Park was the KZN Ordinance and the National Forestry Act. After October 2005 the NEMPAA came into being. This legislation provides the Authority with the means to prosecute directly and not through partner agencies and departments. In the case of Ozabeni land was released by DWAF in terms of the National Forest Act to DEAT in the Park in April 2007. DWAF is now in the process of releasing sections of the Dukuduku / uMfolozi land to DEAT.

    The Park protocol for managing illegal clearing includes:

    · Regular flights and ground patrols to identify new clearing and assess existing clearings;

    · Filing of incident reports when a clearing is identified and the opening of a case file. The incident report details the extent of the clearing and maps the area using GPS points;

    · The serving of warning letters to offenders to verify locus standi and inform them about the illegal activity at time of identification and directing the offender to stop clearing. If the offender does not act according to this directive a second warning letter is issued. Thereafter the offender is arrested and prosecuted.

    Education with Alternatives

    The agriculture that takes place is of a subsistence nature. In order to prevent this activity from continuing and expanding the iSimangaliso Authority through its People and Parks programme has instituted agricultural and other local economic development programmes as alternatives to farming in the Park. Forty food gardens benefiting approximately 900 people (mainly women) have been established to date. Four hundred of the participants have received accredited training. Further funding has been secured from the Flemish Food Security Programme for the expansion of the programme over 3 years targeting sensitive environmental areas – and includes homestead and community gardens.

    Awareness and capacity building workshops as well as information sharing sessions are held on a regular basis with leadership, communities, prosecutors and magistrates.

    (4) NEMPAA is the governing legislation. Specific sections include 50(5), 89 and Regulation 4(1)(c),(f),(g),(h),(i), 39, 43, 45, 61. Penalties range from fines or imprisonment not exceeding five years or both. The actual costs of rehabilitation can also be recovered by civil means.

    Question Number 1611

    (Internal Question Paper)

    Adv H C Schmidt (DA) to ask the Minister of Minerals and Energy:

    (1) How much has her department (a) budgeted and (b) actually spent on creating a public campaign to ensure saving of energy by household and industry users during the period 1 January 2008 to 15 September 2008.

    (2) Whether her department has conducted any studies to determine the success of this campaign, if so what are the findings?

    REPLY:

    (1) R13.5 million

    (2) No


    QUESTION 1612

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 19 September 2008

    Internal question paper no:

    Mrs J A Semple (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) Whether his department has set up a project team with other departments with regard to the Apex priority 8: War against Poverty; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this team be set up; if so, which stake holders are members of this team;

    (2) whether a template for the assessment of households has been prepared; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will it be prepared; if so, what criteria is used by this template to assess households;

    (3) whether the country has been divided into sections for management purposes; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will this take place; if so, how has the country been divided;

    (4) whether any households have been identified as living in dire poverty by this assessment process; if so, (a) how many and (b) where are each of these households situated;

    (5) whether any of these households have received any assistance or interventions from his department since being identified; if not, why not; if so, what assistance/interventions in each case;

    (6) whether any other stakeholders such as business or non-governmental organisations have contributed to these interventions; if not, why not; if so, (a) which stakeholders and (b) what have they contributed? NW2361E

    REPLY:

    Honourable Member, the War on Poverty is a national apex priority within the Social Cluster that is coordinated within the Presidency. The Office of the Deputy Presidency is the appropriate source to reply on this question.


    (1) Yes, as part of implementing the War on Poverty Campaign, a War Room has been established in the Presidency where it is managed and coordinated. A dedicated National Task Team (NTT) has been established and there are meetings which are held every Monday of the week. The Project Team brings together national and provincial departments as well as local government in providing first and foremost a basket of services that households are entitled to. These include services such as social grants to members of households that qualify, official documents, referrals to social workers, local job creation initiatives and others.

    The Department of Social Development (DSD) has set up a team comprising officials responsible from Information Technology and Management Systems. Special Projects Component and the Chief Directorate Community Development to participate actively in the War Room activities. This team is led in-house by the Deputy Director-General: Integrated Development.

    DSD has been given the responsibility to develop household and community profiling tools together with their training manuals. These tools are expected to be ready by March 2009 and progress towards having them ready is impressive.

    (2) Yes, a template is being used in areas where the War on Poverty has been launched. The template uses criteria and has sections on identification, health, education, household dynamics, housing conditions, employment and income.

    Stats SA and Presidency have been instrumental in developing these tools and measures are put in place to have these strengthened as the Campaign unfolds. The idea is to have established and advanced tools ready for the full roll out of the War Room on Poverty Campaign.

    (3) Yes, the selection of areas for intervention through the War on Poverty is based on the identification of geographic areas with highest levels of multiple deprivation and poverty. The coordination is at Provincial level and will be improved on as experience is gained and lessons are learnt.

    (4) (a) Yes, the work on the identification of households is ongoing in provinces and the total number of households identified and assisted will be included in the final report of the War Room launch activities. Currently, the War Room is not rolled out but it is still at the level of launches. As part of the launch, only few poverty stricken households (about 3 per community) are identified for launching. It is a standard procedure in al the launches that profiling must have been done and challenges faced by households identified. During the launch, various government departments make commitments to address some of the challenges while other challenges are addressed on the day of the launch, e.g. registration for social grants, issuing out identity documents, distribution of food hampers as part of social relief of distress, etc

    These are short term interventions put in place while long term service delivery interventions are still bring crafted in line with the information gathered during the profiling exercise.

    (4)(b). The households identified are located in the following areas:

    Province

    Location of Households

    Free State

    Jacobsdal ward 2, Springfontein ward 5 and Jaggersfontein ward 7.

    Eastern Cape

    The launch was held in Qaukeni Municipality ward 12 (village called Lubala) under the O.R Tambo District Municipality. The project will be rolled out in these municipalities Bizana, Nyandeni, Ntabankulu,Mbhashe, Mnquma, Ngqushwa, Elundini, Umzimvubu, Engcobo and Ntsikayethu. Three wards selected are: Ingquza Hill 21503001, 21503002 & 21503017.

    Limpopo

    Sekhukhune District Municipality (Fetakgomo Local Municipality – Ward 2), Makhuduthamaga Local Municipality – (Ward 29) and Capricorn District Municipality Blouberg Local Municipality – Ward 6.

    KwaZulu Natal

    Ward 7 (KwaDolo), Ward 8 (KwaLatha) and Ward 9 ( Keates Drift) Launch site: Msinga Local Municipality under uMzinyathi District Municipality

    Gauteng

    West Rand Kagiso (Ext 14 – Ward 5),

    Metsweding (Zithobeni -Ward 5) and Sedibeng (EVATON: Greater Evaton - Ward 18).

    North West

    3 wards in Greater Taung municipality have been selected; ward 2, 4 and 14.

    Northern Cape

    To be advised

    Mpumalanga

    To be advised

    Western Cape

    To be advised

    (5) Yes, households in the different provinces have received assistance and services from a number of departments. DSD through the South African Social Security Agency (SASSA) has provided a range of services like registration of eligible community members for social grants. Food hampers have also been provided to all poor households that have been profiled as part of the social relief of distress.

    (6) Yes, the War on Poverty is based on working with all key stakeholders in addressing poverty among households in the country. Both NGOs and the business sector are working with government departments to effect changes in identified households. The War Room operates from the premise that government alone will never be able to eradicate poverty. The private sector and NGO's must also play a critical role and contribute towards the achievement of the Millennium Development Goal of reducing poverty by half in 2015. In this connection, these critical stakeholders will form an integral part of the development of a roll out plan for the War Room on Poverty Campaign.

    So, thus far, there has not been any form of contribution from the private sector and NGO's beyond initial meetings to introduce the Campaign. Anglo Platinum is an example of the private sector organization with which the War Room has initiated some engagements. So, the contribution of NGO's and the private sector will become more visible and tangible during the roll out and not the launches of the Campaign.

