Questions & Replies: Questions & Replies No 101 to 150

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2008-11-26

[PMG note: Any gaps in numbering are due to replies not yet received]

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 106 (written 586 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 7)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

(1) Whether one of the two proposals of public/private partnership and a lease model has been approved for the Kempton Park Hospital; if not, why not; if so, when will the hospital be reopened;

(2) whether his department has received any other proposals with regard to the opening of the Kempton Park Hospital; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) how much money has been spent on (a) security and (b) other services in each financial year since the Kempton Park Hospital was closed?

NW640E

REPLY:

We are still waiting from information from the Gauteng Department of Health, which will be furnished to the Honourable Member once it is received.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 111 (written 649 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 07 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 7)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Ms E More (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

Whether there is a foundation document for the proposed National Health Insurance (NHI) system; if not, why not; if so, (a) why has it not been released for public opinion and (b) when will it be released?

NW735E

REPLY:

The draft National Health Insurance Policy is undergoing Cabinet processes and will be released for public consultation as soon as such processes are over.




114 Professor B Turok (ANC) to ask the Minister of Public Works:

(1) Whether she has been informed of an application by the City of Cape Town for a land availability agreement in order that Erf 84603 Steenberg may be developed for low-cost housing, if so,

(2) Whether she has taken a decision on the matter; if not, (a) why not and (b) when will she take such a decision; if so, what are the relevant details? NW501E

REPLY

(1) Yes, the National Department of Public Works, Cape Town regional office has received an application for land from the City of Cape Town.

(2) No;

(a) The Cape Town regional office has recommended the disposal of Erf 84603 Retreat (Steenberg) in favour of the City of Cape Town for a low cost housing development also incorporating land reform beneficiaries.

(b) The department is currently in the process of evaluating the recommendation of the regional office and will be finalizing its decision in due course.

QUESTION 115

WRITTEN REPLY

DATE OF PUBLICATION: FRIDAY, 15 FEBRUARY 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO.: 2-2008

MR M H HOOSEN (ID) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF DEFENCE

Whether the entire Lohatla report will be tabled in Parliament and released to the public; if not, why not; if so, when;

whether any legal actions will be taken against the arms manufacturer that is allegedly responsible for the tragedy as stated in the Lohatla report; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

-------ooo0ooo------- NW502E

REPLY

Yes. In May 2008.

The relevant inputs have been forwarded to the DoD Legal Division, which is considering the liability issues.

QUESTION 117

WEDNESDAY 18 JUNE 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER [NO 17-2008]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 09 June 2008

117. Mr J Bici (UDM) to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Land Affairs:

Whether any strategies are in place to enable subsistence farming contributing towards the alleviation of poverty and hunger in rural areas; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details?

NO16

THE MINISTER FOR AGRICULTURE AND LAND AFFAIRS

In terms of the Department of Agriculture:

(a) Yes, the Integrated Food Security Strategy (IFSS).

(b) The Department of Agriculture through the Provincial Departments of Agriculture provide support to vulnerable households to produce for their own sustenance by establishing backyard and or community gardens.

- The Household food Production Programme (HHFPP) provides once off grants for agricultural starter packs and the required technical know-how.

- The composition of the starter packs depend on the type of enterprise and this covers the basic requisites, ranging from inputs to minimum infrastructure required for the enterprise to kick off.

In terms of the Department of Land Affairs:

Yes, the Settlement and Implementation Support Strategy was launched in February 2008. This strategy addresses support to land reform beneficiaries by ensuring that all relevant role players are on board in terms of implementing projects so that they are sustainable. In this regard, the issue of poverty and hunger in the rural areas should then be addressed accordingly. This strategy is also linked with the Land and Agrarian Reform Programme (led by the Departments of Land Affairs and of Agriculture) which brings relevant role players on board in terms of market access and the development of entrepreneurs, to name a few.

Question 118

Mr S E Kholwane (ANC) to ask the Minister for Public Enterprises:

What has been done to ensure that certain coal powered stations (names furnished) are linked by railway to their suppliers? NO1671E

Reply:

Historically, the inherent spatial relationship between the power stations and their associated mines was premised on the notion that a coal-fired power station should be built directly adjacent to or as close as possible to the mine to ensure continuous, un-interrupted supply of coal to the power stations. Hence, the original architecture of the power stations demanded extensive use of conveyor belt systems over relatively short distances between a coal mine and the power station that it served.

Furthermore, the nature of coal mining for the grade of coal that Eskom requires necessitates that new sections of earth are mined as the coal closest to the conveyor belt gets depleted.

This type of mining does not lend itself well to fixed rail infrastructure being provided to load the coal at the mine. Transportation by rail also requires certain off-loading capabilities at the power stations, which was not incorporated into the original architecture because a direct trade-off was made in favour of conveyor belts.

Thus, almost 70% of coal that is being transported from the mines to the coal power stations are transported by conveyor belt system. Less then 5% of all coal for the power stations are presently being transported by rail.

At present, rail primarily serves the Majuba power station because it has the required tipper to off-load rail wagons at an efficient pace. Since February 2008, rail capacity to service Majuba increased some 30%. A new weekly record of 115 000 tons (up from a weekly average of 94 000 tons previously) was achieved in April 2008.

However, it is recognised that, in the current climate, this is not enough. Indeed, Eskom and Transnet already in discussion about how to substantially increase the weekly volume of coal on rail. While there are several options emerging from this dialogue, more work still needs to be done in order to arrive at a holistic, integrated set of rail interventions.

In addition, a multi-stakeholder Task Team has been established and mandated to develop a sustainable strategy for the transport and logistics of coal to the Eskom power stations, current and new projects, for the long-term. Clearly, given environmental and road damage issues, we will endeavour to put as much coal as possible on to rail.

However, I must caution that this is not easily achieved, nor necessarily that we can achieve a total logistics re-configuration within 3-5 years. Nonetheless, every effort will be made to deliver real results as soon as possible.


With regard to Tutuka Power Station, a: new conveyor or rail link from a future coal source is being explored as an alternative.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 119 (written 760 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 9)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

(1) Whether any applications were received for the registration of medicines and amendments to dossiers (a) in (i) 2005, (ii) 2006, (iii) 2007 and (iv) 2008 and (b) during the period 1 January 2009 up to the latest specified date for which information is available; if so, (i) how many in each case, (ii) on which date was each application submitted, (iii) what conditions/illnesses was each application for, (iv) what are the names of the medicines in each application and (v) which applications (aa) have been registered and (bb) have not been registered;

(2) (a) how many additional clinical evaluators have been appointed in the past two financial years, (b) on what date was each evaluator appointed and (c) how many applications have they completed since their appointment;

(3) whether, with regard to the current backlog, there are any steps to allow for the registration of medicines that have been approved by certain acceptable countries, similar to that of Singapore; if not, (a) why not and (b) by what date will the backlog be addressed; if so, (i) when will this come into effect and (ii) which countries are acceptable?

NW888E

REPLY:

(1) (a) The table below lists the number of applications that were received by the Registrar of Medicines for the:

i. registration of a medicine, or

ii. amendment to the registration of a medicine

(b) number of medicines registered/amended from the applications of the year;

(c) number of medicines registered/amended from the applications of any other year;

(d) accumulated backlog of applications

With regard to names and intended use of medicines, applications are submitted under proposed proprietary names. These names are also subject to evaluation and approval of the MCC as are the intended conditions/illnesses for which the product has been applied for. This information is subject to the secrecy clause provide for in section 34 of the Medicines and Related Substances Control Act, 1965 (Act 101 of 1965) and may therefore not be disclosed for as yet unregistered medicines. However, a wide spectrum of medicines intended for management and treatment of hypertension, tuberculosis, HIV&AIDS, diabetes, cardiac arrhythmias, antibiotics for bacterial infections, allergies, cancer therapy, and many other clinical treatments are included amongst the applications.

YEAR

No. APPLICATIONS RECEIVED

No. MEDICINES REGISTERED FROM THE YEAR OF APPLICATION TO DATE (Sep. 2009)

No. MEDICINES REGISTERED IN THE SAME YEAR OF SUBMISSION

Total registered

DURING THE YEAR

OUTSTANDING APPLICATIONS

2002

552

390

3

427

162

2003

600

452

0

450

148

2004

715

558

7

293

157

(a) (i)

2005

614

380

8

774

234

(a) (ii)

2006

940

482

14

551

458

(a) (iii)

2007

1138

226

17

387

912

(a) (iv)

2008

748

5

0

483

743

(b)

1 Jan to 20 Aug 2009

281

2

2

242

N/A

TOTAL

5307

2493

49

3365

2814

(2) (a) In terms of the provisions of the Act the MCC approves the appointment of evaluators. To date a panel of 28 evaluators has been appointed.

(b) Besides the few full-time staff who are evaluators, evaluators are normally appointed for a five year period. The bulk of evaluators are academics and experienced clinicians and pharmacists. Of the approved panel of 28 evaluators 22 are current evaluators and six are people who used to evaluate and who have been recruited in August 2009 to assist once more for the backlog project.

(c) Applications are distributed to several evaluators to make recommendations from different perspectives. A single registered product is therefore the work of a significant team of people. The average number of applications considered at a MCC meeting is between 70 and 80. The initial period of the project has focused on auditing the entire backlog. The aim is to increase the average number of applications considered at an MCC meeting to more than 80 and to increase the frequency of MCC meetings. In the August meeting 71 registrations were approved. In excess of 70 applications will be ready for review in the October meeting.

(3) No, there are presently no processes in place to allow for the registration of medicines that have been approved by other countries.

(a) There is no enabling policy or legal framework and this will need to be addressed in the future.

(b) It is envisaged that the backlog will be completely addressed within 18 to 24 months, subject to availability of resources.

(i) Following recommendations from the Health Products Technical Task Team which amongst other tasks examined the problems in the MCC and its administrative component - the Medicines Regulatory Authority (MRA) - we immediately embarked on a very substantial project to address the backlogs, to examine closely how we procure medicines in the country and to prepare a project plan to reform the MCC and MRA. By theend of August we had already contracted 57 external staff full time or part time to assist the permanent personnel of the MRA.

The project to address the backlogs commenced at the end of July and is being conducted in several phases, some of which are running in parallel:

Phase 1: Screening of all medicine applications for completeness and correctness. So far this is complete and up to date and the reception procedure has been changed to avoid accumulation of new applications at this stage.

Phase 2: Conducting of an audit of all unprocessed (or incomplete) applications that are in various stages of the registration process. This entailed a physical stock-take and creation of registers office by office and passage by passage with the compilation of a single consolidated data base of applications.

A significant failing in the MRA is that there is grossly inadequate tracking of the huge amount of paper associated with the applications. An Electronic Data Management System (EDMS) was started a long time ago with support of the European Union but stalled for some technical reasons. The EDMS will dramatically improve the ability to manage and track applications. The technical obstacles have been removed and the supplier has provided a new project timetable. By the 19th October training of the staff will begin and trouble-shooting will be conducted until final hand-over on 29th January 2010. The completion of the EDMS implementation and training will cost R1,368m.

Linked to using the EDMS is the need for user licenses. Through the project a total of 111 licenses are being procured to ensure sufficient user licenses for the EDMS to be of maximal benefit. The VAT inclusive price will be R2,79m (license and first year).

The consolidated audit register (simple shared Excel sheet) will be maintained and updated until the EDMS is ready and will be used to populate the EDMS for the transition. (Data is correlated with the Postlog system at reception.)

Phase 3: Ratification and completion of the register by consulting industry to compare their records with this retrieved and compiled in the audit.

Phase 4: Evaluation of applications. This is a time-consuming and complex technical process. Applications are being distributed to the expanded panel of evaluators. The evaluators are being asked not to accept a work-load that they know that they cannot complete within the timeframes of their service level agreements.

Phase 5: Peer review is conducted to assure quality. Standing committees of the MCC conduct these reviews. Logistical provision (printing, transport, accommodation, etc) has been made for an increased number and frequency of the committee meetings for the duration of the project.

Phase 6: Approval is finally a matter for the MCC itself. The MCC is a statutory council of 24 members, including committee chairpersons. Logistical provision (printing, transport, accommodation, etc) has been made for an increased number and frequency of the committee meetings for the duration of the project.

Phase 7: Registry and archiving. It was not originally recognised how much of a problem is created by lack of filing space and poor capacity to file the finalised applications and updates in the Registry. This was soon identified as a massive bottleneck. Prior to the project the NDOH had already entered into a commercial contract to pack, move and store off-site 2500 boxes of old archived documents. The problem was lack of staff to pack and record the contents of the boxes. The project team placed two contract clerks in the Registry to support the permanent staff. The project has also provided funding for a further 3500 boxes to be removed to off-site archives in Sept and 3500 boxes in October.