    QUESTION 1613

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY 19 SEPTEMBER 2008 [IQP N28 -2008]

    Question 1613 for Written Reply, National Assembly: Mr. A Nel (DA) to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Land Affairs:

    (a) When was the programme Jobs for Growth run by her department launched and (b) since its inception up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (i) how many jobs were created in the agriculture sector and (ii) how many people (aa) were employed, (bb) applied for assistance and (cc) received assistance to start up small businesses in the abovementioned sector? NW2362E

    REPLY:

    (a) Jobs for Growth was launched in 2006 as a cross cutting programme involving a number of Departments. It was immediately moved to the IDT, under the Department of Public Works, because of its cross-cutting nature.

    The rest of the question should be referred to the Minister of Public Works for a response.

    Question 1614

    Dr P J Rabie (DA) to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry:

    a) When was the programme Jobs for Growth run by his department launched and (b) since its inception up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (i) how many jobs were created in the trade and industry sector and (ii) how many people (aa) were employed, (bb) applied for assistance and (cc) received assistance to start up small businesses in the abovementioned sector? (NW2363E)

    Response:

    (a) The Jobs for Growth Programme was launched on 06 February 2006 by the following stakeholders, the Presidency, Department of Agriculture (DoA) and the dti and Independent Development Trust (IDT). Departments were not expected to launch their own individual programmes, but to make a contribution towards the achievement of Jobs for Growth objectives driven by the Presidency and coordinated by the IDT. As a result, the dti did not launch its own Jobs for Growth programme. the dti however, contributed to the programme in the area of enterprise development through its divisions and agencies such as seda, Khula, IDC and SAMAF. the dti contribution to jobs for growth has focused on funding startup small enterprises including cooperatives, providing non-financial support to small enterprises, registration of cooperatives and the coordination of the dti institutions for participation in Jobs for Growth.

    (b) In 2006/2007 6562 small enterprise requested funding assistance from Khula with respect to Jobs for Growth. 1,084 received support of R25.4m resulting in the creation of 301 jobs. In 2007/08, 2500 small enterprises received financial support. Since February 2006 the SAMAF supported 707 businesses under the Jobs for Growth program of which the total loan amount disbursed was R10.8m. The Small Enterprise Development Agency (seda) has trained 458 beneficiaries during 2006/7 on capacity building which covered, pre-start up assessment, small business assessment and readiness for change.

    The Cooperatives Incentive Scheme (CIS) received 285 applications in 2006/7 and approved 15 loans totaling R4 million, creating 303 direct jobs. In 2007/08 the CIS approved 44 loans amounting to R 5.4 million.

    The Industrial Development Cooperation approved 23 applications, disbursing an amount of R196.6 million and creating 3 811 jobs.

    QUESTION 1616

    WRITTEN REPLY 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    1616. Mr S E Opperman (DA) to ask the Minister of Public Works:

    Whether any special Public Works programmes have been implemented as required by Apex Priority 9; if not, why not; if so, (a) what programmes, (b) where have they been introduced and (c) how many youths have been assisted by these programmes since its inception? NW2365E

    MINISTER OF PUBLIC WORKS

    (a)(b)(c) Yes, the Department has implemented Special Public Works Programs through EPWP programme. Enterprise development occurs across all sectors of the EPWP, namely the infrastructure, social, environment and culture and economic sectors.

    Key objectives of EPWP enterprise development programmes, across all sectors are:

  • The graduation of persons from the 2nd to the 1st economy;
  • The provision of small business training;
  • The provision of markets, and
  • The provision of access to finance
  • To date, 1454 SMMEs have been created and supported by the EPWP, across all sectors, through the following programmes:

    Programme

    No of SMMEs

    Vuk'uphile: Infrastructure Sector

    508 Civil Contracting Companies

    New Venture Creation Learnerships: Economic Sector

    280 Building Contracting Companies

    30 Wholesale Companies

    Cooperatives: Economic Sector

    10 Cooperatives, 131

    DWAF Contractor Development Programme: Environment and Culture Sector

    636 Emerging Contractors

    Total SMMEs across all EPWP sectors

    1454

    1. Vuk'uphile Programme in the Infrastructure Sector

    The programme develops labour-intensive contractors. The contractor company that is developed consists of the owner and 2 supervisors. The contractors receive training on business unit standards. The supervisors receive training on technical issues related to labour intensive construction. Both the contractors and supervisors receive a NQF Qualification. The Construction SETA paid for the training of the contractors and supervisors. To date, over 508 labour-intensive contracting companies have developed, across all 9 provinces. NDPW has partnered with 22 municipalities, 6 provincial departments and 2 Agencies in the creation and development of the 508 labour-intensive civil works companies. Each of these Public Bodies (municipalities and provinces) has actively participated in the labour-intensive contractor development programmes. A major contribution from the Public Bodies is the provision of training projects that are executed by contractor companies. All companies are started from scratch. All stakeholders assist to identify persons through an open selection process.


    Vuk'uphile SMMEs created

    No of SMMEs Created

    Eastern Cape

    Oliver Tambo Municipality

    15

    Coega Development Corporation

    10

    Buffalo City Municipality

    10

    Nelson Mandela Metropolitan Municipality

    20

    Chris Hani District Municipality

    10

    Ukhahlamba District Municipality

    10

    Department of Public Works of the Eastern Cape

    10

    Amathole District Municipality

    10

    Free State

    Department of Transport, Roads and Public Works

    30

    Mangaung Local Municipality

    20

    Gauteng

    Ekurhuleni Municipality

    25

    City of Tshwane

    12

    Department of Housing of the Gauteng Provincial Government

    27

    City of Johannesburg

    16

    KwaZulu-Natal

    Ethekwini Municipality

    24

    Umkhanyakude District Municipality

    30

    Limpopo

    Roads Agency Limpopo (all 26 municipalities)

    26

    Greater Sekhukhune District Municipality

    10

    Mpumalanga

    Department of Public Works & Roads

    15

    Nkangala District Municipality – Phase I

    21

    Nkangala District Municipality – Phase II

    23

    Nkangala District Municipality – Phase III

    25

    Emalahleni Local Municipality (Witbank)

    10

    Northern Cape

    Department of Transport, Roads, and Public Works Northern Cape

    25

    North West

    Rustenburg Local Municipality

    20

    Madibeng Local Municipality

    10

    Western Cape

    Mossel Bay Municipality

    6

    George Municipality

    6

    Department of Public Works, Roads

    10

    Klipfontein Corridor Project

    22

    Total no of Vuk'uphile SMMEs created

    508

    Each of companies developed through the programme will be CIPRO registered companies; will either exit the programme at level 3, 4 or 5 on the CIDB register in terms of civil works; would have executed work for Government in terms of the construction of pavements, low-volume roads, etc. All companies receive mentor support on business and technical matters when executing training projects. The turnover, per company varies from R1 – 3 million, over the duration of the programme. All companies would have received access to finance through ABSA. Some of the companies' access asset finance through ABSA.

    2. New Venture Creation Learnership in Economic Sector

    This programme is similar to the Vuk'uphile Programme. However, the programme focuses strongly on the development of the SMME owner.

    A large focus of the programme has been the development of building contractors. Generally building is labour-intensive by its very nature and therefore the programme focuses on ensuring job creation through creating sustainable small businesses.

    The programme selects individuals through a series of open selection procedures, for example, newspaper advertisements, public briefing sessions, written assessments and interviews. All individuals are required to register a new close corporation. All individuals undergo a New Venture Creation Learnership at either NQF Level 2 or 4, irrespective of the type of company that is created. The sector is able to create SMMEs in all industrial sector classifications, however, the EPWP Economic sector focuses on businesses where government procures large quantities (volume and value).

    To date, 310 companies have been created through the New Venture Creation Learnership Programme.

    The New Venture Creation Learnership Programme ensures that:

  • All SMMEs are CIPRO registered
  • All SMMEs are VAT and UYF registered;
  • All SMMEs have access to finance through ABSA;
  • All SMMEs receive projects from Government that assists them to develop a track record;
  • All SMMEs receive mentor assistance.
  • The programme is also innovative in that it introduces quarterly assessments of the contractors. Contractors are ranked according to set-criteria (technical, administrative, financial, health and safety categories) and the level of engagements with the contractors is determined by this ranking.

    New Venture Creation

    No of SMMEs Created

    Eastern Cape

    Department of Public Works of the Eastern Cape

    50

    Free State

    Department of Transport, Roads and Public Works

    30

    Limpopo

    Department of Public Works, Limpopo

    120

    Mpumalanga

    Department of Public Works & Roads

    82

    North West

    Department of Public Works, North West

    28

    Total no of New Venture Creation created

    310

    3. Cooperatives Development Programme

    EPWP Economic Sector is partnering with a number of Government Departments and Programmes on the development of cooperatives. EPWP contributes to the development of cooperatives through the provision of accredited business skills training. EPWP is currently registering new courses on the Department of Labour Skills Catalogue that will be available for the support of cooperatives. To date, EPWP has collaborated with LIBSA in Limpopo Province on the development of 10 cooperatives, from various industrial sectors.

    No

    Name of Cooperative

    District in Limpopo

    Sector/Type of business

    No of members trained

    1

    Badirishani

    Capricorn

    Manufacturing of disposable nappies and toilet paper

    7

    2

    Harambe

    Capricorn

    Brick making

    30

    3

    Frontline

    Capricorn

    Financial services

    5

    4

    Lebopo

    Capricorn

    Fresh produce market

    25

    5

    Tiang Maatla

    Capricorn

    clothing manufacturing

    8

    6

    Moutse West

    Sekhukhune

    Filling station and sunflower farming

    10

    7

    Tadimasekgapha

    Sekhukhune

    Stone crusher

    25

    8

    SCTC

    Sekhukhune

    Agricultural

    8

    9

    UlaUla

    Vhembe

    Restaurant

    12

    10

    Twananani

    Vhembe

    Bricklaying

    9

    Total = 10 cooperatives, 139 members

    4. Environment and Culture Sector: DWAF Contractor Development

    The Working for Water Programme focuses on the clearing of Invasive Alien plants, particularly in stressed water catchments on both private and public land. Thus far in the 2007/08 financial year, the programme has supported 636 emerging contractors. The programme is mainly implemented by Regional Directorates within the Department of Water Affairs and Forestry. Where the capacity for implementation is inadequate, DWAF uses the services Implementing Agents (IAs). All IAs are state institutions. The three large IAs are the Independent Development Trust (IDT), who operate in most regions as well as on Department of Defense Land through empowering of military veterans, and South African National Parks, who in their parks and Western Cape Nature Conservation Board (CNC) who work on their reserves in the Cape Floristic Kingdom.

    Working for Water operates within quaternary catchments. In principle, each quaternary catchment constitutes one project area. In total, there are 315 projects in the country. Each project has an assigned project manager that is responsible to manage 5 to 15 teams. Each of these teams are business entities, consisting of a contractor with workers. The workers of the contractors are identified from communities within the catchments area. Furthermore, a project advisory committee is established that identifies potential contractors for the project. The recruitment and selection is then concluded by Working for Water.

    Each emerging contractor is then responsible for team which typically consists of chainsaw operators, herbicide applicators, general workers, first aid persons, HIV/AIDS peer educators and health and safety officer. The contractors are awarded tenders that range in value from R30 000 to R150 000. Ideally, each tender (block of work) lasts for 20 days.

    DWAF has developed a Contractor Development programme that consists of three phases. Generally each phase consists of 10 days of training.

    DWAF Emerging Contractors: Environment and Culture Sector

    No of SMMEs Created

    Eastern Cape

    92

    Gauteng

    62

    KwaZulu Natal

    154

    Limpopo

    9

    Mpumalanga

    25

    North West

    61

    Northern Cape

    4

    Western Cape

    107

    SANPARKS

    122

    Total SMMEs created

    636

    QUESTION 1617

    FOR WRITTEN REPLY

    Date of publication on internal question paper: 19 September 2008

    Internal question paper no: 28

    Mrs J A Semple (DA) to ask the Minister of Social Development:

    (1) How much was (a) budgeted for, (b) allocated to and (c) spent by his department on the Early Childhood Development (ECD) programme in each of the past five years up to the latest specified date for which information is available;

    (2) How many (a) places of care and (b) ECD sites were registered by his department in (i) urban and (ii) rural areas and (c) people have been (i) recruited, (ii) trained and (iii) placed at ECD sites;

    (3) How many (a) existing caregivers at these sites (i) required training and (ii) received training and (b) children benefited from the ECD programme? NW2366E

    REPLY:

    (1) The budget that has been allocated and spent by the Department of Social Development (DSD) on Early Childhood Development (ECD) programme in each of the past five years, are as follows:

    (a) +(b) combined under "budget"

    (c) Summary Expenditure on ECD


    Provincial Departments

    Summary Expenditure – Early Childhood Development (ECD)

    Provinces

    2003/04

    2004/05

    2005/06

    2006/07

    2007/08

    Budget

    Exp

    Budget

    Exp

    Budget

    Exp

    Budget

    Exp

    Budget

    Exp

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    R'000

    EC

    69,582

    69,253

    73,123

    84,735

    94,924

    93,230

    113,285

    107,587

    131,622

    138,715

    FS

    22,557

    22,557

    30,315

    28,087

    28,265

    30,470

    39,489

    39,489

    43,485

    30,177

    GP

    19,540

    19,540

    22,337

    22,337

    25,575

    25,575

    45,297

    45,297

    74,846

    74,846

    KZN

    149,691

    125,405

    153,047

    148,898

    198,744

    201,949

    208,763

    208,599

    231,852

    249,959

    LP

    24,358

    23,868

    25,100

    24,500

    44,500

    44,502

    41,200

    40,186

    49,000

    49,001

    MP

    4,330

    4,330

    15,208

    15,208

    12,393

    12,393

    27,357

    20,866

    51,635

    51,635

    NC

    5,841

    6,330

    11,200

    11,034

    9,248

    9,890

    13,005

    14,855

    24,187

    23,899

    NW

    10,359

    6,636

    34,154

    25,448

    33,623

    25,933

    52,631

    46,817

    73,080

    54,111

    WC

    28,709

    28,709

    35,827

    35,827

    58,198

    58,198

    63,816

    63,816

    86,315

    86,315

    Total

    334,967

    306,628

    400,311

    396,074

    505,470

    502,140

    604,843

    587,512

    766,022

    758,658

    National Department

    2003/04

    2004/05

    2005/06

    2006/07

    2007/08

    2008/09

    Total

    Allocation

    ECD Position vacant

    R20 000

    R150 000

    R200 000

    R400 000

    R3 000 000

    R3 751 000

    Expenditure

    ECD Position vacant

    R20 000

    R131 000

    R200 000

    R1 519 736

    Spending/ committed to date:

    R1 700 000

    R 3 570 736 000

    Note: The amounts for the National Department were for the programme implementation and the amounts for the Provincial Departments were for subsidies

    (2) (a) Places of Care

    In terms of the Child Care Act 74 of 1983 ECD sites are referred to as Places of Care. According to the said Act, the definition of a "place of care" means any building or premises maintained or used, whether for profit or otherwise, for the reception, protection and temporary or partial care of more than six children apart from their parents, but does not include any boarding school, school hostel or any establishment which is maintained or used mainly for the tuition or training of children and which is controlled by or which has been registered or approved by the State, including a provincial administration".

    (b) The total number of registered ECD centres in urban and rural areas

    The Department of Social Development has by end of September 2008 registered12 857 ECD Centres.

    PROVINCE

    NUMBER OF REGISTERED ECD SITES

    Kwazulu Natal

    2 777

    Eastern Cape

    2 590

    Free State

    1 392

    North West

    589

    Northern Cape

    352

    Limpopo

    1 473

    Mpumalanga

    757

    Western Cape

    1049

    Gauteng

    1 878

    TOTAL

    12 857

    (i) and (ii) DSD does not have as yet statistics on disaggregation of ECD sites situated in rural and urban areas. The planned audit on ECD sites will enable the Department to develop a data base which will contain different types of information. DSD is planning to start the national audit in the 2008/9 financial year and it will be done in collaboration with the provinces.