By the end of August 2500 documents were filed in Registry and 1545 boxes prepared and collected by the contractor.

Between the end of July and end of October it is expected that R13,5m will have been spent on this project. This comprises R7,6m on contracted additional personnel, R4,3m on equipment and supplies (including the IT contracts) and R1,6m on logistics. These resources have been generously provided by the UK Department for International Development specifically for this once-off project.

(i) The MCC aligns itself with the national medicines regulatory authorities from the following countries in so far as confirmatory reports and sharing of information are concerned:

· United States, FDA

· United Kingdom, MHRA

· Sweden, MPA

· Australia, TGA

· Canada, Health Canada

· European Union, EMEA

· Japan, MWH

In addition MCC accepts reports from the 36 member countries to the Pharmaceutical Inspection Cooperation Scheme (PIC/S) for quality matters relating to GMP.

Question 120

Mr P A C Hendrickse (ANC) to ask the Minister for Public Enterprises:

(1) Whether he has received any list of skilled persons from a certain union (name furnished) and/or any other union or organisation; if so,

(2) whether persons on the list have the necessary skills required by Eskom; if so, (a) how many persons on the list (i) have been employed or (ii) are being pursued with a view to possible employment at Eskom and (b) in what capacity? NO1673E

Reply:

(1) Eskom has received a letter and a compact disc containing list of names perceived to be potential skilled labour force to Eskom on 11 February 2008 from the Leader of the Freedom Front.

(2) The list of names furnished has been evaluated and a data base has been developed - suitable candidates will be included in Eskom's focussed recruitment drives.

Question 121

Mr C L Gololo (ANC) to ask the Minister for Public Enterprises:

Whether the Government's decision in 1997 to exit from the forestry industry will be reviewed, in view of the SA Forestry Company Ltd being financially viable and creating many jobs as reported in the 2006-07 Annual Report; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details? NO1674E

Reply:

May the Honourable Member note that the 1997 decision to exit from the forestry industry was reviewed, and Cabinet approved that the state is more likely to contribute optimally to developmental objectives in the forestry sector, including empowerment and transformation objectives, and increasing competition, by transferring KLF to the private sector than by retaining it.

However, the disposal of KLF is subject to the verification of all outstanding land claims. This will entail amongst others, engaging in discussions with Departments of Land Affairs and Water Affairs and Forestry on the co-ordination of the land claim process in order to recognise the rights of the affected communities. The land claims issues have thus necessitated the revision of the disposal timelines originally communicated to the Board. The land claims present a number of challenges for both KLF and SAFCOL and the resolution thereof may necessitate consideration of other restitution models to accommodate the affected communities. In the meantime, however, DPE and the SAFCOL Board will need to address the concerns around maintaining the forestry asset whilst considering the resolution of the land claims. The engagements with the Departments of Land Affairs and Water Affairs and Forestry have been initiated and Cabinet will be duly briefed of the latest development in the near future.

ê122. Mr. M J G Mzondeki (ANC) to ask the Minister of Labour:

(1) Whether his department has any programme aimed at training and creating awareness on public service managers on the employment of disabled persons as per the code of good practice on the employment of disabled persons; if so, what were the successes achieved by the programme; if not,

(2) whether there is a plan to embark on such a programme; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

NO1675E

THE MINISTER OF LABOUR REPLIED:

Naxa ndingengo Mphathiswa wesebe Labasebenzi ku Rhulumente – singabasebenzi ngabo kuphela naxa kunjalo rhoqo gqolo ngo nyaka sibaneendibano zokufundisa abantu ngalo mthetho i-Employment Equity, kuze bazi ngokupheleleyo ngawo, sikwenza ke oku sigqale kubo bonke abaqashi ngakumbi abo abakhankanyekayo kwakunye ke nabasebenzi bakaRhulumente. Sizama ukuqonda abaqeshi ukuba baluncothule neengcambu ubandlululo ncalu-calulo ngakumbi ngokubhekiselele kubantu abakhubazekileyo ukuze imthehto usetyenziswe ngendlela ayiyo.

(1) My Department has no specific programmes focusing on training and creating awareness on public service managers per se, however, it is important to note that on annual basis, my Department has conducted various awareness raising campaigns on different Employment Equity issues to educate and advocate all designated employers, including the Public Service on how to comply with the requirements of the Employment Equity Act, 1998. These measures cover that the need for the employers to undertake to eliminate elements of unfair discrimination based on various prohibited grounds, including disability and also on the implementation of Affirmative Action in the workplace.

(2) Yes, there are plans to continue creating awareness and educating employers regarding their legislative duties as designated employers under the Employment Equity Act (the Act) in order to strengthen the implementation mechanisms of the Act. It is important to note that this year again; my Department will be embarking on EE Awareness campaigns in July and August throughout all the provinces. The campaigns will this time focus around mainly on raising awareness and educating employers on various Employment Equity tools (i.e. the Codes of Good Practice on the employment of People with Disabilities and the management of HIV and AIDS in the workplace, including the Technical Assistance Guidelines that accompany these Codes).

In addition to the above initiative, my Department has in collaboration with the Department of Public Service Administration conducted an awareness raising workshop on 11 June 2008 for the Public Service. The workshop focused mainly on educating the Public Service on the various Codes of Good Practice, i.e. the Employment of People with disabilities and the management of HIV and AIDS in the workplace, including other legislated duties of designated employers such as consultation, preparation and implementation of an Employment Equity Plan and submission of Employment Equity reports that are due on 1 October 2008.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 123 (written 797 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 9)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr M J Ellis (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

Whether any funds have been allocated for awareness programmes regarding the N1H1 virus; if not, why not; if so, (a) what amount was allocated to (i) his department and (ii) each of the provinces and (b) how has each amount been spent?

NW935E

REPLY:

Yes funds have been allocated for awareness programmes regarding the H1N1 virus. The following are details in this regard.

(a) (i) A total of R12,000,000.00 was allocated for strengthening awareness campaigns at the National level for control of Pandemic H1N1 virus infection;

(ii) There was no specific allocation provided for use in the provinces.

(b) At national level, R5,700,000.00 has so far been spent. An additional R5,313,232.55 has been requested for use during the period February to March 2010. The details of expenditure and budget are contained in the tables overleaf.


Incurred expenditures for awwreness programmes on Pandemic Influenza H1N1:

Description and media

Quantity

Date

Amount spent

Advertisement in the Daily Sun Newspaper

Alert on H1N1

Advertorial Daily Sun –Alert sponsored by discovery

2

On 04 May 2009

R 70 383,60

Advertisement in the Beeld and Star Newspaper

Alert on H1N1

1

On 08 May 2009

R 86 505,56

Printing of 10 000 A1 posters in English only about the Swine Flu Outbreak (Alert n H1N1)

Distributed to Provincial Departments of Health for further distribution to health facilities and Ports of Entry

10 000

On 07May 2009

R 49 900,08

Advertisement in the Sowetan, Illanga and Mail and Guardian Newspaper

Alert on H1N1

1

On 08 May 2009

R 106 681,51

Advertisement in the City Press Newspaper

Feature article and advertorial

Dr Frew Benson)

1

On 10 May 2009

R 212 236,10

Placement of Preventative Health Messages about H1N1 on Electronic Billboards at the Airports, Freeways and major national roads for the Confederations Cup

On 12 June 2009

R 198 360,00

Advertisement in the Daily Sun Newspaper

1

On 28 July 2009

R 70 383,60

Advertorial Independent newspapers

Beat the Flu

NdoH, Sanovi and FFID

1

July

R185 000.00

Advertorial Sowetan

Beat The Flu

NdoH and Roche

1

July

R56 000.00

Printing of 45 000 A2 posters in English only about the H1N1 Flu preventative messages expenditures paid by the Centre for Disease Control (CDC) Atlanta

45 000

On 06 August 2009

R 65 000.00

Printing of 45 000 A1 posters in All languages about the Swine Flu Outbreak

45 000

On 18 August 2009

R 193 500,00

Printing of 240 000 Pamphlets Minister's letter to the public in All languages about the Swine Flu Outbreak

240 000

On 04 September 2009

R 158 400,00

32 Television Inserts running for 90 seconds each for 16 days by the Minister about H1N1 pandemic

32 TV Inserts

On September 2009

R 2 363 909,89 (NdoH Comms)

R1 400 000,00 (NdoH TB

Advertorial Sunday Newspapers (Minister on prevention of spread of H1N1)

Sunday Times, Sunday World, City Press, Rapport, Sunday Sun

A4 advertorial

End of August

+-R490 000.00

Shift TV Programme SABC 1 (Mon-Wednesdays 13h00)

Diretor for CDC interviewed and answered telephone questions

Interview

15 September 2008

Free

Health Promotion Radio Slots

SABC African Language Stations

Public Service Announcement

Health Education

September 2009

Free

Vukuzenzele Magazine – July August Issue

Double spread plus third page given for free

August 2009

R60 000.00

Pharmaciae Magazine (Pharmacy Council)

Placement of poster (Beat the Flu)

September 2009

Free

E-mail Campaign

District Hospitals and Clinics

H1N1 Multisectoral Committee

Religious institutions

Trade Unions

Major Retail Groups

Chamber of Mines – Mining Houses in SA

Tertiary Institutions

Government Departments provincial and national

Internally within the department and intranet

Distribution of Beat the Flu Poster and frequently asked

Questions

Hospitals (private and Public)

August 2009

E-mail Campaign H1N1@health.gov.za

Continuous

National Blitz

All Health Provincial Departments participated

National Department of Health Blitz Activities

Hotspot areas targeted by NdoH

Sunnyside, Bell Ombre train station, Marabastad, Sammy Marks Shopping Centre, Van Der Walt Street, Intersection between Prinsloo and Church Street, SAMDI, San Arcadia Mall, Bloed Taxi Rank and Mall, Bosman Train Station and Taxi Rank

Dissemination H1N1 information (What you should know about H1N1 and at the back of the leaflet it will be a fact sheet)

19 August

Website (created webpage for H1N1)

Promotional Material

Information for Health Professionals

Guidelines etc

Links to relevant websites

Continuous updating

Website – information for health professionals

Placed on South African Medical Association website

Continuous

H1N1 Communication Task Team

(NdoH, WHO, CDC )

Developed H1N1 Communication Strategy

Discussed Strategy with Risk Communication Experts from Atlanta (telephonically)

Had Telephone Conferences and a meeting with Department of Health provincial communicators

Monitor implementation of communication strategy

Media analysis

Communication surveillance

Developed the Poster ( Beat the Flu)

Worked with Mindset to develop a questionnaire regarding H1N1 messages and placement of health messages on hospital TV sets

Communication Strategy for H1N1

TOTAL

R 5701261.34

Advertising activities from Mid February to Mid March 2010

FINANCIAL IMPLICATIONS

Type of Media

Duration

Placement

Budget

Commutanet

Four weeks

Rank TV

R2 136 282.00

Mindset TV

Four weeks

Health Facilities

Paid for by CDC

Electronic Billboards

Four weeks

Major national roads & Airports

R500 000.00

Commercial Radio

Four weeks

Khaya FM, Radio 702, Metro, YFM, Capricon FM, Igagasi and Empower FM

& all the ALS

R1 381 579.21

Community Radio Stations

Four weeks

60 Community radio stations

R395 953.34

Commuter Radio Station

Four weeks

Railway stations

R459 418.00

Publications

Nursing update

R20 000

South African Medical Journal

R20 000

Internal Newsletters

Communication

Pamphlet for pregnant women

Pamphlet for Health Professionals

200 000

100 000

300 000 Pamphlets

R400 000

TOTAL

R5 313 232.55

QUESTION 125

WEDNESDAY 18 JUNE 2008

INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER [NO 17-2008]

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 09 June 2008

125. Mr A H Nel (DA) to ask the Minister for Agriculture and Land Affairs:

What is the status of claim B243 in Wellington in the Western Cape? NO1680E

THE MINISTER FOR AGRICULTURE AND LAND AFFAIRS

On 26 November 1996, Mr J J Bosman lodged a claim for the restitution of rights in land for Erven 2492, 2445 and 2444, Wellington. In the claim form the claimant stated that no compensation was given and received for the dispossession. However, on investigation of the claim it transpired that these properties were in fact sold and the purchase price was paid to the claimants. For this reason, the Regional Land Claims Commissioner for the Western Cape requested the claimant to provide the Commission with an affidavit to obtain a detailed account of the events and circumstances leading to the dispossession. This will enable the Commission to ascertain, in terms of Rules 3 and 5 of the Rules of the Commission, whether just and equitable compensation was paid, and thereby determine whether the claim complies with the provisions of the Restitution of Land Rights Act, 1994. The Commission is awaiting the said affidavit.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 126 (written 803 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 9)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr T D Lee (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

As at the latest specified date for which information is available, (a) how many posts for (i) doctors, (ii) dentists, (iii) specialists, (iv) nurses and (v) physiotherapists existed at each public hospital in the Eastern Cape and (b) how many of each of these posts were filled?