    (c) People who have been recruited, trained and placed at ECD sites/centres

    (i) The Department of Social Development does not recruit or employ ECD practitioners/caregivers and place them at the ECD centres. ECD centres are also registered as Non Profit Organisations (NPO), which are managed by a board of directors.

    (ii) ECD training for practitioners (caregivers) and support staff is rendered by the Department of Education (DOE) and the Education Training Development Practice Sector Education Training Authority (ETDPSETA). The total numbers of practitioners trained by the Department of Education through the EPWP to June 2008 is as follows:

    · 18 479 practitioners

    · 340 support staff of which 700 are gardeners and 640 cooks.

    · The current number of persons in training is 8 154.

    (iii) The board of directors are responsible for recruiting, selecting and placement of ECD practitioners.

    (3) (a) Number of caregivers at existing ECD centres.

    The information as provided by the Department of Education indicated that there are 38 650 caregivers at existing ECD centres. (Source of information: The inputs were drawn from the Cabinet/Lekgotla report on the Expanded Public Works Programme (EPWP) submitted to the Social Cluster in July 2008 by the National Department of Education).

    (i) Caregivers required training

    The Department of Education has projected to train 21 418 ECD practitioners in 2008/9. Practitioners are being recruited from registered ECD sites. (Source of information: The inputs were drawn from the Cabinet/Lekgotla report on the Expanded Public Works Programme submitted to the Social Cluster in July 2008 by the National Department of Education).

    (ii) Caregivers received training

    The total number of practitioners trained by the Department of Education through the Expanded Public Works Programme to June 2008: 18 479 (Source of information: The inputs were drawn from the Cabinet/Lekgotla report on the Expanded Public Works Programme submitted to the Social Cluster in July 2008 by the National Department of Education). It is to be noted that within the EPWP an agreement exists between the DOE and DSD that practitioners/caregivers will be recruited from the registered ECD sites for training.

    (b) Children benefited from the ECD programme

    By end of September 2008, provinces reported that there are 622 932 children benefiting from the ECD programme, of whom 400 522 are receiving subsidy.

    PROVINCE

    NUMBER OF CHILDREN SUBSIDISED ECD SITES

    Kwazulu Natal

    75 580

    Eastern Cape

    74 184

    Free State

    32 558

    North West

    20 100

    Northern Cape

    23 790

    Limpopo

    49 290

    Mpumalanga

    30 808

    Western Cape

    52 793

    Gauteng

    41 419

    TOTAL

    400 522

    QUESTION NO 1619

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 12 December 2008

    Ms D Kohler-Barnard (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    How many of the (a) organised crime, (b) stock theft, (c) commercial branch, (d) serious and violent crime, (e) vehicle theft, (f) Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences Units and (g) Serious Economic Offences specialist SA Police Service units exist at (i) station level and (ii) any other SA Police Service level, for each province?

    NW2368E

    REPLY:

    See the attached annexure.

    QUESTION NO 1620

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 27 October 2008

    Ms D Kohler‑Barnard (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    What are the current (a) funded posts and (b) vacancies within the South African Police Service by province by (i) rank, (ii) occupation and (iii) police station in respect of (aa) detectives, (bb) visible policing and (cc) crime intelligence, for each Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences Units?

    NW2369E

    REPLY:

    (a)‑ (b) As indicated in one of my predecessor's replies to Parliament during the Peace and Security Cluster Question and Answer session, no answers that will impact negatively on our operational deployments of human and material resources, or with respect to any area of our operational strategy and tactics, will be provided.

    QUESTION NO 1621

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 27 October 2008

    Ms D Kohler‑Barnard (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    What are the current (a) funded posts and (b) vacancies within the South African Police Service by province by (i) rank, (ii) occupation and (iii) police station in respect of (aa) detectives, (bb) visible policing and (cc) crime intelligence, for each borderline security unit?

    NW2370E

    REPLY:

    (a)‑ (b) As indicated in one of my predecessor's replies to Parliament during the Peace and Security Cluster Question and Answer session, no answers that will impact negatively on our operational deployments of human and material resources, or with respect to any area of our operational strategy and tactics, will be provided.

    QUESTION NO 1622

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 27 October 2008

    Mr R J King (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    What are the current (a) funded posts and (b) vacancies within the South African Police Service by province by (i) rank, (ii) occupation and (iii) police station in respect of (aa) detectives, (bb) visible policing and (cc) crime intelligence, for each port of entry security unit?

    NW2371E

    REPLY:

    (a)‑ (b) As indicated in one of my predecessor's replies to Parliament during the Peace and Security Cluster Question and Answer session, no answers that will impact negatively on our operational deployments of human and material resources, or with respect to any area of our operational strategy and tactics, will be provided.

    QUESTION NO 1623

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 27 October 2008

    Mr R J King (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    What are the current (a) funded posts and (b) vacancies within the South African Police Service by province by (i) rank, (ii) occupation and (iii) police station in respect of (aa) detectives, (bb) visible policing and (cc) crime intelligence, for each crime combating units?

    NW2372E

    REPLY:

    (a)‑ (b) As indicated in one of my predecessor's replies to Parliament during the Peace and Security Cluster Question and Answer session, no answers that will impact negatively on our operational deployments of human and material resources, or with respect to any area of our operational strategy and tactics, will be provided.

    QUESTION 1624

    WRITTEN REPLY

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: 28-2008

    MOULANA M R SAYEDALI SHAH (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE

    (a) What military training courses are offered by the SA National Defence Force and (b) what if the (i) duration, (ii) content, (iii) entry requirements, (iv) graduation requirements and (v) number of trainees, (aa) accepted and (bb) graduated per course over each of the past five years?

    -------ooo0ooo------- NW2373

    REPLY

    The required information talks to the strategic and tactical make-up of the South African National Defence Force [SANDF]. Supplying such information overtly, may compromise the operational capability of the SANDF. The information can be provided, though, under protected conditions.

    QUESTION NO.: 1626 DATE OF PUBLICATION: 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    Mr L K Joubert (DA) to ask the Minister for Justice and Constitutional Development:

    What (a) are her department's alternative sentencing (i) targets and (ii) outputs for (aa) adults and (bb) juveniles, (b) were her department's alternative sentencing costs in each of the past five years, (c) number of (i) full-time and (ii) temporary or part-time staff are allocated to alternative sentencing functions or responsibilities, (d) is her department's relationship with the Department of Correctional Services in implementing alternative sentencing, (e) are the key challenges to a larger-scale use of alternative sentencing within the criminal justice system and (f) steps are her department taking to address these challenges?

    NW2375E

    REPLY

    Introduction

    The information with regard to alternative sentencing e.g. correctional supervision in terms of Section 276 (h) or (i) or an order that a convicted juvenile be sent to a reform school in terms of Section 290 of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977 (Act 51 of 1977), is not available. It is requested that the Honourable Member approach the South African Police Services (SAPS) for this information.

    (a)(i) With regard to alternative dispute resolution ("ADR"), the National Prosecuting Authority (NPA) has a target of increasing the number of cases finalised by way of diversion by 5% per annum.

    ii) aa) bb) In 2002/2003, the National Prosecutions Service (NPS) finalised 422 338 cases in all High, Regional & District Courts of which 14 808 were by way of diversion. In 2003/2004, the NPS finalised 399 966 cases of which 18 946 were by way of diversion. In 2005/2006, 411 417 cases were finalised of which 37 422 were by way of diversion and in 2006/2007, 379 034 cases were finalised of which 44 483 were by way of diversion. In 2007/2008, the NPS for the first time also commenced with the measurement of cases finalised by way of informal mediation (Alternative Dispute Resolution – "ADR") and in 2007/2008 388 532 cases were finalised of which 46 469 were by way of diversion and 15 393 by way of informal mediation (ADR).