NW942E

REPLY:

The following table reflects the situation in this regard, according to the Eastern Cape Provincial Department of Health

Region

Hospcomp

Post-Occ-Class-Desc-

Filled

Vacant

Grand Total

Alfred Nzo

Hospital:Madzikane-Kazulu Hospital Total

Dental Practitioners

1

4

5

Medical Practitioner

6

3

9

Nursing Assistants

56

50

106

Physiotherapy

1

4

5

Professional Nurse

49

124

173

Staff Nurses

40

27

67

Madzikane-Ka Zulu Total

153

212

365

Mount Ayliff

Dental Practitioners

0

10

10

Medical Practitioner

15

11

26

Nursing Assistants

124

70

194

Physiotherapy

2

3

5

Professional Nurse

97

318

415

Total

238

412

650

Sipetu

Medical Practitioner

0

2

2

Nursing Assistants

19

7

26

Professional Nurse

12

53

65

Staff Nurses

17

10

27

Total

48

72

120

Taylor Bequest

Dental Practitioners

1

9

10

Medical Practitioner

2

5

7

Nursing Assistants

51

40

91

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

82

223

305

Staff Nurses

12

8

20

Total

148

286

434

Khotsong

Dental Practitioners

0

0

0

Medical Practitioner

2

9

11

Nursing Assistants

87

28

115

Professional Nurse

111

297

408

Staff Nurses

13

2

15

Khotsong Total

213

336

549

Lsa:Umzimvubu

Dental Practitioners

1

9

10

Medical Practitioner

2

9

11

Nursing Assistants

87

28

115

Professional Nurse

111

297

408

Staff Nurses

13

2

15

Lsa:Umzimvubu Total

214

345

559

Alfred Nzo Total

1119

1799

2918

Amatole

Fort Grey Tb

Professional Nurse

18

41

59

Staff Nurses

14

10

24

Dental Practitioners

0

2

2

Medical Practitioner

2

7

9

Nursing Assistants

7

14

21

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

9

34

43

Staff Nurses

2

13

15

Fort Grey Tb Total

53

121

174

Bedford Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

5

5

Dental Specialists

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

2

21

23

Nursing Assistants

56

59

115

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

72

174

246

Staff Nurses

28

54

82

Hospital:Bedford Hospital Total

159

314

473

Bisho Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

5

5

Medical Practitioner

7

7

14

Medical Specialists

0

3

3

Nursing Assistants

109

76

185

Physiotherapy

2

1

3

Professional Nurse

149

245

394

Dental Practitioners

0

4

4

Medical Practitioner

1

8

9

Nursing Assistants

13

10

23

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

15

36

51

Staff Nurses

3

12

15

Hospital:Cathcart Hospital

300

407

707

Dental Practitioners

0

6

6

Medical Practitioner

2

11

13

Nursing Assistants

19

31

50

Physiotherapy

0

2

2

Professional Nurse

27

79

106

Staff Nurses

5

30

35

Hospital:Cathcart Hospital Total

53

159

212

Hospital:Fort Beaufort Hospital

Dental Practitioners

2

2

4

Medical Practitioner

5

13

18

Nursing Assistants

48

1

49

Physiotherapy

1

3

4

Professional Nurse

71

50

121

Staff Nurses

12

23

35

Fort Beaufort Hospital Total

139

92

231

Dental Practitioners

0

2

2

Dental Specialists

0

4

4

Medical Practitioner

8

4

12

Nursing Assistants

104

2

106

Physiotherapy

2

0

2

Professional Nurse

53

155

208

Staff + Pupil Nurses

67

3

70

Grey Hospital Total

234

170

404

Madwaleni

Dental Practitioners

2

5

7

Medical Practitioner

7

6

13

Nursing Assistants

70

6

76

Physiotherapy

2

3

5

Professional Nurse

49

127

176

Staff Nurses

25

43

68

Madwaleni Total

155

190

345

Nompumelelo Hosp.

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

5

4

9

Nursing Assistants

33

40

73

Physiotherapy

1

2

3

Professional Nurse

54

126

180

Staff Nurses

18

40

58

Hospital:Nompumelelo Hospital Total

112

218

330

Ss Gida Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

4

9

13

Nursing Assistants

68

29

97

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

46

163

209

Staff Nurses

24

42

66

Hospital:Ss Gida Hospital Total

143

250

393

Tafalofefe Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

8

9

Medical Practitioner

4

7

11

Nursing Assistants

32

77

109

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

35

195

230

Staff Nurses

20

56

76

Tafalofefe Hospital Total

92

344

436

Victoria Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

17

18

Dental Specialists

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

2

2

4

Nursing Assistants

30

68

98

Professional Nurse

126

201

327

Staff Nurses

6

2

8

Hospital:Victoria Hospital Total

165

291

456

Dental Practitioners

16

24

40

Lsa:Amahlathi

Medical Practitioner

18

23

41

Nursing Assistants

155

193

348

Physiotherapy

0

2

2

Professional Nurse

507

856

1363

Staff + Pupil Nurses

51

32

83

Lsa:Amahlathi Total

747

1130

1877

Lsa Buffalo City

Dental Practitioners

3

7

10

Dental Specialists

0

2

2

Medical Practitioner

0

5

5

Nursing Assistants

69

91

160

Professional Nurse

158

398

556

Staff Nurses

15

25

40

Lsa:Buffalo City Total

245

528

773

Lsa Mbhashe

Dental Practitioners

2

10

12

Medical Practitioner

1

3

4

Nursing Assistants

62

59

121

Professional Nurse

142

288

430

Staff Nurses

17

4

21

Mbhashe Total

224

364

588

Lsa Mnquma

Dental Practitioners

1

13

14

Medical Practitioner

0

5

5

Nursing Assistants

43

82

125

Professional Nurse

118

376

494

Staff Nurses

7

8

15

Lsa:Mnquma Total

169

484

653

Lsa Nkonkobe

Medical Practitioner

2

2

4

Nursing Assistants

115

80

195

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

24

206

230

Staff Nurses

6

16

22

Lsa:Nkonkobe Total

147

305

452

Santa Centre:Marj Parrish

Nursing Assistants

10

8

18

Senior Managers

0

4

4

Staff Nurses

7

11

18

Medical Practitioner

7

7

14

Nursing Assistants

85

40

125

Santa Centre:Marj Parrish Total

109

70

179

Amatole Total

3206

5437

8683

Cacadu District

Fort England Hosp

Medical Practitioner

4

7

11

Nursing Assistants

23

27

50

Physiotherapy

1

2

3

Professional Nurse

31

83

114

Staff Nurses

24

11

35

Fort England Hosp Total

83

130

213

Hospital:Andries Vosloo Hospital

3

4

7

Medical Practitioner

3

5

8

Nursing Assistants

23

48

71

Physiotherapy

2

4

6

Professional Nurse

54

96

150

Staff Nurses

21

21

42

Hospital:Andries Vosloo Hospital Total

106

178

284

Hospital:Humansdorp Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

3

8

11

Nursing Assistants

16

48

64

Physiotherapy

1

1

2

Professional Nurse

29

112

141

Staff Nurses

27

13

40

Hospital:Humansdorp Hospital Total

77

188

265

Hospital:Midland Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

3

5

8

Nursing Assistants

18

28

46

Physiotherapy

1

1

2

Professional Nurse

25

81

106

Staff Nurses

10

23

33

Hospital:Midland Hospital Total

57

145

202

Hospital:Port Alfred Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

6

18

24

Medical Specialists

1

1

2

Nursing Assistants

74

24

98

Physiotherapy

1

5

6

Professional Nurse

86

137

223

Staff Nurses

23

47

70

Hospital:Port Alfred Hospital Total

192

238

430

Hospital:Settlers Hospital

Medical Practitioner

6

3

9

Dental Practitioners

1

8

9

Nursing Assistants

35

18

53

Professional Nurse

32

81

113

Staff Nurses

20

33

53

Hospital:Settlers Hospital Total

94

143

237

Jose Pearson Tb

Medical Practitioner

0

16

16

Nursing Assistants

2

26

28

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

17

74

91

Staff Nurses

5

8

13

Jose Pearson Tb Total

25

124

149

Lsa:Camdeboo

Dental Practitioners

1

7

8

Medical Practitioner

4

20

24

Nursing Assistants

4

38

42

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

24

95

119

Staff Nurses

6

6

12

Lsa:Camdeboo Total

40

166

206

Lsa:Kouga

Dental Practitioners

6

1

7

Medical Practitioner

2

5

7

Nursing Assistants

9

33

42

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

37

97

134

Staff Nurses

4

8

12

Lsa:Kouga Total

58

145

203

Lsa:Makana

Medical Practitioner

1

0

1

Nursing Assistants

11

6

17

Professional Nurse

17

25

42

Staff Nurses

9

9

18

Lsa:Makana Total

38

40

78

Marjorie Parish Tb

Medical Practitioner

0

2

2

Medical Specialists

0

4

4

Nursing Assistants

6

7

13

Professional Nurse

6

25

31

Staff Nurses

4

9

13

Marjorie Parish Tb Total

16

47

63

Marjorie Parkes Tb

Medical Practitioner

1

1

2

Nursing Assistants

5

6

11

Professional Nurse

11

18

29

Staff Nurses

0

13

13

Santa Centre:Margery Parkes Total

17

38

55

Temba Tb

Medical Practitioner

39

14

53

Medical Specialists

10

4

14

Nursing Assistants

99

111

210

Physiotherapy

2

0

2

Professional Nurse

138

368

506

Staff Nurses

39

138

177

Temba Tb Total

327

635

962

Cacadu Total

1130

2217

3347

Frontier Hosp

Medical Practitioner

3

18

21

Nursing Assistants

59

100

159

Professional Nurse

72

258

330

Staff Nurses

35

59

94

Dental Practitioners

1

7

8

Frontier Hosp Total

170

442

612

St Elizabeth's Hosp

Dental Practitioners

0

6

6

Medical Practitioner

23

13

36

Medical Specialists

1

2

3

Nursing Assistants

103

129

232

Physiotherapy

1

2

3

Professional Nurse

92

378

470

Staff Nurses

79

96

175

St Elizabeth's Hosp Total

299

626

925

Chris Hani

Hospital:All Saints Hospital

Medical Practitioner

3

6

9

Nursing Assistants

25

30

55

Physiotherapy

1

1

2

Professional Nurse

38

84

122

Staff Nurses

20

20

40

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Hospital:All Saints Hospital Total