    Between April and September 2008, the NPS has finalised 219 401 cases of which 22 407 were dealt with by way of diversion and 16 470 by way of informal mediation (ADR). A total of 13 399 adults and 9008 juveniles were diverted between April and September 2008.

    (b) The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development (DoJ&CD) incurred no costs during the past 5 years for non-custodial sanctions as the mandate to implement sentences lies with the Department of Correctional Services.

    (c) i) & ii) All prosecutors have a role in identifying suitable matters for diversion or alternative dispute resolution (ADR). It is therefore not possible to indicate how many full-time or part-time staff members are allocated to alternative sentencing functions or responsibilities. The diversion option is mostly utilized in the district courts where the less serious cases are heard.

    (d) The Departments of Justice and Constitutional Development and Correctional Services concerned have a very good working relationship in this regard. The Departments meet and communicate regularly and discuss matters relating to the policy, strategy and monitoring of amongst others, sentenced children, at the Inter-sectoral Child Justice Steering Committee (ISCCJ), which is chaired and convened by the DoJ&CD.

    In addition, the scope and objectives of the Non-custodial Sanctions pilot project were discussed with the Department of Correctional Services since its inception in 2007 and agreement was reached on the necessity of this project. Furthermore, both Departments serve on the National Governance Structure on Non-custodial Sanctions.

    The Department of Correctional Services has also assisted the NPA with the training of staff at the Kwa-Mashu and Hatfield Community Courts. Unfortunately, as a result of legislative constraints, the excellent programmes utilized by the Department of Correctional Services in matters where sentences of community service were imposed cannot be utilized for unconvicted accused. Outside service providers to provide appropriate diversion programmes are relied upon. The lack of appropriate diversion programmes, as well as the lack of sufficient experienced prosecutors to liaise with service providers and to ensure a holistic approach and the selection of an appropriate programme for the offender are however major constraints.

    e)(i) The sentencing component of the Criminal Procedure Act, 1977, is limited in that it does not make provision for Non-custodial Sanctions, but only for suspended and conditional sentences;

    (ii) Public perceptions regarding crime and sentencing to imprisonment, even if there are non-violent crimes involved;

    (iii) The mindset of the Criminal Justice role-players which also need to change accordingly; and

    (iv) Lack of programs.

    (f) The Department of Justice and Constitutional Development as part of the JCPS Cluster, together with the other Government Departments concerned, has embarked on a Non-custodial Sanctions Project developing Non-custodial Sanctions.

    The NPA has established on an optimum capacity project to determine how many staff, including prosecutors, is required to make the NPA function optimally. At this stage, the NPA regards as an ideal staffing of courts at two court prosecutors for every court.

    Since a holistic approach that involves the victim, offender and community as well as interdisciplinary co-operation between different role-players is a requirement for successful utilization of the diversion option, this necessitates more backroom staff as opposed to court prosecutors to deal therewith. When one has limited resources, one tends to focus on the core function, which is prosecution.

    The NPA is constantly providing in-house training to staff in all matters including diversions, and also sharing best practices to ensure that the good practices in areas with a high diversion rate are implemented countrywide. They have also implemented a Restorative Justice project which is aimed at exploring the concept of restorative justice in South Africa and establishing best practices to be implemented in the NPA. The project also seeks to extend the use of diversions as an alternative method of delivering justice. A national conference was hosted in which prosecutors engaged the concept and application thereof. This has been followed up with regional awareness sessions that commenced in March 2007.

    QUESTION 1627

    WRITTEN REPLY

    DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 19 SEPTEMBER 2008

    INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: 28-2008

    MOULANA M R SAYEDALI SHAH (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE

    What (a) is the release date for the next defence review and (b) are the relevant details pertaining to consultative processes with stakeholders and the general public?

    -------ooo0ooo------- NW2376E

    REPLY

    a) The Defence Update is on the agenda of Cabinet and when deliberations on the matter are finalized, it will go to Parliament for further processing.

    b) The Committee process in Parliament will form part of the public interaction. Public hearings will also be part of the equation. Careful consideration has been given - to comprehensively address the issues raised by the Portfolio Committee on Defence on 17 August 2004 and by Civil Society during the Public Hearings that took place on 25 October 2004.

    In its 02 November 2004 report on the Public Hearings, the Portfolio Committee on Defence expressed its satisfaction with the consultative process to establish the key issues to be addressed.

    QUESTION NO 1628

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER

    "Mr J P Blanche, (DA) to ask the Minister of Science and Technology:

    (1) Whether any disciplinary action was taken against officials in his department (a) in (i) 2005, (ii) 2006 and (iii) 2007 and (b) during the period 1 January 2008 up to 30 September 2008; if not what is the position in this regard; if so, (i) how many instances of disciplinary action occurred, (ii) what was the rank/position of each official against whom disciplinary action was taken, (iii) what was the transgression and (iv) what disciplinary action was taken?

    NW2615E

    REPLY:

    DEPARTMENT OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY DISCIPLINARY CASES FOR THE PERIOD 2005 TO 30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    YEAR

    RANK

    TRANSGRESSION

    ACTION

    2005

    Registry clerk (5)

    Wrongful use of government vehicle

    2 months suspension without pay and final written warning

    2006

    ASD: Records Management (9)

    Dishonesty

    Final written warning

    2007

    General Manager (14) Chief Director

    Irregular trip authorization

    Final written warning

    2007

    Manager (13) Director

    Unlawful use of state vehicle or state hired vehicle

    Suspension without pay for a week

    2007

    Supply Chain Practitioner (7)

    Irregular trip authorization

    Written warning

    2007

    Admin Clerk Grade III (5)

    Misrepresentation of qualifications

    Dismissal

    2007

    Group Executive DDG (15)

    Incompatibility

    Final written warning

    2007

    General Manager (14)

    Chief Director

    Incompatibility

    Final written warning

    2007

    Manager (13) Director

    Incompatibility

    Final written warning

    2007

    Manager (13)

    Director

    Sexual harassment

    Dismissal

    During the period 01 January 2008 to 30 September 2008 there were no serious misconduct cases that went to disciplinary hearings because two employees resigned before the institution of disciplinary processes.

    QUESTION 1631

    DATE OF PUBLICATION OF INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER 19/09/2008

    (INTERNAL QESTION PAPER 28-2008)

    Mr LB Labuschagne (DA) to ask the Minister of Education:

    How long does it take to approve a new post establishment at a school?

    NW2406E

    REPLY

    Education MECs approve post establishments on a yearly basis. Preliminary establishments are provided to schools in October of each year and final establishments before the end of the school year for implementation in January of the next school year.

    QUESTION NO 1632

    DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: FRIDAY, 14 NOVEMBER 2008

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: FRIDAY, 19 SEPTEMBER 2008 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 28 – 2008)

    Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) asked the Minister of Transport:

    (1) Whether he has been informed of concerns of communities (details furnished) regarding inadequate road infrastructure for heavy vehicles accessing national key points; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (2) whether, in view of the fatal road accident on Saturday, 9 August 2008 (details furnished), his department will investigate the concerns with regard to heavy vehicles utilising inadequate infrastructure in residential areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

    NW2407E

    REPLY:

    1.1

    The Minister of Transport:

    (1) The Department of Transport (DoT) has intensified its efforts with regard to the implementation of the National Freight Logistics Strategy since the Strategy's approval by Cabinet in 2005. One of the key interventions by the DoT in dealing with constraints in efficiencies and limited infrastructure and operational capacities within the National Freight Logistics System, was the establishment of Provincial Institutional structures, namely, Provincial Freight Logistics Forums.

    The KwaZulu-Natal (KZN) Provincial Freight Logistics Forum (KZN Freight Task Group) and all other forums include the following key stakeholders, namely government departments (National, Provincial and Local Municipalities), State-Owned Enterprises (SOEs), the private sector, organized labour and community organizations.

    (2) As highlighted in the response to part (1) above, the provincial Freight Logistics Forums were established to ensure that infrastructure and services enable safe passage of freight in a manner that does not pose a danger to communities.

    The KwaZulu-Natal Provincial Department of Transport is addressing the concern raised in partnership with the Freight Forums.

    QUESTION 1633

    Dr R Rabinowitz to ask the Minister of Housing:

    1. Whether a tender was issued for the supply of solar water geysers in the two projects in Alexandria (names furnished), if not, why not; if so, (a) which companies responded to the tender, (b) what were their tenders in each case, (c) to whom was the tender awarded (d) what was the cost (i) per item or per geyser and (ii) per geyser installed and (e) how many geysers were installed,

    2. Whether there is an ongoing service component to the awarded contract; if not, why not, if so, what does it comprise;

    3. Whether it includes the training of persons in the community; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

    REPLY

    1. According to the Eastern Cape Department of Housing, as well as the Ndlambe Municipality, none of the housing projects in that municipality contain solar water geysers due to the fact that the housing subsidy does not provide for the installation of geysers in subsidized houses. A tender in this regard was therefore never issued.

    2. Not applicable

    3. Not applicable

    QUESTION NO 1634

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 26 SEPTEMBER 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 29/2008)

    Date reply submitted: 30 October 2008

    Dr R Rabinowitz (DA) to ask the Minister of Safety and Security:

    (1) Whether the SA Police Service have separate units for dealing with crimes against children and rape victims; if so, (a) where are they located and (b) how do they operate; if not,

    (2) whether the relevant functions have been incorporated into police stations; if not, why not; if so, (a) in what way, (b) in which police stations and (c) with what effect?

    NW2343E

    REPLY:

    (1) The SA Police Service does have specialized capacity to deal with crimes against children and victims of rape.

    (1)(a) The specialized capacity is located at accounting stations or at local police stations (Detective Service) depending on the needs, for example the geographical area (distances) and the prevalence of the crimes.

    (1)(b) They attend to the crimes when they are reported and conduct further investigations. Depending on the circumstances, this will include the following:

    • Interviewing the complainant and witnesses and obtaining all the statements

    • Identifying, tracing and interviewing the alleged offender

    • Medical examination

    • Processing the crime scene

    • Collecting physical evidence

    • Using experts and investigation aids

    • Submitting the case docket to court.

    (2)(a)(b)(c) The Family Violence, Child Protection and Sexual Offences Units (FCS) are part of the current restructuring process which will be concluded by March 2009. They will be transferred to the police stations. There will be an FCS capacity at the Detective Service.

    QUESTION NO: 1637

    MR J SELFE (DA) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

    In respect of each of the past five years up to the latest specified date for which information is available, (a) how many offenders were released on parole (i) nationally and (ii) by each correctional centre, (b) how many (i) full-time and (ii) part-time /temporary staff are allocated to parole-related functions by function/occupation (aa) per province (bb) nationally and (cc) by prison, (c) how many parole boards are there and (d)(i) what was the number of personnel, (ii) support and administrative capacity, (iii) allocated budget and (iv) actual expenditure per parole board? NW2410E

    REPLY

    (a)(i)

    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE NATIONALLY

    FINANCIAL YEAR

    TOTAL

    2003/2004

    27769

    2004/2005

    23031

    2005/2006

    22550

    2006/2007

    17870

    2007/2008

    16915

    1 APRIL – 30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    8105

    (a)(ii) See Annexure A, attached.

    (b)(i)(aa)

    FULL TIME STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS PER REGION

    REGION

    POST

    TOTAL

    EASTERN CAPE

    CHAIRPERSON

    8

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    8

    SECRETARY

    8

    FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

    CHAIRPERSON

    7

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    7

    SECRETARY

    7

    GAUTENG

    CHAIRPERSON

    11

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    11

    SECRETARY

    11

    FULL TIME STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS PER REGION

    REGION

    POST

    TOTAL

    KWAZULU/NATAL

    CHAIRPERSON

    8

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    8

    SECRETARY

    8

    LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

    CHAIRPERSON

    8

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    8

    SECRETARY

    8

    WESTERN CAPE

    CHAIRPERSON

    10

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    10

    SECRETARY

    10

    (b)(i)(bb)

    FULL TIME STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS NATIONALLY

    POST

    TOTAL

    CHAIRPERSON

    52

    VICE CHAIRPERSON

    52

    SECRETARY

    52

    GRAND TOTAL

    156

    (b)(i)(cc) Three (3) full time (Chairperson / Vice Chairperson / Secretary) and two (2) part time (Community Member) posts have been allocated to each of the following Management Areas:

    FULL AND PART TIME STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS

    PER MANAGEMENT AREA

    REGION

    MANAGEMENT AREA

    EASTERN CAPE

    ST ALBANS

    MIDDLEDRIFT

    EAST LONDON

    KIRKWOOD

    SADA

    LUSIKISIKI

    CRADOCK

    UMTATA

    FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

    GROENPUNT

    GROOTVLEI

    COLESBERG

    KIMBERLEY

    UPINGTON

    GOEDEMOED

    KROONSTAD

    GAUTENG

    BAVIAANSPOORT

    ZONDERWATER

    KRUGERSDORP

    PRETORIA: PAROLE BOARD 1

    PRETORIA: PAROLE BOARD 2

    FULL AND PART TIME STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS

    PER MANAGEMENT AREA

    REGION

    MANAGEMENT AREA

    GAUTENG (CONTINUE)

    LEEUWKOP: PAROLE BOARD 1

    LEEUWKOP: PAROLE BOARD 2

    JOHANNESBURG: PAROLE BOARD 1

    JOHANNESBURG: PAROLE BOARD 2

    MODDERBEE

    BOKSBURG

    KWAZULU/NATAL

    KOKSTAD

    DURBAN: PAROLE BOARD 1

    DURBAN: PAROLE BOARD 2

    NCOME

    PIETERMARITZBURG

    EMPANGENI

    GLENCOE

    WATERVAL

    LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

    POLOKWANE

    BARBERTON

    BETHAL

    WITBANK

    KLERKSDORP

    ROOIGROND

    RUSTENBURG

    THOHOYANDOU

    WESTERN CAPE

    DRAKENSTEIN

    ALLANDALE

    POLLSMOOR: PAROLE BOARD 1

    POLLSMOOR: PAROLE BOARD 2

    WEST COAST (MALMESBURY)

    BRANDVLEI

    VOORBERG

    SOUTHERN CAPE (GEORGE)

    BREEDE RIVER (WORCESTER)

    OVERBERG (HELDERSTROOM)

    (b)(ii)(aa)

    PART TIME/TEMPORARY STAFF ALLOCATED TO PAROLE-RELATED FUNCTIONS PER REGION

    REGION

    POST

    TOTAL

    EASTERN CAPE

    COMMUNITY MEMBER

    16

    GAUTENG

    22

    KWAZULU/NATAL

    16

    LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

    16

    FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

    14

    WESTERN CAPE

    20

    GRAND TOTAL

    104


    (b)(ii)(bb) One hundred and four (104).

    (b)(ii)(cc) See paragraph (b)(i)(cc) supra.

    (c) There are fifty two (52) Parole Boards.

    (d)(i) The number of personnel is comprised as follows:

    FULL/PART TIME

    POST

    TOTAL

    FULL TIME STAFF

    CHAIRPERSON / VICE CHAIRPERSON / SECRETARY

    156

    PART TIME STAFF

    COMMUNITY MEMBERS

    104

    FULL TIME STAFF

    SUPPORT AND ADMINISTRATIVE

    104

    GRAND TOTAL

    364

    (d)(ii) One hundred and four (104).

    (d)(iii) + (iv) See Annexure B, attached.