88

147

235

Hospital:Cala Hospital

Medical Practitioner

5

4

9

Nursing Assistants

36

18

54

Physiotherapy

0

4

4

Professional Nurse

30

94

124

Staff Nurses

16

23

39

Hospital:Cala Hospital Total

87

143

230

Hospital:Cofimvaba Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

3

8

11

Nursing Assistants

21

53

74

Physiotherapy

4

0

4

Professional Nurse

35

132

167

Hospital:Cofimvaba Hospital Total

63

200

263

Hospital:Cradock Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

4

5

Medical Practitioner

2

6

8

Nursing Assistants

16

14

30

Professional Nurse

22

40

62

Staff Nurses

16

6

22

Hospital:Cradock Hospital

57

70

127

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

5

11

16

Nursing Assistants

54

64

118

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

68

176

244

Staff Nurses

30

58

88

Hospital:Cradock Hospital Total

157

317

474

Hospital:Elliot Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

2

12

14

Physiotherapy

0

3

3

Professional Nurse

14

102

116

Staff Nurses

27

12

39

Hospital:Elliot Hospital Total

43

136

179

Hospital:Glen Grey Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

6

6

Medical Practitioner

1

8

9

Nursing Assistants

13

14

27

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

12

48

60

Staff Nurses

10

11

21

Hospital:Glen Grey Hospital Total

36

88

124

Medical Practitioner

4

3

7

Medical Specialists

0

1

1

Hospital:Mjanyana Hospital

Nursing Assistants

105

103

208

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

73

196

269

Staff Nurses

11

14

25

Hospital:Mjanyana Hospital Total

194

317

511

Hospital:Wilhelm Stahl Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

3

4

Medical Practitioner

0

4

4

Nursing Assistants

23

33

56

Professional Nurse

69

156

225

Staff Nurses

2

0

2

Hospital:Wilhelm Stahl Hospital Total

95

196

291

Komani Hosp

Medical Practitioner

0

7

7

Nursing Assistants

31

62

93

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

83

308

391

Staff Nurses

4

0

4

Komani Hosp Total

118

378

496

Lsa:Emalahleni

Dental Practitioners

0

6

6

Medical Practitioner

0

3

3

Nursing Assistants

43

54

97

Professional Nurse

108

360

468

Lsa:Emalahleni Total

151

423

574

Lsa:Engcobo

Dental Practitioners

2

4

6

Medical Practitioner

2

10

12

Medical Specialists

1

2

3

Nursing Assistants

19

53

72

Professional Nurse

75

195

270

Staff Nurses

2

46

48

Lsa:Engcobo Total

101

310

411

Lsa:Intsika Yethu

Dental Practitioners

3

3

6

Medical Practitioner

2

7

9

Nursing Assistants

51

59

110

Professional Nurse

129

321

450

Staff Nurses

8

18

26

Lsa:Intsika Yethu Total

193

408

601

Lsa:Inxuba Yethemba

Dental Practitioners

1

7

8

Medical Practitioner

0

4

4

Nursing Assistants

13

37

50

Professional Nurse

36

101

137

Staff Nurses

0

1

1

Lsa:Inxuba Yethemba Total

50

150

200

Dental Practitioner

2

10

12

Lsa:Lukhanji

Medical Specialists

0

3

3

Nursing Assistants

245

186

431

Professional Nurse

426

499

925

Staff Nurses

64

267

331

Lsa:Lukhanji Total

737

965

1702

Lsa:Sakisizwe

Dental Practitioners

5

0

5

Medical Practitioner

191

54

245

Physiotherapy

12

3

15

Nursing Assistants

6

40

46

Professional Nurse

22

28

50

Staff Nurses

1

5

6

Lsa:Sakisizwe Total

237

130

367

Chris Hani Total

2405

4378

6785

Complex El

Cecilia Makiwane Hosp

Medical Practitioner

1

8

9

Medical Specialists

0

27

27

Nursing Assistants

248

288

536

Professional Nurse

449

662

1111

Staff Nurses

118

321

439

Ceclia Makiwane Total

816

1306

2122

El Mental Health

Nursing Assistants

6

1

7

Professional Nurse

2

12

14

Staff Nurses

2

5

7

El Mental Health Total

10

18

28

Frere Hospital

Dental Practitioners

2

0

2

Medical Practitioner

221

151

372

Medical Specialists

66

98

164

Physiotherapy

21

2

23

Frere Hospital Total

310

251

561

Complex El Total

1136

1575

2711

Complex Pe

Livingstone

Medical Practitioner

174

253

14

Medical Specialists

59

164

7

Nursing Assistants

159

206

365

Professional Nurse

401

391

793

Staff Nurses

111

166

277

Physiotherapy

13

18

31

Livingstone Hospital Total

743

945

1473

Dora Nginza

Dental Practitioners

2

22

24

Dental Specialists

0

2

2

Nursing Assistants

144

163

307

Professional Nurse

305

343

648

Staff Nurses

87

219

306

Medical Specialists

0

16

16

Dora Nginza Hospital Total

538

765

1303

Staff Nurses

44

144

188

Pe Provincial Hospital

Nursing Assistants

76

55

131

Professional Nurse

152

274

426

Pe Provincial Hospital Total

272

473

745

Complex Pe Total

810

1238

3521

Complex Umtata

Bedford Hospital

Hospital:Bedford Hospital

Nursing Assistants

69

55

124

Professional Nurse

65

166

231

Staff Nurses

38

81

119

Hospital:Bedford Hospital Total

172

302

474

Nelson Mandela Academic Hosp

Medical Practitioner

0

5

5

Nursing Assistants

193

173

366

Professional Nurse

292

479

771

Staff Nurses

124

237

361

Nelson Mandela Academic Hosp Total

609

894

1503

Umtata General Hosp

Medical Practitioner

1

1

2

Medical Specialists

0

1

1

Nursing Assistants

112

65

177

Professional Nurse

157

165

322

Staff Nurses

73

28

101

Umtata General Hosp Total

343

260

603

Umtata Mental Health

Medical Practitioner

0

2

2

Nursing Assistants

2

28

30

Professional Nurse

13

46

59

Staff Nurses

0

2

2

Umtata Mental Health Total

15

78

93

Complex Umtata Total

1139

1534

2673

Nmm

Elizabeth Donkin Hosp

Medical Practitioner

6

3

9

Medical Specialists

2

1

3

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Staff Nurses

1

8

9

Elizabeth Donkin Hosp Total

9

13

22

Hospital:Empilweni Tb Hospital

Medical Practitioner

2

3

5

Nursing Assistants

37

2

39

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

37

45

82

Staff Nurses

23

15

38

Hospital:Empilweni Tb Hospital Total

100

65

165

Hospital:Uitenhage Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

41

22

63

Medical Specialists

3

4

7

Physiotherapy

5

3

8

Professional Nurse

153

59

212

Staff Nurses

80

20

100

Hospital:Uitenhage Hospital Total

282

115

397

Lsa:Nmm

Dental Practitioners

23

1

24

Medical Practitioner

10

6

16

Nursing Assistants

66

104

170

Physiotherapy

2

0

2

Staff Nurses

51

19

70

Lsa:Nmm Total

152

130

282

Orsmond Tb

Medical Practitioner

1

0

1

Nursing Assistants

16

10

26

Professional Nurse

18

43

61

Staff Nurses

17

9

26

Orsmond Tb Total

52

62

114

Nmm Total

595

385

793

Or Tambo

Flagstaff Mental Hlth

Administrative Relat

3

23

26

Nursing Assistants

10

9

19

Professional Nurse

5

23

28

Flagstaff Mental Hlth Total

18

55

73

Hospital:Bambisana Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

9

9

Nursing Assistants

33

35

68

Oral Hygiene

0

1

1

Pharmacists

1

4

5

Physiotherapy

0

3

3

Professional Nurse

26

136

162

Staff Nurses

22

31

53

Hospital:Bambisana Hospital Total

82

219

301

Hospital:Canzibe Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

5

4

9

Nursing Assistants

36

45

81

Pharmacists

2

2

4

Physiotherapy

1

1

2

Professional Nurse

28

138

166

Staff Nurses

10

46

56

Hospital:Canzibe Hospital Total

82

243

325

Hospital:Greenville Hospital

Dental Practitioners

2

5

7

Medical Practitioner

3

6

9

Nursing Assistants

55

15

70

Physiotherapy

0

3

3

Professional Nurse

38

113

151

Staff Nurses

51

4

55

Hospital:Greenville Hospital Total

149

146

295

Hospital:Holy Cross Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

5

5

10

Nursing Assistants

75

24

99

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

57

152

209

Staff Nurses

36

34

70

Hospital:Holy Cross Hospital Total

175

221

396

Hospital:Isilimela Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

3

6

9

Nursing Assistants

30

28

58

Physiotherapy

0

3

3

Professional Nurse

23

106

129

Staff Nurses

17

26

43

Hospital:Isilimela Hospital Total

73

176

249

Hospital:Nessie Knight Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

5

6

11

Nursing Assistants

50

23

73

Physiotherapy

1

2

3

Professional Nurse

35

131

166

Staff Nurses

23

36

59

Hospital:Nessie Knight Hospital Total

114

205

319

Hospital:St Barnabas Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

6

10

16

Nursing Assistants

38

68

106

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

66

152

218

Staff Nurses

21

39

60

Hospital:St Barnabas Hospital Total

131

277

408

Hospital:St Lucy's Hospital

Administrative Relat

2

4

6

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Dental Therapy

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

6

9

15

Nursing Assistants

72

18

90

Physiotherapy

1

3

4

Professional Nurse

50

154

204

Staff Nurses

33

40

73

Hospital:St Lucy's Hospital Total

164

236

400

Hospital:St Patrick's Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

3

3

Dental Therapy

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

9

11

20

Nursing Assistants

72

43

115

Physiotherapy

1

0

1

Professional Nurse

71

170

241

Staff Nurses

46

13

59

Hospital:St Patrick's Hospital Total

199

241

440

Hospital:Zithulele Hospital

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Dental Therapy

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

8

1

9

Nursing Assistants

45

26

71

Physiotherapy

3

1

4

Professional Nurse

48

123

171

Staff Nurses

27

31

58

Hospital:Zithulele Hospital Total

132

189

321

Libode Mental Health

Medical Practitioner

0

1

1

Nursing Assistants

10

0

10

Professional Nurse

15

15

30

Libode Mental Health Total

25

16

41

Lsa:King Sabata Dalindyebo

Dental Practitioners

1

15

16

Dental Therapy

0

1

1

Medical Practitioner

5

15

20

Nursing Assistants

120

92

212

Physiotherapy

0

2

2

Lsa:King Sabata Dalindyebo Total

126

125

251

Or Tambo Total

1363

2157

3520

Ukhahlamba

Csc Ukhahlamba Total

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

3

10

13

Nursing Assistants

30

30

60

Physiotherapy

2

0

2

Professional Nurse

37

106

143

Staff Nurses

12

25

37

Hospital:Aliwal North Hospital Total

84

178

262

Hospital:Burgersdorp Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

5

5

Medical Practitioner

1

10

11

Nursing Assistants

8

21

29

Professional Nurse

15

45

60

Staff Nurses

7

14

21

Hospital:Burgersdorp Hospital Total

31

95

126

Hospital:Cloete Joubert Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

7

7

Medical Practitioner

0

9

9

Nursing Assistants

16

12

28

Professional Nurse

17

49

66

Staff Nurses

6

16

22

Hospital:Cloete Joubert Hospital Total

39

93

132

Hospital:Empilisweni Hospital

Dental Practitioners

2

5

7

Medical Practitioner

5

3

8

Nursing Assistants

34

28

62

Professional Nurse

74

79

153

Staff Nurses

16

37

53

Hospital:Empilisweni Hospital Total

131

152

283

Hospital:Steynsburg Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

2

2

Medical Practitioner

2

4

6

Nursing Assistants

10

10

20

Physiotherapy

0

2

2

Professional Nurse

5

27

32

Staff Nurses

2

13

15

Hospital:Steynsburg Hospital Total

19

58

77

Hospital:Umlamli Hospital

Dental Practitioners

0

3

3

Medical Practitioner

2

7

9

Nursing Assistants

20

42

62

Physiotherapy

0

3

3

Professional Nurse

28

97

125

Staff Nurses

11

36

47

Trade Labourers

2

1

3

Hospital:Umlamli Hospital Total

63

189

252

Lsa:Elundini

Dental Practitioners

1

6

7

Medical Practitioner

0

4

4

Nursing Assistants

29

43

72

Professional Nurse

66

192

258

Staff Nurses

1

1

37

Lsa:Elundini Total

97

246

378

Lsa:Maletswai

Dental Practitioners

1

7

8

Medical Practitioner

0

10

10

Nursing Assistants

4

46

50

Professional Nurse

10

120

130

Lsa:Maletswai Total

15

183

198

Lsa:Senqu

Dental Practitioners

0

8

8

Medical Practitioner

0

6

6

Nursing Assistants

37

32

69

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

89

180

269

Lsa:Senqu Total

126

227

353

Ukhahlamba Total

474

1269

1743

Grand Total

13776

23310

37086

Medical Practitioner

0

6

6

Nursing Assistants

37

32

69

Physiotherapy

0

1

1

Professional Nurse

89

180

269

Lsa:Senqu Total

126

219

345

474

1269

1743

13776

23310

37086

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 127 (written 804 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 14 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 9)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr T D Lee (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

As at the latest specified date for which information is available, (a) how many posts for (i) doctors, (ii) dentists, (iii) specialists, (iv) nurses and (v) physiotherapists existed at each public hospital in KwaZulu-Natal and (b) how many of each of these posts were filled?

NW943E

REPLY:

The following table reflects the situation in this regard

Data as at 31 October 2009

Sum of No. of posts

Post Status

Inst.Type

Specified Ranks

1 FILLED

7 VACANT

Grand Total

DISTRICT HOSPITAL

Dentist

34

14

48

Medical Officer

427

772

1199

Medical Officer(Com Serv)

141

75

216

Medical Officer(Intern)

61

11

72

Medical Specialist

42

74

116

Nurse Professional

3874

1017

4891

Nurse Staff

3417

511

3928

Nurse Assistant

2293

531

2824

Physiotherapist

97

128

225

DISTRICT HOSPITAL Total

10386

3133

13519

REGIONAL HOSPITAL

Dentist

18

9

27

Medical Officer

543

469

1012

Medical Officer(Com Serv)

55

59

114

Medical Officer(Intern)

607

96

703

Medical Specialist

159

333

492

Nurse Professional

3350

900

4250

Nurse Staff

2629

370

2999

Nurse Assistant

2134

400

2534

Physiotherapist

83

61

144

REGIONAL HOSPITAL Total

9578

2697

12275

SPECIALISED HOSP O&D

Dentist

6

1

7

Medical Specialist

5

5

Nurse Professional

1

1

Nurse Staff

1

1

2

Nurse Assistant

1

1

SPECIALISED HOSP O&D Total

9

7

16

SPECIALISED HOSP PSYCH

Medical Officer

19

30

49

Medical Specialist

5

32

37

Nurse Professional

321

384

705

Nurse Staff

172

139

311

Nurse Assistant

563

374

937

Physiotherapist

4

13

17

SPECIALISED HOSP PSYCH Total

1084

972

2056

SPECIALISED HOSP TB

Medical Officer

13

37

50

Medical Specialist

1

1

Nurse Professional

178

135

313

Nurse Staff

239

51

290

Nurse Assistant

279

39

318

Physiotherapist

6

19

25

SPECIALISED HOSP TB Total

715

282

997

TERTIARY HOSPITAL

Medical Officer

74

82

156

Medical Officer(Com Serv)

2

2

Medical Officer(Intern)

70

5

75

Medical Officer(Registrar)

1

1

Medical Specialist

131

239

370

Nurse Professional

1187

337

1524

Nurse Staff

691

107

798

Nurse Assistant

577

100

677

Physiotherapist

25

13

38

TERTIARY HOSPITAL Total

2755

886

3641

Grand Total

24527

7977

32504

OVERALL TOTALS in Hospitals:

Filled posts

Vacant posts

Total

(i)

Medical Officers

2010

1639

3649

(ii)

Dentists

58

24

82

(iii)

Medical Specialists

337

684

1021

(iv)

Nurses

21907

5396

27303

(v)

Physiotherapists

215

234

449

Grand Total

24527

7977

32504

Question 128

Dr P J Rabie (DA) to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry:

Whether the degree to which the National Lottery Distribution Trust Fund (NLDTF) has performed with respect to the distribution of funds is satisfactory; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?NO1683E

Response:

The statistics indicate that as at the 31 March 2008, over 10 000 grants totaling R5,6 billion have been allocated. The actual payments to beneficiaries totals R4,5 billion. The difference between these two amounts is a result of grants being allocated in staggered multiple payments that are dependant on satisfactory progress.

The statistics reflect that the distribution of funds has been satisfactory. However, we do believe that there is a need to continuously improve the turnaround time between the time taken from application for funds and distribution to approved organizations

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

FOR ORAL REPLY

QUESTION NO. 129 (written 816 transferred)

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21 AUGUST 2009

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 10)

Questions Day: 21 October 2009

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

(1) With reference to his reply to Question 332 on 24 July 2009, what are the national core standards for health facilities that were released in 2008;

(2) whether these standards relate to hospitals and clinics; if not, what are the national core standards for (a) hospitals and (b) clinics; if so, what are the relevant details?

NW889E

REPLY:

(1) The national Core Standards for Health Facilities in South Africa that were released in 2008 are contained in the attached departmental publication.

(2) The 2008 edition of the core standards was a set of organisational standards that is transversal throughout the health care system, although the balance was more inclined towards hospitals. Since its introduction the core set of standards has been thoroughly reviewed to amongst other also address the said balance. The revised version of the core set of standards will soon be ready and released.

NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

TYPE: WRITTEN QUESTION

MINISTRY: SPORT AND RECREATION SA

QUESTION: NO 130

(Internal Question Paper No 2 – 2009)

Mr T D Lee (DA) to ask the Minister of Sport and Recreation:

Whether all the winners of the 2008 SA Sports Awards have received their prize money; if not,

(a) Why not,

(b) Which of the winners have not received their prize money and

(c) When will they receive their prize money?

NW140E

REPLY:

a) Not allthe winners of the 2008 SA Sports Awards have received their prize money.

b) Steve Mokone, Lifetime Achievement Award; and Itumeleng Khune, Newcomer of the Year.

Steve Mokone's submitted banking details were of an American bank account; hence the SABC as the paying agency had to follow certain processes for the payment to be made in dollars. Itumeleng Khune's banking details were found to be incorrect; and attempts to reach him or his manager have been fruitless. Efforts are continuing to get these details.

c) Mokone's paper work has been sorted; and payment will probably be at the end of June; while Khune's payment will be processed once the correct details are received.

QUESTION NO. 131 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 17 of 2008

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 9 June 2008

Mr G R Morgan (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism:

(1) What is his department doing to support SA Tourism's effort to attain its strategic goal of making South Africa a "top 3" destination on the list of any foreign tourist planning to travel long-haul from our core markets in 2014;

(2) whether the level of crime is a barrier to the achievement of this goal; if not, how was this conclusion reached; if so, how will this situation be changed?

N168E

MR G R MORGAN (DA) SECRETARY TO PARLIAMENT

HANSARD

PAPERS OFFICE

PRESS

131. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM ANSWERS:

(1) The Department of Environmental Affairs continues to work with Treasury to make sure that South African Tourism receives enough resources to market South Africa globally and to compete with other destinations. Furthermore, the Department acknowledges that South Africa's focus is mainly on stimulating demand. It is for this reason that the Department works with key partners to ensure that the supply side of the tourism value chain is in order. The work of the department includes promoting the development of Human Resources in the sector, ensuring that adequate land and air transport is in place to facilitate movement, support development of enterprises to ensure business competitiveness and improve product offering, promote safety of tourists, ensure that adequate skills are in place to enable industry to compete through people and ensure that there is enabling environment for tourism to flourish.

(2) Crime levels are one of the issues taken into account by potential tourists in deciding to visit South Africa. Therefore efforts are being put in place in partnership with SAPS to ensure safety of tourists. The National Tourism Safety and Awareness Strategy was developed in collaboration with industry stakeholders, representatives from provinces and SAPS. The strategy defines a partnership approach to curb crime against tourists and has both proactive and reactive elements. It identifies measures to be implemented to prevent crime against tourists and also proposes measures to be taken in the unlikely event that there was crime against tourists. It also puts in place measures to manage perception and to communicate measures to be taken after the crime has taken place. The strategy will be rolled down at provincial and local levels, and will be reviewed annually in order to monitor its impact.

QUESTION NO. 132 INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 17 of 2008

DATE OF PUBLICATION: 9 June 2008

Mr G R Morgan (DA) to ask the Minister of Environmental Affairs and Tourism:

(1) Whether, with regard to the release of the Long Term Mitigation Scenarios (LTMS), South Africa is likely to commit to any mitigation action under a post-2012 climate framework; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) whether there is a specific process that will be followed to integrate the LTMS into the decision-making of other government departments; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

N168E

MR G R MORGAN (DA) SECRETARY TO PARLIAMENT

HANSARD

PAPERS OFFICE

PRESS

132. THE MINISTER OF ENVIRONMENTAL AFFAIRS AND TOURISM ANSWERS:

(1) Although the Long Term Mitigation Scenarios (LTMS) document released by the department is policy relevant, it is not policy prescriptive, i.e. it simply maps out what could be done rather what should be done. As such, and as was the intention of the LTMS initiative, the LTMS will be used to inform the mitigation elements of government's policy on climate change response and South Africa's negotiation positions in respect of the post-2012 climate framework. In this regard, there is no doubt that South Africa will need to make commitments to measurable, reportable and verifiable mitigation action along with the other developing nations responsible for significant greenhouse gas emissions. Although, these commitments may not take the form of the current commitments of developed nations, the policy development process to be initiated with the finalisation of the LTMS process in July-August this year, will investigate South Africa's negotiating positions in this regard.

(2) Following the final submission to Cabinet in July-August 2008 of the LTMS documents and proposed policy directions drawn from the high-level discussions around the LTMS findings, the department will facilitate a National Climate Change Response Policy development process that will involve all affected government departments. All significant elements of this policy, will be discussed and debated at the National Climate Change Response Policy Development Conference to be held in February 2009.

QUESTION NO 133

Dr S M van Dyk (DA) to ask the Minister for Public Enterprises:

(a) How many megawatts, expressed as a percentage of the total amount of electricity supplied by Eskom, are used by (i) smelters, (ii) the mining industry, (iii) the industrial sector, (iv) the trade sector, (v) the services sector, (vi) agriculture, (vii) households and (viii) neighbouring countries

(b) what does each of these sectors pay per kilowatt-hour and

(c) what are the reasons in each case where there is a price discrepancy? NO1688E

REPLY

(a-b) The consumption in MWh per sector expressed as a percentage of the total MWh and the price in c/kWh for each sector (based on Eskom's actual sales for 2007/08) are reflected in the table below:

Sector

% of total MWh

c/kWh

Distributors

40

18,1

Industrial excluding aluminium smelters

22

17,7

Mining

14

18,0

Traction

1

23,3

Commercial

4

24,9

Sector

% of total MWh

c/kWh

Agricultural

2

35,9

Residential

5

44,9

International (utilities, industrial and mining)

6

14,4

The aluminium smelters make up 6% of the total.

(c) Most of the differences in prices can be ascribed to differences in the cost of supply. In general the larger customers cross-subsidise the smaller and rural customers, as the cost to supply smaller and rural customers is higher than the prices paid by these customers.

QUESTION: 134

Dr S M van Dyk (DA) to ask the Minister for Public Enterprises:†

(1) Whether a certain foreign company (name furnished) exports aluminium to South Africa in order to smelt it locally at low cost; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what are the relevant details;

(2) whether the contracts which Eskom has concluded with this company can be revoked; if not, (a) for what period will these contracts remain in force, (b) at what price per kilowatt-hour (kWh) is electricity supplied to the smelters and (c) how does this compare with what local households are paying per kWh; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether Eskom will cancel its contract with this company in the light of the extent of the power being used by it; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details? NO1689E

Reply:

(1) Eskom does not have access to the information pertaining to the aluminium smelters' suppliers with regard to raw materials or which markets they serve.

(2) (a-c) Eskom will not revoke the contracts concluded with the company referred to and will honour its contractual obligation. The content of the contract agreement cannot be made public.

(3) A response provided above (part 2 of the question).

QUESTION NO. 134

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15 FEBRUARY 2008

(INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 2)

Mr M Waters (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

With regard to each specialised TB hospital, (a) what is the name of the hospital, (b) where is it located, (c) how many beds does it have, (d) how many (i) doctors, (ii) nurses, (iii) pharmacists and (iv) specialists were employed at the hospital as at the latest specified date for which information is available and (e) what amount was spent on maintenance in each of the three most recent financial years for which information is available? NW526E

REPLY:

Province

(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)

(e)

E. Cape

Jose Pearson MDR/ XDR-TB Unit

Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Metro

350

1 full-time and 1 Sessional doctors; 56 Nurses; 2 part-time Pharmacists; no Specialists

2005/2006: R33,871

2006/2007: R162,473

2007/2008: R348,438

Fort Grey MDR/ XDR-TB Unit

East London, Amatole District.

154

2 Sessional doctors; 27 Nurses; no Pharmacist; no Specialists

2005/2006: R211,542

2006/2007: R125,024.26

2007/2008: R288,634.