    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    EASTERN CAPE

    BURGERSDORP

    0

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    CRADOCK

    195

    187

    42

    0

    0

    0

    DORDRECHT

    0

    0

    0

    6

    5

    4

    MIDDELBURG

    2

    0

    1

    1

    2

    0

    SOMERSET EAST

    1

    0

    0

    26

    59

    29

    EAST LONDON MED. A

    672

    551

    507

    336

    124

    78

    EAST LONDON MED. B

    3

    3

    2

    0

    0

    0

    EAST LONDON MED. C

    92

    94

    77

    62

    69

    39

    MDANTSANE

    229

    186

    246

    289

    399

    174

    JANSENVILLE

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    0

    KIRKWOOD

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    BIZANA

    52

    37

    16

    31

    11

    0

    FLAGSTAFF

    31

    6

    0

    0

    0

    0

    LUSIKISIKI

    273

    203

    126

    111

    90

    9

    MOUNT AYLIFF

    272

    151

    97

    84

    39

    55

    MOUNT FLETCHER

    2

    0

    0

    11

    43

    3

    MOUNT FRERE

    205

    169

    125

    99

    133

    76

    TABANKULU

    0

    144

    130

    110

    96

    48

    FORT BEAUFORT

    147

    163

    122

    114

    51

    28

    GRAHAMSTOWN

    0

    1

    1

    3

    2

    0

    KING WILLIAMS TOWN

    231

    195

    158

    134

    23

    8

    MIDDLEDRIFT

    99

    59

    21

    33

    174

    160

    STUTTERHEIM

    94

    78

    80

    50

    51

    39

    BARKLY EAST

    88

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    BUTTERWORTH

    192

    105

    89

    72

    118

    41

    ELLIOTDALE

    117

    33

    41

    14

    31

    8

    IDUTYWA

    104

    104

    35

    44

    52

    16

    LADY FRERE

    0

    17

    61

    0

    0

    0

    NQAMAKWE

    0

    140

    146

    192

    192

    96

    QUEENSTOWN

    75

    50

    31

    8

    3

    0

    SADA

    0

    1

    0

    33

    17

    5

    STERKSPRUIT

    133

    113

    114

    100

    86

    28

    WILLOWVALE

    31

    62

    132

    72

    72

    36

    PATENSIE

    0

    0

    1

    4

    0

    0

    PORT ELIZABETH

    1052

    944

    670

    637

    734

    375

    ST ALBANS MED. B

    39

    30

    13

    5

    3

    2

    MQANDULI

    26

    191

    169

    180

    180

    90

    UMTATA MAX.

    1

    1

    1

    0

    0

    0

    UMTATA MED.

    651

    558

    504

    279

    248

    128

    TOTAL

    5109

    4577

    3758

    3141

    3108

    1575


    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    FREE STATE & NORTHERN CAPE

    COLESBERG

    89

    56

    52

    37

    61

    37

    DE AAR

    157

    128

    106

    143

    148

    51

    HOPETOWN

    94

    77

    49

    33

    23

    26

    RICHMOND

    71

    52

    35

    34

    44

    17

    VICTORIA WEST

    141

    77

    37

    67

    41

    34

    BETHULIE

    48

    8

    14

    2

    1

    0

    EDENBURG

    0

    0

    0

    2

    9

    10

    FAURESMITH

    81

    70

    39

    25

    8

    2

    ZASTRON

    74

    64

    46

    52

    51

    13

    FRANKFORT

    5

    47

    44

    48

    51

    23

    GROENPUNT JUVENILE

    6

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    GROENPUNT MAX.

    0

    5

    82

    54

    34

    18

    GROENPUNT MED.

    55

    56

    127

    204

    146

    50

    HEILBRON

    0

    1

    0

    0

    10

    5

    PARYS

    0

    0

    0

    2

    0

    0

    VEREENIGING

    221

    210

    244

    172

    204

    75

    BOSHOF

    0

    0

    0

    3

    3

    2

    BRANDFORT

    17

    21

    22

    1

    0

    0

    GROOTVLEI MAX.

    0

    1

    0

    0

    2

    0

    LADYBRAND

    2

    5

    0

    1

    0

    0

    BARKLY WEST

    94

    108

    55

    61

    48

    34

    DOUGLAS

    156

    137

    137

    101

    107

    49

    KIMBERLEY

    415

    352

    400

    364

    337

    179

    FICKSBURG

    146

    126

    97

    129

    112

    51

    HARRISMITH

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1

    1

    HENNENMAN

    9

    1

    5

    4

    1

    1

    HOOPSTAD

    0

    0

    1

    35

    12

    16

    KROONSTAD MED. A

    44

    7

    13

    0

    0

    0

    KROONSTAD MED. B

    29

    1

    3

    0

    0

    0

    KROONSTAD MED. C

    14

    26

    1

    2

    0

    0

    KROONSTAD YOUTH

    3

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    LINDLEY

    58

    40

    46

    42

    44

    21

    ODENDAALSRUS

    118

    97

    124

    78

    61

    5

    SENEKAL

    0

    1

    1

    0

    0

    0

    VENTERSBURG

    1

    1

    1

    2

    0

    2

    VIRGINIA

    0

    5

    20

    1

    0

    0

    KURUMAN

    192

    182

    160

    118

    109

    53

    SPRINGBOK

    113

    96

    94

    89

    99

    51

    UPINGTON

    392

    326

    322

    269

    182

    107

    TOTAL

    2845

    2385

    2377

    2175

    1949

    933


    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    GAUTENG

    BAVIAANSPOORT MED.

    3

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    EMTHONJENI JUVENILE

    0

    0

    2

    1

    0

    0

    BOKSBURG

    5

    1

    0

    2

    3

    0

    BOKSBURG JUVENILE

    0

    0

    0

    1

    1

    0

    HEIDELBERG

    1

    1

    0

    0

    3

    0

    JOHANNESBURG FEMALE

    220

    238

    204

    176

    174

    51

    JOHANNESBURG MED. A

    27

    32

    53

    24

    38

    10

    JOHANNESBURG MED. B

    464

    369

    341

    433

    496

    92

    JOHANNESBURG MED. C

    45

    33

    27

    9

    2

    0

    KRUGERSDORP

    603

    325

    25

    4

    3

    3

    LEEUWKOP JUVENILE

    322

    239

    227

    158

    220

    96

    LEEUWKOP MAX.

    4

    1

    7

    0

    0

    0

    LEEUWKOP MED. A

    335

    350

    719

    751

    532

    325

    LEEUWKOP MED. C

    350

    265

    406

    330

    267

    33

    DEVON

    936

    576

    591

    309

    312

    172

    MODDERBEE

    416

    146

    285

    203

    196

    87

    NIGEL MALE

    154

    137

    175

    48

    74

    35

    ATTERIDGEVILLE

    0

    0

    1

    0

    151

    29

    ODI

    234

    216

    523

    392

    364

    242

    PRETORIA CENTRAL

    2

    0

    0

    0

    7

    1

    PRETORIA FEMALE

    50

    57

    53

    14

    5

    0

    PRETORIA LOCAL

    94

    75

    49

    30

    33

    32

    PRETORIA MAX.