F. State

MDR-TB Unit

Thaba-Nchu

70

1 doctor; 7 Professional nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

R2 million was allocated for the period 2006/07 – 2007/08

Gauteng

Charles Hurwitz TB Hospital

Johannesburg

2005/2006: Under SANTA

2006/2007: R259 402

2007/2008: R96 350

Sizwe Tropical Diseases Hospital

Johannesburg

2005/2006: R813 279

2006/2007: R1 108 847

2007/2008: R1 187 157

East Rand Santa Hospital

Ekurhuleni

2005/2006: Under SANTA

2006/2007: R420 632

2007/2008: R155 016

Tsepong Santa Hospital

Tshwane

2005/2006: Under SANTA

2006/2007: R2 229

2007/2008: R20 996

KZN

Don McKenzie

eThekwini District, Botha's Hill

220

1 Doctor; 71 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: R278,905.00

* 2006/2007: R358,360.00

* 2007/2008: R348,851.00

Richmond Chest

Umgundundlovu District -

Richmond Village

581

2 Sessional doctors; 108 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006 and * 2006/2007:: Previously under private health service(Lifecare)

* 2007/2008: R209,228.00

Siloah Lutheran

Zululand District - Dlomodlomo

145

1 Doctor; 20 Nurses; 1 Part-time Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: Info not available

* 2006/2007: R136,105.00

* 2007/2008: R108,225.67

Charles James

eThekwini District - Ezimbokodweni

220

2 Doctors; 49 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: R75,635.00

* 2006/2007: R770,791.00

* 2007/2008: R737,599.00

Thulasizwe

Uthungulu District, Thulasizwe

122

2 Doctors; 50 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: R1,200,000.00

* 2006/2007: R1,400,000.00

* 2007/2008: R1,550,000.00

Doris Goodwin

Umgungundlovu District, Pietermaritzburg

46

1 Doctor; 43 Nurses; no Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: R200,000.00

* 2006/2007: R400,000.00

* 2007/2008: R1,900,000

Dunstan Farrell

Ugu District- Hibberdene

180

2 Doctors; 34 Nurses; no Pharmacist nor specialist

* 2005/2006: R36,846.00

* 2006/2007: R484,940.00

* 2007/2008: R2,612,963.00

King George V

eThekwini District, Sydenham

260

16 Doctors; 539 Nurses; 8 Pharmacists; 2 Specialists

* 2005/2006: R269,963.00

* 2006/2007: R2,984,488.00

* 2007/2008: R2,761,366.00

Greytown Specialised TB

Umzinyathi District, Greytwon

25

1 Doctor; 27 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; no specialist

* 2005/2006: Nil

* 2006/2007: Nil

* 2007/2008: R344,599.00

FOSA Specialised TB

eTHekwini District, Newlands West

235

5 Doctors; 100 Nurses; 2 Pharmacists; no specialist

* 2005/2006: R100,000.00

* 2006/2007: R230,000.00

* 2007/2008: R275,000.00

Limpopo

MDR-TB Unit

Modimolle

38

1 Doctor supported by doctors at Warmbaths Hospital; 14 Professional Nurses; Pharmacist cover from Warmbaths Hospital; Specialist cover from Warmbaths Hospital.

* 2005/2006: R2000,000

* 2006/2007: R400,000

* 2007200/8: R1,000,000

Mpumalanga

Standerton TB Hospital

Standerton (Sakhile) Gert Sibande

150

2 Sessional doctors; 21 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; No Specialists;

* 2005: Nil

* 2006: R67,392

* 2007: R80,983

Barberton TB Hospital

Barberton (Umjindi) in Ehlanzeni

228

No doctors; 27 Nurses; No Pharmacists; No Specialissts

* 2005: Nil

* 2006/2007: R364,261

Witbank TB Hospital

Witbank (Ferrobank) in Nkangala

226

1 Sessional doctor; 30 Nurses; 1 Sessional Pharmacist; No Specialists

* 2005: Nil

* 2006: R307,920

* 2007: R255,888

Bongani TB Hospital

Bongani (Hazyview) in Ehlanzeni

60

1 doctor; 31 Nurses; No Pharmacists; No Specialists

* 2005: R923,624

* 2006: R1,819,910

* 2007: R1,808,962

N. Cape

Gordonia Hospital MDR-TB Unit

Upington, Gordinia Hospital

35

1 doctor not dedicated to TB; 4 Professional Nurses and 4 Auxiliary Nurses; 1 Pharmacist not dedicated to TB; no specialist

None

Westend Hospital MDR-TB Unit

Kimberley

30

1 sessional doctor; 4 Professional nurses and 1 Enrolled Nurse; 1 Pharmacist not dedicated to TB; 1 Psychiatrist

None

Jan Kempdorp Hospital (Level 1)

Jan Kempdorp

30

3 doctors not dedicated to TB; 1 Professional Nurse, 1 Enrolled Nurse and 3 Auxiliary Nurses; 1 Pharmacist not dedicated to TB; no specialist

None

Warrenton Hospital (Level 1)

Warrenton

8

2 sessional doctors not dedicated to TB; 2 Professional Nurses

None

N. West

Klerksdorp / Tshepong Hospital Complex

Klerksdorp

88

1 Doctor; 3 Professional Nurses, 2 Enrolled Nurses, 11 Enrolled Nursing Auxiliaries; No pharmacist specifically allocated to TB; 1 Specialist

* 2005/2006: R 45 019

* 2006/2007: R 177 312

* 2007/2008: R 170 454

W. Cape

Brooklyn Chest Hospital

Cape Metro

327

6 Doctors; 80 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; Specialist cover from Groote Schuur and Tygerberg Hospitals

* 2005/2006: R1, 160,000,00

* 2006/2007: R2, 192,735,00

* 2007/2008: R1,718,126,00

Marais

Cape Metro

260

2 Doctors; 18 Nurses plus a big agency component; no Specialist

* 2005/2006: SANTA management

* 2006/2007: R31,933,00

* 2007/2008: R609,935,00

Sonstraal

Paarl

90

Sessional doctors cover from Paarl Hospital; 30 Nurses; Pharmacists cover from Paarl Hospital; no Specialists

* 2005/2006: Local Government

* 2006/2007: R28,636,00

* 2007/2008: R13,010,00

Amount spent on maintenance include the capital projects

Infectious Diseases

Malmesbury

40

Sessional doctors cover from Paarl Hospital; 18 Nurses; no Pharmacists; no Specialists

* 2005/2006: Local Government

* 2006/2007: Local Government

* 2007/2008: R1,206,00

Brewelskloof

Worcester

206

4 Doctors; 89 Nurses; 1 Pharmacist; Specialist cover from George Hospital

* 2005/2006: R2,700,000,00

* 2006/2007: R1,074,524,00

* 2007/2008: R132,414,00

Harry Comay

George

100

Doctors cover from George Hospital; 32 Nurses; 2 Pharmacists; Specialist cover from George Hospital

* 2005/2006: SANTA management

* 2006/2007: R3,055,813,00

* 2007/2008: R244,499,00

The information from Mpumalanga Province does not include Sesifuba TB Hospital (Msukaligwa Local Municipality) which is receiving funds from the Department. R2,400,000 was transferred to Msukaligwa in 2007/08.

QUESTION NO: 135

DATE SUBMITTED:

MR VG SMITH (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

(1)(a) What has been the progress of her department in the past two years with regard to the vetting of its correctional officials and (b) how long will it take before the vetting process is completed;

(2) whether there were any delays; if so, what (a) were the reasons for the delays and (b) is her department doing to accelerate the process? NO1842E

REPLY

(1)(a) On 6 September 2007 the Minister approved the establishment of the DCS Vetting Fieldwork Unit. This Unit became operational in April 2008, with four (4) trained vetting officials. The Security Vetting Information System (SVIS) was implemented in the DCS by NIA in March 2008. The following statistics illustrate the security clearances issued to Correctional Officials by NIA:

2007: 216

2008: 335

January 2009 – until September 2009: 28

(b) The length of the vetting process may vary due to factors such as availability of references, workload of NIA evaluators etc. The length of this process may vary due to factors such as availability of references, workload of NIA evaluators etc.

The vetting process encompasses the following;

- Completion of Z204 form

- Conduct vetting investigation by DCS vetting officers

- Evaluation by NIA

- Issuing of security clearances by NIA

(2)(a)The appointment of an external service provider contracted by DCS to conduct credit record checks, assets and qualification verification. Lack of capacity. Currently the Vetting Fieldwork unit consists of only three trained vetting officials. One Deputy Director Post and eight Assistant Director Posts are vacant. These posts were advertised in June 2008 and interviews conducted but due to the moratorium on posts within the DCS these posts were not filled.

(b)The Director for Security Standards, of which the Vetting Fieldwork Unit forms part of, was seconded from NIA on the 1st of August 2009. The Deputy Director post for vetting is in a process to be re-advertised.

QUESTION NO 136

DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 18 JUNE 2008

DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: MONDAY, 09 JUNE 2008 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 17 – 2008)

Mr S B Farrow (DA) asked the Minister of Transport:

(1) Whether he or his department acted on warnings over the past 14 years (details furnished) that the public rail infrastructure was in an advanced state of disrepair; if not, why not; if so, (a) on what basis did he arrive at the conclusion, (b) why was funding delayed while infrastructure went into a state of disrepair and (c) who was responsible for (i) the delay in accessing funding and (ii) allocating it;

(2) whether any action has been taken against officials failing to allocate funding to the rail infrastructure over the past 14 years; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(3) whether he has acted on the views expressed by the Chief Executive Officer (name furnished) of the SA Rail Commuter Corporation; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

(4) whether he intends resigning as a result of the state of the rail infrastructure; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, what steps will be taken?

NO1692E

REPLY:

The Minister of Transport:

(1), (2), (3) and (4)

Government is on record as having stated that Passenger Rail has suffered under three decades of severe under-investment. In January 2005, the Department of Transport authorised a Due Diligence examination of the three passenger rail entities in preparation for their consolidation into the South African Rail Commuter Corporation Limited (SARCC). The Due Diligence Report gave a very clear indication of the severe backlogs the passenger rail sector is facing due to the under-investment referred to above.

In December 2006, Cabinet approved the National Rail Passenger Plan, which provides the long-term strategic direction for the Passenger Rail Industry in South Africa. In February 2006, the Recapitalisation of the Passenger Rail Service was made a Key Action Plan of the Economic Cluster of Government and later that year, Government approved the Turn Around Strategy for Passenger Rail, which was accompanied by significantly increased investment in the system. Twenty Five Billion Rand is earmarked for Passenger Rail between 2007/08 and 2010/11, covering a Capital Grant, an Operational Subsidy, funding preparations in the passenger rail system for the 2010 FIFA World Cup and some funding for Shosholoza Meyl. These are Government's concrete actions and responses aimed at reversing the backlogs in the Passenger Rail System.

QUESTION NO: 137

DATE SUBMITTED:

MR MN PHALISO (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

When will her Department align its demarcation for the jurisdiction of the regional commissioners in accordance with the provincial boundaries as determined by section 103 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa? NO1844E

REPLY

Prior to 2003 the provincial boundaries of the Department of Correctional Services was aligned with the provision of provinces as determined by section 103 of the Constitution of the Republic of South Africa. This reflected the following organizational structure with regard to the jurisdiction of Provincial Commissioners at the time:

Western Cape – Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Chief Deputy Commissioner - CDC)

Eastern Cape - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Chief Deputy Commissioner - CDC)

KwaZulu Natal - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Chief Deputy Commissioner - CDC)

Gauteng - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Chief Deputy Commissioner - CDC)

Free State - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Deputy Commissioner - DC)

Northern Cape - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Deputy Commissioner - DC)

North West - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Deputy Commissioner - DC)

Limpopo - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Deputy Commissioner - DC)

Mpumalanga - Provincial Commissioner (functioning at the level of

Deputy Commissioner - DC)

The regional inmate population towards the end of 2002 reflected as follows:

Province

Inmates (Excluding Probationers and Parolees)

Gauteng

45246

KwaZulu Natal

32319

Western Cape

29578

Eastern Cape

21995

Free State

15693

Northern Cape

6576

Limpopo

5116

Mpumalanga

9369

North West

11781

Total

177673

It was however realized that within the four provinces that had Provincial Commissioners functioning at the level of CDC, there were Management Areas with inmate populations equal to or higher than provincial inmate populations of provinces where Regional Commissioners were functioning at the level of DC. In these Management Areas, Area Managers (Now Area Commissioners) were functioning at the level of Director. The Management Areas with these high inmate populations were Pollsmoor in the Western Cape, St Albans in the Eastern Cape, Durban Westville in KwaZulu Natal and Johannesburg in Gauteng. Due to the fact that the Area Managers of these Management Areas were functioning at the level of director, it filtered down to prison (now Correctional Centre) level. That is, the Head of Prison (now Head of Correctional Centre) was functioning at the level of Deputy Director.

It was also realized that the inmate population of some Management Areas did not justify that they should operate as Management Areas, but instead be incorporated as Correctional Centres into adjacent bigger Management Areas.

At the same time it was realized that some of these Management Areas were bordering bigger Management Areas that are situated in different Provinces but that in terms of services to such smaller Management Areas and service delivery to inmates by such smaller Management Areas, it would be in the interest of the Department to amalgamate these smaller Management Areas as Correctional Centres into the bigger Management Areas in the adjacent Province. Examples in this regard are Calvinia in the Northern Cape Province, bordering the Western Cape Province and Vereeniging in Gauteng Province, bordering Free State Province.

In 2002 the Department embarked on processes that would see the change of strategic direction in the Department, focusing more on the rehabilitation and reintegration of inmates. This process would culminate in the approval by Cabinet in 2005 of the White Paper on Corrections in South Africa.

In 2003, in line with Public Service Regulations, Chapter 1, Part 111 (B) (2) (a):

  • Based on the strategic plan of the department, an executing authority shall-
  • (a) determine the department's organizational structure in terms of its core and support functions.

    the Department embarked on a restructuring process. This restructuring process brought to the fore the following recommendations:

    • Provincial Commissioners to function at the same level;
    • Area Managers (now Area Commissioners) to function at the same level;
    • Management Areas to have an even distribution of inmates (except for the four big Management Areas that can house more inmates than the average Management Area);
    • Re-grading of posts at the four Big Management Areas;
    • The restructuring process should enhance service delivery and support security within Management Areas and rehabilitation and reintegration of inmates.

    The end result of this process with regard to the demarcation for the jurisdiction of the provincial commissioners was the approval by the Executive Authority on 1 October 2003 of the current organizational structure of the Department of Correctional Services. The demarcation of the Department of Correctional Services now reflected the following structure: a National Component (National Office) and six Regions, each headed by a Regional Commissioner that is functioning at the level of CDC. This process also saw the amalgamation of Free State and Northern Cape Provinces into the Free State/Northern Cape Region and the Limpopo, Mpumalanga and North West Provinces into the Limpopo/Mpumalanga/North West (LMN) Region in order to justify the functioning of all Regional Commissioners at the level of CDC.

    Whilst this demarcation poses its own management challenges like Regional Commissioner Free State/Northern Cape and Regional Commissioner LMN who need to deal with different Provincial Legislative structures, it proved to be effective and the challenges are being addressed within the management structures of the Department. At this point the Department is in no need to reconsider the demarcation for the jurisdiction of the Regional Commissioners within its organizational structure



    QUESTION NO: 138

    DATE SUBMITTED:

    MS W NGWENYA (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

    (1) How many of the 52 Correctional Supervision and Parole Boards (CSPBs) countrywide (a) are fully operational and (b) are functioning without appointed chairpersons;

    (2) Whether specific training is provided to the CSPBs to deal with high profile cases; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (3) whether there is a uniform approach nationally to create awareness in the community about (a) the role and functioning of CSPBs as well as (b) the victim's or complainant's involvement in parole hearings; if not, why not in each case; if so, what are the relevant details in each case? NO1845E

    REPLY

    (1) (a) All of the 52 Parole Boards are fully operational.

    (b) There are 16 Parole Boards where the chairperson posts are vacant. At these Parole Boards the vice chairpersons are responsible for the functions of the chairperson. It should be mentioned that only 3 Vice Chairperson posts are currently vacant

    (2) No, training is based on the principles of equality before the law. Parole Boards cannot base their decision on the "high profile" of an offender and all offenders are dealt with equally when placement is considered based on the various submissions. There is no distinction at a Parole Board between offenders based on their "profile" or the "profile of the victim". All Parole Boards have been trained in the principles of The Promotion of Administrative Justice Act, 2000 (Act 3 of 2000).

    (3)(a) and (b) Yes, the Regions have numerous outreach programmes and imbizos where communities are involved. In addition, the various community members serving on the Parole Boards are also involved in community structures where these issues are marketed. Recently, during Corrections Week which was held from 21 to 27 September 2009 there was a specific focus on Victim Involvement in Parole Boards and various activities took place in correctional centres all over the country. During this time a central message with standard communication guidelines was provided.

    QUESTION NO: 139

    DATE SUBMITTED:

    MR S ABRAM (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

    (a) What steps has she taken to encourage more offenders to become involved in production workshops and farming activities and (b) what is the level of self-sufficiency in her department with regard to food for offenders? NO1846E

    REPLY

    (a) During admission to the different correctional centres offenders are briefed on the various educational and training opportunities within the department .This includes the opportunities within production workshops and agriculture. It is furthermore ensured that the CMC's, who are actually responsible for the allocation of offenders to the different programmes, are informed with regard to needs at production workshops and agriculture.

    (b) The self sufficiency levels with regard to food for offenders are as follows:

    Self sufficiency is calculated at the end of each financial year. The self sufficiency percentages of the 2008/2009 were as follows:

    PRODUCT

    DCS PRODUCTION 2008/09 FINANCIAL YEAR

    TOTAL NEED FOR PRODUCTS WITHIN DCS (2008/09 FINANCIAL YEAR)

    % SELF-SUFFICIENCY (OWN PRODUCTION DIVIDED BY TOTAL DCS NEEDS)

    MAXIMUM SELF-SUFFICIENCY % THAT CAN BE ATTAINED (WITH EXISTING RESOURCES AND CONSTANT OFFENDER LABOUR)

    Vegetables

    10 158 668 kg

    18 635 636 kg

    54,9%

    85,1%

    Fruit

    576 294 kg

    3 384 881 kg

    17,03%

    21,2%

    Red meat

    57 415 kg

    2 684 129 kg

    22,1%

    22,7%

    Milk

    5 947 779 liter

    23 300 166 lit

    25,53%

    26,2%

    Chicken

    1 160 748 kg

    4 061 552 kg

    28,6%

    34,4%%

    Eggs

    1 392 033 doz

    2 630 452doz.

    52,9%

    65,0%

    Pork

    2 191315 kg

    2 472 930kg

    88,6%

    93,0%


    Factors influencing self sufficiency percentages:

    The following factors impact on self sufficiency:

    Ø Variation in own production (Increased production enhances self sufficiency, whilst a drop in production decreases self sufficiency.

    Ø Variation in offender totals. Increase in offender total decreases self sufficiency if the production remains constant.

    Ø Variation in the prescribed ration scales. Increase in the prescribed quantities and or tan increase in the frequency of consumption of a specific commodity, decreases self sufficiency if the production remains constant.

    The maximum self sufficiency percentages that can be obtained with the current resources and infrastructures, as indicated in the last column, are dependent on the following:

    Ø The Department must avail sufficient funds to procure production inputs.

    Ø Increased provision of additional 1 000-1500 offenders to the relevant agricultural enterprises.

    Ø Offenders working at least six hours per five days in every week
    The Shortening of Operation Vala from the current 50 days to a maximum of 30 days. This operation falls within the peak planting season and the cut back of offender labour impacts negatively on plant production.

    Ø The acquiring of additional correctional centre farms (The last correctional centre farm was acquired in 1984)

    Ø The financing of the following intensive agricultural projects of which the feasibility studies have been approved by the previous Commissioners, the projects have been referred to the Sub branch Facilities .but could not yet have been financed due to pressure on the Capital Programme to finance offender accommodation:

    o The following is a list of the above mentioned projects:

    Correctional Centre

    Type of project

    Date approved by Commissioner.

    Potential Production Capacity of proposed project per annum

    Current status on Capital Programme.

    Zonderwater.

    Broiler project

    6/2-EZ2 dated 2002/10/30

    330 000 Kg

    Pre design Phase

    Grootvlei

    Broiler project

    6/2 dated 2000/11/13

    150 000 kg

    Design phase

    Waterval

    Broiler project

    Approved by National treasury 6/2/1 dated 1992/05/14

    183 259 kg.

    Not appearing on the current programme

    Barberton

    Broiler project

    6/2 HB- dated 2003/06/10

    160 000 kg

    Not appearing on the current programme

    Tzaneen

    Expansion of Layer project

    6/2 dated 2002/11/21

    50 000 Doz.

    Not appearing on the current programme

    Umtata

    Abattoir

    6/7/1 dated 2001/09/25

    -

    Not appearing on the current programme

    Boksburg

    Layer project

    6/2-EB2 dated 2004/03/30

    245 000 doz

    Not appearing on the current programme

    The financing of the above mentioned projects, will enhance the self sufficiency of especially boilers and eggs, but this could only be attained if a fixed amount from the Capital budget is annually allocated to finance Development and Care projects.



    QUESTION NUMBER 140

    18 JUNE 2008

    mr n singh (ifp) to ask the minister of finance

    (1) Whether, in light of the announcement that the Government will fund Eskom with R60 billion over the next five years, any form of funding programme has been finalised; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details;

    (2) What types of funding vehicles are being considered? N1698E

    REPLY:

    (1) Government's funding of Eskom is through a subordinated loan with equity-like features. This was considered as the most viable funding method, however, we are in discussions with Eskom to finalise the modalities.

    (2) Furthermore, Government also has the option of providing Government Guarantees. After carefully considering the advantages and disadvantages of each option, when deciding how to fund Eskom, National Treasury had to bear in mind that the funding instrument will need to strengthen the company's balance sheet. At the same time, National Treasury wanted to ensure that should Eskom become sufficiently profitable, the money would be repaid back into the fiscus for allocation to future government priorities.

    QUESTION NO: 140

    DATE SUBMITTED:

    MR MN MDAKA (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

    (1) What (a) has been the impact of this new shift system on the implementation of the three-meals-a-day system and (b) problems, other than staff shortages, impact on the implementation of the three-meals-a-day system? NO 1847E

    REPLY

    1(a) 138 of the 237 active correctional centres were already complying with the three meal system as prescribed by Section 8(5) of the Correctional Services Act, 1998 (Act No 111 of 1998) during the 1st Quarter 2009/10.

    (b) It will only be possible to quantify the impact and challenges, if any, after the submission of reports from Regional Commissioners for the 2nd Quarter of the 2009/2010 financial year. These reports are currently being awaited.

    QUESTION NO: 141

    DATE SUBMITTED:

    MS MF NYANDA (ANC) TO ASK THE MINISTER OF CORRECTIONAL SERVICES

    (1) When will the 47 000 awaiting–trail offenders who are incarcerated in correctional facilities across the country be migrated to the proposed remand detention facilities

    (2) whether there will be specific programmes provided for awaiting trial offenders in the near future; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details NO1848E

    REPLY

    (1) Not all awaiting-trial offenders will be moved to the eleven identified Remand Detention Facilities as there is insufficient bed space at these facilities. Migration to ten (10) of the identified eleven (11) Remand Detention Facilities is complete. The last one is Potchefstroom Correctional Centre and progress is slow, as there is insufficient bed space at other correctional centres currently to move the sentenced offenders from this center. Some of the Remand Detention Facilities will also continue to be used as mixed facilities (both sentenced inmates and awaiting-trial offenders) as they provide labour opportunities for sentenced offenders.

    (2) The provision of programmes for awaiting trial detainees is still under discussion. DCS as a lead department on the establishment of the branch for improved management of ATDs has developed a discussion document as a prelude for the development of a White Paper. The discussion document will be circulated before the end of the year.

    Research findings on international best practice revealed that services provided to ATDs differ from country to country. Almost all countries including South Africa provide access to the legal counsellor, access to health services and contact with the outside world in the form of visits, telephonic communication and written communication with significant others, however restrictions are imposed in exceptional cases. The provision of recreational, educational, and work activities for ATDs is not a universal practice; in some countries like Canada it was noted that ATDs have little or no access to activities like recreation, work, rehabilitative programs and other services. The development of the White Paper process will determine the specific programmes to be provided.

    Question 142

    Prof E S Chang (IFP) to ask the Minister of Trade and Industry:

    (1) Whether his department has any plans in place to increase employment opportunities and job creation in the rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what plans;

    (2) Whether there are any plans aimed at job creation for women living in rural areas; if not, why not; if so, what plans?NO1700E

    Response:

    (1) the dti's key policy instrument to increase employment is the implementation of the industrial policy framework. Industrial policy implementation covers a broad range of sectors and takes into consideration geographic spread of industries. Interventions in, for example, the craft industry, chemicals, tourism, clothing and textiles and agro processing will impact on rural and peri-urban economies preserving and creating jobs. In addition to the sector initiatives the dti has formulated One Municipality One Product Programme (OMOP), which constitutes one of the dti's local economic development interventions. The aim of the programme is to increase employment and reduce poverty in rural and peri urban areas. This will be through assisting municipalities to identify an already existing or creating a new unique competitive local product or service that can be promoted in the local and international markets.

    In addition, local people in rural and peri urban areas will be encouraged to form self-help groups that may be formalized into cooperatives. These groups will be provided with support (technical, finance, marketing, cooperative principles and general business skills) in order to start or expand the unique products and services enabling the communities to generate income by making use of local resources. the dti and its agencies working in collaboration with municipalities will facilitate exhibitions (local, national and international) of these products and services as a way of promoting them.