    0

    0

    1

    0

    0

    0

    ZONDERWATER MED. B

    0

    1

    0

    6

    0

    1

    TOTAL

    4265

    3062

    3689

    2891

    2881

    1209


    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    KWAZULU/NATAL

    DURBAN FEMALE

    0

    0

    5

    4

    16

    10

    DURBAN JUVENILE

    3

    0

    0

    0

    1

    1

    DURBAN MED. A

    8

    32

    39

    30

    16

    3

    DURBAN MED. B

    283

    217

    242

    301

    120

    78

    DURBAN MED. C

    478

    571

    622

    397

    239

    132

    UMZINTO

    0

    0

    0

    1

    75

    50

    EMPANGENI

    26

    25

    53

    27

    0

    0

    ESHOWE

    263

    259

    254

    104

    55

    27

    INGWAVUMA

    200

    129

    78

    65

    55

    29

    MAPUMULO

    53

    57

    47

    1

    6

    10

    MELMOTH

    9

    6

    0

    0

    0

    0

    MTUNZINI

    68

    67

    74

    40

    26

    13

    NKANDLA

    70

    45

    49

    20

    22

    18

    QALAKABUSHA

    371

    313

    304

    186

    132

    25

    STANGER

    132

    174

    178

    54

    29

    9

    BERGVILLE

    84

    56

    49

    67

    49

    29

    ESTCOURT

    177

    159

    116

    124

    126

    66

    GLENCOE

    239

    231

    203

    139

    70

    61

    GREYTOWN

    2

    0

    0

    0

    2

    0

    LADYSMITH

    290

    230

    216

    193

    179

    73

    POMEROY

    0

    0

    0

    6

    0

    0

    KOKSTAD MED. C

    216

    177

    156

    138

    141

    69

    MATATIELE

    84

    82

    42

    38

    35

    5

    PORT SHEPSTONE

    565

    273

    41

    1

    4

    3

    NCOME MED. A

    8

    18

    10

    4

    3

    0

    NCOME MED. B

    113

    177

    202

    84

    102

    0

    NONGOMA

    4

    6

    1

    2

    8

    6

    VRYHEID

    288

    204

    168

    148

    165

    89

    IXOPO

    0

    0

    22

    1

    1

    0

    NEW HANOVER

    4

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    PIETERMARITZBURG

    362

    195

    223

    149

    135

    76

    PIETERMARITZBURG MED. B

    147

    215

    259

    254

    159

    86

    SEVONTEIN

    0

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    EKUSENI

    0

    0

    4

    0

    0

    0

    NEWCASTLE

    17

    46

    15

    3

    73

    88

    UTRECHT

    2

    0

    2

    0

    0

    0

    WATERVAL MED. A

    12

    0

    1

    13

    10

    8

    WATERVAL MED. B

    0

    0

    0

    1

    0

    0

    TOTAL

    4578

    3964

    3675

    2595

    2055

    1064


    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    LIMPOPO, MPUMALANGA & NORTH WEST

    BARBERTON FARM MED. A

    0

    0

    0

    0

    22

    16

    BARBERTON FARM MED. B

    73

    0

    2

    0

    0

    1

    BARBERTON TOWN

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    0

    NELSPRUIT

    0

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    BETHAL

    238

    159

    215

    93

    106

    63

    ERMELO

    1

    0

    4

    1

    3

    0

    GELUK

    172

    157

    123

    31

    49

    7

    PIET RETIEF

    125

    97

    150

    121

    136

    44

    STANDERTON MED. A

    79

    40

    61

    84

    71

    22

    STANDERTON MED. B

    113

    93

    138

    103

    119

    32

    CHRISTIANA

    0

    1

    13

    3

    31

    66

    KLERKSDORP

    399

    340

    483

    405

    433

    162

    POTCHEFSTROOM

    309

    311

    313

    307

    260

    128

    WOLMARANSSTAD

    0

    0

    0

    13

    56

    35

    POLOKWANE

    9

    9

    3

    17

    31

    11

    TZANEEN

    182

    189

    146

    114

    116

    60

    LICHTENBURG

    154

    177

    196

    135

    6

    5

    MAFIKENG

    7

    15

    62

    59

    6

    2

    ROOIGROND MED. A

    0

    1

    0

    0

    0

    0

    ROOIGROND MED. B

    229

    161

    192

    118

    78

    49

    ZEERUST

    32

    96

    64

    7

    0

    0

    BRITS

    96

    85

    86

    68

    81

    19

    LOSPERFONTEIN

    245

    167

    218

    92

    123

    67

    MOGWASE

    6

    9

    99

    237

    271

    143

    RUSTENBURG

    200

    167

    144

    157

    176

    56

    RUSTENBURG JUVENILE

    98

    71

    75

    59

    75

    29

    MAKHADO

    509

    212

    320

    33

    22

    43

    THOHOYANDOU FEMALE

    1

    0

    1

    0

    18

    78

    THOHOYANDOU MED. B

    0

    0

    0

    3

    0

    0

    BELFAST

    36

    39

    40

    43

    26

    9

    CAROLINA

    122

    95

    74

    104

    95

    57

    MIDDELBURG

    167

    106

    99

    98

    68

    43

    WITBANK

    6

    45

    227

    51

    62

    49

    TOTAL

    3609

    2843

    3548

    2556

    2540

    1296


    OFFENDERS RELEASED ON PAROLE PER CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    REGION

    CORRECTIONAL CENTRE

    2003/2004

    2004/2005

    2005/2006

    2006/2007

    2007/2008

    1 APRIL –

    30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    WESTERN CAPE

    ALLANDALE

    4

    89

    100

    107

    143

    64

    HAWEQUA

    112

    57

    64

    51

    65

    28

    OBIQUA

    71

    47

    92

    62

    82

    18

    STAART VAN PAARDEBERG

    69

    58

    132

    78

    53

    32

    BRANDVLEI JUVENILE

    135

    96

    147

    107

    79

    36

    BRANDVLEI MAX.

    0

    0

    0

    4

    1

    0

    BRANDVLEI MED.

    157

    90

    156

    107

    85

    36

    DRAKENSTEIN MAX.

    6

    6

    10

    3

    1

    0

    DRAKENSTEIN MED. A

    272

    189

    259

    180

    184

    68

    DRAKENSTEIN MED. B JUVENILE

    102

    107

    90

    92

    75

    36

    STELLENBOSCH

    83

    76

    33

    41

    35

    17

    BEAUFORT WEST

    126

    77

    56

    57

    55

    22

    GEORGE

    502

    377

    366

    410

    329

    164

    KNYSNA

    178

    149

    86

    98

    89

    46

    LADISMITH

    104

    55

    66

    9

    19

    20

    MOSSELBAAI

    356

    349

    201

    222

    192

    81

    OUDTSHOORN MED. A

    352

    297

    252

    238

    196

    129

    OUDTSHOORN MED. B

    80

    57

    62

    50

    37

    20

    PRINCE ALBERT

    64

    37

    47

    31

    43

    18

    UNIONDALE

    123

    85

    60

    59

    46

    45

    GOODWOOD

    261

    308

    395

    279

    231

    89

    BUFFELJAGSRIVIER

    108

    65

    157

    97

    121

    39

    CALEDON

    253

    297

    128

    135

    109

    46

    HELDERSTROOM MAX.

    5

    7

    19

    10

    0

    0

    HELDERSTROOM MED.

    253

    113

    299

    149

    158

    68

    SWELLENDAM

    38

    54

    10

    0

    0

    0

    MALMESBURY MED. A

    191

    114

    146

    121

    162

    89

    MALMESBURY MED. B

    77

    73

    49

    40

    41

    14

    RIEBEECK WEST

    191

    150

    116

    92

    65

    38

    POLLSMOOR FEMALE

    102

    97

    89

    92

    105

    41

    POLLSMOOR MAX.

    0

    1

    1

    0

    1

    1

    POLLSMOOR MED. A

    471

    411

    209

    167

    136

    43

    POLLSMOOR MED. B

    183

    151

    180

    82

    25

    16

    POLLSMOOR MED. C

    1075

    947

    423

    576

    817

    377

    CALVINIA

    74

    53

    18

    13

    5

    2

    VANRHYNSDORP

    174

    158

    81

    61

    46

    12

    VOORBERG MED. A

    82

    62

    70

    83

    88

    42

    VOORBERG MED. B

    276

    231

    175

    158

    151

    75

    DWARSRIVIER

    106

    87

    146

    54

    28

    32

    ROBERTSON

    143

    127

    128

    61

    70

    26

    WARMBOKVELD

    132

    112

    120

    55

    52

    24

    WORCESTER FEMALE

    42

    44

    59

    41

    30

    18

    WORCESTER MALE

    230

    240

    206

    140

    132

    56

    TOTAL

    7363

    6200

    5503

    4512

    4382

    2028

    GRAND TOTAL

    27769

    23031

    22550

    17870

    16915

    8105

    ANNEXURE B

    REGION

    2004 / 2005

    2005 / 2006

    2006 / 2007

    2007 / 2008

    1 APRIL – 30 SEPTEMBER 2008

    BUDGET

    EXPENDITURE

    BUDGET

    EXPENDITURE

    BUDGET

    EXPENDITURE

    BUDGET

    EXPENDITURE

    BUDGET

    EXPENDITURE

    EASTERN CAPE