    With respect to SMME support, the dti has developed a logical framework with the provinces for improved support for SMMEs. The approach considers product and service integration in the form of a one-stop-shop model for service delivery in this regard. With respect to financial support, the dti is looking at ensuring increased coverage across rural areas by developing a plan to increase access to financial support institutions. There is also a broader process of alignment of relevant policies, strategies, legislation and institutional structures for improved SMME support that will ultimately result in an increase in employment opportunities and job creation in rural areas.

    (2) While the above initiatives hold true for all those living in rural areas, as part of the Gender and Women Empowerment Strategic Framework of the dti, rural women have been identified as a specific group to be targeted. the dti cannot create jobs directly for women but it can and will continue to introduce initiatives aimed at stimulating the creation of these jobs. To promote women entrepreneurship, the dti has recently launched the Isivande Women's Fund. Through this Fund, the department intends to assist women to access loans between R30 000 and R250 000. In this way women can create jobs for themselves and others.

    The South African Micro-Finance Apex Fund also ensures that women-owned enterprises are assisted with loans of up to R10 000. By virtue of the majority of financial intermediaries used by SAMAF being women owned financial intermediaries, this lends to a natural outreach by these financial intermediaries to women owned businesses. Khula will continue to use the credit indemnity agreements with banks to facilitate lending to rural based, women owned, black owned, start up and expansion enterprise initiatives. The cooperatives programme has also reflected a strong outreach to rural and women owned enterprises as these target groups show predominant bias to the cooperative enterprise form.

    In order to improve the quality of products being produced by women owned enterprises, the dti has piloted a new skills development and capacity building initiative called Bavumile. Training is provided to a group of 10 women who are exposed to sewing, beading, embroidery and creative design skills. The initiative will be rolled out in four provinces namely, Eastern Cape, Gauteng, Limpopo and Mpumalanga to encourage mass production of the products. The department will assist the women owned enterprises to find a market for these products. An initial group has already undergone training and is producing for an order of about 40000 bags and folders.

    QUESTION NO. 142

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 15 FEBRUARY 2008

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 2)

    Mrs D van der Walt (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

    (1) Whether the Phalaborwa hospital has a full-time doctor; if not, (a) why not, (b) when last was a full-time doctor employed there and (c) who renders emergency care at present;

    (2) whether the provincial department of health stopped session doctors from using the hospital; if so, (a) what are the reasons for doing so and (b) who took the decision?

    NW534E

    REPLY:

    (1) No

    (a) Because it has doctors supporting it from the Maphutha Malatji Hospital on a daily basis.

    It was always run by sessional doctors. There are doctors on call every day who render emergency services.

    (2) Sessional doctors still render services.

    (a) and (b) Fall away.

    143. Mrs C Dudley (ACDP) to ask the Minister of Minerals and Energy:

    (1) When was a decision taken by Cabinet to commit South Africa to nuclear power as the major component of its energy;

    (2) whether the Government intends inviting public participation on the implementation of nuclear energy; if not, why not; if so, (a) when and (b) what are the further relevant details?

    Reply

    (1) Nuclear Energy has always been recognized by Government as one of the most viable alternatives to coal generated electricity. In approving the draft nuclear energy policy in August 2007, Cabinet sent a clear signal of Government's strategic intent to diversify the use of primary energy sources and to increase reliance on sources that do not emit greenhouse gases during electricity generation, such as nuclear energy. Cabinet has last week on 11 June approved the nuclear energy policy, which makes provision for an increased role for nuclear power. The details of how much investment will be made on nuclear energy are still being finalized by Eskom and the Department of Public Enterprises.

    (2) The implementation of nuclear energy will definitely involve public participation. Two pieces of legislation make provision for public participation prior to construction of any nuclear installation. The National Nuclear Regulator Act, 1999 (Act No. 47 of 1999) makes provision for public participation prior to any decision on the construction of a nuclear power plant. The other piece of Legislation is the EIA regulations administered by the Department of Environmental Affairs and Tourism. As we speak, the proposed Pebble Bed Modular Reactor demonstration plant is being subjected to a public participation process in terms of the EIA regulations. All nuclear installations envisaged in the nuclear energy policy and strategy including the nuclear power plants proposed by Eskom will be subjected to public participation. Public participation is also catered for in the process of concluding regulations. All nuclear regulations are published for public comment prior to finalization.

    ADDITIONAL INFO

    The White Paper on Energy Policy (1998) also states that "Government will ensure that decisions to construct new nuclear power stations are taken within the context of an integrated energy policy planning process with due consideration given to all relevant legislation and the process subject to structured participation and consultation with all stakeholders".

    The Department of Minerals and Energy published the "Integrated Energy Plan for the Republic of South Africa" (19 March 2003) it indicated that investigations into nuclear options as a future energy source should continue.

    QUESTION NO 144

    DATE REPLY SUBMITTED: WEDNESDAY, 18 JUNE 2008

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: MONDAY, 09 JUNE 2008 (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO 17 – 2008)

    Rev K R J Meshoe (ACDP) asked the Minister of Transport:

    (1) Whether the Government intends to build monorails to help transport spectators and supporters in host cities with stadiums during the 2010 Soccer World Cup tournament; if so, (a) which cities will have monorails and (b) when will construction of the monorails begin; if not,

    (2) what is Government going to do to ease the existing congestion on our roads;

    (3) whether there are any plans to build new highways between the big cities; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

    NO1702E

    REPLY:

    The Minister of Transport:

    (1) There are currently no known plans by any city to build monorails.

    (a) and (b) Fall away.

    (2) All the 2010 Soccer World Cup Host Cities have been encouraged, through the funding allocation process of the Public Transport Infrastructure and Systems (PTIS) Grant, to find innovative, locally relevant solutions to their various mobility and congestion problems. All the major cities have proposed, and are busy implementing solutions that are guided by the Public Transport Action Strategy, and the funding guidelines of the PTIS Grant. They are all centred around developing an Integrated Rapid Public Transport Network (IRPTN), which identifies the trunk transport corridors of a city, providing an appropriate Public Transport solution, informed by passenger volumes, origin-destinations, and associated costs. These range from full Bus Rapid Transit systems in major cities like Cape Town, Johannesburg and Pretoria, to trunk bus route corridors, supported by local mini and midi-bus taxi services in the smaller cities like Polokwane and Rustenburg.

    (3) There are currently no plans to build new highways between major cities, for the 2010 World Cup™. The South African National Roads Agency Limited (SANRAL) has recently started implementing the Gauteng Freeway Improvement Scheme. This is a R23 billion programme to be fully implemented by 2020. This will see additional lanes added, in both directions, as well as the construction of new freeways. The first 230 km of lane additions will be completed by 2010.

    NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

    FOR ORAL REPLY

    QUESTION NO. 146 (written 894 transferred)

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21 AUGUST 2009

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 10)

    Questions Day: 21 October 2009

    Ms E More (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

    (1) Whether his department has received any complaints about the efficiency of the Medicines Control Council (MCC) and its responsiveness to queries; if not, what is the position in this regard; if so, (a) what are the complaints and (b) what is the extent of these complaints;

    (2) whether his department has conducted an evaluation of the MCC's performance; if not, why not; if so, what are the relevant details?

    NW1050E

    REPLY:

    (1) Yes, the Registrar of Medicines has received many complaints about the efficiency of the Medicines Control Council (MCC).

    (a) Complaints received relate to the delay in the registration of medicines for which applications have been submitted.

    (b) Complaints have been received from various applicants within the pharmaceutical industry that have submitted dossiers for registration of medicines.

    (2) Following recommendations from the Health Products Technical Task Team appointed by my predecessor, which amongst other tasks examined the problems in the MCC and its administrative component, the Medicines Regulatory Authority (MRA), we immediately embarked on a very substantial project to address the backlogs, to examine closely how we procure medicines in the country and to prepare a project plan to reform the MCC.

    By theend of August 2009 we had already contracted 57 external staff full time or part time to assist the permanent personnel of the MRA:

    · two Deputy Registrars (one of whom is a current director in MRA and the other, the project manager)

    · a project manager, with administrative assistant

    · an assistant project manager

    · 12 Technical Assistants (pharmacists)

    · 9 additional Evaluators (previous evaluators requested to assist once more)

    · 24 Administration Clerks

    · 2 IT Specialists

    · 7 inspectors

    The project team installed 10 new computers and monitors and three printers to facilitate the production of letters to applicants.

    A significant failing in the MRA is that there is grossly inadequate tracking of the huge amount of paper associated with the applications. An Electronic Data Management System (EDMS) was started a long time ago with support of the European Union but stalled for some technical reasons. The EDMS will dramatically improve the ability to manage and track applications. The technical obstacles have been removed and the supplier has provided a new project timetable. The training of the staff began on 19 October 2009 and trouble-shooting will be conducted until final hand-over at the end of January 2010. The completion of the EDMS implementation and training will cost R1,368m.

    Linked to using the EDMS is the need for user licenses. Through the project a total of 111 licenses are being procured to ensure sufficient user licenses for the EDMS to be of maximal benefit. The VAT inclusive price will be R2,79m (license and first year).

    The backlog goes back as far as 7 years ago, with some applications not yet having even been "screened". Pharmacists have already completed all screening. Applications have been located, sorted and logged. Industry will be approached shortly to check that their records correlate with the new consolidated data set of applications in the MRA.

    There are few full-time staff evaluators. Most are academics and experienced clinicians and pharmacists who have primary jobs elsewhere. MCC has approved a panel of 28 evaluators for this project. Some are current evaluators and others are people who used to evaluate and who have been roped in again to assist. The MRA is beginning to send out larger batches of applications for evaluation. Evaluation is in most cases a massive and time-consuming task. Each evaluation can take up to 20 hrs and invariably needs more than one evaluator to examine and make recommendations from different perspectives. Each application is peer-reviewed by four expert committees of MCC. Finalised documents are archived in a Registry.

    Between the end of July and end of October it is expected that R13,5m will have been spent on this project. This comprises R7,6m on contracted additional personnel, R4,3m on equipment and supplies (including the IT contracts) and R1,6m on logistics. These resources have been generously provided by the UK Department for International Development specifically for this once-off project.

    The Hon Member is aware that a review of the MCC was previously conducted by my predecessors and, as a result, a new Act was passed to expand the capacity of the MCC. As we have mentioned, part of the project also seeks to develop a detailed, costed project plan for the new public entity South African Health Products Regulatory Authority (SAHPRA).

    This is also a direct follow-on from the TTT recommendations and essential to ensuring that the problems do not merely reoccur. We expect the first draft project plan by the end of October.

    In summary by first week September:

    1. A complete physical audit has been conducted of all outstanding applications.

    - Audits completed in all units

    2. Significant administrative and technical burden have been ameliorated:

    a. Full updates evaluated in P&A (Post Reg) = 34

    b. All backlog initial screening has been completed and screening is up to date: over 600 dossiers screened and letters sent to applicants

    c. Pre-Registration responses to applicants = 175

    d. Over 767 clinical evaluations finalised (means clinical is complete and has been given to Ops & Admin)

    e. Ops & Admin unpacked 119 dossiers and allocated 69 to evaluators

    f. Clinical trial correspondence sorted and classified = 1971

    g. Registry:

    i. 2500 documents filed in Registry

    ii. 1545 Metrofile boxes prepared and collected

    h. Inspectorate

    i. 1707 applications audited(Names & Scheduling)

    ii. 585 amendments processed

    iii. 681 files updated

    iv. 4 Wholesale inspection reports received

    3. Over 400 generic applications provided with SPI recommendations

    4. MCC official registration of applications:

    a. 14 August 2009: 40 registered

    b. 09 October 2009: 163 registered

    NATIONAL ASSEMBLY

    FOR ORAL REPLY

    QUESTION NO. 150 (written 915 transferred)

    DATE OF PUBLICATION IN INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER: 21 AUGUST 2009

    (INTERNAL QUESTION PAPER NO. 10)

    Questions Day: 21 October 2009

    Ms E More (DA) to ask the Minister of Health:

    (1) Whether his Director-General signed a performance contract with him; if not, why not; if so, when;

    (2) whether all senior managers in his department signed performance contracts with the Director-General; if not, (a) which senior managers did not sign, (b) for what reason and (c) when will it be done; if so, on which date did each senior manager sign a performance contract?

    NW1071E

    REPLY:

    Since the Director-General left at the end of September 2009, this Department has not yet appointed a new Director-General. We have one of the Deputy Directors-General acting